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Sample records for intracranial hypertension

  1. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  2. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...

  3. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ... study in which 26 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were treated with octreotide, a synthetic hormone ...

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected but u...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  5. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... post pubescent teenagers, tends to fit the adult stereotype. How is pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosed? If ... Subscribe to AOJ Allied Health Resources for School Nurses About AAPOS Our Association Staff Contacts Medical Disclaimer ...

  6. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  7. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  8. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  9. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store What is IH? What is IH? Intracranial hypertension literally means that the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid ( ... is too high. “Intracranial” means “within the skull.” “Hypertension” means “high fluid pressure.” To understand how this ...

  10. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  11. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  12. Cognitive function in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne Maria; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Forchhammer, Hysse Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department and a terti......OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department...... and a tertiary headache referral clinic at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: 31 patients with definite IIH referred from June 2011 to February 2013 and included within 1 week of diagnostic intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. 29 patients completed re-examination at the 3-month follow...

  13. Prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Jan-Peter A H

    2007-12-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure exerted by cranial contents on the dural envelope. It comprises the partial pressures of brain, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Normal intracranial pressure is somewhere below 10 mmHg; it may increase as a result of traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, Reye's syndrome, hepatic coma, or other pathologies. When ICP increases above 20 mmHg it may damage neurons and jeopardize cerebral perfusion. If such a condition persists, treatment is indicated. Control of ICP requires measurement, which can only be performed invasively. Standard techniques include direct ventricular manometry or measurement in the parenchyma with electronic or fiberoptic devices. Displaying the time course of pressure (high-resolution ICP tonoscopy) allows assessment of the validity of the signal and identification of specific pathological findings, such as A-, B- and C-waves. When ICP is pathologically elevated--at or above 20-25 mmHg--it needs to be lowered. A range of treatment modalities is available and should be applied with consideration of the underlying cause. When intracranial hypertension is caused by hematoma, contusion, tumor, hygroma, hydrocephalus or pneumatocephalus, surgical treatment is indicated. In the absence of a surgically treatable condition, ICP may be controlled by correcting the patient's position, temperature, ventilation or hemodynamics. If intracranial hypertension persists, drainage of CSF via external drainage is most effective. Other first-tier options include induced hypocapnea (hyperventilation; paCO2 < 35 mmHg), hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol, hypertonic saline) and induced arterial hypertension (CPP concept). When autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is compromised, hyperoncotic treatment aimed at reducing vasogenic edema and intracranial blood volume may be applied. When intracranial hypertension persists, second-tier treatments may be indicated. These include 'forced hyperventilation' (paCO2 < 25 mm

  14. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provi...

  16. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Jirásková

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nada Jirásková, Pavel RozsívalDepartment of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicPurpose: To evaluate retrospectively the features, treatment, and outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH in children.Methods: Nine patients, 15 years and younger, diagnosed with IIH. Inclusion criteria were papilledema, normal brain computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pressure greater than 250 mm H2O, normal cerebrospinal fluid content, and a nonfocal neurologic examination except for sixth nerve palsy.Results: Of the nine patients, eight were girls. Five girls were overweight and one boy was obese. The most common presenting symptom was headache (5 patients. Diplopia or strabismus did not occur in our group. Visual field abnormalities were present in all eyes, and severe visual loss resulting in light perception vision occurred in both eyes of one patient. Eight patients were treated medically with acetazolamide alone, and one girl needed a combination of acetazolamide and corticosteroids. This girl also required optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. Resolution of papilledema and recovery of visual function occurred in all patients.Conclusions: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in prepubertal children is rather uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and management are important to prevent permanent visual loss.Keywords: idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pediatric, treatment

  17. Hypertensive response to raised intracranial pressure in infancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, A M; Whitelaw, A G

    1988-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure and intracranial pressure were measured serially in six infants with intracranial hypertension (intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg), and cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated from their difference. Overall, mean arterial pressure increased with rising intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.20 mm Hg/mm Hg. This caused a fall in cerebral perfusion pressure with increasing intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.80 mm Hg/mm Hg overall, although cerebral ...

  18. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  19. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is not benign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes visual loss and severe headache. The aim of this experiment is to examine relapse rate and long-term outcome in IIH patients. The methods involved in this experiment include a prospective...... and comprehensive neuro-ophthalmological examination, including fundus photography, Humphrey visual fields, and measurement of the retinal thickness (RT) and retinal nerve fiber layers (RNFL) by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Relapse was defined as recurrence of either: (1) papilledema or (2) symptoms...

  20. Benign intracranial hypertension diagnosed with bilateral papilloedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Phillips

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case of benign intracranial hypertension (BIH diagnosed from the presence of papilloedema. This potentially sight-threatening condition particularly affects younger obese females and can be idiopathic, caused by adverse reaction to certain prescription medications or by systemic disease. Prompt treatment is essentialto avoid optic atrophy and low energy diet and exercise forms part of long-term treatment to avoid relapse. Optometrists can play a critical primary health care role in the detection of papilloedema and referring appropriately.

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and transverse sinus stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyrman, Simon; Fytagoridis, Anders; Andresen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and bilateral transverse sinus stenoses (TSS), after presenting with papilledema and decreased visual acuity. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of >60 cm H2O. MRI showed bilateral TSS believed to be asso...... was inserted since the patient had improved with CSF diversion. MRI verified reopening of the venous sinuses after shunt placement, and the patient remains asymptomatic with no signs of relapse after 3 years of follow-up....

  2. Report on the second Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanne Emanuel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report highlights a conference designed for patient education on elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. The conference centered on chronic intracranial hypertension (IH including the latest research and clinical information. It was sponsored by the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation and held at the University of Texas Medical School, Houston, on June 21–22nd, 2008.

  3. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliopy Matheos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Papilledema has long been considered a hallmark of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a disease defined by elevated intracranial pressure with indiscernible etiology. Papilledema is often seen in the pediatric population, and as such can lead to delays in diagnosis, and often misdiagnosis. Here, we describe three children who were confirmed to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension with raised intracranial pressure by repeated lumbar puncture or intracranial pressure monitoring, normal neuroimaging and absence of papilledema. All three cases had atypical clinical presentations with visual disturbances or photophobia. The patients had a normal body mass index. This case series demonstrates that idiopathic intracranial hypertension can manifest in the absence of clinically obvious papilledema, and has, as such, the potential to cause permanent visual loss if the diagnosis is missed.

  5. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracr......We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...... to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage....

  6. Intracranial hypertension in 2 children with marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Kroft, Lucia J. M.; Pals, Gerard; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Overweg-Plandsoen, Wouterina C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Two unrelated children with Marfan syndrome presented with recurrent intracranial hypertension. Both children complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting and one of them had papilledema. Both had increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure, and their complaints disappeared after lumbar puncture.

  7. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension with altered consciousness in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a clinical condition of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without an obvious underlying pathological brain lesion. It is usually characterized by headache, neck pain, vomiting, visual disturbances, papilledema, cranial nerve palsy or a combination of these signs and symptoms.

  8. Chronic Meningitis Complicating Intracranial Hypertension in Neurobrucellosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugcu, Betul; Nacaroglu, Senay Asik; Coskun, Cigdem; Kuscu, Demet Yandım; Onder, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    In neurobrucellosis, even though meningitis is encountered frequently, chronic intracranial hypertension is a rare manifestation. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for the prevention of permanent visual loss secondary to poststasis optic atrophy in these cases. We report a case that presented with permanent visual loss secondary to intracranial hypertension in neurobrucellosis. Our goal is to draw attention to the consideration of neurobrucellosis in cases with papilla stasis, even in the absence of neurological findings in endemic areas.

  9. Natriuretic pro-peptides in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren Cecilie Kloppenbor; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Natriuretic peptides may be involved in intracranial pressure regulation, but cerebrospinal fluid (CNS) and plasma concentrations in this disorder are unknown. We evaluated venous and intrathecal concentrations of ANP, BNP...... and CNP precursor peptides in 40 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 20 controls. Natriuretic pro-peptides were quantitated using processing-independent assays. In CSF, no differences in peptide concentrations between patients and controls were found (proANP: 239 + or - 23 vs 231...

  10. Intracranial hypertension prediction using extremely randomized decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hamilton, Robert; Asgari, Shadnaz; Kim, Sunghan; Hu, Xiao

    2012-10-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation (intracranial hypertension, IH) in neurocritical care is typically treated in a reactive fashion; it is only delivered after bedside clinicians notice prolonged ICP elevation. A proactive solution is desirable to improve the treatment of intracranial hypertension. Several studies have shown that the waveform morphology of the intracranial pressure pulse holds predictors about future intracranial hypertension and could therefore be used to alert the bedside clinician of a likely occurrence of the elevation in the immediate future. In this paper, a computational framework is proposed to predict prolonged intracranial hypertension based on morphological waveform features computed from the ICP. A key contribution of this work is to exploit an ensemble classifier method based on extremely randomized decision trees (Extra-Trees). Experiments on a representative set of 30 patients admitted for various intracranial pressure related conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the predicting framework on ICP pulses acquired under clinical conditions and the superior results of the proposed approach in comparison to linear and AdaBoost classifiers. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A typical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Obeid, Tahir H.; Abuzinadah, Ahmad R.; Baeesa, Saleh S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to describe the clinical features of 5 patients with rare atypical presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), and propose the possible mechanism of this atypical presentation. We carried out a retrospective study of 5 patients, admitted at King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with IIH during the period from January 2001 to December 2005. All were females with their age ranges from 24 to 40 years. The clinical presentations, the laboratory and imaging studies were analyzed. The opening pressures of the lumbar puncture tests were documented. All patients were presented with headache. One had typical pain of trigeminal neuralgia and one with neck pain and radiculopathy. Facial diplegia was present in one patient and two patients had bilateral 6th cranial neuropathy. Papilledema was present in all patients except in one patient. Imaging study was normal in all patients, and they had a very high opening pressure during lumbar puncture, except in one patient. All patients achieved full recovery with medical therapy in 6 to 12 weeks with no relapse during the mean follow up of 2 years. Atypical finding in IIH are rare and require a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis. (author)

  12. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-11-12

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature.

  13. Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Presenting With Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Sietze; Stokroos, Robert; Weber, Jacobiene W; van Tongeren, Joost

    2015-12-01

    To present the rare case of a young boy with idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss developing over several months. This was accompanied by headaches, otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo. Furthermore, we aim to provide a concise review on this matter, as this report represents the second case in literature of pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with hearing loss. Workup of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, including (among others) physical examination, audiometry, diagnostic imaging, and lumbar puncture. Physical examination including fundoscopy as well as imaging showed no abnormalities. At presentation, pure tone audiometry revealed bone conduction thresholds of about 30 dB HL in both ears. Two months later, this declined to about 35 dB HL in both ears. Lumbar puncture revealed an increased intracranial pressure. The boy was thus diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. After the lumbar puncture, the otological complaints gradually resolved, and the hearing normalized (bone conduction thresholds of 0-5 dB HL). Although rare, sensorineural hearing loss in the pediatric population together with otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo can be due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and as such can be reversible. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Prediction of intracranial hypertension through noninvasive intracranial pressure waveform analysis in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Matheus Fernando Manzolli; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno Caetano Troca; de Oliveira, Sergio Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Santos

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a noninvasive device to assess intracranial pressure wave form in children with hydrocephalus. A prospective and non-experimental descriptive-analytic study was performed. Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided in four groups: group A, children with clinically compensated hydrocephalus; B, surgically treated hydrocephalus; C, patients with acute intracranial hypertension due to hydrocephalus; and D, children without neurological disease (control). Data were collected through the installation of an extracranial deformation sensor, coupled to the children's scalp, which allowed registration of noninvasive intracranial pressure curves. Parameters obtained were analyzed: P2/P1 ratio, "classification P1 and P2 and P1 slope. P2/P1 index and "classification of P1 and P2" had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100% for predicting intracranial hypertension. "P1 slope" presented no statistical difference. This study showed a useful and noninvasive method for monitoring intracranial pressure, which was able to indicate the intracranial hypertension in children with hydrocephalus and, thus, should be further investigated for clinical applications.

  15. IDIOPATHIC INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A WOMAN WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan N. Dimitrov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH or benign intracranial hypertension is a neurological syndrome characterized by elevated intracranial pressure. This uncommon disorder occurs primarily in obese women aged 10 to 50 years, sometimes in association with endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, with systemic diseases or when treated with multiple medications. We describe a case of IIH in a 43-year-old woman with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, demonstrating a typical clinical picture of benign intracranial hypertension. For the 5 years of treatment with risperidone she put on 35 kg in total (BMI> 35; for the last 2-3 months she began to complain of visual obscurations, nausea with vomiting. Ophthalmoscopy revealed bilateral asymmetric papilledema (OD>OS. Magnetic resonance imaging was normal, intracranial pressure was elevated IIH was diagnosed. Risperidone was discontinued and replaced with Seroquel 200 mg daily. Treatment with furosemide and mannitol 10 % was initiated. Papilledema resolved completely over the next 2 months. The patient was followed-up for four years after risperidone withdrawal. Weight loss of 28 kg was noted for four years. There were no relapses of headache, nausea, visual obscuration. Ophthalmologic examination revealed no papilledema.We suggest that prolonged use of antipsychotics, such as risperidone, should require proper surveillance for possible development of IIH and routine ophthalmologic examinations should be performed.

  16. Complete ophthalmoplegia: A rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Yousuf Wani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a disorder defined by clinical criteria that include signs and symptoms isolated to those produced by increased intracranial pressure (ICP; e. g., headache, papilledema, and vision loss, elevated ICP with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF composition, and no other cause of intracranial hypertension evident on neuroimaging or other evaluations. The most common signs in IIH are papilledema, visual field loss, and unilateral or bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a case of IIH presenting as headache with vision loss, papilledema, complete ophthalmoplegia with proptosis in one eye, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in the other eye. Patient was managed with acetazolamide, topiramate, and diuretics. Symptoms remained static and she was planned for urgent CSF diversion procedure.

  17. Magnetic resonance "flip-flop" in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a headache syndrome with raised CSF pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion. Though earlier confined to excluding intracranial lesions, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in recent years has been shown to identify intracranial changes from prolonged raised CSF pressure, suggestive of IIH. We present the MRI and TOF (time-of-flight venography findings involving the orbit, sella tursica and cerebral venous structures in a 45-year-old lady with IIH and illustrate their reversibility ("flip-flop" following CSF drainage. Our case highlights the role of imaging in evaluation and follow-up of patients with IIH, without the need for repeated lumbar punctures to monitor pressures.

  18. Headache in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Findings From the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah I; Quiros, Peter A; Subramanian, Prem S; Mejico, Luis J; Gao, Shan; McDermott, Michael; Wall, Michael

    2017-09-01

    To characterize the phenotype, headache-related disability, medical co-morbidities, use of symptomatic headache medications, and headache response to study interventions in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT). Patients with untreated IIH and mild vision loss enrolled in the IIHTT and randomized to acetazolamide (ACZ) and weight loss or placebo (PLB) and weight loss had prospective assessment of headache disability using the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) questionnaire. Subjects with headache at the baseline visit were assigned a headache phenotype using the International Classification for Headache Disorders version 3 beta (ICHD-3b). Medication overuse was determined using the participants' reported medication use for the preceding month and ICHD-3b thresholds for diagnosing medication overuse headache. We investigated relationships between headache disability and various other clinical characteristics at baseline and at 6 months. Headache was present in 139 (84%) of the 165 enrollees at baseline. The most common headache phenotypes were migraine (52%), tension-type headache (22%), probable migraine (16%), and probable tension-type headache (4%). Fifty-one (37%) participants overused symptomatic medications at baseline, most frequently simple analgesics. A similar amount of improvement in the adjusted mean (± standard error) HIT-6 score occurred in the ACZ (-9.56 ± 1.05) and PLB groups (-9.11 ± 1.14) at 6 months (group difference -0.45, 95% CI -3.50 to 2.60, P = .77). Headache disability did not correlate with any of the studies, variables of interest, which included: the lumbar puncture opening pressure at baseline or at 6 months, body mass index, the amount of weight lost, papilledema grade, perimetric mean deviation, or the use of hormonal contraception. Headache disability was significantly associated with patient-reported quality of life in the physical, mental, and visual domains. Headache was common, of varied

  19. Secondary Intracranial Hypertension in Pediatric Patients With Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Miguel Ángel; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Andión-Catalán, Maitane; Duat-Rodríguez, Anna; Jiménez-Echevarría, Saioa; Bermejo-Arnedo, Ignacio; Hortigüela-Saeta, Montesclaros; Rekarte-García, Saray; Babín-López, Lara; Ruano Domínguez, David

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics of a pediatric population with hemato-oncological disease and intracranial hypertension, analyze the therapeutic response and outcome, and compare its characteristics with respect to a control group with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We retrospectively analyzed patients with hemato-oncological disease and secondary intracranial hypertension in our center during the past five years. We compared these individuals with a historical cohort with idiopathic intracranial hypertension from our institution (control group). We identified eight patients, all with leukemia, and 21 controls. Mean age at diagnosis was 10.6 years, and 62% of individuals were female. Most of them were under treatment with drugs (62% corticosteroids, 75% active chemotherapy). Mean opening pressure of cerebrospinal fluid was 35 cm H 2 O. All had headache, but only 28% complained of visual symptoms. Only 12.5% exhibited papilledema at the time of diagnosis (versus 71% in controls). All of them were treated with acetazolamide, with average therapy duration of nine months, and all had a favorable outcome (versus 57% of controls who needed second-line treatment). None of them showed long-term visual complications (versus 20% of controls). Patients with hemato-oncological disease and secondary intracranial hypertension may not develop typical symptomatology. Thus, diagnosis and recognition of this entity among this cohort may be difficult. Associated factors are diverse and do not show an obvious causal relationship. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for diagnosis, because a favorable outcome is expected with prompt treatment. Acetazolamide is effective as a first-line therapy and caused few side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The course of headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, H M; Rönnbäck, C; Wegener, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    of the remaining 20 patients reported sustained chronic headache. Early age of onset and high diagnostic intracranial pressure (ICP) were associated with better headache outcome (≤1 headache days/month) after a year. Papilledema decreased rapidly within the first 2 months of diagnosis. After 1 year, OCT measures......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Our aim was to prospectively describe the course of headache during the first year of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed IIH were consecutively included from December 2010 to June 2013. Treatment according to standard...

  1. Utility of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring for Diagnosis of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in the Absence of Papilledema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Kelly J; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by headaches, visual obscurations, and papilledema, and the diagnosis involves lumbar puncture (LP) with an elevated opening pressure (OP) ≥20 cm H 2 0. When papilledema is absent, the diagnosis becomes less clear. Some physicians have argued that the absence of papilledema rules out IIH, whereas others maintain that elevated OP is sufficient for diagnosis. The authors performed a single-institution 4-year retrospective analysis of patients who underwent invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring for presumed IIH. A total of 22 patients were reviewed, and 13 had classic symptoms of IIH, documented elevated OP, and absence of papilledema; 5/13 (38%) patients had proven intracranial hypertension as shown by invasive ICP monitoring, whereas 8/13 (62%) had normal ICP. With the use of current diagnostic algorithms of clinical presentation and elevated OP, over half of patients without papilledema in our series would be falsely diagnosed with IIH, which could result in unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. Thus, elevated OP as determined by LP is insufficient to diagnose IIH. On the other hand, the absence of papilledema does not rule out intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography for intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, M; Yri, H; Sander, B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space-occupying lesions or other known etiology. It primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes permanent visual loss due to papilledema and secondary....... The diagnostic ability of OCT as a marker of increased ICP (> 25 cmH(2)O) was investigated using multiple regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: OCT elevation diagrams showed that in 60 % of patients newly diagnosed with IIH and in 10 % of patients with long-term IIH, 50...

  3. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Monozygotic Female Twins: Intracranial Pressure Dynamics and Treatment Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polemikos, Manolis; Heissler, Hans E; Hermann, Elvis J; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-01

    Familial cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are exceedingly rare, and its occurrence in monozygotic twins has not been reported previously. We report monozygotic female twins who developed IIH, one at age 25 years and the other at age 28 years. Continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring confirmed elevated ICP as measured initially by lumbar puncture. In both cases, successful treatment with resolution of papilledema and symptoms relief was achieved after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. This report documents the first case of IIH in monozygotic twins and the associated changes in ICP dynamics. Interestingly, almost equivalent alterations in ICP dynamics were found in the 2 patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A; Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. METHODS: We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred...

  5. Evolving evidence in adult idiopathic intracranial hypertension: pathophysiology and management

    OpenAIRE

    Mollan, Susan P; Ali, Fizzah; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Botfield, Hannah; Friedman, Deborah I; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare but important disease associated with significant morbidity. There is an expected rise in prevalence in line with the escalating global burden of obesity. Modern revisions in the terminology and diagnostic criteria for IIH help guide clinicians in investigations and researchers in standardising recruitment criteria for clinical trials. The pathophysiology of IIH is incompletely characterised; suggested underpinning mechanisms include the ro...

  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in children: Diagnostic and management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albakr, Abdulrahman; Hamad, Muddathir H; Alwadei, Ali H; Bashiri, Fahad A; Hassan, Hamdy H; Idris, Hiyam; Hassan, Saeed; Muayqil, Taim; Altweijri, Ikhlass; Salih, Mustafa A

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare neurological disorder in children. It is characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of brain parenchymal lesion, vascular malformations, hydrocephalus, or central nervous system (CNS) infection. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by high opening pressure of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with exclusion of secondary causes of intracranial hypertension. If not treated properly, it may lead to severe visual dysfunction. Here we review the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and management of IIH in children through illustration of the clinical and radiological presentation of a 13-year-old overweight girl who presented with severe headache, diplopia and bilateral papilledema. Otherwise, she had unremarkable neurological and systemic examinations. Lumbar puncture showed a high CSF opening pressure (360-540 mmH2O). Her investigations showed normal complete blood count (CBC), normal renal, liver, and thyroid function tests. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood chemistry were unremarkable. Magnetic resonant image (MRI) of the brain demonstrated empty sella turcica, tortuous optic nerves, and flattening of the posterior sclera. Magnetic resonant venography (MRV) showed focal narrowing of the distal transverse sinuses and absence of venous sinus thrombosis. She required treatment with acetazolamide and prednisolone. With medical treatment, weight reduction, and exercise, our patient had a remarkable improvement in her symptoms with resolution of papilledema in two months. This review highlights the importance of early recognition and management of IIH to prevent permanent visual loss.

  7. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  8. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, Terrance A.

    2010-01-01

    During recent long duration missions to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers have reported changes in visual acuity or visual field defects. Exams in the postflight period revealed changes to the visual system and elevated intracranial pressures. As a result, NASA Space Medicine has added a number of tests to be performed in the preflight, inflight and postflight periods for ISS and shuttle missions with the goal of determining the processes at work and any potential mitigation strategies. This discussion will acquaint you with the changes that NASA has made to its medical requirements in order to address the microgravity induced intracranial hypertension and associated visual changes. Key personnel have been assembled to provide you information on this topic. Educational Objectives: Provide an overview of the current Medical Operations requirements and the mitigation steps taken to operationally address the issue.

  9. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and factor V Leiden mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, S; Aissi, M; Chérif, Y; Daoussi, N; Boughammoura, A; Frih Ayed, M; Sfar, M H; Jerbi, S

    2014-07-01

    Activated proteinC resistance is a frequent prothrombotic abnormality. In most cases it is due to factorV Leiden mutation by nucleotide G1691A substitution. This recently described thrombophilic defect of activated proteinC resistance has been postulated to be implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). We report a case of factorV Leiden mutation in association with IIH and their likely link and implication in the management of IIH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. MRI of the optic nerve in benign intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, A.; Barker, G.J.; Riordan-Eva, P.; MacManus, D.; Sanders, M.; Tofts, P.S.; McDonald, W.I.; Moseley, I.F.; Miller, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the MRI appearance of the optic nerve and its cerebrospinal-fluid-containing sheath in 17 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) and 15 normal controls. Using phased-array local coils, 3-mm coronal T2-weighted fat-suppressed fast spin-echo images were obtained with an in-plane resolution of < 0.39 mm. The optic nerve and its sheath were clearly differentiated. An enlarged, elongated subarachnoid space around the optic nerve was demonstrated in patients with BIH. High-resolution MRI of the optic nerve offers additional information which may be of value for diagnosis and in planning and monitoring treatment. (orig.). With 5 figs

  11. Bedside Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in the Identification of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Suspected Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazuzta, Jose E; Brown, Martha E; Akhtar, Javed

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the bedside assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could identify elevated intracranial pressure in individuals with suspected idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This was a single-center, prospective, rater-blinded study performed in a freestanding pediatric teaching hospital. Patients aged 12 to 18 years scheduled for an elective lumbar puncture with the suspicion of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were eligible to participate. Optic nerve sheath diameter was measured via ultrasonography before performing a sedated lumbar puncture for measuring cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure. Abnormal measurements were predefined as optic nerve sheath diameter ≥4.5 mm and a cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure greater than 20 cmH2O. Thirteen patients participated in the study, 10 of whom had elevated intracranial pressure. Optic nerve sheath diameter was able to predict or rule out elevated intracranial pressure in all patients. Noninvasive assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could help to identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure when idiopathic intracranial hypertension is suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic Cerebrovascular and Intracranial Pressure Reactivity Assessment of Impaired Cerebrovascular Autoregulation in Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    We previously suggested that the discrepancy between a critical cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) of 30 mmHg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure (ICP), and 60 mmHg, obtained by decreasing arterial pressure, was due to pathological microvascular shunting at high ICP [1], and that the determination of the critical CPP by the static cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation curve is not valid with intracranial hypertension. Here, we demonstrated that induced dynamic ICP reactivity (iPRx), and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVRx) tests accurately identify the critical CPP in the hypertensive rat brain, which differs from that obtained by the static autoregulation curve. Step changes in CPP from 70 to 50 and 30 mmHg were made by increasing ICP using an artificial cerebrospinal fluid reservoir connected to the cisterna magna. At each CPP, a transient 10-mmHg increase in arterial pressure was induced by bolus intravenous dopamine. iPRx and iCVRx were calculated as ΔICP/Δ mean arterial pressure (MAP) and as ΔCBF/ΔMAP, respectively. The critical CPP at high ICP, obtained by iPRx and iCVRx, is 50 mmHg, where compromised capillary flow, transition of blood flow to nonnutritive microvascular shunts, tissue hypoxia, and brain-blood barrier leakage begin to occur, which is higher than the 30 mmHg determined by static autoregulation.

  13. Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Different manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J Nicholas P; Pickard, John D; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-08-01

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each - fatigue and headache - are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations? We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome. We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Benign intracranial hypertension associated with hypothyroidism in a hemophilic child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Chakraborti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH due to hypothyroidism in children is rare. We report a case of BIH due to hypothyroidism with bilateral sixth nerve palsy in a hemophilic child. The child presented with headache, vomiting, and inward deviation of both eyes for 10 days. On examination, her vision was 20/40 both eyes with restricted abduction in both the eyes. Anterior segments were within normal limits. Fundus showed bilateral disc edema. No marked abnormality was detected by neuroimaging. Baseline investigations were normal except a raised thyroid stimulating hormone. We started the patient on tablet acetazolamide, domperidone, and systemic steroids. Disc edema and ocular movements started improving. We have not come across any such case in literature after thorough PubMed search. The presentation, management, and future problems of this rare case are discussed.

  15. Surgical treatment of intracranial hypertension in encephalic cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, A; Hernández, P; Spagnuolo, E; Johnston, E

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of cryptococcosis has risen sharply together with the growing number of patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Cryptococcal meningitis is nowadays the most common intracranial non-viral infection in such cases. One of its most serious complications is intracranial hypertension (ICH), a situation that can lead either to early death, or disabling sequelae. The authors analyse a series of 10 cases of encephalic cryptococcosis with ICH, and describe the clinical course, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment, and evolution. The physiopathology of ICH in these patients is discussed, proposing placement of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt as the primary and emergency treatment, even when ventricular enlargement might be absent. Although the present series is certainly small, from the preceding discussion and according to an extensive bibliographical review, our conclusion is that patients with encephalic cryptococcosis and uncontrollable ICH should receive surgical treatment, consisting of an emergency diversion of the CSF, because serial lumbar punctures are not enough to improve the clinical course, that if left to its natural evolution would lead to a fatal outcome in a short time. In spite of the fact that CSF shunts were carried out on immunocompromised patients, no superinfections occurred.

  16. Audio-Vestibular Findings in Increased Intracranial Hypertension Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çoban, Kübra; Aydın, Erdinç; Özlüoğlu, Levent Naci

    2017-04-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) can be manifested by audiological and vestibular complaints. The aim of the present study is to determine the audio-vestibular pathologies and their pathophysiologies in this syndrome by performing current audio-vestibular tests. The study was performed prospectively on 40 individuals (20 IIH patients, 20 healthy volunteers). Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and electronystagmography tests were performed in both groups and the results were compared. The mean age of both groups was found to be 30.2±18.7. There were 11 females and 9 males in each group. The study group patients had significantly worse hearing levels. Pure tone averages were significantly higher in both ears of the study group (pvestibular systems are frequently affected in this condition. Our test results suggest inner ear pathologies in these patients. Higher incidence of inferior vestibular nerve and/or saccule dysfunction is detected as a novelty. Increased intracranial pressure may affect the inner ear with similar mechanisms as in hydrops.

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markey KA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Keira A Markey,1 Maria Uldall,2 Hannah Botfield,1 Liam D Cato,1 Mohammed A L Miah,1 Ghaniah Hassan-Smith,1 Rigmor H Jensen,2 Ana M Gonzalez,1 Alexandra J Sinclair1 1Neurometabolism, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; 2Danish Headache Center, Clinic of Neurology, Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark Abstract: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. Keywords: 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, steroid and adipokines, obesity, leptin

  18. Benign intracranial hypertension associated to blood coagulation derangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niglio Alferio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benign Intracranial Hypertension (BIH may be caused, at least in part, by intracranial sinus thrombosis. Thrombosis is normally due to derangements in blood coagulation cascade which may predispose to abnormal clotting activation or deficiency in natural inhibitors' control. The aim of the study is to examine the strength of the association between risk factors for thrombosis and BIH. Patients and methods The incidence of prothrombotic abnormalities among a randomly investigated cohort of 17 patients with BIH, was compared with 51 healthy subjects matched for sex, age, body mass index, height and social background. Results The number of subjects with protein C deficiency was significantly higher in patients than in controls (3 vs 1, p Increased plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1+2, fibrinopeptide A (FPA, and PAI-1 were demonstrated in patients group (5.7 ± 1.15 nM vs 0.45 ± 0.35 nM; 8.7 ± 2.5 ng/mL vs 2.2 ± 1.25 ng/mL; 45.7 ± 12.5 ng/mL vs 8.5 ± 6.7 ng/mL, respectively; p Discussion In agreement with other authors our data suggest a state of hypercoagulability in BIH associated with gene polymorphisms. Our findings also showed that mutations in cardiovascular genes significantly discriminate subjects with a BIH history. The association between coagulation and gene derangements, usually regarded to as cryptogenic, may suggest a possible pathogenetic mechanism in BIH. So, a prothrombotic tendency may exist that would, at least in part, explain some cases of BIH. Although based on a small population, these findings raise the exciting possibility of using these haemostatic factors as markers for selecting high-risk subjects in BIH disease.

  19. Effect of venous stenting on intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloob, Samir A; Toma, Ahmed K; Thompson, Simon D; Gan, Chee L; Robertson, Fergus; Thorne, Lewis; Watkins, Laurence D

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterised by an increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of any central nervous system disease or structural abnormality and by normal CSF composition. Management becomes complicated once surgical intervention is required. Venous sinus stenosis has been suggested as a possible aetiology for IIH. Venous sinus stenting has emerged as a possible interventional option. Evidence for venous sinus stenting is based on elimination of the venous pressure gradient and clinical response. There have been no studies demonstrating the immediate effect of venous stenting on ICP. Patients with a potential or already known diagnosis of IIH were investigated according to departmental protocol. ICP monitoring was performed for 24 h. When high pressures were confirmed, CT venogram and catheter venography were performed to look for venous stenosis to demonstrate a pressure gradient. If positive, venous stenting would be performed and ICP monitoring would continue for a further 24 h after deployment of the venous stent. Ten patients underwent venous sinus stenting with concomitant ICP monitoring. Nine out of ten patients displayed an immediate reduction in their ICP that was maintained at 24 h. The average reduction in mean ICP and pulsatility was significant (p = 0.003). Six out of ten patients reported a symptomatic improvement within the first 2 weeks. Venous sinus stenting results in an immediate reduction in ICP. This physiological response to venous stenting has not previously been reported. Venous stenting could offer an alternative treatment option in correctly selected patients with IIH.

  20. Long-term visual outcome in a Danish population of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatem, Christina F; Yri, Hanne M; Sørensen, Anne L

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP), normal cerebrospinal composition and exclusion of alternative causes to increased ICP. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term visual outcome in a Danish population of IIH patients...... of papilloedema decreased from 2.2 at V0 to 0.5 at V2. The grade of papilloedema at V2 was not significantly related to the severity of papilloedema at V0 (p-values 0.65 and 0.48). CONCLUSION: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is associated with long-term loss of visual function, and relevant treatment...

  1. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cnossen, Maryse C; Huijben, Jilske A; van der Jagt, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP) management...... strategies, resulting in practice variation. The aim of this study was to examine variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in patients with TBI. METHODS: A 29-item survey on ICP monitoring and treatment was developed on the basis of literature and expert opinion...... the others were considered more conservative (n = 34, 52%). CONCLUSIONS: Substantial variation was found regarding monitoring and treatment policies in patients with TBI and intracranial hypertension. The results of this survey indicate a lack of consensus between European neurotrauma centers and provide...

  2. Migraine headache in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Farzad; Razmeh, Saeed; Habibzadeh, Neda; Zavari, Arefeh; Nabovvati, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that afflicts many people in the world and can cause severe disability during the attacks. The pathophysiology of migraine is complex and not fully understood. It seems that migraine is common in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). However, the association between migraine headache and IIH is still unclear. The present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of migraine headache and associated factors in IIH patients. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 68 patients diagnosed with IIH underwent a medical history interview and a neurological examination. The diagnosis of migraine was based on the four diagnostic criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition. Forty-five patients (63.2%) met the diagnostic criteria of migraine headache. There was no significant difference between patients with and without migraine headache in respect of their age, gender, body mass. This study revealed high prevalence of migraine headache in IIH patients; appropriate treatment can reduce their headache and prevent unnecessary treatments for IIH. PMID:29071043

  3. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Prognostic Factors and Multidisciplinary Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Chagot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH mostly affects young obese women and can lead to permanent visual impairment. However, prognostic factors and therapeutic strategy remain unclear. Methods. We retrospectively collected data from all patients diagnosed and managed for IIH in our university center from January 2001 to December 2016. Results. Seventy-nine patients were diagnosed with IIH. Bilateral transverse sinus stenosis (TSS was found in 74% of the population. Visual outcome at 6 months was poor for 46% of patients, including all patients presenting weight gain of at least 5% since diagnosis (p<0.001, whereas mean body mass index at diagnosis was not different between patients with poor versus good outcome (32.9±7.7 versus 34.6 ± 9.4 kg·m−2. Other significant factors of poor prognosis were bilateral TSS (OR = 5.2; 95 CI: 1.24–24.9; p=0.024. Thirteen patients with poor outcome after 6-month assessment underwent unilateral TSS stenting leading to visual improvement in 11 cases. Conclusion. Weight gain, rather than initial weight, emerged as the leading factor of poor visual outcome in patients with IIH, followed by presence of bilateral TSS. Consequently, first-line treatment must include dietary measures to control weight. Unilateral stenting appears to be a safe second-line treatment option for patients with bilateral TSS.

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Corticosteroid Levels and Cortisol Metabolism in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension : A Link between 11 beta-HSD1 and Intracranial Pressure Regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinclair, Alexandra J.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Burdon, Michael A.; van Beek, Andre P.; Kema, Ido P.; Hughes, Beverly A.; Murray, Philip I.; Nightingale, Peter G.; Stewart, Paul M.; Rauz, Saaeha; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2010-01-01

    Context: The etiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is unknown. We hypothesized that obesity and elevated intracranial pressure may be linked through increased 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 beta-HSD1) activity. Objective: The aim was to characterize 11 beta-HSD1 in

  5. Over-the-counter self-medication leading to intracranial hypertension in a young lady.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana Reddy, A M; Prashanth, L K; Sharat Kumar, G G; Chandana, G; Jadav, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Intracranial hypertension (idiopathic-IIH and secondary) is a potentially treatable condition. Although various factors such as female gender and obesity, certain drugs have been implicated as risk factors for IIH, there remains a lack of clarity in the exact causal-effect relationship. In India, self-medication by obtaining drugs over the counter due to lack of adequate drug regulation and ignorance of the public is a very common practice with a potential for severe adverse effects. We present a case of a young lady who has developed intracranial hypertension possibly due to self-medication with steroids and cyproheptadine, obtained over the counter.

  6. Association of benign intracranial hypertension and spontaneous encephalocele with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Laura; Chen, Douglas A; Aziz, Khaled M; Hillman, Todd A

    2012-12-01

    To determine the incidence of intracranial hypertension in patients with spontaneous encephalocele with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Retrospective case review. Tertiary care neurotology practice. Patients presenting between 2008 and 2011 with spontaneous encephalocele and CSF leak in the temporal bone. Lumbar puncture with opening pressure measurement after encephalocele repair. Patient age, sex, postoperative course, body mass index, and postoperative intracranial pressure. Of the 26 patients identified with spontaneous encephalocele with CSF leak, 9 patients had postoperative lumbar puncture data. Of those 9, 89% were female subjects, and 11% were male, with a mean age of 57 and a mean BMI of 41 kg/m (morbidly obese). The mean opening pressure was 24.5 cm H(2)O. Approximately 33% had normal intracranial pressure (mean, 15 cm H(2)O; range, 10-17 cm H(2)O); 67% had elevated intracranial pressure (mean, 29 cm H(2)O; range, 23.5-40 cm H(2)O). The incidence of BIH in the general population is 0.001%. Of the 6 with intracranial hypertension, 3 (50%) were placed on acetazolamide for fundoscopic findings, postoperative headache, and/or visual changes. Mean time to LP after repair of encephalocele was 13 months (range, 4 days to 75 months). This study shows that benign intracranial hypertension is prevalent in a significant number of patients presenting with spontaneous encephalocele with CSF otorrhea at a rate much higher than is found in the general population. This finding has direct clinical implications and suggests that all patients with spontaneous encephalocele/CSF leak warrant evaluation for benign intracranial hypertension.

  7. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  8. The diagnosis and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and the associated headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Yri, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a challenging disorder with a rapid increasing incidence due to a close relation to obesity. The onset of symptoms is often insidious and patients may see many different specialists before the IIH diagnosis is settled. A summary of diagnosis, symptoms...

  9. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: lumboperitoneal shunts versus ventriculoperitoneal shunts--case series and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abubaker, Khalid

    2011-02-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon but important cause of headache that can lead to visual loss. This study was undertaken to review our experience in the treatment of IIH by neuronavigation-assisted ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts with programmable valves as compared to lumboperitoneal (LP) shunts.

  10. Anterior lamina cribrosa surface position in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and glaucoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarruel, Jenni Martinez; Li, Xiao Q.; Bach-Holm, Daniella

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the anterior lamina cribrosa (LC) surface position in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), primary open-angle glaucoma (high-tension glaucoma [HTG] and normal-tension glaucoma [NTG]), and healthy controls using enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical...

  11. SEVERE BRAIN INJURIES: CORRELATION BETWEEN SURVIVAL AND INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Kostić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There are several reasons of intracranial pressure (ICP increase in the brain trauma. Brain edema, due to the brain-blood bariere injury, contusion of brain tissue and intracranial hematomas that represent mass lesion, cerebrovascular autoregulation failure which leads to hemodinamic disorder, and traumatic subarchnoid haemorrhagae that is commonly associated with CSF flow disturbances are the main causes. The aim of our study was to examine the survival of patients with severe brain trauma in the presence of different values of ICP. This prospective study included 32 patients with intracranial pressure monitored, and appropriate treatment undertaken. Twenty-two patients (68.75% had elevated ICP, and in 10 patients (31,25% there were no criteria of intracranial hypertnesion (ICHTN. The results of our study showed that absolute lethal value of ICHTN is 50mmHg and over – none of the injured survived such ICP if lasted more than two hours, because of inevitable brain and brainstem ischemia and failure of the vital functions. The relatively lethal values of ICP ranged from 40 to 50mmHg, in the case of which we menaged to prevent a fatal outcome in one out of five cases.

  12. Use of hypertonic saline solutions in treatment of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, A I; Suarez, J I

    2000-09-01

    To review the literature on the use of hypertonic saline (HS) in treating cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. Review of scientific and clinical literature retrieved from a computerized MEDLINE search from January 1965 through November 1999. Pertinent literature is referenced, including clinical and laboratory investigations, to demonstrate principles and efficacy of treatment with HS in patients with intracranial space-occupying pathology. The literature was reviewed to summarize the mechanisms of action, efficacy, adverse effects, systemic effects, and comparisons with standard treatments in both clinical and laboratory settings. HS has an osmotic effect on the brain because of its high tonicity and ability to effectively remain outside the bloodbrain barrier. Numerous animal studies have suggested that fluid resuscitation with HS bolus after hemorrhagic shock prevents the intracranial pressure (ICP) increase that follows resuscitation with standard fluids. There may be a minimal benefit in restoring cerebral blood flow, which is thought to be mitigated through local effects of HS on cerebral microvasculature. In animal models with cerebral injury, the maximum benefit is observed in animals with focal injury associated with vasogenic edema (cryogenic injury). The ICP reduction is seen for efficacy in reducing ICP, but there is a suggestion that mannitol may have a longer duration of action. Human studies published to date reporting on the use of HS in treating cerebral edema and elevated ICP include case reports, case series, and small controlled trials. Results from studies directly comparing HS with standard treatment in regard to safety and efficacy are inconclusive. However, the low frequency of side effects and a definite reduction of ICP observed with use of HS in these studies are very promising. Systemic effects include transient volume expansion, natriuresis, hemodilution, immunomodulation, and improved pulmonary gas exchange. Adverse effects

  13. CO2 Effects in Space: Relationship to Intracranial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 on Earth and in space. The effects of enhanced exposure to CO2 are experienced in almost all bodily systems. In space some of the effects are heightened due to the fluid shifts to the thorax and head. This fluid shift results in increased intracranial pressure, congested cerebral circulation, increased Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) and Intravenous dilatation. The mechanism of the effect of CO2 on CBF is diagrammed, as is the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) production. A listing of Neuroendocrine targets is included.

  14. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury: A survey in 66 neurotrauma centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); Huijben, J.A. (Jilske A.); van der Jagt, M. (Mathieu); Volovici, V. (Victor); van Essen, T. (Thomas); S. Polinder (Suzanne); D. Nelson (David); Ercole, A. (Ari); Stocchetti, N. (Nino); Citerio, G. (Giuseppe); W.C. Peul (Wilco); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J.E. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); Audibert, G. (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); R.H.M.A. Bartels (Ronald); P. Barzo (P.); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); L. Beretta (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Lund, S.B. (Stine Borgen); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); Brazinova, A. (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bucková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); K.L.H. Carpenter (Keri L.H.); Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); Cnossen, M. (Maryse); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F.D. Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); Gagliardo, P. (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, K.A. (Kristine Asta); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); Jiang, J.-Y. (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); Kettunen, J. (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); Maas, A.I.R. (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); McMahon, C. (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); Menon, D. (David); T. Menovsky (Tomas); Morganti-Kossmann, C. (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); Nelson, D. (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); A.W. Oldenbeuving; M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); Peul, W. (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); S.P. Floury (Sébastien Pili); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Polinder, S. (Suzanne); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); R. Raj (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorcíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); C.M.A.A. Roks (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); D. Rueckert (Daniel); de Ruiz, A.F. (Arcaute Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; Rico, F.S. (Frederik Schou); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dominique); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); E. Stamatakis (Emmanuel); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te, A.B. (Ao Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); Hecke, W.V. (Wim Van); Praag, D.V. (Dominique Van); Dirk, V.R. (Van Roost); Vlierberghe, E.V. (Eline Van); Vyvere, T.V. (Thijs vande); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); Vespa, P.M. (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); E.D. Wildschut (Enno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); Wilson, L. (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K.L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); de Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); den Boogert, H. (Hugo); van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP)

  15. [Effects of solcoseryl on the cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and EEG in acute intracranial hypertensive cats (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S; Asakura, T; Kitamura, K

    1976-02-01

    The experiment was performed on 86 cases under intraperitoneal pentobarbital anesthesia. One balloon was placed in the extradural space of right frontal region, and the other balloon was placed in the left extradural space and the intracranial pressure was measured. A needle was stereotaxically inserted into the subcortical area in order to measure the cerebral blood flow. Systemic blood pressure was recorded by inserting a catheter into the femoral artery, and electrocorticogram was also recorded. An expanding intracranial lesion was made by inflating the extradural balloon with physiological saline. The animals were arbitrarily divided into two groups.: 1) light or moderate groups which intracranial pressure before the injection of drug was below 400 mmH2O. 2) severe groups above 400 mmH2O. After the maintenance of the pressure, Solcoseryl was infused intravenously. The investigation was focused to observe whether Solcoseryl reveales any potent effect on cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and on electroencephalogram in acute intracranial hypertension. Results 1) Intravenous injection of Solcoseryl had the effect of lowering intracranial pressure in the light or moderate and severe groups. Particularly, dose of 80 mg/kg showed the marked effect, though with a rebound phenomenon in the light or moderate groups. Furthermore, the effect was more marked and lasting by drip infusion of Solcoseryl and also by intravenous injection of Solcoseryl after pretreatment with hydrocortisone, and at this time no rebound phenomenon was recognized. 2) Solcoseryl had the effect of increasing the cerebral blood flow accompained with the lowering of intracranial pressure. 3) Systemic blood pressure was transiently lowered by the injection of Solcoseryl 20 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg and recovered immediately. 4) Solcoseryl had no effect on electroencephalogram in the severe groups. Conclusion On the basis of these results, it is rational to conclude that

  16. Comparative observational study on the clinical presentation, intracranial volume measurements, and intracranial pressure scores in patients with either Chiari malformation Type I or idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frič, Radek; Eide, Per Kristian

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Several lines of evidence suggest common pathophysiological mechanisms in Chiari malformation Type I (CMI) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). It has been hypothesized that tonsillar ectopy, a typical finding in CMI, is the result of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) combined with a developmentally small posterior cranial fossa (PCF). To explore this hypothesis, the authors specifically investigated whether ICP is comparable in CMI and IIH and whether intracranial volumes (ICVs) are different in patients with CMI and IIH, which could explain the tonsillar ectopy in CMI. The authors also examined whether the symptom profile is comparable in these 2 patient groups. METHODS The authors identified all CMI and IIH patients who had undergone overnight diagnostic ICP monitoring during the period from 2002 to 2014 and reviewed their clinical records and radiological examinations. Ventricular CSF volume (VV), PCF volume (PCFV), and total ICV were calculated from initial MRI studies by using volumetric software. The static and pulsatile ICP scores during overnight monitoring were analyzed. Furthermore, the authors included a reference (REF) group consisting of patients who had undergone ICP monitoring due to suspected idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus or chronic daily headache and showed normal pressure values. RESULTS Sixty-six patients with CMI and 41 with IIH were identified, with comparable demographics noted in both groups. The occurrence of some symptoms (headache, nausea, and/or vomiting) was comparable between the cohorts. Dizziness and gait ataxia were significantly more common in patients with CMI, whereas visual symptoms, diplopia, and tinnitus were significantly more frequent in patients with IIH. The cranial volume measurements (VV, PCFV, and ICV) of the CMI and IIH patients were similar. Notably, 7.3% of the IIH patients had tonsillar descent qualifying for diagnosis of CMI (that is, > 5 mm). The extent of tonsillar ectopy was

  17. Space Flight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Ophthalmic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Mader, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although physiologic and pathologic changes associated with microgravity exposure have been studied extensively, the effect of this environment on the eye is largely unknown. Over the last several years, NASA s Space Medicine Division has documented astronauts presenting with varying degrees of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, and hyperopic shifts after long-duration space flight. Methods: Before and after long-duration space flight, six astronauts underwent complete eye examinations to include cycloplegic and/or manifest refraction and fundus photography. Five of these astronauts had Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed following their missions. Results: Following exposure to space flight of approximately 6-months duration, six astronauts had neuro-ophthalmic findings. These consisted of disc edema in four astronauts, globe flattening in four astronauts, choroidal folds in four astronauts, cotton wool spots in three astronauts, nerve fiber layer thickening by OCT in five astronauts, and decreased near vision in five astronauts. Four of the astronauts with near vision complaints had a hyperopic shift equal to or greater than + 0.50D between pre- and post-mission spherical equivalent refraction in one or both eyes (range +0.50D to +1.50D). These same four had globe flattening by MRI. Conclusions: The findings we describe may have resulted from a rise in intracranial pressure caused by microgravity fluid shifts, and could represent parts of a spectrum of ocular and cerebral responses to extended microgravity.

  18. Myocardial fatty acid imaging using iodine-123-BMIPP in patients with hypertensive intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Toshikazu; Sakai, Yasuhito; Hayashi, Yasushi

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation of myocardial fatty acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with major complication has not been previously established. To assess the myocardial fatty acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with intracranial hemorrhage (IH), we performed myocardial image using 123 I-15-p-iodophenyl-3-methyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP). Seventeen hypertensive patients with IH (HIH) and 27 hypertensive patients without IH (HT) were studied. A dose of 111 MBq of BMIPP was injected intravenously at rest, and a myocardial image was recorded 30 minutes after the injection. Myocardial perfusion image using Thallium-201 (Tl) was also performed within 2 weeks after BMIPP study. The regional myocardial uptakes of BMIPP and Tl were visually assessed in 17 segments with a four-point scoring system (0=absent to 3=normal uptake). Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by electrocardiogrpahy (ECG) and two-dimensional ultrasonic cardiography (UCG). Sum of uptake scores of Tl was similar in both groups (45.1±5.4 vs. 47.9±4.2), but that of BMIPP in HIH was lower than HT (35.9±7.9 vs 45.6±4.8, p<0.001). Evaluation of cardiac hypertrophy using ECG and UCG revealed no significant difference between two groups. HIH have much more eccentric hypertrophy in UCG study than HT (53% vs. 37%). These data suggest that hypertensive patients with intracranial hemorrhage have a more impaired myocardial fatty acid metabolism compared to the hypertensive patients with similar cardiac hypertrophy. BMIPP imaging might be useful to evaluate the severity of myocardial fatty acid metabolism in hypertensive patients. (author)

  19. Hypertonic saline, not mannitol, should be considered gold-standard medical therapy for intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, Nicholas F

    2012-02-20

    Hyperosmolar therapy is the principal medical management strategy for elevated intracranial pressure. Mannitol has been the primary hyperosmolar agent for nearly a century and remains the de facto gold standard for medical management of intracranial hypertension. Over the past 25 years, however, hypertonic saline (HTS) has become a progressively more common alternative to mannitol, and several recent studies have suggested its relative superiority. These findings have prompted calls for large-scale comparator trials of mannitol and HTS, but such trials would only be necessary if the designation of mannitol as the gold standard is appropriate and if current evidence suggests its therapeutic equipoise with HTS. Mounting evidence supporting HTS suggests that neither of these conditions is necessarily true and, instead, mandates reassessment of the actual gold-standard agent for hyperosmolar therapy. In the present article I make the case that current evidence supports HTS, not mannitol, as the better choice for gold-standard therapy for medical management of intracranial hypertension. This is accomplished first by examining the evidence on which the apparent designation of mannitol as the presumed gold-standard is based, then by reviewing the recent comparative efficacy data for HTS versus mannitol, and finally by discussing additional clinical considerations for appropriate designation of a gold-standard agent for hyperosmolar therapy. This assessment has important implications both for patient care and for clinical trial design.

  20. [Progressive Intracranial Hypertension due to Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Following Mild Head Trauma: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Yuta; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mild head trauma without skull fracture or intracranial hematoma is exceptionally rare. We describe an unusual case of progressive intracranial hypertension due to superior sagittal sinus thrombosis following mild head trauma. A 17-year-old boy presented with nape pain a day after a head blow during a gymnastics competition (backward double somersault). On admission, he showed no neurological deficit. CT scans revealed no skull fractures, and there were no abnormalities in the brain parenchyma. However, his headache worsened day-by-day and he had begun to vomit. Lumbar puncture was performed on Day 6, and the opening pressure was 40 cm of water. After tapping 20 mL, he felt better and the headache diminished for a few hours. MR venography performed on Day 8 revealed severe flow disturbance in the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus with multiple venous collaterals. Because of the beneficial effects of lumbar puncture, we decided to manage his symptoms of intracranial hypertension conservatively with repeated lumbar puncture and administration of glycerol. After 7 days of conservative treatment, his symptoms resolved completely, and he was discharged from the hospital. Follow-up MR venography performed on Day 55 showed complete recanalization of the superior sagittal sinus. The exact mechanism of sinus thrombosis in this case is not clear, but we speculate that endothelial damage caused by shearing stress because of strong rotational acceleration or direct impact to the superior sagittal sinus wall may have initiated thrombus formation.

  1. Clinical effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma in treating hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Shao, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma in treating hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. One hundred and fifty-six patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage were selected. They were randomly divided into the control group (78 cases) and observation group (78 cases). The control group was treated with conventional craniotomy evacuation of hematoma, while the observation group was treated with minimally invasive intracranial hematoma. Neurological impairment score, treatment efficacy and Barthel index were compared between two groups. Comparison results and clinical data of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. Neurological impairment score in observation group had a significantly obvious decrease compared to control group (p hematoma cleared for the first time in control group (75.40±10.20 (%)) was more than observation group (45.10±8.70 (%)). Hematoma in observation group (3.90±0.80 days) disappeared faster than control group (5.80±0.90 days). Differences of the above indexes between two groups were all significant (p intracranial hematoma is remarkably effective. It should be promoted and practiced extensively.

  2. Inflammatory gene expression signatures in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: possible implications in microgravity-induced ICP elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Hurley, James; Skog, Johan; Stevens, Brian; Calvillo, Eusebia; Bershad, Eric

    2018-01-01

    The visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a neuro-ophthalmologic condition described in astronauts returning from long duration space missions. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is characterized by a chronic elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion. Because VIIP and IIH share some neurologic and ophthalmologic manifestations, the latter might be used as a model to study some of the processes underlying VIIP. This work constitutes a preliminary investigation of the molecular pathways associated with the elevation of ICP in IIH. Gene expression signatures were obtained from exosomes collected from CSF and plasma in patients with possible signs of IIH. The gene expression targets focused on inflammatory genes and miRNAs. The results suggest that inflammatory cytokine-driven processes and immune cell migration are activated when ICP is elevated in IIH patients, either as a cause or effect of the ICP increase. Several miRNAs appear to be involved in this response, among which miR-9 and miR-16 are upregulated in CSF and plasma of higher ICP subjects. This study provides evidence in support of neurophysiological alterations and neuro-immunomodulation in this condition. If similar changes are seen in astronauts manifesting with the VIIP syndrome, an underlying pathophysiological basis may be discovered.

  3. Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure for prediction of postoperative complications of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S-X; Zhang, Q-S; Yin, Y; Liu, Z; Wu, J-M; Yang, M-X

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluates the value of continuous dynamic monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage to predict early postoperative complications. Data from 80 patients treated in our hospital from February 2014 to February 2015 were analyzed. The patients all underwent decompressive craniectomies, and their ICP changes were monitored invasively and continuously for 1 to 7 days after surgery. The average blood loss during surgery for the group of patients was 65.3 ± 12.4 ml and the mean GCS score 8.7 ± 2.4. Cases were divided into three groups according to ICP values to compare early postoperative complications of the groups: a normal and mildly increased group (51 cases), a moderately increased group (19 cases) and a severely increased group (10 cases). To validate the analysis we first showed that comparisons among groups based on gender, age, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, bleeding time, blood loss, operation time, craniectomy localization, and preoperative mannitol dosage yielded no statistically significant differences. In contrast, the following comparisons produced statistically significant differences: the comparison of postoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores showing that the lower intracranial pressure, the higher the GCS score; the postoperative rehemorrhage, cerebral edema and death ratios showing the higher the intracranial pressure, the higher the rehemorrhage ratio; the average ICP and the time to occurrence of rehemorrhage, cerebral edema or cerebral infarction, showing the relationship between the average ICP and the time to a complication. Patients with higher ICP averages suffered a complication of rehemorrhage within the first 9.6 ± 2.5 hours on average. Nevertheless, the comparison of GCS scores in those patients and the others showed no significant differences. Based on the findings, the dynamic monitoring of intracranial pressure can early and sensitively predict postoperative

  4. Increased brain water self-diffusion in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Sørensen, P S; Thomsen, C

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in brain water diffusion in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. METHODS: A motion-compensated MR pulse sequence was used to create diffusion maps of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in 12 patients fulfilling conventional diagnostic criteria...... gray matter, the basal nuclei, the internal capsule, or the corpus callosum. Four of 7 patients with increased ADC in subcortical white matter also had increased ADC within gray matter. CONCLUSION: Measurement of diffusion coefficients in vivo demonstrated increased local water mobility within...

  5. Weight reduction for a better visual outcome in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feray Koc

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between weight reduction and visual outcome in overweight patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Methods: Thirty-nine newly diagnosed, overweight (body mass index >25 kg/m2 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were studied retrospectively. All patients underwent medical treatment with acetazolamide, and a weight reduction program was also offered. Patients were grouped according to their compliance with this weight reduction program into the diet-success (Group 1 and diet-failure groups (Group 2. Body mass index, papilledema, visual acuity, and perimetric mean deviation were compared at the end of the 6-month study period. Results: Groups 1 and 2 did not differ regarding the baseline mean body mass index (32.63 ± 5.61, 32.35 ± 5.06 kg/m2, visual acuity (0.080 ± 0.13, 0.130 ± 0.24 logMAR, perimetric mean deviation (-9.978 ± 0.68, -12.86 ± 8.91, or papilledema grade (2.94 ± 0.22, 2.90 ± 0.30, respectively (p>0.05. During the 6 months' follow-up, Group 1 patients, who complied with both medical and diet therapy, improved significantly in all parameters, including body mass index (p<0.001, visual acuity (p=0.001, perimetric mean deviation (p=0.016, and papilledema grade (p<0.001. Conversely, Group 2 patients, who only underwent medical therapy, improved only in papilledema grade (p<0.001. However, coincident development of optic disc pallor was observed in three patients. Further, they also had significant loss in visual acuity (p=0.047 during the study period. Conclusion: Weight reduction combined with medical treatment is associated with significantly better improvement in visual acuity, visual field, and papilledema in idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. Compliance with an efficient diet program should be encouraged in overweight patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

  6. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of moderate hypothermia to prevent intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Murphy, Nicholas; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Animal models and human case series of acute liver failure (ALF) suggest moderate hypothermia (MH) to have protective effects against cerebral oedema (CO) development and intracranial hypertension (ICH). However, the optimum temperature for patient management is unknown...... above management at 36°C in prevention of ICH or in overall survival. This study did not confirm advantage of its prophylactic use. (ISRCTN registration number 74268282; no funding.) LAY SUMMARY: Studies in animals with acute liver failure (ALF) have suggested that cooling (hypothermia) could prevent...

  7. Endolymphatic hydrops in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: prevalence and clinical outcome after lumbar puncture. Preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Angelo; Cavaliere, Michele; Sicignano, Stefania; Falco, Pietro; Cautiero, Federico; De Simone, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) without any underlying pathology, presenting with (IIH) or without papilledema (IIHWOP). Headache, often on daily basis, is the most frequent symptom. Among audiovestibular symptoms, tinnitus and dizziness are commonly reported, while vertigo and hearing impairment are infrequent reports. Endolymphatic hydrops (ELH) is the typical histopathologic feature of Ménière disease, a condition featured by episodes of vertigo, dizziness, fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Evidences suggest that ICP is transmitted to inner ear. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of ELH symptoms in IIH/IIHWOP and the relationship between the raised ICP and ELH. The prevalence of chronic headache and of ELH symptoms was investigated in a consecutive series of IIH/IIHWOP patients, and a standard audiometry with hearing threshold measurement (pure-tone average-PTA) was performed. Differences in chronic headache and ELH symptoms prevalence and changes of PTA threshold were calculated after ICP normalization by lumbar puncture (LP). Thirty-one patients (17 with IIH and 14 with IIHWOP) were included. Before LP, chronic headache was present in 93.5%. The percentages of patients reporting tinnitus, dizziness, vertigo, and aural fullness were 67.7, 77.4, 22.6, and 61.3%, respectively. Headache frequency as well as ELH symptoms and PTA significantly improved after LP. The improvement of PTA and of ELH symptoms observed after LP in this series of IIH/IIHWOP patients indicates that a raised ICP, a condition known to be involved in the progression and refractoriness of migraine pain, has also a role in ELH. We propose that intracranial hypertension may represent the shared pathogenetic step explaining the large epidemiological comorbidity between migraine and vestibular symptoms, at present conceptualized as "vestibular migraine."

  8. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A Wibroe

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with IIH.We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred on suspicion of IIH from 2011-2013. Subjects included as patients fulfilled Friedman and Jacobson's diagnostic criteria for IIH. Individuals in whom intracranial hypertension was refuted were included as controls. Lumbar puncture with ICP measurement was performed at inclusion and repeated for patients after three months of treatment. Osmolality was measured with a Vapor Pressure Osmometer.We collected 90 CSF samples from 38 newly diagnosed patients and 28 controls. At baseline 27 IIH-samples and at 3 months follow-up 35 IIH-samples were collected from patients. We found no significant differences in osmolality between 1 patients at baseline and controls (p = 0. 86, 2 patients at baseline and after 3 months treatment (p = 0.97, and 3 patients with normalized pressure after 3 months and their baseline values (p = 0.79. Osmolality in individuals with normal ICP from 6-25 cmH2O (n = 41 did not differ significantly from patients with moderately elevated ICP from 26-45 cmH2O (n = 21 (p = 0.86 and patients with high ICP from 46-70 cmH2O (n = 4 (p = 0.32, respectively. There was no correlation between osmolality and ICP, BMI, age and body height, respectively. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg (± 1 SE, 95% confidence interval 267-272 for both patients and controls.CSF osmolality was normal in patients with IIH, and there was no relation to treatment, ICP, BMI, age and body height. Mean CSF osmolality was 270 mmol/kg and constitutes a reference for future studies. Changes in CSF osmolality are not responsible for development of IIH. Other underlying pathophysiological mechanisms must be searched.

  9. NASA's Spaceflight Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension Research Plan: An accelerated Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian; Fogarty, J.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J.

    2010-01-01

    To date six long duration astronauts have experienced in flight visual changes and post flight signs of optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, hyperoptic shifts and or raised intracranial pressure. In some cases the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. Given that all astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts develop in-flight idiopathic intracranial hypertension to some degree. Those who are susceptible, have an increased likelihood of developing treatment resistant papilledema resulting in visual impairment and possible long-term vision loss. Such an acquired disability would have a profound mission impact and would be detrimental to the long term health of the astronaut. The visual impairment and increased intracranial pressure phenomenon appears to have multiple contributing factors. Consequently, the working "physiological fault bush" with elevated intracranial pressure at its center, is divided into ocular effects, and CNS and other effects. Some of these variables have been documented and or measured through operational data gathering, while others are unknown, undocumented and or hypothetical. Both the complexity of the problem and the urgency to find a solution require that a unique, non-traditional research model be employed such as the Accelerated Research Collaboration(TM) (ARC) model that has been pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. In the ARC model a single entity facilitates and manages all aspects of the basic, translational, and clinical research, providing expert oversight for both scientific and managerial efforts. The result is a comprehensive research plan executed by a multidisciplinary team and the elimination of stove-piped research. The ARC model emphasizes efficient and effective

  10. Novas terapias para hipertensão endocraniana New therapies for intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Prata Barbosa

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: São revistos os principais conceitos envolvidos na abordagem terapêutica da hipertensão endocraniana, desde a abordagem tradicional até a apresentação das novas terapias preconizadas. FONTES DOS DADOS: Foram revistas as principais bases de dados da literatura médica, particularmente o Medline e o Lilacs, nos últimos 10 anos, além de livros textos consagrados e teses dedicadas ao assunto. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A hipertensão endocraniana pode estar associada a diversas lesões neurológicas cerebrais, sejam de origem traumática, infecciosa ou metabólica, podendo, nos casos graves, se constituir em importante fator de morbimortalidade. O aumento da pressão intracraniana interfere com o fluxo sangüíneo cerebral, de modo que para se manter uma pressão de perfusão cerebral adequada, é necessário tanto a redução e o controle da hipertensão endocraniana, como o combate agressivo à hipotensão arterial, desde as fases iniciais do atendimento. A monitorização adequada é fundamental, e as principais medidas adotadas no tratamento convencional envolvem a elevação da cabeceira do leito a 30 graus, o posicionamento centrado da cabeça, a hipocapnia otimizada, o perfeito equilíbrio hidroeletrolítico e metabólico, a sedação, a terapia anticonvulsiva, a drenagem liquórica, o uso de barbitúricos, manitol e furosemida. As novas terapias que vêm sendo estudadas incluem, principalmente, o dexanabinol, as soluções salinas hipertônicas, a hipotermia moderada, a craniotomia descompressiva, a otimização da pressão de perfusão cerebral e a redução da pressão na microvasculatura cerebral (terapia de Lund. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de novas terapias para o controle eficaz da hipertensão endocraniana, particularmente em casos refratários ao tratamento usual, representam um cenário promissor na abordagem destes quadros.OBJECTIVE: The main concepts involved in the therapeutic management of intracranial hypertension are

  11. Hypermagnesemia does not prevent intracranial hypertension and aggravates cerebral hyperperfusion in a rat model of acute hyperammonemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Eefsen, Martin; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2011-01-01

    . These factors are also thought to be involved in the development of brain edema in acute liver failure. We wanted to study whether hypermagnesemia prevented development of intracranial hypertension and hyperperfusion in a rat model of portacaval anastomosis (PCA) and acute hyperammonemia. We also studied...

  12. Noninvasive Assessment of Intracranial Pressure Status in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Using Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI: A Prospective Patient Study with Contemporaneous CSF Pressure Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saindane, A M; Qiu, D; Oshinski, J N; Newman, N J; Biousse, V; Bruce, B B; Holbrook, J F; Dale, B M; Zhong, X

    2018-02-01

    assess intracranial pressure status in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. The Significance of Arachnoid Granulation in Patients With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watane, Gaurav Vishwasrao; Patel, Bhumi; Brown, Derek; Taheri, M Reza

    The aim of this article was to study the significance of arachnoid granulations (AGs) in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). In an institutional review board-approved retrospective chart review study, 79 patients with clinical diagnosis of idiopathic increased intracranial pressure were compared with 63 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Inclusion criteria also included available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, older than 18 years, and female sex. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure due to other causes were excluded. The electronic medical records were mined for presence of the following: body mass index, age, headache, vision changes, tinnitus, and vertigo. The MRI of the brain was reviewed for the presence of the following features: empty sella, prominent cerebrospinal fluid space in the optic sheaths, tortuosity of the optic nerves and enlarged Meckel cave. In addition, the number, size, and location of AGs associated with major venous drainage sinuses were documented in all patients. Using statistical analysis, association between various imaging and clinical signs were evaluated. The association between AG and various imaging and clinical signs were evaluated. The percentage of patients with AG were significantly higher in patients with IIH. Patients with IIH tended to have 0 to 3 AG. The most common imaging findings observed in MRI of the brain of patients with IIH were empty sella and prominent cerebrospinal fluid space in the optic sheaths. The prevalence of these MRI findings in patients with IIH was inversely proportional to the number of AG. A similar inverse trend was also noted with the opening pressure of patients with IIH and number of AG. The study establishes that there is a relationship between presence of AG and IIH. Arachnoid granulation seems to act in a compensatory mechanism in patients with IIH.

  14. Analysis of petrous apex meningocele associated with meningioma. Is there any relation with chronic intracranial hypertension?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wan-Qun; Huang, Biao; Liang, Chang-Hong; Feng, Jie-Ying; Liu, Hong-Jun

    2018-01-01

    Petrous apex meningocele (PAM) is an uncommon cystic lesion involving the petrous apex. The underlying cause of PAM may be related to chronic elevated intracranial pressure. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between PAM and meningioma and between PAM and other intracranial hypertension findings. Two hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients with meningiomas were retrospectively studied. Fifty age- and gender-matched controls were also enrolled in this study. The incidence of PAM, empty sella, tortuosity of the optic nerve, and hydrops of optic nerve sheath was evaluated. The maximum width, area, volume of each PAM, or Meckel's cave and volume of meningioma were measured in controls and patients, separately. One hundred fifty-nine (57.19%) patients were detected with coexistent PAMs. One hundred twenty-five patients had bilateral PAMs, 34 had unilateral lesions, and the remaining 119 did not have PAM. Two subjects (4/50) had unilateral PAMs in normal controls. The maximum width, area, volume of PAM, or Meckel's cave were significantly larger in the patients with bilateral PAM group than those in the unilateral PAM group, in the group without PAM, and those in control group (p = 0.000). The volume of meningioma was positively correlated with the PAM volume (r = 0.48). There was a positive correlation for the incidence between PAM and (1) empty sella (r = 0.901) and (2) tortuosity of the optic nerves and hydrops of the optic sheath (r = 0.825). Coexistence of PAMs with meningiomas is not rare in incidence, and it suggests a potential role for chronically elevated intracranial pressure and disturbance of CSF circulation in their pathophysiology. (orig.)

  15. Juxtapapillary neovascular membrane secondary to idiopathic intracranial hypertension treated with intravitreal bevacizumab: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortega, V; Soler-Sanchís, M I; Jiménez-Escribano, R M; Sanz-López, A M

    2016-05-01

    A 48 year-old woman with visual acuity loss in left eye (0.3). Funduscopic examination showed papillary oedema and neovascular membrane in the left eye. All neurological tests were normal, except the lumbar puncture with opening pressure of 35cmH2O, being diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). After four doses of bevacizumab, the visual acuity of the left eye has not improved and is counting fingers. Pathogenesis of the juxtapapillary neovascular membrane associated with IIH is not well known. An effect was observed after the anti-VEGF treatment. In our case, there was no improvement after four doses of intravitreal bevacizumab. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of obesity and binge eating disorder on patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Alberto; Curone, Marcella; Bianchi Marzoli, Stefania; Chiapparini, Luisa; Ciasca, Paola; Ciceri, Elisa Fm; Erbetta, Alessandra; Faragò, Giuseppe; Leonardi, Matilde; D'Amico, Domenico

    2017-03-01

    Background Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is associated with obesity, and obesity is associated with binge eating disorder (BED). The aim of this paper is to address the presence and impact of BED in patients undergoing an IIH diagnostic protocol. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Consecutive patients suspected of IIH underwent neurological, neuro-ophthalmologic and psychological examinations, neuroimaging studies and intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements through lumbar puncture in the recumbent position. IIH diagnosis was based on International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition criteria; BED diagnosis was based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition criteria. The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid was also assessed. Results Forty-five patients were enrolled: 33 were diagnosed with IIH and five of them (15%) were obese with BED. Compared to non-obese patients, those who were obese, and particularly those who were obese with BED, were more likely to have an IIH diagnosis (χ 2  = 14.3; p = 0.001), ICP > 200 mmH 2 O (χ 2  = 12.7; p = 0.002) and history of abuse or neglect (χ 2  = 11.2; p = 0.004). No association with OCBs was found. Conclusions We reported for the first time the presence of BED among patients with IIH and showed that BED is associated to IIH, ICP and history of abuse or neglect.

  17. Long-term visual outcome in a Danish population of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, Christina F; Yri, Hanne M; Sørensen, Anne L; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor H; Hamann, Steffen

    2018-02-06

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP), normal cerebrospinal composition and exclusion of alternative causes to increased ICP. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term visual outcome in a Danish population of IIH patients. Retrospective chart review of 41 women diagnosed with IIH between June 2007 and March 2013. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), colour vision, grade and type of visual field (VF) defects and grade of papilloedema according to the Modified Frisén Score were recorded at baseline visit (V0), 2-6 months (V1) and 13 months follow-up visit (V2) from time of diagnosis. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was reduced in 25% of eyes at V0, in 10% at V1 and in 15% at V2. Colour vision was barely affected. Visual field (VF) was affected (>grade 0) in 87% of eyes at V0 and VF defect grade significantly improved by 0.58 at V1 (p-value visual function, and relevant treatment strategies need to be improved. © 2018 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Quality of life at 6 months in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Beau B; Digre, Kathleen B; McDermott, Michael P; Schron, Eleanor B; Wall, Michael

    2016-11-01

    To examine the changes in vision-specific and overall health-related quality of life (QOL) at 6 months in participants with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and mild visual loss enrolled in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) and to determine the signs and symptoms of IIH that mediate the effect of acetazolamide on QOL. We assessed QOL using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (NEI-VFQ-25), the 10-Item NEI-VFQ-25 Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement, and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). We examined associations among changes in QOL measures over 6 months, treatment status, and changes in signs and symptoms using linear and structural equation models. Among the 165 participants with IIH (86 randomized to acetazolamide, 79 to placebo), beneficial effects of acetazolamide were seen on all QOL scales evaluated, as well as on the Near Activities (5.60 points, p = 0.03), Social Functioning (3.85 points, p = 0.04), and Mental Health (9.82, p = 0.04) subscales of the NEI-VFQ-25. Positive acetazolamide-related effects on QOL appeared to be primarily mediated by improvements in visual field, neck pain, pulsatile tinnitus, and dizziness/vertigo that outweighed the side effects of acetazolamide. The marked reductions in baseline QOL seen among patients with mild visual loss from IIH are improved by treatment with acetazolamide. When combined with acetazolamide-associated improvements in visual field and other aspects of IIH, our findings with respect to QOL provide further support from the IIHTT in favor of acetazolamide to augment a dietary intervention in the treatment of IIH with mild visual loss (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01003639). © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Comparison of the sagittal sinus cross-sectional area between patients with multiple sclerosis, hydrocephalus, intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension: a surrogate marker of venous transmural pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Grant A; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Copping, Ross; Moeskops, Christopher; Yap, Swee Leong

    2017-07-06

    There is evidence that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and hydrocephalus share some common pathophysiological mechanisms. Alterations in CSF pressure are known to affect cerebral venous sinus geometry. To further explore these mechanisms, we measured the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) cross-sectional area 3 cm above the torcular using T2 images in 20 MS, 10 spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), 21 hydrocephalus and 20 idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients and compared with 20 matched controls. The SSS area was reduced by 25% in hydrocephalus (p = 0.0008), increased by 22% (p = 0.037) in SIH and unchanged in IIH compared to matched controls. In MS there was a 16% increase in SSS area (p = 0.01).The findings suggest that changes in SSS cross-sectional are common between MS and SIH patients, while in hydrocephalus and IIH these are different.

  20. Doppler Non-invasive Monitoring of ICP in an Animal Model of Acute Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Chiara; Donnelly, Joseph; Bertuetti, Rita; Cardim, Danilo; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Aries, Marcel; Smielewski, Peter; Richards, Hugh; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-12-01

    In many neurological diseases, intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated and needs to be actively managed. ICP is typically measured with an invasive transducer, which carries risks. Non-invasive techniques for monitoring ICP (nICP) have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare three different methods of transcranial Doppler (TCD) assessment of nICP in an animal model of acute intracranial hypertension. In 28 rabbits, ICP was increased to 70-80 mmHg by infusion of Hartmann's solution into the lumbar subarachnoid space. Doppler flow velocity in the basilar artery was recorded. nICP was assessed through three different methods: Gosling's pulsatility index PI (gPI), Aaslid's method (AaICP), and a method based on diastolic blood flow velocity (FVdICP). We found a significant correlation between nICP and ICP when all infusion experiments were combined (FVdICP: r = 0.77, AaICP: r = 0.53, gPI: r = 0.54). The ability to distinguish between raised and 'normal' values of ICP was greatest for FVdICP (AUC 0.90 at ICP >40 mmHg). When infusion experiments were considered independently, FVdICP demonstrated again the strongest correlation between changes in ICP and changes in nICP (mean r = 0.85). TCD-based methods of nICP monitoring are better at detecting changes of ICP occurring in time, rather than absolute prediction of ICP as a number. Of the studied methods of nICP, the method based on FVd is best to discriminate between raised and 'normal' ICP and to monitor relative changes of ICP.

  1. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension After Surgical Treatment of Cushing Disease: Case Report and Review of Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jeffrey; Fleseriu, Cara M; Ibrahim, Aly; Cetas, Justin S

    2016-12-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in patients with Cushing disease (CD), after treatment, is rarely described, in adults. The cause is believed to be multifactorial, potentially related to a relative decrease in cortisol after surgical resection or medical treatment of a corticotroph pituitary adenoma. We investigate our center's CD database (140 surgically and 60 medically [primary or adjunct] treated patients) for cases of IIH, describe our center's experience with symptomatic IIH, and review treatment strategies in adults with CD after transsphenoidal resection. We present the case of a 22-year-old woman who presented with worsening headache, nausea, vomiting, blurry vision, diplopia, visual loss, and facial numbness 14 weeks after surgical resection of adrenocorticotropic hormone-positive pituitary adenoma. Her CD had been in remission since surgery, with subsequent adrenal insufficiency (AI), which was initially treated with supraphysiologic glucocorticoid replacement, tapered down to physiologic doses at the time the IIH symptoms developed. Symptomatic IIH is rare in adult patients but can be severe and result in permanent vision loss. A high index of suspicion should be maintained and a fundus examination is necessary to exclude papilledema, whenever there are suggestive symptoms that initially may overlap with AI. It is possible that some cases of mild IIH are misdiagnosed as GC withdrawal or AI; however, further studies are needed. Treatment consists of reinitiation of higher steroid doses together with acetazolamide with or without cerebrospinal fluid diversion and the priority is to preserve vision and reverse any visual loss. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: lumboperitoneal shunts versus ventriculoperitoneal shunts--case series and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abubaker, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is an uncommon but important cause of headache that can lead to visual loss. This study was undertaken to review our experience in the treatment of IIH by neuronavigation-assisted ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts with programmable valves as compared to lumboperitoneal (LP) shunts. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 25 patients treated for IIH between 2001 and 2009. Age, sex, clinical presentation, methods of treatment and failure rates were recorded. RESULTS: Seventy-two per cent were treated initially with LP shunts. Failure rate was 11% in this group. Neuronavigation-assisted VP shunts were used to treat 28%. In this group, the failure rate was 14%. CONCLUSION: Our experience indicates that both LP shunts and VP shuts are effective in controlling all the clinical manifestations of IIH in the immediate postoperative period. Failure rates are slightly higher for VP shunts (14%) than LP shunts (11%). However, revision rates are higher with LP shunts (60%) than with VP shunts (30%).

  3. Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Spitze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH has been increasing in prevalence in the past decade, following the obesity epidemic. When medical treatment fails, surgical treatment options must be considered. However, controversy remains as to which surgical procedure is the preferred surgical option - optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shunting - for the long-term treatment of this syndrome. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of ONSF versus shunt placement for the treatment of IIH. Design: This was a retrospective review of the current literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: The authors conducted a PubMed search using the following terms: Idiopathic IIH, pseudotumor cerebri, ONSF, CSF shunts, vetriculo-peritoneal shunting, and lumbo-peritoneal shunting. The authors included pertinent and significant original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed the new aspects and updates in these topics. Results: The treatment of IIH remains controversial and lacks randomized controlled clinical trial data. Treatment of IIH rests with the determination of the severity of IIH-related visual loss and headache. Conclusion: The decision for ONSF versus shunting is somewhat institution and surgeon dependent. ONSF is preferred for patients with visual symptoms whereas shunting is reserved for patients with headache. There are positive and negative aspects of both procedures, and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is needed (currently underway. This article will hopefully be helpful in allowing the reader to make a more informed decision until that time.

  4. Accuracy of brain imaging in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maralani, P.J. [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Hassanlou, M. [Department of Ophthalmology, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Torres, C.; Chakraborty, S.; Kingstone, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Patel, V.; Zackon, D. [Department of Ophthalmology, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Bussiere, M., E-mail: mbussiere@toh.on.ca [Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To investigate the accuracy of individual and combinations of signs on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional research ethics board without informed consent. Forty-three patients and 43 control subjects were retrospectively identified. Each patient and control had undergone brain MRI and MRV. Images were anonymized and reviewed by three neuroradiologists, blinded to clinical data, for the presence or absence of findings associated with IIH. The severity of stenosis in each transverse sinus was graded and summed to generate a combined stenosis score (CSS). The sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR) were calculated for individual and combinations of signs. Results: Partially empty sella (specificity 95.3%, p < 0.0001), flattening of the posterior globes (specificity 100%, p < 0.0001), and CSS <4 (specificity 100%, p < 0.0001) were highly specific for IIH. The presence of one sign, or any combination, significantly increased the odds of a diagnosis of IIH (LR+ 18.5 to 46, p < 0.0001). Their absence, however, did not rule out IIH. Conclusions: Brain MRI with venography significantly increased the diagnostic certainty for IIH if there was no evidence of a mass, hydrocephalus, or sinus thrombosis and one of the following signs was present: flattening of the posterior globes, partially empty sella, CSS <4. However, absence of these signs did not exclude a diagnosis of IIH.

  5. Visualizing the pressure and time burden of intracranial hypertension in adult and paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güiza, Fabian; Depreitere, Bart; Piper, Ian; Citerio, Giuseppe; Chambers, Iain; Jones, Patricia A; Lo, Tsz-Yan Milly; Enblad, Per; Nillson, Pelle; Feyen, Bart; Jorens, Philippe; Maas, Andrew; Schuhmann, Martin U; Donald, Rob; Moss, Laura; Van den Berghe, Greet; Meyfroidt, Geert

    2015-06-01

    To assess the impact of the duration and intensity of episodes of increased intracranial pressure on 6-month neurological outcome in adult and paediatric traumatic brain injury. Analysis of prospectively collected minute-by-minute intracranial pressure and mean arterial blood pressure data of 261 adult and 99 paediatric traumatic brain injury patients from multiple European centres. The relationship of episodes of elevated intracranial pressure (defined as a pressure above a certain threshold during a certain time) with 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale was visualized in a colour-coded plot. The colour-coded plot illustrates the intuitive concept that episodes of higher intracranial pressure can only be tolerated for shorter durations: the curve that delineates the duration and intensity of those intracranial pressure episodes associated with worse outcome is an approximately exponential decay curve. In children, the curve resembles that of adults, but the delineation between episodes associated with worse outcome occurs at lower intracranial pressure thresholds. Intracranial pressures above 20 mmHg lasting longer than 37 min in adults, and longer than 8 min in children, are associated with worse outcomes. In a multivariate model, together with known baseline risk factors for outcome in severe traumatic brain injury, the cumulative intracranial pressure-time burden is independently associated with mortality. When cerebrovascular autoregulation, assessed with the low-frequency autoregulation index, is impaired, the ability to tolerate elevated intracranial pressures is reduced. When the cerebral perfusion pressure is below 50 mmHg, all intracranial pressure insults, regardless of duration, are associated with worse outcome. The intracranial pressure-time burden associated with worse outcome is visualised in a colour-coded plot. In children, secondary injury occurs at lower intracranial pressure thresholds as compared to adults. Impaired cerebrovascular

  6. Structural olfactory nerve changes in patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schmidt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complications of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH are usually caused by elevated intracranial pressure (ICP. In a similar way as in the optic nerve, elevated ICP could also compromise the olfactory nerve system. On the other side, there is growing evidence that an extensive lymphatic network system around the olfactory nerves could be disturbed in cerebrospinal fluid disorders like IIH. The hypothesis that patients with IIH suffer from hyposmia has been suggested in the past. However, this has not been proven in clinical studies yet. This pilot study investigates whether structural changes of the olfactory nerve system can be detected in patients with IIH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-three patients with IIH and 23 matched controls were included. Olfactory bulb volume (OBV and sulcus olfactorius (OS depth were calculated by magnetic resonance techniques. While mean values of total OBV (128.7±38.4 vs. 130.0±32.6 mm(3, p=0.90 and mean OS depth (8.5±1.2 vs. 8.6±1.1 mm, p=0.91 were similar in both groups, Pearson correlation showed that patients with a shorter medical history IIH revealed a smaller OBV (r=0.53, p<0.01. In untreated symptomatic patients (n=7, the effect was greater (r=0.76, p<0.05. Patients who suffered from IIH for less than one year (n=8, total OBV was significantly smaller than in matched controls (116.6±24.3 vs. 149.3±22.2 mm(3, p=0.01. IIH patients with visual disturbances (n=21 revealed a lower OS depth than patients without (8.3±0.9 vs. 10.8±1.0 mm, p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that morphological changes of the olfactory nerve system could be present in IIH patients at an early stage of disease.

  7. Pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension - Is the fixed threshold value of elevated LP opening pressure set too high?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, Lucia; Schoppe, Nikola; Albers, Lucia; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Alperin, Noam; Ehrt, Oliver; Pomschar, Andreas; Landgraf, Mirjam N; Heinen, Florian

    2017-11-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in children is a rare condition of unknown etiology and various clinical presentations. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate if our pediatric IIH study group fulfilled the revised diagnostic criteria for IIH published in 2013, particularly with regard to clinical presentation and threshold value of an elevated lumbar puncture opening pressure. Additionally we investigated the potential utilization of MR-based and fundoscopic methods of estimating intracranial pressure for improved diagnosis. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from twelve pediatric patients diagnosed with IIH between 2008 and 2012 and revised diagnostic criteria were applied. Comparison with non-invasive methods for measuring intracranial pressure, MRI-based measurement (MR-ICP) and venous ophthalmodynamometry was performed. Only four of the twelve children (33%) fulfilled the revised diagnostic criteria for a definite diagnosis of IIH. Regarding noninvasive methods, MR-ICP (n = 6) showed a significantly higher mean of intracranial pressure compared to a healthy age- and sex-matched control group (p = 0.0043). Venous ophthalmodynamometry (n = 4) showed comparable results to invasive lumbar puncture. The revised diagnostic criteria for IIH may be too strict especially in children without papilledema. MR-ICP and venous ophthalmodynamometry are promising complementary procedures for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension associated with anaemia, secondary to antiretroviral drug in a human immunodeficiency virus positive patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Vijay Ananth

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Papilledema in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome is an alarming finding. Any condition giving rise to raised intracranial tension (ICT can cause papilledema, and in these patients, it could be secondary to opportunistic infections like meningitis to neoplasm. We report a case of a 28-year old female with HIV on antiretroviral therapy, who presented to us, with papilledema. Her fundus examination revealed superficial hemorrhages and Roth's spots along with papilledema. Patient was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, and all other possible systemic associations were ruled out. Her blood tests showed severe anemia. The papilledema and retinal changes resolved with treatment of anemia. This is a rare presentation of IIH in HIV positive patient due to anemia, secondary to zidovudine adverse effect.

  9. Antisecretory factor (AF) exerts no effects on intracranial pressure (ICP) waves and ICP in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Eidsvaag, Vigdis Andersen; Hansson, Hans-Arne

    2014-08-15

    Antisecretory factor (AF) and derivates thereof counteract brain edema and inflammation, and normalize ICP dynamics. The aim of the present study was to assess whether AF normalized the abnormal ICP waves, indicative of impaired intracranial compliance, seen in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The hypothesis was that brain swelling contributes to the abnormal ICP waves. The study enrolled patients undergoing diagnostic ICP wave monitoring for either iNPH or IIH. The ICP waves and ICP were recorded continuously before and after oral administration of Salovum® (0.5 g/kg body weight/day divided by three doses), a freeze-dried egg yolk enriched in AF activity. Mean ICP wave amplitude (MWA), mean ICP wave rise time coefficient (MWRTC), and mean ICP were compared before and after Salovum® administration. A total of 10 iNPH patients and 8 IIH patients were included. No significant changes in the ICP wave indices or ICP were seen after Salovum® administration. Neither any significant time-dependent effect was observed. The lack of effect of Salovum® on ICP wave indices and ICP in iNPH and IIH may provide indirect evidence that brain swelling does not play a crucial role in the ICP wave indices or ICP of these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Experience over 25 years and a management protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge Galindo, Lorena; Fernando Martínez, Ruth; Fuertes Rodrigo, Cristina; Fustero de Miguel, David; Pueyo Royo, Victoria; García Iñiguez, Juan Pablo; López-Pisón, Javier; Peña-Segura, José Luis

    2017-08-01

    We present our experience on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), before and after the introduction of a specific diagnosis and management protocol. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted on patients with IIH over a 25year period (1990-2015), comparing the last 7years (after introduction of the protocol) with the previous 18years. Among the 18,865 patients evaluated, there were 54 cases of IIH (29 infants and 25 children). A comparison was made between the two time periods: 32 cases in 1990-2008 -published in An Pediatr (Barc). 2009;71:400-6-, and 23 cases in 2008-2015. In post-protocol period, there were 13 patients aged between 3-10months (62% males) with transient bulging fontanelle, and 10 aged between 2-14years (50% males), with papilloedema. A total of 54% of infants had recently finished corticosteroid treatment for bronchitis. In the older children, there was one case associated with venous thrombosis caused by otomastoiditis, one case on corticosteroid treatment for angioma, and another case treated with growth hormone. Transfontanelle ultrasound was performed on all infants, and CT, MRI and angio-MRI was performed on every child. Lumbar puncture was performed on 2 infants in whom meningitis was suspected, and in all children. All patients progressed favourably, with treatment being started in 3 of them. One patient relapsed. Characteristics and outcomes of patients overlap every year. IIH usually has a favourable outcome, although it may be longer in children than in infants. It can cause serious visual disturbances, so close ophthalmological control is necessary. The protocol is useful to ease diagnostic decisions, monitoring, and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebral venous thrombosis and isolated intracranial hypertension without papilledema in CDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrone, A; Bono, F; Oliveri, R L; Gambardella, A; Pirritano, D; Labate, A; Lucisano, A; Valentino, P; Zappia, M; Aguglia, U; Lavano, A; Fera, F; Pardatscher, K

    2001-07-10

    There is evidence that patients with chronic daily headache (CDH) may have isolated intracranial hypertension without papilledema (IHWOP). Recent studies have emphasized that isolated IH may be due to cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). To detect the occurrence of CVT in patients with CDH. The authors investigated the occurrence of CVT in 114 consecutive patients with CDH by using MR venography (MRV). A portion of these patients underwent a lumbar puncture (LP) to measure CSF pressure. MRV and LP were also performed in 28 age-matched control subjects. In all the control subjects, both MRV and CSF pressure were normal. One hundred three of the 114 patients with CDH had normal MRV. Twenty-seven (Group 1) of these 103 patients underwent LP, and all of them had normal CSF pressure. Eleven (9.6%) of the 114 patients with CDH had CVT of one or both transverse sinuses. Six of these 11 patients had flowing abnormalities of one transverse sinus (Group 2), whereas the remaining five patients showed involvement of both transverse sinuses (Group 3). The CSF pressure of Group 2 was higher than that of either Group 1 or the control subjects, and one of the six patients showed isolated IHWOP. Patients of Group 3 displayed the highest CSF pressure, and four of five had isolated IHWOP. The headache profiles of patients with CDH and CVT did not differ from those of patients with CDH but normal MRV. CVT, as detected by MRV, occurred in 9.6% of patients who presented with CDH. Almost half of the patients with CVT had isolated IHWOP. These results suggest that MRV may be a useful tool for selecting patients with CDH who should have LP to exclude isolated IHWOP.

  12. Visual Field Outcomes for the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael; Johnson, Chris A.; Cello, Kimberly E.; Zamba, K. D.; McDermott, Michael P.; Keltner, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) showed that acetazolamide provided a modest, significant improvement in mean deviation (MD). Here, we further analyze visual field changes over the 6-month study period. Methods Of 165 subjects with mild visual loss in the IIHTT, 125 had perimetry at baseline and 6 months. We evaluated pointwise linear regression of visual sensitivity versus time to classify test locations in the worst MD (study) eye as improving or not; pointwise changes from baseline to month 6 in decibels; and clinical consensus of change from baseline to 6 months. Results The average study eye had 36 of 52 test locations with improving sensitivity over 6 months using pointwise linear regression, but differences between the acetazolamide and placebo groups were not significant. Pointwise results mostly improved in both treatment groups with the magnitude of the mean change within groups greatest and statistically significant around the blind spot and the nasal area, especially in the acetazolamide group. The consensus classification of visual field change from baseline to 6 months in the study eye yielded percentages (acetazolamide, placebo) of 7.2% and 17.5% worse, 35.1% and 31.7% with no change, and 56.1% and 50.8% improved; group differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions In the IIHTT, compared to the placebo group, the acetazolamide group had a significant pointwise improvement in visual field function, particularly in the nasal and pericecal areas; the latter is likely due to reduction in blind spot size related to improvement in papilledema. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.) PMID:26934136

  13. Flurbiprofen and hypertension but not hydroxyethyl starch are associated with post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma requiring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, M; Li, X; Wang, A; Zhang, L; Han, R; Gelb, A W

    2014-11-01

    Post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma is one of the most serious complications after neurosurgery. We examined whether post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma requiring surgery is associated with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs flurbiprofen, hypertension, or hydroxyethyl starch (HES). A case-control study was conducted among 42 359 patients who underwent elective craniotomy procedures at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between January 2006 and December 2011. A one-to-one control group without post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma was selected matched by age, pathologic diagnosis, tumour location, and surgeon. Perioperative blood pressure records up to the diagnosis of haematoma, the use of flurbiprofen and HES were examined. The incidence of post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma and the odds ratios for the risk factors were determined. A total of 202 patients suffered post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma during the study period, for an incidence of 0.48% (95% CI=0.41-0.55). Haematoma requiring surgery was associated with an intraoperative systolic blood pressure of >160 mm Hg (OR=2.618, 95% CI=2.084-2.723, P=0.007), an intraoperative mean blood pressure of >110 mm Hg (OR=2.600, 95% CI=2.312-3.098, P=0.037), a postoperative systolic blood pressure of >160 mm Hg (OR=2.060, 95% CI= 1.763-2.642, P=0.022), a postoperative mean blood pressure of >110 mm Hg (OR=3.600, 95% CI= 3.226-4.057, P=0.001), and the use of flurbiprofen during but not after the surgery (OR=2.256, 95% CI=2.004-2.598, P=0.005). The intraoperative infusion of HES showed no significant difference between patients who had a haematoma and those who did not. Intraoperative and postoperative hypertension and the use of flurbiprofen during surgery are risk factors for post-craniotomy intracranial haematoma requiring surgery. The intraoperative infusion of HES was not associated with a higher incidence of haematoma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  14. Impact of CO2 on Intracranial Hypertension in Spaceflight. Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension: An Emerging Spaceflight Risk [Part 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Polk, James D.; Tarver, William J.; Gibson, Charles R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Taddeo, Terrance A.; Alexander, David J.; Otto, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    A. CO2 - Acute: Given the history of uneven removal of CO2 from spacecraft areas, there is a history of acute illness that impacts short-term health and performance. 1) Acute CO2 symptoms occur in space flight due to a combination of CO2 scrubbing limitations, microgravity-related lack of convection, and possibly interaction with microgravity-related physiological changes. 2) Reported symptoms mainly include headaches, malaise, and lethargy. Symptoms are treatable with analgesics, rest, temporarily increasing scrubbing capability, and breathing oxygen. This does not treat the underlying pathology. 3)ld prevent occurrence of symptoms. B. CO2 - Chronic: Given prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 levels, there is a history that the long-term health of the crew is impacted. 1) Chronic CO2 exposures occur in space flight due to a combination of CO2 scrubbing limitations and microgravity-related lack of convection, with possible contribution from microgravity-related physiological changes. 2) Since acute symptoms are experienced at levels significantly lower than expected, there are unidentified long-term effects from prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 levels on orbit. There have been long term effects seen terrestrially and research needed to further elucidate long term effects on orbit. 3) Recommended disposition: Research required to further elucidate long term effects. In particular, elucidation of the role of elevated CO2 on various levels of CO2 vasodilatation of intracranial blood vessels and its potential contribution to elevation of intracranial pressure.

  15. Ciclosporin does not attenuate intracranial hypertension in rats with acute hyperammonaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rikke Hebo; Kjær, Mette S; Eefsen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective potential of ciclosporin during acute liver failure. We evaluated the effect of intrathecally administered ciclosporin on intracranial pressure, brain water content and aquaporin-4 expression in a rat model with acute hyperammonaemia....

  16. Papilledema Outcomes from the OCT Substudy of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment efficacy using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) measurements of papilledema in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT), which evaluated the effects of acetazolamide (ACZ) and weight management and placebo and weight management in eyes with mild visual loss. Design Randomized double-masked control clinical trial of acetazolamide (ACZ) plus weight management compared with placebo plus weight management in previously untreated III in subjects withmild visual field loss. Subjects Eighty-nine (43 ACZ, 46 placebo treated) of 165 subject meeting entry criteria for the IIHTT. Methods Subjects had perimetry, papilledema grading (Frisén method), high and low contrast visual acuity, and SD-OCT imaging at study entry, 3 and 6 months. Study eye (worse perimetric mean deviation, PMD) results were used for most analyses. Main Outcome Measures Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), total retinal thickness (TRT), optic nerve volume (ONHV), and retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) measurements were derived using 3-D segmentation. Results Study entry OCT values were similar in both treatment groups. At 6 months, the ACZ group had greater reduction than the placebo group for RNFL (175 μm vs 89 μm, p=0.001), TRT (220 μm vs 113 μm, p=0.001), and ONHV (4.9 mm3 vs 2.1 mm3, p=0.001). The RNFL (p=0.01), TRT (p=0.003), and ONHV (p=0.002) also showed less swelling in subjects who lost ≥ 6% of study entry weight. GCL thinning was minor in ACZ (3.6 μm) and placebo (2.1 μm, p =0.06) groups. The RNFL, TRT, and ONHV showed moderate correlations (r=0.48-0.59, p≤0.0001) with Frisén grade. The 14 eyes with GCL thickness OCT measures at 6 months show only moderate correlations with papilledema grade. PMID:26198807

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy due to meningoencephaloceles into the greater sphenoid wing. A consequence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Jamneala, G.; Mader, I.; Egger, K.; Yang, S.; Altenmueller, D.

    2018-01-01

    Antero-inferior temporal lobe meningoencephaloceles are a rare, but increasingly recognized cause of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In order to evaluate whether these lesions are related to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), we analyzed clinical and MRI findings of a cohort of patients undergoing presurgical work-up. Seizure onset in the anterior temporal lobe was proven by EEG electrodes in 22 patients, and in 21 patients, anterior temporal lobectomy (mostly with sparing of the hippocampus) was performed. MRI signs of IIH (in particular empty sella) and the volumes of the ventricles and external CSF spaces were determined and related to the body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcome. Six of seven obese (BMI > 30 kg/m 2 ) compared to four of 15 non-obese patients had partial empty or empty sella (p = 0.007). Bilateral lesions were found in all obese and 11 patients. Seizure freedom (Engel class 1A) was achieved in 12 of 21 patients (5 obese compared to 7 non-obese patients). BMI was related to the volume of the external CSF spaces (r = 0.467), and age at seizure onset was higher in obese patients. Roughly a third of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy due to antero-inferior meningoencephaloceles is obese and has MRI signs of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. (orig.)

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid corticosteroid levels and cortisol metabolism in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a link between 11beta-HSD1 and intracranial pressure regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Alexandra J; Walker, Elizabeth A; Burdon, Michael A; van Beek, Andre P; Kema, Ido P; Hughes, Beverly A; Murray, Philip I; Nightingale, Peter G; Stewart, Paul M; Rauz, Saaeha; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2010-12-01

    The etiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is unknown. We hypothesized that obesity and elevated intracranial pressure may be linked through increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) activity. The aim was to characterize 11β-HSD1 in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) secretory [choroid plexus (CP)] and drainage [arachnoid granulation tissue (AGT)] structures, and to evaluate 11β-HSD1 activity after therapeutic weight loss in IIH. We conducted in vitro analysis of CP and AGT and a prospective in vivo cohort study set in two tertiary care centers. Twenty-five obese adult female patients with active IIH were studied, and 22 completed the study. Fasted serum, CSF, and 24-h urine samples were collected at baseline, after 3-month observation, and after a 3-month diet. Changes in urine, serum, and CSF glucocorticoids (measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry) after weight loss were measured. 11β-HSD1 and key elements of the glucocorticoid signaling pathway were expressed in CP and AGT. After weight loss (14.2±7.8 kg; Plevels correlated with weight loss (r=-0.512; P=0.018). Therapeutic weight loss in IIH is associated with a reduction in global 11β-HSD1 activity. Elevated 11β-HSD1 may represent a pathogenic mechanism in IIH, potentially via manipulation of CSF dynamics at the CP and AGT. Although further clarification of the functional role of 11β-HSD1 in IIH is needed, our results suggest that 11β-HSD1 inhibition may have therapeutic potential in IIH.

  19. Long-term Response of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension - A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, V Abdul; Smita, B; Jose, James

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increased intracranial pressure (ICP) with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contents, in the absence of an intracranial mass, hydrocephalus, or other identifiable causes. The current knowledge of the treatment outcome of IIH is limited, and the data on the natural history of this entity are scant. The objective of the study is to study the treatment response of IIH by serially measuring the CSF opening pressure and to delineate the factors influencing the same. A prospective observational study in a cohort of fifty patients with IIH in whom CSF opening pressure was serially measured at pre-specified intervals. The mean CSF opening pressure at baseline was 302.4 ± 51.69 mm of H 2 O (range: 220-410). Even though a higher body mass index (BMI) showed a trend toward a higher CSF opening pressure, the association was not significant ( P = 0.168). However, the age of the patient had a significant negative correlation with the CSF pressure ( P = 0.006). The maximum reduction in CSF pressure occurred in the first 3 months of treatment, and thereafter it plateaued. Remission was attained in 12 (24%) patients. BMI had the strongest association with remission ( P = 0.001). In patients with IIH, treatment response is strongly related to BMI. However, patients with normal BMI are also shown to relapse and hence should have continuous, long-term follow-up. The reduction in CSF pressure attained in the first 3 months could reflect the long-term response to treatment.

  20. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a caesarean with epidural anaesthesia after bringing the cerebrospinal fluid pressure back to normal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Rodríguez, M; de Carlos Errea, J; Dorronsoro Auzmendi, M; Batllori Gastón, M

    2013-12-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is diagnosed by exclusion. Because of its uncertain physiopathology and infrequent occurrence, its anaesthetic management is not well defined. The patient in this case is a pregnant woman with this disease with no lumbar-peritoneal shunt who was referred for non-urgent caesarean section, consisting of CSF drainage and pressure normalisation before the administration of epidural anaesthesia. We believe this technique can de effective to achieve adequate blockage and increased patient comfort, as well as improving postoperative recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Optic nerve sheath decompression for visual loss in intracranial hypertension: Report from a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithyanandam Suneetha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Severe visual loss is the only serious complication of intracranial hypertension secondary to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH and some cases of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT. Optic nerve sheath decompression (ONSD has been shown to improve or stabilize visual function in patients with IIH, while its role in CVT is yet to be established. We report our experience with optic nerve sheath decompression for visual loss in IIH and CVT. Materials and Methods: In this prospective noncomparative, interventional study, 41 eyes of 21 patients with IIH and CVT and visual loss underwent ONSD. The main outcome measures included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, visual fields, pupillary light reflex, optic nerve sheath diameter on B-scan and resolution of papilledema which were evaluated preoperatively and at follow-up at four days, two weeks, one month, three months and final follow-up. In 7/41 eyes with absent light perception preoperatively, the functional outcome was analyzed separately. Results: Following ONSD BCVA and visual fields stabilized or improved in 32/34 (94% eyes. Statistically significant improvement in BCVA, visual fields and pupillary light reflex occurred over the three month follow-up period. Surgical success was indicated by reduction in optic nerve diameter and papilledema resolution occurred in all patients. The outcome in the IIH and CVT groups was comparable. Four eyes with absent light perception showed marginal improvement in visual acuity. Four eyes had transient benign complications. Conclusion: Optic nerve sheath decompression is an effective and safe procedure to improve or stabilize vision in patients with visual loss caused by IIH and CVT.

  2. Neuromodulation as a last resort option in the treatment of chronic daily headaches in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Andrew B; Sharma, Mayur; Shaikhouni, Ammar; Marlin, Evan S; Ikeda, Daniel S; McGregor, John M; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2015-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in patients with refractory headaches secondary to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). IIH is a syndrome characterized by elevated intracranial pressures in the absence of a mass lesion. These patients typically present with chronic and intractable headaches. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion fails in relieving the headache in a significant proportion of this population. ONS has been shown to be effective in medically refractory headaches and to our knowledge, has not been attempted as a therapeutic modality in this population. Four patients with occipital predominant chronic daily headaches and IIH who failed medical management underwent bilateral ONSs. Octopolar percutaneous electrodes were implanted in the defined area of pain. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used as an outcome measure. Patient demographics and surgical complications were also reviewed in this retrospective study. Following the trial period, all patients had >50% pain reduction resulting in permanent implantation. All 4 patients had an average improvement of their VAS scores by 75%, with 85% spatial coverage and the remainder of the uncovered region being frontal. Sustained benefits were seen up to 3 years of follow-up. One patient had a lead erosion requiring removal followed by delayed re-implantation and another lost treatment efficacy at 2 years resulting in explantation. One patient required CSF diversion due to visual threat during the follow-up period but maintained sustained benefit from her ONS. Bilateral ONS may be a useful treatment option in the management of selected patients with IIH, after standard surgical interventions have been attempted. Bilateral ONS may provide therapeutic option for management of residual headaches in these complicated patients.

  3. Cerebral haemodynamic response to acute intracranial hypertension induced by head-down tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosone, Daniele; Ozturk, Vesile; Roatta, Silvestro; Cavallini, Anna; Tosi, Piera; Micieli, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a context of general inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system, the cerebral haemodynamic response to -30 degrees head-down tilt (HDT), a manoeuvre that produces an increase in intracranial arterial pressure. Nineteen healthy subjects were studied according to the following protocol: 10 min lying in supine position, 10 min HDT, 10 min recovery. Inhibition of the sympathetic system was confirmed by the decrease in heart rate (-3.6 bpm) and arterial blood pressure (-5.9 mmHg, p<0.05) in the late phase of the test. Blood velocity and blood pusatility index initially increased (+3.2 cm s(-1) and +9% respectively, p<0.01) then returned towards baseline before the end of HDT, while the cerebrovascular resistance index (=arterial blood pressure/blood velocity) dropped significantly and remained below control level (-7%, p<0.01) throughout the test. The changes in both these indices were opposite to those reported in several sympathetic activation tests, such as the handgrip and cold pressor tests. Conversely, arterial pressure at cranial level increased during HDT (as it also does during sympathetic activation tests), due to the development of a hydrostatic pressure gradient between heart and brain levels. Therefore, the effects observed on the pulsatility and resistance indices are not secondary to the increase in intracranial arterial pressure. It is suggested that the changes in these cerebrovascular indices are mediated by a reduction of sympathetic tone that presumably involves the cerebral as well as the peripheral vascular bed.

  4. Therapeutic effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma evacuation in the treatment of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and TCD evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Hao Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the therapeutic effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma evacuation in the treatment of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and the value of dynamic TCD monitoring in predicting the neurological function recovery. Methods: A total of 70 patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and divided into the minimally invasive group and conservative group with 35 cases in each group according to different treatment protocols. The patients in the two groups were given drug conservative treatments. On this basis, the patients in the minimally invasive group were given urokinase in combined with minimally invasive hematoma puncture with YL-1 type needle. TCD was performed before treatment, 1 d, 5 d, 10 d, and 21 d after treatment. The hematoma and edema volume was calculated. NIHSS was used to evaluate the neurological function recovery. Results: Vs, Vd, and Vm after treatment in the minimally invasive group were significantly elevated, while PI was significantly reduced. Vs, Vd, and Vm after treatment in the conservative group were reduced first and elevated later, while PI was elevated first and reduced later, and reached the lowest/peak 10d after treatment. Vs, Vd, and Vm 5 d, 10 d, and 21 d after treatment in the minimally invasive group were significantly higher than those in the conservative group, while PI was significantly lower than that in the conservative group. The hematoma and edema volume after treatment in the two groups was significantly reduced. The hematoma and edema volume at each timing point was significantly lower than that in the conservative group. NIHSS score after treatment in the minimally invasive group was significantly reduced. NIHSS score in the conservative group was elevated first and reduced later, reached the peak 10d after treatment, and at each timing point was higher than that in the minimally invasive group. Conclusions: The

  5. Decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of post-traumatic intracranial hypertension in children: our philosophy and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuriat, P A; Javouhey, E; Szathmari, A; Courtil-Tesseydre, S; Desgranges, F P; Grassiot, B; Hequet, O; Mottolese, C

    2015-12-01

    Decompressive craniotomy (DC) in children is a life-saving procedure for the treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension related to traumatic, ischemic and infectious lesions. Different surgical procedures have been proposed including uni or bilateral hemicraniectomy, bi-frontal, bi-temporal, or bi-parietal craniotomies. DC can avoid the cascade of events related to tissue hypoxia, brain perfusion reduction, hypotension and the evolution of brain edema that can be responsible for brain herniation. The monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is very important to take a decision as well as the value of Trans cranial Doppler (TCD). Repeated TCD in the intensive care unit give important information about the decrease of the cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and facilitates the decision making. The important question is about how long time we have to wait before to perform the DC. Three conditions can be distinguished: 1) ICP stable and TCD with good parameters: the decision can be postponed; 2) ICP>20 mmHg with good TCD and without clinical signs of deterioration: the decision can be postponed; 3) ICP>20 mmHg with altered CPP and degraded TCD value and clinical signs of brain herniation: the surgical procedure is indicated. The decision of a ventricular drainage can also be discussed but in cases of slit ventricles it is preferable to realize a DC to avoid the problems of multiple taps without finding the ventricular system. In some very specific situations, DC has to be contraindicated. The first one is a prolonged cardiopulmonary arrest with a no-flow longer than 15 minutes and irreversible lesions on the TCD or on the CT-scan. The second most common situation is a patient with GCS of 3 on admission associated with bilaterally fixed dilated pupils. In this case TCD is very useful to document the decrease or the absence of diastolic flux that indicates a very poor cerebral perfusion. In case of severe polytraumatism with multiorgan failure, especially in very

  6. Post-transfusion hypertension, convulsion and intracranial haemorrhage in beta-thalassemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, S.A.; Zaidi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The haematologic disorder b-thalassemia major is common in Pakistan. We describe a patient with undiagnosed thalassemia presenting with hypertension and convulsions and found to have cerebral haemorrhage on neuro-imaging. He had been transfused 2 weeks before this illness. Our experience is similar to a few case reports described in literature that were found to have cerebral haemorrhages post-mortem after a similar clinical presentation. All patients had a blood transfusion within 2 weeks prior to the presentation so association with transfusion has been proposed. We have reviewed the several mechanisms presented and discussed the findings. (author)

  7. Restenosis of the sigmoid sinus after stenting for treatment of intracranial venous hypertension: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumoto, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Shimizu, M.; Inui, Y.; Nakakita, K.; Hayashi, S.; Terada, T.

    2003-01-01

    We report what we believe to be the first case of restenosis of the sigmoid sinus after stenting, in a 42-year-old man with an arteriovenous malformation with progressive right hemiparesis secondary to venous hypertension. Angiography revealed severe stenosis of the left sigmoid sinus, which was dilated with a self-expandable stent. Six months after the procedure, however, the sinus was again severely stenosed. Intravascular sonography revealed intimal proliferation in the stented sinus. It was dilated percutaneously, and the venous pressure decreased from 51 to 33 mmHg. On sonography, the intimal tissue decreased in thickness and the diameter of the stent enlarged a little. (orig.)

  8. Association between idiopathic intracranial hypertension and sigmoid sinus dehiscence/diverticulum with pulsatile tinnitus: a retrospective imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhaohui, Liu; Qing, Li; Cheng, Dong; Xiao, Wang; Xiaoyi, Han; Pengfei, Zhao; Han, Lv; Zhenchang, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of occurrence of sigmoid sinus dehiscence/diverticulum (SSDD) in pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients remains under debate. Its association with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) lacks evidence, which is important for therapeutic planning and improving the clinical outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the association between SSDD and IIH by comparing the prevalence of several established imaging features of IIH between PT patients with SSDD and healthy volunteers. Thirty-three unilateral PT patients with SSDD identified on CT images and 33 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers underwent T1-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optic nerve, pituitary gland, transverse sinus, and ventricles were assessed. The prevalence of established IIH imaging features was compared between the two groups. Furthermore, the PT patients were divided into two subgroups: PT patients with dehiscence only and PT patients with diverticulum. The same statistical analysis was performed on each pathophysiologic entity respectively. The PT patients with SSDD showed a significantly higher prevalence of empty sella (P < 0.001), flattened posterior sclera (P = 0.001), vertical tortuosity of the optic nerve (P = 0.001), protrusion of the optic nerve (P = 0.006), transverse sinus stenosis (P = 0.011), and distension of the optic nerve sheath (P = 0.000). There were no significant differences between the PT and control groups in the maximum widths of the third and fourth ventricles and the lateral ventricle size. In contrast to controls, the imaging findings persisted in both of pathophysiologic entities, except for transverse sinus stenosis. Several IIH imaging features occur more frequently in PT patients with SSDD than in healthy individuals, which suggests a potential correlation between SSDD with PT and IIH. (orig.)

  9. Association between idiopathic intracranial hypertension and sigmoid sinus dehiscence/diverticulum with pulsatile tinnitus: a retrospective imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhaohui, Liu; Qing, Li [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Cheng, Dong; Xiao, Wang; Xiaoyi, Han; Pengfei, Zhao; Han, Lv; Zhenchang, Wang [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China)

    2015-07-15

    The mechanism of occurrence of sigmoid sinus dehiscence/diverticulum (SSDD) in pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients remains under debate. Its association with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) lacks evidence, which is important for therapeutic planning and improving the clinical outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the association between SSDD and IIH by comparing the prevalence of several established imaging features of IIH between PT patients with SSDD and healthy volunteers. Thirty-three unilateral PT patients with SSDD identified on CT images and 33 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers underwent T1-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optic nerve, pituitary gland, transverse sinus, and ventricles were assessed. The prevalence of established IIH imaging features was compared between the two groups. Furthermore, the PT patients were divided into two subgroups: PT patients with dehiscence only and PT patients with diverticulum. The same statistical analysis was performed on each pathophysiologic entity respectively. The PT patients with SSDD showed a significantly higher prevalence of empty sella (P < 0.001), flattened posterior sclera (P = 0.001), vertical tortuosity of the optic nerve (P = 0.001), protrusion of the optic nerve (P = 0.006), transverse sinus stenosis (P = 0.011), and distension of the optic nerve sheath (P = 0.000). There were no significant differences between the PT and control groups in the maximum widths of the third and fourth ventricles and the lateral ventricle size. In contrast to controls, the imaging findings persisted in both of pathophysiologic entities, except for transverse sinus stenosis. Several IIH imaging features occur more frequently in PT patients with SSDD than in healthy individuals, which suggests a potential correlation between SSDD with PT and IIH. (orig.)

  10. Baseline OCT measurements in the idiopathic intracranial hypertension treatment trial, part II: correlations and relationship to clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, Peggy; Durbin, Mary; Feldon, Steven; Garvin, Mona; Kardon, Randy; Keltner, John; Kupersmith, Mark J; Sibony, Patrick; Plumb, Kim; Wang, Jui-Kai; Werner, John S

    2014-11-04

    The accepted method to evaluate and monitor papilledema, Frisén grading, uses an ordinal approach based on descriptive features. Part I showed that spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a clinical trial setting provides reliable measurement of the effects of papilledema on the optic nerve head (ONH) and peripapillary retina, particularly if a 3-D segmentation method is used for analysis.(1) We evaluated how OCT parameters are interrelated and how they correlate with vision and other clinical features in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients. A total of 126 subjects in the IIH Treatment Trial (IIHTT) OCT substudy had Cirrus SD-OCT optic disc and macula scans analyzed by using a 3-D segmentation algorithm to derive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, total retinal thickness (TRT), retinal ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCL+IPL) thickness, and ONH volume. The SD-OCT parameter values were correlated with high- and low-contrast acuity, perimetric mean deviation, Frisén grading, and IIH features. At study entry, the average RNFL thickness, TRT, and ONH volume showed significant strong correlations (r ≥ 0.90) with each other. The same OCT parameters showed a strong (r > 0.76) correlation with Frisén grade and a mild (r > 0.24), but significant, correlation with lumbar puncture opening pressure. For all eyes at baseline, neither visual acuity (high or low contrast) nor mean deviation correlated with any OCT measure of swelling or GCL+IPL thickness. In newly diagnosed IIH, OCT demonstrated alterations of the peripapillary retina and ONH correlate with Frisén grading of papilledema. At presentation, OCT measures of papilledema, in patients with newly diagnosed IIH and mild vision loss, do not correlate with clinical features or visual dysfunction. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.). Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. Baseline OCT measurements in the idiopathic intracranial hypertension treatment trial, part I: quality control, comparisons, and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, Peggy; Durbin, Mary; Feldon, Steven; Garvin, Mona; Kardon, Randy; Keltner, John; Kupersmith, Mark; Sibony, Patrick; Plumb, Kim; Wang, Jui-Kai; Werner, John S

    2014-11-04

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to investigate papilledema in single-site, mostly retrospective studies. We investigated whether spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT), which provides thickness and volume measurements of the optic nerve head and retina, could reliably demonstrate structural changes due to papilledema in a prospective multisite clinical trial setting. At entry, 126 subjects in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) with mild visual field loss had optic disc and macular scans, using the Cirrus SD-OCT. Images were analyzed by using the proprietary commercial and custom 3D-segmentation algorithms to calculate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), total retinal thickness (TRT), optic nerve head volume (ONHV), and retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness. We evaluated variability, with interocular comparison and correlation between results for both methods. The average RNFL thickness > 95% of normal controls in 90% of eyes and the RNFL, TRT, ONH height, and ONHV showed strong (r > 0.8) correlations for interocular comparisons. Variability for repeated testing of OCT parameters was low for both methods and intraclass correlations > 0.9 except for the proprietary GCL thickness. The proprietary algorithm-derived RNFL, TRT, and GCL thickness measurements had failure rates of 10%, 16%, and 20% for all eyes respectively, which were uncommon with 3D-segmentation-derived measurements. Only 7% of eyes had GCL thinning that was less than fifth percentile of normal age-matched control eyes by both methods. Spectral-domain OCT provides reliable continuous variables and quantified assessment of structural alterations due to papilledema. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01003639.). Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  12. Segmentation error in spectral domain optical coherence tomography measures of the retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aojula, Anuriti; Mollan, Susan P; Horsburgh, John; Yiangou, Andreas; Markey, Kiera A; Mitchell, James L; Scotton, William J; Keane, Pearse A; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2018-01-04

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging is being increasingly used in clinical practice for the monitoring of papilloedema. The aim is to characterise the extent and location of the Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer (RNFL) Thickness automated segmentation error (SegE) by manual refinement, in a cohort of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) patients with papilloedema and compare this to controls. Baseline Spectral Domain OCT (SDOCT) scans from patients with IIH, and controls with no retinal or optic nerve pathology, were examined. The internal limiting membrane and RNFL thickness of the most severely affected eye was examined for SegE and re-segmented. Using ImageJ, the total area of the RNFL thickness was calculated pre and post re-segmentation and the percentage change was determined. The distribution of RNFL thickness error was qualitatively assessed. Significantly greater SegE (p = 0.009) was present in RNFL thickness total area, assessed using ImageJ, in IIH patients (n = 46, 5% ± 0-58%) compared to controls (n = 14, 1% ± 0-6%). This was particularly evident in moderate to severe optic disc swelling (n = 23, 10% ± 0-58%, p < 0.001). RNFL thickness was unable to be quantified using SDOCT in patients with severe papilloedema. SegE remain a concern for clinicians using SDOCT to monitor papilloedema in IIH, particularly in the assessment of eyes with moderate to severe oedema. Systematic assessment and manual refinement of SegE is therefore important to ensure the accuracy in longitudinal monitoring of patients.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging finding of empty sella in obesity related idiopathic intracranial hypertension is associated with enlarged sella turcica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Lee, Sang H.; Checkver, Adam; Sklar, Evelyn; Danton, Gary H. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Lam, Byron L. [University of Miami, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Miami, FL (United States); Alperin, Noam [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Professional Arts Center, Miami, FL (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Empty sella in MRI is an important finding associated with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). This study assesses the sensitivity and reproducibility of several morphological measures of the sella and pituitary gland to identify the measure that best differentiates IIH from controls. Additionally, the study assesses reversal in gland compression following treatment. Sagittal 3D-T1W sequence with 1 mm isotropic resolution was obtained from ten newly diagnosed IIH patients and 11 matched healthy controls. Follow-up MRI scans were obtained from eight patients at 1-week post-lumbar puncture and acetazolamide treatment. 1D and 2D measures of absolute and normalized heights and cross-sectional areas of the gland and sella were obtained to identify the measure that best differentiates IIH patients and controls. Overall area-based measurements had higher sensitivity than length with p < 0.0001 for sella area compared with p = 0.004 for normalized gland height. The gland cross-sectional areas were similar in both cohorts (p = 0.557), while the sella area was significantly larger in IIH, 200 {+-} 24 versus 124 {+-} 25 mm{sup 2}, with the highest sensitivity and specificity, 100 % and 90.9 %, respectively. Absolute gland area was the most sensitive measure for assessing post treatment changes, with 100 % sensitivity and 50 % specificity. Average post-treatment gland area was 18 % larger (p = 0.016). Yet, all eight patients remained within the empty sella range based on a normalized gland area threshold of 0.41. Sellar area is larger in IIH, and it demonstrated highest sensitivity for differentiating IIH from control subjects, while absolute gland area was more sensitive for detecting post treatment changes. (orig.)

  14. Effect of residue hematoma volume on inflammation factors in hypertensive intracranial hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-san ZHANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives  In this study, the relationships of residue hematoma volume to brain edema and inflammation factors were studied after intracerebral hematoma was evacuated with a frameless stereotactic aspiration. Methods  Eighty-nine patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH were treated by frameless stereotactic aspiration. According to residual volume of the hematoma, the patients were divided into gross-total removal of hematoma (GTRH (≤5ml and sub-total removal of hematoma (STRH (≥10ml groups after the operation. The pre-operative and postoperative data of the patients were compared between the two groups. The pre-operative data included age, sex, hematoma volume, time interval from the ictus to the operation, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS scores. The post-operative information included edema grade, level of thromboxane B2 (TXB2, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α(6-K-PGF1α, tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α and endothelin (ET in hematoma cavity or cerebral spinal fluid (CSF. Results  There were 46 patients in GTRH group and 43 in STRH group respectively. There was no statistical difference in the pre-operative data between the two groups. The levels of TXB2, 6-K-PGF1α, TNF-αand ET were significantly lower in the GTRH group than in the STRH group at different post-operative time points. There was a significant difference between the two groups. The post-operative CT scan at different time points showed that the brain edema grades were better in the GTRH group than in the STRH group. Conclusions  GTRH is helpful for decreasing ICH-induced injury to brain tissue, which is related to decreased perihematomal edema formation and secondary injury by coagulation end products activated inflammatory cascade. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.09.12

  15. Are shunt series and shunt patency studies useful in patients with shunted idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ann; Elder, Benjamin D; Sankey, Eric W; Goodwin, C Rory; Jusué-Torres, Ignacio; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-11-01

    Shunt series and shunt patency studies can be performed in the emergency department (ED) to evaluate for shunt malfunction in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Here, we examine the utility of these studies in this specific patient population. We retrospectively reviewed the ED visits of all shunted patients diagnosed with IIH from 2003 to 2014. ED visits for symptoms not related to the patient's IIH were excluded from the study. Collected variables included demographics, symptoms, IIH diagnosis and treatment history, imaging findings, and management changes. Twenty-five (81%) patients had a total of 105 visits involving a shunt series, with four (3.9%) showing problems with the catheter. The majority of shunt series (n=101, 96%) showed no catheter pathology. Based on results of the shunt series alone, in 3 instances, management changes in the form of shunt revision or shunt reprogramming occurred. Of the 105 visits with a shunt series, 17 (16%) resulted in a change in management as compared to 12 out of 66 (18%) visits without a shunt series (p=0.83). Nine patients had a total of 10 visits involving a shunt patency study: five were normal, four were abnormal, and one was inconclusive. Based on findings on the shunt patency study alone, changes in management leading to shunt adjustment or revision occurred in 4 instances. Of the 10 visits with shunt patency studies, 5 resulted in a change in management as compared to 24 out of 161 visits without a shunt patency study (p=0.014). Shunt series detected catheter pathology only 3.9% of the time, and there was no difference in the rate of management changes between those patients who underwent a shunt series and those who did not. There was a significant difference in the rate of management changes in patients who received shunt patency studies as compared to those who did not. Shunt series may not be a useful screening tool to be used universally to diagnose shunt malfunction in IIH patients in

  16. The safety of vasopressor-induced hypertension in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with coexisting unruptured, unprotected intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Buckley, Robert T; Indrakanti, Santoshi S; Turkmani, Ali H; Oh, Gerald; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Fargen, Kyle M; El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y; Naidech, Andrew M; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Hoh, Brian L; Bendok, Bernard R; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-10-01

    Vasopressor-induced hypertension (VIH) is an established treatment for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who develop vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). However, the safety of VIH in patients with coincident, unruptured, unprotected intracranial aneurysms is uncertain. This retrospective multiinstitutional study identified 1) patients with aneurysmal SAH and 1 or more unruptured, unprotected aneurysms who required VIH therapy (VIH group), and 2) patients with aneurysmal SAH and 1 or more unruptured, unprotected aneurysms who did not require VIH therapy (non-VIH group). All patients had previously undergone surgical or endovascular treatment for the presumed ruptured aneurysm. Comparisons between the VIH and non-VIH patients were made in terms of the patient characteristics, clinical and radiographic severity of SAH, total number of aneurysms, number of ruptured/unruptured aneurysms, aneurysm location/size, number of unruptured and unprotected aneurysms during VIH, severity of vasospasm, degree of hypervolemia, and degree and duration of VIH therapy. For the VIH group (n = 176), 484 aneurysms were diagnosed, 231 aneurysms were treated, and 253 unruptured aneurysms were left unprotected during 1293 total days of VIH therapy (5.12 total years of VIH therapy for unruptured, unprotected aneurysms). For the non-VIH group (n = 73), 207 aneurysms were diagnosed, 93 aneurysms were treated, and 114 unruptured aneurysms were left unprotected. For the VIH and non-VIH groups, the mean sizes of the ruptured (7.2 ± 0.3 vs 7.8 ± 0.6 mm, respectively; p = 0.27) and unruptured (3.4 ± 0.2 vs 3.2 ± 0.2 mm, respectively; p = 0.40) aneurysms did not differ. The authors observed 1 new SAH from a previously unruptured, unprotected aneurysm in each group (1 of 176 vs 1 of 73 patients; p = 0.50). Baseline patient characteristics and comorbidities were similar between groups. While the degree of hypervolemia was similar between the VIH and non-VIH patients

  17. Fifty shades of gradients: does the pressure gradient in venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension matter? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Cameron M; Ban, Vin Shen; Beecher, Jeffrey; Pride, Lee; Welch, Babu G

    2018-03-02

    OBJECTIVE The role of venous sinus stenting (VSS) for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is not well understood. The aim of this systematic review is to attempt to identify subsets of patients with IIH who will benefit from VSS based on the pressure gradients of their venous sinus stenosis. METHODS MEDLINE/PubMed was searched for studies reporting venous pressure gradients across the stenotic segment of the venous sinus, pre- and post-stent pressure gradients, and clinical outcomes after VSS. Findings are reported according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. RESULTS From 32 eligible studies, a total of 186 patients were included in the analysis. Patients who had favorable outcomes had higher mean pressure gradients (22.8 ± 11.5 mm Hg vs 17.4 ± 8.0 mm Hg, p = 0.033) and higher changes in pressure gradients after stent placement (19.4 ± 10.0 mm Hg vs 12.0 ± 6.0 mm Hg, p = 0.006) compared with those with unfavorable outcomes. The post-stent pressure gradients between the 2 groups were not significantly different (2.8 ± 4.0 mm Hg vs 2.7 ± 2.0 mm Hg, p = 0.934). In a multivariate stepwise logistic regression controlling for age, sex, body mass index, CSF opening pressure, pre-stent pressure gradient, and post-stent pressure gradient, the change in pressure gradient with stent placement was found to be an independent predictor of favorable outcome (p = 0.028). Using a pressure gradient of 21 as a cutoff, 81/86 (94.2%) of patients with a gradient > 21 achieved favorable outcomes, compared with 82/100 (82.0%) of patients with a gradient ≤ 21 (p = 0.022). CONCLUSIONS There appears to be a relationship between the pressure gradient of venous sinus stenosis and the success of VSS in IIH. A randomized controlled trial would help elucidate this relationship and potentially guide patient selection.

  18. Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypertension Triglycerides Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Hypertension September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Fady ... Additional Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is hypertension? Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a leading ...

  19. The use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts for uncontrollable intracranial hypertension in patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis with or without hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Renfang; Tang, Yang; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-12-01

    Extremely elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis is a poor prognostic predictor of death during initial therapy. The risks associated with implanting a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt into immunocompromised patients with ongoing CSF infection have historically discouraged surgeons from implanting CSF shunts in patients with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis. An unanswered question is whether ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts can effectively provide long-term treatment for patients with intracranial hypertension and HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in China. Outcomes for 9 patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis who were given VP shunts for increased ICP were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient's age, sex, clinical manifestations, CD4+ lymphocyte count, HIV viral load, neurological status, CSF features, image findings, anad other opportunistic infections were recorded for analysis. All patients had signs and symptoms of increased ICP, including headaches, nausea, and vomiting. Seven patients (77.78%) had visual loss due to persistent papilledema. The median time from diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis to VP shunting in the 9 patients was 5 months (range 0.5-12.5 months). Seven patients (77.78%) had good outcomes, with recovery from 1 month to 48 months. Two patients had poor outcomes; one died six months after shunting due to severe adverse reactions to antiretroviral drugs, and the other died two weeks after surgery. Patients with intracranial hypertension and HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis who cannot tolerate cessation of external lumbar CSF drainage or frequent lumbar punctures may be eligible for VP shunt placement, despite severe immunosuppression and persistent CSF cryptococcal infection.

  20. Effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage on inflammatory factors, serum ferritin and serum P substance in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-De Nong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage on inflammatory factors, serum ferritin and serum P substance in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: 92 cases of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage patients in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups: minimally invasive group (51 cases and routine group (41 cases. Minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage was performed on the minimally invasive group. Bone flap decompression or small bone window craniotomy were used in the routine group. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, high sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP and serum protein (SF, serum substance P (SP in the 2 groups were detected before treatment and 2 weeks after treatment. Results: The comparison of TNF-α, IL-6, hs-CRP, SP, and SF in the two groups before treatment was not statistically significant (P>0.05. TNF-α, IL-6, hs-CRP and SF in both groups after treatment significantly decreased, compared with that before treatment (P<0.01, P<0.05. TNF-α, IL-6, and SF in minimally invasive group decreased more significantly than that in routine group (P<0.01; The comparison of SP in the two groups after treatment significantly increased compared with that before treatment (P<0.01, P<0.05. SP in minimally invasive group increased more significantly than that in routine group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Compared with bone flap decompression or small bone window craniotomy, minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage can inhibit inflammatory reaction, reduce the degree of nerve damage and alleviate clinical symptoms more effectively

  1. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to sight-saving treatments and plays a key role in reducing visual impairment and blindness. NEI Home Contact Us A-Z Site Map NEI on Social Media Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, Social ...

  2. Intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients treated with recombinant human growth hormone: data from 25 years of the Genentech National Cooperative Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Richard; Maneatis, Thomas; Frane, James; Alexander, Kimberly; Lippe, Barbara; Davis, D Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (IH) is a rare condition in children. However, a relationship between recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy and IH has been well documented. Risk factors were assessed for 70 rhGH-naive patients enrolled in the National Cooperative Growth Study with reports of IH after treatment initiation. Patients with severe growth hormone deficiency, Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency (CRI), and obesity (particularly in the CRI group) were at highest risk of developing IH during the first year of therapy, suggesting initiation of careful early monitoring. In some patients, factors such as corticosteroid use or other chromosomal abnormalities appear to confer a delayed risk of IH, and these patients should be monitored long-term for signs and symptoms of IH.

  3. MR imaging of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in health and disease. On the vascular pathogenesis of communicating hydrocephalus and benign intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greitz, D.; Hannerz, J.; Raehn, T.; Bolander, H.; Ericsson, A.

    1994-01-01

    The CSF flows in the aqueduct and at the foramen magnum were examined in 5 patients with communicating hydrocephalus (HC) and in 10 with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) as well as in 5 healthy volunteers. As compared to normal individuals, the aqueductal flow in HC was about 10 times larger and the cervical flow was half as large. In BIH the CSF flows were not different from those of normal volunteers. The decreased arterial expansion as reflected in the reduced cervical flow in HC may be due to pathologic changes in the arteries and paravascular spaces. The large aqueductal flow in HC reflects a large brain expansion, causing increased transcerebral mantle pressure gradient and ventricular dilatation. In BIH there is a normal brain expansion (aqueductal flow) and consequently no ventricular dilatation. It is argued that BIH be caused by an obstruction on the venous side, as opposed to the vascular alterations in HC, which are on the arterial side. (orig.)

  4. Craniotomia descompressiva para tratamento precoce da hipertensão intracraniana traumática Decompressive craniotomy for the early treatment of traumatic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Moreira Faleiro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O papel da craniotomia descompressiva (CD no tratamento da hipertensão intracraniana (HIC refratária ainda não está estabelecido na literatura. Atualmente é recomendada como opção, pois há deficiência de trabalhos classe I ou II que suportem seu emprego. Trabalhos recentes têm avaliado a eficácia da CD quando aplicada precocemente no tratamento da HIC pós traumática. No presente trabalho analisam-se 21 pacientes nos quais a CD foi realizada precocemente. A maioria dos pacientes apresentava traumatismo cranioencefálico grave (Escala de coma glasgow There is no clear role for decompressive craniotomy (DC for the intracranial hypertension (ICH treatment in the literature. Actually, there is a lack of class I or II published data for DC, so it is recomended as a second tier option for the refractory ICH. Recent studies has analized the role of early DC for pos traumatic ICH. The present study analizes 21 patients who has received the early DC for the treatment of traumatic ICH. The majority of the patients had Glasgow Coma Scale < 9 and harboring a brain swelling or acute subdural hematoma at cranial computadorized tomography. Hydrocephalus was frequent after DC (28.5%. Good results were obtained in 11 patients (52.5%. We favour the early application of DC for pos traumatic hypertension.

  5. Imaging of Intracranial Pressure Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, John; Saindane, Amit M

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure inside the bony calvarium and can be affected by a variety of processes, such as intracranial masses and edema, obstruction or leakage of cerebrospinal fluid, and obstruction of venous outflow. This review focuses on the imaging of 2 important but less well understood ICP disorders: idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Both of these ICP disorders have salient imaging findings that are important to recognize to help prevent their misdiagnosis from other common neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  6. Pattern of pressure gradient alterations after venous sinus stenting for idiopathic intracranial hypertension predicts stent-adjacent stenosis: a proposed classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, Daniel; Buell, Thomas J; Ding, Dale; Chen, Ching-Jen; Starke, Robert M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2018-04-01

    Venous sinus stenting (VSS) is a safe and effective treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) with angiographic venous sinus stenosis. However, predictors of stent-adjacent stenosis (SAS) remain poorly defined. We performed a retrospective review of 47 patients with IIH and intracranial venous stenosis who underwent VSS with pre- and post-stent venography. Patient characteristics, treatments and outcomes were reviewed. Changes in pressure gradient after VSS were classified according to pattern of gradient resolution into types I-III. Type I gradient resolution, in which mean venous pressure (MVP) in the transverse sinus (TS) decreases towards MVP in the sigmoid sinus (SS), occurred in 18 patients (38.3%). Type II gradient resolution pattern, in which SS MVP increases towards that in the TS, occurred in 7patients (14.9%). Type III pattern, in which MVP equilibrates to a middle value, occurred in 22patients (46.8%). SAS occurred in 0%, 28.6%, and 22.7% of patients in types I, II and III, respectively. Compared with patients with type I gradient resolution, SAS was more common in those with type II (p=0.0181) and type III (p=0.0306) patterns. The pattern of change in the trans-stenosis venous pressure gradient may be predictive of SAS and is a useful tool for classifying the response of the venous obstruction to stenting. A type I pattern appears to represent the ideal response to VSS. Some patients with type II and III changes, particularly if they have other predictors of recurrent stenosis, may benefit from longer initial stent constructs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Clinical profile, evaluation, management and visual outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a neuro-ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary referral ophthalmic center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To discuss the clinical features and management of patients who presented with optic disc edema and had features of presumed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. Materials and Methods: Case series of all patients diagnosed to have IIH from January 2000 to December 2003 in the neuro-ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary referral ophthalmic institution, were retrospectively analyzed. Analysis was done for 50/106 patients who fulfilled modified Dandy′s criteria and had optic disc edema and a minimal follow-up period of two years. Results: Most (40/50, 80% of the patients were females and the mean age of presentation for all the 50 patients was 32.89 years. Chief complaints were headache in 38 (76% patients, 24 (48% patients had transient visual obscuration, 24 (48% patients had reduced vision, 15 (30% patients had nausea, vomiting, 4 (8% patients had diplopia. Bilateral disc edema was seen in 46 (92% patients and unilateral disc edema in 4 (8% patients. 60 eyes had enlarged blind spot as the common visual field defect. Neuroimaging revealed prominent perioptic CSF spaces in 14 patients and empty sella in three patients. CSF opening pressure was 250-350 mm H2O (water in 39 patients and was > 350 mm H2O in 11 patients. Medical treatment was started for all patients; whereas 35 [70%] patients responded, 15 [30%] patients had to undergo LP shunt.

  8. Hypertension

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for hypertension hyperlipidemia. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County...

  9. Pentobarbital coma for refractory intra-cranial hypertension after severe traumatic brain injury: mortality predictions and one-year outcomes in 55 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gary T; James, Robert F; Landman, Matthew P; O'Neill, Patrick J; Cotton, Bryan A; Hansen, Erik N; Morris, John A; May, Addison K

    2010-08-01

    To identify predictors of mortality and long-term outcomes in survivors after pentobarbital coma (PBC) in patients failing current treatment standards for severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI). This is a retrospective cohort study of severe TBI patients receiving PBC at Level I Trauma Center and tertiary university hospital. Four thousand nine hundred thirty-four patients were admitted to the trauma intensive care unit with severe TBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale >or= 3) between April 1998 and December 2004. Six hundred eleven received intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and 58 received PBC. Three patients underwent craniotomy for intracranial mass lesion and were excluded. The study group received standardized medical management for severe TBI including opiates, benzodiazepines, elevation of the head of bed, avoidance of hypotension and hypercapnia and hyperosmolar therapy (HOsmRx). In addition, 31 of 55 patients (56%) underwent placement of intraventricular catheters for cerebrospinal fluid drainage. If routine medical management and cerebrospinal fluid diversion failed to control ICP, then the patient was determined to have refractory intracranial hypertension (RICH) and PBC treatment was initiated. PBC was performed with pentobarbital infusion with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring to ensure adequate burst suppression. The measurements include serum sodium (Na) and osmolality (Osm) were assessed as indicators for initiation of PBC and to estimate the 50% mortality cut-points when controlling for ICP. Follow-up functional outcomes were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and stratified according to admission Glasgow Coma Scale score and Marshall computed tomography classification. Of the 55 PBC patients, 22 (40%) survived at discharge. 19 of 22 had long-term follow-up (1 year or more) available. Of these, 13 (68%) were normal or functionally independent (Glasgow Outcome Scale score 4 or 5). Serum Na and Osm were associated with death (p < 0

  10. Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Katherine H; Tuttle, Laura A; Viera, Anthony J

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Antihypertensive treatment substantially reduces the risk of heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Current guidelines recommend screening all adults for high blood pressure (BP). Lifestyle modifications to help control high BP include weight loss, exercise, moderation of alcohol intake, and a diet low in sodium and saturated fats and high in fruits and vegetables. Out-of-office BP monitoring should be used to confirm suspected white coat effect, especially in patients with apparent resistant hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus in healthy volunteers, and in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension with phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Gjerris, F

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure blood flow and velocity in the superior sagittal ++sinus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MR velocity mapping was used to examine 14 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), 3 patients with high pressure hydrocephalus (HPH), and 11 patients with idiopathic...... intracranial hypertension (IIH). RESULTS: Mean blood flow was 443 ml/min in healthy volunteers with a tendency towards reduced blood flow with increasing age. In NPH patients significantly lower superior sagittal sinus blood flow values were found, but this difference was no longer significant when patients...

  12. Hastigt progredierende synstab ved idiopatisk intrakraniel hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren; Jensen, Rigmor; Milea, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of increased intracranial pressure of unknown aetiology. Slowly progressing visual defects secondary to papilloedema are well-known complications. Rapidly progressing visual loss is rare. A case of acute and rapidly progressing visual loss...... in idiopathic intracranial hypertension is presented. Rapid recognition and treatment of IIH is important, and may occasionally prompt acute surgical treatment....

  13. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  14. Headache Linked to Intracranial Hypertension and Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis as the Initial and Dominant Presentation of Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis. Case Report and Review of the Recent Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutoglou, Marianthi A; Xerras, Chrysostomos G; Kalevrosoglou, Ioannis K; Rafailidis, Vasileios D; Notas, Konstantinos P; Tegos, Thomas I

    2018-02-15

    The objective of this article is to report a rare case of headache as the initial symptom of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and to review the recent literature. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a rare, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology. GPA has a wide spectrum of clinical symptomatology, including involvement of the nervous system, even as the initial manifestation. Symptoms of the peripheral nervous system used to dominate the clinical symptomatology. However, recent reports are focusing increasingly in granulomatous lesions of the central nervous system, and especially on the increased frequency of patients with hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP). We report the case of a patient with headache linked to intracranial hypertension and hypertrophic pachymeningitis as the initial and dominant presentation of GPA and we review the recent literature. A 54-year-old male, without any related medical history developed a severe headache. In the following 2 months, he gradually developed hoarseness and diplopia at the left and lower fields of vision. A brain MRI revealed wide-spread fattening and meningeal enhancement over the left hemisphere and the left cerebellar hemisphere. An endoscopy of the pharynx revealed the presence of a tumor-like mass in the left half of the nasopharynx. A biopsy showed inflammation with presence of polykaryocyte Langhans giant cells. The laboratory testing revealed important albuminuria and microhematuria, positive c-ANCA and negative p-ANCA. A diagnosis of GPA was established. A steroid treatment was administered initially, which improved the headache drastically, followed by the administration of a combination of cyclophosphamide and corticosteroid, which led to a gradual resolve of the remaining symptomatology. A follow-up brain MRI showed a decrease in meningeal enhancement, whereas a second one, 2 years later, was completely normal. HP was considered an extremely rare manifestation of GPA. However, recent studies

  15. Intracranial hypertension following neck dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, W. A.; Balm, A. J.; Tiwari, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    A 51-year-old man developed prolonged papilloedema as a result of increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure following staged bilateral radical neck dissection. The patient recovered completely with no further specific therapy. Although the prognosis for vision is usually good in patients with

  16. Comparison of Automated and Manual Recording of Brief Episodes of Intracranial Hypertension and Cerebral Hypoperfusion and Their Association with Outcome After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    multimodality evoked potentials, CT scanning, and intracranial pressure. J Neurosurg. 1981; 54(6):751-762. 12. Andrews PJ, Sleeman DH, Statham PF...a comparison between decision tree analysis and logistic regression. J Neurosurg. 2002; 97(2):326-336. 13. Clifton GL , Miller ER, Choi SC, Levin...Suppl. 1998; 71:47-49. 40 . Rossi S, Buzzi F, Paparella A, Mainini P, Stocchetti N. Complications and safety associated with ICP monitoring: a study

  17. Intracranial haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consultant Neurosurgeon, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town. David Le Feuvre .... evacuation. This, together with criticism of various limitations of the STICH trial, has led to the initiation of STICH II.[19]. Intracranial haematomas may also be dealt with during another ...

  18. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  19. Intracranial lipomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takashi; Shojima, Kazuhito; Moritaka, Kazuhiko; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Konishi, Jun

    1984-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas are very rare and reports of infantile lipomas are scarce. Nine cases of intracranial lipomas, five in infants and four in adults are described and characteristic findings of the CT are presented. Two of the six cases involved lipomas at the corpus callosum that were associated with frontal dysraphism and cranium bifidum at the midline of frontal region. Five of the nine cases involved lipomas at the quadrigeminal cistern. In one case with an advanced enlargement in circumference of the head in the perinatal period, a V-P shunt was conducted for obstructive hydrocephalus. Another case had widely ranging agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with an interhemispheric cyst showing the right sided parietal and occipital lobes through the callosal agenesis. One of the nine cases had a lipoma in the left sylvian fissure and in the adult was in the interpeduncular cistern. Four of the nine cases were associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Based on these cases and published reports, the CT features of intracranial lipoma are discussed. (author)

  20. Presence of Essential Hypertension or Diabetes Mellitus Is a Predictor of Intracranial Bleeding in Elderly Patients: A Study of 108 Patients with Isolated Thrombocytopenia from a Single Reference Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Kapoor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thrombocytopenia poses a significant problem in the elderly. Not only are there varied causes, but it is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We carried out a study to learn the causes of isolated thrombocytopenia in elderly patients and to correlate the severity of thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations with various etiologic factors and comorbidities. METHODS: A total of 108 patients above 50 years of age presenting with isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet counts of <100x109/L with normal hemoglobin and total leukocyte counts were enrolled in the study. Detailed history and clinical examinations were carried out for each patient. Complete blood counts were analyzed by automated cell counter. Peripheral smears were examined in all cases. HbsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was done in all patients. Wherever clinically indicated, bone marrow aspiration biopsy and cytogenetic studies were done. RESULTS: Out of 108 patients, 102 (94.4% presented with bleeding tendencies. Twenty-nine (26.8% presented with serious (World Health Organization grade 3/4 bleedings. Major findings were immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 79 (73.1%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 7 (6.5%, drug-induced thrombocytopenia in 7 (6.5%, and connective tissue disorder in 4 (3.7% cases. Ten patients presented with intracranial bleedings. Upon logistic regression analysis, comorbidities in the form of essential hypertension and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with occurrence of intracranial bleeding. There was no correlation of serious bleedings with platelet counts. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Isolated thrombocytopenia in the elderly is associated with significant morbidity. Diligent clinical and laboratory evaluation is required to elucidate the cause of thrombocytopenia in the elderly. Comorbidities in this population are associated with serious bleedings and not low platelet counts as is

  1. Increased Intracranial Pressure in the Setting ofEnterovirusand Other Viral Meningitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Jules C

    2017-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure due to viral meningitis has not been widely discussed in the literature, although associations with Varicella and rarely Enterovirus have been described. Patients with increased intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid analysis suggestive of a viral process are sometimes classified as having atypical idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). However, a diagnosis of IIH requires normal cerebrospinal fluid, and therefore in these cases an infection with secondary intracranial hypertension may be a more likely diagnosis. Here seven patients are presented with elevated intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of viral or aseptic meningitis. Of these, 1 had Enterovirus and the remainder were diagnosed with nonspecific viral meningitis. These data suggest that viral meningitis may be associated with elevated intracranial pressure more often than is commonly recognized. Enterovirus has previously been associated with increased intracranial pressure only in rare case reports.

  2. Increased Intracranial Pressure in the Setting of Enterovirus and Other Viral Meningitides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules C. Beal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intracranial pressure due to viral meningitis has not been widely discussed in the literature, although associations with Varicella and rarely Enterovirus have been described. Patients with increased intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid analysis suggestive of a viral process are sometimes classified as having atypical idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. However, a diagnosis of IIH requires normal cerebrospinal fluid, and therefore in these cases an infection with secondary intracranial hypertension may be a more likely diagnosis. Here seven patients are presented with elevated intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of viral or aseptic meningitis. Of these, 1 had Enterovirus and the remainder were diagnosed with nonspecific viral meningitis. These data suggest that viral meningitis may be associated with elevated intracranial pressure more often than is commonly recognized. Enterovirus has previously been associated with increased intracranial pressure only in rare case reports.

  3. Intracranial pressure monitoring (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intracranial pressure monitoring is performed by inserting a catheter into the head with a sensing device to monitor the pressure around the brain. An increase in intracranial pressure can cause a decrease in blood flow to ...

  4. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  5. Computed tomographic findings of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was a reliable technique to evaluate the exact size and location of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and to predict it's prognosis. Fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and reviewed by CT scan. The following results were obtained. 1. The sex ratio of male to female was 1 to 1.4, The highest incidence was in 6th and 7th decades. 2. The most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage was hypertension (74.6%), followed by the aneurysm (13.5%), arteriovenous malformation (5.1%), occlusive vascular disease (3.4%), and blood dyscrasia (3.4%). 3. The most common location was basal ganglia and thalamic hemorrhage (37.3%), followed by lobar hemorrhage (27.1%), cerebellar hemorrhage (13.5%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11.9%). 4. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage carried the highest mortality. 5. The larger volume of hematoma, the higher the mortality rate.

  6. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  7. Raised intracranial pressure: What it is and how to recognise it

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raised ICP can be defined in many ways, but in the acute setting it commonly refers to pressure greater than .... Hypertensive encephalopathy (malignant hypertension, eclampsia). Metabolic encephalopathy. Hypoxic-ischaemic ... Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. ICP varies over the course of the day and is influenced.

  8. Changes in weight, papilledema, headache, visual field, and life status in response to diet and metformin in women with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with and without concurrent polycystic ovary syndrome or hyperinsulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Charles J; Golnik, Karl C; Aregawi, Dawit; Goldenberg, Naila; Sieve, Luann; Wang, Ping

    2006-11-01

    The authors hypothesized that a metformin (MET)-diet would improve symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in women who also had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or hyperinsulinemia without PCOS. Changes in weight, papilledema, headache, visual fields, and overall life status were prospectively assessed in response to 6 to 14 months on 2.25 g/day MET-diet or diet alone in 36 women with IIH, 23 with PCOS, selected by baseline body mass index (BMI) > or = 25, and no previous surgery for IIH. Overall life status was graded using a self-reported 1-5 scale (1 = well, normal activities; 2 = unwell, usual activities; 3 = poor, usual activities; 4 = poor, no usual activities; 5 = totally disabled). Conventional treatment for IIH was maintained unchanged during MET-diet intervention. The diet was hypocaloric (1500 calories/day), high protein (26% of calories), and low carbohydrate (44%). Of the 23 women with PCOS, 20 received MET-diet and 3 diet only (could not tolerate MET). Of the 13 women without PCOS, 7 were hyperinsulinemic and received MET-diet and 6 received diet alone. The 3 treatment groups (diet only [n = 9], PCOS-MET-diet [n = 20], and hyperinsulinemia-MET-diet [n = 7]) did not differ by median entry BMI (33.3, 37.6, and 35.7 kg/m(2)) or by duration of treatment (10.2, 11.4, and 10.9 months). Median percent weight loss was greatest in the PCOS-MET group (7.7%, P = 0.0015), was 3.3% in the diet only group, and 2.4% (P = 0.04) in the hyperinsulinemia-MET group. Papilledema significantly improved in the diet-alone group from 100% at baseline to 13% (P = 0.03), and in the PCOS-MET group from 95% to 30% (P = 0.002). If headache persisted on therapy, it was less intense-less frequent (P = 0.03) in the diet-only group and in the PCOS-MET group (P = 0.04). As many women with IIH have PCOS, and because weight loss is central to IIH treatment, diet-MET is a novel approach to treat IIH in women with concurrent PCOS or hyperinsulinemia without PCOS.

  9. Comparison of the effects of 7.2% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol on whole blood coagulation and platelet function in dogs with suspected intracranial hypertension - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozova, Ivayla D; Howard, Judith; Henke, Diana; Dirkmann, Daniel; Adamik, Katja N

    2017-06-19

    Hyperosmolar therapy with either mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS) is commonly used in the treatment of intracranial hypertension (ICH). In vitro data indicate that both mannitol and HTS affect coagulation and platelet function in dogs. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 20% mannitol and 7.2% HTS on whole blood coagulation using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) and platelet function using a platelet function analyzer (PFA®) in dogs with suspected ICH. Thirty client-owned dogs with suspected ICH needing osmotherapy were randomized to receive either 20% mannitol (5 ml/kg IV over 15 min) or 7.2% HTS (4 ml/kg IV over 5 min). ROTEM® (EXTEM® and FIBTEM® assays) and PFA® analyses (collagen/ADP cartridges) were performed before (T 0 ), as well as 5 (T 5 ), 60 (T 60 ) and 120 (T 120 ) minutes after administration of HTS or mannitol. Data at T 5 , T 60 and T 120 were analyzed as a percentage of values at T 0 for comparison between groups, and as absolute values for comparison between time points, respectively. No significant difference was found between the groups for the percentage change of any parameter at any time point except for FIBTEM® clotting time. Within each group, no significant difference was found between time points for any parameter except for FIBTEM® clotting time in the HTS group, and EXTEM® and FIBTEM® maximum clot firmness in the mannitol group. Median ROTEM® values lay within institutional reference intervals in both groups at all time points, whereas median PFA® values were above the reference intervals at T 5 (both groups) and T 60 (HTS group). Using currently recommended doses, mannitol and HTS do not differ in their effects on whole blood coagulation and platelet function in dogs with suspected ICH. Moreover, no relevant impairment of whole blood coagulation was found following treatment with either solution, whereas a short-lived impairment of platelet function was found after both solutions.

  10. Long-term evolution of papilledema in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: observations concerning two cases Avaliação do comportamento do papiledema na hipertensão intracraniana idiopática: a propósito de dois casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Juliato Piovesan

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic headaches, associated with papilledema and pulsatile tinnitus without any neuroradiologic, cytobiochemical or cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities are suggestive of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. However the absence of the papilledema does not rule out this diagnosis. The reason why some patients do not develop papilledema in IIH is ignored, however there are some hypotheses concerning the structure of the optical nerve. In this study we described two female patients that presented diagnosis of IIH with papilledema, with subsequent resolution of papilledema without the due resolution of intracranial hypertension. The long-term behavior of the optic nerve (ON facing an increased intracranial pressure was evaluated through repeated measurements of the intracranial pressure. We concluded that the ON submitted to high intracranial pressure for a certain lenght of time can adapt itself with subsequent disappearance of the papilledema. The presence or not of papilledema in IIH can be related to the period in which the diagnosis is accomplished.Cefaléias com características crônica, diária, acompanhadas de edema de papila e tinitus pulsátil, sem nenhum achado neuroradiológico ou citobioquímico no líquor, são altamente sugestivas de hipertensão intracraniana idiopática (HII. Entretanto a ausência do papiledema não invalida o seu diagnóstico. A razão pela qual alguns pacientes não desenvolvem papiledema na HII é desconhecida, porém algumas hipóteses relacionadas com propriedades intrínsecas da bainha do nervo óptico têm sido propostas. Neste estudo relatamos dois pacientes do sexo feminino que apresentaram diagnóstico de HII com papiledema, evoluindo para resolução do papiledema sem a devida resolução da HII. O comportamento do nervo óptico (NO frente ao aumento da pressão intracraniana foi avaliado neste estudo a partir de um monitoramento intermitente criterioso da pressão intracraniana. Concluímos que o

  11. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  12. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm results in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a subtype of stroke with an incidence of 9 per 100,000 person-years and a case-fatality around 35%. In order to prevent SAH, patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be treated by neurosurgical or

  13. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  14. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  15. Stent-assisted recanalization of atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Mee Lim; Dae Chul Suh

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke, and depending on the studied population, it accounts for 8%-15% of all strokes that are due to cerebral atherosclerosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoses seems to depend on the location and extent of intracranial atherosclerosis. Currently, the primary treatment in intracranial atherosclerosis is the control of vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Secondary prevention with antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of subsequent vascular events in patients who have suffered a recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Unfortunately, a significant number of patients with intracranial atherosclerosis continue to suffer from repeated strokes or TIA despite maximal medical treatment. Although endovascular revascularization for symptomatic intracranial stenoses remains at the investigational stage and much of the pertinent information is anecdotal, intracranial angioplasty and stenting are being increasingly performed to treat stenotic lesions. This article reviews basic principles involved in the patient selection, premedication, angio-interventional procedures, angiographic and clinical results, periprocedural complication, patients aftercare. (authors)

  16. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  17. Paradoxical presentation of orthostatic headache associated with increased intracranial pressure in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung B Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is the most common symptom of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT; however, the detailed underlying mechanisms and characteristics of headache in CVT have not been well described. Here, we report two cases of CVT whose primary and lasting presentation was orthostatic headache, suggestive of decreased intracranial pressure. Contrary to our expectations, the headaches were associated with elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography showed characteristic voiding defects consistent with CVT. We suggest that orthostatic headache can be developed in a condition of decreased intracranial CSF volume in both intracranial hypotensive and intracranial hypertensive states. In these cases, orthostatic headache in CVT might be caused by decreased intracranial CSF volume that leads to the inferior displacement of the brain and traction on pain-sensitive intracranial vessels, despite increased CSF pressure on measurement. CVT should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a patient complains of orthostatic headache.

  18. Intracranial dural arterio-venous fistula presenting with progressive myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbonnaya, Ebere Sunny

    2011-01-01

    Spinal dural arterio-venous fistula (DAVF) is rare and usually involves the thoracic segments. The classical presentation is a slowly progressive ataxia. Clinical presentation of intracranial DAVF depends on the site of the DAVF, as well as the vessels involved. Patients may present with pulsatile tinnitus, occipital bruit, headache, dementia, visual impairment as well as neurological deterioration distant from the DAVF as a result of venous hypertension and cortical haemorrhage. The authors present a rare case of progressive myelopathy secondary to an intracranial DAVF.

  19. Intracranial pressure after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Lombardo, Alessandra; Colombo, Angelo; Longhi, Luca; Zanier, Elisa R; Rampini, Paolo; Stocchetti, Nino

    2015-01-01

    To describe mean intracranial pressure after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, to identify clinical factors associated with increased mean intracranial pressure, and to explore the relationship between mean intracranial pressure and outcome. Analysis of a prospectively collected observational database. Neuroscience ICU of an academic hospital. One hundred sixteen patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracranial pressure monitoring. None. Episodes of intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg lasting at least 5 minutes and the mean intracranial pressure for every 12-hour interval were analyzed. The highest mean intracranial pressure was analyzed in relation to demographic characteristics, acute neurologic status, initial radiological findings, aneurysm treatment, clinical vasospasm, and ischemic lesion. Mortality and 6-month outcome (evaluated using a dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale) were also introduced in multivariable logistic models. Eighty-one percent of patients had at least one episode of high intracranial pressure and 36% had a highest mean intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg. The number of patients with high intracranial pressure peaked 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage and declined after day 7. Highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg was significantly associated with initial neurologic status, aneurysmal rebleeding, amount of blood on CT scan, and ischemic lesion within 72 hours from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg had significantly higher mortality. When death, vegetative state, and severe disability at 6 months were pooled, however, intracranial pressure was not an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome. High intracranial pressure is a common complication in the first week after subarachnoid hemorrhage in severe cases admitted to ICU. Mean intracranial pressure is associated with the severity of early brain injury and with mortality.

  20. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  1. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect

  2. Intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, T.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, O.; De Keyser, J.; Brouns, R.; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Luijckx, G. J.

    The aim of this narrative review is to evaluate the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of intracranial artery dissection (IAD). IAD is a rare and often unrecognized cause of stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), especially in young adults. Two types of IAD can be

  3. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  4. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  5. Ocular Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es la hipertensión ocular? ...

  6. The quantitative evaluation of intracranial pressure by optic nerve sheath diameter/eye diameter CT measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekerman, Inessa; Sigal, Tal; Kimiagar, Itzhak; Ben Ely, Anna; Vaiman, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The changes of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) have been used to assess changes of the intracranial pressure for 20 years. The aim of this research was to further quantify the technique of measuring the ONSD for this purpose. Retrospective study of computed tomographic (CT) data of 1766 adult patients with intracranial hypotension (n=134) or hypertension (n=1632) were analyzed. The eyeball transverse diameter (ETD) and ONSD were obtained bilaterally, and the ONSD/ETD ratio was calculated. The ratio was used to calculate the normal ONSD for patients and to estimate the intracranial pressure of the patients before and after the onset of the pathology. Correlation analysis was performed with invasively measured intracranial pressure, the presence or absence of papilledema, sex, and age. In hypotension cases, the ONSD by CT was 3.4±0.7 mm (P=.03 against normative 4.4±0.8 mm). In cases with hypertension, the diameter was 6.9±1.3 (P=.02, with a cutoff value ˃5.5 mm). The ONSD/ETD ratio was 0.29±0.04 against 0.19±0.02 in healthy adults (P=.01). The ONSD and the ONSD/ETD ratio can indicate low intracranial pressure, but quantification is impossible at intracranial pressure less than 13 mm Hg. In elevated intracranial pressure, the ONSD and the ratio provide readings that correspond to readings in millimeters of mercury. The ONSD method, reinforced with additional calculations, may help to indicate a raised intracranial pressure, evaluate its severity quantitatively, and establish quantitative goals for treatment of intracranial hypertension, but the limitations of the method are to be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  8. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of intraocular pressure measurement for the detection of raised intracranial pressure: meta-analysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavin, Daniel; Luu, Judy; James, Matthew T; Roberts, Derek J; Sutherland, Garnette R; Jette, Nathalie; Wiebe, Samuel

    2014-09-01

    Because clinical examination and imaging may be unreliable indicators of intracranial hypertension, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement has been proposed as a noninvasive method of diagnosis. The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the correlation between IOP and intracranial pressure (ICP) and the diagnostic accuracy of IOP measurement for detection of intracranial hypertension. The authors searched bibliographic databases (Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from 1950 to March 2013, references of included studies, and conference abstracts for studies comparing IOP and invasive ICP measurement. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, and extracted data. Correlation coefficients, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated using DerSimonian and Laird methods and bivariate random effects models. The I(2) statistic was used as a measure of heterogeneity. Among 355 identified citations, 12 studies that enrolled 546 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled correlation coefficient between IOP and ICP was 0.44 (95% CI 0.26-0.63, I(2) = 97.7%, p intracranial hypertension were 81% (95% CI 26%-98%, I(2) = 95.2%, p intracranial hypertension. Given the significant heterogeneity between included studies, further investigation is required prior to the adoption of IOP in the evaluation of intracranial hypertension into routine practice.

  10. Brain herniation in a patient with apparently normal intracranial pressure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlqvist Mats B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intracranial pressure monitoring is commonly implemented in patients with neurologic injury and at high risk of developing intracranial hypertension, to detect changes in intracranial pressure in a timely manner. This enables early and potentially life-saving treatment of intracranial hypertension. Case presentation An intraparenchymal pressure probe was placed in the hemisphere contralateral to a large basal ganglia hemorrhage in a 75-year-old Caucasian man who was mechanically ventilated and sedated because of depressed consciousness. Intracranial pressures were continuously recorded and never exceeded 17 mmHg. After sedation had been stopped, our patient showed clinical signs of transtentorial brain herniation, despite apparently normal intracranial pressures (less than 10 mmHg. Computed tomography revealed that the size of the intracerebral hematoma had increased together with significant unilateral brain edema and transtentorial herniation. The contralateral hemisphere where the intraparenchymal pressure probe was placed appeared normal. Our patient underwent emergency decompressive craniotomy and was tracheotomized early, but did not completely recover. Conclusions Intraparenchymal pressure probes placed in the hemisphere contralateral to an intracerebral hematoma may dramatically underestimate intracranial pressure despite apparently normal values, even in the case of transtentorial brain herniation.

  11. Intracranial Pressure Is a Determinant of Sympathetic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Eric A. Schmidt; Eric A. Schmidt; Fabien Despas; Fabien Despas; Anne Pavy-Le Traon; Anne Pavy-Le Traon; Zofia Czosnyka; John D. Pickard; Kamal Rahmouni; Atul Pathak; Atul Pathak; Jean M. Senard; Jean M. Senard

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure within the cranium. ICP rise compresses brain vessels and reduces cerebral blood delivery. Massive ICP rise leads to cerebral ischemia, but it is also known to produce hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory irregularities due to a sympatho-adrenal mechanism termed Cushing response. One still unresolved question is whether the Cushing response is a non-synaptic acute brainstem ischemic mechanism or part of a larger physiological reflex for arteria...

  12. Evaluation of Optical Coherence Tomography to Detect Elevated Intracranial Pressure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jordan W; Aleman, Tomas S; Xu, Wen; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Pan, Wei; Liu, Grant T; Lang, Shih-Shan; Heuer, Gregory G; Storm, Phillip B; Bartlett, Scott P; Katowitz, William R; Taylor, Jesse A

    2017-04-01

    Detecting elevated intracranial pressure in children with subacute conditions, such as craniosynostosis or tumor, may enable timely intervention and prevent neurocognitive impairment, but conventional techniques are invasive and often equivocal. Elevated intracranial pressure leads to structural changes in the peripapillary retina. Spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) can noninvasively quantify retinal layers to a micron-level resolution. To evaluate whether retinal measurements from OCT can serve as an effective surrogate for invasive intracranial pressure measurement. This cross-sectional study included patients undergoing procedures at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from September 2014 to June 2015. Three groups of patients (n = 79) were prospectively enrolled from the Craniofacial Surgery clinic including patients with craniosynostosis (n = 40). The positive control cohort consisted of patients with hydrocephalus and suspected intracranial hypertension (n = 5), and the negative control cohort consisted of otherwise healthy patients undergoing a minor procedure (n = 34). Spectral-domain OCT was performed preoperatively in all cohorts. Children with cranial pathology, but not negative control patients, underwent direct intraoperative intracranial pressure measurement. The primary outcome was the association between peripapillary retinal OCT parameters and directly measured elevated intracranial pressure. The mean (SD) age was 34.6 (45.2) months in the craniosynostosis cohort (33% female), 48.9 (83.8) months in the hydrocephalus and suspected intracranial hypertension cohort (60% female), and 59.7 (64.4) months in the healthy cohort (47% female). Intracranial pressure correlated with maximal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (r = 0.60, P ≤ .001), maximal retinal thickness (r = 0.53, P ≤ .001), and maximal anterior retinal projection (r = 0.53, P = .003). Using cut points derived from the

  13. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  14. Risk for intracranial pressure increase related to enclosed air in post-craniotomy patients during air ambulance transport: a retrospective cohort study with simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändström, Helge; Sundelin, Anna; Hoseason, Daniela; Sundström, Nina; Birgander, Richard; Johansson, Göran; Winsö, Ola; Koskinen, Lars-Owe; Haney, Michael

    2017-05-12

    Post-craniotomy intracranial air can be present in patients scheduled for air ambulance transport to their home hospital. We aimed to assess risk for in-flight intracranial pressure (ICP) increases related to observed intracranial air volumes, hypothetical sea level pre-transport ICP, and different potential flight levels and cabin pressures. A cohort of consecutive subdural hematoma evacuation patients from one University Medical Centre was assessed with post-operative intracranial air volume measurements by computed tomography. Intracranial pressure changes related to estimated intracranial air volume effects of changing atmospheric pressure (simulating flight and cabin pressure changes up to 8000 ft) were simulated using an established model for intracranial pressure and volume relations. Approximately one third of the cohort had post-operative intracranial air. Of these, approximately one third had intracranial air volumes less than 11 ml. The simulation estimated that the expected changes in intracranial pressure during 'flight' would not result in intracranial hypertension. For intracranial air volumes above 11 ml, the simulation suggested that it was possible that intracranial hypertension could develop 'inflight' related to cabin pressure drop. Depending on the pre-flight intracranial pressure and air volume, this could occur quite early during the assent phase in the flight profile. DISCUSSION: These findings support the idea that there should be radiographic verification of the presence or absence of intracranial air after craniotomy for patients planned for long distance air transport. Very small amounts of air are clinically inconsequential. Otherwise, air transport with maintained ground-level cabin pressure should be a priority for these patients.

  15. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  16. Disseminated Cryptococcosis With Severe Increased Intracranial Pressure Complicated With Cranial Nerve Palsy in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir Kocabaş, Bilge; Emin Parlak, Mehmet; Özhak Baysan, Betil; Karaali, Kamil; Bingöl, Ayşen; Haspolat, Şenay

    2018-04-01

    Cryptococcosis is less common in children than in adults but remains an important cause of pneumonia and meningoencephalitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Intracranial hypertension commonly complicates cryptococcal meningitis and may cause significant visual and neurologic morbidity and mortality. Early and aggressive management of intracranial hypertension in accordance with established guidelines reduces the risk of long-term complications and death. In this case report, we present a 12-year-old girl with cryptococcal meningitis, pneumonitis and dermatitis complicated with cranial nerve palsy and loss of vision. She was successfully treated with serial cerebrospinal fluid drainage, antifungal and interferon gamma therapy.

  17. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  18. Anestesia em gestante com hipertensão intracraniana por meningite tuberculosa: relato de caso Anestesia en gestante con hipertensión intracraneal por meningitis tísica: relato de caso Anesthesia in pregnant patient with intracranial hypertension due to tuberculous meningitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Breitenbach

    2005-02-01

    área electiva. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente blanca, 32 años, 60 kg, 1,62 m de estatura, en la 36ªsemana de edad gestacional, agendada para interrupción quirúrgica de la gestación por presentarse tetraparética, con hidrocefalia consecuente de meningitis tísica, (tuberculosa. Se escogió la anestesia general para la cesárea con inducción en secuencia rápida y maniobra de Sellick para la intubación traqueal. Las drogas utilizadas fueron tiopental (250 mg, rocuronio (50 mg, fentanil (100 µg y lidocaína (60 mg por vía venosa. La inducción anestésica fue suave y mantenida con isoflurano hasta el inicio del encerramiento de la piel de la paciente, con mínimas alteraciones de sus señales vitales y del recién nacido, que recibió índice de Apgar 8 y 9, en el 1º y 5º minutos, respectivamente. La paciente despertó precozmente, sin deficiencias neurológicas adicionales. CONCLUSIONES:La anestesia general aún es la técnica anestésica preferida para cesárea en gestantes con hipertensión intracraneal, utilizándose drogas de media-vida corta y que tengan mínima interferencia en la presión intracraneal y en el recién nacido.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: It is a well-established fact today that the technique of choice for elective cesarean delivery is regional anesthesia. However, in patients with intracranial hypertension and central nervous system infection, this technique should be avoided. This paper aimed at reporting the anesthetic management of a pregnant patient with intracranial hypertension due to tuberculous meningitis submitted to elective cesarean delivery. CASE REPORT: Caucasian patient, 32 years old, 1.62 m height and 60 kg weight, in the 36th week of gestational age admitted to the obstetrics unit to have her pregnancy interrupted by cesarean delivery because she had become quadriparetic with hydrocephalus due to tuberculous meningitis. The chosen technique was general anesthesia with rapid sequence induction and Sellick maneuver for intubation. Drugs

  19. INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Widiyanthi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Intracranial pressure is total of pressure that is produced by brain, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid/CSF in the tight cranial space. As a respon to intracranial pressure increasing, compensation begin by movement of CSF from ventricle to cerebral subarachnoidal space, and increase the absorption of CSF. Increasing of ICP usually caused by increasing of brain volume (cerebral oedem, blood (intracranial bleeding, space occupying lesion, or CSF (hidrocephalus. Indication in ICP monitoring can be seen from : neurological criteria, abnormal CT-scan result when admission, normal CT-scan result, but had more two risk factors. According to the procedure that must be done, there are two methods in ICP monitoring: invasive ICP monitoring methodes and non-invasive measuring method. Increasing of ICP will decrease the compliance of brain, pulsation of artery more clearly, and the component of vein is lost. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  20. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess...... and subcortical abscesses in combination with sinusitis. She was treated with endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Both patients had developed psoriasis and episodes of infection during treatment. They were non-septic and had low fever on presentation. None of the patients suffered any long...

  1. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...... standard in terms of accurate measurement of pressure, although microtransducers generally are just as accurate. Both invasive techniques are associated with a minor risk of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. Furthermore, zero drift is a problem with selected microtransducers. The non...

  2. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  3. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide there are varying reports on the prevalence of meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms. Different reports state intracranial meningiomas, gliomas or metastatic tumours as the most common tumour among intracranial neoplasms. We present our institutions' experience of patients with intracranial ...

  4. Noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Bollela

    Full Text Available Mortality and adverse neurologic sequelae from HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis (HIV-CM remains high due to raised intracranial pressure (ICP complications. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF high opening pressure occurs in more than 50% of HIV-CM patients. Repeated lumbar puncture with CSF drainage and external lumbar drainage might be required in the management of these patients. Usually, there is a high grade of uncertainty and the basis for clinical decisions regarding ICP hypertension tends to be from clinical findings (headache, nausea and vomiting, a low Glasgow coma scale score, and/or fundoscopic papilledema. Significant neurological decline can occur if elevated CSF pressures are inadequately managed. Various treatment strategies to address intracranial hypertension in this setting have been described, including: medical management, serial lumbar punctures, external lumbar and ventricular drain placement, and either ventricular or lumbar shunting. This study aims to evaluate the role of a non-invasive intracranial pressure (ICP-NI monitoring in a critically ill HIV-CM patient.

  5. Noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollela, V R; Frigieri, G; Vilar, F C; Spavieri, D L; Tallarico, F J; Tallarico, G M; Andrade, R A P; de Haes, T M; Takayanagui, O M; Catai, A M; Mascarenhas, S

    2017-08-07

    Mortality and adverse neurologic sequelae from HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis (HIV-CM) remains high due to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) complications. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) high opening pressure occurs in more than 50% of HIV-CM patients. Repeated lumbar puncture with CSF drainage and external lumbar drainage might be required in the management of these patients. Usually, there is a high grade of uncertainty and the basis for clinical decisions regarding ICP hypertension tends to be from clinical findings (headache, nausea and vomiting), a low Glasgow coma scale score, and/or fundoscopic papilledema. Significant neurological decline can occur if elevated CSF pressures are inadequately managed. Various treatment strategies to address intracranial hypertension in this setting have been described, including: medical management, serial lumbar punctures, external lumbar and ventricular drain placement, and either ventricular or lumbar shunting. This study aims to evaluate the role of a non-invasive intracranial pressure (ICP-NI) monitoring in a critically ill HIV-CM patient.

  6. Increased Intracranial Pressure in a Boy with Gorham-Stout Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha K. Patel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gorham-Stout disease (GSD, also known as vanishing bone disease, is a rare disorder, which most commonly presents in children and young adults and is characterized by an excessive proliferation of lymphangiomatous tissue within the bones. This lymphangiomatous proliferation often affects the cranium and, due to the proximate location to the dura surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF spaces, can result in CSF leaks manifesting as intracranial hypotension with clinical symptoms to include orthostatic headache, nausea, and vertigo. We present the case of a boy with GSD and a known history of migraine headaches who presented with persistent headaches due to increased intracranial pressure. Although migraine had initially been suspected, he was eventually diagnosed with intracranial hypertension after developing ophthalmoplegia and papilledema. We describe the first known instance of successful medical treatment of increased intracranial pressure in a patient with GSD.

  7. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  8. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G

    2017-01-01

    (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent...

  9. Clinical experience with telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring in a Danish neurosurgical center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Alexander; Andresen, Morten; Hadi, Amer

    2014-01-01

    kinds of hydrocephalus, seven patients had idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and three patients had normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Fifteen patients had a shunt prior to implantation. Median duration of implantation was 248 (49-666) days and median duration from implantation to last...

  10. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  11. Hypertensive Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... the Facts About HBP • Know Your Numbers Introduction Hypertensive Crisis Monitoring Your Blood Pressure At Home • Understand Symptoms ...

  12. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  14. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  15. Relationships among neuroscore, magnetic resonance imaging features, and intracranial pressure in sheep affected by slow-growing brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Maria A; Deiana, Roberta; Melosu, Valentino; Burrai, Giovanni P; Ballocco, Isabella; Varcasia, Antonio; Scala, Antonio; Manunta, Maria L

    2017-12-22

    Diagnosing high intracranial pressure by clinical and diagnostic imaging is particularly challenging for chronic or slow-growing lesions. The aim of this prospective case-control study is to determine whether the neuroscore and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are related to the direct measurement of intracranial pressure in sheep affected by intracranial slow-growing lesions due to chronic cerebral coenurosis (Coenurus cerebralis). Seventeen affected and 10 control sheep were included. All animals underwent a neurological examination, MRI of the brain, and direct measurement of intracranial pressure. The severity of clinical signs and MRI findings were scored. Data were statistically analyzed. The invasive intracranial pressure value was higher in affected animals. A severely altered neuroscore is related to an increased intracranial pressure beyond the normal threshold (P intracranial hypertension. In conclusion, this study shows that in sheep affected by slow-growing lesions, severe alterations in the neuroscore and the results of objective MRI are related to an increased intracranial pressure beyond the normal threshold. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. Intracranial pressure monitoring after primary decompressive craniectomy in traumatic brain injury: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picetti, Edoardo; Caspani, Maria Luisa; Iaccarino, Corrado; Pastorello, Giulia; Salsi, Pierpaolo; Viaroli, Edoardo; Servadei, Franco

    2017-04-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring represents an important tool in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although current information exists regarding ICP monitoring in secondary decompressive craniectomy (DC), little is known after primary DC following emergency hematoma evacuation. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years and admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for TBI and ICP monitoring after primary DC. Exclusion criteria were ICU length of stay (LOS) pressure (CPP) after primary DC, (2) to evaluate the relationship between ICP/CPP and neurological outcome and (3) to characterize and evaluate ICP-driven therapies after DC. A total of 34 patients were enrolled. Over 308 days of ICP/CPP monitoring, 130 days with at least one episode of intracranial hypertension (26 patients, 76.5%) and 57 days with at least one episode of CPP intracranial hypertension was treated with: barbiturate coma (n = 7, 20.6%), external ventricular drain (EVD) (n = 4, 11.8%), DC diameter widening (n = 1, 2.9%) and removal of newly formed hematomas (n = 3, 8.8%). Intracranial hypertension and/or low CPP occurs frequently after primary DC; their occurence is associated with an unfavorable neurological outcome. ICP monitoring appears useful in guiding therapy after primary DC.

  17. Analysis of risk factors for perifocal oedema after endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial arterial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, Snezana; Jankovic, Slobodan; Popovic, Katarina Surlan; Bankovic, Dragic; Popovic, Peter; Mijailovic, Milan

    2015-12-01

    Endovascular embolization is a treatment of choice for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, but sometimes is complicated with perianeurysmal oedema. The aim of our study was to establish incidence and outcomes of perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and to reveal possible risk factors for development of this potentially serious complication. In total 119 adult patients with endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (performed at Department for Interventional Neuroradiology, Clinical Center, Kragujevac, Serbia) were included in our study. The embolizations were made by electrolite-detachable platinum coils: pure platinum, hydrophilic and combination of platinum and hydrophilic coils. Primary outcome variable was perianeurysmal oedema visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 7, 30 and 90 days after the embolization. The perianurysmal oedema appeared in 47.6% of patients treated with hydrophilic coils, in 21.6% of patients treated with platinum coils, and in 53.8% of those treated with mixed type of the coils. The multivariate logistic regression showed that variables associated with occurrence of perianeurysmal oedema are volume of the aneurysm, hypertension, diabetes and smoking habit. Hypertension is the most important independent predictor of the perianeurysmal oedema, followed by smoking and diabetes. The results of our study suggest that older patients with larger unruptured intracranial aneurysms, who suffer from diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and have the smoking habit, are under much higher risk of having perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling.

  18. Fatores associados à hipertensão intracraniana em crianças e adolescentes vítimas de traumatismo crânio-encefálico grave Factors associated with intracranial hypertension in children and teenagers who suffered severe head injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Diniz Guerra

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar fatores associados à ocorrência de hipertensão intracraniana em pacientes pediátricos vítimas de traumatismo crânio-encefálico (TCE grave. MÉTODOS: Coorte com coleta retrospectiva do período de 1998 a 2003. Incluídos pacientes entre 0 e 16 anos com TCE, pontuação 20 mmHg com necessidade de tratamento e HIC refratária, acima de 25 mmHg, com necessidade de coma barbitúrico ou craniectomia descompressiva. Foi realizada análise univariada, seguida de multivariada, sendo consideradas significativas as variáveis com p OBJECTIVE: To analyze factors associated with intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients who suffered severe head injuries. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study, with data collected from September 1998 through August 2003, including patients aged 0 to 16 who suffered severe head injuries, Glasgow score 20 mmHg requiring treatment, while refractory IH was ICP over 25 mmHg requiring barbiturates or decompressive craniectomy. Univariate analysis was followed by multivariate analysis; variables were considered significant if p < 0.05. RESULTS: Ages ranged from 2 months to 16 years, median age 9.7 (6.0-2.3 years. Glasgow scores ranged from 3 to 8, median 6 (4-7. Traffic accidents were responsible for 79.5% of events. Monitoring devices were installed, on average, 14 hours after trauma, median time 24 hours. One hundred and three patients (78% had IH, while 57 (43.2% had refractory IH. In multivariate analysis, younger age ranges were associated with IH relative risk = 1.67 (1.03-2.72; p = 0.037, and abnormal postures were associated with refractory IH relative risk = 2.25 (1.06-4.78. The group mortality rate was 51.5%; it was correlated with use of barbiturates in refractory IH and low cerebral perfusion pressure at the intensive care unit. CONCLUSIONS: IH and refractory IH were frequent events in pediatric patients who suffered severe head injuries. The younger the patient, the greater the chance of

  19. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    . The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  20. Intracranial dural metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lakshmi; Abrey, Lauren E; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2009-05-01

    : Intracranial dural metastases (IDM) are found at autopsy in 9% of patients with advanced systemic cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, IDM have not been studied systematically in the modern neuroimaging era. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and prognosis of patients with IDM. : The current study was a retrospective review of 122 patients with IDM diagnosed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2006. Patients with concurrent brain or leptomeningeal metastases were excluded. : Sixty-one percent of the patients were women; the median age at diagnosis was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) at diagnosis was 80, and the median time to IDM diagnosis from initial cancer diagnosis was 37 months. Breast (34%) and prostate (17%) cancers were the most frequent primary tumors associated with IDM. Fifty-six percent of patients had a single dural metastasis. On imaging, 70% had metastases of the overlying skull, 44% had dural tail metastases, 53% had vasogenic edema, and 34% had brain invasion. Direct extension from skull metastases was the most common mode of spread. Eighty-three percent of patients had active systemic disease at the time of IDM diagnosis. A lower KPS and lung cancer were associated with worse overall survival. Surgical resection and chemotherapy improved progression-free survival, but only resection was found to be associated with improved overall survival. : IDM affect a significant proportion of cancer patients. KPS and status of systemic cancer should guide treatment decisions. Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  1. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  2. Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension.

  3. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  4. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies.

  5. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension affects about 10 - 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta, aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism - Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3, non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia, and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics. Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy.

  6. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  7. MR imaging findings in patients with secondary intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, A C; Riedel, C; Fruehauf, M-C; van Baalen, A; Bartsch, T; Hedderich, J; Alfke, K; Doerner, L; Jansen, O

    2011-01-01

    IH can alter the configuration of anatomic structures of the central nervous system. We determined the sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging to detect these changes in patients with secondary IH. Patients (n = 36) with IH were prospectively investigated with MR imaging and were matched to 36 controls. MR images were evaluated for elongation and edema of the optic nerves, protrusion of the optic disc, flattening of the posterior sclera, height of the pituitary gland, and width of the optic nerve sheath. On MRV, we recorded venous sinus abnormalities and measured the luminal width of the superior ophthalmic veins. A grading score was introduced to define cranial venous outflow obstruction. Cranial venous outflow obstruction and ONS hydrops were the most valid signs indicating IH with a sensitivity of 94% and 92% and a specificity of 100% and 89%, respectively. Sensitivities and specificities were 56% and 97% for reduced pituitary height, 64% and 78% for flattening of the posterior sclera, 31% and 97% for widening of the superior ophthalmic veins, 33% and 100% for optic disc protrusion, 14% and 100% for optic nerve edema, and 6% and 100% for elongation of the optic nerve. At least 2 MR imaging findings could be demonstrated in each patient but in none of the controls. The number of positive MR imaging findings correlated with CSF pressure (r = 0.62, P = .01). The combination of cranial and orbital MR imaging and MRV can be highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of patients with IH.

  8. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension with altered consciousness in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 39, No 3 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Unilateral transverse sinus stenting of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussière, M; Falero, R; Nicolle, D; Proulx, A; Patel, V; Pelz, D

    2010-04-01

    The pathophysiology of IIH remains unknown. TS stenoses have been observed in a high proportion of these patients. Stent placement to remove this potential obstruction to venous outflow has been proposed as a treatment option for patients with IIH refractory to medical treatment. The clinical presentation, treatment, and outcome of patients with refractory IIH evaluated for venous sinus stent placement at a tertiary care center was retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen female patients with IIH were evaluated for sinovenous stent placement. Moderate sinus stenoses with normal intrasinus pressures were found in 3 patients and therefore stent placement was not performed. Ten patients had elevated intrasinus pressures (pressure gradient across stenosis, 11-50 mm Hg), which decreased following unilateral TS stent placement. Headaches improved or resolved in all stented patients. Papilledema resolved completely or almost completely in 8 patients and significantly improved in 2 patients. One patient developed optic atrophy. There were no major periprocedural complications. In this small case series, restoring the patency of stenotic venous sinuses with a stent in patients with refractory IIH resulted in symptomatic improvement in all treated patients. The safety and efficacy of this procedure should be evaluated in a randomized controlled study to determine its role within the armamentarium of therapeutic options for patients with IIH.

  10. Clinical review: Therapy for refractory intracranial hypertension in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttler, Eric; Schellinger, Peter D; Aschoff, Alfred; Zweckberger, Klaus; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of patients with large hemispheric ischaemic stroke accompanied by massive space-occupying oedema represents one of the major unsolved problems in neurocritical care medicine. Despite maximum intensive care, the prognosis of these patients is poor, with case fatality rates as high as 80%. Therefore, the term 'malignant brain infarction' was coined. Because conservative treatment strategies to limit brain tissue shift almost consistently fail, these massive infarctions often are regarded as an untreatable disease. The introduction of decompressive surgery (hemicraniectomy) has completely changed this point of view, suggesting that mortality rates may be reduced to approximately 20%. However, critics have always argued that the reduction in mortality may be outweighed by an accompanying increase in severe disability. Due to the lack of conclusive evidence of efficacy from randomised trials, controversy over the benefit of these treatment strategies remained, leading to large regional differences in the application of this procedure. Meanwhile, data from randomised trials confirm the results of former observational studies, demonstrating that hemicraniectomy not only significantly reduces mortality but also significantly improves clinical outcome without increasing the number of completely dependent patients. Hypothermia is another promising treatment option but still needs evidence of efficacy from randomised controlled trials before it may be recommended for clinical routine use. This review gives the reader an integrated view of the current status of treatment options in massive hemispheric brain infarction, based on the available data of clinical trials, including the most recent data from randomised trials published in 2007.

  11. OCT for optic disc evaluation in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren; Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables quantification of retinal layer thicknesses. Studies evaluating the ability of OCT to identify and quantify papilledema are few. Therefore, the aim was to evaluate the applicability of peripapillary OCT evaluation in an unselected, consecutive series...

  12. Giant arachnoid granulation in a patient with benign intracranial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Yaqci, Baki; Cirak, Bayram; Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Denizli (Turkey)

    2008-10-15

    We report magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and angiographic imaging of an unusual giant arachnoid granulation in the superior sagittal sinus in a man with headache and vertigo. Intrasinus pressure measurements revealed a significant pressure gradient across the lesion. MR imaging is useful to identify giant arachnoid granulation and dural sinus thrombosis, whereas dural sinus pressure measurement in certain cases of giant arachnoid granulations can be used to evaluate the lesion as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (orig.)

  13. Giant arachnoid granulation in a patient with benign intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Yaqci, Baki; Cirak, Bayram; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2008-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and angiographic imaging of an unusual giant arachnoid granulation in the superior sagittal sinus in a man with headache and vertigo. Intrasinus pressure measurements revealed a significant pressure gradient across the lesion. MR imaging is useful to identify giant arachnoid granulation and dural sinus thrombosis, whereas dural sinus pressure measurement in certain cases of giant arachnoid granulations can be used to evaluate the lesion as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (orig.)

  14. Prognosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    visual impairment as best-corrected visual acuity of <0.5 in the better eye. Student's unpaired t test was used to compare continuous variables, Fisher's exact test was used for categorical data, and binary logistic regression analysis was used to predict visual outcomes. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant.

  15. Intracranial hemorrhage: ultrasound, CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is one of the most common causes of acute focal neurologic deficit in children and adults. Neuroimaging including ultrasonography (US), computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. Imaging findings should guide treatment. The highly variable appearance of an intracranial hemorrhage can be challenging. A thorough knowledge of hematoma evolution and US, CT and MR hematoma characteristics is mandatory for adequate interpretation of findings. The purpose of this review is (1) to summarize the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage on various imaging techniques and (2) to review the various types of intracranial hemorrhage, and their causes. (orig.)

  16. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Intracranial tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic.1 In the central nervous system tuberculosis manifests as cerebritis, cerebral abscess, tuberculoma, and tubercu- lous meningitis (TBM).1-5 TBM is thought to arise from cerebrospinal.

  17. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Imaging intracranial tuberculosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children`s Hospital, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    1995-05-01

    A morphologically based imaging review of intracranial tuberculosis in childhood is presented. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance features of parenchymal tuberculoma, tuberculous meningitis and meningeal/meniningocerebral tuberculoma are illustrated. Recent insight into the nature of tuberculoma necrosis and its magnetic resonance correlation is reviewed. Pathogenesis, relevant clinical background and the role of modern imaging is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  20. Retina findings in intracranial aneurysm patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Il Kang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate fundus findings in patients with intracranial aneurysm(ICAto determine the relation between ICA and distinguishable retinal features.METHODS: We analyzed the medical records and ocular images of 46 patients with previously diagnosed ICA referred from the Neurosurgical Department. All patients underwent ophthalmologic evaluation including fluorescein angiography(FAG. Furthermore, the presence of drusen, macular degeneration, cotton wool spot, hard exudates, retinal hemorrhage, arteriolar attenuation, A-V crossing signs, arm-to-retina time, and A-V transit time were evaluated. The results of ICA patients(Group 1were compared with those of 22 idiopathic epiretinal membrane patients with unaffected eyes(Group 2.RESULTS: Mean ages were 60.02y(Group 1and 60.68y(Group 2respectively(P=0.70. The prevalence of hypertension was similar in both groups. No case with retinal macroaneurysm was found in either group. The presence of drusen, macular degeneration, cotton wool spot, hard exudates, retinal hemorrhage, arteriolar attenuation, and A-V crossing sign was not significantly different between the two groups. Mean arm-to-retina time was not significantly different in two groups, either.CONCLUSION: We cannot find any evidence that the patients with ICA shows specific changes in the FAG and fundus.

  1. The relationship between intracranial pressure and lactate/pyruvate ratio in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesak, T; Adamkov, J; Habalova, J; Poczos, P; Kanta, M; Bartos, M; Hosszu, T

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between intracranial pressure (intracranial pressure monitoring) and lactate pyruvate ratio (cerebral microdialysis) in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. In a group of fifteen patients, intracranial pressure and lactate/pyruvate ratios were measured and logged in hourly intervals. The relationship between these two variables was subsequently analysed in two ways. 1) Intracranial hypertension (ICP > 20 mmHg) in the presence of energy deprivation (L/P ratio > 30) was noted. 2) The dynamics of L/P ratio changes in relation to immediate ICP and CPP values was analysed. Out of a total of 1873 monitored hours we were able to record lactate/pyruvate ratios higher than 30 in 832 hours (44 %). Of those 832 hours during which lactate/pyruvate ratios were higher than 30, ICP was higher than 20 in 193 hours (23 %). Out of 219 hours of monitoring, in which ICP was higher than 20, a simultaneously increased L/P ratio higher than 30 was recorded in 193 hours (88 %). L/P ratio values above 30 were associated with decreased CPP values (p = 0.04), but not with increased ICP values (p = 0.79). Intracranial hypertension coincides with energetic imbalance in approximately one quarter of cases. This points to the shortcomings of the most common form of neuromonitoring in SAH patients - ICP monitoring. This method may not be reliable enough in detecting hypoxic damage, which is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in SAH patients (Fig. 5, Ref. 11).

  2. Brain computed tomography of the hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, W. K.; Park, C. K.; Cho, O. K.; Hahm, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    Now a day, hypertension is more increasing in frequency and ranked the top of the causes of death in Korea and other nations. Most of cerebrovascular accidents in hypertensive patients are composed of vascular occlusive changes and hemorrhages. In cerebral angiogram, we can only detect occlusion of large artery and large mass effect from hematoma or cerebral infarction without identification of its entity. The computed tomogram, however, is the best way for evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. This study includes evaluation of computed tomograms of 106 patients with hypertension during the period of 17 months from Feb. 1979 to June 1980 in the department of radiology, college of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 106 patients was broad ranging from 25 years to 76 years. 67.9% of patients were over the age of 50. The male and female sex ratio was 3:2. 2. 28 out of 106 patients were normal and 78 patients revealed abnormal on C. T. findings; those were intracranial hemorrhage (35 patients), cerebral infarction (32 patients) and brain atrophy (11 patients). 3. All of the intracranial hemorrhage except one were intracerebral hemorrhage; those were located in the cerebral hemisphere (19 patients), basal ganglia (15 patients) and brain stem (1 patient). The except one case of intracranial hemorrhage was subdural hematoma. 7 patients of intraventricular hemorrhage and 1 patient of subarachnoid hemorrhage were combined with intracerebral hemorrhage. 2/3 of patients who had hemorrhage in cerebral hemisphere revealed lesions in the parietal and temporal lobes. 4. In cases of cerebral infarction, the cerebral hemisphere was most common site of lesion (20 cases), and the next was basal ganglia (11 cases). Most of the infarcts in cerebral hemisphere were located in the parietal and temporal lobes. The left basal ganglia was more commonly involved

  3. Hypertension hos gravide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Johansen, Marianne; Kamper, Anne Lise

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...

  4. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  5. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  6. [Hypertension during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Johansen, M.; Kamper, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...

  7. Transethmoidal encephalocele after reduction of high intracranial pressure in aqueductal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Guive; Alavi, Ehsan; Jalessi, Maryam; Haddadian, Karim; Faramarzi, Faezeh

    2014-01-01

    Acquired non-traumatic transethmoidal encephaloceles are very infrequent lesions that are generally caused by a tumor or hydrocephalus. As far as we know, there is no reported case of encephalocele after CSF diversion in the literature. We present a 25-year-old woman with hydrocephalus due to aquiductal stenosis who was treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Nine months later, she had developed rhinorrhea and on imaging she had a transethmoidal encephalocele. She underwent endonasal endoscopic repair of the defect and removal of herniated parenchyma. CSF diversion to parasellar cisterns is not a known iatrogenic cause of basal encephalocele and is not noted elsewhere as a complication of third ventriculostomy. However, as third ventriculostomy is performed usually for intracranial hypertension treatment and intracranial hypertension itself is a known but rare cause of lacunar skull defect and encephalocele, this co-incidence may occur.

  8. Intracranial Hemorrhage Following a 3-week Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 35-year-old female presented to the ED with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 11. Per her boyfriend, the patient was having headaches for the past 3 weeks. She was initially taken to an outside hospital where her GCS was reported as 13. A non-contrast head computed tomography (CT revealed a large lobar intraparenchymal hemorrhage within the left frontal parietal lobe with midline shift. Upon examination, vitals were notable for blood pressure of 209/88mmHg, and her left pupil was fixed and dilated. The patient had extension of her right arm to noxious stimuli, paralysis of her right leg, and purposeful movement of the left arm and left leg. The patient was started on a nicardipine drip in the ED and subsequently taken to the operating room for a decompressive craniectomy. Significant findings: The patient’s head CT showed a significant area of hyperdensity consistent with an intracranial hemorrhage located within the left frontal parietal lobe (red arrow. Additionally, there is rightward midline shift up to 1.1cm (green arrow and entrapment of the right lateral ventricle (blue arrow. Discussion: Intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the mortality for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH has declined steadily over the past several decades, the mortality for IPH mortality has not significantly.1 One of the most serious considerations when treating a patient with IPH is the management of intracranial pressure (ICP.2 Once an IPH is identified, immediate steps should be taken to bring ICP within acceptable levels including elevating the head of the bed to 30 degrees, sedation, and controlling hypertension with medications.2-3 Even with early and aggressive care, the prognosis for IPH remains poor; the 30-day mortality rate for IPH is estimated to be less than 50%, and a 2010 systematic review estimated only 12-39% of IPH patients achieve independent function.4-5 Predictors of

  9. The Upper Limit of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation Is Decreased with Elevations in Intracranial Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesek, Matthew; Kibler, Kathleen; Easley, R Blaine; Mytar, Jennifer; Rhee, Christopher; Andropolous, Dean; Brady, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The upper limit of cerebrovascular pressure autoregulation (ULA) is inadequately characterized. We sought to delineate the ULA in a neonatal swine model. Neonatal piglets with sham surgery (n = 9), interventricular fluid infusion (INF; n = 10), controlled cortical impact (CCI; n = 10), or impact + infusion (CCI + INF; n = 11) had intracranial pressure monitoring and bilateral cortical laser-Doppler flux recordings during arterial hypertension until lethality. An increase in red cell flux as a function of cerebral perfusion pressure was determined by piecewise linear regression and static rates of autoregulation (SRoRs) were determined above and below this inflection. When identified, the ULA (median [interquartile range]) was as follows: sham group: 102 mmHg (97-109), INF group: 75 mmHg (52-84), CCI group: 81 mmHg (69-101), and CCI + INF group: 61 mmHg (52-57; p = 0.01). Both groups with interventricular infusion had significantly lower ULA compared with the sham group. Neonatal piglets without intracranial pathological conditions tolerated acute hypertension, with minimal perturbation of cerebral blood flow. Piglets with acutely elevated intracranial pressure, with or without trauma, demonstrated loss of autoregulation when subjected to arterial hypertension.

  10. [Intraoperative fluid therapy in infants with congestive heart failure due to intracranial pial arteriovenous fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Fernández, F J; Calderón-Seoane, E; Rodríguez-Peña, F; Torres-Morera, L M

    2016-05-01

    Pial arteriovenous fistula is a rare intracranial congenital malformation (0.1-1: 100,000). It has a high blood flow between one or more pial arteries and drains into the venous circulation. It is usually diagnosed during the childhood by triggering an intracranial hypertension and/or congestive heart failure due to left-right systemic shunt. It is a rare malformation with a complex pathophysiology. The perioperative anaesthetic management is not well established. We present a 6-month-old infant diagnosed with pial arteriovenous fistula with hypertension and congestive heart failure due to left-right shunt. He required a craniotomy and clipping of vascular malformation. Anaesthetic considerations in patients with this condition are a great challenge. It must be performed by multidisciplinary teams with experience in paediatrics. The maintenance of blood volume during the intraoperative course is very important. Excessive fluid therapy can precipitate a congestive heart failure or intracranial hypertension, and a lower fluid therapy may cause a tissue hypoxia due to the bleeding. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author).

  12. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  13. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... that carry blood from your heart to your lungs become hard and narrow. Your heart has to ...

  14. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  15. Endokrin hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Ibsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma-aldosterone-to-renin ......Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma...

  16. Perioperative hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pinna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Perioperative hypertension is a situation whose management is suggested by the clinical judgement much more than clinical evidences. JNC 7 guidelines give a classification of blood pressure (BP, without any mention specifically dedicated to patients undergoing surgery. The ACC/AHA guidelines recommend deferring surgery if diastolic BP is above 110 mmHg and systolic BP is above 180 mmHg. AIM OF THE STUDY In this review we considered pathogenetic, clinical and therapeutic factors related to perioperative management of hypertensive patients. DISCUSSION In actual trend of the preoperative evaluation, alone hypertension is considered as a minor risk factor. BP values ≤ 180/110 mmHg do not influence the outcomes in patients who underwent noncardiac surgery. Therefore, in these conditions it’s not necessary to delay surgery. Hypertensive picks are possible during the operation, mostly because of the intubation, but, much more dangerous, falls of pressure are possible. The intraoperative arterial pressure should be maintained within 20% of the best estimated preoperative arterial pressure, especially in patients with markedly elevated preoperative pressures. After surgery the arterial BP can increase for stress factors, pain, hypoxia and hypercapnia, hypothermia and infusional liquids overload. For all these reasons a careful monitoring is mandatory. Anti-hypertensive medication should be continued during the postoperative period in patients with known and treated hypertension, as unplanned withdrawal of treatment can result in rebounded hypertension. The decision to give anti-hypertensive drugs must be made for each patient, taking into account their normal BP and their postoperative BP. With regard to the optimal treatment of the patient with poorly or uncontrolled hypertension in the perioperative evaluation, recent guidelines suggest that the best treatment may consider cardioselective β-blockers therapy, but also clonidin by

  17. A Comparison of Pharmacologic Therapeutic Agents Used for the Reduction of Intracranial Pressure After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnemari, Ahmed M; Krafcik, Brianna M; Mansour, Tarek R; Gaudin, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    In neurotrauma care, a better understanding of treatments after traumatic brain injury (TBI) has led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality in this population. TBI represents a significant medical problem, and complications after TBI are associated with the initial injury and postevent intracranial processes such as increased intracranial pressure and brain edema. Consequently, appropriate therapeutic interventions are required to reduce brain tissue damage and improve cerebral perfusion. We present a contemporary review of literature on the use of pharmacologic therapies to reduce intracranial pressure after TBI and a comparison of their efficacy. This review was conducted by PubMed query. Only studies discussing pharmacologic management of patients after TBI were included. This review includes prospective and retrospective studies and includes randomized controlled trials as well as cohort, case-control, observational, and database studies. Systematic literature reviews, meta-analyses, and studies that considered conditions other than TBI or pediatric populations were not included. Review of the literature describing the current pharmacologic treatment for intracranial hypertension after TBI most often discussed the use of hyperosmolar agents such as hypertonic saline and mannitol, sedatives such as fentanyl and propofol, benzodiazepines, and barbiturates. Hypertonic saline is associated with faster resolution of intracranial hypertension and restoration of optimal cerebral hemodynamics, although these advantages did not translate into long-term benefits in morbidity or mortality. In patients refractory to treatment with hyperosmolar therapy, induction of a barbiturate coma can reduce intracranial pressure, although requires close monitoring to prevent adverse events. Current research suggests that the use of hypertonic saline after TBI is the best option for immediate decrease in intracranial pressure. A better understanding of the efficacy of

  18. Relationship between intracranial pressure and antifungal agents levels in the CSF of patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Fernanda; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Pilla, Carmen; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; Neto, Gustavo Wissmann; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2017-08-02

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intracranial hypertension in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amphotericin B and fluconazole levels of patients with cryptococcal meningitis. CSF samples and intracranial pressure were obtained by means of routine punctures performed at days 1, 7, and 14 of therapy, respectively. Amphotericin B and fluconazole CSF levels were measured by HPLC method as previously described. The minimum inhibitory concentration for amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5΄flucytosine, and voriconazole of each Cryptococcus isolate was performed according to CLSI. The predominant Cryptococcus species found was C. neoformans, and the major underlying condition was AIDS. Only one CSF sample had a detectable level for amphotericin B during the 14 days of therapy. Fluconazole CSF levels progressively increased from day 1 to day 14 of therapy for most cases. Fluconazole levels in the CSF were above the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Cryptococcus during the initial 14 days of antifungal therapy. Variations of intracranial pressure did not affect amphotericin B and fluconazole levels in the CSF. The generalized estimating correlation (GEE) and Spearman correlation test (SCT) showed no significant correlation between the amphotericin B or fluconazole concentrations in the CSF and intracranial pressure (P = .953 and P = .093, respectively for GEE test and P = .477 and P = .847, respectively, for SCT). Combination therapy of amphotericin B with fluconazole was effective in 60% of the patients considering CSF cultures were negative in 9 of 15 patients after 14 days of therapy. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of intracranial hypertension on the therapeutic efficacy of different antifungal agents in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  19. Dolichoectasia and dissection of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, D.; Boshnjakovich, P.; Zivkovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the clinical neuro-radiological features of dolichoectatic intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection. The clinical features native and post-contrast CT scans of five patients (4 men and 1 woman; age ranged from 25 to 68 years) with dolichoectatic intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection were analysed retrospectively for a period of 3 years. Diagnosis was confirmed by vertebral angiography. Clinical symptoms due to ischemic cerebellar and/or brain stem lesion were present in 4 patient, 2 of them had Wallenberg syndrome. Occipital and/or posterior neck pains were found in 4 patients. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was shown in 1 patient. The incidence of previously documented hypertension was 60% (3 of 5 patients). The prognosis was relatively good. Dolichoectasia was detected by native, post-contrast CT scans and reconstructions in all patients. Intimal flap was visualized with post contrast CT scans in 1 patients. Extension of the basilar artery tip into the third ventricle was detected in 3 patients. Ischemic low-density lesions were detected in 3 patients and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1 patient. Vertebral angiography disclosed elongation and dilatation of the vertebral and basilar arteries, double lumen sign - the presence of a true and false lumen and an intimal flap, double density and retention of contrast medium. Ischemic symptoms and head and/or neck pain were the most common clinical findings. The double lumen sign considered as the only pathognomonic angiographic finding of arterial dissection, was found in all patients. Angiography is still considered the 'gold standard' for diagnosis of intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection. (author)

  20. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  1. Early Craniectomy Improves Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Casey J; Baldor, Daniel J; Hanna, Mena M; Namias, Nicholas; Bullock, M Ross; Jagid, Jonathan R; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2018-03-01

    After traumatic brain injury, decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a second-tier, late therapy for refractory intracranial hypertension. We hypothesize that early DC, based on CT evidence of intracranial hypertension, improves intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). From September 2008 to January 2015, 286 traumatic brain injury patients requiring invasive ICP monitoring at a single Level I trauma center were reviewed. DC and non-DC patients were propensity score matched 1:1, based on demographics, hemodynamics, injury severity score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), transfusion requirements, and need for vasopressor therapy. Data are presented as M ± SD or median (IQR) and compared at P ≤ 0.05. The study population was 42 ± 17 years, 84 per cent male, ISS = 29 ± 11, GCS = 6(5), length of stay (LOS) = 32(40) days, and 28 per cent mortality. There were 116/286 (41%) DC, of which 105/116 (91%) were performed at the time of ICP placement. For 50 DC propensity matched to 50 non-DC patients, the midline shift was 7(11) versus 0(5) mm (P 20 mm Hg) was 1(10) versus 8(16) (P = 0.017), abnormal CPP (hours < 60 mm Hg) was 0(6) versus 4(9) (P = 0.008), daily minimum CPP (mm Hg) was 67(13) versus 62(17) (P = 0.010), and daily maximum ICP (mm Hg) was 18(9) versus 22(11) (P < 0.001). However, LOS [33(37) versus 25(34) days], mortality (24 versus 30%), and Glasgow Outcome Score Extended [3.0(3.0) versus 3.0(4.0)] did not improve significantly. Early DC for CT evidence of intracranial hypertension decreased abnormal ICP and CPP time and improved ICP and CPP thresholds, but had no obvious effect on the outcome.

  2. Renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Sos, T.A.; Nielsen, S.L.; Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Herlev; Cornell Univ., New York

    1989-01-01

    Hypertension constitutes a major health problem and the challenge is to identify patients having 'surgically' curable renal vascular disease among the majority with so-called essential hypertension. The best of unsatisfactory diagnostic tests are renography and plasma renin activity both before and during angiotensin II blockade. The necessity of better screening tests has increased because of the recent advances in surgical techniques and especially percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. The latter has definitely become the method of choice for correction of suspected hemodynamically significant artery stenoses whenever technically feasible. With improved angioplasty techniques the risk of treating renal artery stenosis without hemodynamic and clinical importance (so-called cosmetic repair) has increased. Unfortunately randomized trials including surgery versus angioplasty are not available. It should be kept in mind that only after correction of the stenosis is achieved and the blood pressure has become normal, can the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension be made with certainty. (orig.)

  3. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  4. Phase contrast MRI in intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are outpouchings of intracranial arteries that cause brain hemorrhage after rupture. Unruptured aneurysms can be treated but the risk of treatment may outweigh the risk of rupture. Local intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics can contribute substantially to the rupture risk estimation

  5. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. Key Words: Intracranial Complications, Sinusitis, ...

  6. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  7. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  8. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  9. Technique of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression effectively reduces postoperative complications of severe bifrontal contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Bifrontal contusion is a common clinical brain injury. In the early stage, it is often mild, but it progresses rapidly and frequently worsens suddenly. This condition can become life threatening and therefore requires surgery. Conventional decompression craniectomy is the commonly used treatment method. In this study, the effect of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression surgery on the prognosis of patients with acute severe bifrontal contusion was investigated. Method A total of 136 patients with severe bifrontal contusion combined with deteriorated intracranial hypertension admitted from March 2001 to March 2014 in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups, i.e., a conventional decompression group and an intracranial pressure (ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression group (68 patients each, to conduct a retrospective study. The incidence rates of acute intraoperative encephalocele, delayed hematomas, and postoperative cerebral infarctions and the Glasgow outcome scores (GOSs 6 months after the surgery were compared between the two groups.Results (1 The incidence rates of acute encephalocele and contralateral delayed epidural hematoma in the stepwise decompression surgery group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05; (2 6 months after the surgery, the incidence of vegetative state and mortality in the stepwise decompression group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05; the rate of favorable prognosis in the stepwise decompression group was also significantly higher than that in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05.Conclusions The ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression technique reduced the perioperative complications of traumatic brain injury through the gradual release of intracranial pressure and was beneficial to the prognosis of

  10. Predicting Intracranial Pressure and Brain Tissue Oxygen Crises in Patients With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Risa B; Lazaridis, Christos; Jermaine, Christopher M; Robertson, Claudia S; Rusin, Craig G

    2016-09-01

    To develop computer algorithms that can recognize physiologic patterns in traumatic brain injury patients that occur in advance of intracranial pressure and partial brain tissue oxygenation crises. The automated early detection of crisis precursors can provide clinicians with time to intervene in order to prevent or mitigate secondary brain injury. A retrospective study was conducted from prospectively collected physiologic data. intracranial pressure, and partial brain tissue oxygenation crisis events were defined as intracranial pressure of greater than or equal to 20 mm Hg lasting at least 15 minutes and partial brain tissue oxygenation value of less than 10 mm Hg for at least 10 minutes, respectively. The physiologic data preceding each crisis event were used to identify precursors associated with crisis onset. Multivariate classification models were applied to recorded data in 30-minute epochs of time to predict crises between 15 and 360 minutes in the future. The neurosurgical unit of Ben Taub Hospital (Houston, TX). Our cohort consisted of 817 subjects with severe traumatic brain injury. Our algorithm can predict the onset of intracranial pressure crises with 30-minute advance warning with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.86 using only intracranial pressure measurements and time since last crisis. An analogous algorithm can predict the start of partial brain tissue oxygenation crises with 30-minute advanced warning with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.91. Our algorithms provide accurate and timely predictions of intracranial hypertension and tissue hypoxia crises in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Almost all of the information needed to predict the onset of these events is contained within the signal of interest and the time since last crisis.

  11. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Li Guoxin; Qu Yuanming; Tang Jun; Liu Zuoqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To setup an endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm with detachable balloon and micro-coil. Methods: Trans-femoral artery Seldinger's catheterization was used. Balloons and free MDS, GDC micro-coils were pushed into the aneurysm or carrying arteries. Results: No mortality occurred in authors' group. Internal carotid arteries (ICA) were occluded with detachable balloons in 5 aneurysms at sinus segment of ICA and 4 traumatic pseudo-aneurysms. No complications occurred. 9 aneurysms were completely occluded with micro-coils and 2 were partly (95%) occluded. 2 patients got mild paralysis due to vasospasm or mal detaching of MDS coils. Conclusions: Balloon occlusion of ICA for treatment of aneurysm at sinus segment is safe and effective in case of having abundant collateral circulation. Coil occlusion of intracranial aneurysm is a promising method of endovascular treatment. Compared with MDS, GDC coil is safer but expensive. Free coil is not very safe theoretically, but can be used with careful consideration as it is much cheaper

  12. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  13. A case of intracranial teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Madoka; Ando, Yukinori; Takashima, Sachio; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hiramoto, Shinsuke.

    1985-01-01

    A case of neonatal intracranial teratoma was examined on ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and tumor markers in serum, CSF and tumor tissue. This 27-day-old male infant was pointed out a head enlargement by prenatal sonography at 39 weeks' gestation. He admitted to our hospital at the age of one day after cesarean section. His birth weight was 4430 g and head circumstance 47.5 cm. On admission, physical and neurological examinations reveled big head, weak crying, twiching and sun set phenomenon. The optic fundi were normal. The CT scan at 1 day demonstrated the marked enlargement of lateral ventricles and the supratentorial large polycystic mass with calcifications at midline area. Transfontanelle sonography also delineated the polycystic mass and enlarged ventricle. Ventricular tap showed bloody CSF. Alpha-Fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen level in CSF was higher than those in serum. Postmortam tumor necropsy revealed a teratoma including mature squamous epithelium, muscle, cartilage, bone, lymphoid and nervous tissue. There were immature mesenchymal cells in some parts. The immune histochemical method showed positive staining to AFP in intestinal and respiratory epithelium, and to CEA in intestinal epithelium and immature mesenchymal cells. In summary, these characteristic findings of US, CT and tumor marker in CSF have a diagnostic value of intracranial teratoma. (author)

  14. Risk Factors Associated With the Presence of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Jisung; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S; Kwon, Sun U

    2015-11-01

    With the increased investigation of cerebral arteries using magnetic resonance angiography in the general population, the detection of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) has increased. Understanding the distribution and factors associated with UIAs might be helpful for understanding the pathomechanism. Subjects who underwent magnetic resonance angiography with a health examination at the Health Screening and Promotion Center were enrolled. The incidence and risk factors of UIAs (age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol, and coronary artery disease) were investigated by comparing patients with and without UIAs. These risk factors were also investigated by the UIA location, distal internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery (MCA), MCA bifurcation, anterior and posterior communicating artery, and posterior circulation. Among 187 166 subjects who received health examination, 18 954 underwent magnetic resonance angiography. Of them, 367 (1.93%) had UIAs. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P=0.003), women (OR, 2.00; P<0.001), hypertension (OR, 2.21; P<0.001), smoking (OR, 1.66; P=0.001), and coronary artery disease (OR, 0.23; P<0.001) were independently associated with the presence of UIAs. Hypertension was associated with most UIAs, except for those located at sidewalls (anterior cerebral artery and MCA). MCA aneurysms were associated with old age and smoking. Distal internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, and MCA-bifurcation aneurysms were associated with female sex. Anterior communicating artery aneurysms were associated with smoking and alcohol. Posterior circulation UIAs were only associated with hypertension. Coronary artery disease was negatively associated with anterior circulation aneurysms. The risk factors for UIAs differ by their location, compared with the control. Interestingly, the presence of coronary artery disease was protective against the presence of UIAs. © 2015 American Heart

  15. Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Liver Disease .) Portal hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure in the portal vein (the large vein that brings blood from the ... imaging (MRI), or liver biopsy. Drugs can reduce blood pressure in the portal vein, but if bleeding in the digestive tract occurs, ...

  16. Neuro-ophthalmic presentations and treatment of Cryptococcal meningitis-related increased intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino Barros Palau, Angelina; Morgan, Michael L; Foroozan, Rod; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    To illustrate three different ophthalmic presentations of cryptococcal meningitis (CM). CM is the most common manifestation of extra-pulmonary cryptococcosis. Intracranial hypertension occurs in up to 75% of patients with CM and is associated with increased mortality. CM can present to the ophthalmologist as vision loss, papilledema, abducens palsy, and/or other cranial neuropathies. We report three cases, two C. neoformans and one C. gattii, highlighting the various CM presentations. The first was a woman immunosuppressed following kidney transplantation in whom idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) was initially suspected. The second was a man immunocompromised by previously undiagnosed HIV/AIDS who presented with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure. The third case is an immunocompetent man with bilateral disc edema and an incomplete macular star diagnosed with presumed neuroretinitis. Further evaluation revealed positive CSF cryptococcal antigen with culture positive for C. gattii. Ophthalmologists should be aware that cryptococcosis can mimic more benign etiologies including IIH and neuroretinitis. Additionally, C. gattii, an emerging organism, can infect immunocompetent patients. In contrast to the typical treatment of increased ICP, serial lumbar punctures are recommended while acetazolamide and surgical CSF shunting may be harmful. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G; Kelsen, Jesper; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strategy. A 13-year-old girl was admitted after prolonged resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an inferior vena cava aneurysm and multiple pulmonary emboli as the likely cause. An intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor was inserted, and, on day 3, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent hyperkalemia and overhydration, ultrafiltration and intermittent hemodialysis were performed separately on day 4 with a small dialyzer, low blood and dialysate flow, and high dialysate sodium content. During subsequent treatments, isolated ultrafiltration was well tolerated, whereas hemodialysis was associated with increased ICP necessitating frequent pauses or early cessation of dialysis. In patients at risk of DDS, hemodialysis should be performed with utmost care and continuous monitoring of ICP should be considered.

  18. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Lund

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strategy. A 13-year-old girl was admitted after prolonged resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Computed tomography (CT revealed an inferior vena cava aneurysm and multiple pulmonary emboli as the likely cause. An intracranial pressure (ICP monitor was inserted, and, on day 3, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent hyperkalemia and overhydration, ultrafiltration and intermittent hemodialysis were performed separately on day 4 with a small dialyzer, low blood and dialysate flow, and high dialysate sodium content. During subsequent treatments, isolated ultrafiltration was well tolerated, whereas hemodialysis was associated with increased ICP necessitating frequent pauses or early cessation of dialysis. In patients at risk of DDS, hemodialysis should be performed with utmost care and continuous monitoring of ICP should be considered.

  19. [SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF INTRAVENTRICULAR AND PARENCHYMAL INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE TRAUMA BRAIN INJURY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshorov, A V; Popugaev, K A; Savin, I A; Potapov, A A

    2016-01-01

    "Standard" assessment of ICP by measuring liquor ventricular pressure recently questioned. THE OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: Compare the values of ventricular and parenchymal ICP against the closure of open liquor drainage and during active CSF drainage. Examined 7 patients with TBI and intracranial hypertension syndrome, GCS 5.6 ± 1.2 points, 4.2 ± age 33 years. Compared parenchymal and ventricular ICP in three time periods: 1--during closure of ventricular drainage, 2--during of the open drains and drainage at the level of 14-15 mmHg, 3--during the period of active drainage. When comparing two methods of measurement used Bland-Altman method. 1. During time period of the closed drainage correlation coefficient was r = 0.83, p intracranial pressure is reduced. 3. During the active CSF drainage correlation between the two methods of measuring intracranial pressure can be completely lost. Under these conditions, CSF pressure is not correctly reflect the ICP 4. For an accurate and continuous measurement of intracranial pressure on the background of the active CSF drainage should be carried out simultaneous parenchymal ICP measurement.

  20. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  1. [Progression of gestational hypertension to chronic hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Muro Barragán, Sergio Alejandro; Ponce de León, Ana Lilia Ponce

    2009-09-01

    The gestational hypertension is the most frequent cause of hypertension during the pregnancy. The gestational hypertension is a provisional diagnosis only during the pregnancy; it is unknown the number of women with gestational hypertension who progress to chronic hypertension. To determine the number of women with gestational hypertension who progress to chronic hypertension. A cohort prospective study was carried out; we includedl96 patients with the diagnosis of gestational hypertension at the time of the interruption of the pregnancy; after 12 weeks, a follow up appointment was scheduled in order to measure the blood pressure and to determine how many patients progressed to chronic hypertension. The data were analyzed with arithmetic mean, standard error and percentage values. For the comparison of variables, the Chi2 test and a logistic regression analysis were used; an alpha value was set at 0.05. Thirteen patients (6.6%) with diagnosis of gestational hypertension progressed to chronic hypertension. It was found that advanced age (p = 0.007), high body mass index (p = 0.013) and the antecedent of hypertensive disease in a previous pregnancy (p = 0.048) were significantly associated with the progression to chronic hypertension. The overweight, advanced maternal age and the antecedent of hypertensive disorder in a previous pregnancy are the variables associated with the progression from gestational hypertension to chronic hypertension.

  2. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  3. High frequency of intracranial arterial stenosis and cannabis use in ischaemic stroke in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Valérie; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Beaujeux, Rémy; Manisor, Monica; Rouyer, Olivier; Lauer, Valérie; Meyer, Nicolas; Marescaux, Christian; Geny, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Leading aetiologies of ischaemic stroke in young adults are cervico-cerebral arterial dissections and cardio-embolism, but the causes remain undetermined in a considerable proportion of cases. In a few reports, intracranial arterial stenosis has been suggested to be a potential cause of ischaemic stroke in young adults. The aim of our work was to evaluate the frequency, characteristics and risk factors of intracranial arterial stenosis in a prospective series of young ischaemic stroke patients. The study was based on a prospective consecutive hospital-based series of 159 patients aged 18-45 years who were admitted to our unit for an acute ischaemic stroke from October 2005 to December 2010. A structured questionnaire was used in order to assess common vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, use of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs, migraine, and, in women, oral contraceptive use. A systematic screening was performed, including the following: brain magnetic resonance imaging or, if not feasible, brain computed tomography scan, carotid and vertebral Duplex scanning and trans-cranial Doppler sonography, 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance cerebral angiography or cerebral computed tomography angiography. Long-duration electrocardiography, trans-thoracic and trans-oesophageal echocardiography were performed and laboratory blood investigations were extensive. Urine samples were screened for cannabinoids, cocaine, amphetamine and methylene-dioxy-methamphetamine. When this initial work-up was inconclusive, trans-femoral intra-arterial selective digital subtraction angiography with reconstructed 3D images was performed. In this series, 49 patients (31%) had intracranial arterial stenosis. Other defined causes were found in 91 patients (57%), including cardio-embolism in 32 (20%), cervical dissection in 23 (14%), extracranial atherosclerosis in 7 (4%), haematological disorders in 7 (4%), small vessel disease in 1, and isolated patent

  4. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    OpenAIRE

    Abiodun M. Adeoye; Adewole Adebiyi; Bamidele O. Tayo; Babatunde L. Salako; Adesola Ogunniyi; Richard S. Cooper

    2014-01-01

    Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% fema...

  6. Resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, P; Oliveras, A; de la Sierra, A

    2013-11-01

    A 53 year old woman with hypercholesterolemia treated with statins, with no history of cardiovascular disease, was referred to the Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit for management of hypertension resistant to 4 antihypertensive agents at full doses. The patient had obesity, with a body mass index of 36.3kg/m(2) and office blood pressure 162/102mm Hg. Physical examination showed no data of interest. glucose 120mg/dl, glycated Hb: 6.4%, albuminuria 68mg/g, kidney function and study of the renin angiotensin system and other biochemical parameters were normal. Echocardiography: left ventricular mass, 131g/m(2) (normal, <110g/m(2)). True resistant hypertension was confirmed by ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure during 24h (153/89mm Hg). Spironolactone treatment (25mg/day) was added and was well tolerated, with no change in renal function and kaliemia within normal (4.1mmol/l) following the treatment. After 8 weeks, blood pressure was well controlled: office blood pressure 132/86mm Hg and 24h-ambulatory blood pressure: 128/79mm Hg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun M. Adeoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH, isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH, and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH. Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5% and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7% were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2% was higher among males (P=0.048. Female subjects were more obese (P<0.0001 and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations.

  8. Blood Pressure Management in Intracranial Hemorrhage: Current Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcel, Cheryl; Sato, Shoichiro; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-04-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (i.e. intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH] and subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]) are more life threatening and least treatable despite being less common than ischemic stroke. Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a strong predictor of poor outcome in both ICH and SAH. Data from a landmark clinical trial INTERACT 2, wherein 2839 participants enrolled with spontaneous ICH were randomly assigned to receive intensive (target systolic BP <140 mmHg) or guideline recommended BP lowering therapy (target systolic BP <180 mmHg), showed that intensive BP lowering was safe, and more favorable functional outcome and better overall health-related quality of life were seen in survivors in the intensive treatment group. These results contributed to the shift in European and American guidelines towards more aggressive early management of elevated BP in ICH. In contrast, the treatment of BP in SAH is less well defined and more complex. Although there is consensus that hypertension needs to be controlled to prevent rebleeding in the acute setting, induced hypertension in the later stages of SAH has questionable benefits.

  9. High Blood Pressure Increases the Risk of Poor Outcome at Discharge and 12-month Follow-up in Patients with Symptomatic Intracranial Large Artery Stenosis and Occlusions: Subgroup analysis of the CICAS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Pu, Yue-Hua; Pan, Yue-Song; Zou, Xin-Ying; Soo, Yannie; Leung, Thomas; Liu, Li-Ping; Wang, David Z; Wong, Ka-Sing; Wang, Yi-Long; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to discuss the relationship between blood pressure and prognosis of patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis. Data on 2426 patients with symptomatic intracranial large artery stenosis and occlusion who participated in the Chinese Intracranial Atherosclerosis (CICAS) study were analyzed. According to the JNC 7 criteria, blood pressure of all patients was classified into one of the four subgroups: normal, prehypertension, hypertension stage I, and hypertension stage II. Poor outcomes were defined as death and functional dependency (mRS 3-5) at discharge or at 1 year. For patients with intracranial stenosis of 70% to 99%, the rate of poor outcome at discharge was 19.3%, 23.5%, 26.8%, and 39.8% (P = 0.001) for each blood pressure subgroup. For patients with intracranial large artery occlusion, the rates were 17.6%, 22.1%, 29.5%, and 49.8%, respectively (P pressure subgroup and 11.6%, 21.5%, 23.9%, 35.1% (P intracranial arterial stenosis or occlusion, higher hypertension stages are associated with an increased risk of poor outcome at discharge and 12-month follow-up. © 2015 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Choroid plexus aquaporin 1 and intracranial pressure are increased in obese rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, M; Bhatt, D K; Kruuse, C

    2017-01-01

    furthermore investigated expression profiles of aquaporin 1 (AQP1) and Na/K ATPase. METHODS: ICP was measured in obese and lean Zucker rats over a period of 28 days. Arterial pCO2and serum retinol were measured in serum samples. The CPs were isolated, and target messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were analyzed......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without identifiable cause. The majority of IIH patients are obese, which suggests a connection between ICP and obesity. The aim of the study was to compare ICP in lean...... and obese rats. We also aimed to clarify if any ICP difference could be attributed to changes in some well-known ICP modulators; retinol and arterial partial pressure of CO2(pCO2). Another potential explanation could be differences in water transport across the choroid plexus (CP) epithelia, and thus we...

  11. Idiopatisk intrakraniel hypertension er en alvorlig tilstand i hastig stigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disease of unknown aetiology. IIH typically affects young obese females. The majority of the cases are complicated by papilloedema, visual loss and significant headache. Weight loss is, in addition to medical therapy, the mainstay of IIH management....... Medical therapy is currently solely based on clinical experience. Malignant cases with rapid visual deterioration may require immediate surgical treatment in order to prevent irreversible visual loss. Early identification is essential, and increased awareness of IIH is important....

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  13. Intracranial EEG Connectivity Analysis and Result Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 275-279 ISSN 2010-3638 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Connectivity * Correlation * Intracranial EEG * Signal Processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  15. The commonly missed diagnosis of intracranial hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee N. Ruggeri-McKinley, BSN, RN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 year old female who presented with a subacute onset of a severe throbbing and stabbing headache after a morning spin class 9 months ago. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension cause by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The headache finally resolved after a 55 ml blood patch. Affecting an estimated 5/100,000 patients, spontaneous intracranial hypotension is considered rare in medical literature. Many patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension are incapacitated for years and even decades. The misdiagnosis of intracranial hypotension can have serious consequences and lead to unnecessary testing and treatment. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of this diagnosis when evaluating a patient with acute head pain. Considering that physical exams are usually normal, clinicians must focus on the patient history and physical. Clues in the patient interviewing process can lead to an immediate and accurate diagnosis.

  16. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  17. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  18. Mucocele and pyocele with marked intracranial extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Machida, Tohru; Iio, Masahiro

    1984-08-01

    Two cases are presented with frontal sinus pyocele and fronto-ethmoid sinus mucocele in which marked intracranial extension is shown. Their intracranial part appeared as a large biconvex mass, which showed iso or slightly low density homogeneously and had gross calcification in the posterior rim. The findings of the paranasal sinuses and the orbit in tomograms and CT scans are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma.

  19. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jerônimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xareltor. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban.

  20. Hypertension hos gravide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Johansen, Marianne; Kamper, Anne Lise

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantag...... and disadvantages of different classes of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy and lactation are described....

  1. Hypertension intracrânienne idiopathique: à propos d'un cas rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the case of a 25-year old primipara whose pregnancy was complicated by idiopathic intracranial hypertension (ICHT) associated with visual impairment in the first quarter. She underwent lumboperitoneal shunt without obstetric consequences. This study aimed to determine the features of this rare pathological ...

  2. Hypertension and Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Hypertension A disease that often goes undetected. What is hypertension? Hypertension, also called high blood pressure , is a condition in which the arteries of ...

  3. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images.

  4. Neonatal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Shastri, Sweta; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-03-01

    Neonatal hypertension (HT) is a frequently under reported condition and is seen uncommonly in the intensive care unit. Neonatal HT has defined arbitrarily as blood pressure more than 2 standard deviations above the base as per the age or defined as systolic BP more than 95% for infants of similar size, gestational age and postnatal age. It has been diagnosed long back but still is the least studied field in neonatology. There is still lack of universally accepted normotensive data for neonates as per gestational age, weight and post-natal age. Neonatal HT is an important morbidity that needs timely detection and appropriate management, as it can lead to devastating short-term effect on various organs and also poor long-term adverse outcomes. There is no consensus yet about the treatment guidelines and majority of treatment protocols are based on the expert opinion. Neonate with HT should be evaluated in detail starting from antenatal, perinatal, post-natal history, and drug intake by neonate and mother. This review article covers multiple aspects of neonatal hypertension like definition, normotensive data, various etiologies and methods of BP measurement, clinical features, diagnosis and management.

  5. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  6. The Cushing Reflex: Oliguria as a Reflection of an Elevated Intracranial Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leyssens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oliguria is one of the clinical hallmarks of renal failure. The broad differential diagnosis is well known, but a rare cause of oliguria is intracranial hypertension (ICH. The actual knowledge to explain this relationship is scarce. Almost all literature is about animals where authors describe the Cushing reflex in response to ICH. We hypothesize that the Cushing reflex is translated towards the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with a subsequent reduction in medullary blood flow and oliguria. Recently, we were confronted with a patient who had complicated pituitary surgery and displayed multiple times an oliguria while he developed ICH.

  7. Role of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Management of Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of a Large Level I Trauma Center in Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Sadraei, Nazanin; Niakan, Amin; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Sadraei, Amin

    2016-10-01

    To determine the role of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to a large level I trauma center in Southern Iran. This was a cohort study performed during a 2-year period in a level I trauma center in Southern Iran including all adult patients (>16 years) with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score, 3-8) who underwent ICP monitoring through ventriculostomy. The management was based on the recorded ICP values with threshold of 20 mm Hg. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in patients with intractable intracranial hypertension (persistent ICP ≥25 mm Hg). In unresponsive patients, barbiturate coma was induced. Patients were followed for 6 months and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended was recorded. The determinants of favorable and unfavorable outcome were also determined. Overall, we included 248 patients with mean age of 34.6 ± 16.6 years, among whom there were 216 men (87.1%) and 32 women (12.9%). Eighty-five patients (34.2%) had favorable and 163 (65.8%) unfavorable outcomes. Those with favorable outcome had significantly lower age (P = 0.004), higher GCS score on admission (P intracranial hypertension (P intracranial hypertension, and maximum recorded ICP are important determinants of outcome in patients with severe TBI. ICP monitoring assisted us in targeted therapy and management of patients with severe TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  9. Critical cerebral perfusion pressure at high intracranial pressure measured by induced cerebrovascular and intracranial pressure reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria L; Yonas, Howard; Dai, Xingping; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2014-12-01

    The lower limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation is the critical cerebral perfusion pressure at which cerebral blood flow begins to fall. It is important that cerebral perfusion pressure be maintained above this level to ensure adequate cerebral blood flow, especially in patients with high intracranial pressure. However, the critical cerebral perfusion pressure of 50 mm Hg, obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, differs from the value of 30 mm Hg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure, which we previously showed was due to microvascular shunt flow maintenance of a falsely high cerebral blood flow. The present study shows that the critical cerebral perfusion pressure, measured by increasing intracranial pressure to decrease cerebral perfusion pressure, is inaccurate but accurately determined by dopamine-induced dynamic intracranial pressure reactivity and cerebrovascular reactivity. Cerebral perfusion pressure was decreased either by increasing intracranial pressure or decreasing mean arterial pressure and the critical cerebral perfusion pressure by both methods compared. Cortical Doppler flux, intracranial pressure, and mean arterial pressure were monitored throughout the study. At each cerebral perfusion pressure, we measured microvascular RBC flow velocity, blood-brain barrier integrity (transcapillary dye extravasation), and tissue oxygenation (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) in the cerebral cortex of rats using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy. University laboratory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. At each cerebral perfusion pressure, dopamine-induced arterial pressure transients (~10 mm Hg, ~45 s duration) were used to measure induced intracranial pressure reactivity (Δ intracranial pressure/Δ mean arterial pressure) and induced cerebrovascular reactivity (Δ cerebral blood flow/Δ mean arterial pressure). At a normal cerebral perfusion pressure of 70 mm Hg, 10 mm Hg mean arterial pressure pulses had no effect on

  10. Paradoxical Increase in Mortality and Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms in Microsomal Prostaglandin E2 Synthase Type 1-Deficient Mice: Attenuation by Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Silva, Ricardo A; Mitchell, Ian J; Kung, David K; Pewe, Lecia L; Granja, Manuel F; Harty, John T; Faraci, Frank M; Heistad, Donald D; Hasan, David M

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Expression of microsomal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthase type 1 (mPGES-1) is increased in the wall of intracranial aneurysms in humans. PGE2, a by-product of mPGES-1, is associated with inflammation and cerebrovascular dysfunction. To test the hypothesis that deletion of mPGES-1 decreases the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in a murine model. Intracranial aneurysms were induced in wild-type and mPGES-1 knockout (mPGES-1 KO) mice by using a combination of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension and intracranial injection of elastase in the basal cistern. Prevalence of aneurysms, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and mortality were assessed. We also tested the effects of administration of aspirin (6 mg/kg/d) by gavage and PGE2 (1 mg/kg/d) by subcutaneous infusion. Systolic blood pressure and prevalence of aneurysm were similar in wild-type and mPGES-1 KO mice. However, mortality and the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage were markedly increased in mPGES-1 KO mice (P increase rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Aspirin, but not PGE2, attenuated the increased mortality in mPGES-1 KO mice (P increase in rupture of cerebral aneurysms and mortality, which are attenuated by low-dose aspirin.

  11. Modulação da pressão intracraniana em um modelo experimental de hipertensão abdominal e lesão pulmonar aguda Factors associated with variation in intracranial pressure in a model of intra-abdominal hypertension with acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito de alterações hemodinâmicas, respiratórias e metabólicas sobre a pressão intracraniana em um modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda e síndrome compartimental abdominal. MÉTODOS: Oito porcos Agroceres foram submetidos, após a instrumentação, a cinco cenários clínicos: 1 estado basal com baixa pressão intra-abdominal e pulmão sadio; 2 pneumoperitôneo, com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg; 3 lesão pulmonar aguda induzida por lavagem pulmonar e desativação de surfactante; 4 pneumoperitôneo com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg na vigência de lesão pulmonar aguda e com PEEP baixo; e 5 PEEP ajustado a 27 cm H2O na vigência de pneumoperitôneo e lesão pulmonar aguda. Variáveis respiratórias e hemodinâmicas foram coletadas. Análise multivariada foi realizada buscando as variáveis associadas com elevação da pressão intracraniana nos cinco cenários estudados. RESULTADOS: Após a análise multivariada, nas situações não associadas com lesão pulmonar aguda apenas a pressão de platô das vias aéreas se correlacionou positivamente com a pressão intracraniana. Nos modelos associados com lesão pulmonar aguda, a pressão de platô de vias aéreas, a pressão arterial de CO2, o CO2 no final da expiração e a pressão venosa central se correlacionaram positivamente com incrementos da pressão intracraniana. CONCLUSÃO: Em um modelo de disfunção orgânica múltipla com situações clínicas associadas com aumento da pressão torácica e abdominal, o incremento da pressão intracraniana desencadeado pela elevação da pressão abdominal parece ser decorrente da piora da complacência do sistema respiratório e da redução do gradiente para drenagem venosa cerebral ocasionado pela elevação da pressão venosa central.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic changes on intracranial pressure in a model of acute lung injury and abdominal compartment syndrome

  12. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    %. Limited literature is available on intracranial aneurysms in HIV-infected patients. Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV- positive adults. Method: In this retrospective analysis of ...

  13. Predictors of severe complications in intracranial meningioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Förander, Petter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of complications after intracranial meningioma resection using a standardized reporting system for adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian population-based cohort of 979 adult operations for intracranial meningioma perfo...

  14. Intracranial arachnoid cysts treated surgically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Junji; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1982-01-01

    Craniotomy and an examination of the maximal extent of extirpation of the cystic membrane were performed under an operative microscope in a series of 30 consecutive cases of intracranial arachnoid cysts. From these clinical features and a histological examination of the membrane, the etiologies of the arachnoid cysts may be divided into three fundamental categories: arachnoid cysts due to local brain atrophy or malformation (Category I), arachnoid cysts due to a malformation of the local arachnoid membrane itself (Category II), and arachnoid cysts due to acquired etiology (Category III). The postoperative reduction rates were investigated by means of a serial CT examination over a follow-up period of from 1 month to 6.5 years (average 2 years) in 27 cases. The postoperative reduction rates of 5 cases were less than 20% (Group A), 15 cases had rates from 30 to 80% (Group B), and 7 cases had rates of more than 90% (Group C). Cases of females, large cysts, round-shaped cysts, and cases with positive mass signs and poorly communicating cysts are revealed by metrizamide CT examination seemed to have a tendency for cystic cavity to be reduced well, judging from the postoperative analysis of the clinical findings. Furthermore, from the standpoint of our hypothesis concerning the etiology of the arachnoid cysts, Group A fit in almost all cases in Category I, though a few cases of Group A who had severe secondary local brain damage were in Category II. Group C fit in Category III in almost all cases, though a few cases of Group C who had minimal local brain damage were in Category II. Cases of Group B were considered to show some changes in the local cerebrum of various degrees in the cases of Categories II and III. (J.P.N.)

  15. Bilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction presenting with hypertension and cerebral vascular accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourchi, Ali; Kajbafzadeh, Abdolmohammad; Nejat, Farideh; Golmohammadi, Abolfazl; Alizadeh, Farshid; Mahboobi, Amir Hassan

    2010-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accident and renal hypertension secondary to ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) are extremely rare. A 6-year-old girl presented with intracranial hemorrhage because of hypertension secondary to the bilateral UPJO. This was successfully treated with craniotomy and subsequent percutaneous nephrostomy placement and bilateral pyeloplasty. Brain computerized tomography revealed right-sided intracranial hemorrhage, and renal ultrasonography confirmed bilateral severe hydronephrosis. Craniotomy with evacuation of intracerebral hematoma and bilateral nephrostomy under ultrasound guidance were performed. One week later, she underwent bilateral pyeloplasty in 2 stages. The patient has been well with normalized renal function and is completely cured of her hypertension in long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypertension Associated with Coarctation of the Aorta Revisited: Case-Based Update from Experience of Three Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baykan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coarctation of the aorta (CoA can present with different clinical pictures depending on the severity of the narrowness in the coarcted aortic segment in an age range between newborn and adolescence. Sometimes, it can cause intracranial hemorrhage or infarction when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. The aim of this report is taking attention to CoA as a cause of systemic hypertension and is also emphasizing the differences of diagnostic approach for hypertension in children from adults. Two cases of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and one case of hypertensive cerebellar infarction associated with CoA are reported. These cases help us to pay attention to the possibility of CoA in adolescents with hypertensive stroke. We want to emphasize the importance of physical examination for evaluation of hypertension and to impress the diagnostic approach for secondary hypertension in children.

  17. Intracranial sewing needles in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanci, Atilla; Ozdemir, Halil Ibrahim; Kazanci, Burak; Kazanci, Dilek Ozturk; Er, Uygur

    2012-01-01

    A 37-year-old patient is reported with intracranial sewing needles, which were located in the right frontal lobe. Both clinical and radiological findings suggested that these needles must have been introduced in infancy before the closure of anterior fontanelle during an unsuccessful homicide. Usually intracranial foreign objects are placed due to penetrating trauma or surgical procedures. Child abuse has been known for centuries. Many types of physical traumas have been reported, especially in Western countries. In Iran, insertion of sewing needles into the brain aiming to kill the infant have been seen in a lot of cases. This situation takes part in a lot of Persian stories. We reported a 37-year-old man who had 2 intracranial sewing needles with unknown etiology.

  18. Endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang; Li Shenmao; Ji Xunming; Miao Zhongrong; Zhu Fengshui; Zhi Xinglong; Ling Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and risk of endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Methods: Twenty seven patients with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis confirmed by CT, MRI, MRV and/or DSA, from 2004 September to 2006 September, were treated with anticoagulant therapy but without response and then followed by multiple modalities including endovascular treatment. Nineteen of them accepted intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombus maceration, another 5 accepted intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical thrombus maceration and intraarterial thrombolysis and the last 3 with stenting. Results: After thrombolysis, symptoms and signs of 23 patients improved obviously and headache disappeared in 18 of them, but with only mild degree in other 5 and no improvement in 3. Twenty one patients among them achieved recanalization of sinuses completely as confirmed on postprocedural angiography, MRI and MRV studies taken prior to hospital discharge and other 3 achieved recanalization of sinuses partly. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment is an effective and safe measure for potentially catastrophic intracranial dural sinus thrombosis. (authors)

  19. Intracranial meningiomas in the present era of modern neuroimaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intracranial meningioma is the most common primary, intracranial, extra-axial neoplasm. It is mesenchymal in origin and arises from meningothelial cells of arachnoid villi of meninges. Objectives: To re-emphasize the regional anatomic localisation and diagnostic radiological features of intracranial ...

  20. Cerebral Abcess and Intracranial Empyemas in Children (Francais ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    And in both cases because of brain herniation secondary to severe raised intracranial pressure. We observed no recurrence of pus collection. Neurological sequelae was observed in 8 cases. Conclusion Intracranial subdural empyemas are most common form of intracranial suppurations seen in children in our unit.

  1. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The device...

  2. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus with Intracranial Calcifications in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: There are numerous causes for intracranial calcification in children. We describe an unusual cause of intracranial calcifications in a child, namely, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Case Report: A 12-year-old boy presented with seizures and developmental delay. MRI of the brain revealed intracranial ...

  3. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  4. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Syndrome in Long Duration NASA Astronauts: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, C. A.; Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M. J.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and distended optic nerve sheaths). In some cases, elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure has been documented postflight reflecting increased intracranial pressure (ICP). While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular affects are thought to be related to the effect of cephalad fluid shift on the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, both leading to cephalic congestion and increased ICP. Although not all crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that all astronauts exposed to microgravity have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and has been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them.

  6. Primary intracranial leiomyoma in renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyoma, the benign tumor of smooth muscle cell origin, is commonly seen in genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Primary intracranial leiomyoma, however, is extremely rare occurrence. We hereby report a case of Epstein-Barr negative primary intracranial leiomyoma in a middle-aged renal transplant recipient, which mimicked left frontal parasagittal meningioma on neuroimaging. The tumor was completely excised and diagnosis of leiomyoma was clinched on pathological analysis with immunohistochemistry. The patient improved after tumor removal, and no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted on follow-up study after 10 months postsurgically.

  7. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Ramlakhan, BMedSc, MBBCh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial dermoid cysts are congenital tumors of ectodermal origin. Rupture of these cysts can occur spontaneously, but rupture in association with trauma is reported infrequently. The diagnosis of rupture is made by the presence of lipid (cholesterol droplets in the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles. Nonenhanced CT of the head demonstrates multiple foci of low attenuation that correspond with hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI. We present a case of an adult patient with rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst, precipitated by minor trauma.

  8. Intracranial osteosarcoma after radiosurgery. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanno, Naoko; Hayashi, Shinkichi; Shimura, Toshiro; Maeda, Shotaro; Teramoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an intracranial osteosarcoma at the site of previous radiosurgery, manifesting as sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis with aphasia. She had a previous history of stereotactic radiosurgery for an intracranial tumor under a diagnosis of falx meningioma. Computed tomography showed intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage at the right parietofrontal region. Gross total resection of the tumor with hematoma was performed. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. Sarcomatous change is a rare complication of radiotherapy. This case illustrates that osteosarcoma may develop years after radiosurgery for benign brain neoplasm. (author)

  9. Hypertension in women

    OpenAIRE

    Hage, Fadi G; Mansur, Sulaf J; Xing, Dongqi; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women. The prevalence and severity of hypertension rise markedly with age, and blood pressure control becomes more difficult with aging in both genders, particularly in women. In addition, there are forms of hypertension that occur exclusively in women, e.g., hypertension related to menopause, oral contraceptive use, or pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, gestationa...

  10. [Hypertensive crisis: urgency and hypertensive emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Doménech Feria-Carot, Mónica; Morales Salinas, Alberto; Coca Payeras, Antonia

    2016-11-18

    Hypertensive crises lumped several clinical situations with different seriousness and prognosis. The differences between hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergency depends on if this situation involves a vital risk for the patient. This risk is defined more by the severity of the organ damage than for the higher values of blood pressure. The hypertensive urgency not involves an immediately risk for the patient, for these reason, the treatment can be completed after discharged. Otherwise, the hypertensive emergency is a critical clinical condition that requires hospital assistance. Faced with a patient, with severe hypertension, asymptomatic or with unspecific symptoms we must be careful. First, we need to confirm the values of blood pressure, with several measures of blood pressure and investigate and treat factors, which triggered this situation. The objective of medical treatment for hypertensive urgency is to reduce blood pressure values (at least 20% of baseline values) but to avoid sudden reduction of these values. In hypertensive urgencies rapid acting drug should not be used because of the risk of ischemic stroke and use drugs with longer half-life. The cardiovascular risk of these patients is higher than that do not suffer hypertensive crisis. The treatment must be personalized in each hypertensive emergency and intravenous it’s the best route to treat these patients.

  11. Systolic hypertension in adult nigerians with hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opadijo, O.G.; Salami, T.A.T.; Sanya, E.O.; Omotoso, A.B.O.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of both systolic and diastolic hypertensions in relation to age and their impacts on target organ among adult Nigerians with hypertension. Newly diagnosed adult hypertensives, with blood pressure 140/90mm Hg, taken twice with mercury column sphygmomanometer at 3 weeks interval, were studied. The total number of hypertensive patients treated over this period was also taken into consideration. The newly diagnosed hypertensives were classified using JNC VI classification. The frequency of occurrence of target organ damage such as Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH), heart failure, renal impairment etc. was charted according to systolic and or diastolic pressures. The occurrence of systolic or diastolic blood pressure was also related with the age of the patients. Blood metabolic parameters were compared in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures for their possible contributory role. Two thousand seven hundred and ninety-two adult hypertensive patients were managed over the study period. Of them, 218 (7.8%) were newly diagnosed and studied. There were 94 males and 124 females. Seventy-seven (35.3%) were aged 60 years and above with equal frequency in the gender. One hundred and seventy-eight (81.7%) cases had combined systolic and diastolic pressures. Twenty-nine (13.3%) patients had systolic hypertension. Twenty-five (86.2%) of these 29 were aged 50 years and above and 20 (69.0%) were aged 60 years and above. Eleven (5.0%) patients had isolated diastolic hypertension and they were all in the age bracket 40-49 years. Systolic blood pressure was found to be rising with advancing age while diastolic blood pressure peaked at mid 40's and declined. Target organ damage occurred more frequently with systolic hypertension and advancing age than with diastolic hypertension. Systolic hypertension occurred more frequently in this series of adult Nigerians with hypertension. It was higher with advancing age and associated with more target organ

  12. Demographic profile of patients diagnosed with intracranial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Meningiomas are common brain tumours and display gender, racial and ethnic differences in their demographic profile. The demographic profile of our patients diagnosed with intracranial meningiomas is presented and compared with the literature. Objectives: To determine the age, gender, racial and ethnic ...

  13. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, G.; Demaerel, P.; Baert, A.L. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Casselman, J. (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Plets, C. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Haene, I. de (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology)

    1991-04-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. (orig.).

  14. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  15. CONTEMPORARY ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past twenty years we have witnessed a revolution in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular technique and materials have rapidly developed since the approval of Guglielmi detachable coils in 1995 which now allow successful treatment of most aneurysms. The development of intracranial stents and balloons for stent-assisted coiling and balloon-remodeling technique further expanded the spectrum of aneurysms treatable with endovascular technique. For these reasons, the aim of this review was to describe endovascular technique and materials which we use in our daily practice, to show benefits of endovascular treatment and to discus complications of endovascular treatment and surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular treatment is more comfortable for the patient not only because it is minimally invasive but also because it does not require long hospitalization equal to that after surgical treatment. It is a fact that with further development of endovascular materials, this a procedure will have even a more significant place in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

  16. Calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Bouzas, A. [ENEP Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico (Mexico); Ballesteros-Maresma, A. [Radiologia Clinica de Cuernavaca (Mexico); Casian, G.; Hernandez-Martinez, P. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico S. S. (Mexico); Martinez-Lopez, M. [Fundacion Clinica Medica Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We report calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis. Calcification was observed in the middle cerebral arteries in two patients, and the circle of Willis in two others. The patients with middle cerebral artery calcification underwent CT with inhaled stable xenon and an area of mild hypoperfusion was observed in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere. (orig.)

  17. Measuring elevated intracranial pressure through noninvasive methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Helena; Nissborg, Emelie; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important cause of secondary brain injury, and a measurement of ICP is often of crucial value in neurosurgical and neurological patients. The gold standard for ICP monitoring is through an intraventricular catheter, but this invasive technique...

  18. Intracranial neoplasmin Ibadan, Nigeria | Olasode | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the pattern of histopathological variants of intracranial neoplasms, relative distribution of the variants in the age groups and also to determine the gender differences that exist in these tumours. Design: Case control study. Setting: Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

  19. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) wer...

  20. Telemetric Intracranial Pressure Monitoring with the Raumedic Neurovent P-tel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Sebastian; Tschan, Christoph A; Heckelmann, Michael; Breuskin, David; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Devices enabling long-term intracranial pressure monitoring have been demanded for some time. The first solutions using telemetry were proposed in 1967. Since then, many other wireless systems have followed but some technical restrictions have led to unacceptable measurement uncertainties. In 2009, a completely revised telemetric pressure device called Neurovent P-tel was introduced to the market. This report reviews technical aspects, handling, possibilities of data analysis, and the efficiency of the probe in clinical routine. The telemetric device consists of 3 main parts: the passive implant, the active antenna, and the storage monitor. The implant with its parenchymal pressure transducer is inserted via a frontal burr hole. Pressure values can be registered with a frequency of 1 Hz or 5 Hz. Telemetrically gathered data can be viewed on the storage monitor or saved on a computer for detailed analyses. A total of 247 patients with suspected (n = 123) or known (n = 124) intracranial pressure disorders underwent insertion of the telemetric pressure probe. A detailed analysis of the long-term intracranial pressure profile including mean values, maximum and negative peaks, pathologic slow waves, and pulse pressure amplitudes is feasible using the detection rate of 5 Hz. This enables the verification of suspected diagnoses as normal-pressure hydrocephalus, benign intracranial hypertension, shunt malfunction, or shunt overdrainage. Long-term application also facilitates postoperative surveillance and supports valve adjustments of shunt-treated patients. The presented telemetric measurement system is a valuable and effective diagnostic tool in selected cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Intracranial Volume Pressure Response in Increased Intracranial Pressure Patients: Clinical Significance of the Volume Pressure Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yi; Lee, Ching-Hsin; Lee, Ching-Yi

    2016-01-01

    For patients suffering from primary brain injury, monitoring intracranial pressure alone is not enough to reflect the dynamic intracranial condition. In our previous study, a segment of the pressure-volume curve can be expressed by the parabolic regression model with single indicator "a". The aim of this study is to evaluate if the indicator "a" can reflect intracranial conditions. Patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and/or hydrocephalus who had external ventricular drainage from January 2009 to February 2010 were included. The successive volume pressure response values were obtained by successive drainage of cerebral spinal fluid from intracranial pressure 20-25 mm Hg to 10 mm Hg. The relationship between withdrawn cerebral spinal fluid volume and intracranial pressure was analyzed by the parabolic regression model with single parameter "a". The overall mean for indicator "a" was 0.422 ± 0.046. The mean of "a" in hydrocephalus was 0.173 ± 0.024 and in severe intracranial mass with slender ventricle, it was 0.663 ± 0.062. The two extreme intracranial conditions had a statistical significant difference (ppressure-volume curve can reflect the dynamic intracranial condition and is comparable in different situations. A significantly larger indicator "a" with increased intracranial pressure is always observed in severe intracranial mass lesions with cerebral edema. A significantly smaller indicator "a" with increased intracranial pressure is observed in hydrocephalus. Brain computed tomography should be performed early if a rapid elevation of indicator "a" is detected, as it can reveal some ongoing intracranial pathology prior to clinical deterioration. Increased intracranial pressure was frequently observed in patients with intracranial pathology. The progression can be differentiated using the pattern of the volume pressure indicator.

  2. Portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collini, F J; Brener, B

    1990-02-01

    The management of both acute and recurrent variceal bleeding continues to be a significant challenge to the clinician. The cause and pathogenesis of portal hypertension has been described. Alcoholic cirrhosis is the most common cause of intrahepatic sinusoidal and postsinusoidal obstruction in the United States. Long term survival depends on rapid institution of an established protocol of surgical management for variceal hemorrhage. A patient who presents with variceal bleeding must be rapidly stabilized with fluid resuscitation, and specific measures, such as the use of vasopressin and balloon tamponade, must be instituted to control hemorrhage so that endoscopy can be used to establish the diagnosis. Sclerotherapy achieves a high rate of success in the acute situation, but if hemorrhage cannot be controlled, percutaneous transhepatic embolization or emergent shunting must be performed, depending on the condition of the patient. Angiography, prior to surgical treatment, is necessary to define venous anatomy and determine portal hemodynamics, both of which provide information vital in choosing the type of shunt. If bleeding is massive and the patient is unstable, H-grafts are most appropriate, for they are technically easier and give excellent short term results. In a stable Child's A or B patient with minor ascites as well as suitable anatomy and hepatopedal flow, DSRS is the procedure of choice because it produces the smallest degree of HE postoperatively and increases the survival rate for nonalcoholics. If this is not feasible or if the surgeon lacks the technical expertise to perform DSRS, PCS is the logical alternative. In view of the data from the series observed in the United States, ablative procedures cannot be recommended at the present for the treatment of variceal bleeding. In the Child's C poor-risk patient, the operative mortality rate is prohibitive, and only nonsurgical means should be used to establish control of bleeding. In the elective

  3. [Hypertension in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschin, Anja; Henny-Fullin, Katja; Buess, Daniel; Leuppi, Jörg; Dieterle, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Arterial hypertension remains the most important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal diseases. In view of an increasing prevalence with older age and an increasingly aging population, the treatment of elderly patients with arterial hypertension will become increasingly important in daily practice. Arterial hypertension in the elderly differs in many aspects from arterial hypertension in younger patients. For example, isolated systolic hypertension is the predominant form of arterial hypertension in the elderly. In comparison to younger patients, treatment of hypertension in the elderly is less well investigated. However, available data suggest that lowering of blood pressure in the elderly and very elderly reduces the risk of heart failure, stroke, and even mortality. The best evidence for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly exists for diuretics and calcium antagonists. However, the primary choice of antihypertensive therapy should be guided by the presence of existing cardiovascular and/or renal comorbidities.

  4. Genetik og hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tarnow, Lisa; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Monogenic forms of hypertension are very rare, but have a well-characterized heredity. Primary hypertension is very common with a complex and polygenic heredity. Primary hypertension arises due to an interaction between multiple genetic and environmental factors. Its heredity is unknown, although...

  5. Hypertension and sexual dysfunction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article: Hypertension and sexual dysfunction. 117. Vol 54 No 2. S Afr Fam Pract 2012. Introduction. Hypertension is a major independent cardiovascular risk factor, and also a marker of survival risk. Quality of life during the treatment of hypertension is an important health issue, as one in every five treated patients ...

  6. Intracranial Pressure Is a Determinant of Sympathetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric A; Despas, Fabien; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Czosnyka, Zofia; Pickard, John D; Rahmouni, Kamal; Pathak, Atul; Senard, Jean M

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure within the cranium . ICP rise compresses brain vessels and reduces cerebral blood delivery. Massive ICP rise leads to cerebral ischemia, but it is also known to produce hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory irregularities due to a sympatho-adrenal mechanism termed Cushing response. One still unresolved question is whether the Cushing response is a non-synaptic acute brainstem ischemic mechanism or part of a larger physiological reflex for arterial blood pressure control and homeostasis regulation. We hypothesize that changes in ICP modulates sympathetic activity. Thus, modest ICP increase and decrease were achieved in mice and patients with respectively intra-ventricular and lumbar fluid infusion. Sympathetic activity was gauged directly by microneurography, recording renal sympathetic nerve activity in mice and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients, and gauged indirectly in both species by heart-rate variability analysis. In mice ( n = 15), renal sympathetic activity increased from 29.9 ± 4.0 bursts.s -1 (baseline ICP 6.6 ± 0.7 mmHg) to 45.7 ± 6.4 bursts.s -1 (plateau ICP 38.6 ± 1.0 mmHg) and decreased to 34.8 ± 5.6 bursts.s -1 (post-infusion ICP 9.1 ± 0.8 mmHg). In patients ( n = 10), muscle sympathetic activity increased from 51.2 ± 2.5 bursts.min -1 (baseline ICP 8.3 ± 1.0 mmHg) to 66.7 ± 2.9 bursts.min -1 (plateau ICP 25 ± 0.3 mmHg) and decreased to 58.8 ± 2.6 bursts.min -1 (post-infusion ICP 14.8 ± 0.9 mmHg). In patients 7 mmHg ICP rise significantly increases sympathetic activity by 17%. Heart-rate variability analysis demonstrated a significant vagal withdrawal during the ICP rise, in accordance with the microneurography findings. Mice and human results are alike. We demonstrate in animal and human that ICP is a reversible determinant of efferent sympathetic outflow, even at relatively low ICP levels. ICP is a biophysical stress related to the forces within the brain. But ICP has also to be

  7. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  9. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  10. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were...... (P meningiomas did not differ significantly from those seen with high-grade gliomas or cerebral metastases...

  11. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  12. Intracranial Volume Quantification from 3D Photography

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Liyun; Porras, Antonio R.; Ensel, Scott; Tsering, Deki; Paniagua, Beatriz; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Oh, Albert; Keating, Robert; Rogers, Gary F.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2017-01-01

    3D photography offers non-invasive, radiation-free, and anesthetic-free evaluation of craniofacial morphology. However, intracranial volume (ICV) quantification is not possible with current non-invasive imaging systems in order to evaluate brain development in children with cranial pathology. The aim of this study is to develop an automated, radiation-free framework to estimate ICV. Pairs of computed tomography (CT) images and 3D photographs were aligned using registration. We used the real I...

  13. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  14. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  15. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.J. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway))

    1989-04-01

    The signal intensity of a hematoma at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is largely determined by the presence of paramagnetic substances derived from hemoglobin. Depending upon their structure and molecular mobility, paramagnetic substances may shorten the T1 and T2 of surrounding water protons and thus alter the MRI signal intensity and contrast. The article describes the evolution of intracranial hematomas and explains the relationship between the paramagnetic substance present and the result signal intensity at 1.5 T.

  17. Idiopathic portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae Kyun; Ryu, Dae Sik; Kim, Heung Chul; Hur, Hun; Eom, Kyeung Tae; Namkung, Sook; Park, Man Soo; Hwang, Woo Chul; Lee, Kwan Seop

    1996-01-01

    To describe the radiologic findings of idiopathic portal hypertension and to find the points of differentiation between idiopathic portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis. Four portograms in five patients who for four years had suffered from pathologically confirmed idiopathic portal hypertension were retrospectively analyzed and compared with a portogram obtained from a control subject with liver cirrhosis. Portographic finding s of idiopathic portal hypertension were paucity of medium-sized portal branches, irregular and obtuse-angled division of peripheral branches, abrupt interruption and an avascular area beneath the liver margin. A portogram of idiopathic portal hypertension may be useful in differentiation this and liver cirrhosis

  18. SECONDARY (ENDOCRINE HYPERTENSION: LECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Yukina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a  very common disease with high morbidity and reduction in quality of life. Endocrine disorders are the most common cause of secondary hypertension affecting ~3% of the population. Primary aldosteronism can be the cause of endocrine hypertension more often than other endocrine disorders. Other less common causes of endocrine hypertension include Cushing syndrome, pheochromocytoma, thyroid disorders, and hyperparathyroidism. Endocrine hypertension is potentially curable if the underlying cause is identified and treated accordingly. Younger age at manifestation of resistance to multiple antihypertensive drugs, together with other clinical signs of an endocrine disorder, should raise the suspicion and prompt the appropriate evaluation.

  19. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  20. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  1. Brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Byun, Woo Mok; Cho, Jae Ho; Cho Kil Ho; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Yang Gu [Keimyoung Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. A retrospective review of MRI findings was conducted on six patients with clinically proven spontaneous intracranial hypotension; no patient had a history of previous spinal puncture. Follow-up MRI was available in two patients, and to detect CSF leakage, radio-nuclide cisternography(n=3D5), myelography(n=3D1), and MR myelography(n=3D1) were performed. On contrast-enhanced T1WI, diffuse dural enhancement was seen in all cases, subdural hematoma or hygroma was seen in four cases, pituitary gland prominence in four, dural sinus dilatation in four, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil in two, downward displacement of the iter in one, and suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement in two. In no patient was abnormal CSF leakage found. Although dural enhancement, as seen on MRI, is not specific, diffuse enhancement of the dura mater accompanied by subdural hematoma, hygroma, pituitary gland prominence, dural sinus dilatation, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil, or suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement can strongly suggest intracranial hypotension.=20.

  2. Endovascular treatment for pediatric intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Hebei (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with intracranial aneurysms. From 1998 to 2005, 25 pediatric patients (aged {<=}17 years) with intracranial aneurysm were treated at our institute. Eleven of 25 patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage. In ten patients, the aneurysm was an incidental finding. One patient presented with cranial nerves dysfunction and three with neurological deficits. The locations of the aneurysms were as follows: vertebral artery (VA; n = 9), middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 5), posterior cerebral artery (PCA; n = 4), basilar artery (BA; n = 2), anterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), and internal carotid artery (n = 1). Five patients were treated with selective embolization with coils. Sixteen patients were treated with parent vessel occlusion (PVO). Eight PVOs were performed with balloons and eight were performed with coils. One patient with a VA aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed 4 days after the initial diagnostic angiogram. In three patients treated with stent alone or stent-assisted coiling, one with BA trunk aneurysm died. One aneurismal recurrence occurred and was retreated. At a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months, 96% of patients had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms occur more commonly in male patients and have a predilection for the VA, PCA, and MCA. PVO is an effective and safe treatment for fusiform aneurysms. Basilar trunk fusiform aneurysms were difficult to treat and were associated with a high mortality rate. (orig.)

  3. Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jonathan G; Yazdi, Farshid; Reisin, Efrain

    2017-12-08

    Obesity continues to increase in prevalence worldwide. Hypertension has long been associated with obesity, and weight loss continues to be a first-line therapy in the treatment of hypertension. Lifestyle modification and pharmacologic therapy, however, often meet with treatment failure. Bariatric surgery continues to be the most successful approach to sustained weight loss. This review focuses on the underlying physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the impact of bariatric surgery on the treatment of hypertension. Current available literature on the physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the major trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the impact of bariatric surgery procedures on hypertension are reviewed. Evidence suggests significant improvement in obesity-hypertension in patients who undergo surgical weight-reduction procedures. Malabsorptive techniques such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or surgical resection techniques such as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appear to offer superior results in regards to hypertension control over restrictive techniques such as Gastric Banding. Though long-term control of hypertension following surgery remains a concern, available follow-up post-operative data of up to 10 years suggests a sustained, if lessened, effect on hypertension control over time. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Vittorio; Zanconato, Giovanni; Lonati, Gisella; Baggio, Silvia; Gottin, Leonardo; Polati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia is an infrequent occurrence in the obstetric population. Nevertheless, it is a potentially life-threatening complication. In the majority of the cases, the first clinical symptom associated with intracranial subdural bleeding is severe headache, but the clinical course may have different presentations. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with an acute intracranial subdural hematoma shortly after spinal anesthe...

  5. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song

    1986-01-01

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  6. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  7. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma using the improved cubature formula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Lu, Wen

    2010-06-01

    The more accurate calculate method was investigated according to the improved formula of intracranial hematoma using segment deducing. The improved formula was deduced to calculate the intracranial hematoma using the volume formula of the solid geometry. The volume of intracranial hematoma was measured as a related accurate standards using software. The volumes of intracranial hematoma calculated by the improved formula, Tada's formula and the software were compared. The measure accuracy of the improved formula was higher than that of Tada's formula, and showed a similarity with that by using software method. The improved formula method shows a more accurate result than Tada's formula, and can be used in forensic practice.

  8. Blood Pressure and Intracranial Aneurysms in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Niemczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is correlated with an increased frequency of both intracranial aneurysms (ICANs, and arterial hypertension (AH. The aim of our study was to search for the association between blood pressure (BP and ICANs in ADPKD patients. Methods: Sixty-eight adult, pre-dialysis phase ADPKD patients underwent both screening for ICANs with magnetic resonance angiography of the brain, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM. Results: ICANs were diagnosed in 10 patients (ICAN(+ group, while in 58 were not (ICAN(- group. The nighttime maximum diastolic blood pressure (DBP, maximum increase in DBP from measurement to measurement (positive delta of DBP at night, and the standard deviation of the daytime mean arterial pressure were significantly higher in ICAN(+ compared to ICAN(- patients. Additionally, in a subgroup of patients after 45 years-of-age, ICAN(+ patients had significantly higher maximum 24-hour and daytime systolic blood pressure, maximum 24-hour, daytime, nighttime DBP, maximum daytime and nighttime positive delta of DBP compared to ICAN(- cases. Conclusions: Development of ICANs in hypertensive ADPKD patients is accompanied with higher values of some BP parameters measured by ABPM. Hypertensive ADPKD patients with substantial fluctuations in BP assessed by ABPM, especially those after 45 years-of-age, should become candidates for screening for ICANs.

  9. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gastón

    2012-05-01

    Hypertensive crisis is rare in children and is usually secondary to an underlying disease. There is strong evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the genesis of hypertensive crisis. An important principle in the management of children with hypertensive crisis is to determine if severe hypertension is chronic, acute, or acute-on-chronic. When it is associated with signs of end-organ damage such as encephalopathy, congestive cardiac failure or renal failure, there is an emergent need to lower blood pressures to 25-30% of the original value and then accomplish a gradual reduction in blood pressure. Precipitous drops in blood pressure can result in impairment of perfusion of vital organs. Medications commonly used to treat hypertensive crisis in children are nicardipine, labetalol and sodium nitroprusside. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and recent developments in management of hypertensive crisis in children.

  10. Hypertension in Danish seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Mingshan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension and its role in the development of athe- rosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke, hypertension is a major public health challenge worldwide. There is limited knowledge of the prevalence of hypertension among seafarers who......, however, are known to have an excess morbidity and mortality from these disorders. This article addresses the prevalence of hypertension among Danish seafarers and discusses potential risk factors for hypertension in maritime settings. Materials and methods: A representative sample of 629 Danish seafarers...... who had statutory medical examinations was studied from the beginning of October 2011 to the end of June 2012. The medical examination included measurements of blood pressure. The prevalence of hypertension in the study po- pulation was stratified by age, work place on board, smoking status, alcohol...

  11. The risk of intravenous thrombolysis-induced intracranial hemorrhage in Taiwanese patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ting Chiu

    Full Text Available The presence of an intracranial aneurysm is contraindicated to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, it is difficult to exclude asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms by using conventional, noncontrast head computed tomography (CT, which is the only neuroimaging suggested before r-tPA. Recent case reports and series have shown that administering r-tPA to patients with a pre-existing aneurysm does not increase the bleeding risk. However, Asians are known to have a relatively higher bleeding risk, and little evidence is available regarding the risk of using r-tPA on Asian patients with intracranial aneurysms.Medical records from the Shuang Ho hospital stroke registration between July 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed, and 144 patients received r-tPA. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms were detected using CT, or magnetic resonance or conventional angiography after r-tPA. The primary and secondary outcomes were the difference in overall intracranial hemorrhage (ICH and symptomatic ICH after r-tPA. The differences were analyzed using Fisher's exact or Mann-Whitney U tests, and p < 0.05 was defined as the statistical significance.A total of 144 patients were reviewed, and incidental unruptured intracranial aneurysms were found in 11 of them (7.6%. No significant difference was observed in baseline demographic data between the aneurysm and nonaneurysm groups. Among patients with an unruptured aneurysm, two had giant aneurysms (7.7 and 7.4 mm, respectively. The bleeding risk was not significant different between aneurysm group (2 out of 11, 18% with nonaneurysm group (7 out of 133, 5.3% (p = 0.14. None of the patients with an unruptured aneurysm had symptomatic ICH, whereas one patient without an aneurysm exhibited symptomatic ICH.The presence of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm did not significantly increase the risk of overall and symptomatic ICH in Taiwanese patients after they

  12. Cerebrovascular reactivity after treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms--A transcranial Doppler sonography and acetazolamide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøthun, Marianne Lundervik; Haaland, Øystein Ariansen; Logallo, Nicola; Svendsen, Frode; Thomassen, Lars; Helland, Christian A

    2016-04-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is defined as the change in cerebral blood flow, or blood velocity, in response to a vasoactive stimulus. There is a possible association between impaired CVR and vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Most studies on CVR and vasospasm have used healthy subjects as reference. However, due to potential different vascular features, CVR in persons with intracranial aneurysms may differ from CVR in healthy subjects. Therefore, our aim was to examine CVR in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). CVR was examined in 37 patients in the first postoperative week after treatment for UIA, using acetazolamide (AZ) test with transcranial Doppler monitoring of blood flow velocities. Mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries was 58.5 (SD 12.8) cm/s at baseline, and 94.3 (SD 19.5) cm/s after stimulation with AZ. Mean CVR was 62.6 (SD 16.8) %. There was no significant difference when comparing right and left sides, and treated and untreated sides. A simple regression analysis suggested that CVR increased with 0.7% points for each year a patient aged (p=0.004). However, the significance disappeared in a multiple analysis (increase of 0.6% points per year, p=0.055). Other possible influencing factors (gender, smoking, hypertension, body mass index, aneurysm location and treatment modality) were not significantly associated with CVR. CVR in patients with UIA is not different from normal values reported in healthy subjects, and does not indicate a systemically impaired vascular system in patients with UIA. We suggest that CVR in age and gender matched healthy controls can be used as reference for persons with intracranial aneurysms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Hypertension og hyperlipidaemi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik Steen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension and hyperlipidemia are well-established and partially overlapping risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Analyses of cardiovascular morbidity in relationship to changes in blood pressure and in serum cholesterol levels have shown that combined reduction of both risk factors...... are important to achieve a reduction in morbidity. Statins have been shown to be effective in preventing both coronary and cerebrovascular events in both hypertensive and normotensive cases. Consequently, most recent guidelines recommend that statin treatment be considered in hypertensive patients aged less...

  14. [Hypertension in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Tagle V, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Mónica; Valdés, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    The present review examines the types of hypertension that women may suffer throughout life, their physiopathological characteristics and management. In early life, the currently used low-dose oral contraceptives seldom cause hypertension. Pregnancy provokes preeclampsia, its main medical complication, secondary to inadequate transformation of the spiral arteries and the subsequent multisystem endothelial damage caused by deportation of placental factors and microparticles. Hypertension in preeclampsia is an epiphenomenon which needs to be controlled at levels that reduce maternal risk without impairing placental perfusion. The hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may unmask a hypertensive phenotype, may exacerbate a chronic hypertension, or may complicate hypertension secondary to lupus, renovascular lesions, and pheochromocytoma. On the other hand a primary aldosteronism may benefit from the effect of progesterone and present as a postpartum hypertension. A hypertensive pregnancy, especially preeclampsia, represents a risk for cardiac, vascular and renal disease in later life. Menopause may mimic a pheochromocytoma, and is associated to endothelial dysfunction and salt-sensitivity. Among women, non-pharmacological treatment should be forcefully advocated, except for sodium restriction during pregnancy. The blockade of the renin-angiotensin system should be avoided in women at risk of pregnancy; betablockers could be used with precautions during pregnancy; diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists should not be used during breast feeding. Collateral effects of antihypertensives, such as hyponatremia, cough and edema are more common in women. Thus, hypertension in women should be managed according to the different life stages.

  15. The new hypertension guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Ralph H

    2013-10-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) has published guidelines annually since 2000. The CHEP guidelines are a model of concise, comprehensive, up-to-date, evidence-rated guidelines for physicians who diagnose and treat hypertension. The guidelines address measurement of blood pressure and the definition of hypertension, secondary hypertension evaluation and treatment, and blood pressure targets and medication choices in patients with and without compelling indications. This review describes CHEP's process for developing guidelines and provides an overview of the 2013 recommendations. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 42. Hypertension: Morbidity review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzullah khan

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, eye abnormalities and end stage renal disease, which require proper counseling and management of patients.

  17. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  18. Genus zero graph segmentation: Estimation of intracranial volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, w...

  19. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... embryogenetic classifications of intracranial neoplasms in which terms like neuroblastoma, spongioblastoma, astroblastoma and ependymoblastoma were coined to indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). Advances in our understanding of the morphobiology of intracranial neoplasms have ...

  20. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    Apr 4, 2014 ... has been described in young adults and affects predominantly the extracranial blood vessels.2. Intracranial aneurysms in HIV-positive adults are described infrequently. About 22 case reports of HIV-infected adult patients who presented with intracranial aneurysms could be located in the literature. Isolated ...

  1. Mannitol-induced rebleeding from intracranial aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenørn, J; Westergaard, L; Hansen, P H

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented in which rebleeding from an intracranial saccular aneurysm occurred a few minutes after intravenous administration of mannitol during surgery. The relationship between the reducing effect of mannitol on elevated intracranial pressure and the increased pressure gradient across...

  2. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stéphanie; Compter, A; Labeyrie, Marc Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Béjot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Specken-Welleweerd, Jantien; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touzé, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stéphane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  3. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stephanie; Compter, Annette; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Bejot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Welleweerd, Janna C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grand-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touze, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stephane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  4. Intracranial Convexity Lipoma with Massive Calcification: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Intracranial lipoma is a rare entity, accounting for less than 0.5% of intracranial tumors, which usually develops in the callosal cisterns. We report a case of lipoma with an unusual location; in the high parietal convexity combined with massive calcification, and no underlying vascular malformation or congenital anomaly.

  5. THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ARACHNOID CYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts have been found in 0.3% of computed tomography (CT) scans and in 0.1% of brain autopsy specimens, more often in children than in adults. Intracranial arachnoid cysts occur prevalently in males, on the left side, and in the temporal fossa. Their occasional association

  6. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: initial and follow-up screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, A.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms may rupture, causing subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating subtype of stroke, resulting in death or severe disability in half the patients. This thesis has a focus on initial and follow-up screening for unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and consists

  7. Genetic Determinants of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymani, Abbas; Adams, Hieab H H; Cremers, Lotte G M; Krestin, Gabriel; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for intracranial aneurysms in clinical samples. In addition, SNPs have been discovered for blood pressure, one of the strongest risk factors for intracranial aneurysms. We studied the role of these genetic variants on occurrence and size of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, discovered incidentally in a general community-dwelling population. In 4890 asymptomatic participants from the Rotterdam Study, 120 intracranial aneurysms were identified on brain imaging and segmented for maximum diameter and volume. Genetic risk scores (GRS) were calculated for intracranial aneurysms (10 SNPs), systolic blood pressure (33 SNPs), and diastolic blood pressure (41 SNPs). The GRS for intracranial aneurysms was not statistically significantly associated with presence of aneurysms in this population (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.96-1.40; P=0.119), but showed a significant association with both maximum diameter (difference in log-transformed mm per SD increase of GRS, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.19; P=0.018) and volume (difference in log-transformed µL per SD increase of GRS, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.01-0.41; P=0.040) of aneurysms. GRSs for blood pressures were associated with neither presence nor size of aneurysms. Genetic variants previously identified for intracranial aneurysms in clinical studies relate to the size rather than the presence of incidentally discovered, unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the general population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Unintended Complication of Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, Kee D.; Lim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty (PEN) is a known interventional technique for the management of spinal pain. As with any procedures, PEN is associated with complications ranging from mild to more serious ones. We present a case of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN requiring surgical evacuation. We review the relevant literature and discuss possible complications of PEN and patholophysiology of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN.

  9. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui [Nan fang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tamrakar, Karuna [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-15

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  10. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui; Tamrakar, Karuna

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  11. A case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Sarrami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma which had infiltrated pons, cerebellum and basal surface of left temporal lobe without any visible mass. The patient presented with a sudden loss of consciousness and vomiting. Clinical findings, laboratory tests, imaging and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid tended to establish the diagnosis of an infectious condition than a malignancy. Without any response to the antibiotics and with a progressive deterioration of neurologic and mental condition, the patient died after 20 days. In the autopsy, histological and immunohistochemical study of the brain revealed the diagnosis of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH.

  12. Imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, M.K.; Musluman, M.; Kilicoglu, G.; Hakan, T.; Aker, F.V.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas in infants and adults. We retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance and computed tomography findings for 2 female patients and 3 male patients, ranging in age from 1 to 73 years (median 41 years), with histopathologically proven cystic meningioma. Although cystic meningiomas usually appear as solid and cystic masses, they may present as a mainly multicystic lesion. The wall of a cystic part of the meningioma may include both enhancing and unenhancing areas at imaging. The cystic portion of a meningioma is hypointense on diffusion-weighted images and markedly hyperintense on corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps. (author)

  13. Secondary Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Gundogan Bozdag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypotension is a clinical condition that characterized by postural (orthostatic headache and low pressure. It apperas with cerebrospinal fluid leak which occurs spontaneous or depending on the secondary attempts. 31 years old female patient which has diagnosis of acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy under spinal anesthesia. postoperative 5.day she admitted with a postural headache, diplopia. Patient was treated with conservative methods after diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to asses an encountered complication after spinal anesthesia which widely applied for surgical procedures with imaging findings and literature.

  14. Intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis in beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi-Kai; Tamrakar, Karuna; Wu, Yuan-Kui

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  15. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to diagnose and distinguish from each other. STUDY AIMS AND METHODS: Patients with PD and MSA and controls were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using tissue...... segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...

  16. Ventriculoperitoneal shunts for treating increased intracranial pressure in cryptococcal meningitis with or without ventriculomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Corti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic mycosis, especially in patients that are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive, and frequently involves the central nervous system. Methods We assessed the potential of ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS in preventing mortality due to uncontrollable intracranial hypertension (ICH in 15 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis. Results After 2 weeks of antifungal therapy consisting of amphotericin B deoxycholate with or without fluconazole, patients with persistent ICH underwent VPS, despite having persistent Cryptococcus neoformans infection. In 12 patients, the uncontrollable ICH was resolved by VPS. Conclusions Patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis who have ICH must be considered for VPS even with positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures.

  17. Overall outcomes following early interventions for intracranial arteriovenous malformations with hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Shyamal C; Maiti, Tanmoy Kumar; Konar, Subhas; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the timing and predictors of surgical intervention for intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with hematoma. A ruptured intracranial AVM with hematoma is an emergency condition, and the optimal timing for surgical intervention is not well understood. In addition, the outcome predictors of surgical intervention have rarely been reported. We identified and analyzed 78 patients treated with microsurgical resection for pathologically proven AVM at Louisiana State University Health in Shreveport from February 1992 to December 2004. All 78 patients were diagnosed with ruptured AVM before surgery. The independent variables, including patient demographics, timing of surgery, location of the AVM and comorbidities were analyzed to assess outcome. The results of this series revealed that surgical intervention after 48hours resulted in poor outcomes for patients with hematoma, following a ruptured AVM. Several other prognostic factors, including younger age (11-40years), Spetzler-Martin Grade I and II, and AVM in a supratentorial location, had significant positive effects on outcomes. However, hypertension, smoking, and a prior embolization showed significant negative effects on outcomes after surgery. The multiple logistic regression analyses also revealed that the timing of surgical intervention had a significant effect on outcomes in patients with hematoma following ruptured AVM. Early intervention is the key to success in these patients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. MRI diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis (73 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qingyong; Li Xin; He Zhihui; Cheng Chuanhu; Deng Kaijun; Deng Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the MRI features, classification and diagnostic value for intracranial tuberculosis. Methods MRI findings of 73 patients suffering from intracranial tuberculosis proved by pathology or clinic were analyzed respectively. Among the total 73 patients, 39 cases were tuberculosis meningitis, 12 cases simple intracranial tuberculoma, while 22 cases were tuberculoma combining with meningitis. Results: The MRI features of tuberculous meningitis are cerebral infarction, hydrocephalus, abnormal meningeal and cerebral cistern enhancement. 12 cases mature tuberculoma demon- strated typical features with high or low density on T 2 WI images and ring contrast enhancement; 22 cases non-mature tuberculoma showed focal nodular contrast enhancement with evident cerebral edema. FLAIR is more sensitive to find out focus than T 2 WI. Small lesions could be showed definitively by contrast-enhanced scan. Conclusion: MRI possess typical features in the diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis. It plays an important role in evaluating location, range, classification of intracranial tuberculosis, and is helpful to clinical treatment. (authors)

  19. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  20. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeun Cha [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory.

  1. Genome screen in familial intracranial aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langefeld Carl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with 1st degree relatives harboring an intracranial aneurysm (IA are at an increased risk of IA, suggesting genetic variation is an important risk factor. Methods Families with multiple members having ruptured or unruptured IA were recruited and all available medical records and imaging data were reviewed to classify possible IA subjects as definite, probable or possible IA or not a case. A 6 K SNP genome screen was performed in 333 families, representing the largest linkage study of IA reported to date. A 'narrow' (n = 705 definite IA cases and 'broad' (n = 866 definite or probable IA disease definition were used in multipoint model-free linkage analysis and parametric linkage analysis, maximizing disease parameters. Ordered subset analysis (OSA was used to detect gene × smoking interaction. Results Model-free linkage analyses detected modest evidence of possible linkage (all LOD Conclusion These data suggest it is unlikely that there is a single common variant with a strong effect in the majority of the IA families. Rather, it is likely that multiple genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the susceptibility for intracranial aneurysms.

  2. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed I Hussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  3. Longterm surgery of posttraumatic intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babochkin D.S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Research objective — studying of consequences of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas in the remote period. Material. The nearest and remote results of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas at 105 patients in terms from 6 months till 3 years are analyzed. During research the anamnesis was studied, neurologic investigation, and also research cognitive functions by means of scale MMSE, the test of drawing of hours, a scale of studying of alarm/depression HADS, learning of 5 words, scale quality of life SF-36. Results. It is established, that in the remote period the condition of the majority of patients gradually improves, at the same time, frequent enough and expressed consequences which are necessary for analyzing with the purpose of optimization of outcomes and the forecast at the given disease are observed. The special attention should be given again developing complications to which it is possible to carry epileptic seizures and behavioral-memorable infringements. Conclusion. Studying of the remote consequences of this heavy kind of craniocereberal trauma allows to optimize results of treatment and to provide complex medical, labor, social and family adaptation

  4. Maskeret hypertension i graviditeten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Margit Bistrup; Thingaard, Ebbe; Andersen, Anita Sylvest

    2018-01-01

    Hypertension during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Monitoring of blood pressure is therefore an essential part of prenatal care. Masked hypertension, where blood pressure levels are elevated at home despite normal blood pressure levels...

  5. Hypertension og hjernen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and modifiable risk factor of stroke and dementia. Hypertension causes remodelling of the cerebral resistance vessels, impairing their tolerance to very low blood pressure. In primary prevention of stroke, the effect of beta-blockers is inferior to other classes...

  6. Therapeutic Exercise and Hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Beneficial effects of exercise training on human hypertension.Journal of Nig Soc of Physiotherapy. 10 (2): 28-30. ALLHAT Collaboration Research Group (2000) Major cardiovascular. Events in hypertensive patients randomized to doxagosin versus chlorthalidone: the antihypertensive and lipid lowering treatment to.

  7. Noncirrotisk intrahepatisk portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Fialla, Annette; Havelund, Troels

    2007-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension is characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of liver cirrhosis or portal vein thrombosis. The disease is common in the East and rarely seen in the West. Two cases with oesophageal varices are described. The histopathology is heterogeneous...

  8. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...

  9. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  10. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  11. Uraemia from Benign Hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tance,' and the criteria for the recognition of malignant hypertension have become so well established that there is no dispute about the diagnosis when this condition ends in uraemia. By contrast, benign hypertension mani- fests itself mainly as cardiac or cerebrovascular disease,"" and although the occurrence of renal ...

  12. Hypertension and cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-hang SHANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As a leading risk factor for stroke, hypertension is also an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Midlife hypertension doubles the risk of dementia later in life and accelerates the progression of dementia, but the correlation between late-life blood pressure and cognitive impairment is still unclear. Beside blood pressure, the effect of pulse pressure, blood pressure variability and circadian rhythm of blood pressure on cognition is currently attracting more and more attention. Hypertension induces alterations in cerebrovascular structure and functions, which lead to brain lesions including cerebral atrophy, stroke, lacunar infarcts, diffuse white matter damage, microinfarct and microhemorrhage, resuling in cognitive impairment. Hypertension also impairs the metabolism and transfer of amyloid-β protein (Aβ, thus accelerates cognitive impairment. Individualized therapy, focusing on characteristics of hypertensive patients, may be a good choice for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.004

  13. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin...... activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This is a topic for future research....

  14. Overweight, adipocytokines and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seven, Ekim; Husemoen, Lise L N; Wachtell, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The adipocytokines, leptin, adiponectin, and interleukin-6, which stimulate liver C-reactive protein (CRP) production, are regarded as potential candidate intermediates between adipose tissue and overweight-induced hypertension. METHODS: We examined the associations between leptin......, adiponectin, and CRP levels with both prevalent and 5-year incident hypertension (IHT) in a general population of Danish adults (n = 5,868, 51.3% women, mean age 45.8 ± 7.9 years). RESULTS: We recorded 2195 prevalent and 379 incident cases of hypertension. In models including leptin, CRP, adiponectin, sex.......023) in the fully adjusted model. The population attributable risk estimate of IHT owing to overweight was 31%. CONCLUSION: Leptin, but not adiponectin or CRP, may play a mediating role in overweight-induced hypertension. However, as BMI was a strong independent predictor of hypertension, other factors than leptin...

  15. Overweight, adipocytokines and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seven, Ekim; Husemoen, Lise L N; Wachtell, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The adipocytokines, leptin, adiponectin, and interleukin-6, which stimulate liver C-reactive protein (CRP) production, are regarded as potential candidate intermediates between adipose tissue and overweight-induced hypertension. METHODS:: We examined the associations between leptin......, adiponectin, and CRP levels with both prevalent and 5-year incident hypertension (IHT) in a general population of Danish adults (n = 5868, 51.3% women, mean age 45.8 ± 7.9 years). RESULTS:: We recorded 2195 prevalent and 379 incident cases of hypertension. In models including leptin, CRP, adiponectin, sex.......023) in the fully adjusted model. The population attributable risk estimate of IHT owing to overweight was 31%. CONCLUSION:: Leptin, but not adiponectin or CRP, may play a mediating role in overweight-induced hypertension. However, as BMI was a strong independent predictor of hypertension, other factors than leptin...

  16. Hypertension in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, and a highly prevalent condition in both men and women. However, the prevalence of hypertension is predicted to increase more among women than men. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) can induce hypertension in a small group of women and, increase CV risk especially among those with hypertension. Both COC-related increased CV risk and blood pressure (BP) returns to pretreatment levels by 3 months of its discontinuation. The effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on BP are controversial, and COCs and HRT containing the new generation progestin drospirenone are preferred in women with established hypertension. Despite the high incidence of cancer in women, CV disease remains the major cause of death in women and comparable benefit of antihypertensive treatment have been demonstrated in both women and men.

  17. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  18. Epigenomics of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W; Mattson, David L; Kotchen, Theodore A; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome-wide scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature variability in the day-night cycle is associated with further intracranial pressure during therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Adriano Barreto; Annen, Eva; Boss, Oliver; Farokhzad, Faraneh; Sikorski, Christopher; Keller, Emanuela

    2017-08-03

    To assess whether circadian patterns of temperature correlate with further values of intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe brain injury treated with hypothermia. We retrospectively analyzed temperature values in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients treated with hypothermia by endovascular cooling. The circadian patterns of temperature were correlated with the mean ICP across the following day (ICP 24 ). We analyzed data from 17 days of monitoring of three subarachnoid hemorrhage patients that underwent aneurysm coiling, sedation and hypothermia due to refractory intracranial hypertension and/or cerebral vasospasm. ICP 24 ranged from 11.5 ± 3.1 to 24.2 ± 6.2 mmHg. The ratio between the coefficient of variation of temperature during the nocturnal period (18:00-6:00) and the preceding diurnal period (6:00-18:00) [temperature variability (TV)] ranged from 0.274 to 1.97. Regression analysis showed that TV correlated with ICP 24 (Pearson correlation = -0.861, adjusted R square = 0.725, p TV) mmHg or, for 80% prediction interval, [Formula: see text] mmHg. The results indicate that the occurrence of ICP 24 higher than 20 mmHg is unlikely after a day with TV ≥1.0. TV correlates with further ICP during hypothermia regardless the strict range that temperature is maintained. Further studies with larger series could clarify whether intracranial hypertension in severe brain injury can be predicted by analysis of oscillation patterns of autonomic parameters across a period of 24 h or its harmonics.

  20. Increased Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment Associated with Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2011-01-01

    Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made it a high priority to understand this syndrome and provide mitigation techniques to protect crewmembers from visual impairment. While there are many possible factors that could contribute to intracranial hypertension associated with spaceflight, the relative contribution of these, as well as the processes by which eye damage occurs as a result of intracranial hypertension, are not fully understood. The observed pathophysiological phenomena are extremely complex and it is likely that multiple factors contribute to their incidence, rather than one simple mechanism. This paper will define and examine the findings in detail, and expound upon the potential contributing factors and their relative contribution to this syndrome.

  1. Effect of minimally invasive surgery for cerebral hematoma evacuation in different stages on motor evoked potential and thrombin in dog model of intracranial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guofeng; Zhong, Weibin

    2010-03-01

    To observe the effect of minimally invasive surgery for cerebral hematoma evacuation in different stages on motor evoked potential (MEP) and thrombin in dog model of intracranial hemorrhage. Twenty dogs were selected to prepare the intracranial hemorrhage model, which were randomly divided into 6, 12, 18 and 24 hour groups, respectively. The animals in each group underwent a minimally invasive surgery to evacuate the cerebral hematoma after the models were prepared. Before and after procedures, Purdy score, MEP and thrombin in hematoma region were determined and compared. Significant decreases in Purdy score, latency of MEP and thrombin expression were observed in 6 and 12 hour groups as compared with the 18 and 24 hour groups (pintracranial hemorrhage, which was minimally invasive, easy to operate, highly repeated, simulating the pathological and physiological changes of clinical hypertensive intracranial hemorrhage. Both the latency of MEP and the expression of thrombin decreased after evacuation of intracranial hematoma in early stages by minimally invasive procedures, indicating that minimally invasive procedures for cerebral hematoma in ultra-early and early stages might be more effective to limit brain injury and decrease the latency of MEP and thrombin expression.

  2. Intracranial structural alteration predicts treatment outcome in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanna; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2018-02-01

    Background Intracranial structural dislocation in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) can be measured by various intracranial angles and distances. We aimed to identify the clinical significance of structural dislocation in relation to treatment outcome in patients with SIH. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we identified patients with SIH who received an epidural blood patch (EBP) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2005 to March 2015. Structural dislocation in pretreatment MRIs of SIH patients was assessed by measuring tonsillar herniation, mamillopontine distance, the angle between the vein of Galen and straight sinus (vG/SS angle), the pontomesencephalic angle, and the lateral ventricular angle. After the first EBP, poor response was defined as the persistence of symptoms that prompted a repeat EBP. Results Out of the 95 patients included, 31 (32.6%) showed poor response. Among the radiological markers of structural dislocation, the vG/SS angle was associated with poor response (49.82 ± 16.40° vs 66.58 ± 26.08°, p = 0.002). Among clinical variables, premorbid migraine ( p = 0.036) was related to poor response. In multivariate analysis, reduced vG/SS angle was independently associated with poor response (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01 - 1.07] per 1° decrease, p = 0.006). In 23 patients who underwent MRI after successful treatment, the vG/SS angle significantly increased after the EBP ( p < 0.001, by paired t-test), while two patients with aggravation or recurrence showed a further reduction of their vG/SS angles. Conclusions Intracranial structural dislocation, measured by the vG/SS angle, is associated with poor response to the first EBP in patients with SIH. Successful treatment can reverse the structural dislocation.

  3. Topographic Surgical Anatomy of the Parasylvian Anterior Temporal Artery for Intracranial-Intracranial Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Griswold, Dylan; Tabani, Halima; Lawton, Michael T; Mokhtari, Pooneh; Payman, Andre; Benet, Arnau

    2016-09-01

    The anterior temporal artery (ATA) is an appealing donor artery for intracranial-intracranial bypass procedures. However, its identification may be difficult. Current literature lacks useful landmarks to help identify the ATA at the surface of the sylvian fissure. The objective of this study was to define the topographic anatomy of the cortical segment of the ATA relative to constant landmarks exposed during the pterional approach. The temporopolar artery (TPA), ATA, and middle temporal artery (MTA) were examined in 16 cadaveric specimens. The topographic anatomy and key landmarks of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were recorded. The distance between the point of emergence from the sylvian fissure to the lesser sphenoid wing and anterior tip of the temporal lobe was measured. The features of the inferior frontal gyrus relative to each of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were also recorded. The average distances from the lesser sphenoid wing to the TPA, ATA, and MTA were 3.7 mm, 21.2 mm, and 37 mm. The mean distances from the temporal pole were TPA, 14.7 mm; ATA, 32.0 mm; and MTA, 45.4 mm. The differences between the average distances were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The ATA most frequently faced pars triangularis, whereas the TPA always faced pars orbitalis. The MTA was always found posterior to the junction of pars triangularis and pars opercularis. This article provides topographic evidence for efficient identification of the ATA in the parasylvian space. The key relationship and landmarks identified in this study may increase efficiency and safety when harvesting the ATA for intracranial-intracranial bypass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  5. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Cheng, Henrich; Ko, Chin-Chu

    2012-11-01

    A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs) yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH). Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient's headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage). Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The right heart catheterization is the gold standard in the diagnosis and determines the severity of pulmonary hypertension. The significant technical progress of noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods significantly improves the pixel density and spatial resolution in the study of cardiovascular structures, thus changes their role and place in the overall diagnostic plan. Learning points: What is the etiology, clinical manifestation and general pathophysiological disorders in pulmonary hypertension. What are the established diagnostic methods in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension. What is the recommended protocol for CT scanning for patients with clinically suspected or documented pulmonary hypertension. What are the important diagnostic findings in CT scan of a patient with pulmonary hypertension. Discussion: The prospect of instantaneous complex - anatomical and functional cardiopulmonary and vascular diagnostics seems extremely attractive. The contrast enhanced multislice computed (CT ) and magnetic resonance imaging are very suitable methods for imaging the structures of the right heart, with the possibility of obtaining multiple projections and three-dimensional imaging reconstructions . There are specific morphological features that, if carefully analyzed, provide diagnostic information. Thus, it is possible to avoid or at least reduce the frequency of use of invasive diagnostic cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: This review focuses on the use of contrast-enhanced CT for comprehensive evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension and presents the observed characteristic changes in the chest, lung parenchyma , the structures of the right half of the heart and pulmonary vessels

  7. Genes and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E A; Newhouse, S; Caulfield, M J; Munroe, P B

    2003-01-01

    The combination of investigation of rare Mendelian forms of hypertension, candidate gene studies, comparative mapping and genome-wide screening in both animal models and man has led to significant progress in determining new mechanisms of blood pressure control. In this review, the newly discovered blood pressure/cardiovascular genes, WNK kinases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and the development of a new anti-hypertensive agent PST2238 are discussed. Major genes causing essential hypertension have yet to be discovered, however, there are now over 20 published genome-wide screens for blood pressure controlling genes. Several regions demonstrate suggestive linkage to the trait and there is some overlap of regions between the different studies. It is hoped that new blood pressure genes will ultimately be discovered using this method. Pharmacogenetic studies in hypertension have only been initiated recently, some are described in this paper. Small studies upon single candidate genes, suggest that the contribution of genetics to the inter-individual variation in blood pressure response to anti-hypertensive therapy, is small, approximately 3-5%. Recently micro-arrays with multiple polymorphisms in multiple genes have been used. After accounting for the additive affects of multiple blood pressure loci, an individual's genetic profile appeared to explain up to 50% of the variation in blood pressure response to therapy. Knowledge of the genetic variants that cause hypertension and influence response to anti-hypertensive therapy will ultimately provide a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying blood pressure control.

  8. Management of raised intracranial pressure and hyperosmolar therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropper, Allan H

    2014-06-01

    The management of raised intracranial pressure is undergoing rapid change. The choice of medical treatments to reduce intracranial pressure varies between institutions and regions of the world. The mainstay of therapy, however, continues to be the infusion of a hyperosmolar solution to achieve an osmotic gradient to force the exit of water from the brain. This review introduces the basic concepts of raised intracranial pressure, summarises several recent studies that have challenged dogma in the field, and provides practical advice on hyperosmolar treatment, based on personal experience and a critical reading of the literature.

  9. A Case Of Ollier′s Disease With Intracranial Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharthan Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of multiple enchondromas is known as Ollier′s disease. Enchondromas are benign tumours of hyaline cartilage arising within the medullary cavity of tubular bones. We are reporting the case of a 16 year old girl with Ollier′s disease who presented with seizures and brainstem compression. A MRI scan of brain showed an intracranial space-occupying lesion in the region of clivus. The intracranial tumour was surgically removed and the histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of enchondroma. Intracranial enchondroma is an extremely rare situation and reported for the first time from south India.

  10. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma volume by personal computer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Wanping; Tan, Lihua; Zhai, Ning; Zhou, Shunke; Wang, Rui; Xue, Gongshi; Xiao, An

    2011-01-01

    To explore the method for intracranial hematoma volume measurement by the personal computer. Forty cases of various intracranial hematomas were measured by the computer tomography with quantitative software and personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software, respectively. the data from the 2 methods were analyzed and compared. There was no difference between the data from the computer tomography and the personal computer (P>0.05). The personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software can measure the volume of various intracranial hematomas precisely, rapidly and simply. It should be recommended in the clinical medicolegal identification.

  11. Intracranial Infectious Aneurysm in Orbital Cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm and cavernous sinus thrombosis are rare complications of orbital cellulitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old male presenting with sinusitis and orbital cellulitis complicated by the development of an orbital mass. Following orbitotomy with debulking, the patient underwent bony orbital decompression for increasing proptosis postoperatively. While his exam stabilized, the patient developed complete ptosis and extraocular motor palsy in the contralateral eye after undergoing bilateral sinus debridement. Imaging was notable for the presence of a pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery, which was treated with a stent. This report demonstrates rare complications of orbital cellulitis. These patients should be monitored carefully with noninvasive imaging studies, such as cerebral angiography, for early detection of vascular abnormalities that can progress rapidly.

  12. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  13. Intracranial developmental venous anomaly: is it asymptomatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, A Bolívar; de Asís Bravo Rodríguez, F; Bravo Rey, I; Romero, E Roldán

    2018-03-16

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies are the most common vascular malformation. In the immense majority of cases, these anomalies are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, and they are considered benign. Very exceptionally, however, they can cause neurological symptoms. In this article, we present three cases of patients with developmental venous anomalies that presented with different symptoms owing to complications derived from altered venous drainage. These anomalies were located in the left insula, right temporal lobe, and cerebellum. The exceptionality of the cases presented as well as of the images associated, which show the mechanism through which the symptoms developed, lies in the low incidence of symptomatic developmental venous anomalies reported in the literature. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracranial Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Young Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Prasan Kumar; Mavidi, Sunil Kumar; Wig, Naveet; Garg, Ajay; Nalwa, Aasma; Sharma, M C

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial aspergillosis (ICA) is very rare in the immunocompetent individuals, usually misdiagnosed as a tumor or an abscess. A high index of clinical suspicion is required in patients who present with focal neurological deficits, headache, or seizures. We report the case of a 25-year-old immunocompetent female, who presented with a 15-month history of headache, seizures, left-sided proptosis and ophthalmoplegia, and right hemiparesis. Recovery from the symptoms and decrease in the lesion size seen on the radiological assessment were achieved through two decompressive craniotomies followed by prolonged combined systemic antifungal therapies. Although the initial neuroimaging suggested a mitotic pathology, the surgical sample confirmed ICA. Now the patient is on single antifungal therapy (Tab. voriconazole, 200 mg twice daily) and doing her daily activities, but with a reduced intelligent quotient. We report a challenging case of ICA where multiple courses of combined antifungal therapies and repeat surgeries paved the way for a good prognosis.

  15. Endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, A; Nepper-Rasmussen, J

    2011-01-01

    to large aneurysms (> 3 mm). However the data also suggest that endovascular treatment of very small aneurysms might be associated with an increased risk of procedural ruptures and mortality. At nine-month follow-up results indicate significantly less compaction in the very small aneurysms....... endovascular treatment was attempted in 956 consecutive intracranial aneurysms. Of 956 aneurysms, 111 aneurysms were very small aneurysms with a maximal diameter of 3 mm or less. We conducted a retrospective analysis of angiographic and clinical outcome following coiling of very small aneurysms...... aneurysms and less than 90% aneurysm occlusion in six aneurysms. Complications occurred in the treatment of 15 aneurysms, including eight procedural ruptures, six thromboembolic events and one case of early hemorrhage. Compared with larger aneurysms, treatment of very small aneurysms was associated...

  16. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Mukada, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Migita, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  17. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author)

  18. Intracranial calcification on paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.; Cavanagh, N.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the computed tomograms of 18000 children examined consecutively form the basis of an assessment of the diagnostic significance of intracranial calcification. The low incidence of physiological calcification in the pineal and choroid of about 2% up to the age of 8 years, but increasing 5-fold by the age of 15 years, is confirmed. Pathological calcification occurred in 1.6%, the commonest causes being neoplasms (43%), neuroectodermal syndromes (20%) and infections (12%). Diffuse basal ganglia calcification (15%) bore little relation to the diverse clinical symptomatology, and routine bio-chemical studies showed a disorder of metabolism to be present in only 6 cases. Calcification has not been previously noted in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, Pertussis or Cocksackie encephalitis, infantile neuraxonal dystrophy, Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome or in the basal ganglia in neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  19. Converging intracranial markers of conscious access.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaillard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms, accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access.

  20. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation......) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  1. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...... hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  2. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive......Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  3. Imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shuilian; Man Yuping; Ma Longbai; Liu Ying; Wei Qiang; Zhu Youkai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFT). Methods: Ten patients with ISFT proven histopathologically were collected. Four cases had CT data and all cases had MR data. The imaging features and pathological results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All cases were misdiagnosed as meningioma at pre-operation. All lesions arose from intracranial meninges including 5 lesions above the tentorium, 4 lesions beneath the tentorium and 1 lesion growing around the tentorium. The margins of all the masses were well defined, and 8 lesions presented multilobular shape. CT demonstrated hyerattenuated masses in all 4 lesions, smooth erosion of the basicranial skull in 1 lesion, and punctiform calcification of the capsule in 1 lesion. T 1 WI showed most lesions with isointense or slight hyperintense signals including homogeneous in 4 lesions and heterogeneous in 6 lesions. T 2 WI demonstrated isointense or slight hyperintense in 2 lesions, mixed hypointense and hyperintense signals in 4, cystic portion in 2, and two distinct portion of hyperintense and hypointense signal, so called 'yin-yang' pattern, in 2. Strong enhanced was found in all lesions, especially in 8 lesion with heterogeneous with the low T 2 signal. 'Dural tail' was found in 4 lesions. Conclusions: ISFI has some specific CT and MR features including heterogeneous signal intensity on T 2 WI, strong enhancement of areas with low T 2 signal intensity, slight or no 'dural tail', without skull thickening, and the typical 'yin-yang' pattern. (authors)

  4. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  5. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Andrea; Benner, Jan; Reinhardt, Julia; De Vere-Tyndall, Anthony; Stieltjes, Bram; Hainc, Nicolin; Stippich, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting. A structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: "congruent," "partially congruent," "incongruent," or "not mentioned in free-style report." Tumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17) with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7-43% per item). Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12-17:06 min). First results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the case for free text reporting. A mean reporting time of 8

  6. Intracranial pressure changes during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazen, Mehran; Alazmani, Ali; Rafferty, Katherine; Liu, Zi-Jun; Gustafson, Jennifer; Cunningham, Michael L; Fagan, Michael J; Herring, Susan W

    2016-01-04

    During early stages of postnatal development, pressure from the growing brain as well as cerebrospinal fluid, i.e. intracranial pressure (ICP), load the calvarial bones. It is likely that such loading contributes to the peripheral bone formation at the sutural edges of calvarial bones, especially shortly after birth when the brain is growing rapidly. The aim of this study was to quantify ICP during mouse development. A custom pressure monitoring system was developed and calibrated. It was then used to measure ICP in a total of seventy three wild type mice at postnatal (P) day 3, 10, 20, 31 and 70. Retrospectively, the sample in each age group with the closest ICP to the average value was scanned using micro-computed tomography to estimate cranial growth. ICP increased from 1.33±0.87mmHg at P3 to 1.92±0.78mmHg at P10 and 3.60±1.08mmHg at P20. In older animals, ICP plateaued at about 4mmHg. There were statistically significant differences between the ICP at the P3 vs. P20, and P10 vs. P20. In the samples that were scanned, intracranial volume and skull length followed a similar pattern of increase up to P20 and then plateaued at older ages. These data are consistent with the possibility of ICP being a contributing factor to bone formation at the sutures during early stages of development. The data can be further used for development and validation of computational models of skull growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We report the clinical and angiographic results of endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Over a three-year period, 80 unruptured aneurysms in 74 patients were electively treated with endovascular management. One aneurysm was diagnosed during investigations for a second ruptured aneurysm, 54 aneurysms were incidentally discovered, 18 aneurysms presented with symptoms of mass effect and seven aneurysms presented with symptoms of brain stem ischemia. Mean size of the 80 unruptured aneurysms was 12.5±8.0 mm (range, 2-39 mm). Thirty-six aneurysms (45%) were small (<10 mm), 38 aneurysms (47.5%) were large (10-25 mm), and six aneurysms (7.5%) were giant (25-39 mm). Forty-eight wide-necked aneurysms (60%) were coiled with the aid of a supporting device. The mortality rate was 1.25%, and the overall morbidity was 1.25%. Of these, one of the patients suffered a stroke, leading to severe disability (1.25%). In one patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in death. Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete (100%) in 76.25% aneurysms, nearly complete (90%-98%) in 10% aneurysms and incomplete (60%-85%) in 13.75% aneurysms. Follow-up angiography was available in 67 patients with 73 treated aneurysms (91.25%) from one to 36 months (mean 9.3 months); partial reopening occurred in 7.5%, mainly large and giant aneurysms (5.5%). Additional coiling was performed in four aneurysms. There were no complications in additional treatments. At 14.1-month clinical follow-up (range, 2 to 36 months), mRS score was 0 in 78.75% patients, 1 in 10% patients, 2 in 8.75% and 3 in 1.25%. There was no aneurysmal rupture during the follow-up period. Endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms has low procedural mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:22192544

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoroki, Koji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Kadota, Koki; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kanemaru, Reizou; Fujimoto, Toshirou; Yamamoto, Kunimitsu

    1987-12-01

    A sequential MR scan was performed on 21 patients with intracranial hematoma, and simultaneously the T/sub 1/ values of the hematomas were calculated. The T/sub 1/ value of a hematoma was found to be longer than that of the white matter in the acute phase, but it soon becomes as short as that of the white matter (7 - 10 day after). After several days, the T/sub 1/ value again gradually becomes longer. In the experiment, 30 ml of fresh blood (15 samples) were stored at room temperature, and a sequential MR scan and the calculation of the T/sub 1/ were performed over a period of 20 days. In vitro, most of the T/sub 1/ values were long, but there was much variation on the first day. A shortening of the T/sub 1/ was observed as well in vivo, and after this shortening, no prolongation of the T/sub 1/ was observed. Perhaps the shortening of T/sub 1/ was caused by the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin and by the coagulation of the blood. The lysis and absorption of the hematoma may, on the other hand, cause the prolongation of the T/sub 1/ in vitro. For the diagnosis of intracranial hematoma, CT was found to be a method superior to MRI, especially in the acute phase. However, MRI gives us more information about hematoma (concerning the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, the lysis and absorption of the hematoma, the range of hemorrhagic tissue and edema, etc.) than does CT. An IR (T/sub 1/-weighted) image shows a good contrast between the hematoma and the surrounding tissue (hemorrhagic tissue, edema) in the early phase. On the other hand, the SE (T/sub 2/-weighted) image informs us of the lesion when the hematoma is low approx. isodense on the CT in the chronic phase.

  9. Noninvasive assessment of intracranial elastance and pressure in spontaneous intracranial hypotension by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Tung, Hsin; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Hsian-Min; Pan, Kuan-Jung; Cheng, Da-Chuan; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Chai, Jyh-Wen; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2018-02-13

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is often misdiagnosed, and can lead to severe complications. Conventional MR sequences show a limited ability to aid in this diagnosis. MR-based intracranial pressure (MR-ICP) may be able to detect changes of intracranial elastance and pressure. To determine whether MR-ICP is able to differentiate SIH patients from normal subjects, improve diagnostic sensitivity, and provide an insight into the pathophysiology. Prospective. Twenty-eight SIH cases with orthostatic headache and 20 healthy volunteers. Cine phase-contrast MRI on a 1.5T scanner. Intracranial elastance (IE) was derived from the ratio of the peak-to-peak cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure gradient (PG csf-pp ) and intracranial volume change, obtained by summing all flows before each sequential cardiac frame. Student's t-test was used to compare the MR-ICP indexes and flow parameters between SIH patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The SIH patients with cervical epidural venous dilatation (EVD) had an IE of 0.121 ± 0.027 mmHg/cm/ml, significantly higher than that of the normal volunteers (0.085 ± 0.027 mmHg/cm/ml; P = 0.002). In contradistinction, the EVD-negative SIH patients, including four with no sign of CSF leaks, had significantly lower IE (0.055 ± 0.012 mmHg/cm/ml) compared with the normal volunteers and the EVD-positive group (P = 0.001, P < 0.001). The EVD-negative patients had significantly lower PG csf-pp (0.024 ± 0.007 mmHg/cm) compared with the normal volunteers and the EVD-positive group (0.035 ± 0.011 mmHg/cm, 0.040 ± 0.010 mmHg/cm; P = 0.003, P < 0.001). Additionally, the MRI flow study showed a significant decrease in transcranial inflow and outflow of SIH patients (P < 0.01). We found that the MR-ICP method is potentially more sensitive than morphological MRI in the early diagnosis of SIH. Also, contrary to common belief, our results suggest that an abnormal craniospinal elastance

  10. Diabetes + Hypertension (comorbidity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set provides de-identified population data for diabetes and hypertension comorbidity prevalence in Allegheny County.

  11. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both...... supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia......, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society...

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and may possibly fail. Because the blood has dif culty getting through the lungs to pick up ... Arterial Hypertension? The cause of PAH is often dif cult to determine. Your health care provider will ...

  13. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a tank can help relieve shortness of breath. Medicines that can be used to treat pulmonary hypertension include the following: Endothelin receptor antagonists Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors Prostacyclins Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) ...

  14. [Hypertension and insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, A; Kutkuhn, B; Rösen, P; Grabensee, B

    1997-10-17

    Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and obesity are defined as classical insulin resistant states. Essential hypertension is now also considered to be an insulin resistant state, even in absence of NIDDM or obesity, as shown in epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies. Neither the underlying mechanism nor a direct causality between the two phenomena has been detected as yet, but different hypotheses have been postulated where, on the one hand, insulin resistance and hypertension are considered to be causally related and, on the other hand, they are considered to be parallel phenomena due to genetic and acquired factors. The clarification of the connection between hypertension and insulin resistance seems to be of great clinical importance, since they are both independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and mortality from cardiovascular complications. This paper gives an overview of the results of recent research on the possible underlying pathogenetic mechanisms linking hypertension and insulin resistance.

  15. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  16. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who also suffer from PH have lower pulmonary artery pressures than those who have PH alone; despite ... Address and Privacy Pulmonary Hypertension Association 801 Roeder Road, Ste. 1000 Silver Spring, MD 20910 Patient-to- ...

  17. Minimally invasive trans-portal resection of deep intracranial lesions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raza, S.M.; Recinos, P.F.; Avendano, J.; Adams, H.; Jallo, G.I.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical management of deep intra-axial lesions still requires microsurgical approaches that utilize retraction of deep white matter to obtain adequate visualization. We report our experience with a new tubular retractor system, designed specifically for intracranial applications,

  18. Chemical Meningitis with Intracranial Tumours | De Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with intracranial epidermoid tumours who had a chemical meningitis as part of their clinical course, are described. The importance of recognising this as a presenting complaint is stressed. The pathogenesis and treatment are discussed.

  19. Intracranial teratoma associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.C.; Sarwar, M.; Virapongse, C.; Bhimani, S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual case of a congenital intracranial teratoma associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum is presented. The radiographic features and the differentiation of this tumor from others that occur in agenesis is discussed. (orig.)

  20. Adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing a bifocal intracranial germinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Julie; Potorac, Iulia; Lutteri, Laurence; Gennigens, Christine; Martin, Didier; Daly, Adrian F; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Tshibanda, Luaba; Beckers, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of intracranial tumors in which impaired antidiuretic hormone secretion is associated with the loss of thirst sensation. Here, we present the case of a patient with bifocal intracranial germinoma, diagnosed due to symptoms mainly caused by adipsic diabetes insipidus. This is, to our knowledge, the first case of adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing an intracranial germinoma reported in the literature. We describe the diagnostic procedures and the three-year follow-up of this patient. Management of intracranial germ-cell tumors is made complex by the wide range of histological features. Although germinomas have a generally better prognosis than most nongerminomatous tumors, they can have severe or even life-threatening presentations. Adipsic diabetes insipidus is one such severe presentation and its rarity can make it difficult to recognize and manage. Awareness of this potential entity is therefore important for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Congenital intracranial meningioma. A case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed....

  2. Bathing Trunk Inevus Associated with Neurofibromatosis and Raised Intracranial Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V.S Arya

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old boy had bathing trunk nevus with multiple large neurofibromata on the nevus and raised intracranial tension presenting with bilateral papilloedema and pyramidal tract sings. This combination, of features is extremely rare.

  3. Post-operative intracranial foreign body granuloma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djindjian, M.; Brugieres, P.; Razavi-Encha, F.; Allegret, C.; Poirier, J.

    1987-09-01

    The authors report and discuss some clinical, radiological, histological and ultrastructural aspects of an intracranial foreign body granuloma. This granuloma, which simulated a cavernoma, was due to a surgical swab forgotten during a previous neurosurgical evacuation of an intracerebral hematoma.

  4. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    blood pressure. This review considers the alterations in systemic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of the renal origin. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development...... of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This most...

  5. Renovascular hypertension: bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Guzman, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    A review of the literature on the management of the renovascular disease is performed to provide better attention to patients. Renovascular hypertension is defined. The clinical implications and complications of the disease are determined. Pharmacological and surgical management are specified. Endovascular therapy has allowed to determine some indication in the management of hypertension renovascular. Instances where endovascular therapy has been beneficial are detailed. The new interventions for the management of renovascular disease are exposed [es

  6. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully w...

  7. Thromboembolic chronicle pulmonary Hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovalle, Amador

    2003-01-01

    The thromboembolic chronicle pulmonary Hypertension, also well known as chronic lung thromboembolism not resolved; it is a form not very common of lung thromboembolism. Until very recently was considered a rare curiosity of autopsy, but as the methods of diagnoses have improved and our attitude has changed, the incidence of this nosological entity has experienced a notable increment, but the most excellent in this illness is maybe that it is a form of lung hypertension, potentially recoverable

  8. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğrul, Armağan

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health problem. Its prevalence is 1.5-2 times higher in diabetic population than that in non-diabetic individuals. Its pathogenesis depends on diabetic nephropathy in type 1, whereas may be multifactorial in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In diabetics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are most widely preferred in the treatment of hypertension because of their numerous desirable effects. In this article, the most recent data are presented on the relationshi...

  9. Congenital intracranial meningioma. A case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed.......A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed....

  10. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives of this slide presentation are: 1: To review the morphological changes in orbit structures caused by elevated Intracranial Pressure (ICP), and their imaging representation. 2: To learn about the similarities and differences between MRI and sonographic imaging of the eye and orbit. 3: To learn about the role of MRI and sonography in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure in aerospace medicine, and the added benefits from their combined interpretation.

  11. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  12. A Method of Managing Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Absence of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: The Imaging and Clinical Examination Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnut, Randall M; Temkin, Nancy; Dikmen, Sureyya; Rondina, Carlos; Videtta, Walter; Petroni, Gustavo; Lujan, Silvia; Alanis, Victor; Falcao, Antonio; de la Fuenta, Gustavo; Gonzalez, Luis; Jibaja, Manuel; Lavarden, Arturo; Sandi, Freddy; Mérida, Roberto; Romero, Ricardo; Pridgeon, Jim; Barber, Jason; Machamer, Joan; Chaddock, Kelley

    2018-01-01

    The imaging and clinical examination (ICE) algorithm used in the Benchmark Evidence from South American Trials: Treatment of Intracranial Pressure (BEST TRIP) randomized controlled trial is the only prospectively investigated clinical protocol for traumatic brain injury management without intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. As the default literature standard, it warrants careful evaluation. We present the ICE protocol in detail and analyze the demographics, outcome, treatment intensity, frequency of intervention usage, and related adverse events in the ICE-protocol cohort. The 167 ICE protocol patients were young (median 29 years) with a median Glasgow Coma Scale motor score of 4 but with anisocoria or abnormal pupillary reactivity in 40%. This protocol produced outcomes not significantly different from those randomized to the monitor-based protocol (favorable 6-month extended Glasgow Outcome Score in 39%; 41% mortality rate). Agents commonly employed to treat suspected intracranial hypertension included low-/moderate-dose hypertonic saline (72%) and mannitol (57%), mild hyperventilation (adjusted partial pressure of carbon dioxide 30-35 mm Hg in 73%), and pressors to maintain cerebral perfusion (62%). High-dose hyperosmotics or barbiturates were uncommonly used. Adverse event incidence was low and comparable to the BEST TRIP monitored group. Although this protocol should produce similar/acceptable results under circumstances comparable to those in the trial, influences such as longer pre-hospital times and non-specialist transport personnel, plus an intensive care unit model of aggressive physician-intensive care by small groups of neurotrauma-focused intensivists, which differs from most high-resource models, support caution in expecting the same results in dissimilar settings. Finally, this protocol's ICP-titration approach to suspected intracranial hypertension (vs. crisis management for monitored ICP) warrants further study.

  13. [Management of arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groha, P; Schunkert, H

    2015-09-01

    Arterial hypertension is one of the most frequent diseases in the western world and is one of the three most important risk factors for heart diseases. The 2013 guidelines of the European Societies of Hypertension and Cardiology (ESH/ESC) provide a clear action plan for evidence-based diagnostics and therapeutic measures in hypertensive subjects and simplify target blood pressures across various patient groups. Non-pharmacological options play a central role in the treatment of arterial hypertension. The indications for drug therapy arise from three criteria including the level of hypertension, risk profile of the patient, as well as response to non-pharmacological therapy. For the first choice monotherapy five substance groups are available: diuretics, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin (AT) 1 receptor antagonists and calcium antagonists. By combination therapy, the responder rate can be significantly increased with respect to a normalization of blood pressure. A true treatment resistance, in which the therapeutic goal is not reached in spite of a triple combination with maximum dosage, is extremely rare. Further treatment options are combinations of four drug classes and changes of medication. Hypertensive emergencies require a rapid intervention; nevertheless, the magnitude of blood pressure lowering can greatly vary depending on the individual clinical picture.

  14. High Intracranial Pressure Induced Injury in the Healthy Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xingping; Bragina, Olga; Zhang, Tongsheng; Yang, Yirong; Rao, Gutti R; Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-08-01

    We recently showed that increased intracranial pressure to 50 mm Hg in the healthy rat brain results in microvascular shunt flow characterized by tissue hypoxia, edema, and increased blood-brain barrier permeability. We now determined whether increased intracranial pressure results in neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade stain and whether changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen suggest nonnutritive microvascular shunt flow. Intracranial pressure was elevated by a reservoir of artificial cerebrospinal fluid connected to the cisterna magna. Arterial blood gases, cerebral arterial-venous oxygen content difference, and cerebral blood flow by MRI were measured. Fluoro-Jade stain neurons were counted in histologic sections of the right and left dorsal and lateral cortices and hippocampus. University laboratory. Male Sprague Dawley rats. Arterial pressure support if needed by IV dopamine infusion and base deficit corrected by sodium bicarbonate. Fluoro-Jade stain neurons increased 2.5- and 5.5-fold at intracranial pressures of 30 and 50 mm Hg and cerebral perfusion pressures of 57 ± 4 (mean ± SEM) and 47 ± 6 mm Hg, respectively (p intracranial pressure and decreased cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen. High intracranial pressure likely caused neuronal injury because of a transition from normal capillary flow to nonnutritive microvascular shunt flow resulting in tissue hypoxia and edema, and it is manifest by a reduction in the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

  15. Prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of fetal intracranial tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, D M; Onyeije, C I

    1998-05-01

    Our objective was to review current literature pertaining to prenatal ultrasonography of various fetal intracranial neoplastic and non-neoplastic tumors. To this goal, all manuscripts published in the English language regarding this topic obtained from a MEDLINE search from 1966 through January 1998 were selected and reviewed. Additional sources were identified through cross-referencing. Intracranial fetal tumors are extremely rare and precise diagnosis is dependent on histology examination of tissue obtained at subsequent surgery or autopsy. Currently, prenatal ultrasonographic findings associated with the following fetal intracranial tumors have been described: teratomas; neuroepithelial tumors including: glioblastoma, astrocytoma, gangliocytoma, medulloblastoma, choroid plexus, and papilloma; and mesenchymal tumors. Non-neoplastic fetal intracranial tumors are even less frequent and include: unilateral megalencephaly, heterotopia, and lipoma of the corpus callosum. Cardinal ultrasonographic findings associated with fetal intracranial tumors include: echogenic and semicystic space occupying lesions with or without distortion of normal symmetrical intracranial (usually midline) structures, calcifications, craniomegaly, polyhydramnios, obstructive hydrocephaly, high-output cardiac failure (hydrops fetalis), the presence of other associated structural anomalies, and infrequently abnormal cerebral Doppler flow velocimetry.

  16. Disease activity in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a 3-month follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren; Sander, Birgit; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    , fast RNFL 3.4 protocol), and Humphrey visual field testing were evaluated at regular intervals. Repeat lumbar puncture was performed at final visit (n = 13). The diagnostic delay was 3 months and initial symptoms were headache (94%), visual blurring (82%) and pulsatile tinnitus (65%). Complete clinical...

  17. New predictive value of optical coherence tomography analysis in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sajjadi

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion Four different OCT diagnostic Patterns presented for IIH cases. The demographics of the patients considered having IIH by OCT Patterns I-IV and proven by positive LP; do not fit the classic demographic patterns. Classically, IIH has been reported to be observed in obese females with headaches and visible papilledema. Our findings put this classic set of presenting signs into question.

  18. Correlation between optical coherence tomography parameters and retinal sensitivity in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia H Khalil

    2015-01-01

    GCC and RNFL thickness abnormalities assessed by optical coherence tomography in IIH patients were quantitatively correlated with visual field sensitivity losses and can be definitively useful to quantify optic nerve damage.

  19. Renal effects of low-dose dopamine during vasopressor therapy for posttraumatic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmalek, F; Behforouz, N; Benoist, J F; Lafay, M; Mimoz, O; Samii, K; Edouard, A R

    1999-04-01

    To investigate the effects of low-dose dopamine (Dop) on renal hemodynamics and function in patients with brain trauma receiving norepinephrine (NE). Prospective clinical study. Surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. 20 stable, non-septic, mechanically ventilated, sedated patients with brain trauma and normal renal function treated with intravenous NE (0.11-0.65 microg/kg per min) to maintain an adequate cerebral perfusion pressure (> 60 mmHg). Two successive 1-h study periods with NE alone then NE + Dop (2 microg/kg per min). During each period, creatinine (Cl(CREAT)), sodium (Cl(Na)), potassium (Cl(K)), osmolar (Cl(OSM)) and free water (Cl(H2O)), clearances were measured in all the patients. Effective renal blood flow (ERBF, para-aminohippurate clearance) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance) were measured in 7 of the 20 patients. Dop during NE infusion induced increases in urine flow and natriuresis which were not correlated with possible changes in arterial pressure. Cl(CREAT), GFR and their difference remained unchanged, whereas ERBF tended to increase. Fractional sodium excretion [100 x (Cl(Na)/Cl(CREAT)] and C1(K) increased during Dop infusion. The mechanism of Dop-induced natriuresis during NE infusion in brain trauma patients seems mainly related to a direct tubular effect of the drug.

  20. Headache attributed to intracranial pressure alterations: applicability of the International Classification of Headache Disorders ICHD-3 beta version versus ICHD-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curone, M; Peccarisi, C; Bussone, G

    2015-05-01

    The association between headache and changes in intracranial pressure is strong in clinical practice. Syndromes associated with abnormalities of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure include spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). In 2013, the Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (IHS) published the third International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta version). The aim of this study was to investigate applicability of the new ICHD-3 versus ICHD-2 criteria in a clinical sample of patients with intracranial pressure (ICP) alterations. Patients admitted at our Headache Center for headache evaluation in whom a diagnosis of ICP alterations was performed were reviewed. 71 consecutive patients were studied. 40 patients (Group A) were diagnosed as IIH, 22 (Group B) as SIH, 7 (Group C) and 2 (Group D), respectively, as symptomatic intracranial hypertension and symptomatic intracranial hypotension. Main headache features were: in Group A, daily or nearly-daily headache (100 %) with diffuse/non-pulsating pain (73 %), aggravated by coughing/straining (54 %) and migrainous-associated symptoms (43 %). In Group B, an orthostatic headache (100 %) with nausea (29 %), vomiting (24 %), hearing disturbance (33 %), neck pain (48 %), hypacusia (24 %), photophobia (22 %) was reported. In Group C, a diffuse non-pulsating headache was present in 95 % with vomiting (25 %), sixth nerve palsy (14 %) and tinnitus (29 %). In Group D, an orthostatic headache with neck stiffness was reported by 100 %. Regarding applicability of ICHD-2 criteria in Group A, 73 % of the patients fitted criterion A; 100 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 75 %, criterion D; while applying ICHD-3 beta version criteria, 100 % fitted criterion A; 97.5 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 100 %, criterion D. In Group B, application of ICHD-2 showed 91 % patients fitting criterion A; 100 %, criterion B; 100

  1. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting.MethodsA structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: “congruent,” “partially congruent,” “incongruent,” or “not mentioned in free-style report.”ResultsTumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17 with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7–43% per item. Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12–17:06 min.ConclusionFirst results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the

  2. Intracranial Ewing sarcoma: four pediatric examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Michael J; Whelan, Ros; Madden, Jennifer; Mulcahy Levy, Jean M; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K; Hankinson, Todd C; Foreman, Nicholas K; Handler, Michael H

    2018-03-01

    Ewing sarcoma typically arises in bone and is unrelated to intraparenchymal small blue cell embryonal central nervous system (CNS) tumors previously designated primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs). When the CNS is impacted, it is usually secondary to local extension from either the epidural space, skull, or intracranial or spinal metastases. Primary examples within the cranial vault are rare, usually dural-based, and are largely case reports in the literature. We detail four pediatric patients with solitary, primary intracranial Ewing sarcoma, all manifesting the archetypal EWRS1 gene rearrangement that confirms diagnosis. Neurosurgical Department records, spanning 21 years (1995-2016), were reviewed to identify patients. Demographics, clinical history, pathological/genetic features, and clinical course were retrieved from the medical record and personal files of the authors. Four patients, one male and three females, age 5 to 16 years, were identified. One presented in extremis from a large lesion, two with soft tissue masses, and the fourth as an incidental finding after being involved in a motor vehicle collision. Three had clear bony involvement: a 10-year-old girl with a large left temporal lesion had clear origin in the skull, with spiculated calcified striations throughout the mass; a 9-year-old girl presented with a bony left petrous apex mass; and a 16-year-old girl presented with a left temporal mass with extension to the dura and underlying bone erosion. Only the 5-year-old boy had a large left frontoparietal mass traversing the falx with no bony contact. All four tumors manifested the diagnostic EWSR1 mutation and were treated with an Ewing sarcoma regimen. Outcomes were variable, with one patient showing progressive metastatic disease and death 3 years after presentation, one patient with disease-free survival 10.5 years after completion of therapy, and one alive and well at the completion of therapy 1 year after diagnosis. One patient

  3. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N.

    1998-01-01

    The somatostatin analogue [ 111 In-DTPA-d-Phe 1 ]-octreotide ( 111 In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq 111 In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed 111 In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show 111 In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial lesions express somatostatin receptors and

  4. Adaptation, allometry, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weder, A B; Schork, N J

    1994-08-01

    Essential hypertension is a "disease of civilization" but has a clear genetic component. From an evolutionary perspective, persistence in the human genome of elements capable of raising blood pressure presupposes their adaptive significance. Recently, two hypotheses that explicitly appeal to selectionist arguments, the "slavery" and "thrifty gene" theories, have been forwarded. We find neither completely successful, and we advance an alternative explanation of the adaptive importance of genes responsible for hypertension. We propose that blood pressure rises during childhood and adolescence to subserve homeostatic needs of the organism. Specifically, we contend that blood pressure is a flexible element in the repertoire of renal homeostatic mechanisms serving to match renal function to growth. The effect of modern diet and lifestyle on human growth stimulates earlier and more vigorous development, straining biologically necessary relationships between renal and general somatic growth and requiring compensation via homeostatic mechanisms preserved during evolution. Prime among such mechanisms is blood pressure, which rises as a compensation to maintain renal function in the face of greater growth. Since virtually all members of acculturated societies share in the modern lifestyle, the demands imposed by accelerated growth and development result in a populational shift to higher blood pressures, with a consequent increase in the prevalence of hypertension. We propose that hypertension is the product of maladaptation of highly genetically conserved mechanisms subserving important biological homeostatic needs. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying hypertension will require approaches that examine the developmental processes linking growth to blood pressure.

  5. Migraine and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Tabeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of a relationship between migraine and hypertension are being continued. In spite of numerous studies, the association of some types of migraine (migraine with aura and migraine without aura with hypertension has not been fully elucidated. This issue is particularly relevant since these forms differ both clinically and pathophysiologically. Of even greater importance are the analysis and prediction of associations between migraine and cardiovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease. The review deals with the clinical and pathophysiological features of the relationship between hypertension and migraine. There is evidence for the anatomic and functional correlation between the antinociceptive system and blood pressure (BP regulation control. It has been speculated that the increase in pain threshold is not the result of just hypertension as a disease, but it is caused by elevated BP-related hypalgesia. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs is the fact that supports the association between hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Identification of groups of patients having migraine and a high cardiovascular risk will allow timely early primary prevention and therapy. Introduction of a stratification approach at diagnostic stages may cause a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates.

  6. Intracranial epidural hemorrhage during lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial epidural hemorrhage (ICEH) during spinal surgery. We could not find ICEH, though we recorded transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs). A 35-year-old man was referred for left anterior thigh pain and low back pain that hindered sleep. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural tumor at L3-L4 vertebral level. We performed osteoplastic laminectomy and en bloc tumor resection. TcMEPs were intraoperatively recorded at the bilateral abductor digiti minimi (ADM), quadriceps, tibialis anterior and abductor hallucis. When we closed a surgical incision, we were able to record normal TcMEPs in all muscles. The patient did not fully wake up from the anesthesia. He had right-sided unilateral positive ankle clonus 15 min after surgery in spite of bilateral negative of ankle clonus preoperatively. Emergent brain computed tomography scans revealed left epidural hemorrhage. The hematoma was evacuated immediately via a partial craniotomy. There was no restriction of the patient's daily activities 22 months postoperatively. We should pay attention to clinical signs such as headache and neurological findgings such as DTR and ankle clonus for patients with durotomy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Spine surgeons should know that it was difficult to detect ICEH by monitoring with TcMEPs.

  7. Intracranial meningiomas after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, D.; Gomori, J.M.; Siegal, T.; Shalit, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients who presented with intracranial meningiomas 12, 15, and 20 years, respectively, after therapeutic high-dose irradiation of a primary brain tumor are described. Analysis of these cases and similar documented cases suggests that meningiomas after high-dose irradiation constitute a recognizable entity. Patients with such tumors received radiation therapy at a young age (mean age, 9.4 years). After a latent period of 2 to 47 years (mean, 19.8 years) they developed meningiomas at the site of irradiation, at a much younger age than patients with ''spontaneous'' meningiomas. Similar to the situation with meningiomas after low-dose irradiation, a relatively high proportion of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation tend to be malignant and biologically aggressive. A very young age at the time of irradiation seems to predispose to the induction of malignant meningiomas, rather than benign tumors. These unusual features provide indirect evidence that high-dose radiation may play a role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas.41 references

  8. A case of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Masami; Tanji, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masakazu

    1981-01-01

    Intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is very rare, only 14 cases being reported in Europe and in the United States of America. Recently we experienced a case in which the follow-up indicating computed tomograms (CT) demonstrated interesting data on the radiosensitivity of this tumor. The patient, a 14-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of left hemiplegia which had gradually progressed. CT revealed an area spreading upward from the right median base of the skull and consisted of two components showing (A) a density as high as that of calcium and (B) a density higher than that of surrounding brain tissue, but much lower than that of calcium. Temporoparietal craniotomy was performed to resect approximately one-half of the tumor. Histological finding revealed mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The component-A was though to be a cartilaginous tissue, and-B to be an undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue. Postoperative irradiation of 7,000 rad was initiated. The effect of radiotherapy as seen on computed tomograms is as follows, (1) decrease in the volume of the tumor by 26%, (2) decrease in density and enhancement of the area which is considered to be the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, (3) mild reduction of the area which is considered to be the caltilaginous tissue, and (4) a very high density of the entire tumor similar in degree to that of the bone one year later. These results suggested that radiotherapy is effective for this tumor. (author)

  9. Intracranial Fluid Redistribution During a Spaceflight Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Pasternak, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Reuter-Lorenz, Patrica A.; Kofman, Igor S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    The neural correlates of spaceflight-induced sensorimotor impairments are unknown. Head down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) serves as a microgravity analog because it mimics the headward fluid shift and limb unloading of spaceflight. We investigated focal brain white matter (WM) changes and fluid shifts during 70 days of 6 deg HDBR in 16 subjects who were assessed pre (2x), during (3x), and post-HDBR (2x). Changes over time were compared to those in control subjects (n=12) assessed four times over 90 days. Diffusion MRI was used to assess WM microstructure and fluid shifts. Free-Water Imaging, derived from diffusion MRI, was used to quantify the distribution of intracranial extracellular free water (FW). Additionally, we tested whether WM and FW changes correlated with changes in functional mobility and balance measures. HDBR resulted in FW increases in fronto-temporal regions and decreases in posterior-parietal regions that largely recovered by two weeks post-HDBR. WM microstructure was unaffected by HDBR. FW decreased in the post-central gyrus and precuneus. We previously reported that gray matter increases in these regions were associated with less HDBR-induced balance impairment, suggesting adaptive structural neuroplasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine causality and underlying mechanisms.

  10. Total intravenous anesthesia: advantages for intracranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Chad D; Gottfried, Oren N; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Couldwell, William T

    2007-11-01

    Although volatile anesthetics have been widely accepted in anesthetic management for neurosurgery, they reduce vascular resistance, resulting in increased cerebral blood flow and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). In patients with elevated ICP who undergo craniotomy, the increase in ICP during surgery from inhaled anesthetics can make the surgery more difficult, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic cerebral insults. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and analgesic drugs (remifentanil or fentanyl) and excluding simultaneous administration of any inhaled drugs is being used in patients undergoing craniotomy because of its potential to reduce ICP and ease access to the operative site. We reviewed the literature and describe our experience with TIVA, with emphasis on hemodynamic stability, effects on ICP, emergence from anesthesia, extubation times, and return of cognitive function in patients undergoing craniotomy for space-occupying lesions. TIVA with propofol is similar to inhaled anesthetics with regard to hemodynamic stability, emergence times, extubation times, early cognitive function, and adverse events. In several prospective, randomized clinical trials, evidence suggests that ICP is decreased and cerebral perfusion pressure is increased in patients receiving TIVA when compared with those receiving volatile anesthetics during elective craniotomy procedures. The impact of TIVA on ICP, brain swelling, and access to the operative site in patients with severely elevated ICP has yet to be evaluated and is the subject of a future study at our institution.

  11. Suppurative intracranial processes in 15 domestic ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Lopes Câmara

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to listeriosis which is relatively common in ruminants, there are three other uncommon suppurative intracranial processes (SIP identifiable in adult ungulates as brain abscess, basilar empyema and suppurative meningitis. The present paper reports the epidemiological, clinical, laboratorial, pathological and microbiological findings of 15 domestic ruminants with SIP. A total of 15 animals were selected (eight sheep, four cattle and three goats; with the definitive diagnoses of basilar empyema (n=3, brain abscess (n=1, listeriosis (n=5 and suppurative meningitis (n=6. Hematology revealed leukocytosis with inversion of the lymphocyte/ neutrophil ratio in 4 cases. In the majority of animals, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF presented light yellow coloration and cloudy aspect due to neutrophilic pleocytosis (15 - 997 leukocytes/µL. Microbiological culture of CSF or central nervous system (CNS fragments resulted on isolation of Trueperella (Arcanobacterium pyogenes,Listeria monocytogenes,Escherichia coli and Stenotrophomonas sp. In a goat with thalamic abscess, microbiological assay was not performed, but Gram positive bacilli type bacteria were observed in histology. The diagnosis of these outbreaks was based on the association of epidemiological, clinical, pathological and bacteriological findings; reiterating that the infectious component remains an important cause of CNS disease in domestic ruminants and also shows the need for dissemination of information about the most effective preventive measures for the ranchers.

  12. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  13. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: how to approach hypertension in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    During fertile life women are usually normo or hypotensive. Hypertension may appear during pregnancy and this represents a peculiar phenomenon increasing nowadays for delay time of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension appears partially similar to hypertension in the context of metabolic syndrome for a similar condition of increased waste circumference. Parity, for the same pathogenesis, has been reported to be associated to peri and postmenopausal hypertension, not confirmed by our study of parous women with transitional non persistent perimenopausal hypertension. Estrogen's deficiency inducing endothelial dysfunction and increased body mass index are the main cause for hypertension in this phase of life. For these reasons lifestyle modification, diet and endothelial active drugs represent the ideal treatment. Antioxidant agents may have a role in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In conclusion, hypertension in women represents a peculiar constellation of different biological and pathogenic factors, which need a specific gender related approach, independent from the male model.

  14. Visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazife Sefi-Yurdakul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors.METHODS:The medical charts of the patients with intracranial tumors who initially admitted to the Neuro-ophthalmology and Strabismus Department with ocular complaints between August 1999 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The detailed clinical history and the findings of neuro-ophthalmologic examination were recorded. Ocular symptoms and signs, the types and locations of intracranial tumors, and the duration of symptoms before the diagnosis were evaluated.RESULTS:The mean age of 11 women (61.1% and 7 men (38.9% was 42.2±11.0 (range 20-66y at the time of intracranial tumor diagnosis. Initial symptoms were transient visual obscurations, visual loss or visual field defect in 16 cases (88.9%, and diplopia in 2 cases (11.1%. Neuro-ophthalmologic examination revealed normal optic discs in both eyes of 6 patients (33.3%, paleness, atrophy or edema of optic disc in 12 patients (66.7%, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in 2 patients (11.1%. Visual acuity ranged between normal vision and loss of light perception. Cranial imaging demonstrated craniopharyngioma (n=1, plasmacytoma (n=1, meningioma (n=6; olfactory groove and tuberculum sellae, pontocerebellar angle, anterior cranial fossa, frontal vertex, suprasellar region, and pituitary macroadenoma (n=10. The mean duration between the onset of visual disturbances and the diagnosis of intracranial tumor was 9.8±18mo (range 3d-6y.CONCLUSION:The ophthalmologist is frequently the first physician to encounter a patient with clinical manifestations of intracranial tumors that may cause neurological and ocular complications. Neuro-ophthalmologic findings should be carefully evaluated to avoid a delay in the diagnosis of intracranial tumors.

  15. Rare Coding Variants in ANGPTL6 Are Associated with Familial Forms of Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Romain; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Bonnaud, Stéphanie; Karakachoff, Matilde; Bourcereau, Emmanuelle; Heurtebise-Chrétien, Sandrine; Menguy, Céline; Dina, Christian; Simonet, Floriane; Moles, Alexis; Lenoble, Cédric; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Chatel, Stéphanie; Isidor, Bertrand; Génin, Emmanuelle; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Le Marec, Hervé; Loirand, Gervaise; Desal, Hubert; Redon, Richard

    2018-01-04

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are acquired cerebrovascular abnormalities characterized by localized dilation and wall thinning in intracranial arteries, possibly leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage and severe outcome in case of rupture. Here, we identified one rare nonsense variant (c.1378A>T) in the last exon of ANGPTL6 (Angiopoietin-Like 6)-which encodes a circulating pro-angiogenic factor mainly secreted from the liver-shared by the four tested affected members of a large pedigree with multiple IA-affected case subjects. We showed a 50% reduction of ANGPTL6 serum concentration in individuals heterozygous for the c.1378A>T allele (p.Lys460Ter) compared to relatives homozygous for the normal allele, probably due to the non-secretion of the truncated protein produced by the c.1378A>T transcripts. Sequencing ANGPTL6 in a series of 94 additional index case subjects with familial IA identified three other rare coding variants in five case subjects. Overall, we detected a significant enrichment (p = 0.023) in rare coding variants within this gene among the 95 index case subjects with familial IA, compared to a reference population of 404 individuals with French ancestry. Among the 6 recruited families, 12 out of 13 (92%) individuals carrying IA also carry such variants in ANGPTL6, versus 15 out of 41 (37%) unaffected ones. We observed a higher rate of individuals with a history of high blood pressure among affected versus healthy individuals carrying ANGPTL6 variants, suggesting that ANGPTL6 could trigger cerebrovascular lesions when combined with other risk factors such as hypertension. Altogether, our results indicate that rare coding variants in ANGPTL6 are causally related to familial forms of IA. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating the morphological changes of intracranial arteries and whole-brain perfusion in undetermined isolated vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenxian; Feng, Youzhen; Lu, Weibiao; Xie, Xie; Xiong, Zhilin; Jing, Zhen; Cai, Xiangran; Huang, Li'an

    2016-11-15

    To determine the morphological changes of intracranial arteries and whole-brain perfusion in undetermined isolated vertigo (UIV) patients using 320-detector row computed tomography (CT). A total of 150 patients who underwent CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging were divided into UIV group and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) group. Sixty individuals with sex- and age-matched without vertigo and cerebral diseases served as the control. The morphological changes of intracranial arteries, perfusion parameters and vascular risk factors (VRFs) were analyzed, calculated and compared. In UIV patients, hypertension (HT), hyperlipidemia and number of VRFs≥3 occurred more commonly (P<0.0125, respectively). The incidence of vertebral artery dominance (VAD), vertebral artery stenosis (VAS) and basilar artery curvature (BAC) were significantly higher (P<0.0125, respectively). HT was an independent risk predictor of non-VAD (OR: 5.411, 95%CI: 1.401; 20.900, P=0.014). HT and VAD associated with BAC served as risk predictors (OR: 4.081, 95%CI: 1.056;15.775, P=0.041 and OR: 6.284, 95%CI: 1.848; 21.365, P=0.003, respectively). The absolute difference in relative values of CTP parameters from cerebellum and brainstem were significantly different (P<0.05), and hypoperfusion was found in the territories of the non-VAD side and the BAC cohort (P<0.05, respectively). On the basis of multiple VRFs, morphological changes of vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) and the unilateral hypoperfusion of the cerebellum and brainstem, that acts as a herald for IV occurrence, which should be paid cautious attention to UIV patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurosarcoidosis-related intracranial haemorrhage: three new cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, J P

    2012-06-09

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial haemorrhage in neurosarcoidosis (NS-ICH) is rare, poorly understood and the diagnosis of NS may not be immediately apparent. METHODS: The clinical features of three new NS-ICH cases are described including new neuropathological findings and collated with cases from a systematic literature review. RESULTS: Cases: (i) A 41-year-old man with headaches, hypoandrogenism and encephalopathy developed a cerebellar haemorrhage. He had neuropathological confirmation of NS with biopsy-proven angiocentric granulomata and venous disruption. He responded to immunosuppressive therapy. (ii) A 41-year-old man with no history of hypertension was found unconscious. A subsequently fatal pontine haemorrhage was diagnosed. Liver biopsy revealed sarcoid granulomas. (iii) A 36-year-old man with raised intracranial pressure headaches presented with a seizure and a frontal haemorrhage. Hilar lymph node biopsy confirmed sarcoidosis, and he was treated successfully. Systematic Review: Twelve other published cases were identified and collated with our cases. Average age was 36 years and M:F = 2.3:1; 46% presented with neurological symptoms and 31% had CNS-isolated disease. Immediate symptoms of ICH were acute\\/worsening headache or seizures (60%). ICH was supratentorial (62%), infratentorial (31%) or subarachnoid (7%). 40% had definite NS, 53% probable NS and 7% possible NS (Zajicek criteria). Antigranulomatous\\/immunosuppressive therapy regimens varied and 31% died. CONCLUSIONS: This series expands our knowledge of the pathology of NS-ICH, which may be of arterial or venous origin. One-third have isolated NS. Clinicians should consider NS in young-onset ICH because early aggressive antigranulomatous therapy may improve outcome.

  18. Central Hemodynamics and Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Acute Cerebral Circulatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Lukashev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the central hemodynamics (CH and intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (ICP and CPP in acute cerebral circulatory disorders (ACCD and their possible relationships for further development of intensive differential therapy for the detected disorders. Material and methods. Hemodynamic studies using the transpulmonary thermodilu-tion technique, measurements of ICP, calculations of CPP, and currently available X-ray studies were conducted in 18 patients on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of ACCD. All the patients were found to have essential hypertension and coronary heart disease. Results. In the first 5 days of ACCD, there was a normodynamic type of circulation in hemorrhagic stroke (HS and a hypodynamic type in ischemic stroke (IS. ICP remained at the baseline elevated level in the IS group and increased over time in the HS group. CPP was significantly unchanged. Myocardial dysfunction was detected when there was a significant preload caused by a high postload. In IS, an inverse correlation was found between ICP and global ejection fraction (GEF, cardiac performance index (CPI and on day 7, the correlation was direct. In HS, ICP had a direct correlation with CPI and an inverse correlation with GEF. These changes during treatment failed to progress and were revealed in the presence of brain dislocation, as evidenced by spiral computed tomography. Conclusion. Thus, the pattern of CH disorders depends on the type of ACCD. In the first 5 days of ACCD, a hypokinetic circulatory type is registered in IS and a normokinetic type is in HS. Evolving dislocation of the brain with impaired function of its stem structures due to ICP elevation is one of the causes of central hemodynamic changes. The value of ICP in ACCD is a crucial indicator in the diagnosis of secondary brain damages and determines treatment policy. Key words: acute ischemic attack, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, central hemodynamics, myocardial depression.

  19. Benefits of Surgical Treatment for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E-Wook; Jung, Jin-Young; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Objective Due to longer life spans, patients newly diagnosed with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are increasing in number. This study aimed to evaluate how management of UIAs in patients age 65 years and older affects the clinical outcomes and post-procedural morbidity rates in these patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 patients harboring 136 aneurysms across 12 years, between 1997 and 2009, at our institute. We obtained the following data from all patients : age, sex, location and size of the aneurysm(s), presence of symptoms, risk factors for stroke, treatment modality, and postoperative 1-year morbidity and mortality. We classified these patients into three groups : Group A (surgical clipping), Group B (coil embolization), and Group C (observation only). Results Among the 109 patients, 56 (51.4%) underwent clipping treatment, 25 (23%) patients were treated with coiling, and 28 observation only. The overall morbidity and mortality rates were 2.46% and 0%, respectively. The morbidity rate was 1.78% for clipping and 4% for coiling. Factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and family history of stroke were correlated with unfavorable outcomes. Two in the observation group refused follow-up and died of intracranial ruptured aneurysms. The observation group had a 7% mortality rate. Conclusion Our results show acceptable favorable outcome of treatment-related morbidity comparing with the natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm. Surgical clipping did not lead to inferior outcomes in our study, although coil embolization is generally more popular for treating elderly patients. In the treatment of patients more than 65 years old, age is not the limiting factor. PMID:21494358

  20. Risk factors for all-cause death after diagnosis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvela, Seppo; Lehto, Hanna

    2015-02-03

    We investigated all-cause mortality and risk factors of death of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in a long-term follow-up study. A total of 142 patients with 181 UIAs diagnosed between 1956 and 1978 when UIAs were not treated were included in this study. Patients were followed until death or until 2011 to 2012. Mortality rates and risk factors were studied with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards regression models. During 3,530 person-years, 113 (80%) had died, giving an average annual mortality of 3.2%. Of them, 19 (17%) died of aneurysm rupture from the index UIA, 6 (5%) of other aneurysm-related causes, and 2 (2%) of unspecified subarachnoid hemorrhage. The remaining 86 died of causes unrelated to intracranial aneurysms. The cumulative death rate was 20% (95% confidence interval 14%-27%) at 10 years and 60% (52%-68%) at 30 years. Independent risk factors for subsequent death were patient age (adjusted hazard ratio 1.09 per year, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), male sex (2.81, 1.59-4.96, p < 0.001), heavy alcohol use (4.22, 2.22-8.02, p < 0.001), and cigarette smoking (1.72, 0.97-3.07, p = 0.064). History of hypertension, family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and diameter of UIA predicted death only in univariable analysis. In patients of working age with a UIA, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable risk factors for untimely death through several causes and should be taken into account when treatment is considered. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.