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Sample records for intracranial catheter integrating

  1. Delayed Catheter-Related Intracranial Hemorrhage After a Ventriculoperitoneal or Ventriculoatrial Shunt in Hydrocephalus.

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    Qian, Zhouqi; Gao, Liang; Wang, Ke; Pandey, Sajan

    2017-11-01

    Delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage is not rare after a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) or ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt for the treatment of hydrocephalus. Immediate postoperative catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage is possibly due to the procedure itself; however, delayed intracranial hemorrhage may have other underlying mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and reveal the risk factors of delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage after a VP or VA shunt. We did a retrospective study to review patients with hydrocephalus and underwent VP or VA shunt in our department from September 2011 to December 2015. We reviewed the clinical characteristics of the patients with delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage, and its risk factors were analyzed with SPSS 16.0. Of the 218 patients enrolled in the study (145 male, 73 female), 17 (7.8%) patients experienced delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage, including 11 of 151 (7.3%) patients with a VP shunt and 6 of 67 (9.0%) patients with a VA shunt. Additionally, 4 of the 16 patients with postoperative low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) therapy and 13 of the 202 patients without LMWH experienced bleeding, showing a significant difference (25% vs. 6.4%, P = 0.026). The relative risk was 4.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-17.1). Delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage is not rare after a VP or VA shunt. However, most patients can be cured after appropriate treatment. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy with enoxaparin may be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. MRI findings of cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter under various intracranial conditions

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    Yamamoto, Yoshisuke; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hidenori (Matsusaka Chuo Hospital, Mie (Japan))

    1993-12-01

    We have experienced 4 cases of cerebral parenchymas in which high intensity was sustained by MRI T[sub 2] WI, though a low density disappeared in CT, among the cases in which an expansion of the low density was observed in the cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter by a CT scan after ventricular drainage and a shunt operation designed to combat increased intracranial pressure due to meningitis and a brain tumor. The cases were classified on the basis of morbidity into 1 case of cryptococcus meningitis, 1 case complicated by cerebellar hemorrhage and meningitis, and two cases of acute increased intracranial pressue due to a thalamic tumor and cerebellar astrocytoma. If a ventricular catheter or drainage tube is inserted, cerebral fluid penetrates into the cerebral parenchyma to cause a change in the tissue which can be explained, on the basis of CT findings, as a reversible change. However, this histological change is not always reversible according to our present MRI finding; rather, it becomes strong if the results of an inflammation such as meningitis are added to the cerebral fluid; in such a case, the reversibility is considered to disappear completely. (author).

  3. MRI findings of cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter under various intracranial conditions

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    Yamamoto, Yoshisuke; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hidenori

    1993-01-01

    We have experienced 4 cases of cerebral parenchymas in which high intensity was sustained by MRI T 2 WI, though a low density disappeared in CT, among the cases in which an expansion of the low density was observed in the cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter by a CT scan after ventricular drainage and a shunt operation designed to combat increased intracranial pressure due to meningitis and a brain tumor. The cases were classified on the basis of morbidity into 1 case of cryptococcus meningitis, 1 case complicated by cerebellar hemorrhage and meningitis, and two cases of acute increased intracranial pressue due to a thalamic tumor and cerebellar astrocytoma. If a ventricular catheter or drainage tube is inserted, cerebral fluid penetrates into the cerebral parenchyma to cause a change in the tissue which can be explained, on the basis of CT findings, as a reversible change. However, this histological change is not always reversible according to our present MRI finding; rather, it becomes strong if the results of an inflammation such as meningitis are added to the cerebral fluid; in such a case, the reversibility is considered to disappear completely. (author)

  4. Optimal Guiding Catheter Length for Endovascular Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms in Anterior Circulation in Era of Flourishing Distal Access System.

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    Jia, Zhen Yu; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Young Eun; Choi, Joon Ho; Hwang, Sun Moon; Lee, Ga Young; Youn, Jin Ho; Lee, Deok Hee

    2017-09-01

    To determine the minimum required guiding catheter length for embolization of various intracranial aneurysms in anterior circulation and to analyze the effect of various patient factors on the required catheter length and potential interaction with its stability. From December 2016 to March 2017, 90 patients with 93 anterior circulation aneurysms were enrolled. Three types of guiding catheters (Envoy, Envoy DA, and Envoy DA XB; Codman Neurovascular, Raynham, MA, USA) were used. We measured the in-the-body length of the catheter and checked the catheter tip location in the carotid artery. We analyzed factors affecting the in-the-body length and stability of the guiding catheter system. The average (±standard deviation) in-the-body length of the catheter was 84.2±5.9 cm. The length was significantly longer in men (89.1±5.6 vs. 82.1±4.6 cm, Pguiding catheter was 84 cm on average for elective anterior-circulation aneurysm embolization. The length increased in men older than 65 years with a more tortuous arch. We could reach a higher position with distal access catheters with little difference in the stability once we reached the target location.

  5. Lumbar catheter for monitoring of intracranial pressure in patients with post-hemorrhagic communicating hydrocephalus.

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    Speck, Verena; Staykov, Dimitre; Huttner, Hagen B; Sauer, Roland; Schwab, Stefan; Bardutzky, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-measurement by lumbar drainage (LD) catheter in patients with post-hemorrhagic communicating hydrocephalus (PHCH). Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, n = 21) or spontaneous ganglionic hemorrhage (ICH, n = 22) with ventricular involvement and the need for external ventricular drainage (EVD) due to acute hydrocephalus were included. When EVD weaning was not feasible due to persistent hydrocephalus, an additional LD was placed, after which EVD was clamped off. During this overlap period, patients underwent simultaneous pressure recording via EVD ("EVD-ICP") and LD ("LD-ICP"). Testing included manual compression of the jugular veins and body-posture changes from supine to 30° position. After EVD removal, we evaluated sensitivity and specificity of ICP-rise >20 mmHg during continuous monitoring via LD for the detection of persistent PHCH using additional evaluation with computed tomography (CT). A total of 1,806 measurements were performed in 43 patients. "LD-ICP" was strongly correlated to "EVD-ICP", with determination coefficients R(2) for the baseline measurements and each of the maneuvers ranging from 0.95-0.99, and slopes ranging 0.96-1.01. Sensitivity of "LD-ICP" >20 mmHg for detection of persistent PHCH as compared to CT was 81% and specificity was 100%. Two patients with severe SAH developed reversible signs of herniation after gradually increasing differences between "LD-ICP" and "EVD-ICP" indicated a cranio-spinal pressure gradient, likely due to cerebrospinal fluid overdrainage via LD. ICP measured via LD highly and reliably correlated to ICP measured via EVD in patients with PHCH.

  6. Intracranial pressure monitoring

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    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  7. [Cerebrovascular fiberoptic catheter oximetry in an intracranial pressure model in swine. New aspects of a clinical routine].

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    Menzel, M; Rieger, A; Roth, S; Sanchin, L; Soukup, J; Hennig, C; Furka, H; Burkert, W; Radke, J

    1997-02-01

    The reliability of continuous fibreoptic oximetry in cerebral venous blood and its correlation with intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (pressure-volume curve) were examined in an experimental porcine study. The pressure in the infratentorial compartment of 13 domestic pigs (18-24 kg) was gradually increased by inflating a Fogarty balloon catheter placed on the surface of the right cerebellar hemisphere and below the tentorium. Single volumes of 0.4 ml saline were injected into the inflatable balloon at 1-min intervals up to a total volume of 7 ml. Intracranial pressure (ICP), arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and cerebral venous saturation measured continuously by fibreoptic oximetry and intermittent blood-gas analyses (SjO2 superior sagittal sinus) were monitored during balloon inflation. All data were down-loaded onto a PC and evaluated off-line by a commercial statistical software package. Over the whole pressure-volume curve, two phases of SjO2 behaviour were registered by continuous fibreoptic oximetry (Oximetrix 3, Abbott) (Fig. 1). CPP ranges of less than 50% reduction from the initial value showed a linear correlation (rmittl. = 0.712, P < 0.01) between both parameters (CPP-SjO2). In CPP ranges below a crucial point of about 50 mmHg no such correlation was found (rmittl = 0.176, P < 0.5). In contrast, in 3 pigs a very good correlation was found between CPP and SjO2 over the whole pressure-volume curve as measured by blood-gas analyses of samples from the cerebrovenous catheter (rmittl. = 0.84, P < 0.05). We conclude that in physiological CPP ranges down to 50 mmHg, SjO2 measurement is a reliable method of detecting oxygen desaturation in cerebrovenous blood. Below that CPP value, the fibreoptic catheter showed repeated false-high oxygen saturation values. The accuracy of SjO2 measurement seems to depend on sufficient cerebral blood flow (CBF): with decreasing CBF the amount of cerebral venous outflow is diminished. We

  8. A novel approach using Neuron 6F guiding catheter for the embolization of intracranial aneurysm with coiling of the parent internal carotid artery.

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    Wang, Donghai; Wang, Ying; Su, Wandong; Wang, Yunyan; Li, Gang; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    To describe our initial experience and early outcomes with distal placement of the Neuron 6F guiding catheter through coiled ICA for aneurysmal EVT. We examined the utility of the Neuronf 70 6F guiding catheter for the embolization procedure in such cases, fourteen cases of aneurysm with coiling of the parent ICA are presented via traditional guiding catheters. With the support of 8F ENVOY guiding catheter as a shuttle sheath, the Neuron(TM) 70 6F guiding catheter was successfully placed through coiled extracranial ICA, so the mirocatheter could be delivered to a more strategic position for embolization of the aneurysm. Coiling of extracranial ICA was found as parent artery on angiogram in all patients with ruptured aneurysms. Even where there were two curvatures of more than 360° in the coiled segment of the ICA, Neuron(TM) 70 6F guiding catheter could be placed through the coiling to a distal position and enabled EVT of intracranial aneurysms with no related neurological complications. Neuron guiding catheter is a useful device for embolization of aneurysm where there is coiling of parent ICA, easily placed through the coiling of the ICA and provided robust anatomical support via enhanced catheter-to-vessel wall engagement.

  9. Use of Simple Neck Extension to Improve Guiding Catheter Accessibility in Tortuous Cervical Internal Carotid Artery for Endovascular Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysm: A Technical Note.

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    Takata, Megumu; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kinosada, Masanori; Miyake, Kosuke; Murao, Kenichi

    2017-09-01

    In endovascular embolization of intracranial aneurysms, a tortuous cervical internal carotid artery can limit guiding catheter access to a sufficiently high position. Although intermediate distal access catheters can go beyond the tortuous segment of internal carotid arteries, they may increase the risk of procedure-related complications, require significantly complex technical procedures, and limit the use of adjunctive techniques. Using simple neck extension alone, we successfully improved guiding catheter access in 2 patients. Through a provocative test, we confirmed suitability of manual neck extension in 2 patients with severe posterior curvature of a tortuous internal carotid artery. Intraoperatively, we manually extended the neck and stretched the curvatures. We guided a 6F guiding catheter superiorly and performed coil embolization with an occlusion balloon catheter in 1 case and with the balloon-assisted neck remodeling technique in 1 case. Coil embolization was completed without any adverse events in both cases. The simple neck extension technique successfully improved accessibility of the guiding catheter. As the need for safe and highly skilled intervention increases, our technique may be useful because it can reduce procedure-related complications and allow balloon-assisted techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracranial pressure monitoring (image)

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    Intracranial pressure monitoring is performed by inserting a catheter into the head with a sensing device to monitor the pressure around the brain. An increase in intracranial pressure can cause a decrease in blood flow to ...

  11. Analyses of cerebral microdialysis in patients with traumatic brain injury: relations to intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and catheter placement

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    Wanecek Michael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral microdialysis (MD is used to monitor local brain chemistry of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Despite an extensive literature on cerebral MD in the clinical setting, it remains unclear how individual levels of real-time MD data are to be interpreted. Intracranial pressure (ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP are important continuous brain monitors in neurointensive care. They are used as surrogate monitors of cerebral blood flow and have an established relation to outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relations between MD parameters and ICP and/or CPP in patients with TBI. Methods Cerebral MD, ICP and CPP were monitored in 90 patients with TBI. Data were extensively analyzed, using over 7,350 samples of complete (hourly MD data sets (glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol to seek representations of ICP, CPP and MD that were best correlated. MD catheter positions were located on computed tomography scans as pericontusional or nonpericontusional. MD markers were analyzed for correlations to ICP and CPP using time series regression analysis, mixed effects models and nonlinear (artificial neural networks computer-based pattern recognition methods. Results Despite much data indicating highly perturbed metabolism, MD shows weak correlations to ICP and CPP. In contrast, the autocorrelation of MD is high for all markers, even at up to 30 future hours. Consequently, subject identity alone explains 52% to 75% of MD marker variance. This indicates that the dominant metabolic processes monitored with MD are long-term, spanning days or longer. In comparison, short-term (differenced or Δ changes of MD vs. CPP are significantly correlated in pericontusional locations, but with less than 1% explained variance. Moreover, CPP and ICP were significantly related to outcome based on Glasgow Outcome Scale scores, while no significant relations were found between outcome and MD. Conclusions The

  12. Technique of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters improve the prognosis of acute post-traumatic hemispheric brain swelling patients

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    Lei eShi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute post-traumatic cerebral hemispheric brain swelling (ACHS is a serious disorder that occurs after traumatic brain injury (TBI, and it often requires immediate treatment. The aim of our clinical study was to assess the effects of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters on the prognosis of ACHS patients.Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 172 cases of severe craniocerebral trauma patients with acute cerebral hemispheric swelling. The patients were divided into two groups: unilateral stepwise standard large trauma craniectomy (S-SLTC combined with external ventricular drainage (EVD catheter implants (n = 86 and unilateral routine frontal temporal parietal SLTC (control group, n = 86.Result: No significant differences in age, sex, or preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale score were observed between groups (P < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the ipsilateral subdural effusion incidence rates between the S-SLTC+EVD treatment group and the routine SLTC group. However, the incidence rates of intraoperative acute encephalocele and contralateral epidural and subdural hematoma in the S-SLTC+EVD group were significantly lower than those in the SLTC group (17.4% and 3.5% vs. 37.2% and 23.3%, respectively. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP values of patients in the S-SLTC+EVD group were also lower than those in the SLTC group at days 1 through7 (P<0.05. A positive neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 50.0% and decreased mortality (15.1% was observed in the S-SLTC+EVD group compared to the neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 33.8%; 36.0% in the SLTC group (P<0.05.Conclusions: Our data suggest that S-SLTC+EVD is more effective for controlling ICP, improving neurological outcome, and decreasing mortality rate compared with routine SLTC.

  13. Effect of an acrylic terpolymer barrier film beneath transparent catheter dressings on skin integrity, risk of dressing disruption, catheter colonisation and infection.

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    Pivkina, A I; Gusarov, V G; Blot, S I; Zhivotneva, I V; Pasko, N V; Zamyatin, M N

    2018-03-23

    We assessed the effect of a skin-protective terpolymer barrier film around the catheter insertion site on frequency of dressing disruptions and skin integrity issues (hyperaemia, skin irritation, residues of adhesives and moisture under the dressing). Secondary outcomes included colonisation of the central venous catheter (CVC) and rates of central line-associated bloodstream infection. A monocentric, open-label, randomised controlled trial was performed comparing a control group receiving standard transparent catheter dressings without the skin-protecting barrier film and an intervention group receiving a transparent chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing with use of the skin-protective acrylic terpolymer barrier film (3M™ Cavilon™ No - Sting Barrier Film, 3 M Health Care, St. Paul, MN, USA). Sixty patients were enrolled and randomised in the study accounting for 60 central venous catheters and a total of 533 catheter days. Dressing disruptions occurred more frequently and at sooner time point in the control group. Skin integrity issues were significantly less observed in the intervention group. No differences in CVC colonisation or central line-associated bloodstream infection were observed. The application of a barrier film creating a skin-protective polymer layer beneath transparent catheter dressings is associated with less dressing disruptions and skin integrity issues without altering the risk of infectious complications if used in combination with a chlorhexidine-impregnated catheter dressing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review.

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    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, pSMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was -1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD -0.37; pSMD, -1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits.

  15. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray ... are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test ...

  17. Integration of a capacitive pressure sensing system into the outer catheter wall for coronary artery FFR measurements

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    Stam, Frank; Kuisma, Heikki; Gao, Feng; Saarilahti, Jaakko; Gomes Martins, David; Kärkkäinen, Anu; Marrinan, Brendan; Pintal, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    The deadliest disease in the world is coronary artery disease (CAD), which is related to a narrowing (stenosis) of blood vessels due to fatty deposits, plaque, on the arterial walls. The level of stenosis in the coronary arteries can be assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) measurements. This involves determining the ratio between the maximum achievable blood flow in a diseased coronary artery and the theoretical maximum flow in a normal coronary artery. The blood flow is represented by a pressure drop, thus a pressure wire or pressure sensor integrated in a catheter can be used to calculate the ratio between the coronary pressure distal to the stenosis and the normal coronary pressure. A 2 Fr (0.67mm) outer diameter catheter was used, which required a high level of microelectronics miniaturisation to fit a pressure sensing system into the outer wall. The catheter has an eccentric guidewire lumen with a diameter of 0.43mm, which implies that the thickest catheter wall section provides less than 210 microns height for flex assembly integration consisting of two dies, a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor and an ASIC. In order to achieve this a very thin circuit flex was used, and the two chips were thinned down to 75 microns and flip chip mounted face down on the flex. Many challenges were involved in obtaining a flex layout that could wrap into a small tube without getting the dies damaged, while still maintaining enough flexibility for the catheter to navigate the arterial system.

  18. Integrated HIFU Drive System on a Chip for CMUT-Based Catheter Ablation System.

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    Farhanieh, Omid; Sahafi, Ali; Bardhan Roy, Rupak; Ergun, Arif Sanli; Bozkurt, Ayhan

    2017-06-01

    Conventional High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a therapeutic modality which is extracorporeally administered. In applications where a relatively small HIFU lesion is required, an intravascular HIFU probe can be deployed to the ablation site. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and implementation a fully integrated HIFU drive system on a chip to be placed on a 6 Fr catheter probe. An 8-element capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT) ring array of 2 mm diameter has been used as the ultrasound source. The driver chip is fabricated in 0.35 μm AMS high-voltage CMOS technology and comprises eight continuous-wave (CW) high-voltage CMUT drivers (10.9 ns and 9.4 ns rise and fall times at 20 V pp output into a 15 pF), an eight-channel digital beamformer (8-12 MHz output frequency with 11.25 ° phase accuracy) and a phase locked loop with an integrated VCO as a tunable clock source (128-192 MHz). The chip occupies 1.85 × 1.8 mm 2 area including input and output (I/O) pads. When the transducer array is immersed in sunflower oil and driven by the IC with eight 20 V pp CW pulses at 10 MHz, real-time thermal images of the HIFU beam indicate that the focal temperature rises by 16.8  ° C in 11 seconds. Each HV driver consumes around 67 mW of power when driving the CMUT array at 10 MHz, which adds up to 560 mW for the whole chip. FEM based analysis reveals that the outer surface temperature of the catheter is expected to remain below the 42  ° C tissue damage limit during therapy.

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a ... few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an artery. The catheter is ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive ... of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter ... use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example ...

  5. Urinary catheters

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    ... indwelling catheter, clean the area where the catheter exits your body and the catheter itself with soap ... DO, urologist with the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  7. External Ventricular Catheters: Is It Appropriate to Use an Open/Monitor Position to Adequately Trend Intracranial Pressure in a Neuroscience Critical Care Environment?

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    Sunderland, Nicole E; Villanueva, Nancy E; Pazuchanics, Susan J

    2016-10-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring can be an important assessment tool in critically and acutely ill patients. An external ventricular drain offers a comprehensive way to monitor ICP and drain cerebrospinal fluid. The Monro-Kellie hypothesis, Pascal's principle, and fluid dynamics were used to formulate an assumption that an open/monitor position on the stopcock is an adequate trending measure for ICP monitoring while concurrently draining cerebrospinal fluid. Data were collected from 50 patients and totaled 1053 separate number sets. The open/monitor position was compared with the clamped position every hour. An order for "open to drain" was needed for appropriate measurement and nursing care. Results showed the absolute average differences between open/monitor and clamped positions at 1.6268 mm Hg. This finding suggests that it is appropriate to use an open/monitor position via an external ventricular drain for adequate trending of patients' ICP.

  8. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  9. The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Syndrome in Long Duration NASA Astronauts: An Integrated Approach

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    Otto, C. A.; Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M. J.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and distended optic nerve sheaths). In some cases, elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure has been documented postflight reflecting increased intracranial pressure (ICP). While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular affects are thought to be related to the effect of cephalad fluid shift on the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, both leading to cephalic congestion and increased ICP. Although not all crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that all astronauts exposed to microgravity have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and has been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them.

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... anxiety during the procedure. The area of the groin or arm where the catheter will be inserted ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... a tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ... nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the catheter entered the ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... should inform the nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the ... Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter tip ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the ... days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material ... inserted into an artery. The catheter is then guided through the arteries to the area to be ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography produces very ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding ...

  18. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  19. Real-time Noninvasive Monitoring of Intracranial Fluid Shifts During Dialysis Using Volumetric Integral Phase-Shift Spectroscopy (VIPS): A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubba Rao, Chethan P; Bershad, Eric M; Calvillo, Eusebia; Maldonado, Nelson; Damani, Rahul; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Suarez, Jose I

    2018-02-01

    Cerebral edema, which is associated with increased intracranial fluid, is often a complication of many acute neurological conditions. There is currently no accepted method for real-time monitoring of intracranial fluid volume at the bedside. We evaluated a novel noninvasive technique called "Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy (VIPS)" for detecting intracranial fluid shifts during hemodialysis. Subjects receiving scheduled hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease and without a history of major neurological conditions were enrolled. VIPS monitoring was performed during hemodialysis. Serum osmolarity, electrolytes, and cognitive function with mini-mental state examination (MMSE) were assessed. Twenty-one monitoring sessions from 14 subjects (4 women), mean group age 50 (SD 12.6), were analyzed. The serum osmolarity decreased by a mean of 6.4 mOsm/L (SD 6.6) from pre- to post-dialysis and correlated with an increase in the VIPS edema index (E-Dex) of 9.7% (SD 12.9) (Pearson's correlation r = 0.46, p = 0.037). Of the individual determinants of serum osmolarity, changes in serum sodium level correlated best with the VIPS edema index (Pearson's correlation, r = 0.46, p = 0.034). MMSE scores did not change from pre- to post-dialysis. We detected an increase in the VIPS edema index during hemodialysis that correlated with decreased serum osmolarity, mainly reflected by changes in serum sodium suggesting shifts in intracranial fluids.

  20. Measuring elevated intracranial pressure through noninvasive methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Helena; Nissborg, Emelie; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important cause of secondary brain injury, and a measurement of ICP is often of crucial value in neurosurgical and neurological patients. The gold standard for ICP monitoring is through an intraventricular catheter, but this invasive technique...

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  5. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic ... By selecting the arteries through which the catheter passes, it is possible to assess vessels in several ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... and x-rays. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prick when the needle is inserted into your vein for the intravenous line (IV). Injecting a local anesthetic at the site where the catheter is inserted may sting briefly, but it will ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such ... to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Interventional radiologist performing an angiography exam View ... ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored by Please note ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... dose of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ... live more than an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... by angioplasty and placement of a stent . The degree of detail displayed by catheter angiography may not ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in your ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once ... in the chest and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... material injection, you should immediately inform the technologist. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible ... and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery of the neck, ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking and allergies, especially ... is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of severe arterial narrowing, ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... disease). evaluate obstructions of vessels. top of page How should I prepare? You should inform your physician ... as a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to examine blood ... an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  2. 4-D ICE: A 2-D Array Transducer With Integrated ASIC in a 10-Fr Catheter for Real-Time 3-D Intracardiac Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Douglas; Lee, Warren; Haider, Bruno; Cogan, Scott; Sundaresan, Krishnakumar; Mills, David M; Yetter, Christopher; Hart, Patrick H; Haun, Christopher R; Concepcion, Mikael; Kirkhorn, Johan; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-12-01

    We developed a 2.5 ×6.6 mm 2 2 -D array transducer with integrated transmit/receive application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for real-time 3-D intracardiac echocardiography (4-D ICE) applications. The ASIC and transducer design were optimized so that the high-voltage transmit, low-voltage time-gain control and preamp, subaperture beamformer, and digital control circuits for each transducer element all fit within the 0.019-mm 2 area of the element. The transducer assembly was deployed in a 10-Fr (3.3-mm diameter) catheter, integrated with a GE Vivid E9 ultrasound imaging system, and evaluated in three preclinical studies. The 2-D image quality and imaging modes were comparable to commercial 2-D ICE catheters. The 4-D field of view was at least 90 ° ×60 ° ×8 cm and could be imaged at 30 vol/s, sufficient to visualize cardiac anatomy and other diagnostic and therapy catheters. 4-D ICE should significantly reduce X-ray fluoroscopy use and dose during electrophysiology ablation procedures. 4-D ICE may be able to replace transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and the associated risks and costs of general anesthesia, for guidance of some structural heart procedures.

  3. Intracranial haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consultant Neurosurgeon, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town. David Le Feuvre .... evacuation. This, together with criticism of various limitations of the STICH trial, has led to the initiation of STICH II.[19]. Intracranial haematomas may also be dealt with during another ...

  4. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  5. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  6. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  7. 4D ICE: A 2D Array Transducer with Integrated ASIC in a 10 Fr Catheter for Real-Time 3D Intracardiac Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Douglas; Lee, Warren; Haider, Bruno; Cogan, Scott; Sundaresan, Krishnakumar; Mills, David; Yetter, Christopher; Hart, Patrick; Haun, Christopher; Concepcion, Mikael; Kirkhorn, Johan; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-10-12

    We developed a 2.5 x 6.6 mm 2D array transducer with integrated transmit/receive ASIC for 4D ICE (real-time 3D IntraCardiac Echocardiography) applications. The ASIC and transducer design were optimized so that the high voltage transmit, low-voltage TGC (time-gain control) and preamp, subaperture beamformer, and digital control circuits for each transducer element all fit within the 0.019 mm2 area of the element. The transducer assembly was deployed in a 10 Fr (3.3 mm diameter) catheter, integrated with a GE Vivid1 E9 ultrasound imaging system, and evaluated in three pre-clinical studies. 2D image quality and imaging modes were comparable to commercial 2D ICE catheters. The 4D field of view was at least 90° x 60° x 8 cm and could be imaged at 30 volumes/sec, sufficient to visualize cardiac anatomy and other diagnostic and therapy catheters. 4D ICE should significantly reduce X-ray fluoroscopy use and dose during electrophysiology (EP) ablation procedures. 4D ICE may be able to replace trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and the associated risks and costs of general anesthesia, for guidance of some structural heart procedures.

  8. Intracranial lipomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takashi; Shojima, Kazuhito; Moritaka, Kazuhiko; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Konishi, Jun

    1984-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas are very rare and reports of infantile lipomas are scarce. Nine cases of intracranial lipomas, five in infants and four in adults are described and characteristic findings of the CT are presented. Two of the six cases involved lipomas at the corpus callosum that were associated with frontal dysraphism and cranium bifidum at the midline of frontal region. Five of the nine cases involved lipomas at the quadrigeminal cistern. In one case with an advanced enlargement in circumference of the head in the perinatal period, a V-P shunt was conducted for obstructive hydrocephalus. Another case had widely ranging agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with an interhemispheric cyst showing the right sided parietal and occipital lobes through the callosal agenesis. One of the nine cases had a lipoma in the left sylvian fissure and in the adult was in the interpeduncular cistern. Four of the nine cases were associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Based on these cases and published reports, the CT features of intracranial lipoma are discussed. (author)

  9. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches. show the extent and severity of ... the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a regular x-ray ... any possibility that they are pregnant. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x- ...

  14. The neurobiology of self-generated thought from cells to systems: Integrating evidence from lesion studies, human intracranial electrophysiology, neurochemistry, and neuroendocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kieran C R; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Christoff, Kalina

    2016-10-29

    Investigation of the neural basis of self-generated thought is moving beyond a simple identification with default network activation toward a more comprehensive view recognizing the role of the frontoparietal control network and other areas. A major task ahead is to unravel the functional roles and temporal dynamics of the widely distributed brain regions recruited during self-generated thought. We argue that various other neuroscientific methods - including lesion studies, human intracranial electrophysiology, and manipulation of neurochemistry - have much to contribute to this project. These diverse data have yet to be synthesized with the growing understanding of self-generated thought gained from neuroimaging, however. Here, we highlight several areas of ongoing inquiry and illustrate how evidence from other methodologies corroborates, complements, and clarifies findings from functional neuroimaging. Each methodology has particular strengths: functional neuroimaging reveals much about the variety of brain areas and networks reliably recruited. Lesion studies point to regions critical to generating and consciously experiencing self-generated thought. Human intracranial electrophysiology illuminates how and where in the brain thought is generated and where this activity subsequently spreads. Finally, measurement and manipulation of neurotransmitter and hormone levels can clarify what kind of neurochemical milieu drives or facilitates self-generated cognition. Integrating evidence from multiple complementary modalities will be a critical step on the way to improving our understanding of the neurobiology of functional and dysfunctional forms of self-generated thought. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Indwelling catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley catheter ... You will need to make sure your indwelling catheter is working properly. You will also need to ... not get an infection or skin irritation. Make catheter and skin care part of your daily routine. ...

  16. Intraventricular catheter placement by electromagnetic navigation safely applied in a paediatric major head injury patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenblatten, Christoph Alexander; Altermatt, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    In the management of severe head injuries, the use of intraventricular catheters for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and the option of cerebrospinal fluid drainage is gold standard. In children and adolescents, the insertion of a cannula in a compressed ventricle in case of elevated intracranial pressure is difficult; therefore, a pressure sensor is placed more often intraparenchymal as an alternative option. In cases of persistent elevated ICP despite maximal brain pressure management, the use of an intraventricular monitoring device with the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid drainage is favourable. We present the method of intracranial catheter placement by means of an electromagnetic navigation technique.

  17. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...

  18. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napalkov, Pavel; Felici, Diana M; Chu, Laura K; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M

    2013-10-16

    Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association's Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter-related complications (MCRCs). Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter-related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters. Data provided in this study can be applied

  19. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  20. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  1. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  3. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm results in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a subtype of stroke with an incidence of 9 per 100,000 person-years and a case-fatality around 35%. In order to prevent SAH, patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be treated by neurosurgical or

  4. Critical cerebral perfusion pressure at high intracranial pressure measured by induced cerebrovascular and intracranial pressure reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria L; Yonas, Howard; Dai, Xingping; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2014-12-01

    The lower limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation is the critical cerebral perfusion pressure at which cerebral blood flow begins to fall. It is important that cerebral perfusion pressure be maintained above this level to ensure adequate cerebral blood flow, especially in patients with high intracranial pressure. However, the critical cerebral perfusion pressure of 50 mm Hg, obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, differs from the value of 30 mm Hg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure, which we previously showed was due to microvascular shunt flow maintenance of a falsely high cerebral blood flow. The present study shows that the critical cerebral perfusion pressure, measured by increasing intracranial pressure to decrease cerebral perfusion pressure, is inaccurate but accurately determined by dopamine-induced dynamic intracranial pressure reactivity and cerebrovascular reactivity. Cerebral perfusion pressure was decreased either by increasing intracranial pressure or decreasing mean arterial pressure and the critical cerebral perfusion pressure by both methods compared. Cortical Doppler flux, intracranial pressure, and mean arterial pressure were monitored throughout the study. At each cerebral perfusion pressure, we measured microvascular RBC flow velocity, blood-brain barrier integrity (transcapillary dye extravasation), and tissue oxygenation (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) in the cerebral cortex of rats using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy. University laboratory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. At each cerebral perfusion pressure, dopamine-induced arterial pressure transients (~10 mm Hg, ~45 s duration) were used to measure induced intracranial pressure reactivity (Δ intracranial pressure/Δ mean arterial pressure) and induced cerebrovascular reactivity (Δ cerebral blood flow/Δ mean arterial pressure). At a normal cerebral perfusion pressure of 70 mm Hg, 10 mm Hg mean arterial pressure pulses had no effect on

  5. Role of ischemic modified albumin in the early diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure and brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, I; Pampal, H K; Yildirim, F; Dilekoz, E; Emmez, G; U, F P; Kocabiyik, M; Demirel, C B

    Increased intracranial pressure following trauma and subsequent possible development of brain death are important factors for morbidity and mortality due to ischemic changes. We aimed to establish the role of ischemic modified albumin (IMA) in the early diagnosis of the process, starting with increased intracranial pressure and ending with brain death. Eighteen Wistar-Albino rats were divided into three groups; control (CG, n = 6), increased intracranial pressure (ICPG, n = 6), and brain death (BDG, n = 6). Intracranial pressure elevation and brain death were constituted with the inflation of a balloon of a Fogarty catheter in the epidural space. In all three groups, blood samples were drawn before the procedure, and at minutes 150 and 240 for IMA and malondialdehyde (MDA) analysis. Serum IMA levels at 150 and 240 minutes were higher in ICPG than in CG (p intracranial pressure elevation and ending at brain death (Tab. 3, Fig. 5, Ref. 31).

  6. Direct cervical arterial access for intracranial endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, R. [Fondation Rothschild, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); APHP, Hopital Henri Mondor, Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostique et Therapeutique, Creteil Cedex (France); Piotin, M.; Mounayer, C.; Spelle, L. [Fondation Rothschild, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Moret, J. [Fondation Rothschild, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Hopital de la Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Service de Neuroradiologie Interventionnelle, Paris Cedex 19 (France)

    2006-12-15

    Tortuous vasculature is a cause of failure of endovascular treatment of intracranial vascular lesions. We report our experience of direct cervical accesses in patients in whom the arterial femoral route was not attainable. In this retrospective study, 42 direct punctures of the carotid or the vertebral arteries at the neck were performed in 38 patients. The vessel harboring the intracranial lesion was punctured at the neck above the main tortuosity, a sheath was then positioned under fluoroscopic control to allow a stable access to the intracranial circulation. After the procedure, the sheath was removed and hemostasis was gained either by manual compression or by an arterial closure device (4 of 42, 9%). The cervical route allowed access to all intracranial lesions in all 42 procedures. A complication was encountered in six procedures (14%) related to the direct puncture. In 2 of the 42 procedures (4%), a transient vasospasm was encountered. A cervical hematoma formed in 3 of the 42 procedures (7%) after sheath withdrawal (one patient in whom an 8F sheath had been used, required surgical evacuation of a hematoma compressing the upper airways; the other patients did well without surgical evacuation). In the remaining patient (1 of 42 procedures, 2%), a small asymptomatic aneurysm at the puncture site was seen on the follow-up angiogram. Direct cervical arterial approaches to accessing the intracranial circulation is effective in patients in whom the femoral route does not allow the navigation and stabilization of guiding catheters. (orig.)

  7. Intracranial Vascular Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the interventional neuroradiologist inserts a catheter through the skin into a blood vessel and advances it to the treatment site. A device or synthetic material called an embolic agent is then inserted ...

  8. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcsar, Zsolt; Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ... study in which 26 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were treated with octreotide, a synthetic hormone ...

  10. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected but u...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  11. Intracranial pressure after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Lombardo, Alessandra; Colombo, Angelo; Longhi, Luca; Zanier, Elisa R; Rampini, Paolo; Stocchetti, Nino

    2015-01-01

    To describe mean intracranial pressure after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, to identify clinical factors associated with increased mean intracranial pressure, and to explore the relationship between mean intracranial pressure and outcome. Analysis of a prospectively collected observational database. Neuroscience ICU of an academic hospital. One hundred sixteen patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracranial pressure monitoring. None. Episodes of intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg lasting at least 5 minutes and the mean intracranial pressure for every 12-hour interval were analyzed. The highest mean intracranial pressure was analyzed in relation to demographic characteristics, acute neurologic status, initial radiological findings, aneurysm treatment, clinical vasospasm, and ischemic lesion. Mortality and 6-month outcome (evaluated using a dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale) were also introduced in multivariable logistic models. Eighty-one percent of patients had at least one episode of high intracranial pressure and 36% had a highest mean intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg. The number of patients with high intracranial pressure peaked 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage and declined after day 7. Highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg was significantly associated with initial neurologic status, aneurysmal rebleeding, amount of blood on CT scan, and ischemic lesion within 72 hours from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg had significantly higher mortality. When death, vegetative state, and severe disability at 6 months were pooled, however, intracranial pressure was not an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome. High intracranial pressure is a common complication in the first week after subarachnoid hemorrhage in severe cases admitted to ICU. Mean intracranial pressure is associated with the severity of early brain injury and with mortality.

  12. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  13. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  14. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect

  15. Intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, T.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, O.; De Keyser, J.; Brouns, R.; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Luijckx, G. J.

    The aim of this narrative review is to evaluate the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of intracranial artery dissection (IAD). IAD is a rare and often unrecognized cause of stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), especially in young adults. Two types of IAD can be

  16. [Effects of solcoseryl on the cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and EEG in acute intracranial hypertensive cats (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S; Asakura, T; Kitamura, K

    1976-02-01

    The experiment was performed on 86 cases under intraperitoneal pentobarbital anesthesia. One balloon was placed in the extradural space of right frontal region, and the other balloon was placed in the left extradural space and the intracranial pressure was measured. A needle was stereotaxically inserted into the subcortical area in order to measure the cerebral blood flow. Systemic blood pressure was recorded by inserting a catheter into the femoral artery, and electrocorticogram was also recorded. An expanding intracranial lesion was made by inflating the extradural balloon with physiological saline. The animals were arbitrarily divided into two groups.: 1) light or moderate groups which intracranial pressure before the injection of drug was below 400 mmH2O. 2) severe groups above 400 mmH2O. After the maintenance of the pressure, Solcoseryl was infused intravenously. The investigation was focused to observe whether Solcoseryl reveales any potent effect on cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and on electroencephalogram in acute intracranial hypertension. Results 1) Intravenous injection of Solcoseryl had the effect of lowering intracranial pressure in the light or moderate and severe groups. Particularly, dose of 80 mg/kg showed the marked effect, though with a rebound phenomenon in the light or moderate groups. Furthermore, the effect was more marked and lasting by drip infusion of Solcoseryl and also by intravenous injection of Solcoseryl after pretreatment with hydrocortisone, and at this time no rebound phenomenon was recognized. 2) Solcoseryl had the effect of increasing the cerebral blood flow accompained with the lowering of intracranial pressure. 3) Systemic blood pressure was transiently lowered by the injection of Solcoseryl 20 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg and recovered immediately. 4) Solcoseryl had no effect on electroencephalogram in the severe groups. Conclusion On the basis of these results, it is rational to conclude that

  17. Effect of abdominal insufflation for laparoscopy on intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Papavassiliou, Efstathios; Schneider, Benjamin E

    2014-04-01

    Increased abdominal pressure may have a negative effect on intracranial pressure (ICP). Human data on the effects of laparoscopy on ICP are lacking. We retrospectively reviewed laparoscopic operations for ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement to determine the effect of insufflation on ICP. Nine patients underwent insufflation with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) at pressures ranging from 8 to 15 mm Hg and ICP measured through a ventricular catheter. We used a paired t test to compare ICP with insufflation and desufflation. Linear regression correlated insufflation pressure with ICP. The mean ICP increase with 15-mm Hg insufflation is 7.2 (95% CI, 5.4-9.1 [P pressure (P = .04). Maximum ICP recorded was 25 cm H(2)O. Intracranial pressure significantly increases with abdominal insufflation and correlates with laparoscopic insufflation pressure. The maximum ICP measured was a potentially dangerous 25 cm H(2)O. Laparoscopy should be used cautiously in patients with a baseline elevated ICP or head trauma.

  18. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  19. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  20. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  1. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  2. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  3. Imaging of Intracranial Pressure Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, John; Saindane, Amit M

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure inside the bony calvarium and can be affected by a variety of processes, such as intracranial masses and edema, obstruction or leakage of cerebrospinal fluid, and obstruction of venous outflow. This review focuses on the imaging of 2 important but less well understood ICP disorders: idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Both of these ICP disorders have salient imaging findings that are important to recognize to help prevent their misdiagnosis from other common neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  4. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed.

  5. Optothermal profile of an ablation catheter with integrated microcoil for MR-thermometry during Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies of the liver—an in-vitro experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardoulaki, Evdokia M; Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Choonee, Kaushal; Rea, Marc; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M W

    2015-03-01

    Flexible microcoils integrated with ablation catheters can improve the temperature accuracy during local MR-thermometry in Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies. Here, the authors are concerned with obtaining a preliminary confirmation of the clinical utility of the modified catheter. They investigate whether the thin-film substrate and copper tracks of the printed coil inductor affect the symmetry of the thermal profile, and hence of the lesion produced. Transmission spectroscopy in the near infrared was performed to test for the attenuation at 1064 nm through the 25 μm thick Kapton substrate of the microcoil. The radial transmission profile of an infrared high-power, light emitting diode with >80% normalized power at 1064 nm was measured through a cross section of the modified applicator to assess the impact of the copper inductor on the optical profile. The measurements were performed in air, as well as with the applicator surrounded by two types of scattering media; crystals of NaCl and a layer of liver-mimicking gel phantom. A numerical model based on Huygens-Fresnel principle and finite element simulations, using a commercially available package (COMSOL Multiphysics), were employed to compare with the optical measurements. The impact of the modified optical profile on the thermal symmetry was assessed by examining the high resolution microcoil derived thermal maps from a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a liver-mimicking gel phantom. Less than 30% attenuation through the Kapton film was verified. Shadowing behind the copper tracks was observed in air and the measured radial irradiation correlated well with the diffraction pattern calculated numerically using the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Both optical experiments and simulations, demonstrate that shadowing is mitigated by the scattering properties of a turbid medium. The microcoil derived thermal maps at the end of a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a gel phantom in a 3 T scanner confirm that the

  6. Efeito de lubrificantes sobre a integridade da sonda de Foley e implicações no tamponamento nasal para epistaxe Effect of lubricants on the integrity of the Foley catheter and their implications in nasal packing for epistaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. Gaspar-Sobrinho

    2004-06-01

    balloons were inspected once every 24 hours for five days. The lubricants were tested regarding hydrosolubility. RESULTS: Twenty balloons ruptured, all of them in the Vaseline group or in the group of one of the ointments. The products that did not damage the latex balloon were soluble in water despite the petrolatum excipient. DISCUSSION: It is conjectured that hydrophobic lubricant contained petrolatum used to lubricate the gauze of nasal packing may damage the Foley catheter when in close contact with it. CONCLUSION: The creams tested in this study, as well as the Furacin® ointment, may be suggested as suitable for use as lubricants of the gauze used in the anterior nasal packing associated with the Foley balloon as they cause no deterioration to the nasal balloon. Our results suggest that hydro soluble creams, ointments and gels preserve to Foley catheter integrity although contained petroleum derivatives in excipient.

  7. INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Widiyanthi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Intracranial pressure is total of pressure that is produced by brain, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid/CSF in the tight cranial space. As a respon to intracranial pressure increasing, compensation begin by movement of CSF from ventricle to cerebral subarachnoidal space, and increase the absorption of CSF. Increasing of ICP usually caused by increasing of brain volume (cerebral oedem, blood (intracranial bleeding, space occupying lesion, or CSF (hidrocephalus. Indication in ICP monitoring can be seen from : neurological criteria, abnormal CT-scan result when admission, normal CT-scan result, but had more two risk factors. According to the procedure that must be done, there are two methods in ICP monitoring: invasive ICP monitoring methodes and non-invasive measuring method. Increasing of ICP will decrease the compliance of brain, pulsation of artery more clearly, and the component of vein is lost. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  8. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess...... and subcortical abscesses in combination with sinusitis. She was treated with endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Both patients had developed psoriasis and episodes of infection during treatment. They were non-septic and had low fever on presentation. None of the patients suffered any long...

  9. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...... standard in terms of accurate measurement of pressure, although microtransducers generally are just as accurate. Both invasive techniques are associated with a minor risk of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. Furthermore, zero drift is a problem with selected microtransducers. The non...

  10. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  11. Intravascular (catheter) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Hurst, G.C.; Katz, D.E.; Dverk, J.L.; Wiesen, E.J.; Czerski, L.W.; Malaya, R.; Bellon, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Intravascular MR probes allow excellent spatial resolution and have the potential to detect arterial wall microstructure. Ultrasonic intravascular probes suggest that detailed morphologic information can assist clinical decision making. Catheter MR probes of 2--7 mm outside diameter (OD) were built of copper wire, Teflon, and parts from standard commercial catheters. The probes were connected to the surface coil receiver input of our Picker VISTA 2055HP 1.5-T imaging system. The extant (linear) body coil was used for transmit. Phantoms were constructed of coaxial glass MR tubes, filled with doped water. Watanabe rabbit aorta and human autopsy iliac artery specimens were examined within 4 hours of excision or stored by freezing. In vivo iliac arteries in dogs under general anesthesia were imaged, with percutaneous placement of the probe. Results are presented

  12. Severe head injuries and intracranial pressure monitoring outcome in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Reza Farrokhi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Head injury is still a major cause of death and disability. Despite advances in intensive monitoring and clinical practice, little data is available to show the predictive value of intracranial pressure monitoring in assessment of the outcome of head injuries. This study was undertaken to evaluate this predictive value and is the first Iranian study in which ICP monitoring has been included. METHODS: In a prospective study from September 1999 to September 2003, all head- injured patients (53 patients with GCS of 4-8 who were admitted to Nemazee Hospital of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were included in this study. Subarachnoid screw method or ventricular catheter via ventriculostomy was used to determine intracranial pressure. Patients were monitored for 3 days and were followed for two years at 6-month intervals. RESULTS: Car accidents were the most common cause of head injury (43.3% and 43.3% of patients had GCS of 8. Sixty percent of patients had abnormal intracranial pressure. The patients were most commonly in their first decade of life (18.8% and 81% of patients were male. Controlling increased intracranial pressure was successful in 60% of patients and resulted in a decrease of mortality rate from 60% to 15%. CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment of increased intracranial pressure in head injury patients would be beneficial in reducing mortality and morbidity rates. KEY WORDS: Southern Iran, head injury, outcome, intracranial pressure.

  13. Role of MRI in Diagnosis of Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muçaj, Sefedin; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Dedushi, Kreshnike; Ramadani, Naser; Jerliu, Naim

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial dermoid cystic tumors account for <1% of all intracranial masses. A 52-year-old male, having headaches, nausea and is presented with a history of 2 episodes of new onset seizures. On presentation, the patient had a normal physical exam, including a complete neurological and cranial nerve exam. Precontrast MRI; TSE/T2Wsequence in axial/coronal planes; 3D - HI-resolution T1W sagittal; FLAIR/T2W axial; FLAIR/T2W, Flash/T2W oblique coronal plane, GRE/T2W axial. Post-contrast TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Diffusion weighted and ADC mapping, postcontrast: TSE/T1W sequence in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Subsequent MRI of the brain revealed an oval and lobulated 47x34x30mm (TRxAPxCC) non-enhancing T1-hyperintense mass in right cavernous sinus, with compression of surrounding mesial temporal lobe and right anterolateral aspect of mesencephalon. Findings are consistent with ruptured dermoid cyst, given the evacuated sebum content at its lower half. Sebum particles in millimetric sizes are seen within right Sylvian fissure, anterior horns of lateral ventricles and to a lesser extent within left Sylvian fissure, right parietal sulci, cerebral aqueduct, and basal cisterns. No restricted diffusion is seen, eliminating the possibility of epidermoid. A shunt catheter is evident traversing between right lateral ventricle and right parietal bone; besides, slit-like right lateral ventricle is noted (likely secondary to over-draining shunt catheter). Intracranial dermoid cysts are benign rare slow-growing tumors that upon rupture, however, widespread presence of T1 hyperintense droplets and leptomeningeal enhancement can be noted-making MRI the best imaging modality for diagnosis of this rare entity.

  14. Successful Resection of Intracranial Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Okimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is rare, but has an extremely poor prognosis. We report a case with successful surgical removal of intracranial metastasis of HCC. A 32-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe vomiting. He had been followed for liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus infection and received a right hepatic trisectionectomy for HCC 1 year earlier. For the recurrence of HCC, sorafenib had been administered 6 months before admission. On admission, he exhibited consciousness disturbance, which gradually worsened. Two days later, both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intra-axial tumor with perifocal edema and hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. The tumor was successfully removed by craniotomy and pathological examination revealed that it was composed of moderately differentiated HCC cells. The day after surgical resection of the tumor, his consciousness returned to normal. Subsequently, he was treated with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin using an implanted port-catheter system. Surgical resection of intracranial metastasis of HCC would be important and meaningful in some cases.

  15. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide there are varying reports on the prevalence of meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms. Different reports state intracranial meningiomas, gliomas or metastatic tumours as the most common tumour among intracranial neoplasms. We present our institutions' experience of patients with intracranial ...

  16. Manejo do cateter venoso central totalmente implantado em pacientes oncológicos: revisão integrative Manejo del catéter venoso central totalmente implantado en pacientes oncológicos: revisión integrativa Management of totally implanted catheter in patients with cancer: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Inocêncio Vasques

    2009-10-01

    patients with cancer. Thus, the goal of this study was to identify the nursing actions regarding the manipulation and management of totally implanted catheter in patients with cancer. An integrative literature review was conducted. A final sample of 15 articles was evaluated. Findings indicated that nursing actions are directed to the catheter dwelling time, the catheter-related complications, the manipulation and management of the catheter, the patients' perception of the catheter, and the education of patients regarding the catheter care. These findings show the complexities of nursing actions regarding the management of totally implanted catheters. In addition, the findings can be useful for professionals who do not work in oncology who may need to apply this knowledge in their clinical practice.

  17. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  18. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... post pubescent teenagers, tends to fit the adult stereotype. How is pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosed? If ... Subscribe to AOJ Allied Health Resources for School Nurses About AAPOS Our Association Staff Contacts Medical Disclaimer ...

  19. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  20. Skin colonisation at the catheter exit site is strongly associated with catheter colonisation and catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Vennila; Perperoglou, Aris; Venkatesh, Vidheya; Curley, Anna; Brown, Nicholas; Tremlett, Catherine; Clarke, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The commonest mode of catheter colonisation is via the extraluminal route with skin bacteria. Catheter-related sepsis causes significant mortality and morbidity in neonates. Our aim was to study the relationships between culture-positive catheter exit site skin swabs, percutaneous central venous catheter segments and blood to determine the magnitude of associations between exit site skin colonisation, catheter colonisation and catheter-related sepsis. In a prospective study, an exit site skin swab and three formerly in vivo catheter segments (proximal, middle and tip) were taken for culture at catheter removal. In those neonates who were clinically unwell at catheter removal, a peripheral blood culture was also collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to study associations. Skin swabs were culture positive in 39 (21%) of 187 catheter removals. With a culture-positive skin swab, the risk of associated catheter colonisation was nearly eight times higher (OR: 7.84, 95% CI: 3.59-17.15) and the risk of definite catheter-related sepsis with the same organism was nearly 10 times higher (OR 9.86, 95% CI: 3.13-31.00). Culture-positive skin swabs from the catheter exit site were strongly associated with catheter colonisation and with definite catheter-related sepsis with the same organism. These data provide further evidence supporting catheter colonisation via the extraluminal route and highlight the importance of optimising skin disinfection before catheter insertion. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  2. Immediate Catheter Directed Thrombolysis for Thromboembolic Stroke During Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fletcher

    Full Text Available : Background: Carotid artery endarterectomy (CEA is a common procedure undertaken by vascular surgeons with over 5,000 procedures performed annually worldwide. Published rates of perioperative stroke range from 1.3% to 6.3%. Case report: A case is presented in which on-table intra-cranial angiography and catheter directed thrombolysis were used for a thromboembolic occlusion of the distal internal carotid artery (ICA and proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA. An 83-year-old lady developed a dense right hemiparesis while undergoing a CEA under local anaesthetic (LA. Immediate re-exploration of the endarterectomy did not reveal technical error. Intraoperative duplex scanning of the internal carotid artery revealed no detectable diastolic flow. On-table angiogram showed complete occlusion of the distal ICA and proximal MCA. Catheter directed administration of TPA was undertaken. The entire ICA and MCA were completely clear on a completion angiogram. The patient made a full neurological recovery. Discussion and conclusion: Prompt diagnosis and treatment with intraoperative catheter directed thrombolysis can resolve thromboembolic occlusion of the ICA/MCA. It is argued that performing CEA under LA is useful for immediate recognition of perioperative stroke. Furthermore, the advantage is highlighted of vascular surgeons having both the resources and skillset to perform on-table angiography and thrombolysis. Keywords: Carotid endarterectomy, Stroke, Thrombolysis, Thromboembolus, Local anaesthetic

  3. Stuck long-term indwelling central venous catheters in adolescents: three cases and a short topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, A; Afshari, A; Henneberg, S W

    2010-01-01

    in the vessel wall and impossible to remove. In the other two cases, catheters were removed with great difficulty by the interventional radiologists. These cases raise important questions concerning the maximum indwelling time and the choice of catheter material when implanting permanent central venous......We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated...... catheters (CVCs) in adolescents. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of not breaking a CVC in the attempt to remove it....

  4. Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atheromatous ischemic disease with Wingspan stent system: short-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhaoshuo; Li Tianxiao; Zhao Shuiting; Xue Jiangyu; Wang Ziliang; Bai Weixing; Shi Shuaitao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety, feasibility and short-term efficiency of the Wingspan stent system and Gateway balloon catheter in the treatment of symptomatic intracranial atheromatous stenosis. Methods: Seventeen patients with symptomatic intracranial atheromatous stenosis were treated with the Gateway ballon-Wingspan system. The pre-and post-treatment improvement in symptom, severity of stenosis, successful rate of treatment, all kinds of complication were closely observed and compared before and after the procedure. Physician-reported follow-up in all 17 patients lasted for an average of 5 months. Results: All 17 lesions showed involvement of the internal carotid artery (n=5), middle cerebral arteries (n=5), intracranial segmental vertebral artery (n=4), basilar artery (n=3). 16 lesions were successfully pre-dilated with an Gateway balloon catheter before the deployment of the self-expanding Wingspan stent. 1 case failed because of the failure of delivery of the Gateway balloon catheter to the accurate site, but the stent was successfully deployed through direct localization. The successful rate of stenting was 100%. The Mean SD pretreatment stenosis was 82% and improved to 43% after stenting. During the follow-up (an average of 5 months), 4 patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA)but without recurrence, the other 12 patients with stroke showed significantly syptomatic improvements. One complication occured with attribution of contralateral hemisphere embolic infarction. There was no hemorrhagic complication. Conclusions: Angioplasty and stenting with the Gateway-Wingspan stent system are safe and good in short-term outcomes for treating symptomatic intracranial arterial atheroscleromatic stenosis. (authors)

  5. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  6. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  7. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  8. Effect of venous stenting on intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloob, Samir A; Toma, Ahmed K; Thompson, Simon D; Gan, Chee L; Robertson, Fergus; Thorne, Lewis; Watkins, Laurence D

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterised by an increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of any central nervous system disease or structural abnormality and by normal CSF composition. Management becomes complicated once surgical intervention is required. Venous sinus stenosis has been suggested as a possible aetiology for IIH. Venous sinus stenting has emerged as a possible interventional option. Evidence for venous sinus stenting is based on elimination of the venous pressure gradient and clinical response. There have been no studies demonstrating the immediate effect of venous stenting on ICP. Patients with a potential or already known diagnosis of IIH were investigated according to departmental protocol. ICP monitoring was performed for 24 h. When high pressures were confirmed, CT venogram and catheter venography were performed to look for venous stenosis to demonstrate a pressure gradient. If positive, venous stenting would be performed and ICP monitoring would continue for a further 24 h after deployment of the venous stent. Ten patients underwent venous sinus stenting with concomitant ICP monitoring. Nine out of ten patients displayed an immediate reduction in their ICP that was maintained at 24 h. The average reduction in mean ICP and pulsatility was significant (p = 0.003). Six out of ten patients reported a symptomatic improvement within the first 2 weeks. Venous sinus stenting results in an immediate reduction in ICP. This physiological response to venous stenting has not previously been reported. Venous stenting could offer an alternative treatment option in correctly selected patients with IIH.

  9. Colonization of peripheral intravascular catheters with biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Biofilms often colonize catheters and contribute to catheter-related septicemia. However, predictors of catheter colonization by biofilms remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical factors that may be associated with biofilm colonization of catheters. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 ...

  10. Results of Cryoenergy and Radiofrequency-Based Catheter Ablation for Treating Ventricular Arrhythmias Arising From the Papillary Muscles of the Left Ventricle, Guided by Intracardiac Echocardiography and Image Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Santiago; Ricapito, Maria de la Paz; Tomas, Leandro; Parodi, Josefina; Bardera Molina, Guillermo; Banega, Rodrigo; Bueti, Pablo; Orosco, Agustin; Reinoso, Marcelo; Caro, Milagros; Belardi, Diego; Albina, Gaston; Giniger, Alberto; Scazzuso, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Catheter radiofrequency ablation of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) arising from the left ventricle's papillary muscles has been associated with inconsistent results. The use of cryoenergy versus radiofrequency has not been compared yet. This study compares outcomes and complications of catheter ablation of VA from the papillary muscles of the left ventricle with either cryoenergy or radiofrequency. Twenty-one patients (40±12 years old; 47% males; median ejection fraction 59±7.3%) with drug refractory premature ventricular contractions or ventricular tachycardia underwent catheter cryoablation or radiofrequency ablation. VAs were localized using 3-dimensional mapping, multidetector computed tomography, and intracardiac echocardiography, with arrhythmia foci being mapped at either the anterolateral papillary muscle or posteromedial papillary muscles of the left ventricle. Focal ablation was performed using an 8-mm cryoablation catheter or a 4-mm open-irrigated radiofrequency catheter, via transmitral approach. Acute success rate was 100% for cryoenergy (n=12) and 78% for radiofrequency (n=9; P=0.08). Catheter stability was achieved in all patients (100%) treated with cryoenergy, and only in 2 (25%) patients treated with radiofrequency (P=0.001). Incidence of multiple VA morphologies was observed in 7 patients treated with radiofrequency (77.7%), whereas none was observed in those treated with cryoenergy (P=0.001). VA recurrence at 6 months follow-up was 0% for cryoablation and 44% for radiofrequency (P=0.03). Cryoablation was associated with higher success rates and lower recurrence rates than radiofrequency catheter ablation, better catheter stability, and lesser incidence of polymorphic arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    . The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  12. Intracranial dural metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lakshmi; Abrey, Lauren E; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2009-05-01

    : Intracranial dural metastases (IDM) are found at autopsy in 9% of patients with advanced systemic cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, IDM have not been studied systematically in the modern neuroimaging era. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and prognosis of patients with IDM. : The current study was a retrospective review of 122 patients with IDM diagnosed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2006. Patients with concurrent brain or leptomeningeal metastases were excluded. : Sixty-one percent of the patients were women; the median age at diagnosis was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) at diagnosis was 80, and the median time to IDM diagnosis from initial cancer diagnosis was 37 months. Breast (34%) and prostate (17%) cancers were the most frequent primary tumors associated with IDM. Fifty-six percent of patients had a single dural metastasis. On imaging, 70% had metastases of the overlying skull, 44% had dural tail metastases, 53% had vasogenic edema, and 34% had brain invasion. Direct extension from skull metastases was the most common mode of spread. Eighty-three percent of patients had active systemic disease at the time of IDM diagnosis. A lower KPS and lung cancer were associated with worse overall survival. Surgical resection and chemotherapy improved progression-free survival, but only resection was found to be associated with improved overall survival. : IDM affect a significant proportion of cancer patients. KPS and status of systemic cancer should guide treatment decisions. Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  13. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - insertion ... A PICC is a long, thin tube (called a catheter) that goes into your body through a vein in ... into a large vein near your heart. The PICC helps carry nutrients and medicines into your body. ...

  14. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  15. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  16. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  17. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  18. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  19. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies.

  20. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  1. Intracranial hemorrhage: ultrasound, CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is one of the most common causes of acute focal neurologic deficit in children and adults. Neuroimaging including ultrasonography (US), computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. Imaging findings should guide treatment. The highly variable appearance of an intracranial hemorrhage can be challenging. A thorough knowledge of hematoma evolution and US, CT and MR hematoma characteristics is mandatory for adequate interpretation of findings. The purpose of this review is (1) to summarize the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage on various imaging techniques and (2) to review the various types of intracranial hemorrhage, and their causes. (orig.)

  2. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Intracranial tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic.1 In the central nervous system tuberculosis manifests as cerebritis, cerebral abscess, tuberculoma, and tubercu- lous meningitis (TBM).1-5 TBM is thought to arise from cerebrospinal.

  3. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  4. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store What is IH? What is IH? Intracranial hypertension literally means that the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid ( ... is too high. “Intracranial” means “within the skull.” “Hypertension” means “high fluid pressure.” To understand how this ...

  5. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  6. Imaging intracranial tuberculosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children`s Hospital, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    1995-05-01

    A morphologically based imaging review of intracranial tuberculosis in childhood is presented. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance features of parenchymal tuberculoma, tuberculous meningitis and meningeal/meniningocerebral tuberculoma are illustrated. Recent insight into the nature of tuberculoma necrosis and its magnetic resonance correlation is reviewed. Pathogenesis, relevant clinical background and the role of modern imaging is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  8. Noninvasive monitoring intracranial pressure – A review of available modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Marium Naveed; Shallwani, Hussain; Khan, Muhammad Ulusyar; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is important in many neurosurgical and neurological patients. The gold standard for monitoring ICP, however, is via an invasive procedure resulting in the placement of an intraventricular catheter, which is associated with many risks. Several noninvasive ICP monitoring techniques have been examined with the hope to replace the invasive techniques. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of all modalities that have been used for noninvasive ICP monitoring to date. Methods: A thorough literature search was conducted on PubMed, selected articles were reviewed in completion, and pertinent data was included in the review. Results: A total of 94 publications were reviewed, and we found that over the past few decades clinicians have attempted to use a number of modalities to monitor ICP noninvasively. Conclusion: Although the intraventricular catheter remains the gold standard for monitoring ICP, several noninvasive modalities that can be used in settings when invasive monitoring is not possible are also available. In our opinion, measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter and pupillometry are the two modalities which may prove to be valid options for centers not performing invasive ICP monitoring. PMID:28480113

  9. Stuck long-term indwelling central venous catheters in adolescents: three cases and a short topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Afshari, A; Henneberg, S W

    2010-01-01

    We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated in the v......We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated...... in the vessel wall and impossible to remove. In the other two cases, catheters were removed with great difficulty by the interventional radiologists. These cases raise important questions concerning the maximum indwelling time and the choice of catheter material when implanting permanent central venous...

  10. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  11. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which isinserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion ofthe vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter.Objective:To point out the maintheoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses toperform the PICC.Methodology:Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching thedatabase scientific journals and bibliographies area.Results:The success of integration depends onthe patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tipshould be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava.In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursingcare in making the dressing, and the first24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICCremains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasinginvasive procedures.Conclusion:According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawfulforthe insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  12. Sofia intermediate catheter and the SNAKE technique: safety and efficacy of the Sofia catheter without guidewire or microcatheter construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Jeremy J; Wong, Johnny Hy; Mofaff, Adrienne M; Telischak, Nicholas A; Dodd, Robert L; Marks, Michael P; Do, Huy M

    2018-04-01

    Neurointerventional surgeries (NIS) benefit from supportive endovascular constructs. Sofia is a soft-tipped, flexible, braided single lumen intermediate catheter designed for NIS. Sofia advancement from the cervical to the intracranial circulation without a luminal guidewire or microcatheter construct has not been described. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new Sofia Non-wire Advancement techniKE (SNAKE) for advancement of the Sofia into the cerebral circulation. Consecutive patients who underwent NIS using Sofia were identified. Patient information, SNAKE use, and patient outcome were determined from electronic medical records. Sofia advancement to the cavernous internal carotid artery or the V2/V3 segment junction of the vertebral artery was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes included arterial vasospasm and arterial dissection. 263 Patients (181 females, 69%) who underwent a total of 305 NIS using Sofia were identified. SNAKE (SNAKE+) was used in 187 procedures (61%). Two hundred and ninety-three procedures (96%) were technically successful, which included 184 SNAKE+ NIS and 109 SNAKE- NIS. Primary outcome was achieved in all SNAKE+ procedures, but not in five SNAKE- procedures (2%). No arterial dissections were identified among 305 interventions. In the intracranial circulation, a single SNAKE+ patient (0.5%) had non-flow limiting arterial vasospasm involving the petrous internal carotid. Three SNAKE+ patients (1.6%) and one SNAKE- patient (0.8%) demonstrated external carotid artery branch artery vasospasm during dural arteriovenous fistula or facial arteriovenous malformation treatment. SNAKE is a safe and effective technique for Sofia advancement. Sofia is a highly effective and safe intermediate catheter for a variety of NIS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Malfunctioning and infected tunneled infusion catheters: over-the-wire catheter exchange versus catheter removal and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, David M; Trerotola, Scott O; Clark, Timothy W; Dagli, Mandeep; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Itkin, Maxim; Soulen, Michael C; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Stavropoulos, S William

    2011-05-01

    To compare the safety and effectiveness of over-the-wire catheter exchange (catheter-exchange) with catheter removal and replacement (removal-replacement) at a new site for infected or malfunctioning tunneled infusion catheters. Using a quality assurance database, 61 patients with tunneled infusion catheters placed during the period July 2001 to June 2009 were included in this study. Patients receiving hemodialysis catheters were excluded. Catheter-exchange was performed in 25 patients, and same-day removal-replacement was performed in 36 patients. Data collected included demographic information, indication for initial catheter placement and replacement, dwell time for the new catheter, and ultimate fate of the new device. Statistical comparisons between the two cohorts were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and Fisher exact test. Catheters exchanged over the wire remained functional without infection for a median of 102 days (range, 2-570 days), whereas catheters removed and replaced were functional for a median 238 days (range, 1-292 days, P = .12). After catheter replacement, there were 11 instances of subsequent infection in the catheter-exchange group and 7 instances in the removal-replacement cohort, accounting for infection rates of 4.4 and 2.3 per 1,000 catheter days (P = .049). Patients in the catheter-exchange group had 3.2 greater odds of infection compared with patients in the removal-replacement group. Five malfunction events occurred in each group, accounting for 2.0 and 1.7 malfunctions per 1,000 catheter days in the catheter-exchange and removal-replacement groups (P = .73). Catheter-exchange of tunneled infusion catheters results in a higher infection rate compared with removal-replacement at a new site. The rate of catheter malfunction is not significantly different between the two groups. Catheter-exchange is an alternative for patients with tunneled infusion catheters who have limited venous access, but this technique should not be

  14. Translumbar aortography by catheter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, B.; Honemeyer, U.; Meier-Duis, H.

    1982-01-01

    400 examinations performed during the last three years by TLA (only catheter technique) were subjected to critical analysis and studied particularly in respect to the rate of complications. We observed 13 complications (3.25%) of moderate severity, including 3 large hematomas (documented by CT), 3 paravasations and 7 dissections, but no fatal complication. Two (0.5%) of these complications had clinical evidence. The advantages of the catheter technique of TLA are described. Injections through rigid metal cannula should be avoided because of the high incidence of complications (mainly the increased risk of dissection). Downstream injection resulted in excellent visualization of peripheral occluding vascular disease. Upstream injection should be preferred to demonstrate the major abdominal arteries as well as supraceliac collateral circulation in the case of high Leriche syndrome. The low or intermediate puncture of the aorta is preferable to facilitate caudad direction of the catheter and to diminish the risk of damaging other vessels or puncturing an organ. (orig.) [de

  15. FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS AFFECTING CATHETER AND TECHNIQUE SURVIVAL WITH PERMANENT SINGLE-LUMEN DIALYSIS CATHETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEESTER, J; VANHOLDER, R; DEROOSE, J; RINGOIR, S

    1994-01-01

    This long-term study on the outcome of permanent silicone single-lumen dialysis catheters consisted of 43 surgically inserted catheters in 33 patients. All catheters were attached to a pressure-pressure single-cannula dialysis system. Technique and catheter survival were 80 and 59% at 1 year, and 63

  16. Spontaneous intracranial arterial dissection in the young: diagnosis by CT angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Given Curtis A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous carotid artery dissections have been rarely reported in children. Diagnosis has traditionally been confirmed by catheter arteriography. More recently diagnosis has been made by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography; however the sensitivity of these techniques has yet to be determined. The authors are unaware of reports of carotid dissection confirmed by dynamic computed tomography (computerized tomographic arteriography in the young. Case presentation We recently evaluated a fourteen year-old male following the development of transient neurologic symptoms. There was no antecedent illness or trauma. Dynamic computed tomography revealed an intracranial dissection involving the supraclinoid segment of the left internal carotid artery (confirmed by catheter arteriography. Studies for vasculitis, pro-thrombotic states, and defects of collagen were negative. Conclusion Spontaneous carotid artery dissection is a potential cause of transient neurological symptoms and ischemic stroke in the pediatric population. Dynamic computed tomography appears to be a reliable diagnostic tool which can lead to early diagnosis.

  17. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author).

  18. Intracranial arterial aneurysm vasculopathies: targeting the outer vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krings, Timo; Piske, Ronie L.; Lasjaunias, Pierre L.

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intracranial arterial aneurysms (AA) remains unclear, despite their clinical importance. An improved understanding of this disease is important in choosing therapeutic options. In addition to the ''classical'' berry-type aneurysm, there are various other types of intracranial AA such as infectious, dissecting or giant, partially-thrombosed aneurysms. From the clinician's perspective, the hypothesis that some of these intracranial AA might be due to abluminal factors has been proposed for several years. Indeed, this hypothesis and the empirical use of anti-inflammatory drugs in giant intracranial aneurysms have been confirmed by recent studies reporting that an enzyme involved in the inflammatory cascade (5-lipoxygenase or 5-LO) promotes the pathogenesis of specific aneurysms in humans. 5-LO generates different forms of leukotrienes which are potent mediators of inflammation. Adventitial inflammation leads to a weakening of the media from the abluminal part of the vessel wall due to the release of proinflammatory factors that invade the media, thereby degrading the extracellular matrix, the elastic lamina of the vascular wall, and, finally, the integrity of the vessel lumen. This in turn results in a dilation of the vessel and aneurysm formation. Moreover, neoangiogenesis of vasa vasorum is found in close proximity to 5-LO activated macrophages. In addition to this biological cascade, we argue that repeated subadventitial haemorrhages from the new vasa vasorum play an important role in aneurysm pathogenesis, due to a progressive increase in size mediated by the apposition of new layers of intramural haematoma within the vessel wall. Intracranial giant AA can therefore be regarded as a proliferative disease of the vessel wall induced by extravascular activity. (orig.)

  19. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  20. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  1. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caridi, James G.; Hawkins, Irvin F.; Akins, E. William; Young, Ronald S.

    1997-01-01

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  2. Robotic positioning of standard electrophysiology catheters: a novel approach to catheter robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bradley; Ayers, Gregory M; Cohen, Todd J

    2008-05-01

    Robotic systems have been developed to manipulate and position electrophysiology (EP) catheters remotely. One limitation of existing systems is their requirement for specialized catheters or sheaths. We evaluated a system (Catheter Robotics Remote Catheter Manipulation System [RCMS], Catheter Robotics, Inc., Budd Lake, New Jersey) that manipulates conventional EP catheters placed through standard introducer sheaths. The remote controller functions much like the EP catheter handle, and the system permits repeated catheter disengagement for manual manipulation without requiring removal of the catheter from the body. This study tested the hypothesis that the RCMS would be able to safely and effectively position catheters at various intracardiac sites and obtain thresholds and electrograms similar to those obtained with manual catheter manipulation. Two identical 7 Fr catheters (Blazer II; Boston Scientific Corp., Natick, Massachusetts) were inserted into the right femoral veins of 6 mongrel dogs through separate, standard 7 Fr sheaths. The first catheter was manually placed at a right ventricular endocardial site. The second catheter handle was placed in the mating holder of the RCMS and moved to approximately the same site as the first catheter using the Catheter Robotics RCMS. The pacing threshold was determined for each catheter. This sequence was performed at 2 right atrial and 2 right ventricular sites. The distance between the manually and robotically placed catheters tips was measured, and pacing thresholds and His-bundle recordings were compared. The heart was inspected at necropsy for signs of cardiac perforation or injury. Compared to manual positioning, remote catheter placement produced the same pacing threshold at 7/24 sites, a lower threshold at 11/24 sites, and a higher threshold at only 6/24 sites (p > 0.05). The average distance between catheter tips was 0.46 +/- 0.32 cm (median 0.32, range 0.13-1.16 cm). There was no difference between right atrial

  3. Totally implantable catheter embolism: two related cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Chaves Ribeiro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Long-term totally implantable catheters (e.g. Port-a-Cath® are frequently used for long-term venous access in children with cancer. The use of this type of catheter is associated with complications such as infection, extrusion, extravasation and thrombosis. Embolism of catheter fragments is a rare complication, but has potential for morbidity. The aim here was to report on two cases in which embolism of fragments of a long-term totally implantable catheter occurred. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case series study at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective review of catheter embolism in oncological pediatric patients with long-term totally implantable catheters. RESULTS: The first patient was a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with stage IV Wilms' tumor. Treatment was started with the introduction of a totally implantable catheter through the subclavian vein. At the time of removal, it was realized that the catheter had fractured inside the heart. An endovascular procedure was necessary to remove the fragment. The second case was a boy diagnosed with stage II Wilms' tumor at the age of two years. At the time of removal, it was noticed that the catheter had disconnected from the reservoir and an endovascular procedure was also necessary to remove the embolized catheter. CONCLUSION: Embolism of fragments of totally implantable catheters is a rare complication that needs to be recognized even in asymptomatic patients.

  4. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  5. A Comparison of the Changes in Pain and Discharge in Open Endotracheal Suction Catheters with two Sizes of 12 and 14: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akwan Paymard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Since hospitalized patients intubated in the intensive care unit are not able to discharge secretions and require periodic suctioning and require periodic suctioning that is associated with different adverse effects, this study aimed to compare the effects of open endotracheal suction with two catheter sizes of 12 and 14 on the levels of pain and discharge in patients admitted to intensive care. Methods: In this clinical trial, 36 patients in one group underwent suction with catheters of two sizes, 12 and 14. Pain level in the first to third episodes, was assessed based on the CPOT criteria. The secretions output after the suctioning was collected in wing container and weighed on scales. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and analysis of variance. Results: In this study, pain during suctioning in the third episode, had the highest score, which was significantly different between large and small catheters (p=0.000. The secretion drainage after suctioning by large catheter was more and significantly statistically different (p=0.000. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, in patients with high pulmonary secretions, larger suction catheter is recommended to facilitate the discharge, but on the other hand, due to feeling pain caused by large catheter, use of small catheter is recommended for better control of intracranial pressure and pain levels.

  6. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  7. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  8. Phase contrast MRI in intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are outpouchings of intracranial arteries that cause brain hemorrhage after rupture. Unruptured aneurysms can be treated but the risk of treatment may outweigh the risk of rupture. Local intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics can contribute substantially to the rupture risk estimation

  9. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  10. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. Key Words: Intracranial Complications, Sinusitis, ...

  11. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  12. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  13. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  14. Endovascular Therapy for Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysms in the Elderly: Poor Accessibility of the Guiding Catheter and Use of Local Anesthesia as the Predictors of Procedure-Related Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Handa, Akira; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Lo, Benjamin W Y; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-10-01

    Endovascular therapy is favored for ruptured intracranial aneurysms in the elderly. However, poor accessibility to the aneurysm through the parent artery and use of local anesthesia in this age group may predispose to intraprocedural complications. To evaluate whether age-related poor access to the ruptured target aneurysm and use of local anesthesia are associated with increased incidence of procedure-related rupture during endovascular embolization. A total of 117 patients with 117 ruptured aneurysms underwent endovascular embolization at a single institution. Correlation of increasing age with poor accessibility of the guiding catheter was analyzed. In addition, the distance from the aneurysm to the guiding catheter was investigated to identify an association with incidence of procedure-related rupture. Correlation of local anesthesia with procedure-related rupture was also evaluated in the multivariable analysis. Increasing age was significantly associated with poor accessibility of the guiding catheter (P = .001, Mann-Whitney U test). Procedure-related rupture occurred in 9 of 117 aneurysms (7.7%). Longer distance between distal aneurysms and low-positioned guiding catheters carried a higher risk of procedure-related rupture than a shorter distance between proximal aneurysms and high-positioned guiding catheters (odds ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.84-201; P = .01, multivariable analysis). Use of local anesthesia was also a significant risk factor of procedure-related rupture by multivariable analysis. Increasing age was correlated with poor accessibility of the guiding catheter in endovascular embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Distally located aneurysms treated through a low-positioned guiding catheter and use of local anesthesia increased the risk of procedure-related rupture.

  15. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Li Guoxin; Qu Yuanming; Tang Jun; Liu Zuoqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To setup an endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm with detachable balloon and micro-coil. Methods: Trans-femoral artery Seldinger's catheterization was used. Balloons and free MDS, GDC micro-coils were pushed into the aneurysm or carrying arteries. Results: No mortality occurred in authors' group. Internal carotid arteries (ICA) were occluded with detachable balloons in 5 aneurysms at sinus segment of ICA and 4 traumatic pseudo-aneurysms. No complications occurred. 9 aneurysms were completely occluded with micro-coils and 2 were partly (95%) occluded. 2 patients got mild paralysis due to vasospasm or mal detaching of MDS coils. Conclusions: Balloon occlusion of ICA for treatment of aneurysm at sinus segment is safe and effective in case of having abundant collateral circulation. Coil occlusion of intracranial aneurysm is a promising method of endovascular treatment. Compared with MDS, GDC coil is safer but expensive. Free coil is not very safe theoretically, but can be used with careful consideration as it is much cheaper

  16. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  17. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  18. A case of intracranial teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Madoka; Ando, Yukinori; Takashima, Sachio; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hiramoto, Shinsuke.

    1985-01-01

    A case of neonatal intracranial teratoma was examined on ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and tumor markers in serum, CSF and tumor tissue. This 27-day-old male infant was pointed out a head enlargement by prenatal sonography at 39 weeks' gestation. He admitted to our hospital at the age of one day after cesarean section. His birth weight was 4430 g and head circumstance 47.5 cm. On admission, physical and neurological examinations reveled big head, weak crying, twiching and sun set phenomenon. The optic fundi were normal. The CT scan at 1 day demonstrated the marked enlargement of lateral ventricles and the supratentorial large polycystic mass with calcifications at midline area. Transfontanelle sonography also delineated the polycystic mass and enlarged ventricle. Ventricular tap showed bloody CSF. Alpha-Fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen level in CSF was higher than those in serum. Postmortam tumor necropsy revealed a teratoma including mature squamous epithelium, muscle, cartilage, bone, lymphoid and nervous tissue. There were immature mesenchymal cells in some parts. The immune histochemical method showed positive staining to AFP in intestinal and respiratory epithelium, and to CEA in intestinal epithelium and immature mesenchymal cells. In summary, these characteristic findings of US, CT and tumor marker in CSF have a diagnostic value of intracranial teratoma. (author)

  19. Mechanical thrombectomy of acute ischemic stroke with a new intermediate aspiration catheter: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallustio, Fabrizio; Pampana, Enrico; Davoli, Alessandro; Merolla, Stefano; Koch, Giacomo; Alemseged, Fana; Panella, Marta; D'Agostino, Vittoria Carla; Mori, Francesco; Morosetti, Daniele; Konda, Daniel; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Diomedi, Marina; Gandini, Roberto

    2018-02-08

    To report clinical and procedural outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients after endovascular treatment with the new thromboaspiration catheter AXS Catalyst 6. Patients with anterior and posterior circulation stroke were selected. Successful reperfusion defined as a Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2 b and 3-month functional independence defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤2 were the main efficacy outcomes. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were the main safety outcomes. 107 patients were suitable for analysis. Mean age was 73.18±12.62 year and median baseline NIHSS was 17 (range: 3-32). The most frequent site of occlusion was the middle cerebral artery (MCA) (60.7%). 76.6% of patients were treated with AXS Catalyst 6 alone without the need for rescue devices or thromboaspiration catheters. Successful reperfusion was achieved in 84.1%, functional independence in 47.6%, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 3.7%, and mortality in 21.4%. Endovascular treatment with AXS Catalyst 6 proved to be safe, technically feasible, and effective. Comparison analyses with other devices for mechanical thrombectomy are needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Malposition of catheters during voiding cystourethrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathaus, V.; Konen, O.; Shapiro, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Sapir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba and Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Veteran Pediatric Radiologist, Kfar Saba (Israel)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report catheter malposition during voiding cystourethrography. Eight hundred forty-three voiding cystourethrography (265 males and 578 females, aged 1 week to 12 years, mean age 2 years) were performed during a period of 4 years. The conventional standard procedure was applied. In 3 cases with passed history of urinary tract infection the catheter entered directly into the ureter. In all these cases the uretero-vesical reflux was present on the same side where the catheter entered. It appears that insertion of a catheter into the ureter is possible only in the presence of an anomaly or pathology at the vesicoureteric junction. (orig.)

  1. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  2. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracr......We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...... to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage....

  3. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  4. Hypertensive response to raised intracranial pressure in infancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, A M; Whitelaw, A G

    1988-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure and intracranial pressure were measured serially in six infants with intracranial hypertension (intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg), and cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated from their difference. Overall, mean arterial pressure increased with rising intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.20 mm Hg/mm Hg. This caused a fall in cerebral perfusion pressure with increasing intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.80 mm Hg/mm Hg overall, although cerebral ...

  5. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Determination in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noraky, James; Verghese, George C; Searls, David E; Lioutas, Vasileios A; Sonni, Shruti; Thomas, Ajith; Heldt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) should ideally be measured in many conditions affecting the brain. The invasiveness and associated risks of the measurement modalities in current clinical practice restrict ICP monitoring to a small subset of patients whose diagnosis and treatment could benefit from ICP measurement. To expand validation of a previously proposed model-based approach to continuous, noninvasive, calibration-free, and patient-specific estimation of ICP to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we made waveform recordings of cerebral blood flow velocity in several major cerebral arteries during routine, clinically indicated transcranial Doppler examinations for vasospasm, along with time-locked waveform recordings of radial artery blood pressure (APB), and ICP was measured via an intraventricular drain catheter. We also recorded the locations to which ICP and ABP were calibrated, to account for a possible hydrostatic pressure difference between measured ABP and the ABP value at a major cerebral vessel. We analyzed 21 data records from five patients and were able to identify 28 data windows from the middle cerebral artery that were of sufficient data quality for the ICP estimation approach. Across these windows, we obtained a mean estimation error of -0.7 mmHg and a standard deviation of the error of 4.0 mmHg. Our estimates show a low bias and reduced variability compared with those we have reported before.

  7. Standardizing umbilical catheter usage in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaneela; Dutta, Sourabh; Symington, Amanda; Shivananda, Sandesh

    2014-06-01

    Absence of guidelines on umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) and umbilical venous catheter (UVC) use and inability to predict the hospital course may sway the frontline staff to overuse umbilical catheters in preterm infants. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters and its impact on the incidence of sepsis and resource use. All inborn infants delivered at <33 weeks' gestation and admitted to the NICU were included in this quality improvement study. The primary outcome was proportion of infants receiving umbilical catheters. Secondary outcomes were central venous catheter (CVC) use and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). The proportion of infants receiving UACs and UVCs was significantly lower in postintervention (sustainment) phase than in the preintervention phase (93 [42.3%] vs 52 [23.6%], P = .0001) and (137 [62.6%] vs 93 [42.3%], P = .0001), respectively. There was no corresponding increase in the proportion of infants receiving peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) or surgical CVCs (SCVCs) during the sustainment phase. There was a significant reduction in the proportion of infants receiving CVCs (UVC, PICC, and SCVC) in the sustainment phase. The incidence of CLABSI was similar in the preintervention and sustainment phases. Implementation of guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters in the NICU is feasible. Fewer infants were exposed to the risk of UVC or UAC, and fewer resources were used. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  9. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.J. van den; Wille, J.C.; Benthem, B.H.B. van; Perenboom, R.J.M.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Nielen, A.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to

  10. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control.

  11. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  12. Bladder catheter protocol: technical modification for the change of Long-Term bladder catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rueda Pérez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of urinary catheters is a common practice in chronic patients for both outpatients and inpatients. This action involves a large number of nursing interventions either planned or caused by emergency (obstruction, incorrect implantation, etc.... This modification of the catheter technique tries to improve the patient’s quality of life by minimizing the stress produced by urethral catheter replacements and reducing malpractice risks. This change in the urinary catheter technique also intends to alleviate some of the side effects of permanent urethral catheterization. By filling the bladder with saline prior to the change of catheter, it is possible to get a quick and safe implantation, dragging possible sediment and microorganisms and thereby reducing the number of nursing actions related to the process of the urinary catheter replacement (obstruction or incorrect catheter implantations etc.

  13. Intracranial EEG Connectivity Analysis and Result Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 275-279 ISSN 2010-3638 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Connectivity * Correlation * Intracranial EEG * Signal Processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  15. The commonly missed diagnosis of intracranial hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee N. Ruggeri-McKinley, BSN, RN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 year old female who presented with a subacute onset of a severe throbbing and stabbing headache after a morning spin class 9 months ago. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension cause by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The headache finally resolved after a 55 ml blood patch. Affecting an estimated 5/100,000 patients, spontaneous intracranial hypotension is considered rare in medical literature. Many patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension are incapacitated for years and even decades. The misdiagnosis of intracranial hypotension can have serious consequences and lead to unnecessary testing and treatment. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of this diagnosis when evaluating a patient with acute head pain. Considering that physical exams are usually normal, clinicians must focus on the patient history and physical. Clues in the patient interviewing process can lead to an immediate and accurate diagnosis.

  16. Implantable electrolyte conductance-based pressure sensing catheter, II. Device construction and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert; Benharash, Peyman; Schulam, Peter; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2013-12-01

    Direct measurements of arterial blood pressure most commonly use bulky external instrumentation containing a pressure transducer connected to an ex vivo fluid-filled arterial line, which is subject to several sensing artifacts. In situ blood pressure sensors, typically solid state piezoresistive, capacitive, and interferometric sensors, are unaffected by these artifacts, but can be expensive to produce and miniaturize. We have developed an alternative approach to blood pressure measurement based on deformation of an elastic tube filled with electrolyte solution. Simple measurement of the electrical conductance of this solution as the tube dimensions change allows determination of the external pressure. The sensor is made from inexpensive materials and its miniaturization is straightforward. In vitro static testing of initial sensor prototypes mounted on a catheter tip showed a linear response with applied pressure and a resolution of 1 mmHg. In vivo sensing followed catheterization of the sensor into the femoral artery of a porcine model through a 7F catheter port. The sensor performed comparably to a commercial pressure transducer also connected to the catheter port. Due to its scalability and cost, this sensor has the potential for use in a range of pressure sensing applications, such as measurement of intracranial, spinal, or interstitial pressures.

  17. Microbial contamination of haemodialysis catheter connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorke, A

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial contamination and colonisation of the haemodialysis catheter is a reason for infection in dialysis patients. One reason for contamination may be frequent routine connections at the beginning, during and end of dialysis. Higher infection rates observed with double lumen catheters may be due to the absence of the sterile, disposable device that is fitted between the blood tubing and the catheter hubs with single lumen catheters. A sterile, disposable extension was implemented at the author's unit for use in dialysis with double lumen catheters. The proximal and distal ends of the extension were assessed for microbial contamination after standard dialysis. Results show microbial contamination in almost 30% of the samples retrieved from the extensions. Experiences in PD and the behaviour of skin bacteria on polymers, suggest that disposable extensions might have the potential to serve as a barrier or absorber for bacterial contamination.

  18. Effect of Catheter Gauge on the Success of Intravenous Catheter Placement by Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Quandt, Jane

    2017-11-03

    The purposes of this study were to determine if senior veterinary students find it easier to place a smaller-bore catheter, and to relate patient variables with student success in catheter placement. For dogs between 10 kg and 20 kg, the catheter size options were 20 gauge or 22 gauge. For dogs larger than 20 kg, the catheter size options were 18 gauge or 20 gauge. Variables recorded included time for catheter placement, number of catheterization attempts, number of catheters used, number of legs used, difficulty of catheterization, student success, and patient characteristics including signalment, weight, body condition score, premedication drugs given, tentative diagnosis, and procedure. If the student could not place an IV catheter after three attempts, it was graded as a student catheter placement failure. For the 55 students participating in the study over 28 months, we recorded 192 individual catheterization attempts. In small patients, students were successful in 19/20 attempts with 22-gauge catheters and in 24/30 with 20-gauge catheters. In large patients, students were successful in 59/68 attempts with 20-gauge catheters and 61/74 with 18-gauge catheters. The overall success rate was 164/192 (85%). Students were more likely to be successful when attempting placement in those dogs receiving acepromazine than in those not receiving acepromazine (p=.02). There were no significant differences among any of the other variables for difficulty, placement time, number of attempts, or student success. Clinicians and educators may select a size catheter for the patient without concern for the effects on student catheter placement success.

  19. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  20. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  1. Mucocele and pyocele with marked intracranial extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Machida, Tohru; Iio, Masahiro

    1984-08-01

    Two cases are presented with frontal sinus pyocele and fronto-ethmoid sinus mucocele in which marked intracranial extension is shown. Their intracranial part appeared as a large biconvex mass, which showed iso or slightly low density homogeneously and had gross calcification in the posterior rim. The findings of the paranasal sinuses and the orbit in tomograms and CT scans are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma.

  2. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jerônimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xareltor. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban.

  3. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency, a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5F angiographic catheters (pigtail, Sos Omni), goose-neck snare, or combinations thereof. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients, port catheter malposition correction was not possible because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. In migrated catheter tips, radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis, port catheter correction is often more challenging

  4. Outcome of Radiologically Placed Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayani, R.; Anwar, M.; Haq, T.U.; Qamari, N.A.; Bilal, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the outcome of radiologically placed double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheters for the management of renal failure. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Interventional Suite of Radiology Department at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from April 2010 to June 2011. Methodology: All consecutive patients who were referred to the department of radiology by the nephrologists for double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheter (Permacath) placement during the study period were included. Patients with septicemia, those for whom follow-up was not available, those coming for catheter exchange or who died due to a noncatheter related condition were excluded. A radio-opaque, soft silicone double lumen catheter was inserted through a subcutaneous tunnel created over the anterior chest wall. The catheter tip was placed in the right atrium via the internal jugular vein. Ultrasound guidance was used for initial venous puncture. The rest of the procedure was carried out under fluoroscopic guidance. Technical success, catheter related bacteremia rates, adequacy of dialysis, patency, and adverse events were analyzed. Results: Overall 88 tunneled haemodialysis catheters were placed in 87 patients. Patients were followed-up for duration of 1 - 307 days with mean follow-up period of 4 months. Immediate technical success was 100%. The procedural complication rate was 5.6% (5 catheters). Eight patients died during the study period, seven from causes unrelated to the procedure. One patient died due to septicemia secondary to catheter related infection. Of the remaining 69 patients, 50 (72.4%) predominantly had uneventful course during the study period. Twelve patients developed infection (17.3%); two were successfully treated conservatively while in 10 patients catheter had to be removed. Seven catheters (10.1%) failed due to mechanical problems. In 3 patients the internal jugular veins got partially thrombosed. One catheter was

  5. Creation of transcatheter aortopulmonary and cavopulmonary shunts using magnetic catheters: feasibility study in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel S; Danon, Saar; Gordon, Brent; Virdone, Nicky; Vinuela, Fernando; Shah, Sanjay; Carman, Greg; Moore, John W

    2009-05-01

    Surgical shunts are the basic form of palliation for many types of congenital heart disease. The Glenn shunt (superior cavopulmonary connection) and central shunt (aortopulmonary connection) represent surgical interventions that could potentially be accomplished by transcatheter techniques. We sought to investigate the efficacy of using neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnetic catheters to create transcatheter cavopulmonary and aortopulmonary shunts. NdFeB magnets were machined and integrated into catheters. "Target" catheters were placed in the pulmonary arteries (PAs), and radiofrequency "perforation" catheters were placed in either the descending aorta (DAo) for central shunts or the superior vena cava (SVC) for Glenn shunts. The magnet technique or "balloon target" method was used to pass wires from the DAo or the SVC into the PA. Aortopulmonary and cavopulmonary connections were then created using Atrium iCAST covered stents. Magnet catheters were used to perforate the left pulmonary artery from the DAo, thereby establishing a transcatheter central shunt. Given the orientation of the vasculature, magnetic catheters could not be used for SVC-to-PA connections; however, perforation from the SVC to the right pulmonary artery was accomplished with a trans-septal needle and balloon target. Transcatheter Glenn or central shunts were successfully created in four swine.

  6. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images.

  7. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  8. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Complication following fracture of a central venous catheter can be catastrophic to both the patient and the attending doctor. Catheter fracture has been attributed to several factors namely prolong mechanical force acting on the catheter, and forceful removal or insertion of the catheter. CASE DETAILS: In ...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable catheter...

  10. Prolonged use of indwelling urinary catheter following acute urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.O. Bello

    duration of catheter use and median out-of-pocket payment per catheter change was 65 years (range 20–90 years), 12 months (range .... pocket payments per catheter change and reasons for prolonged catheter use was collected. ... ing almost half (44.7%) of the average annual income of an adult in the study region of ...

  11. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  12. Percutaneous catheter dilatation of carotid stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, K.; Mittermayer, C.; Ensinger, H.; Neff, W.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-one carotid artery stenoses were produced in thirty dogs by three different techniques. Twenty-three of these could be cured by transfemoral percutaneous catheter dilatation. High grade tight stenoses may present resistance which cannot be overcome by the catheter. Histological examination of the dilated vessels showed circumscribed changes in the vessel wall, with destruction of elastic membranes. From our experience of catheter dilatation of pelvic and lower limb arteries and of renal arteries, we consider it feasible to use this technique in selected patients with carotid stenosis. (orig.) [de

  13. Bedside burr hole for intracranial pressure monitoring performed by pediatric intensivists in children with CNS infections in a resource-limited setting: 10-year experience at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Kumar, Ramesh; Singhi, Pratibha; Jayashree, Muralidharan; Bansal, Arun

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial pressure monitoring can help in early identification of raised intracranial pressure and in setting more informed goals for treatment. We describe our 10-year experience of bedside burr holes performed by pediatric intensivists to establish intracranial pressure monitoring in children with CNS infections in a resource-limited setting and the technical difficulties and complications encountered. Descriptive study of prospectively recorded data. PICU of a tertiary care academic institute. Consecutive comatose patients with raised intracranial pressure who underwent intracranial pressure monitoring from 2004 to 2013. An intraparenchymal (1.2 mm) or an intraventricular transducer (3.4 mm) (Codman) was placed by a pediatric intensivist through a micro burr hole using a standard protocol. Technical difficulties during the procedure and complications were recorded. Over 10 years, 265 intracranial pressure catheters were placed in 259 patients, mainly for acute CNS infections (n = 242, 93.4%). Median age of patients was 4.8 years, youngest being 6 weeks; 21 patients (8.1%) were younger than 1 year. Intraparenchymal transducer was used in 252 patients (97.3%). Median (interquartile range) duration of intracranial pressure monitoring was 96 hours (72-144 hr). Complications were seen in 3.5% of patients (n = 9/259); the incidence was 0.28 per 1,000 hours of intracranial pressure monitoring. Procedure-related ventriculitis occurred in three of seven patients (42.8%) with intraventricular catheter, in contrast to none in patients with intraparenchymal transducer. Overall mortality was 32.8% (n = 85). On Cox-regression analysis, "blood component therapy" was an independent predictor of poor outcome defined as death or severe neurodisability (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.16-2.16; p = 0.004). In a resource-limited setting, pediatric intensivists can safely and successfully perform burr holes at bedside for establishing intraparenchymal intracranial pressure

  14. THE KISSING BALLOON TECHNIQUE WITH 2 OVER-THE-WIRE BALLOON CATHETERS THROUGH A SINGLE 8-FRENCH GUIDING CATHETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHEIJER, P; BERNINK, PJLM; VANDIJK, RB; TWISK, SPM; LIE, KI

    Some of the newer over-the-wire coronary angioplasty catheters have shaft sizes of 3.0 French (F) or less. The inner diameter of modern 8-F guiding catheters is large enough to accommodate two of such balloon catheters. We report a kissing balloon procedure with two over-the-wire catheters through a

  15. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Glowinski, A.; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212[). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF[). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [de

  16. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    %. Limited literature is available on intracranial aneurysms in HIV-infected patients. Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV- positive adults. Method: In this retrospective analysis of ...

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provi...

  18. Predictors of severe complications in intracranial meningioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Förander, Petter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of complications after intracranial meningioma resection using a standardized reporting system for adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian population-based cohort of 979 adult operations for intracranial meningioma perfo...

  19. Intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshal; Bosch, Wendelyn; Thompson, Kristine M; Hellinger, Walter C

    2013-07-01

    Intravascular catheters required for the care of many hospitalized patients can give rise to bloodstream infection, a complication of care that has occurred most frequently in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Elucidation of the pathogenesis of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) has guided development of effective diagnostic, management, and prevention strategies. When CRBSIs occur in the ICU, physicians must be prepared to recognize and treat them. Prevention of these infections requires careful attention to optimal catheter selection, insertion and maintenance, and to removal of catheters when they are no longer needed. This review provides a succinct summary of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and microbiology of CRBSIs and a review of current guidance for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of these infections.

  20. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Frequently Asked Questions about Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is ... an incision above the pubis. What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection ...

  1. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  2. Intracranial arachnoid cysts treated surgically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Junji; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1982-01-01

    Craniotomy and an examination of the maximal extent of extirpation of the cystic membrane were performed under an operative microscope in a series of 30 consecutive cases of intracranial arachnoid cysts. From these clinical features and a histological examination of the membrane, the etiologies of the arachnoid cysts may be divided into three fundamental categories: arachnoid cysts due to local brain atrophy or malformation (Category I), arachnoid cysts due to a malformation of the local arachnoid membrane itself (Category II), and arachnoid cysts due to acquired etiology (Category III). The postoperative reduction rates were investigated by means of a serial CT examination over a follow-up period of from 1 month to 6.5 years (average 2 years) in 27 cases. The postoperative reduction rates of 5 cases were less than 20% (Group A), 15 cases had rates from 30 to 80% (Group B), and 7 cases had rates of more than 90% (Group C). Cases of females, large cysts, round-shaped cysts, and cases with positive mass signs and poorly communicating cysts are revealed by metrizamide CT examination seemed to have a tendency for cystic cavity to be reduced well, judging from the postoperative analysis of the clinical findings. Furthermore, from the standpoint of our hypothesis concerning the etiology of the arachnoid cysts, Group A fit in almost all cases in Category I, though a few cases of Group A who had severe secondary local brain damage were in Category II. Group C fit in Category III in almost all cases, though a few cases of Group C who had minimal local brain damage were in Category II. Cases of Group B were considered to show some changes in the local cerebrum of various degrees in the cases of Categories II and III. (J.P.N.)

  3. Persistent left superior vena cava with thrombus formed in the catheter lumen 4 h after dialysis catheter placed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tomoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oba, Miki; Takada, Megumi; Tanaka, Haruna; Suda, Shin

    2018-02-17

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is one of the most common thoracic venous anomaly and rarely noticed, because it is asymptomatic. However, for nephrologists, it is frequent enough to be encountered while placing hemodialysis catheters through the jugular vein. We report the case of 66-year-old patient with PLSVC presenting intrinsic thrombosis formation 4 h after dialysis catheter placed. Dialysis catheter was placed in the left internal jugular vein without resistance and any complication. PLSVC was detected after dialysis catheter insertion. We decided to remove the catheter, because the patient has other veins in which the catheter can be placed. When it was removed 4 h after catheter placing, thrombus was recognized in the catheter lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography was performed and no thrombus formation was observed in the heart chamber. For patients with PLSVC, if there were other veins in which the catheter can be placed, catheter replacement should be considered.

  4. An ovine model of cerebral catheter venography for implantation of an endovascular neural interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Thomas James; Opie, Nicholas Lachlan; Rind, Gil Simon; Liyanage, Kishan; John, Sam Emmanuel; Ronayne, Stephen; McDonald, Alan James; Dornom, Anthony; Lovell, Timothy John Haynes; Mitchell, Peter John; Bennett, Iwan; Bauquier, Sebastien; Warne, Leon Norris; Steward, Chris; Grayden, David Bruce; Desmond, Patricia; Davis, Stephen M; O'Brien, Terence John; May, Clive N

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Neural interface technology may enable the development of novel therapies to treat neurological conditions, including motor prostheses for spinal cord injury. Intracranial neural interfaces currently require a craniotomy to achieve implantation and may result in chronic tissue inflammation. Novel approaches are required that achieve less invasive implantation methods while maintaining high spatial resolution. An endovascular stent electrode array avoids direct brain trauma and is able to record electrocorticography in local cortical tissue from within the venous vasculature. The motor area in sheep runs in a parasagittal plane immediately adjacent to the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). The authors aimed to develop a sheep model of cerebral venography that would enable validation of an endovascular neural interface. METHODS Cerebral catheter venography was performed in 39 consecutive sheep. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was performed on 13 animals. Multiple telescoping coaxial catheter systems were assessed to determine the largest wide-bore delivery catheter that could be delivered into the anterior SSS. Measurements of SSS diameter and distance from the motor area were taken. The location of the motor area was determined in relation to lateral and superior projections of digital subtraction venography images and confirmed on MRI. RESULTS The venous pathway from the common jugular vein (7.4 mm) to the anterior SSS (1.2 mm) was technically challenging to selectively catheterize. The SSS coursed immediately adjacent to the motor cortex (catheters was associated with longer procedure times and higher complication rates. A 4-Fr catheter (internal lumen diameter 1.1 mm) was successful in accessing the SSS in 100% of cases with no associated complications. Complications included procedure-related venous dissection in two major areas: the torcular herophili, and the anterior formation of the SSS. The bifurcation of the cruciate sulcal veins with the SSS was

  5. Intracranial sewing needles in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanci, Atilla; Ozdemir, Halil Ibrahim; Kazanci, Burak; Kazanci, Dilek Ozturk; Er, Uygur

    2012-01-01

    A 37-year-old patient is reported with intracranial sewing needles, which were located in the right frontal lobe. Both clinical and radiological findings suggested that these needles must have been introduced in infancy before the closure of anterior fontanelle during an unsuccessful homicide. Usually intracranial foreign objects are placed due to penetrating trauma or surgical procedures. Child abuse has been known for centuries. Many types of physical traumas have been reported, especially in Western countries. In Iran, insertion of sewing needles into the brain aiming to kill the infant have been seen in a lot of cases. This situation takes part in a lot of Persian stories. We reported a 37-year-old man who had 2 intracranial sewing needles with unknown etiology.

  6. Endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang; Li Shenmao; Ji Xunming; Miao Zhongrong; Zhu Fengshui; Zhi Xinglong; Ling Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and risk of endovascular treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis. Methods: Twenty seven patients with intracranial venous sinus thrombosis confirmed by CT, MRI, MRV and/or DSA, from 2004 September to 2006 September, were treated with anticoagulant therapy but without response and then followed by multiple modalities including endovascular treatment. Nineteen of them accepted intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombus maceration, another 5 accepted intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical thrombus maceration and intraarterial thrombolysis and the last 3 with stenting. Results: After thrombolysis, symptoms and signs of 23 patients improved obviously and headache disappeared in 18 of them, but with only mild degree in other 5 and no improvement in 3. Twenty one patients among them achieved recanalization of sinuses completely as confirmed on postprocedural angiography, MRI and MRV studies taken prior to hospital discharge and other 3 achieved recanalization of sinuses partly. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment is an effective and safe measure for potentially catastrophic intracranial dural sinus thrombosis. (authors)

  7. Cognitive function in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne Maria; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Forchhammer, Hysse Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department and a terti......OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent and nature of cognitive deficits in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) at the time of diagnosis and after 3 months of treatment. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: Neurological department, ophthalmological department...... and a tertiary headache referral clinic at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: 31 patients with definite IIH referred from June 2011 to February 2013 and included within 1 week of diagnostic intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. 29 patients completed re-examination at the 3-month follow...

  8. Computed tomographic findings of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was a reliable technique to evaluate the exact size and location of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and to predict it's prognosis. Fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and reviewed by CT scan. The following results were obtained. 1. The sex ratio of male to female was 1 to 1.4, The highest incidence was in 6th and 7th decades. 2. The most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage was hypertension (74.6%), followed by the aneurysm (13.5%), arteriovenous malformation (5.1%), occlusive vascular disease (3.4%), and blood dyscrasia (3.4%). 3. The most common location was basal ganglia and thalamic hemorrhage (37.3%), followed by lobar hemorrhage (27.1%), cerebellar hemorrhage (13.5%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11.9%). 4. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage carried the highest mortality. 5. The larger volume of hematoma, the higher the mortality rate.

  9. Prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Jan-Peter A H

    2007-12-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure exerted by cranial contents on the dural envelope. It comprises the partial pressures of brain, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Normal intracranial pressure is somewhere below 10 mmHg; it may increase as a result of traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, Reye's syndrome, hepatic coma, or other pathologies. When ICP increases above 20 mmHg it may damage neurons and jeopardize cerebral perfusion. If such a condition persists, treatment is indicated. Control of ICP requires measurement, which can only be performed invasively. Standard techniques include direct ventricular manometry or measurement in the parenchyma with electronic or fiberoptic devices. Displaying the time course of pressure (high-resolution ICP tonoscopy) allows assessment of the validity of the signal and identification of specific pathological findings, such as A-, B- and C-waves. When ICP is pathologically elevated--at or above 20-25 mmHg--it needs to be lowered. A range of treatment modalities is available and should be applied with consideration of the underlying cause. When intracranial hypertension is caused by hematoma, contusion, tumor, hygroma, hydrocephalus or pneumatocephalus, surgical treatment is indicated. In the absence of a surgically treatable condition, ICP may be controlled by correcting the patient's position, temperature, ventilation or hemodynamics. If intracranial hypertension persists, drainage of CSF via external drainage is most effective. Other first-tier options include induced hypocapnea (hyperventilation; paCO2 < 35 mmHg), hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol, hypertonic saline) and induced arterial hypertension (CPP concept). When autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is compromised, hyperoncotic treatment aimed at reducing vasogenic edema and intracranial blood volume may be applied. When intracranial hypertension persists, second-tier treatments may be indicated. These include 'forced hyperventilation' (paCO2 < 25 mm

  10. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-11-12

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature.

  11. Intracranial meningiomas in the present era of modern neuroimaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intracranial meningioma is the most common primary, intracranial, extra-axial neoplasm. It is mesenchymal in origin and arises from meningothelial cells of arachnoid villi of meninges. Objectives: To re-emphasize the regional anatomic localisation and diagnostic radiological features of intracranial ...

  12. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  13. Cerebral Abcess and Intracranial Empyemas in Children (Francais ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    And in both cases because of brain herniation secondary to severe raised intracranial pressure. We observed no recurrence of pus collection. Neurological sequelae was observed in 8 cases. Conclusion Intracranial subdural empyemas are most common form of intracranial suppurations seen in children in our unit.

  14. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620... pressure monitoring device. (a) Identification. An intracranial pressure monitoring device is a device used for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The device...

  15. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus with Intracranial Calcifications in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: There are numerous causes for intracranial calcification in children. We describe an unusual cause of intracranial calcifications in a child, namely, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Case Report: A 12-year-old boy presented with seizures and developmental delay. MRI of the brain revealed intracranial ...

  16. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  17. Peritoneal catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position to prevent catheter malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyan; Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Xia, Yangyang; Tang, Tianfeng; Wan, Cheng; Shao, Qiuyuan; Liu, Jing; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    Catheter malfunction is the main reason for early peritoneal dialysis (PD) technique failure. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a new surgery technique with catheter fixation to the lower abdominal wall combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position in reducing catheter malfunction. Patients with end stage renal disease who received PD in our centre from January 2013 to December 2015 were involved in this study. They were randomly divided into three groups according to surgical technique: traditional open surgery group, modified open surgery group and modified open surgery with catheter fixation group. All patients were followed up for six months after surgery. Catheter- related complications were analyzed. A total of 152 patients were involved. Among them, 49 received traditional open surgery (TOS group), 49 received modified open surgery (MOS group), and 54 received modified open surgery with catheter fixation (MOS-F group). During follow-up, no patients (0%) in MOS-F group developed catheter malfunction which was significantly lower than that of the TOS group (0 vs 16.33%, P = 0.002). Although not statistically significant, the incidence of catheter malfunction was lower in MOS-F group than that in MOS group (0 vs 4.08%, P = 0.134). No significant difference was observed in the episodes of infection, bleeding, leakage, inflow or outflow pain, hernia and delayed wound healing among the three groups (all P > 0.05). Catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position can effectively prevent catheter malfunction in PD catheter placement. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  18. Primary intracranial leiomyoma in renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyoma, the benign tumor of smooth muscle cell origin, is commonly seen in genitourinary and gastrointestinal tracts. Primary intracranial leiomyoma, however, is extremely rare occurrence. We hereby report a case of Epstein-Barr negative primary intracranial leiomyoma in a middle-aged renal transplant recipient, which mimicked left frontal parasagittal meningioma on neuroimaging. The tumor was completely excised and diagnosis of leiomyoma was clinched on pathological analysis with immunohistochemistry. The patient improved after tumor removal, and no evidence of tumor recurrence was noted on follow-up study after 10 months postsurgically.

  19. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Ramlakhan, BMedSc, MBBCh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial dermoid cysts are congenital tumors of ectodermal origin. Rupture of these cysts can occur spontaneously, but rupture in association with trauma is reported infrequently. The diagnosis of rupture is made by the presence of lipid (cholesterol droplets in the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles. Nonenhanced CT of the head demonstrates multiple foci of low attenuation that correspond with hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI. We present a case of an adult patient with rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst, precipitated by minor trauma.

  20. Intracranial osteosarcoma after radiosurgery. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanno, Naoko; Hayashi, Shinkichi; Shimura, Toshiro; Maeda, Shotaro; Teramoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an intracranial osteosarcoma at the site of previous radiosurgery, manifesting as sudden onset of headache and left hemiparesis with aphasia. She had a previous history of stereotactic radiosurgery for an intracranial tumor under a diagnosis of falx meningioma. Computed tomography showed intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage at the right parietofrontal region. Gross total resection of the tumor with hematoma was performed. The histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma. Sarcomatous change is a rare complication of radiotherapy. This case illustrates that osteosarcoma may develop years after radiosurgery for benign brain neoplasm. (author)

  1. An ultrafiltration catheter for monitoring of venous lactate and glucose around myocardial ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiessen, RG; Tio, RA; Venema, K; Korf, J; Hoekstra, A.

    Early detection of myocardial ischemia is of major importance in critical-care medicine. Changes of lactate or glucose levels in the cardial venous efflux may be useful parameters. We succeeded in integrating an ultrafiltration membrane in a cardiac catheter for continuous sampling. The

  2. Clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Janita; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most frequent health care-associated infection in neonatal units. This study aimed to analyze articles on the clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in neonates. A systematic search was performed for studies published from 1987-2017, without language restriction. Observational studies carried out in neonates with CRBSI diagnosed using catheter-drawn blood samples or catheter tip cultures were included. A total of 412 articles were identified in the databases and 10 articles were included. The 7 studies that evaluated central venous catheter tip cultures and cultures of catheter fragments presented sensitivities ranging from 58.5%-100% and specificities ranging from 60%-95.7%. Three studies that evaluated catheter-drawn blood cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, reported sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 71% when evaluated for the differential time to positivity. When quantitative evaluation was performed, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 99.4%. Most of the studies analyzed cultures from the central venous catheter tip and catheter fragments for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonatal populations. The results of this review suggest that the analysis of the catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, are efficient methods for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonates. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of blood supply to intracranial pathologies in children using MR digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chooi, Weng Kong; Coley, Stuart C.; Connolly, Dan J.A.; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2006-01-01

    MR digital subtraction angiography (MR-DSA) is a contrast-enhanced MR angiographic sequence that enables time-resolved evaluation of the cerebral circulation. We describe the feasibility and technical success of our attempts at MR-DSA for the assessment of intracranial pathology in children. We performed MR-DSA in 15 children (age range 5 days to 16 years) referred for MR imaging because of known or suspected intracranial pathology that required a dynamic assessment of the cerebral vasculature. MR-DSA consisted of a thick (6-10 mm) slice-selective RF-spoiled fast gradient-echo sequence (RF-FAST) acquired before and during passage of an intravenously administered bolus of Gd-DTPA. The images were subtracted and viewed as a cine loop. MR-DSA was performed successfully in all patients. High-flow lesions were shown in four patients; these included vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation, dural fistula, and two partially treated arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Low-flow lesions were seen in three patients, all of which were tumours. Normal flow was confirmed in eight patients including two with successfully treated AVMs, and in three patients with cavernomas. Our early experience suggests that MR-DSA is a realistic, non-invasive alternative to catheter angiography in certain clinical settings. (orig.)

  4. Catheter ablation of epicardial ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Yamada, MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachycardias (VTs can usually be treated by endocardial catheter ablation. However, some VTs can arise from the epicardial surface, and their substrate can be altered only by epicardial catheter ablation. There are two approaches to epicardial catheter ablation: transvenous and transthoracic. The transvenous approach through the coronary venous system (CVS has been commonly used because it is easily accessible. However, this approach may be limited by the distribution of the CVS and insufficient radiofrequency energy delivery. Transthoracic epicardial catheter ablation has been developed to overcome these limitations of the transvenous approach. It is a useful supplemental or even preferred strategy to eliminate epicardial VTs in the electrophysiology laboratory. This technique has been applied for scar-related VTs secondary to often non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and sometimes ischemic cardiomyopathy, and idiopathic VTs as the epicardial substrates of these VTs have become increasingly recognized. When endocardial ablation and epicardial ablation through the CVS are unsuccessful, transthoracic epicardial ablation should be the next option. Intrapericardial access is usually obtained through a subxiphoidal pericardial puncture. This approach might not be possible in patients with pericardial adhesions caused by prior cardiac surgery or pericarditis. In such cases, a hybrid procedure involving surgical access with a subxiphoid pericardial window and a limited anterior or lateral thoracotomy might be a feasible and safe method of performing an epicardial catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory. Potential complications associated with this technique include bleeding and collateral damage to the coronary arteries and phrenic nerve. Although the risk of these complications is low, electrophysiologists who attempt epicardial catheter ablation should know the complications associated with this technique, how to minimize their

  5. [Results of deconstructive endovascular surgery in treatment of large and giant intracranial aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arustamyan, S R; Yakovlev, S B; Shakhnovich, A R; Krasnoperov, I V; Sazonova, O B; Bocharov, A V; Bukharin, E Yu; Belousova, O B; Kaftanov, A N

    To clarify the indications for deconstructive endovascular surgery in patients with large and giant intracranial aneurysms and to evaluate short-term and long-term postoperative outcomes. The study was based on a retrospective analysis of the treatment results in 50 patients with large (15-25 mm) and giant (more than 25 mm) intracranial aneurysms, aged from 18 to 75 years, who were treated at the Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute in 2002-2014. The patients underwent a balloon occlusion test (BOT) in various modifications before stationary occlusion of the carrier artery. For vascular occlusion, we used detachable latex balloon catheters (33 cases) and microcoils (17 cases). The condition of patients in the pre- and postoperative period was assessed by using the modified Rankin Scale. There were no deaths due to occlusion of the internal carotid artery (37 patients). Postoperative complications occurred in 5 patients. On the basis of BOT, revascularization surgery involving placement of an extra-intracranial microanastomosis (EICMA) was performed in 6 cases. In more 4 cases, EICMA was placed in the early postoperative period due to developing signs of ischemia. Two of 7 patients underwent occlusion of both vertebral arteries (VAs) in the vertebrobasilar basin, which led to fatal outcomes. One more patient died of aggravation of brainstem compression after VA occlusion. There was no worsening of neurological symptoms among survivors. There were no deaths and persistent neurological disorders upon occlusion of branches of the main cerebral arteries, starting with the first order arteries (6 patients). Thirty one patients (66%) were followed-up in the period from 1 to 104 months. There were no deaths associated with artery occlusion. Two patients experienced delayed ischemic disorders. Occlusion of the carrier artery should be performed in a carefully selected group of BOT-negative patients. This surgery can be indicated for aneurysms with a complicated configuration

  6. Demographic profile of patients diagnosed with intracranial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Meningiomas are common brain tumours and display gender, racial and ethnic differences in their demographic profile. The demographic profile of our patients diagnosed with intracranial meningiomas is presented and compared with the literature. Objectives: To determine the age, gender, racial and ethnic ...

  7. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, G.; Demaerel, P.; Baert, A.L. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Casselman, J. (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Plets, C. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Haene, I. de (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology)

    1991-04-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. (orig.).

  8. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  9. CONTEMPORARY ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past twenty years we have witnessed a revolution in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular technique and materials have rapidly developed since the approval of Guglielmi detachable coils in 1995 which now allow successful treatment of most aneurysms. The development of intracranial stents and balloons for stent-assisted coiling and balloon-remodeling technique further expanded the spectrum of aneurysms treatable with endovascular technique. For these reasons, the aim of this review was to describe endovascular technique and materials which we use in our daily practice, to show benefits of endovascular treatment and to discus complications of endovascular treatment and surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Endovascular treatment is more comfortable for the patient not only because it is minimally invasive but also because it does not require long hospitalization equal to that after surgical treatment. It is a fact that with further development of endovascular materials, this a procedure will have even a more significant place in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

  10. Calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Bouzas, A. [ENEP Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico (Mexico); Ballesteros-Maresma, A. [Radiologia Clinica de Cuernavaca (Mexico); Casian, G.; Hernandez-Martinez, P. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico S. S. (Mexico); Martinez-Lopez, M. [Fundacion Clinica Medica Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We report calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis. Calcification was observed in the middle cerebral arteries in two patients, and the circle of Willis in two others. The patients with middle cerebral artery calcification underwent CT with inhaled stable xenon and an area of mild hypoperfusion was observed in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere. (orig.)

  11. Intracranial neoplasmin Ibadan, Nigeria | Olasode | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the pattern of histopathological variants of intracranial neoplasms, relative distribution of the variants in the age groups and also to determine the gender differences that exist in these tumours. Design: Case control study. Setting: Department of Pathology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

  12. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) wer...

  13. The Intracranial Volume Pressure Response in Increased Intracranial Pressure Patients: Clinical Significance of the Volume Pressure Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yi; Lee, Ching-Hsin; Lee, Ching-Yi

    2016-01-01

    For patients suffering from primary brain injury, monitoring intracranial pressure alone is not enough to reflect the dynamic intracranial condition. In our previous study, a segment of the pressure-volume curve can be expressed by the parabolic regression model with single indicator "a". The aim of this study is to evaluate if the indicator "a" can reflect intracranial conditions. Patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage, and/or hydrocephalus who had external ventricular drainage from January 2009 to February 2010 were included. The successive volume pressure response values were obtained by successive drainage of cerebral spinal fluid from intracranial pressure 20-25 mm Hg to 10 mm Hg. The relationship between withdrawn cerebral spinal fluid volume and intracranial pressure was analyzed by the parabolic regression model with single parameter "a". The overall mean for indicator "a" was 0.422 ± 0.046. The mean of "a" in hydrocephalus was 0.173 ± 0.024 and in severe intracranial mass with slender ventricle, it was 0.663 ± 0.062. The two extreme intracranial conditions had a statistical significant difference (ppressure-volume curve can reflect the dynamic intracranial condition and is comparable in different situations. A significantly larger indicator "a" with increased intracranial pressure is always observed in severe intracranial mass lesions with cerebral edema. A significantly smaller indicator "a" with increased intracranial pressure is observed in hydrocephalus. Brain computed tomography should be performed early if a rapid elevation of indicator "a" is detected, as it can reveal some ongoing intracranial pathology prior to clinical deterioration. Increased intracranial pressure was frequently observed in patients with intracranial pathology. The progression can be differentiated using the pattern of the volume pressure indicator.

  14. Prediction of intracranial hypertension through noninvasive intracranial pressure waveform analysis in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Matheus Fernando Manzolli; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno Caetano Troca; de Oliveira, Sergio Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Santos

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a noninvasive device to assess intracranial pressure wave form in children with hydrocephalus. A prospective and non-experimental descriptive-analytic study was performed. Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided in four groups: group A, children with clinically compensated hydrocephalus; B, surgically treated hydrocephalus; C, patients with acute intracranial hypertension due to hydrocephalus; and D, children without neurological disease (control). Data were collected through the installation of an extracranial deformation sensor, coupled to the children's scalp, which allowed registration of noninvasive intracranial pressure curves. Parameters obtained were analyzed: P2/P1 ratio, "classification P1 and P2 and P1 slope. P2/P1 index and "classification of P1 and P2" had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100% for predicting intracranial hypertension. "P1 slope" presented no statistical difference. This study showed a useful and noninvasive method for monitoring intracranial pressure, which was able to indicate the intracranial hypertension in children with hydrocephalus and, thus, should be further investigated for clinical applications.

  15. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  16. Complications of central venous stenosis due to permanent central venous catheters in children on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinat, Choni; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Becker-Cohen, Rachel; Feinstein, Sofia; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently used as access for hemodialysis (HD) in children. One of the known complications is central venous stenosis. Although this complication is not rare, it is often asymptomatic and therefore unacknowledged. Superior vena cava (SVC) stenosis is obviously suspected in the presence of upper body edema, but several other signs and symptoms are often unrecognized as being part of this syndrome. We describe four patients with various manifestations of central venous stenosis and SVC syndrome. These sometimes life- or organ-threatening conditions include obstructive sleep apnea, unresolving stridor, increased intracranial pressure, increased intraocular pressure, right-sided pleural effusion, protein-losing enteropathy and lymphadenopathy. The temporal relationship of these complications associated with the use of central venous catheters and documentation of venous stenosis, together with their resolution after alleviation of high venous pressure, points to a causal role. We suggest pathophysiological mechanisms for the formation of each of these complications. In patients with occlusion of the SVC, various unexpected clinical entities can be caused by high central venous pressure. As often the etiology is not obvious, a high index of suspicion is needed as in some cases prompt alleviation of the high pressure is mandatory.

  17. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  18. Treatment delivery platform for conformal catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Titania; Wootton, Jeffery; Hsu, I.-Chow; Diederich, Chris

    2009-02-01

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. This integrated system consists of hardware and software components required for thermal therapy delivery, treatment monitoring and control, and realtime and post-treatment analysis; and interstitial and endocavity ultrasound heating applicators. Hardware includes a 32-channel RF amplifier with independent power (0-25 W) and frequency (5-10 MHz) control for ultrasound power delivery and a 48-channel thermometry system compatible with 0.4 mm OD multi-sensor thermocouple probes. Software graphical user interfaces (GUI) are used to monitor and control both the amplifier and the thermometry system. The amplifier GUI controls, monitors, and records individual channel frequency and power values in real-time; the thermometry GUI monitors and records temperature and thermal dose values in real-time, as well as displaying and allowing dynamic control for temperature and thermal dose target thresholds. The thermometry GUI also incorporates registration of thermocouple positions relative to target anatomy and applicator transducers based on HDR planning tools (CT/MRI/US overlays) for improved treatment control and documentation. The interstitial (2.4 mm) and endocavity (6 mm) ultrasound hyperthermia applicators are composed of linear arrays of 1-4 tubular piezoceramic transducers - sectored at 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360° for single or dual directional heating patterns - that are compatible with plastic implant catheters. QA techniques specific to these catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been devised and implemented, and include rotational beam plots and dynamic force balance efficiency measurements, which are critical to establish applicator performance. A quality assurance test matrix has been devised and used to evaluate and characterize all components of this system

  19. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  20. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  1. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring—Review and Avenues for Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Harary

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial pressure (ICP monitoring is a staple of neurocritical care. The most commonly used current methods of monitoring in the acute setting include fluid-based systems, implantable transducers and Doppler ultrasonography. It is well established that management of elevated ICP is critical for clinical outcomes. However, numerous studies show that current methods of ICP monitoring cannot reliably define the limit of the brain’s intrinsic compensatory capacity to manage increases in pressure, which would allow for proactive ICP management. Current work in the field hopes to address this gap by harnessing live-streaming ICP pressure-wave data and a multimodal integration with other physiologic measures. Additionally, there is continued development of non-invasive ICP monitoring methods for use in specific clinical scenarios.

  2. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring—Review and Avenues for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Rianne G. F.

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is a staple of neurocritical care. The most commonly used current methods of monitoring in the acute setting include fluid-based systems, implantable transducers and Doppler ultrasonography. It is well established that management of elevated ICP is critical for clinical outcomes. However, numerous studies show that current methods of ICP monitoring cannot reliably define the limit of the brain’s intrinsic compensatory capacity to manage increases in pressure, which would allow for proactive ICP management. Current work in the field hopes to address this gap by harnessing live-streaming ICP pressure-wave data and a multimodal integration with other physiologic measures. Additionally, there is continued development of non-invasive ICP monitoring methods for use in specific clinical scenarios. PMID:29401746

  3. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  4. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non-deflating Foley catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Okorie

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Most urinary catheters marketed in developing countries are unidentifiable after unpacking. A catheterization diary is a useful tool for solving catheter-related problems, and its application in health-care facilities should be encouraged. Companies marketing Foley catheters should print the catheter name on both the catheter packaging and on the catheter itself.

  5. Accidental Breakage of Lumbar Epidural Catheter - Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breakage of epidural catheter is a rare occurrence with only isolated reports. Though insertion of epidural catheter is generally considered a safe procedure, breakage during removal leaving a segment in the patient's back can occur. There are many factors associated with breakage of an epidural catheter, such as the ...

  6. Misplaced left internal jugular venous catheter with an exceptional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year in the intensive care units and misplacement occurs frequently. Many critically ill patients require central venous catheterization for multiple and varied reasons. Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheter is one of the most frequent central venous catheters in ...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  8. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bladder. What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Some of the common symptoms of a urinary tract infection are: • Burning or ... catheter is removed. Sometimes people with catheter-associated urinary tract ... these symptoms of infection. Can catheter-associated urinary tract infections ...

  9. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in in...

  10. Intravascular catheter related infections in children admitted on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peripheral venous intravascular catheters uncoated with no antibiotic or antiseptic, was done. Social demographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical examination including the catheter site were determined at enrollment. The children had their blood, catheter tip and hub samples taken off for culture and sensitivity as ...

  11. Catheter associated urinary tract infection: Aetiologic agents and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to identify microbial pathogens associated with bacteriuria and UTI in patients with indwelling urethral catheters and determine their susceptibility patterns to commonly used antimicrobial agents in our institution. Catheter urine and catheter tip specimens of all the patients were analyzed by ...

  12. Severe Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis Related to Tunneled Catheters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient improved after catheter removal and treatment with ceftazidime, vancomycin and amikacin. Another patient who was maintained on chronic HD through a tunneled catheter in the right internal jugular vein presented with a limited infection in the sub-cutaneous tunnel of the catheter that improved after treatment ...

  13. Management of Non- Deflating Foley Suprapubic Catheters - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The procedure described uses a 10 ml syringe and needle passed through the lumen of the catheter to puncture the inner surface of the catheter balloon and thus deflate it. Because the catheter balloon does not burst in this procedure there is no risk of balloon fragmentation or subsequent stone formation. The technique is ...

  14. Dislodgment of Port-A-Cath Catheters in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Lin Ho

    2008-10-01

    Conclusion: The dislodgment rate of port-a-cath catheters in children in our series was 4.1%. Most (83% catheters were broken at the site of anastomosis to the port. All dislodged catheters could be successfully retrieved by transcatheter retrieval using a gooseneck snare.

  15. Cuidados com cateter central de inserção periférica no neonato: revisão integrativa da literatura Cuidados con catéter central de inserción periférica en el neonato: revisión integrativa de la literatura Peripherally inserted central catheter care in neonates: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derdried Athanasio Johann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O cateter central de inserção periférica é tecnologia comum empregada na terapia intravenosa de neonatos. Trata-se de revisão integrativa, cujo objetivo foi investigar e analisar as evidências disponíveis na literatura acerca da temática. As bases de dados pesquisadas foram Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS e Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina dos Estados Unidos (PubMed. Resultados apontam lacunas no que tange à população neonatal; conhecimento insuficiente dos profissionais quanto indicações (n=1; e variados temas sobre uso de anticoagulantes (n=6, comparação com outros cateteres (n=4, diagnóstico por imagem (n=2, dor (n=2, infecção relacionada a cateter e sua prevenção (n=7, entre outros fatores. Conclui-se que há necessidade de atualização profissional, evidências científicas de fácil acesso e publicações nacionais.El catéter central de inserción periférica es una tecnología común empleada en terapia endovenosa de neonatos. Se trata de una revisión integrativa, cuyo objetivo fue investigar y analizar las evidencias disponibles en la literatura acerca de la temática. Se investigaron las bases de datos Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS y la Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina de los Estados Unidos (PubMed. Los resultados expresan omisiones en lo referente a la población neonatal; conocimiento insuficiente de los profesionales al respecto de las indicaciones (n=1, diagnóstico por imagen (n=2, dolor (n=2, infección relacionada al catéter y su prevención (n=7, entre otras. Se necesita de actualización profesional; evidencias científicas de fácil acceso y publicaciones nacionales.The peripherally inserted central catheter is a common technology employed in the intravenous therapy of neonates. This integrative review was performed with the objective to investigate and analyze the evidence available in the literature regarding this

  16. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  17. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  18. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies.

  19. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  20. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were...... (P meningiomas did not differ significantly from those seen with high-grade gliomas or cerebral metastases...

  1. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  2. Intracranial Volume Quantification from 3D Photography

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Liyun; Porras, Antonio R.; Ensel, Scott; Tsering, Deki; Paniagua, Beatriz; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Oh, Albert; Keating, Robert; Rogers, Gary F.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2017-01-01

    3D photography offers non-invasive, radiation-free, and anesthetic-free evaluation of craniofacial morphology. However, intracranial volume (ICV) quantification is not possible with current non-invasive imaging systems in order to evaluate brain development in children with cranial pathology. The aim of this study is to develop an automated, radiation-free framework to estimate ICV. Pairs of computed tomography (CT) images and 3D photographs were aligned using registration. We used the real I...

  3. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  5. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.J. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway))

    1989-04-01

    The signal intensity of a hematoma at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is largely determined by the presence of paramagnetic substances derived from hemoglobin. Depending upon their structure and molecular mobility, paramagnetic substances may shorten the T1 and T2 of surrounding water protons and thus alter the MRI signal intensity and contrast. The article describes the evolution of intracranial hematomas and explains the relationship between the paramagnetic substance present and the result signal intensity at 1.5 T.

  7. electrode catheter techniques for treattnent of supraventricular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    damaged by radiofrequency energy (RP) delivered via catheters insened percutaneously without general anaes- thesia. The technique and results of its use were the main topics of interest at the 9th World Symposium on. Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology held in. Washington, DC, in June 1991. Effective cure of WPW.

  8. Percutaneous Placement of Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The percutaneous placement of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters using conscious sedation with ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance is underutilised and hasseveral advantages over the open surgical and laparoscopic placement methods, especially in the resource-limited developing world. Objectives: To ...

  9. OCCASIONAL REVIEW 'Map and zap' - electrode catheter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where does this leave surgical treatment of WPW syndrome? Despite the high success rates reported, ·it is acknowledged that not all patients can be successfully treated by catheter ablation. The treatment of those with multiple accessory pathways and associated defects such as Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve is ...

  10. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  11. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  12. Placement issues of hemodialysis catheters with pre-existing central lines and catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurshina, Afsha; Hingorani, Anil; Alsheekh, Ahmad; Kibrik, Pavel; Marks, Natalie; Ascher, Enrico

    2018-03-01

    It has been a widely accepted practice that a previous placed pacemaker, automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators, or central line can be a contraindication to placing a hemodialysis catheter in the ipsilateral jugular vein. Fear of dislodging pacing wires, tunneling close to the battery site or causing venous obstruction has been a concern for surgeons and interventionalists alike. We suggest that this phobia may be unfounded. A retrospective review was conducted of patients in whom hemodialysis catheters were placed over a period of 10 years. For each hemodialysis catheter that was placed, perioperative chest X-ray performed was used to evaluate for pre-existing pacemakers and central lines. The position and laterality of placement of the hemodialysis catheter along with presence of arteriovenous fistula with functional capacity for access were noted. A total of 600 hemodialysis catheters were placed in patients over the period of 10 years. The mean age of the patients was 73.6 ± 12 years with a median age of 76 years. We found 20 pacemakers or automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators and 19 central lines on the same side of the neck as the hemodialysis catheter that was placed in the ipsilateral jugular vein. No patient exhibited malfunction or dislodgment of the central line, the pacemaker, or automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator or evidence of upper extremity venous obstruction based upon signs symptoms or duplex exams. Based on our experience, we suggest that placement of hemodialysis catheter in the internal jugular vein ipsilateral to the pre-existing catheter/leads is safe and spares the contralateral limb for arteriovenous fistula creation.

  13. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliopy Matheos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Papilledema has long been considered a hallmark of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a disease defined by elevated intracranial pressure with indiscernible etiology. Papilledema is often seen in the pediatric population, and as such can lead to delays in diagnosis, and often misdiagnosis. Here, we describe three children who were confirmed to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension with raised intracranial pressure by repeated lumbar puncture or intracranial pressure monitoring, normal neuroimaging and absence of papilledema. All three cases had atypical clinical presentations with visual disturbances or photophobia. The patients had a normal body mass index. This case series demonstrates that idiopathic intracranial hypertension can manifest in the absence of clinically obvious papilledema, and has, as such, the potential to cause permanent visual loss if the diagnosis is missed.

  14. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Jirásková

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nada Jirásková, Pavel RozsívalDepartment of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicPurpose: To evaluate retrospectively the features, treatment, and outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH in children.Methods: Nine patients, 15 years and younger, diagnosed with IIH. Inclusion criteria were papilledema, normal brain computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pressure greater than 250 mm H2O, normal cerebrospinal fluid content, and a nonfocal neurologic examination except for sixth nerve palsy.Results: Of the nine patients, eight were girls. Five girls were overweight and one boy was obese. The most common presenting symptom was headache (5 patients. Diplopia or strabismus did not occur in our group. Visual field abnormalities were present in all eyes, and severe visual loss resulting in light perception vision occurred in both eyes of one patient. Eight patients were treated medically with acetazolamide alone, and one girl needed a combination of acetazolamide and corticosteroids. This girl also required optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. Resolution of papilledema and recovery of visual function occurred in all patients.Conclusions: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in prepubertal children is rather uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and management are important to prevent permanent visual loss.Keywords: idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pediatric, treatment

  15. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  16. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  18. Brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Byun, Woo Mok; Cho, Jae Ho; Cho Kil Ho; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Yang Gu [Keimyoung Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Jin [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate brain MRI findings of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. A retrospective review of MRI findings was conducted on six patients with clinically proven spontaneous intracranial hypotension; no patient had a history of previous spinal puncture. Follow-up MRI was available in two patients, and to detect CSF leakage, radio-nuclide cisternography(n=3D5), myelography(n=3D1), and MR myelography(n=3D1) were performed. On contrast-enhanced T1WI, diffuse dural enhancement was seen in all cases, subdural hematoma or hygroma was seen in four cases, pituitary gland prominence in four, dural sinus dilatation in four, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil in two, downward displacement of the iter in one, and suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement in two. In no patient was abnormal CSF leakage found. Although dural enhancement, as seen on MRI, is not specific, diffuse enhancement of the dura mater accompanied by subdural hematoma, hygroma, pituitary gland prominence, dural sinus dilatation, downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsil, or suprasellar and prepontine cistern effacement can strongly suggest intracranial hypotension.=20.

  19. Endovascular treatment for pediatric intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Hebei (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with intracranial aneurysms. From 1998 to 2005, 25 pediatric patients (aged {<=}17 years) with intracranial aneurysm were treated at our institute. Eleven of 25 patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage. In ten patients, the aneurysm was an incidental finding. One patient presented with cranial nerves dysfunction and three with neurological deficits. The locations of the aneurysms were as follows: vertebral artery (VA; n = 9), middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 5), posterior cerebral artery (PCA; n = 4), basilar artery (BA; n = 2), anterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), and internal carotid artery (n = 1). Five patients were treated with selective embolization with coils. Sixteen patients were treated with parent vessel occlusion (PVO). Eight PVOs were performed with balloons and eight were performed with coils. One patient with a VA aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed 4 days after the initial diagnostic angiogram. In three patients treated with stent alone or stent-assisted coiling, one with BA trunk aneurysm died. One aneurismal recurrence occurred and was retreated. At a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months, 96% of patients had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms occur more commonly in male patients and have a predilection for the VA, PCA, and MCA. PVO is an effective and safe treatment for fusiform aneurysms. Basilar trunk fusiform aneurysms were difficult to treat and were associated with a high mortality rate. (orig.)

  20. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-van Marle M Elske

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13 and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13, decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96, but increased significantly in intensive care (IC and coronary care (CC units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17. The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16 and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18 and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96 and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90. The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an existing guideline can lead to better adherence and cost savings. Especially, hospitals which use a lot of urethral catheters or

  1. Método bundle na redução de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada a cateteres centrais: revisão integrativa Método bundle en la redución de infecciones relacionadas a catéteres centrales: una revisión integrativa Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Dane Pereira Brachine

    2012-12-01

    éter con su retirada inmediata cuando posible. La mayoría de los estudios analizados mostraron una reducción significante de infección sanguínea relacionadas o asociadas con catéteres intravenosos centrales.This is an integrative review of literature aimed to identify evidence-based interventions which make up care bundles to reduce central venous catheter-related or associated bloodstream infections. To collect data in Brazilian and international databases were used the key word bundle and the descriptors catheter-related infection, infection control and central venous catheterization, resulting in fifteen articles, after inclusion criteria application. This work showed five interventions as those commonly employed in the bundles methods: hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate for skin antisepsis, use of maximal sterile barrier precaution during the catheter insertion, avoid the femoral access and daily review of catheter necessity with prompt removal as no longer essential. The majority of the studies showed a significant reduction in bloodstream infection related to or associated with central venous catheters.

  2. Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Vittorio; Zanconato, Giovanni; Lonati, Gisella; Baggio, Silvia; Gottin, Leonardo; Polati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia is an infrequent occurrence in the obstetric population. Nevertheless, it is a potentially life-threatening complication. In the majority of the cases, the first clinical symptom associated with intracranial subdural bleeding is severe headache, but the clinical course may have different presentations. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with an acute intracranial subdural hematoma shortly after spinal anesthe...

  3. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  4. Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration......Bidraget diskuterer de forskellige intergrationsopfattelse i Danmark - og hvad der kan forstås ved vellykket integration...

  5. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song

    1986-01-01

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  6. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  7. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma using the improved cubature formula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Lu, Wen

    2010-06-01

    The more accurate calculate method was investigated according to the improved formula of intracranial hematoma using segment deducing. The improved formula was deduced to calculate the intracranial hematoma using the volume formula of the solid geometry. The volume of intracranial hematoma was measured as a related accurate standards using software. The volumes of intracranial hematoma calculated by the improved formula, Tada's formula and the software were compared. The measure accuracy of the improved formula was higher than that of Tada's formula, and showed a similarity with that by using software method. The improved formula method shows a more accurate result than Tada's formula, and can be used in forensic practice.

  8. Diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography for intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, M; Yri, H; Sander, B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space-occupying lesions or other known etiology. It primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes permanent visual loss due to papilledema and secondary....... The diagnostic ability of OCT as a marker of increased ICP (> 25 cmH(2)O) was investigated using multiple regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: OCT elevation diagrams showed that in 60 % of patients newly diagnosed with IIH and in 10 % of patients with long-term IIH, 50...

  9. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Monozygotic Female Twins: Intracranial Pressure Dynamics and Treatment Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polemikos, Manolis; Heissler, Hans E; Hermann, Elvis J; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-01

    Familial cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are exceedingly rare, and its occurrence in monozygotic twins has not been reported previously. We report monozygotic female twins who developed IIH, one at age 25 years and the other at age 28 years. Continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring confirmed elevated ICP as measured initially by lumbar puncture. In both cases, successful treatment with resolution of papilledema and symptoms relief was achieved after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. This report documents the first case of IIH in monozygotic twins and the associated changes in ICP dynamics. Interestingly, almost equivalent alterations in ICP dynamics were found in the 2 patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Indwelling Urinary Catheter-Related Problems After Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuvers, Sarah; Zonneveld, Willemijn; Meiland-van Bakel, Marja; Putter, Hein; Nicolai, Melianthe; Pelger, Rob; Elzevier, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine occurrence rates of catheter-related problems and their association to pertinent clinical characteristics in men with indwelling urinary catheters following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Descriptive, correlational study. One hundred twelve men who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between December 2010 and December 2012 at the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands were included in this study. After surgery, a Charriere 20 (20F) silicone catheter was left indwelling for 1 week. Data were gathered from 2 sources; we reviewed participants' medical records, and participants completed a questionnaire designed for this study. Pearson χ tests were used to analyze associations between dichotomous and ordinal variables and catheter-related problems. Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the relationships between continuous factors and catheter-related problems. Seventy-five percent of participants reported at least 1 catheter-related problem. Univariate regression analyses revealed correlations between body weight and experiencing catheter-related problems (odds ratio [OR] = 1.050; P = .028) and between body mass index and experiencing catheter-related problems (OR = 1.159; P = .049). Indwelling catheter-related problems after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are prevalent, and they may occur at any time during the entire period of catheter use. High body mass index and high body weight were associated with an increased likelihood of catheter-related problems following radical prostatectomy.

  11. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T. [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  12. In vitro analysis of balloon cuffing phenomenon: inherent biophysical properties of catheter material or mechanics of catheter balloon deflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; So, Karina

    2012-06-01

    To investigates the different methods of balloon deflation, types of urinary catheters and exposure to urine media in catheter balloon cuffing. Bardex®, Bard-Lubri-Sil®, Argyle®, Releen® and Biocath® were tested in sterile and E.Coli inoculated urine at 0, 14 and 28 days. Catheter deflation was performed with active deflation; passive deflation; passive auto-deflation; and excision of the balloon inflow channel. Balloon cuffing was assessed objectively by running the deflated balloon over a plate of agar and subjectively by 3 independent observers. Bardex®, Argyle® and Biocath® showed greater degree of catheter balloon cuffing (p deflation was the worst method (p 0.05). Linear regression model analysis confirmed time as the most significant factor. The duration of catheters exposure, different deflation methods and types of catheters tested contributed significantly to catheter balloon cuffing (p < 0.01).

  13. Exploring relationships of catheter-associated urinary tract infection and blockage in people with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; McMahon, James M; Crean, Hugh F; Brasch, Judith

    2017-09-01

    To describe and explore relationships among catheter problems in long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, including excess healthcare use for treating catheter problems. Long-term urinary catheter users experience repeated problems with catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage of the device, yet little has been reported of the patterns and relationships among relevant catheter variables. Secondary data analysis was conducted from a sample in a randomised clinical trial, using data from the entire sample of 202 persons over 12 months' participation. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the sample over time. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were employed for logistic regressions to evaluate predictor variables of the presence/absence and frequencies of catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage. Catheter-related urinary tract infection was marginally associated with catheter blockage. Problems reported at least once per person in the 12 months were as follows: catheter-related urinary tract infection 57%, blockage 34%, accidental dislodgment 28%, sediment 87%, leakage (bypassing) 67%, bladder spasms 59%, kinks/twists 42% and catheter pain 49%. Regression analysis demonstrated that bladder spasms were significantly related to catheter-related urinary tract infection and sediment amount, and catheter leakages were marginally significantly and positively related to catheter-related urinary tract infection. Frequencies of higher levels of sediment and catheter leakage were significantly associated with higher levels of blockage, and being female was associated with fewer blockages. Persons who need help with eating (more disabled) were also more likely to have blockages. Catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage appear to be related and both are associated with additional healthcare expenditures. More research is needed to better understand how to prevent adverse catheter outcomes and patterns of problems in

  14. Utility of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring for Diagnosis of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in the Absence of Papilledema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Kelly J; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by headaches, visual obscurations, and papilledema, and the diagnosis involves lumbar puncture (LP) with an elevated opening pressure (OP) ≥20 cm H 2 0. When papilledema is absent, the diagnosis becomes less clear. Some physicians have argued that the absence of papilledema rules out IIH, whereas others maintain that elevated OP is sufficient for diagnosis. The authors performed a single-institution 4-year retrospective analysis of patients who underwent invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring for presumed IIH. A total of 22 patients were reviewed, and 13 had classic symptoms of IIH, documented elevated OP, and absence of papilledema; 5/13 (38%) patients had proven intracranial hypertension as shown by invasive ICP monitoring, whereas 8/13 (62%) had normal ICP. With the use of current diagnostic algorithms of clinical presentation and elevated OP, over half of patients without papilledema in our series would be falsely diagnosed with IIH, which could result in unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. Thus, elevated OP as determined by LP is insufficient to diagnose IIH. On the other hand, the absence of papilledema does not rule out intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The risk of intravenous thrombolysis-induced intracranial hemorrhage in Taiwanese patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ting Chiu

    Full Text Available The presence of an intracranial aneurysm is contraindicated to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, it is difficult to exclude asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms by using conventional, noncontrast head computed tomography (CT, which is the only neuroimaging suggested before r-tPA. Recent case reports and series have shown that administering r-tPA to patients with a pre-existing aneurysm does not increase the bleeding risk. However, Asians are known to have a relatively higher bleeding risk, and little evidence is available regarding the risk of using r-tPA on Asian patients with intracranial aneurysms.Medical records from the Shuang Ho hospital stroke registration between July 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed, and 144 patients received r-tPA. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms were detected using CT, or magnetic resonance or conventional angiography after r-tPA. The primary and secondary outcomes were the difference in overall intracranial hemorrhage (ICH and symptomatic ICH after r-tPA. The differences were analyzed using Fisher's exact or Mann-Whitney U tests, and p < 0.05 was defined as the statistical significance.A total of 144 patients were reviewed, and incidental unruptured intracranial aneurysms were found in 11 of them (7.6%. No significant difference was observed in baseline demographic data between the aneurysm and nonaneurysm groups. Among patients with an unruptured aneurysm, two had giant aneurysms (7.7 and 7.4 mm, respectively. The bleeding risk was not significant different between aneurysm group (2 out of 11, 18% with nonaneurysm group (7 out of 133, 5.3% (p = 0.14. None of the patients with an unruptured aneurysm had symptomatic ICH, whereas one patient without an aneurysm exhibited symptomatic ICH.The presence of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm did not significantly increase the risk of overall and symptomatic ICH in Taiwanese patients after they

  16. Retrograde epidural catheter relieves intractable sacral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchir Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique.

  17. Percutaneous catheter drainage of tuberculous psoas abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombo, F.; Martin-Egana, R.; Cela, A.; Diaz, J.L.; Linares-Mondejar, P.; Freire, M.

    1993-01-01

    Six patients with 7 tuberculous psoas or ilio-psoas abscesses were treated by CT-guided catheter drainage and chemotherapy. The abscesses (5 unilateral and 1 bilateral) were completely drained using a posterior or lateral approach. The abscess volume was 70 to 700 ml (mean 300 ml) and the duration of drainage 5 to 11 days (mean 7 days). Immediate local symptomatic improvement was achieved in all patients, and there were no procedural complications. CT follow-up at 3 to 9 months showed normalization in 5 patients, 2 of whom are still in medical therapy. One patient, who did not take the medication regularly, had a recurrent abscess requiring new catheter drainage after which the fluid collection disappeared. Percutaneous drainage represents an efficient and attractive alternative to surgical drainage as a supplement to medical therapy in the management of patients with large tuberculous psoas abscesses. (orig.)

  18. Urgent peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis catheter dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, there is a steady incident rate of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who require renal replacement therapy. Of these patients, approximately one-third have an "unplanned" or "urgent" start to dialysis. This can be a very challenging situation where patients have either not had adequate time for education and decision making regarding dialysis modality and appropriate dialysis access, or a decision was made and plans were altered due to unforeseen circumstances. Despite such unplanned starts, clinicians must still consider the patient's ESKD "life-plan", which includes the best initial dialysis modality and access to suit the patient's individual goals and their medical, social, logistic, and facility circumstances. This paper will discuss the considerations of peritoneal dialysis and a peritoneal dialysis catheter access and hemodialysis and central venous catheter access in patients who require an urgent start to dialysis.

  19. Inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertion in hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang-Wen; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Chen, Ching-Huey; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the incidence and rationale for inappropriate reinsertion of urinary catheters and elucidated whether reinsertion is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. A longitudinal study was adopted. Patients aged ≥65 years with urinary catheters placed within 24 hours of hospitalization were enrolled. Data collection, including demographic variables and health conditions, was conducted within 48 hours after admission. Patients with catheters in place were followed-up every day. If the patient had catheter reinsertion, the reinsertion information was reviewed from medical records. Adverse outcomes were collected at discharge. A total of 321 patients were enrolled. Urinary catheters were reinserted in 66 patients (20.6%), with 95 reinsertions; 49.5% of catheter reinsertions were found to be inappropriate. "No evident reason for urinary catheter use" was the most common rationale for inappropriate reinsertion. Inappropriate reinsertion was found to be a significant predictor for prolonged length of hospital stay, development of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and catheter-related complications, and decline in activities of daily living. This study indicates a considerable percentage of inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertions in hospitalized older patients. Inappropriate reinsertion was significantly associated with worsening outcomes. Efforts to improve appropriateness of reinsertion and setting clinical policies for catheterization are necessary to reduce the high rate of inappropriate reinsertion. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Peritoneal dialysis catheter embedment: surgical considerations, expectations, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, John H; Burchette, Raoul J

    2013-10-01

    Peritoneal dialysis catheter embedment consists of implanting the catheter far in advance of anticipated need, with the external tubing buried under the skin. The catheter is externalized when initiation of dialysis is required. Details of the surgical procedure and management of associated complications are generally lacking. A total of 84 catheters including conventional and extended catheters were embedded and externalized during the study period. Factors influencing duration of embedment, functionality upon externalization, and long-term outcomes were analyzed. Mean duration of embedment was 13.9 months (median 9.4; range .5 to 68.5). Immediate function was exhibited in 85.7% of catheters. Employing laparoscopic revision, 98.8% of embedded catheters were successfully used for peritoneal dialysis. Extended catheters and duration of embedment were important determinants of catheter functionality. Catheters can be embedded for prolonged periods and still result in functional dialysis access when needed. Complications are few and easily managed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  2. Recommended Clinical Trial End Points for Dialysis Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allon, Michael; Brouwer-Maier, Deborah J; Abreo, Kenneth; Baskin, Kevin M; Bregel, Kay; Chand, Deepa H; Easom, Andrea M; Mermel, Leonard; Mokrzycki, Michele H; Patel, Priti R; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Shenoy, Surendra; Valentini, Rudolph P; Wasse, Haimanot

    2018-03-07

    Central venous catheters are used frequently in patients on hemodialysis as a bridge to a permanent vascular access. They are prone to frequent complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection, catheter dysfunction, and central vein obstruction. There is a compelling need to develop new drugs or devices to prevent central venous catheter complications. We convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts to propose standardized definitions of catheter end points to guide the design of future clinical trials seeking approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Our workgroup suggests diagnosing catheter-related bloodstream infection in catheter-dependent patients on hemodialysis with a clinical suspicion of infection (fever, rigors, altered mental status, or unexplained hypotension), blood cultures growing the same organism from the catheter hub and a peripheral vein (or the dialysis bloodline), and absence of evidence for an alternative source of infection. Catheter dysfunction is defined as the inability of a central venous catheter to ( 1 ) complete a single dialysis session without triggering recurrent pressure alarms or ( 2 ) reproducibly deliver a mean dialysis blood flow of >300 ml/min (with arterial and venous pressures being within the hemodialysis unit parameters) on two consecutive dialysis sessions or provide a Kt/V≥1.2 in 4 hours or less. Catheter dysfunction is defined only if it persists, despite attempts to reposition the patient, reverse the arterial and venous lines, or forcefully flush the catheter. Central vein obstruction is suspected in patients with >70% stenosis of a central vein by contrast venography or the equivalent, ipsilateral upper extremity edema, and an existing or prior history of a central venous catheter. There is some uncertainty about the specific criteria for these diagnoses, and the workgroup has also proposed future high-priority studies to resolve these questions. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of

  3. Antimicrobial Agents and Catheter Complications in Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sara C; Dzintars, Kathryn; Gorski, Lisa A; Williams, Deborah; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2018-03-01

    Debate about whether certain antimicrobial agents traditionally considered vesicants increase the risk of catheter complications has led to uncertainty in venous catheter placement protocols. To understand whether patients requiring home-based outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) should receive peripheral catheters (e.g., midline catheters) versus central venous catheters, and to understand whether certain antimicrobial agents place home-based OPAT patients at higher risk for catheter complications, we investigated associations between antimicrobial agent(s) and catheter complications. We performed a prospective cohort study of patients requiring home-based OPAT discharged from two urban tertiary care academic medical centers, including telephone surveys and chart abstractions. Multivariable Poisson regressions were used to evaluate: (i) associations between antimicrobial agents traditionally considered vesicants, based on pH or osmolarity, and catheter complication rates, and (ii) associations between antimicrobial agent and rates of catheter complications. Vesicant antimicrobials defined using pH or osmolarity criteria were not associated with an increased rate of catheter complications (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR]: 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89-2.96). Vancomycin was associated with an increased rate of catheter complications, as was daptomycin (aIRR: 2.32 [95% CI: 1.20-4.46] and 4.45 [95% CI: 1.02-19.41], respectively). Staphylococcus aureus infections were also associated with an increased rate of catheter complications (aIRR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.09-4.19), as were midline catheters (aIRR: 9.44, 95% CI: 2.12-41.97). Our study supports recent guidance identifying vancomycin as a vesicant, among a subset of antimicrobial agents, and removal of pH criteria for identification of vesicants. © 2018 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  4. CATHETER DURATION AND THE RISK OF SEPSIS IN PREMATURE BABIES WITH UMBILICAL VEIN CATHETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartojo Hartojo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical catheters are frequently required in the management of severely ill premature babies. The risk of complications may increase with duration of UVC use. Objective: To determine whether the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs and sepsis remained constant over the duration of umbilical vein catheters (UVCs in high-risk premature neonates. Methods:retrospective analysis. The data were collected from the medical record of high risk premature neonates who had a UVC placed in neonatal care unit of Husada Utama Hospital between April 1st 2008 to April 30th 2011 with purposive sampling. Catheter duration was observed before and after 14 days on placement. Blood and UVC culture was performed to establish the risk of CLA-BSIs and sepsis. Chi-square and logistic regression analysis were performed in the laboratorium data. Result: A total 44 high risk premature babies with UVCs were enrolled (sepsis group: n = 23 and non sepsis group: n = 21. Baseline demographics were similar between the groups. 15 babies in sepsis group have UVCs duration > 14 days, and 8 babies have UVCs 14 days show blood culture performance in 11 babies with positive evidence, UVCs culture performance is negative in 18 babies (p = 0.456. Burkholderia cepacia and Klebsiella pneumonia mostly appeared in blood culture performance. 25% of UVC culture performance shows Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Conclusions: The catheter duration have no significant difference in risk of sepsis in premature babies with Umbilical Vein Catheters.

  5. Retrograde prostatic urethroplasty with balloon catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, F.; Reddy, P.; Hulbert, J.; Letourneau, J.G.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplatz, K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors performed retrograde prostatic urethroplasty in 18 patients using a 25-mm urethroplasty balloon catheter. The procedure was performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia. Voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, rectal US, and MRE imaging were performed before and immediately after the procedure and at 2 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Long-term results at 18 months and possible clinical implications are discussed

  6. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  7. Genus zero graph segmentation: Estimation of intracranial volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, w...

  8. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... embryogenetic classifications of intracranial neoplasms in which terms like neuroblastoma, spongioblastoma, astroblastoma and ependymoblastoma were coined to indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). Advances in our understanding of the morphobiology of intracranial neoplasms have ...

  9. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-04

    Apr 4, 2014 ... has been described in young adults and affects predominantly the extracranial blood vessels.2. Intracranial aneurysms in HIV-positive adults are described infrequently. About 22 case reports of HIV-infected adult patients who presented with intracranial aneurysms could be located in the literature. Isolated ...

  10. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension with altered consciousness in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a clinical condition of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without an obvious underlying pathological brain lesion. It is usually characterized by headache, neck pain, vomiting, visual disturbances, papilledema, cranial nerve palsy or a combination of these signs and symptoms.

  11. Mannitol-induced rebleeding from intracranial aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenørn, J; Westergaard, L; Hansen, P H

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented in which rebleeding from an intracranial saccular aneurysm occurred a few minutes after intravenous administration of mannitol during surgery. The relationship between the reducing effect of mannitol on elevated intracranial pressure and the increased pressure gradient across...

  12. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stéphanie; Compter, A; Labeyrie, Marc Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Béjot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Specken-Welleweerd, Jantien; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touzé, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stéphane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  13. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stephanie; Compter, Annette; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Bejot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Welleweerd, Janna C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grand-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touze, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stephane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  14. Intracranial Convexity Lipoma with Massive Calcification: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Tae; Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Intracranial lipoma is a rare entity, accounting for less than 0.5% of intracranial tumors, which usually develops in the callosal cisterns. We report a case of lipoma with an unusual location; in the high parietal convexity combined with massive calcification, and no underlying vascular malformation or congenital anomaly.

  15. Report on the second Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanne Emanuel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report highlights a conference designed for patient education on elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. The conference centered on chronic intracranial hypertension (IH including the latest research and clinical information. It was sponsored by the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation and held at the University of Texas Medical School, Houston, on June 21–22nd, 2008.

  16. THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL ARACHNOID CYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts have been found in 0.3% of computed tomography (CT) scans and in 0.1% of brain autopsy specimens, more often in children than in adults. Intracranial arachnoid cysts occur prevalently in males, on the left side, and in the temporal fossa. Their occasional association

  17. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: initial and follow-up screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, A.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms may rupture, causing subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating subtype of stroke, resulting in death or severe disability in half the patients. This thesis has a focus on initial and follow-up screening for unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and consists

  18. Genetic Determinants of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymani, Abbas; Adams, Hieab H H; Cremers, Lotte G M; Krestin, Gabriel; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for intracranial aneurysms in clinical samples. In addition, SNPs have been discovered for blood pressure, one of the strongest risk factors for intracranial aneurysms. We studied the role of these genetic variants on occurrence and size of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, discovered incidentally in a general community-dwelling population. In 4890 asymptomatic participants from the Rotterdam Study, 120 intracranial aneurysms were identified on brain imaging and segmented for maximum diameter and volume. Genetic risk scores (GRS) were calculated for intracranial aneurysms (10 SNPs), systolic blood pressure (33 SNPs), and diastolic blood pressure (41 SNPs). The GRS for intracranial aneurysms was not statistically significantly associated with presence of aneurysms in this population (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.96-1.40; P=0.119), but showed a significant association with both maximum diameter (difference in log-transformed mm per SD increase of GRS, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02-0.19; P=0.018) and volume (difference in log-transformed µL per SD increase of GRS, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.01-0.41; P=0.040) of aneurysms. GRSs for blood pressures were associated with neither presence nor size of aneurysms. Genetic variants previously identified for intracranial aneurysms in clinical studies relate to the size rather than the presence of incidentally discovered, unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the general population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Unintended Complication of Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, Kee D.; Lim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty (PEN) is a known interventional technique for the management of spinal pain. As with any procedures, PEN is associated with complications ranging from mild to more serious ones. We present a case of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN requiring surgical evacuation. We review the relevant literature and discuss possible complications of PEN and patholophysiology of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN.

  20. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui [Nan fang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tamrakar, Karuna [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-15

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is not benign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes visual loss and severe headache. The aim of this experiment is to examine relapse rate and long-term outcome in IIH patients. The methods involved in this experiment include a prospective...... and comprehensive neuro-ophthalmological examination, including fundus photography, Humphrey visual fields, and measurement of the retinal thickness (RT) and retinal nerve fiber layers (RNFL) by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Relapse was defined as recurrence of either: (1) papilledema or (2) symptoms...

  2. Intracranial Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Beta-Thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi Kai; Wu, Yuan Kui; Tamrakar, Karuna

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  3. Benign intracranial hypertension diagnosed with bilateral papilloedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Phillips

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case of benign intracranial hypertension (BIH diagnosed from the presence of papilloedema. This potentially sight-threatening condition particularly affects younger obese females and can be idiopathic, caused by adverse reaction to certain prescription medications or by systemic disease. Prompt treatment is essentialto avoid optic atrophy and low energy diet and exercise forms part of long-term treatment to avoid relapse. Optometrists can play a critical primary health care role in the detection of papilloedema and referring appropriately.

  4. A case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Sarrami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma which had infiltrated pons, cerebellum and basal surface of left temporal lobe without any visible mass. The patient presented with a sudden loss of consciousness and vomiting. Clinical findings, laboratory tests, imaging and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid tended to establish the diagnosis of an infectious condition than a malignancy. Without any response to the antibiotics and with a progressive deterioration of neurologic and mental condition, the patient died after 20 days. In the autopsy, histological and immunohistochemical study of the brain revealed the diagnosis of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH.

  5. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and transverse sinus stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyrman, Simon; Fytagoridis, Anders; Andresen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and bilateral transverse sinus stenoses (TSS), after presenting with papilledema and decreased visual acuity. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of >60 cm H2O. MRI showed bilateral TSS believed to be asso...... was inserted since the patient had improved with CSF diversion. MRI verified reopening of the venous sinuses after shunt placement, and the patient remains asymptomatic with no signs of relapse after 3 years of follow-up....

  6. Imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, M.K.; Musluman, M.; Kilicoglu, G.; Hakan, T.; Aker, F.V.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the imaging features of unusual intracranial cystic meningiomas in infants and adults. We retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance and computed tomography findings for 2 female patients and 3 male patients, ranging in age from 1 to 73 years (median 41 years), with histopathologically proven cystic meningioma. Although cystic meningiomas usually appear as solid and cystic masses, they may present as a mainly multicystic lesion. The wall of a cystic part of the meningioma may include both enhancing and unenhancing areas at imaging. The cystic portion of a meningioma is hypointense on diffusion-weighted images and markedly hyperintense on corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps. (author)

  7. Secondary Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Gundogan Bozdag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypotension is a clinical condition that characterized by postural (orthostatic headache and low pressure. It apperas with cerebrospinal fluid leak which occurs spontaneous or depending on the secondary attempts. 31 years old female patient which has diagnosis of acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy under spinal anesthesia. postoperative 5.day she admitted with a postural headache, diplopia. Patient was treated with conservative methods after diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to asses an encountered complication after spinal anesthesia which widely applied for surgical procedures with imaging findings and literature.

  8. Intracranial extramedullary hematopoiesis in beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi-Kai; Tamrakar, Karuna; Wu, Yuan-Kui

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) represents tumor-like proliferation of hemopoietic tissue which complicates chronic hemoglobinopathy. Intracranial EMH is an extremely rare occurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a precise diagnosis. It is essential to distinguish EMH from other extradural central nervous system tumors, because treatment and prognosis are totally different. Herein, we report the imaging findings of beta-thalassemia in a 13-year-old boy complaining of weakness of left side of the body and gait disturbance; CT and MRI revealed an extradural mass in the right temporoparietal region.

  9. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to diagnose and distinguish from each other. STUDY AIMS AND METHODS: Patients with PD and MSA and controls were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using tissue...... segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...

  10. MRI diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis (73 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qingyong; Li Xin; He Zhihui; Cheng Chuanhu; Deng Kaijun; Deng Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the MRI features, classification and diagnostic value for intracranial tuberculosis. Methods MRI findings of 73 patients suffering from intracranial tuberculosis proved by pathology or clinic were analyzed respectively. Among the total 73 patients, 39 cases were tuberculosis meningitis, 12 cases simple intracranial tuberculoma, while 22 cases were tuberculoma combining with meningitis. Results: The MRI features of tuberculous meningitis are cerebral infarction, hydrocephalus, abnormal meningeal and cerebral cistern enhancement. 12 cases mature tuberculoma demon- strated typical features with high or low density on T 2 WI images and ring contrast enhancement; 22 cases non-mature tuberculoma showed focal nodular contrast enhancement with evident cerebral edema. FLAIR is more sensitive to find out focus than T 2 WI. Small lesions could be showed definitively by contrast-enhanced scan. Conclusion: MRI possess typical features in the diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis. It plays an important role in evaluating location, range, classification of intracranial tuberculosis, and is helpful to clinical treatment. (authors)

  11. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  12. Planning-free cerebral blood flow territory mapping in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Daniel F; Strother, Megan K; Davis, L Taylor; Fusco, Matthew R; Faraco, Carlos C; Roach, Brent A; Scott, Allison O; Donahue, Manus J

    2017-06-01

    A noninvasive method for quantifying cerebral blood flow and simultaneously visualizing cerebral blood flow territories is vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling MRI. However, obstacles to acquiring such information include limited access to the methodology in clinical centers and limited work on how clinically acquired vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling data correlate with gold-standard methods. The purpose of this work is to develop and validate a semiautomated pipeline for the online quantification of cerebral blood flow maps and cerebral blood flow territories from planning-free vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling MRI with gold-standard digital subtraction angiography. Healthy controls (n = 10) and intracranial atherosclerotic disease patients (n = 34) underwent 3.0 T MRI imaging including vascular (MR angiography) and hemodynamic (cerebral blood flow-weighted arterial spin labeling) MRI. Patients additionally underwent catheter and/or CT angiography. Variations in cross-territorial filling were grouped according to diameters of circle of Willis vessels in controls. In patients, Cohen's k-statistics were computed to quantify agreement in perfusion patterns between vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling and angiography. Cross-territorial filling patterns were consistent with circle of Willis anatomy. The intraobserver Cohen's k-statistics for cerebral blood flow territory and digital subtraction angiography perfusion agreement were 0.730 (95% CI = 0.593-0.867; reader one) and 0.708 (95% CI = 0.561-0.855; reader two). These results support the feasibility of a semiautomated pipeline for evaluating major neurovascular cerebral blood flow territories in patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  13. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  14. [Biodegradable catheters and urinary stents. When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, F; Morcillo, E; López de Alda, A; Pastor, T; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-10-01

    One of the main wishes in the field of urinary catheters and stents is to arm them with biodegradable characteristics because we consider a failure of these devices the need for retrieval, the forgotten catheter syndrome as well as the adverse effects permanent devices cause after fulfilling their aim. The efforts focused in new designs, coatings and biomaterials aim to increase the biocompatibility of theses internal devices. Lately, there have been correct advances to answer the main challenges regarding biodegradable ureteral devices. Thus, modulation of the rate of degradation has been achieved thanks to new biomaterials and the use of copolymers that enable to choose the time of permanence as it is programmed with conventional double J catheters. Biocompatibility has improved with the use of new polymers that adapt better to the urine. Finally, one of the main problems is elimination of degraded fragments and experimentally it has be demonstrated that new designs elicit controlled degradation, from distal to proximal; using stranding and combination of copolymers degradation may be caused by dilution, reducing fragmentation to the last stages of life of the prosthesis. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that biodegradable catheters potentially may cause less urinary tract infection, less encrustation and predictably they will diminish catheter morbidity, since their degradation process reduces adverse effects. Regarding the development of biodegradable urethral stents, it is necessary to find biomaterials that enable maintaining their biomechanical properties in the long term, keeping open the urethral lumen both in patients with BPH and urethral stenosis. Modulation of the time of degradation of the prosthesis has been achieved, but the appearance of urothelial hyperplasia is still a constant in the initial phases after implantation. The development of drug eluting stents, anti-proliferative or anti-inflammatory, as well as biodegradable stents biocoated is a

  15. Double guiding catheters for complex percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shing-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Pin; Lin, Yen-Chen; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Lin, Ming-Shyan; Chang, Chi-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A large-lumen guiding catheter is often used for complex percutaneous coronary intervention-particularly when a final kissing-balloon or 2-stent technique is required. However, catheter insertion is sometimes restricted by diseased vascular access sites or a tortuous vascular route.We report 2 cases in which a unique double guiding catheter technique was used to create a lumen of sufficient size for complex percutaneous coronary intervention. In each patient, two 6F guiding catheters were used concurrently to engage the ostium of 1 target vessel. In 1 patient, these catheters were used for the delivery of 2 balloons to complete kissing-balloon dilation after single-stent placement. In the other patient, the catheters were used to deliver 2 stents sequentially to their respective target lesions. The stents were then deployed simultaneously as kissing stents, followed by high-pressure kissing-balloon postdilation.

  16. Balloon catheter versus basket catheter for endoscopic bile duct stone extraction: a multicenter randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Hisai, Hiroyuki; Yane, Kei; Onodera, Manabu; Eto, Kazunori; Haba, Shin; Okuda, Toshinori; Ihara, Hideyuki; Kukitsu, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Ryusuke; Kitaoka, Keisuke; Sonoda, Tomoko; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Endoscopic bile duct stone (BDS) removal is a well-established treatment; however, the preference for basket or balloon catheters for extraction is operator-dependent. We therefore conducted a multicenter prospective randomized trial to compare catheter performance. We enrolled patients with a BDS diameter ≤ 10 mm and common bile duct diameter ≤ 15 mm. Participants were randomly assigned to groups that were treated with basket or balloon catheters between October 2013 and September 2014. The primary endpoint was the rate of complete clearance of the duct; the secondary endpoints were the rate and time to complete clearance in one endoscopic session. We initially enrolled 172 consecutive patients; 14 were excluded after randomization. The complete clearance rates were 92.3 % (72/78) in the balloon group and 80.0 % (64 /80) in the basket group. The difference in the rates between the two groups was 12.3 percentage points, indicating non-inferiority of the balloon method (non-inferiority limit -10 %; P < 0.001 for non-inferiority). Moreover, the balloon was superior to the basket (P = 0.037). The rate of complete clearance in one endoscopic session was 97.4 % using the balloon and 97.5 % using the basket (P = 1.00). The median times to complete clearance in one endoscopic session were 6.0 minutes (1 - 30) and 7.8 minutes (1 - 37) in the balloon and basket groups, respectively (P = 0.15). For extraction of BDSs ≤ 10 mm, complete endoscopic treatment with a single catheter is more likely when choosing a balloon catheter over a basket catheter.University Hospital Medical Information Network Trials Registry: UMIN000011887. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hong Kil; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyuong; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeun Cha [Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the CT and MRI findings of neurosyphilis. We retrospectively reviewed the CT and MR imaging findings in five patients with intracranial neurosyphilis confirmed by CSF, VDRL, TPHA, and clinical follow-up. MR imaging was performed in all five cases, and CT in two. The MRI and CT findings of intracranial neurosyphilis included infarction (n=3), focal inflammation (n=1) and encephalopathy (n=1). There was a total of ten infaretions : three of the basal ganglia, two each of the frontal lobe, watershed zone, and cerebellum, and one of the occipital lobe. Intaretion was most common in MCA territory (n=9; 50%), followed by the watershed zone (16.6%), posterior cerebral artery territory (16.6%), and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (11.1%). The size of the lesion varied from 1cm to larger than one lobe. One patient showed diffuse high signal intensity in the left temporal lobe, but on follow-up MRI, this had resolved. The most common finding of neurosyphilis, as seen on MRI and CT, was infarction in middle cerebral arterial territory.

  18. Genome screen in familial intracranial aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langefeld Carl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with 1st degree relatives harboring an intracranial aneurysm (IA are at an increased risk of IA, suggesting genetic variation is an important risk factor. Methods Families with multiple members having ruptured or unruptured IA were recruited and all available medical records and imaging data were reviewed to classify possible IA subjects as definite, probable or possible IA or not a case. A 6 K SNP genome screen was performed in 333 families, representing the largest linkage study of IA reported to date. A 'narrow' (n = 705 definite IA cases and 'broad' (n = 866 definite or probable IA disease definition were used in multipoint model-free linkage analysis and parametric linkage analysis, maximizing disease parameters. Ordered subset analysis (OSA was used to detect gene × smoking interaction. Results Model-free linkage analyses detected modest evidence of possible linkage (all LOD Conclusion These data suggest it is unlikely that there is a single common variant with a strong effect in the majority of the IA families. Rather, it is likely that multiple genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the susceptibility for intracranial aneurysms.

  19. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed I Hussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  20. Longterm surgery of posttraumatic intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babochkin D.S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Research objective — studying of consequences of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas in the remote period. Material. The nearest and remote results of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas at 105 patients in terms from 6 months till 3 years are analyzed. During research the anamnesis was studied, neurologic investigation, and also research cognitive functions by means of scale MMSE, the test of drawing of hours, a scale of studying of alarm/depression HADS, learning of 5 words, scale quality of life SF-36. Results. It is established, that in the remote period the condition of the majority of patients gradually improves, at the same time, frequent enough and expressed consequences which are necessary for analyzing with the purpose of optimization of outcomes and the forecast at the given disease are observed. The special attention should be given again developing complications to which it is possible to carry epileptic seizures and behavioral-memorable infringements. Conclusion. Studying of the remote consequences of this heavy kind of craniocereberal trauma allows to optimize results of treatment and to provide complex medical, labor, social and family adaptation

  1. Embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations using tracker catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Yong; Son, Mi Young; Jang, Jae Chun; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    With the recent advance in micro catheters, steerable guide wires, balloons, embolic materials and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), as well as technical refinements in endovascular surgery, there has been a revolution in therapeutic strategies for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have performed super selective angiography and embolization with Tracker micro catheter about 12 cases of brain AVMs for therapeutic and preoperative aims. This micro catheter and guide wire provided high selectivity of feeding artery, greater maneuverability and useful for deliver various embolus materials

  2. Clinical features of catheter-related candidemia at disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Satoshi; Seo, Kazunori; Koga, Ichiro; Kitazawa, Takatoshi; Okugawa, Shu; Ota, Yasuo

    2014-11-01

    Early detection of catheter-related candidemia is necessary to ensure that patients receive prompt and appropriate treatment. The aim of the present case-control study is to investigate the clinical features of catheter-related candidemia at disease onset, so as to determine the clinical indications for empiric antifungal therapy. All 41 cases of catheter-related candidemia from September 2009 to August 2011 at a teaching hospital were included in the present study. To determine the characteristics that were risk factors for developing catheter-related candidemia, we compared all cases of catheter-related candidemia with all 107 cases of catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) caused by non-Candida spp. In comparison with CRBSI due to non-Candida spp., the duration of catheter use was significantly longer in cases of catheter-related candidemia (13.9 ± 9.0 days vs. 23.2 ± 25.2 days). There was also a significant difference in the frequency of pre-antibiotic treatment between catheter-related candidemia and CRBSI due to non-Candida spp. (97.6% [40/41 cases] vs. 44.9% [48/107 cases]). Patients with catheter-related candidemia also had significantly more severe clinical statuses (measured using the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score) than patients with CRBSI due to non-Candida spp. (7.63 ± 3.65 vs. 5.92 ± 2.81). When compared to patients with CRBSI caused by non-Candida spp., patients with catheter-related candidemia had significantly more severe clinical backgrounds, longer duration of catheter use and more frequent prior administration of antibiotic agents.

  3. Non-contrast-enhanced 3D volumetric time-resolved MRA combining PCASL for intracranial vessels. President award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Masami; Tabuchi, Takashi; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Takemura, Atsushi; Obara, Makoto; Takahara, Taro

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic information is required for accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and follow-up examination of numerous cerebrovascular diseases. A recently introduced technique for non-contrast 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)-contrast inherent inflow enhanced multi phase angiography (CINEMA)-provides useful qualitative information on the morphologic and dynamic filling of intracranial vessels and requires no catheter insertion or contrast agent. We propose combining CINEMA with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL). We present a preliminary study of non-contrast time-resolved MRA with time-of-arrival map and discuss its clinical relevance. Studies in all volunteers and patients clearly depicted major intracranial vessels. In patients, CINEMA-PCASL demonstrated the nidus, feeding arteries, and right posterior cerebral artery, and subsequent draining into the superficial venous system was clearly observed with a temporal resolution of 200 ms. Time-of-arrival maps presented the different filling time of every segment vessel in a single colorful image. The expected pattern of delayed transit to more distal vessels is apparent as well as the earlier arrival in central portions of larger vessels. This preliminary study demonstrated the usefulness of the CINEMA-PCASL technique in evaluating the cerebral vasculature. Simultaneous acquisition of high quality temporal and spatial resolutions obviated the need for contrast agent. (author)

  4. Catheter Fracture and Embolization Related to an Arm Venous Port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent E. Burbridge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This 55-year-old female had a chest X-ray during a follow-up visit for the management of her breast cancer. The chest X-ray demonstrated an embolized venous catheter superimposed upon the mediastinum. It was determined that the catheter of the patient's arm port had fractured and embolized to the pulmonary circulation. The catheter was retrieved, in the interventional radiology suite, under fluoroscopic guidance. The patient suffered no ill effects. Subsequently, one day later, the old vein port was removed and a new arm port and associated catheter were implanted to facilitate the delivery of the patient's ongoing chemotherapy.

  5. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Leah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such interventions in the magnetic environment are summarized. Designs for remote control catheter guidance include a catheter tip electromagnetic microcoil design, a ferromagnetic sphere-tipped catheter design, smart material-actuated catheters, and hydraulically actuated catheters. Remote control catheter guidance systems were compared and contrasted with respect to visualization, safety, and performance. Performance is characterized by bending angles achievable by the catheter, time to achieve bending, degree of rotation achievable, and miniaturization capacity of the design. Necessary improvements for furthering catheter design, especially for use in the MRI environment, are addressed, as are hurdles that must be overcome in order to make MRI guided endovascular procedures more accessible for regular use in clinical practice. Conclusions MR-guided endovascular interventions under remote control steering are in their infancy due to issues regarding safety and reliability. Additional experimental studies are needed prior to their use in humans.

  6. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shufeng Li Zheng; Gu Weizhong; Ru Fuming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  7. Design and performance evaluation of collision protection-based safety operation for a haptic robot-assisted catheter operating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linshuai; Guo, Shuxiang; Yu, Huadong; Song, Yu; Tamiya, Takashi; Hirata, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Hidenori

    2018-02-23

    The robot-assisted catheter system can increase operating distance thus preventing the exposure radiation of the surgeon to X-ray for endovascular catheterization. However, few designs have considered the collision protection between the catheter tip and the vessel wall. This paper presents a novel catheter operating system based on tissue protection to prevent vessel puncture caused by collision. The integrated haptic interface not only allows the operator to feel the real force feedback, but also combines with the newly proposed collision protection mechanism (CPM) to mitigate the collision trauma. The CPM can release the catheter quickly when the measured force exceeds a certain threshold, so as to avoid the vessel puncture. A significant advantage is that the proposed mechanism can adjust the protection threshold in real time by the current according to the actual characteristics of the blood vessel. To verify the effectiveness of the tissue protection by the system, the evaluation experiments in vitro were carried out. The results show that the further collision damage can be effectively prevented by the CPM, which implies the realization of relative safe catheterization. This research provides some insights into the functional improvements of safe and reliable robot-assisted catheter systems.

  8. Stent-assisted recanalization of atherosclerotic intracranial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Mee Lim; Dae Chul Suh

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke, and depending on the studied population, it accounts for 8%-15% of all strokes that are due to cerebral atherosclerosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoses seems to depend on the location and extent of intracranial atherosclerosis. Currently, the primary treatment in intracranial atherosclerosis is the control of vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Secondary prevention with antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of subsequent vascular events in patients who have suffered a recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Unfortunately, a significant number of patients with intracranial atherosclerosis continue to suffer from repeated strokes or TIA despite maximal medical treatment. Although endovascular revascularization for symptomatic intracranial stenoses remains at the investigational stage and much of the pertinent information is anecdotal, intracranial angioplasty and stenting are being increasingly performed to treat stenotic lesions. This article reviews basic principles involved in the patient selection, premedication, angio-interventional procedures, angiographic and clinical results, periprocedural complication, patients aftercare. (authors)

  9. Intracranial hypertension prediction using extremely randomized decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Hamilton, Robert; Asgari, Shadnaz; Kim, Sunghan; Hu, Xiao

    2012-10-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation (intracranial hypertension, IH) in neurocritical care is typically treated in a reactive fashion; it is only delivered after bedside clinicians notice prolonged ICP elevation. A proactive solution is desirable to improve the treatment of intracranial hypertension. Several studies have shown that the waveform morphology of the intracranial pressure pulse holds predictors about future intracranial hypertension and could therefore be used to alert the bedside clinician of a likely occurrence of the elevation in the immediate future. In this paper, a computational framework is proposed to predict prolonged intracranial hypertension based on morphological waveform features computed from the ICP. A key contribution of this work is to exploit an ensemble classifier method based on extremely randomized decision trees (Extra-Trees). Experiments on a representative set of 30 patients admitted for various intracranial pressure related conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the predicting framework on ICP pulses acquired under clinical conditions and the superior results of the proposed approach in comparison to linear and AdaBoost classifiers. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracranial structural alteration predicts treatment outcome in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanna; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2018-02-01

    Background Intracranial structural dislocation in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) can be measured by various intracranial angles and distances. We aimed to identify the clinical significance of structural dislocation in relation to treatment outcome in patients with SIH. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we identified patients with SIH who received an epidural blood patch (EBP) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2005 to March 2015. Structural dislocation in pretreatment MRIs of SIH patients was assessed by measuring tonsillar herniation, mamillopontine distance, the angle between the vein of Galen and straight sinus (vG/SS angle), the pontomesencephalic angle, and the lateral ventricular angle. After the first EBP, poor response was defined as the persistence of symptoms that prompted a repeat EBP. Results Out of the 95 patients included, 31 (32.6%) showed poor response. Among the radiological markers of structural dislocation, the vG/SS angle was associated with poor response (49.82 ± 16.40° vs 66.58 ± 26.08°, p = 0.002). Among clinical variables, premorbid migraine ( p = 0.036) was related to poor response. In multivariate analysis, reduced vG/SS angle was independently associated with poor response (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01 - 1.07] per 1° decrease, p = 0.006). In 23 patients who underwent MRI after successful treatment, the vG/SS angle significantly increased after the EBP ( p < 0.001, by paired t-test), while two patients with aggravation or recurrence showed a further reduction of their vG/SS angles. Conclusions Intracranial structural dislocation, measured by the vG/SS angle, is associated with poor response to the first EBP in patients with SIH. Successful treatment can reverse the structural dislocation.

  11. Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Different manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J Nicholas P; Pickard, John D; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-08-01

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each - fatigue and headache - are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations? We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome. We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Topographic Surgical Anatomy of the Parasylvian Anterior Temporal Artery for Intracranial-Intracranial Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Griswold, Dylan; Tabani, Halima; Lawton, Michael T; Mokhtari, Pooneh; Payman, Andre; Benet, Arnau

    2016-09-01

    The anterior temporal artery (ATA) is an appealing donor artery for intracranial-intracranial bypass procedures. However, its identification may be difficult. Current literature lacks useful landmarks to help identify the ATA at the surface of the sylvian fissure. The objective of this study was to define the topographic anatomy of the cortical segment of the ATA relative to constant landmarks exposed during the pterional approach. The temporopolar artery (TPA), ATA, and middle temporal artery (MTA) were examined in 16 cadaveric specimens. The topographic anatomy and key landmarks of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were recorded. The distance between the point of emergence from the sylvian fissure to the lesser sphenoid wing and anterior tip of the temporal lobe was measured. The features of the inferior frontal gyrus relative to each of the arteries at the sylvian fissure were also recorded. The average distances from the lesser sphenoid wing to the TPA, ATA, and MTA were 3.7 mm, 21.2 mm, and 37 mm. The mean distances from the temporal pole were TPA, 14.7 mm; ATA, 32.0 mm; and MTA, 45.4 mm. The differences between the average distances were statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The ATA most frequently faced pars triangularis, whereas the TPA always faced pars orbitalis. The MTA was always found posterior to the junction of pars triangularis and pars opercularis. This article provides topographic evidence for efficient identification of the ATA in the parasylvian space. The key relationship and landmarks identified in this study may increase efficiency and safety when harvesting the ATA for intracranial-intracranial bypass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Totally implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: experience in 500 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Wolosker

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Totally implantable devices are increasingly being utilized for chemotherapy treatment of oncological patients, although few studies have been done in our environment to analyze the results obtained from the implantation and utilization of such catheters. OBJECTIVE: To study the results obtained from the implantation of totally implantable catheters in patients submitted to chemotherapy. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective. SETTING: Hospital do Câncer A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: 519 totally implantable catheters were placed in 500 patients submitted to chemotherapy, with preference for the use of the right external jugular vein. Evaluations were made of the early and late-stage complications and patient evolution until removal of the device, death or the end of the treatment. RESULTS: The prospective analysis showed an average duration of 353 days for the catheters. There were 427 (82.2% catheters with no complications. Among the early complications observed, there were 15 pathway hematomas, 8 cases of thrombophlebitis of the distal stump of the external jugular vein and one case of pocket infection. Among the late-stage complications observed, there were 43 infectious complications (0.23/1000 days of catheter use, 11 obstructions (0.06/1000 days of catheter use and 14 cases of deep vein thrombosis (0.07/1000 days of catheter use. Removal of 101 catheters was performed: 35 due to complications and 66 upon terminating the treatment. A total of 240 patients died while the catheter was functioning and 178 patients are still making use of the catheter. CONCLUSION: The low rate of complications obtained in this study confirms the safety and convenience of the use of totally implantable accesses in patients undergoing prolonged chemotherapy regimes.

  14. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  15. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Cheng, Henrich; Ko, Chin-Chu

    2012-11-01

    A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs) yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH). Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient's headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage). Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. 'Integration'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2011-01-01

    , while the countries have adopted disparate policies and ideologies, differences in the actual treatment and attitudes towards immigrants and refugees in everyday life are less clear, due to parallel integration programmes based on strong similarities in the welfare systems and in cultural notions...

  17. Management of raised intracranial pressure and hyperosmolar therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropper, Allan H

    2014-06-01

    The management of raised intracranial pressure is undergoing rapid change. The choice of medical treatments to reduce intracranial pressure varies between institutions and regions of the world. The mainstay of therapy, however, continues to be the infusion of a hyperosmolar solution to achieve an osmotic gradient to force the exit of water from the brain. This review introduces the basic concepts of raised intracranial pressure, summarises several recent studies that have challenged dogma in the field, and provides practical advice on hyperosmolar treatment, based on personal experience and a critical reading of the literature.

  18. Natriuretic pro-peptides in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren Cecilie Kloppenbor; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Natriuretic peptides may be involved in intracranial pressure regulation, but cerebrospinal fluid (CNS) and plasma concentrations in this disorder are unknown. We evaluated venous and intrathecal concentrations of ANP, BNP...... and CNP precursor peptides in 40 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 20 controls. Natriuretic pro-peptides were quantitated using processing-independent assays. In CSF, no differences in peptide concentrations between patients and controls were found (proANP: 239 + or - 23 vs 231...

  19. A Case Of Ollier′s Disease With Intracranial Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharthan Neeraj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of multiple enchondromas is known as Ollier′s disease. Enchondromas are benign tumours of hyaline cartilage arising within the medullary cavity of tubular bones. We are reporting the case of a 16 year old girl with Ollier′s disease who presented with seizures and brainstem compression. A MRI scan of brain showed an intracranial space-occupying lesion in the region of clivus. The intracranial tumour was surgically removed and the histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of enchondroma. Intracranial enchondroma is an extremely rare situation and reported for the first time from south India.

  20. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma volume by personal computer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Wanping; Tan, Lihua; Zhai, Ning; Zhou, Shunke; Wang, Rui; Xue, Gongshi; Xiao, An

    2011-01-01

    To explore the method for intracranial hematoma volume measurement by the personal computer. Forty cases of various intracranial hematomas were measured by the computer tomography with quantitative software and personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software, respectively. the data from the 2 methods were analyzed and compared. There was no difference between the data from the computer tomography and the personal computer (P>0.05). The personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software can measure the volume of various intracranial hematomas precisely, rapidly and simply. It should be recommended in the clinical medicolegal identification.

  1. Bedside Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in the Identification of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Suspected Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazuzta, Jose E; Brown, Martha E; Akhtar, Javed

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the bedside assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could identify elevated intracranial pressure in individuals with suspected idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This was a single-center, prospective, rater-blinded study performed in a freestanding pediatric teaching hospital. Patients aged 12 to 18 years scheduled for an elective lumbar puncture with the suspicion of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were eligible to participate. Optic nerve sheath diameter was measured via ultrasonography before performing a sedated lumbar puncture for measuring cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure. Abnormal measurements were predefined as optic nerve sheath diameter ≥4.5 mm and a cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure greater than 20 cmH2O. Thirteen patients participated in the study, 10 of whom had elevated intracranial pressure. Optic nerve sheath diameter was able to predict or rule out elevated intracranial pressure in all patients. Noninvasive assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could help to identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure when idiopathic intracranial hypertension is suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracranial Infectious Aneurysm in Orbital Cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm and cavernous sinus thrombosis are rare complications of orbital cellulitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old male presenting with sinusitis and orbital cellulitis complicated by the development of an orbital mass. Following orbitotomy with debulking, the patient underwent bony orbital decompression for increasing proptosis postoperatively. While his exam stabilized, the patient developed complete ptosis and extraocular motor palsy in the contralateral eye after undergoing bilateral sinus debridement. Imaging was notable for the presence of a pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery, which was treated with a stent. This report demonstrates rare complications of orbital cellulitis. These patients should be monitored carefully with noninvasive imaging studies, such as cerebral angiography, for early detection of vascular abnormalities that can progress rapidly.

  3. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  4. Intracranial developmental venous anomaly: is it asymptomatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, A Bolívar; de Asís Bravo Rodríguez, F; Bravo Rey, I; Romero, E Roldán

    2018-03-16

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies are the most common vascular malformation. In the immense majority of cases, these anomalies are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, and they are considered benign. Very exceptionally, however, they can cause neurological symptoms. In this article, we present three cases of patients with developmental venous anomalies that presented with different symptoms owing to complications derived from altered venous drainage. These anomalies were located in the left insula, right temporal lobe, and cerebellum. The exceptionality of the cases presented as well as of the images associated, which show the mechanism through which the symptoms developed, lies in the low incidence of symptomatic developmental venous anomalies reported in the literature. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracranial Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Young Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Prasan Kumar; Mavidi, Sunil Kumar; Wig, Naveet; Garg, Ajay; Nalwa, Aasma; Sharma, M C

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial aspergillosis (ICA) is very rare in the immunocompetent individuals, usually misdiagnosed as a tumor or an abscess. A high index of clinical suspicion is required in patients who present with focal neurological deficits, headache, or seizures. We report the case of a 25-year-old immunocompetent female, who presented with a 15-month history of headache, seizures, left-sided proptosis and ophthalmoplegia, and right hemiparesis. Recovery from the symptoms and decrease in the lesion size seen on the radiological assessment were achieved through two decompressive craniotomies followed by prolonged combined systemic antifungal therapies. Although the initial neuroimaging suggested a mitotic pathology, the surgical sample confirmed ICA. Now the patient is on single antifungal therapy (Tab. voriconazole, 200 mg twice daily) and doing her daily activities, but with a reduced intelligent quotient. We report a challenging case of ICA where multiple courses of combined antifungal therapies and repeat surgeries paved the way for a good prognosis.

  6. Endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, A; Nepper-Rasmussen, J

    2011-01-01

    to large aneurysms (> 3 mm). However the data also suggest that endovascular treatment of very small aneurysms might be associated with an increased risk of procedural ruptures and mortality. At nine-month follow-up results indicate significantly less compaction in the very small aneurysms....... endovascular treatment was attempted in 956 consecutive intracranial aneurysms. Of 956 aneurysms, 111 aneurysms were very small aneurysms with a maximal diameter of 3 mm or less. We conducted a retrospective analysis of angiographic and clinical outcome following coiling of very small aneurysms...... aneurysms and less than 90% aneurysm occlusion in six aneurysms. Complications occurred in the treatment of 15 aneurysms, including eight procedural ruptures, six thromboembolic events and one case of early hemorrhage. Compared with larger aneurysms, treatment of very small aneurysms was associated...

  7. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, M.; Uozumi, T.; Kiya, K.; Mukada, K.; Arita, K.; Kurisu, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Onda, J.; Satoh, H.; Ikawa, F.; Migita, K.

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  8. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author)

  9. Intracranial calcification on paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.; Cavanagh, N.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the computed tomograms of 18000 children examined consecutively form the basis of an assessment of the diagnostic significance of intracranial calcification. The low incidence of physiological calcification in the pineal and choroid of about 2% up to the age of 8 years, but increasing 5-fold by the age of 15 years, is confirmed. Pathological calcification occurred in 1.6%, the commonest causes being neoplasms (43%), neuroectodermal syndromes (20%) and infections (12%). Diffuse basal ganglia calcification (15%) bore little relation to the diverse clinical symptomatology, and routine bio-chemical studies showed a disorder of metabolism to be present in only 6 cases. Calcification has not been previously noted in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, Pertussis or Cocksackie encephalitis, infantile neuraxonal dystrophy, Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome or in the basal ganglia in neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  10. Converging intracranial markers of conscious access.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaillard

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms, accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access.

  11. Imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shuilian; Man Yuping; Ma Longbai; Liu Ying; Wei Qiang; Zhu Youkai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the imaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFT). Methods: Ten patients with ISFT proven histopathologically were collected. Four cases had CT data and all cases had MR data. The imaging features and pathological results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All cases were misdiagnosed as meningioma at pre-operation. All lesions arose from intracranial meninges including 5 lesions above the tentorium, 4 lesions beneath the tentorium and 1 lesion growing around the tentorium. The margins of all the masses were well defined, and 8 lesions presented multilobular shape. CT demonstrated hyerattenuated masses in all 4 lesions, smooth erosion of the basicranial skull in 1 lesion, and punctiform calcification of the capsule in 1 lesion. T 1 WI showed most lesions with isointense or slight hyperintense signals including homogeneous in 4 lesions and heterogeneous in 6 lesions. T 2 WI demonstrated isointense or slight hyperintense in 2 lesions, mixed hypointense and hyperintense signals in 4, cystic portion in 2, and two distinct portion of hyperintense and hypointense signal, so called 'yin-yang' pattern, in 2. Strong enhanced was found in all lesions, especially in 8 lesion with heterogeneous with the low T 2 signal. 'Dural tail' was found in 4 lesions. Conclusions: ISFI has some specific CT and MR features including heterogeneous signal intensity on T 2 WI, strong enhancement of areas with low T 2 signal intensity, slight or no 'dural tail', without skull thickening, and the typical 'yin-yang' pattern. (authors)

  12. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Andrea; Benner, Jan; Reinhardt, Julia; De Vere-Tyndall, Anthony; Stieltjes, Bram; Hainc, Nicolin; Stippich, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting. A structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: "congruent," "partially congruent," "incongruent," or "not mentioned in free-style report." Tumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17) with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7-43% per item). Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12-17:06 min). First results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the case for free text reporting. A mean reporting time of 8

  13. Intracranial pressure changes during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazen, Mehran; Alazmani, Ali; Rafferty, Katherine; Liu, Zi-Jun; Gustafson, Jennifer; Cunningham, Michael L; Fagan, Michael J; Herring, Susan W

    2016-01-04

    During early stages of postnatal development, pressure from the growing brain as well as cerebrospinal fluid, i.e. intracranial pressure (ICP), load the calvarial bones. It is likely that such loading contributes to the peripheral bone formation at the sutural edges of calvarial bones, especially shortly after birth when the brain is growing rapidly. The aim of this study was to quantify ICP during mouse development. A custom pressure monitoring system was developed and calibrated. It was then used to measure ICP in a total of seventy three wild type mice at postnatal (P) day 3, 10, 20, 31 and 70. Retrospectively, the sample in each age group with the closest ICP to the average value was scanned using micro-computed tomography to estimate cranial growth. ICP increased from 1.33±0.87mmHg at P3 to 1.92±0.78mmHg at P10 and 3.60±1.08mmHg at P20. In older animals, ICP plateaued at about 4mmHg. There were statistically significant differences between the ICP at the P3 vs. P20, and P10 vs. P20. In the samples that were scanned, intracranial volume and skull length followed a similar pattern of increase up to P20 and then plateaued at older ages. These data are consistent with the possibility of ICP being a contributing factor to bone formation at the sutures during early stages of development. The data can be further used for development and validation of computational models of skull growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We report the clinical and angiographic results of endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Over a three-year period, 80 unruptured aneurysms in 74 patients were electively treated with endovascular management. One aneurysm was diagnosed during investigations for a second ruptured aneurysm, 54 aneurysms were incidentally discovered, 18 aneurysms presented with symptoms of mass effect and seven aneurysms presented with symptoms of brain stem ischemia. Mean size of the 80 unruptured aneurysms was 12.5±8.0 mm (range, 2-39 mm). Thirty-six aneurysms (45%) were small (<10 mm), 38 aneurysms (47.5%) were large (10-25 mm), and six aneurysms (7.5%) were giant (25-39 mm). Forty-eight wide-necked aneurysms (60%) were coiled with the aid of a supporting device. The mortality rate was 1.25%, and the overall morbidity was 1.25%. Of these, one of the patients suffered a stroke, leading to severe disability (1.25%). In one patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in death. Initial aneurysm occlusion was complete (100%) in 76.25% aneurysms, nearly complete (90%-98%) in 10% aneurysms and incomplete (60%-85%) in 13.75% aneurysms. Follow-up angiography was available in 67 patients with 73 treated aneurysms (91.25%) from one to 36 months (mean 9.3 months); partial reopening occurred in 7.5%, mainly large and giant aneurysms (5.5%). Additional coiling was performed in four aneurysms. There were no complications in additional treatments. At 14.1-month clinical follow-up (range, 2 to 36 months), mRS score was 0 in 78.75% patients, 1 in 10% patients, 2 in 8.75% and 3 in 1.25%. There was no aneurysmal rupture during the follow-up period. Endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms has low procedural mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:22192544

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoroki, Koji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Kadota, Koki; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kanemaru, Reizou; Fujimoto, Toshirou; Yamamoto, Kunimitsu

    1987-12-01

    A sequential MR scan was performed on 21 patients with intracranial hematoma, and simultaneously the T/sub 1/ values of the hematomas were calculated. The T/sub 1/ value of a hematoma was found to be longer than that of the white matter in the acute phase, but it soon becomes as short as that of the white matter (7 - 10 day after). After several days, the T/sub 1/ value again gradually becomes longer. In the experiment, 30 ml of fresh blood (15 samples) were stored at room temperature, and a sequential MR scan and the calculation of the T/sub 1/ were performed over a period of 20 days. In vitro, most of the T/sub 1/ values were long, but there was much variation on the first day. A shortening of the T/sub 1/ was observed as well in vivo, and after this shortening, no prolongation of the T/sub 1/ was observed. Perhaps the shortening of T/sub 1/ was caused by the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin and by the coagulation of the blood. The lysis and absorption of the hematoma may, on the other hand, cause the prolongation of the T/sub 1/ in vitro. For the diagnosis of intracranial hematoma, CT was found to be a method superior to MRI, especially in the acute phase. However, MRI gives us more information about hematoma (concerning the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, the lysis and absorption of the hematoma, the range of hemorrhagic tissue and edema, etc.) than does CT. An IR (T/sub 1/-weighted) image shows a good contrast between the hematoma and the surrounding tissue (hemorrhagic tissue, edema) in the early phase. On the other hand, the SE (T/sub 2/-weighted) image informs us of the lesion when the hematoma is low approx. isodense on the CT in the chronic phase.

  16. Noninvasive assessment of intracranial elastance and pressure in spontaneous intracranial hypotension by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Tung, Hsin; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Hsian-Min; Pan, Kuan-Jung; Cheng, Da-Chuan; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Chai, Jyh-Wen; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2018-02-13

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is often misdiagnosed, and can lead to severe complications. Conventional MR sequences show a limited ability to aid in this diagnosis. MR-based intracranial pressure (MR-ICP) may be able to detect changes of intracranial elastance and pressure. To determine whether MR-ICP is able to differentiate SIH patients from normal subjects, improve diagnostic sensitivity, and provide an insight into the pathophysiology. Prospective. Twenty-eight SIH cases with orthostatic headache and 20 healthy volunteers. Cine phase-contrast MRI on a 1.5T scanner. Intracranial elastance (IE) was derived from the ratio of the peak-to-peak cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure gradient (PG csf-pp ) and intracranial volume change, obtained by summing all flows before each sequential cardiac frame. Student's t-test was used to compare the MR-ICP indexes and flow parameters between SIH patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The SIH patients with cervical epidural venous dilatation (EVD) had an IE of 0.121 ± 0.027 mmHg/cm/ml, significantly higher than that of the normal volunteers (0.085 ± 0.027 mmHg/cm/ml; P = 0.002). In contradistinction, the EVD-negative SIH patients, including four with no sign of CSF leaks, had significantly lower IE (0.055 ± 0.012 mmHg/cm/ml) compared with the normal volunteers and the EVD-positive group (P = 0.001, P < 0.001). The EVD-negative patients had significantly lower PG csf-pp (0.024 ± 0.007 mmHg/cm) compared with the normal volunteers and the EVD-positive group (0.035 ± 0.011 mmHg/cm, 0.040 ± 0.010 mmHg/cm; P = 0.003, P < 0.001). Additionally, the MRI flow study showed a significant decrease in transcranial inflow and outflow of SIH patients (P < 0.01). We found that the MR-ICP method is potentially more sensitive than morphological MRI in the early diagnosis of SIH. Also, contrary to common belief, our results suggest that an abnormal craniospinal elastance

  17. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  18. Prevention of catheter-related blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections are a morbid complication of central venous catheters. This review will highlight a comprehensive approach demonstrated to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. Elements of prevention important to inserting a central venous catheter include proper hand hygiene, use of full barrier precautions, appropriate skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine, and using the subclavian vein as the preferred anatomic site. Rigorous attention needs to be given to dressing care, and there should be daily assessment of the need for central venous catheters, with prompt removal as soon as is practicable. Healthcare workers should be educated routinely on methods to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. If rates remain higher than benchmark levels despite proper bedside practice, antiseptic or antibiotic-impregnated catheters can also prevent infections effectively. A recent program utilizing these practices in 103 ICUs in Michigan resulted in a 66% decrease in infection rates. There is increasing recognition that a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections can prevent most infections, if not all. This suggests that thousands of infections can potentially be averted if the simple practices outlined herein are followed.

  19. Safety and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Klitfod, Lotte; Broholm, R

    2012-01-01

    To describe the background for--and mechanism of--catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) accessed via the popliteal vein. Focus is on safety and efficacy.......To describe the background for--and mechanism of--catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) accessed via the popliteal vein. Focus is on safety and efficacy....

  20. Diagnosis of intra vascular catheter-related infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicalini, S; Palmieri, F; Noto, P; Boumis, E; Petrosillo, N

    2002-01-01

    The use of central vascular catheters (CVC) is associated with a substantial number of complications, amongst which infections predominate. A diagnosis of CVC-related infection usually requires catheter removal for culture. Semiquantitative (roll-plate method) and quantitative methods (flush, vortex, centrifugation or sonication methods) are the most reliable diagnostic methodologies requiring catheter removal, because of their greater specificity. The roll-plate method is the simplest and most commonly used technique. This method only samples the external surface of the catheter, and is particularly indicated for recently inserted catheters in which extraluminal colonisation is the primary mechanism of infection. Luminal culture techniques, such as the quantitative methods, may be more relevant for catheters that have been in place for a long period of time. However, in up to 85% of removed CVC the culture is negative, and other diagnostic techniques that do not require catheter removal have been proposed, including paired quantitative blood cultures, endoluminal brushing, and differential time to positivity (DTP) of paired blood cultures. DTP, that compares the time to positivity for qualitative cultures of blood samples simultaneously drawn from the CVC and a peripheral vein, appears to be the most reliable in the routine clinical practice since many hospitals use automatic devices for qualitative blood culture positivity detection. More recently catheter-sparing direct diagnostic methods, which include Gram stain and acridin-orange leucocyte cytospin (AOLC) test, appeared to be especially useful because of the rapidity of results and the ability to distinguish different microorganisms, allowing early targeted antimicrobial therapy.

  1. Risk factors for peritoneal dialysis catheter failure in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC) failure still remains a common clinical problem in pediatric patients despite advancements in catheter placement and dialysis techniques. Our aim was to determine the risk factors that may lead to PDC failure, especially those factors that could be potentially modified to ...

  2. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  3. Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection In A Tetiary Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of indwelling catheter creates an inherent risk for infection. Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) comprise perhaps the largest institutional reservoir of nosocomial antibiotic resistant pathogens. This could lead to complications such as pyelonephritis and bacteraemia. Objective: To ...

  4. Cognitive Skills in Catheter-based Cardiovascular Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Boshuizen, Els; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Boshuizen, H. P. A., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012). Cognitive skills in catheter-based cardiovascular interventions. In P. Lanzer (Ed.), Catheter-based cardiovascular interventions (pp. 69-86). Berlin, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-27676-7_7

  5. Indwelling Urethral Catheter Self-Care Preparedness Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: These subjects were not properly assessed and assigned appropriate systems of nursing care. Nurses need to be clear about the content of their patient teaching in catheter care and assume full responsibility in teaching them. Key words: Indwelling urethral catheter, Self-care, Preparedness. [Jnl of College of ...

  6. A prototype catheter designed for ultraviolet C disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Begovic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    UVC light exposure, sampling and plate counting. Findings Two minutes of UVC exposure was sufficient to obtain 4 log10 disinfection for the full-length prototype catheter. This exposure corresponds to ∼40 mJ/cm2 at the catheter tip and indicates that even shorter exposure times can be achieved...

  7. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated ...

  8. Coronary artery angioplasty with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurbel, PA; Anderson, RD; vanBoven, AJ; denHeijer, P

    The initial in-hospital and long-term clinical experience with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter in the treatment of coronary artery disease is reported, This new catheter design allows blood to flow passively around the inflated balloon through a protected helical channel molded into the

  9. Unusual migration of ventriculo peritoneal distal catheter into vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sghavamedin Tavallaee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available VP shunt is one of the most popular methods for ICP reduction and treatment of hydrocephalus. Various complications of this method are not uncommon such as shunt malfunction, infection and unusual migration of distal catheter. I present a case of migration of the peritoneal catheter out of the vagina.

  10. Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs include umbilical venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and tunneled catheters. CRBSI is defined as a laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI with either a positive catheter tip culture or a positive blood culture drawn from the CVC. BSIs most frequently result from pathogens such as gram-positive cocci, coagulase-negative staphylococci , and sometimes gram-negative organisms. CRBSIs are usually associated with several risk factors, including prolonged catheter placement, femoral access, low birth weight, and young gestational age. Most NICUs have a strategy for catheter insertion and maintenance designed to decrease CRBSIs. Specific interventions slightly differ between NICUs, particularly with regard to the types of disinfectants used for hand hygiene and appropriate skin care for the infant. In conclusion, infection rates can be reduced by the application of strict protocols for the placement and maintenance of CVCs and the education of NICU physicians and nurses.

  11. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jung Suk; Lee, Hae Giu; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6–20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6–38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5–14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10–58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites

  12. [Interventional catheter treatment of tricuspid valve regurgitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wißt, T; Kreidel, F; Schlüter, M; Kuck, K-H; Frerker, C

    2017-11-01

    The tricuspid valve can be considered the "forgotten" valve because in the past hardly any research has been conducted in this field and as a result only few therapeutic options existed. The prognosis of untreated tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is poor and mortality is high for patients with severe TR. Patients frequently return to medical practices and hospitals because of cardiac decompensation, with shortness of breath and leg edema. Recent years have seen more development in catheter-based treatment options. Currently, several devices are in clinical evaluation, which are presented in this article. A web-based literature search was carried out and information was gathered at international cardiology meetings (TCT 2016 in Washington, DGK 2017 in Mannheim, EuroPCR 2017 in Paris). There are various options for interventional catheter procedures for TR, which are being investigated within the scope of clinical studies. Most aim at reducing the tricuspid annular diameter and optimizing leaflet coaptation. Because of these new therapy options patients can now be treated who were considered untreatable in the past because of the high perioperative mortality.

  13. Monitoring Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forleo, Giovanni B; Casella, Michela; Russo, Antonio Dello; Moltrasio, Massimo; Fassini, Gaetano; Tesauro, Manfredi; Tondo, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Although catheter ablation is an effective treatment for recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF), there is no consensus on the definition of success or follow-up strategies. Symptoms are the major motivation for undergoing catheter ablation in patients with AF, however it is well known that reliance on perception of AF by patients after AF ablation results in an underestimation of recurrence of the arrhythmia. Because symptoms of AF occurrence may be misleading, a reliable assessment of rhythm outcome is essential for the definition of success in both clinical care and research trials. Continuous rhythm monitoring over long periods of time is superior to intermittent recording using external monitors to detect the presence of AF episodes and to quantify the AF burden. Today, new devices implanted subcutaneously using a minimally invasive technique have been developed for continuous AF monitoring. Implantable devices keep detailed information about arrhythmia recurrences and might allow identification of very brief episodes of AF, the significance of which is still uncertain. In particular, it is not known whether there is any critical value of daily AF burden that has a prognostic significance. This issue remains an area of active discussion, debate and investigation. Further investigation is required to determine if continuous AF monitoring with implantable devices is effective in reducing stroke risk and facilitating maintenance of sinus rhythm after AF ablation.

  14. Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy for thoracic deep vein thrombosis is safe and effective in selected patients with and without cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Marchal, Pieter; Heye, Sam; Vaninbroukx, Johan [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Palmers, Marleen [Sint-Trudo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sint-Truiden (Belgium); Verhamme, Peter; Verhaeghe, Raymond [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Vascular Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis for thoracic central venous thrombosis in both cancer and non-cancer patients. A retrospective case series of 68 patients, including 35 with active cancer and 33 without cancer, was analysed. They all received catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase or urokinase for symptomatic acute major thoracic vein thrombosis. Substantial clot lysis was obtained in 62 out of 68 patients (91%), the results being 88.6 and 93.8% for cancer and non-cancer patients respectively (P = 0.68). The mean infusion time in patients with and without cancer was 2.11 and 1.84 days respectively (P = 0.3259). Procedure-related complications occurred in two cancer patients (8.6%) and in seven non-cancer patients (21%) (P = 0.18). One cancer patient developed a fatal intracranial bleeding. Additional intervention after successful lysis was performed in cancer (n = 18; 51%) as well as in non-cancer patients (n = 29; 88%). Catheter-directed thrombolysis is a feasible and highly effective interventional procedure with an acceptable safety profile in selected patients with and without cancer for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic central venous thrombosis. In most cases, additional endovascular or surgical procedures are required to restore and maintain vessel patency after successful thrombolysis. (orig.)

  15. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Technology, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Thermometry, and Technical Considerations for Proper Catheter Placement During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitesh V; Mian, Matthew; Stafford, R Jason; Nahed, Brian V; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced thermal therapy has become a powerful tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium. The physics of laser therapy are complex, but a sound understanding of this topic is clinically relevant, as many centers have incorporated it into their treatment algorithm, and educated patients are demanding consideration of its use for their disease. Laser ablation has been used for a wide array of intracranial lesions. Laser catheter placement is guided by stereotactic planning; however, as the procedure has popularized, the number of ways in which the catheter can be inserted has also increased. There are many technical nuances for laser placement, and, to date, there is not a clear understanding of whether any one technique is better than the other. In this review, we describe the basic physics of magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy and describe the several common techniques for accurate Visualase laser catheter placement in a stepwise fashion. MRg-LITT, magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapyPAD, precision aiming device.

  16. Catheter-directed thrombolytic therapy for thoracic deep vein thrombosis is safe and effective in selected patients with and without cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Marchal, Pieter; Heye, Sam; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Palmers, Marleen; Verhamme, Peter; Verhaeghe, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis for thoracic central venous thrombosis in both cancer and non-cancer patients. A retrospective case series of 68 patients, including 35 with active cancer and 33 without cancer, was analysed. They all received catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase or urokinase for symptomatic acute major thoracic vein thrombosis. Substantial clot lysis was obtained in 62 out of 68 patients (91%), the results being 88.6 and 93.8% for cancer and non-cancer patients respectively (P = 0.68). The mean infusion time in patients with and without cancer was 2.11 and 1.84 days respectively (P = 0.3259). Procedure-related complications occurred in two cancer patients (8.6%) and in seven non-cancer patients (21%) (P = 0.18). One cancer patient developed a fatal intracranial bleeding. Additional intervention after successful lysis was performed in cancer (n = 18; 51%) as well as in non-cancer patients (n = 29; 88%). Catheter-directed thrombolysis is a feasible and highly effective interventional procedure with an acceptable safety profile in selected patients with and without cancer for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic central venous thrombosis. In most cases, additional endovascular or surgical procedures are required to restore and maintain vessel patency after successful thrombolysis. (orig.)

  17. Initial experience with SOFIA as an intermediate catheter in mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Johnny H Y; Do, Huy M; Telischak, Nicholas A; Moraff, Adrienne M; Dodd, Robert L; Marks, Michael P; Ingle, Shreya M; Heit, Jeremy J

    2017-11-01

    The benefits of mechanical thrombectomy for emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) have been established. Combined mechanical/aspiration (Solumbra) and a direct aspiration as a first pass technique (ADAPT) are valid procedures requiring an intermediate catheter for clot suction. Recently, SOFIA (Soft torqueable catheter Optimized For Intracranial Access) was developed as a single lumen flexible catheter with coil and braid reinforcement, but its suitability for mechanical thrombectomy had not been evaluated. To describe our initial experience with SOFIA in acute stroke intervention and evaluate its efficacy and safety. All patients with ELVO undergoing endovascular stroke intervention with SOFIA were identified. Demographic, presentation, treatment, and complication data were recorded. Primary outcome was Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) 2b/3 revascularization rate and the number of passes required. Secondary outcomes included complication rates and discharge National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. 33 patients with a mean age of 72 years were treated for ELVO with SOFIA and IV tissue plasminogen activator was administered in 67%. Vessel occlusion involved the internal carotid artery (15.2%), M1 (48.5%), and M2 (24.2%) segments, and posterior circulation (12.1%). Median presentation NIHSS score was 14 (IQR 11-19) and discharge NIHSS 4 (IQR 2-14). The Solumbra technique represented 94% of treatments and ADAPT 3%. The TICI 2b/3 revascularization rate was 94%, including 48.5% TICI 3 with an average of 1.6 passes. The symptomatic reperfusion hemorrhage rate was 6%. Procedural complications occurred in four patients, but were unrelated to SOFIA. Mortality was 21%, secondary to failed revascularization, hemorrhagic transformation, and baseline medical condition. Mechanical and aspiration thrombectomy with SOFIA is safe and effective with high revascularization rates. Its trackability, stability, and luminal size make SOFIA suitable for stroke

  18. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  19. Positioning of nasobiliary tube using magnet-loaded catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Seitaro; Sato, Takamitsu; Kato, Shingo; Hosono, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kubota, Kensuke

    2013-10-01

    In endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD), repositioning the catheter from the mouth to the nose is complicated. We devised a method using catheters with magnets and verified its utility and safety. We prospectively enrolled 20 patients undergoing ENBD at Yokohama City University Hospital. The procedures were successful in all 20 cases and no case required a change of operators to a senior doctor. The mean time for the procedure was 36.6 seconds. The emetic reflex was induced 0.5 times on average using the magnet method. The mean X-ray exposure time was 29.6 seconds. No complications occurred. The magnet-loaded catheter method for positioning the ENBD catheter before finally leading it through the nose took little time and was performed successfully and safely. Therefore, the magnet method could become the first choice among techniques for ENBD catheter placement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Dose requirements for UVC disinfection of catheter biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D.; Tvede, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms on permanent catheters are the major sources of infection. Exposure to ultraviolet-C (UVC) light has been proposed as a method for disinfecting the inner surface of catheters. Specification of a UVC-based device for in vivo disinfection is based on the knowledge of the required...... doses to kill catheter biofilm. Given these doses and the power of available UVC light sources, calculation of the necessary treatment times is then possible. To determine the required doses, contaminated urinary catheters were used as test samples and UVC treated in vitro. Patient catheters (n = 67......) were collected and cut into segments of equal size and treated with various UVC doses. After treatment, the biofilm was removed by scraping and quantified by counting colony forming units. Percentage killing rates were determined by calculating ratios between UVC-treated samples and controls (no UVC...

  1. Minimally invasive trans-portal resection of deep intracranial lesions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raza, S.M.; Recinos, P.F.; Avendano, J.; Adams, H.; Jallo, G.I.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical management of deep intra-axial lesions still requires microsurgical approaches that utilize retraction of deep white matter to obtain adequate visualization. We report our experience with a new tubular retractor system, designed specifically for intracranial applications,

  2. Chemical Meningitis with Intracranial Tumours | De Klerk | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with intracranial epidermoid tumours who had a chemical meningitis as part of their clinical course, are described. The importance of recognising this as a presenting complaint is stressed. The pathogenesis and treatment are discussed.

  3. Intracranial teratoma associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.C.; Sarwar, M.; Virapongse, C.; Bhimani, S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual case of a congenital intracranial teratoma associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum is presented. The radiographic features and the differentiation of this tumor from others that occur in agenesis is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing a bifocal intracranial germinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Julie; Potorac, Iulia; Lutteri, Laurence; Gennigens, Christine; Martin, Didier; Daly, Adrian F; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Tshibanda, Luaba; Beckers, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of intracranial tumors in which impaired antidiuretic hormone secretion is associated with the loss of thirst sensation. Here, we present the case of a patient with bifocal intracranial germinoma, diagnosed due to symptoms mainly caused by adipsic diabetes insipidus. This is, to our knowledge, the first case of adipsic diabetes insipidus revealing an intracranial germinoma reported in the literature. We describe the diagnostic procedures and the three-year follow-up of this patient. Management of intracranial germ-cell tumors is made complex by the wide range of histological features. Although germinomas have a generally better prognosis than most nongerminomatous tumors, they can have severe or even life-threatening presentations. Adipsic diabetes insipidus is one such severe presentation and its rarity can make it difficult to recognize and manage. Awareness of this potential entity is therefore important for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance "flip-flop" in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a headache syndrome with raised CSF pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion. Though earlier confined to excluding intracranial lesions, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in recent years has been shown to identify intracranial changes from prolonged raised CSF pressure, suggestive of IIH. We present the MRI and TOF (time-of-flight venography findings involving the orbit, sella tursica and cerebral venous structures in a 45-year-old lady with IIH and illustrate their reversibility ("flip-flop" following CSF drainage. Our case highlights the role of imaging in evaluation and follow-up of patients with IIH, without the need for repeated lumbar punctures to monitor pressures.

  6. Intracranial hypertension in 2 children with marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Kroft, Lucia J. M.; Pals, Gerard; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Overweg-Plandsoen, Wouterina C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Two unrelated children with Marfan syndrome presented with recurrent intracranial hypertension. Both children complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting and one of them had papilledema. Both had increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure, and their complaints disappeared after lumbar puncture.

  7. Congenital intracranial meningioma. A case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed....

  8. Bathing Trunk Inevus Associated with Neurofibromatosis and Raised Intracranial Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V.S Arya

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old boy had bathing trunk nevus with multiple large neurofibromata on the nevus and raised intracranial tension presenting with bilateral papilloedema and pyramidal tract sings. This combination, of features is extremely rare.

  9. Post-operative intracranial foreign body granuloma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djindjian, M.; Brugieres, P.; Razavi-Encha, F.; Allegret, C.; Poirier, J.

    1987-09-01

    The authors report and discuss some clinical, radiological, histological and ultrastructural aspects of an intracranial foreign body granuloma. This granuloma, which simulated a cavernoma, was due to a surgical swab forgotten during a previous neurosurgical evacuation of an intracerebral hematoma.

  10. Temperature-controlled irrigated tip radiofrequency catheter ablation: comparison of in vivo and in vitro lesion dimensions for standard catheter and irrigated tip catheter with minimal infusion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    1998-01-01

    In patients with ventricular tachycardias due to structural heart disease, catheter ablation cures radiofrequency ablation. Irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation using power control and high infusion rates enlarges lesion size, but has...

  11. Chronic Meningitis Complicating Intracranial Hypertension in Neurobrucellosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugcu, Betul; Nacaroglu, Senay Asik; Coskun, Cigdem; Kuscu, Demet Yandım; Onder, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    In neurobrucellosis, even though meningitis is encountered frequently, chronic intracranial hypertension is a rare manifestation. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for the prevention of permanent visual loss secondary to poststasis optic atrophy in these cases. We report a case that presented with permanent visual loss secondary to intracranial hypertension in neurobrucellosis. Our goal is to draw attention to the consideration of neurobrucellosis in cases with papilla stasis, even in the absence of neurological findings in endemic areas.

  12. Congenital intracranial meningioma. A case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed.......A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed....

  13. Imaging Modalities Relevant to Intracranial Pressure Assessment in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Kramer, Larry A.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Polk, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives of this slide presentation are: 1: To review the morphological changes in orbit structures caused by elevated Intracranial Pressure (ICP), and their imaging representation. 2: To learn about the similarities and differences between MRI and sonographic imaging of the eye and orbit. 3: To learn about the role of MRI and sonography in the noninvasive assessment of intracranial pressure in aerospace medicine, and the added benefits from their combined interpretation.

  14. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  15. Extraction of challenging intracoronary thrombi: multi-device strategies using guide catheters, distal vascular protection devices and aspiration catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornratanarangsi, Suwatchai; El-Jack, Seif S; Webster, Mark W I; McNab, Duncan; Stewart, James T; Ormiston, John A; Ruygrok, Peter N

    2008-09-01

    Patients with large intracoronary thrombi represent a difficult management problem for the interventional cardiologist. We report 10 cases of challenging thrombi treated percutaneously using varying combinations of deep guide catheter engagement, guide aspiration, dedicated catheter aspiration and withdrawal of a distal filter vascular protection device. These cases demonstrate interventional options which may be considered for such patients.

  16. Removal of non-deflatable retained foley catheter in the bladder by percutaneous puncture of catheter balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Duk; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyun; Chung, Hyon De

    1988-01-01

    Nondeflatable Foley catheter in the bladder is an uncommon event. We recently experienced a patient in whom the urologist were unable to remove a Foley catheter with cystoscope due to public bone fractures. The procedure, which was successfully carried out, consists of puncturing the ballon under fluoroscope.

  17. High Intracranial Pressure Induced Injury in the Healthy Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xingping; Bragina, Olga; Zhang, Tongsheng; Yang, Yirong; Rao, Gutti R; Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-08-01

    We recently showed that increased intracranial pressure to 50 mm Hg in the healthy rat brain results in microvascular shunt flow characterized by tissue hypoxia, edema, and increased blood-brain barrier permeability. We now determined whether increased intracranial pressure results in neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade stain and whether changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen suggest nonnutritive microvascular shunt flow. Intracranial pressure was elevated by a reservoir of artificial cerebrospinal fluid connected to the cisterna magna. Arterial blood gases, cerebral arterial-venous oxygen content difference, and cerebral blood flow by MRI were measured. Fluoro-Jade stain neurons were counted in histologic sections of the right and left dorsal and lateral cortices and hippocampus. University laboratory. Male Sprague Dawley rats. Arterial pressure support if needed by IV dopamine infusion and base deficit corrected by sodium bicarbonate. Fluoro-Jade stain neurons increased 2.5- and 5.5-fold at intracranial pressures of 30 and 50 mm Hg and cerebral perfusion pressures of 57 ± 4 (mean ± SEM) and 47 ± 6 mm Hg, respectively (p intracranial pressure and decreased cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen. High intracranial pressure likely caused neuronal injury because of a transition from normal capillary flow to nonnutritive microvascular shunt flow resulting in tissue hypoxia and edema, and it is manifest by a reduction in the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

  18. Prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of fetal intracranial tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, D M; Onyeije, C I

    1998-05-01

    Our objective was to review current literature pertaining to prenatal ultrasonography of various fetal intracranial neoplastic and non-neoplastic tumors. To this goal, all manuscripts published in the English language regarding this topic obtained from a MEDLINE search from 1966 through January 1998 were selected and reviewed. Additional sources were identified through cross-referencing. Intracranial fetal tumors are extremely rare and precise diagnosis is dependent on histology examination of tissue obtained at subsequent surgery or autopsy. Currently, prenatal ultrasonographic findings associated with the following fetal intracranial tumors have been described: teratomas; neuroepithelial tumors including: glioblastoma, astrocytoma, gangliocytoma, medulloblastoma, choroid plexus, and papilloma; and mesenchymal tumors. Non-neoplastic fetal intracranial tumors are even less frequent and include: unilateral megalencephaly, heterotopia, and lipoma of the corpus callosum. Cardinal ultrasonographic findings associated with fetal intracranial tumors include: echogenic and semicystic space occupying lesions with or without distortion of normal symmetrical intracranial (usually midline) structures, calcifications, craniomegaly, polyhydramnios, obstructive hydrocephaly, high-output cardiac failure (hydrops fetalis), the presence of other associated structural anomalies, and infrequently abnormal cerebral Doppler flow velocimetry.

  19. Comparative study of peripherally inserted central venous catheter and traditional central catheter assisted with X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianchun; Wang Xiurong; Jiang Zhuming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, complications, mid- and long-term advantages of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) compared with central venous access assisted with X-ray. Methods: From Jan 1997 to Dec 1998, the authors conducted a study in 60 patients with placed PICC lines and 60 patients with central lines. Study variables included tip placement and complication rates. Results: Tere were on significant differences between PICC and CVC in the successful placement 95.0% and 88.3%, t = 1.745, P 0.19; the mean duration 13(6-98) days and 14 (7-104) days, F = 0.049, P = 0.83; the total occlusion rate 6.7% (4/60) and 5.0%(3/60), t = 0.152, P = 0.70. In PICC patients, the occlusion rate was slightly higher in 3 Fr (20-gauge) catheter (3/20, 15.0%) than in 4 Fr(18-gauge) catheters (1/20, 5.0%), t = 1.111, P=0.29. Phlebitis occurred in 5.0% of patients (3/60) and one catheter fracture was happened on the catheter hub junction (1.7%). In 3 catheter tips dislocation cases, the catheter tips were moved to the optional position assisted with X-ray image. In CVC group, pneumothorax happened in 1 case (1.7%). In 4 catheter dislocation cases, the catheters were with drawn. No catheter-related sepsis and hemo-pneumothorax happened in both group patients. Conclusions: Both PICC and CVC can be acceptable in clinical use. PICC assisted with X-ray possesses the advantages of less trauma, accurate localization preventing some possible severe complications of central venous access such as pneumothorax. The new method provides a reliable, effective venous access for mid-and long-term usage in patients receiving a variety of solutions, primarily parenteral alimentation, chemotherapy or antibiotic infusion

  20. Structured Reporting in Neuroradiology: Intracranial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical feasibility, diagnostic yield, advantages, and disadvantages of structured reporting for routine MRI-reading in patients with primary diagnosis of intracranial tumors as compared to traditional neuroradiological free text reporting.MethodsA structured MRI reporting template was developed covering pathological, anatomical, and functional aspects in an itemized fashion. Retrospectively, 60 consecutive patients with first diagnosis of an intracranial tumor were selected from the radiology information system/PACS system. Structured reporting was performed by a senior neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical and radiological data. Reporting times were measured per patient. The diagnostic content was compared to free text reporting which was independently performed on the same MRI exams by two other neuroradiologists. The comparisons were categorized per item as: “congruent,” “partially congruent,” “incongruent,” or “not mentioned in free-style report.”ResultsTumor-related items: congruent findings were found for all items (17/17 with congruence rates ranging between 98 and 39% per item. Four items achieved congruence rates ≥90%, 5 items >80%, and 9 items ≥70%. Partially congruent findings were found for all items in up to 50% per item. Incongruent findings were present in 7/17 items in up to 5% per item. Free text reports did not mention 12 of 17 items (range 7–43% per item. Non-tumor-related items, including brain atrophy, microangiopathy, vascular pathologies, and various extracranial pathologies, which were not mentioned in free-text reports between 18 and 85% per item. Mean reporting time for structured reporting was 7:49 min (3:12–17:06 min.ConclusionFirst results showed that expert structured reporting ensured reliable detection of all relevant brain pathologies along with reproducible documentation of all predefined diagnostic items, which was not always the

  1. Intracranial Ewing sarcoma: four pediatric examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Michael J; Whelan, Ros; Madden, Jennifer; Mulcahy Levy, Jean M; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K; Hankinson, Todd C; Foreman, Nicholas K; Handler, Michael H

    2018-03-01

    Ewing sarcoma typically arises in bone and is unrelated to intraparenchymal small blue cell embryonal central nervous system (CNS) tumors previously designated primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs). When the CNS is impacted, it is usually secondary to local extension from either the epidural space, skull, or intracranial or spinal metastases. Primary examples within the cranial vault are rare, usually dural-based, and are largely case reports in the literature. We detail four pediatric patients with solitary, primary intracranial Ewing sarcoma, all manifesting the archetypal EWRS1 gene rearrangement that confirms diagnosis. Neurosurgical Department records, spanning 21 years (1995-2016), were reviewed to identify patients. Demographics, clinical history, pathological/genetic features, and clinical course were retrieved from the medical record and personal files of the authors. Four patients, one male and three females, age 5 to 16 years, were identified. One presented in extremis from a large lesion, two with soft tissue masses, and the fourth as an incidental finding after being involved in a motor vehicle collision. Three had clear bony involvement: a 10-year-old girl with a large left temporal lesion had clear origin in the skull, with spiculated calcified striations throughout the mass; a 9-year-old girl presented with a bony left petrous apex mass; and a 16-year-old girl presented with a left temporal mass with extension to the dura and underlying bone erosion. Only the 5-year-old boy had a large left frontoparietal mass traversing the falx with no bony contact. All four tumors manifested the diagnostic EWSR1 mutation and were treated with an Ewing sarcoma regimen. Outcomes were variable, with one patient showing progressive metastatic disease and death 3 years after presentation, one patient with disease-free survival 10.5 years after completion of therapy, and one alive and well at the completion of therapy 1 year after diagnosis. One patient

  2. Somatostatin receptor imaging in intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Scheidhauer, K.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Luyken, C.; Hildebrandt, G.; Klug, N.

    1998-01-01

    The somatostatin analogue [ 111 In-DTPA-d-Phe 1 ]-octreotide ( 111 In-octreotide) allows scintigraphic visualization of somatostatin receptor-expressing tissue. While it is well known that a large variety of tissues express somatostatin receptors and 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy has a clearly defined role in various neuroendocrine diseases, the clinical value of 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy in brain tumours is still under clinical investigation. In 124 patients with 141 brain lesions (63 meningiomas, 24 pituitary adenomas, 10 gliomas WHO class I and II, 12 gliomas WHO class III and IV, 11 neurinomas and 2 neurofibromas, 7 metastases and 12 other varieties: three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, two epidermoids, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma, one haemangiopericytoma, one osteosarcoma, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst), 111 In-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 110-220 MBq 111 In-octreotide. Planar images of the head in four views with a 128 x 128 matrix and single-photon emission tomographic images (64 x 64 matrix) were acquired, and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Fifty-nine of the 63 meningiomas showed moderate to intense tracer uptake. Nine of 24 pituitary adenomas were visible; the remaining 15 did not show any tracer uptake. None of the class I and II gliomas with an intact blood-brain barrier were detected whereas 11/12 class III and IV gliomas showed 111 In-octreotide uptake. None of the neurinomas or neurofibromas were positive. Five of seven metastases were classified as positive, as were the osteosarcoma, two of three non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, one abscess, one angioleiomyoma, one chordoma and one haemangiopericytoma. The other varieties (one non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, two epidermoids, one plasmacytoma and one pseudocyst) did not show 111 In-octreotide uptake. The results demonstrate that a large variety of intracranial lesions express somatostatin receptors and

  3. Intracranial Hemorrhage Following a 3-week Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 35-year-old female presented to the ED with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 11. Per her boyfriend, the patient was having headaches for the past 3 weeks. She was initially taken to an outside hospital where her GCS was reported as 13. A non-contrast head computed tomography (CT revealed a large lobar intraparenchymal hemorrhage within the left frontal parietal lobe with midline shift. Upon examination, vitals were notable for blood pressure of 209/88mmHg, and her left pupil was fixed and dilated. The patient had extension of her right arm to noxious stimuli, paralysis of her right leg, and purposeful movement of the left arm and left leg. The patient was started on a nicardipine drip in the ED and subsequently taken to the operating room for a decompressive craniectomy. Significant findings: The patient’s head CT showed a significant area of hyperdensity consistent with an intracranial hemorrhage located within the left frontal parietal lobe (red arrow. Additionally, there is rightward midline shift up to 1.1cm (green arrow and entrapment of the right lateral ventricle (blue arrow. Discussion: Intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the mortality for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH has declined steadily over the past several decades, the mortality for IPH mortality has not significantly.1 One of the most serious considerations when treating a patient with IPH is the management of intracranial pressure (ICP.2 Once an IPH is identified, immediate steps should be taken to bring ICP within acceptable levels including elevating the head of the bed to 30 degrees, sedation, and controlling hypertension with medications.2-3 Even with early and aggressive care, the prognosis for IPH remains poor; the 30-day mortality rate for IPH is estimated to be less than 50%, and a 2010 systematic review estimated only 12-39% of IPH patients achieve independent function.4-5 Predictors of

  4. Medically Attended Catheter Complications Are Common in Patients With Outpatient Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Steven S; Rebeiro, Peter F; Miller, Mickie; Koss, Katie; Wright, Patty W; Talbot, Thomas R

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Outpatient central venous catheters (CVCs) are being used more frequently; however, data describing mechanical complications and central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in the outpatient setting are limited. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study to understand the burden of these complications to elucidate their impact on the healthcare system. METHODS Data were retrospectively collected on patients discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center with a CVC in place and admitted into the care of Vanderbilt Home Care Services. Risk factors for medically attended catheter-associated complications (CACs) and outpatient CLABSIs were analyzed. RESULTS A CAC developed in 143 patients (21.9%), for a total of 165 discrete CAC events. Among these, 76 (46%) required at least 1 visit to the emergency department or an inpatient admission, while the remaining 89 (54%) required an outpatient clinic visit. The risk for developing a CAC was significantly increased in female patients, patients with a CVC with >1 lumen, and patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. The absolute number of CLABSIs identified in the study population was small at 16, or 2.4% of the total cohort. CONCLUSIONS Medically attended catheter complications were common among outpatients discharged with a CVC, and reduction of these events should be the focus of outpatient quality improvement programs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:439-444.

  5. Nephrologists Hate the Dialysis Catheters: A Systemic Review of Dialysis Catheter Associated Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Janga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old Egyptian female with end stage renal disease, one month after start of hemodialysis via an internal jugular catheter, presented with fever and shortness of breath. She developed desquamating vesiculobullous lesions, widespread on her body. She was in profound septic shock and broad spectrum antibiotics were started with appropriate fluid replenishment. An echocardiogram revealed bulky leaflets of the mitral valve with a highly mobile vegetation about 2.3 cm long attached to the anterior leaflet. CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed bilateral pleural effusions in the chest, with triangular opacities in the lungs suggestive of infarcts. There was splenomegaly with triangular hypodensities consistent with splenic infarcts. Blood cultures repeatedly grew Candida albicans. Despite parenteral antifungal therapy, the patient deteriorated over the course of 5 days. She died due to a subsequent cardiac arrest. Systemic review of literature revealed that the rate of infection varies amongst the various types of accesses, and it is well documented that AV fistulas have a much less rate of infection in comparison to temporary catheters. All dialysis units should strive to make a multidisciplinary effort to have a referral process early on, for access creation, and to avoid catheters associated morbidity.

  6. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  7. Usefulness of multifunctional gastrointestinal coil catheter for colorectal stent placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae [Asan Medical Center, Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Song, Ho-Young [Asan Medical Center - Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea); Park, In Kook [Dongguk University, Life Science, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Eugene K. [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a multifunctional gastrointestinal coil catheter for stent placement in 98 patients with colorectal strictures. The catheter was used in 98 consecutive patients for stent placement in the rectum (n = 24), recto-sigmoid (n = 13), sigmoid (n = 38), descending (n = 6), transverse (n = 11), splenic flexure (n = 3), hepatic flexure (n = 2), and ascending (n = 1) colon. The catheter was made of a stainless steel coil (1.3 mm in inner diameter), a 0.4-mm nitinol wire, a polyolefin tube, and a hemostasis valve. Usefulness of the catheter was evaluated depending on whether the catheter could pass a stricture over a guide wire and whether measurement of the stricture length was possible. The passage of the catheter over a guide wire beyond the stricture was technically successful and well tolerated in 93 (94.9%) of 98 patients. In the failed five patients, it was not possible to negotiate the guide wire due to presence of nearly complete small bowel obstruction. The average length of stricture was 6.15 cm (range, 3 cm to 20 cm) in patients with the colorectal stricture. There were no procedure-related complications. In conclusion, the multifunctional coil catheter seems to be useful in colorectal stent placement. (orig.)

  8. Intracervical Foley catheter balloon vs. prostaglandin in preinduction cervical ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niromanesh, S; Mosavi-Jarrahi, A; Samkhaniani, F

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of the intracervical Foley balloon catheter and 3 mg prostaglandin E(2) tablet(s) in preinduction cervical ripening. Ninety women referred to the maternity clinic for induction of labor with a Bishop score of less than or equal to 5 were randomized to receive an intracervical Foley catheter or prostaglandin E(2) tablets. The primary measured outcome was ripening of the cervix as measured with the Bishop score. There were no differences in mean Bishop scores between the prostaglandin and the Foley catheter groups. Bishop scores (mean+/-S.D.) after ripening were 6.6+/-0.80 and 6.7+/-0.86 for the Foley catheter and prostaglandin groups, respectively (P=0.54). The Foley catheter group showed a statistically shorter time to ripening compared with the prostaglandin group (3.4+/-2.1 and 6.5+/-3.2 h, respectively (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in induction time (4.8+/-1.8 h and 5.3+/-2.4 h, respectively (P=0.36). There are no differences in preinduction cervical ripening efficacy between prostaglandin E(2) and the Foley catheter, but the Foley catheter has the advantage of ripening an unfavorable cervix in a shorter time.

  9. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intraabdominal abscesses and fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kwon, Tae Hee; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Young Ho

    1986-01-01

    Percutaneous catheter drainage has been reported to be an effective method in the management of selected patients with abscess and fluid collection. Its high success rate and relatively low complications make the procedure an alternative to surgery in the individual cases. During past two years percutaneous catheter drainage in 25 patients with intraabdominal abscesses and fluid collection was performed at the Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of medicine. Here the technique and author's results were summarized. 1. The total 25 patients who had percutaneous catheter drainage are 10 liver abscesses, 3 subphrenic, one subhepatic, 4 renal and perirenal, 2 pelvic, one psoas, one anterior pararenal fluid from acute pancreatitis, one pancreas pseudocyst and 2 malignant tumor necrosis. 2. The modified Seldinger technique used for all cases of abscess and fluid drainage under guidance of ultrasound scan. The used catheters were 10F. Pigtail and 14F. Malecot (Cook c/o) catheters. 3. The abscesses and fluid of 17 patients among 25 were cured by the percutaneous catheter drainage and 4 patients were clinically improved. The catheter drainage was failed in 2 patients and 3 complication were developed. 4. The success rate of this procedure was 91.3%, failure rate was 8.7% and complication rate was 12%.

  10. Prostate HDR brachytherapy catheter displacement between planning and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, May; Hruby, George; Lovett, Aimee; Patanjali, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: HDR brachytherapy is used as a conformal boost for treating prostate cancer. Given the large doses delivered, it is critical that the volume treated matches that planned. Our outpatient protocol comprises two 9 Gy fractions, two weeks apart. We prospectively assessed catheter displacement between CT planning and treatment delivery. Materials and methods: Three fiducial markers and the catheters were implanted under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Metal marker wires were inserted into 4 reference catheters before CT; marker positions relative to each other and to the marker wires were measured from the CT scout. Measurements were repeated immediately prior to treatment delivery using pelvic X-ray with marker wires in the same reference catheters. Measurements from CT scout and film were compared. For displacements of 5 mm or more, indexer positions were adjusted prior to treatment delivery. Results: Results are based on 48 implants, in 25 patients. Median time from planning CT to treatment delivery was 254 min (range 81–367 min). Median catheter displacement was 7.5 mm (range −2.9–23.9 mm), 67% of implants had displacement of 5 mm or greater. Displacements were predominantly caudal. Conclusions: Catheter displacement can occur in the 1–3 h between the planning CT scan and treatment. It is recommended that departments performing HDR prostate brachytherapy verify catheter positions immediately prior to treatment delivery.

  11. Magnetic catheter manipulation in the interventional MR imaging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W; Martin, Alastair B; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron D; Yee, Erin J; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vincent; Evans, Lee; Sincic, Ryan; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L; Hetts, Steven W

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate deflection capability of a prototype endovascular catheter, which is remotely magnetically steerable, for use in the interventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment. Copper coils were mounted on the tips of commercially available 2.3-3.0-F microcatheters. The coils were fabricated in a novel manner by plasma vapor deposition of a copper layer followed by laser lithography of the layer into coils. Orthogonal helical (ie, solenoid) and saddle-shaped (ie, Helmholtz) coils were mounted on a single catheter tip. Microcatheters were tested in water bath phantoms in a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner, with variable simultaneous currents applied to the coils. Catheter tip deflection was imaged in the axial plane by using a "real-time" steady-state free precession MR imaging sequence. Degree of deflection and catheter tip orientation were measured for each current application. The catheter tip was clearly visible in the longitudinal and axial planes. Magnetic field artifacts were visible when the orthogonal coils at the catheter tip were energized. Variable amounts of current applied to a single coil demonstrated consistent catheter deflection in all water bath experiments. Changing current polarity reversed the observed direction of deflection, whereas current applied to two different coils resulted in deflection represented by the composite vector of individual coil activations. Microcatheter navigation through the vascular phantom was successful through control of applied current to one or more coils. Controlled catheter deflection is possible with laser lithographed multiaxis coil-tipped catheters in the MR imaging environment. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High definition urethral pressure profilometry: Evaluating a novel microtip catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klünder, Mario; Amend, Bastian; Vaegler, Martin; Kelp, Alexandra; Feuer, Ronny; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Urethral pressure profilometry (UPP) is used in the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). SUI is a significant medical, social, and economic problem, affecting about 12.5% of the population. A novel microtip catheter was developed for UPP featuring an inclination sensor and higher angular resolution compared to systems in clinical use today. Therewith, the location of each measured pressure sample can be determined and the spatial pressure distribution inside the urethra reconstructed. In order to assess the performance and plausibility of data from the microtip catheter, we compare it to data from a double balloon air charged system. Both catheters are used on sedated female minipigs. Data from the microtip catheter are processed through a signal reconstruction algorithm, plotted and compared against data from the air-charged catheter. The microtip catheter delivers results in agreement with previous comparisons of microtip and air-charged systems. It additionally provides a new level of detail in the reconstructed UPPs which may lead to new insights into the sphincter mechanism of minipigs. The ability of air-charged catheters to measure pressure circumferentially is widely considered a main advantage over microtip catheters. However, directional pressure readings can provide additional information on angular fluctuations in the urethral pressure distribution. It is shown that the novel microtip catheter in combination with a signal reconstruction algorithm delivers plausible data. It offers the opportunity to evaluate urethral structures, especially the sphincter, in context of the correct location within the anatomical location of the pelvic floor. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:888-894, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Intracranial epidural hemorrhage during lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial epidural hemorrhage (ICEH) during spinal surgery. We could not find ICEH, though we recorded transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs). A 35-year-old man was referred for left anterior thigh pain and low back pain that hindered sleep. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural tumor at L3-L4 vertebral level. We performed osteoplastic laminectomy and en bloc tumor resection. TcMEPs were intraoperatively recorded at the bilateral abductor digiti minimi (ADM), quadriceps, tibialis anterior and abductor hallucis. When we closed a surgical incision, we were able to record normal TcMEPs in all muscles. The patient did not fully wake up from the anesthesia. He had right-sided unilateral positive ankle clonus 15 min after surgery in spite of bilateral negative of ankle clonus preoperatively. Emergent brain computed tomography scans revealed left epidural hemorrhage. The hematoma was evacuated immediately via a partial craniotomy. There was no restriction of the patient's daily activities 22 months postoperatively. We should pay attention to clinical signs such as headache and neurological findgings such as DTR and ankle clonus for patients with durotomy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Spine surgeons should know that it was difficult to detect ICEH by monitoring with TcMEPs.

  14. Retina findings in intracranial aneurysm patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Il Kang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate fundus findings in patients with intracranial aneurysm(ICAto determine the relation between ICA and distinguishable retinal features.METHODS: We analyzed the medical records and ocular images of 46 patients with previously diagnosed ICA referred from the Neurosurgical Department. All patients underwent ophthalmologic evaluation including fluorescein angiography(FAG. Furthermore, the presence of drusen, macular degeneration, cotton wool spot, hard exudates, retinal hemorrhage, arteriolar attenuation, A-V crossing signs, arm-to-retina time, and A-V transit time were evaluated. The results of ICA patients(Group 1were compared with those of 22 idiopathic epiretinal membrane patients with unaffected eyes(Group 2.RESULTS: Mean ages were 60.02y(Group 1and 60.68y(Group 2respectively(P=0.70. The prevalence of hypertension was similar in both groups. No case with retinal macroaneurysm was found in either group. The presence of drusen, macular degeneration, cotton wool spot, hard exudates, retinal hemorrhage, arteriolar attenuation, and A-V crossing sign was not significantly different between the two groups. Mean arm-to-retina time was not significantly different in two groups, either.CONCLUSION: We cannot find any evidence that the patients with ICA shows specific changes in the FAG and fundus.

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A typical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Obeid, Tahir H.; Abuzinadah, Ahmad R.; Baeesa, Saleh S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to describe the clinical features of 5 patients with rare atypical presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), and propose the possible mechanism of this atypical presentation. We carried out a retrospective study of 5 patients, admitted at King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with IIH during the period from January 2001 to December 2005. All were females with their age ranges from 24 to 40 years. The clinical presentations, the laboratory and imaging studies were analyzed. The opening pressures of the lumbar puncture tests were documented. All patients were presented with headache. One had typical pain of trigeminal neuralgia and one with neck pain and radiculopathy. Facial diplegia was present in one patient and two patients had bilateral 6th cranial neuropathy. Papilledema was present in all patients except in one patient. Imaging study was normal in all patients, and they had a very high opening pressure during lumbar puncture, except in one patient. All patients achieved full recovery with medical therapy in 6 to 12 weeks with no relapse during the mean follow up of 2 years. Atypical finding in IIH are rare and require a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis. (author)

  16. Intracranial meningiomas after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, D.; Gomori, J.M.; Siegal, T.; Shalit, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients who presented with intracranial meningiomas 12, 15, and 20 years, respectively, after therapeutic high-dose irradiation of a primary brain tumor are described. Analysis of these cases and similar documented cases suggests that meningiomas after high-dose irradiation constitute a recognizable entity. Patients with such tumors received radiation therapy at a young age (mean age, 9.4 years). After a latent period of 2 to 47 years (mean, 19.8 years) they developed meningiomas at the site of irradiation, at a much younger age than patients with ''spontaneous'' meningiomas. Similar to the situation with meningiomas after low-dose irradiation, a relatively high proportion of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation tend to be malignant and biologically aggressive. A very young age at the time of irradiation seems to predispose to the induction of malignant meningiomas, rather than benign tumors. These unusual features provide indirect evidence that high-dose radiation may play a role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas.41 references

  17. A case of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Masami; Tanji, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masakazu

    1981-01-01

    Intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is very rare, only 14 cases being reported in Europe and in the United States of America. Recently we experienced a case in which the follow-up indicating computed tomograms (CT) demonstrated interesting data on the radiosensitivity of this tumor. The patient, a 14-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of left hemiplegia which had gradually progressed. CT revealed an area spreading upward from the right median base of the skull and consisted of two components showing (A) a density as high as that of calcium and (B) a density higher than that of surrounding brain tissue, but much lower than that of calcium. Temporoparietal craniotomy was performed to resect approximately one-half of the tumor. Histological finding revealed mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The component-A was though to be a cartilaginous tissue, and-B to be an undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue. Postoperative irradiation of 7,000 rad was initiated. The effect of radiotherapy as seen on computed tomograms is as follows, (1) decrease in the volume of the tumor by 26%, (2) decrease in density and enhancement of the area which is considered to be the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, (3) mild reduction of the area which is considered to be the caltilaginous tissue, and (4) a very high density of the entire tumor similar in degree to that of the bone one year later. These results suggested that radiotherapy is effective for this tumor. (author)

  18. Intracranial Fluid Redistribution During a Spaceflight Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Pasternak, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Reuter-Lorenz, Patrica A.; Kofman, Igor S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    The neural correlates of spaceflight-induced sensorimotor impairments are unknown. Head down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) serves as a microgravity analog because it mimics the headward fluid shift and limb unloading of spaceflight. We investigated focal brain white matter (WM) changes and fluid shifts during 70 days of 6 deg HDBR in 16 subjects who were assessed pre (2x), during (3x), and post-HDBR (2x). Changes over time were compared to those in control subjects (n=12) assessed four times over 90 days. Diffusion MRI was used to assess WM microstructure and fluid shifts. Free-Water Imaging, derived from diffusion MRI, was used to quantify the distribution of intracranial extracellular free water (FW). Additionally, we tested whether WM and FW changes correlated with changes in functional mobility and balance measures. HDBR resulted in FW increases in fronto-temporal regions and decreases in posterior-parietal regions that largely recovered by two weeks post-HDBR. WM microstructure was unaffected by HDBR. FW decreased in the post-central gyrus and precuneus. We previously reported that gray matter increases in these regions were associated with less HDBR-induced balance impairment, suggesting adaptive structural neuroplasticity. Future studies are warranted to determine causality and underlying mechanisms.

  19. Total intravenous anesthesia: advantages for intracranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Chad D; Gottfried, Oren N; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Couldwell, William T

    2007-11-01

    Although volatile anesthetics have been widely accepted in anesthetic management for neurosurgery, they reduce vascular resistance, resulting in increased cerebral blood flow and increased intracranial pressure (ICP). In patients with elevated ICP who undergo craniotomy, the increase in ICP during surgery from inhaled anesthetics can make the surgery more difficult, thereby increasing the risk of ischemic cerebral insults. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and analgesic drugs (remifentanil or fentanyl) and excluding simultaneous administration of any inhaled drugs is being used in patients undergoing craniotomy because of its potential to reduce ICP and ease access to the operative site. We reviewed the literature and describe our experience with TIVA, with emphasis on hemodynamic stability, effects on ICP, emergence from anesthesia, extubation times, and return of cognitive function in patients undergoing craniotomy for space-occupying lesions. TIVA with propofol is similar to inhaled anesthetics with regard to hemodynamic stability, emergence times, extubation times, early cognitive function, and adverse events. In several prospective, randomized clinical trials, evidence suggests that ICP is decreased and cerebral perfusion pressure is increased in patients receiving TIVA when compared with those receiving volatile anesthetics during elective craniotomy procedures. The impact of TIVA on ICP, brain swelling, and access to the operative site in patients with severely elevated ICP has yet to be evaluated and is the subject of a future study at our institution.

  20. Suppurative intracranial processes in 15 domestic ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Lopes Câmara

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to listeriosis which is relatively common in ruminants, there are three other uncommon suppurative intracranial processes (SIP identifiable in adult ungulates as brain abscess, basilar empyema and suppurative meningitis. The present paper reports the epidemiological, clinical, laboratorial, pathological and microbiological findings of 15 domestic ruminants with SIP. A total of 15 animals were selected (eight sheep, four cattle and three goats; with the definitive diagnoses of basilar empyema (n=3, brain abscess (n=1, listeriosis (n=5 and suppurative meningitis (n=6. Hematology revealed leukocytosis with inversion of the lymphocyte/ neutrophil ratio in 4 cases. In the majority of animals, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF presented light yellow coloration and cloudy aspect due to neutrophilic pleocytosis (15 - 997 leukocytes/µL. Microbiological culture of CSF or central nervous system (CNS fragments resulted on isolation of Trueperella (Arcanobacterium pyogenes,Listeria monocytogenes,Escherichia coli and Stenotrophomonas sp. In a goat with thalamic abscess, microbiological assay was not performed, but Gram positive bacilli type bacteria were observed in histology. The diagnosis of these outbreaks was based on the association of epidemiological, clinical, pathological and bacteriological findings; reiterating that the infectious component remains an important cause of CNS disease in domestic ruminants and also shows the need for dissemination of information about the most effective preventive measures for the ranchers.

  1. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  2. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  3. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  4. Factors Influencing Lesion Formation During Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf J. Eick

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In radiofrequency (RF ablation, the heating of cardiac tissue is mainly resistive. RF current heats cardiac tissue and in turn the catheter electrode is being heated. Consequently, the catheter tip temperature is always lower - or ideally equal - than the superficial tissue temperature. The lesion size is influenced by many parameters such as delivered RF power, electrode length, electrode orientation, blood flow and tissue contact. This review describes the influence of these different parameters on lesion formation and provides recommendations for different catheter types on selectable parameters such as target temperatures, power limits and RF durations

  5. Spiculated Bladder Calculi: The Culprit for Repeated Catheter Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the case of a frustrated 90-year-old gentleman who was seen in the Accident and Emergency department for the third time in four days with failure of his long-term urethral catheter. He reported that the catheter simply “fell out” with the balloon deflated. On each occasion previously, the catheter had been reinserted in A&E and the patient discharged home. These repeated visits to A&E were understandably a source of much frustration for the patient and his family. On the third presentation, plain abdominal radiography demonstrated a large spiculated bladder calculus.

  6. New percutaneous and retrieval vena cava catheter filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieronne, A.; Cuingnet, P.; Dehont, G.; Boutaud, P.; Delenzenne, A.; Joffre, P.; Lemoinne, J.P.; Quesnel, F.; Fajadet, P.; Rousseau, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a new percutaneous and retrievable vena cava filter assessed. The authors used the Seldinger technique for percutaneous insertion of the 10-F catheter filter through the right internal jugular vein with fluoroscopic guidance. The authors used fibrinolytic agents (streptokinase) by direct infusion through the catheter filter. Venocavography and pulmonary angiography were performed at day 5 and day 10 before removal of the catheter filter at the patient's bed. This vena cava percutaneous filter was made for use by radiologists, interventional cardiologists, and staff of intensive care units. The compilation rate for this technique was low

  7. [Prevention of catheter-related infection: usefulness and cost-effectiveness of antiseptic catheters in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Ana M; Vassallo, Juan C; Moreno, Guillermo E; Althabe, María; Gómez, Silvia; Magliola, Ricardo; Casimir, Lidia; Bologna, Rosa; Barretta, Jorge; Ruffa, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the antiseptic-impregnated catheter compared with conventional catheters in preventing catheter- related blood stream infections (CR-BSI). Cost-effectiveness analysis; clinical trial, experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, open label. Patients and methods. A 172 patient cohort, under 1-year-old or less than 10 kg, postoperative cardiovascular children with central venous catheters (CVC) admitted to Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (UCI 35) at Hospital Nacional de Pediatría "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan", since September 2005 to December 2007. Demographic and CVC data were retrieved to compare: age, gender, weight, diagnosis, surgery, CVC days, costs and complications. Intervention. CVC Arrow, double-lumen, > 48 h of duration; intervention group: antiseptic-impregnated CVC vs. control group: CVC without antiseptics (conventional). The incidence of CR-IE (CR-Infected Events: colonization, local infection and/or CRBSI; combined end point) was 27% for antiseptic- impregnated CVC vs. 31% for conventional catheters (p= 0.6) with similar accumulated incidence of CR- BSI: 2.8 vs. 3.3 per 1000 dayscatheter. We found no differences between groups, except in weight: median 4.0 kg (r 2-17) vs. 4.7 kg (r 2-9) p= 0.0002 and age, median 2 months (r 1- 48) vs. 5 months (r 1- 24) p= 0.0019 in antiseptic-impregnated CVC group. These differences, though statistically significant were clinically non relevant. Median cost per patient during intensive care stay in the conventional CVC group was $3.417 (359-9.453) and in the antiseptic-impregnated-CVC group was $4.962 (239-24.532), p= 0.10. The use of antiseptic-impregnated CVC compared with conventional CVC did not decrease CR-BSI in this population. The cost per patients was higher in the antiseptic impregnated CVC group. These results do not support the routine use of this type of CVC in our population.

  8. Visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazife Sefi-Yurdakul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the visual findings as primary manifestations in patients with intracranial tumors.METHODS:The medical charts of the patients with intracranial tumors who initially admitted to the Neuro-ophthalmology and Strabismus Department with ocular complaints between August 1999 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The detailed clinical history and the findings of neuro-ophthalmologic examination were recorded. Ocular symptoms and signs, the types and locations of intracranial tumors, and the duration of symptoms before the diagnosis were evaluated.RESULTS:The mean age of 11 women (61.1% and 7 men (38.9% was 42.2±11.0 (range 20-66y at the time of intracranial tumor diagnosis. Initial symptoms were transient visual obscurations, visual loss or visual field defect in 16 cases (88.9%, and diplopia in 2 cases (11.1%. Neuro-ophthalmologic examination revealed normal optic discs in both eyes of 6 patients (33.3%, paleness, atrophy or edema of optic disc in 12 patients (66.7%, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in 2 patients (11.1%. Visual acuity ranged between normal vision and loss of light perception. Cranial imaging demonstrated craniopharyngioma (n=1, plasmacytoma (n=1, meningioma (n=6; olfactory groove and tuberculum sellae, pontocerebellar angle, anterior cranial fossa, frontal vertex, suprasellar region, and pituitary macroadenoma (n=10. The mean duration between the onset of visual disturbances and the diagnosis of intracranial tumor was 9.8±18mo (range 3d-6y.CONCLUSION:The ophthalmologist is frequently the first physician to encounter a patient with clinical manifestations of intracranial tumors that may cause neurological and ocular complications. Neuro-ophthalmologic findings should be carefully evaluated to avoid a delay in the diagnosis of intracranial tumors.

  9. Dynamic Cerebrovascular and Intracranial Pressure Reactivity Assessment of Impaired Cerebrovascular Autoregulation in Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    We previously suggested that the discrepancy between a critical cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) of 30 mmHg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure (ICP), and 60 mmHg, obtained by decreasing arterial pressure, was due to pathological microvascular shunting at high ICP [1], and that the determination of the critical CPP by the static cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation curve is not valid with intracranial hypertension. Here, we demonstrated that induced dynamic ICP reactivity (iPRx), and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVRx) tests accurately identify the critical CPP in the hypertensive rat brain, which differs from that obtained by the static autoregulation curve. Step changes in CPP from 70 to 50 and 30 mmHg were made by increasing ICP using an artificial cerebrospinal fluid reservoir connected to the cisterna magna. At each CPP, a transient 10-mmHg increase in arterial pressure was induced by bolus intravenous dopamine. iPRx and iCVRx were calculated as ΔICP/Δ mean arterial pressure (MAP) and as ΔCBF/ΔMAP, respectively. The critical CPP at high ICP, obtained by iPRx and iCVRx, is 50 mmHg, where compromised capillary flow, transition of blood flow to nonnutritive microvascular shunts, tissue hypoxia, and brain-blood barrier leakage begin to occur, which is higher than the 30 mmHg determined by static autoregulation.

  10. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm and International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms cohorts : Differences in multiplicity and location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackey, Jason; Brown, Robert D; Moomaw, Charles J; Sauerbeck, Laura; Hornung, Richard; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Woo, Daniel; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L; Meissner, Irene; Anderson, Craig; Connolly, E Sander; Rouleau, Guy; Kallmes, David F; Torner, James; Huston, John; Broderick, Joseph P; Groen, Rob

    OBJECT: Familial predisposition is a recognized nonmodifiable risk factor for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). However, data regarding the characteristics of familial IAs are limited. The authors sought to describe familial IAs more fully, and to compare their

  11. Epidemiological and imaging features of intracranial aneurysms in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Huan-yu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays, the epidemiological report and study about the intracranial aneurysms in young adults are very rare, especially in China. This paper aims to investigate the epidemiological and imaging features of intracranial aneurysms in young adults with the age of 16-29 years old. Methods Clinical data of 2119 patients with intracranial aneurysms admitted from January 2010 to October 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results Intracranial aneurysms in young adults (16-29 years old accounted for 1.93% of all intracranial aneurysms (41/2119 treated in the same period, and the gender ratio (male : female was 2.15 : 1. A total of 42 intracranial aneurysms were found in 41 patients, including 35 located in the anterior circulation and 7 in the posterior circulation, of which 13 aneurysms (30.95% in the anterior communicating artery, 6 aneurysms (14.29% each in the middle cerebral artery and the distal of anterior cerebral artery, and 2 aneurysms (4.76% in the posterior communicating artery. There were almost 34 aneurysms (80.95% located in bifurcation of Willis circle and proximal aorta and 8 aneurysms (19.05% in the branches of artery. The diameter of aneurysms were ≤5 mm in 19 aneurysms (45.24%, 6-10mm in 13 (30.95%, 11-24 mm in 3 (7.14% and ≥25mm in 7 (16.67%. Conclusion Young men are much more susceptible to intracranial aneurysms than young women, but the incidence in women increases as they grow old. The anterior communicating artery is the predilection site of intracranial aneurysms in young adults (16-29 years old, and the occurence of giant aneurysms and the aneurysms in the posterior circulation and the distal of anterior cerebral artery is common. The epidemiological and imaging features and gender ratio of intracranial aneurysms in young adults (16-29 years old are similar to those in children and adolesents, but much different from adult patients.

  12. Deep Neural Architectures for Mapping Scalp to Intracranial EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Andreas; Spyrou, Loukianos; Martin-Lopez, David; Valentin, Antonio; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Sanei, Saeid; Took, Clive Cheong

    2018-03-19

    Data is often plagued by noise which encumbers machine learning of clinically useful biomarkers and electroencephalogram (EEG) data is no exemption. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) data enhances the training of deep learning models of the human brain, yet is often prohibitive due to the invasive recording process. A more convenient alternative is to record brain activity using scalp electrodes. However, the inherent noise associated with scalp EEG data often impedes the learning process of neural models, achieving substandard performance. Here, an ensemble deep learning architecture for nonlinearly mapping scalp to iEEG data is proposed. The proposed architecture exploits the information from a limited number of joint scalp-intracranial recording to establish a novel methodology for detecting the epileptic discharges from the sEEG of a general population of subjects. Statistical tests and qualitative analysis have revealed that the generated pseudo-intracranial data are highly correlated with the true intracranial data. This facilitated the detection of IEDs from the scalp recordings where such waveforms are not often visible. As a real-world clinical application, these pseudo-iEEGs are then used by a convolutional neural network for the automated classification of intracranial epileptic discharges (IEDs) and non-IED of trials in the context of epilepsy analysis. Although the aim of this work was to circumvent the unavailability of iEEG and the limitations of sEEG, we have achieved a classification accuracy of 68% an increase of 6% over the previously proposed linear regression mapping.

  13. Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Presenting With Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Sietze; Stokroos, Robert; Weber, Jacobiene W; van Tongeren, Joost

    2015-12-01

    To present the rare case of a young boy with idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss developing over several months. This was accompanied by headaches, otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo. Furthermore, we aim to provide a concise review on this matter, as this report represents the second case in literature of pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with hearing loss. Workup of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, including (among others) physical examination, audiometry, diagnostic imaging, and lumbar puncture. Physical examination including fundoscopy as well as imaging showed no abnormalities. At presentation, pure tone audiometry revealed bone conduction thresholds of about 30 dB HL in both ears. Two months later, this declined to about 35 dB HL in both ears. Lumbar puncture revealed an increased intracranial pressure. The boy was thus diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. After the lumbar puncture, the otological complaints gradually resolved, and the hearing normalized (bone conduction thresholds of 0-5 dB HL). Although rare, sensorineural hearing loss in the pediatric population together with otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo can be due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and as such can be reversible. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Intracranial hemorrhage: principles of CT and MRI interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizel, P.M.; Makkat, S.; Miert, E. van; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage represents a frequent challenge for the practicing radiologist. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a synoptic overview of the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, using text, tables, and figures to illustrate time-dependent changes. We examine the underlying physical, biological, and biochemical factors of evolving hematoma and correlate them with the aspect on cross-sectional imaging techniques. On CT scanning, the appearance of intracranial blood is determined by density changes which occur over time, reflecting clot formation, clot retraction, clot lysis and, eventually, tissue loss. However, MRI has become the technique of choice for assessing the age of an intracranial hemorrhage. On MRI the signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage is much more complex and is influenced by multiple variables including: (a) age, location, and size of the lesion; (b) technical factors (e.g., sequence type and parameters, field strength); and (c) biological factors (e.g., pO2, arterial vs venous origin, tissue pH, protein concentration, presence of a blood-brain barrier, condition of the patient). We discuss the intrinsic magnetic properties of sequential hemoglobin degradation products. The differences in evolution between extra- and intracerebral hemorrhages are addressed and illustrated. (orig.)

  15. IDIOPATHIC INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A WOMAN WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan N. Dimitrov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH or benign intracranial hypertension is a neurological syndrome characterized by elevated intracranial pressure. This uncommon disorder occurs primarily in obese women aged 10 to 50 years, sometimes in association with endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, with systemic diseases or when treated with multiple medications. We describe a case of IIH in a 43-year-old woman with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, demonstrating a typical clinical picture of benign intracranial hypertension. For the 5 years of treatment with risperidone she put on 35 kg in total (BMI> 35; for the last 2-3 months she began to complain of visual obscurations, nausea with vomiting. Ophthalmoscopy revealed bilateral asymmetric papilledema (OD>OS. Magnetic resonance imaging was normal, intracranial pressure was elevated IIH was diagnosed. Risperidone was discontinued and replaced with Seroquel 200 mg daily. Treatment with furosemide and mannitol 10 % was initiated. Papilledema resolved completely over the next 2 months. The patient was followed-up for four years after risperidone withdrawal. Weight loss of 28 kg was noted for four years. There were no relapses of headache, nausea, visual obscuration. Ophthalmologic examination revealed no papilledema.We suggest that prolonged use of antipsychotics, such as risperidone, should require proper surveillance for possible development of IIH and routine ophthalmologic examinations should be performed.

  16. Sinusitis and intracranial sepsis: the CT imaging and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxton, V.J.; Boldt, D.W.; Shield, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    The CT imaging and clinical presentation in 14 children with coexistent intracranial sepsis and sinusitis were reviewed. A routine CT head scan (10-mm thick semi-axial slices through the cranium done before and after intravenous contrast medium administration) was found to be an inadequate initial investigation as the intracranial collection was missed in four patients and the abnormal sinuses not shown in six. In half the children the dagnosis of sinusitis was unsuspected at the time of admission. The dominant clinical features were fever, intense headache and facial swelling in early adolescent males. In this clinical setting we recommend: (1) The routine scan is extended through the frontal and ethmoidal sinuses and photographed at a window level and width showing both bone detail and air/soft tissue interfaces; (2) direct coronal projections are performed through the anterior cranial fossa if no collection is seen on the routine study; (3) an early repeat scan within 48 h if the initial study shows no intracranial pathology but the fronto-ethomoidal sinuses are abnormal and there is a high clinical supicion of intracranial sepsis; and (4) in the presence of intracranial sepsis the vault is viewed at bone window settings to exclude cranial osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  17. Intracranial hemorrhage: principles of CT and MRI interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizel, P.M.; Makkat, S.; Miert, E. van; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de [Dept. of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium)

    2001-09-01

    Accurate diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage represents a frequent challenge for the practicing radiologist. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a synoptic overview of the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, using text, tables, and figures to illustrate time-dependent changes. We examine the underlying physical, biological, and biochemical factors of evolving hematoma and correlate them with the aspect on cross-sectional imaging techniques. On CT scanning, the appearance of intracranial blood is determined by density changes which occur over time, reflecting clot formation, clot retraction, clot lysis and, eventually, tissue loss. However, MRI has become the technique of choice for assessing the age of an intracranial hemorrhage. On MRI the signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage is much more complex and is influenced by multiple variables including: (a) age, location, and size of the lesion; (b) technical factors (e.g., sequence type and parameters, field strength); and (c) biological factors (e.g., pO2, arterial vs venous origin, tissue pH, protein concentration, presence of a blood-brain barrier, condition of the patient). We discuss the intrinsic magnetic properties of sequential hemoglobin degradation products. The differences in evolution between extra- and intracerebral hemorrhages are addressed and illustrated. (orig.)

  18. Which criteria demand additive stenting during catheter-directed thrombolysis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Just, S; Foegh, P

    2014-01-01

    Many factors are necessary for obtaining satisfactory results after catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Selections of patients, composition of the thrombolytic fluid, anticoagulation per- and post-procedural, recognition and treatment of persistent...

  19. Catheter Calibration Using Template Matching Line Interpolation Algorithm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagy, L

    2001-01-01

    ..., such as: image resolution, type of the calibration, algorithm used for contour detection, size of the FOV, other parameters of the image The studied calibration method is the one using catheter size...

  20. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented

  1. Subarachnoid pneumocephalus: a rare complication of epidural catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Robert; Jan, Rehana

    2002-11-01

    Several potential complications may occur during identification of the epidural space. We present a case of subarachnoid pneumocephalus as a rare complication of epidural catheter placement. Copyright 2002 by Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  3. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A; Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. METHODS: We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referred...

  4. RNA Sequencing Analysis of Intracranial Aneurysm Walls Reveals Involvement of Lysosomes and Immunoglobulins in Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinloog, Rachel; Verweij, Bon H.; van der Vlies, Pieter; Deelen, Patrick; Swertz, Morris A.; de Muynck, Louis; Van Damme, Philip; Giuliani, Fabrizio; Regli, Luca; van der Zwan, Albert; van der Sprenkel, Jan W. Berkelbach; Han, K. Sen; Gosselaar, Peter; van Rijen, Peter C.; Korkmaz, Emine; Post, Jan A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Veldink, Jan H.; Ruigrok, Ynte M.

    Background and Purpose-Analyzing genes involved in development and rupture of intracranial aneurysms can enhance knowledge about the pathogenesis of aneurysms, and identify new treatment strategies. We compared gene expression between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms and control intracranial

  5. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Vedran Premuzic; Lea Katalinic; Marijan Pasalic; Hrvoje Jurin

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumo...

  6. Temperature-controlled irrigated tip radiofrequency catheter ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with ventricular tachycardias due to structural heart disease, catheter ablation cures radiofrequency ablation. Irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation using power control and high infusion rates enlarges lesion......: We conclude that temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation with irrigated tip catheters using low target temperature and low infusion rate enlarges lesion size without increasing the incidence of cratering and reduces coagulum formation of the tip....

  7. Microbiological testing of devices used in maintaining peripheral venous catheters

    OpenAIRE

    Rossini, Fernanda de Paula; Andrade, Denise de; Santos, Lissandra Chaves de Sousa; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Tieppo, Caroline; Watanabe, Evandro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the use of peripheral venous catheters based on microbiological analysis of devices (dressing and three-way stopcocks) and thus contribute to the prevention and infection control. Methods: this was a prospective study of microbiological analysis of 30 three-way stopcocks (external surfaces and lumens) and 30 dressing used in maintaining the peripheral venous catheters of hospitalized adult patients. Results: all external surfaces, 40% of lumens, and 86.7% of...

  8. Massive hydrothorax with malpositioned central venous catheter – Ultrasound detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Hasija

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Radioimaging is the gold standard for confirmation of the position of central venous catheter as well as its related complications. Use of ultrasound has been proven in guiding central venous cannulations, and it can also be used in detecting related complications. We report a case of a 2 year old child with hydrothorax causing desaturation due to malpositioned central venous catheter diagnosed by ultrasound in the delay for getting a radiograph.

  9. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou J; Zamdborg L; Sebastian E

    2015-01-01

    Jun Zhou,1,2 Leonid Zamdborg,1 Evelyn Sebastian1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, 2Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI, USA Abstract: The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy ...

  10. Intracranial Atypical Meningiomas: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Man Yip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atypical meningiomas fall into a category World Health Organization Grade II, which have higher local recurrence rates and lower survival rates than their benign counterparts. The aim of this study is to review the outcome of newly diagnosed patients with atypical meningioma after therapy. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of patients having atypical meningiomas who were treated in our hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. Their age, sex, initial presentation, tumor location, tumor size, extent of resection, tumor recurrence or tumor progression, duration of follow-up, adjuvant therapy, and outcome were reviewed. Results: There were 27 consecutive patients (15 male and 12 female having fresh intracranial atypical meningiomas treated in our hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. Their mean age at diagnosis was 60.81 years. Twenty-three patients (85.19% underwent total resection of the tumor, whereas 4 patients (14.81% had partial resection of their tumors during their first time of surgery. Fifteen patients (55.56% had finished adjuvant radiotherapy. Nine patients (33.33% had tumor progression or recurrence during follow-up, and 4 of them were proved to have malignant transformation to anaplastic meningiomas in the following operations. The mean time to tumor progression or recurrence of these nine patients was 17.67 months. Nineteen patients (70.37% had a favorable outcome, 7 patients (25.93% had an unfavorable outcome, and we lost 1 patient (3.7% due to disease progression. Conclusions: Surgery remains the standard treatment to atypical meningioma, and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy is still controversial especially to those who undergo total surgical resection of the tumors. Our study reveals that early postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy seems to play a role in local control. Atypical meningioma can have malignant transformation to anaplastic meningioma, so aggressive

  11. Recanalization and rupture after intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Emmanuel; Vaz, Geraldo R; Finet, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; Docquier, Marie A; Raftopoulos, Christian

    2016-11-25

    Treatment of intra cranial aneurysm (ICA) can sometimes required several procedures. The aim of this study is to analyze the risk of recanalization and rupture recurrence after ICA treatment by endovascular coiling (EVC) or surgical clipping (SC) on a very long follow-up. Clinical data of 373 consecutive patients treated in our group between January 1996 and December 2006 as well by EVC as by SC for ruptured (RIA) or unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), were reviewed. Patients were followed up at least to August 2009. First radiologic follow-up done six months after EVC and between three and five years after SC (median time: 5 years)). All patients underwent a clinical follow-up after treatment, at least by telephonic communication (median time: 6 years). Out of 197 patients with 198 RIAs, 82 (42 %) patients underwent an endovascular treatment and 115 (58%) were allocated to surgical treatment. From a total of 176 patients with 229 UIAs, 66 (37.5%) patients were treated by 74 EVC; and 110 (62.5%) patients were treated with 124 surgical procedures. Fifteen recanalizations of coiled RIAs were detected and only one in the surgical group (27% vs. 2%; p= 0.0008). Of the 15 recanalizations in the EVC group, 6 (40%) were initially completely occluded. We observed two rebleedings, one in each group (1.4% for EVC; 1% for SC; p=0.8). Our findings during the longest reported follow-up confirm a greater risk of recanalization for RIA treated by EVC without so far a significant difference in the rerupture risk.

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of small intracranial malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Minoru; Shibui, Soichiro; Nomura, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with small intracranial malignancies. Methods and Materials: From July 1991 to March 1997, 80 patients with a total of 121 brain or skull-base tumors were treated with FSRT alone, and were followed for periods ranging from 3 to 62 months (median 9.8). The majority of patients received 42 Gy in 7 fractions over 2.3 weeks, but in July 1993, protocols using smaller fraction doses were introduced for patients whose radiation-field diameters were larger than 3 cm or whose tumors were close to critical normal tissues. Results: For 64 patients with metastatic brain tumors the overall median survival was 8.3 months and 1-year actuarial survival rate was 33%. Significant prognostic factors were: the presence of extracranial tumors, pre-treatment performance status, and the lung as a primary site. Patients without extracranial tumors prior to FSRT had a median survival of 21.2 months. For seven patients with high-grade glioma, 1-year actuarial local control rate was 75%, with a median survival of 10.3 months. For patients with skull-base tumors the local control was achieved in 6 of 6 patients (100%), with a median survival of 30.7 months. No one suffered from acute complications, but three patients, two of whom had undergone FSRT as the third course of radiotherapy, developed late radiation injuries. Conclusion: Overall high local control and low morbidity rates suggest that FSRT is an effective and safe modality, even for those with a history of prior irradiation. However, patients with risk factors should be treated with smaller fraction doses

  13. Lifetime Effects of Small Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishima, Kaoru; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Aihara, Masanori; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2016-11-01

    Recent prospective multicenter studies have shown that the probability of rupture of unruptured aneurysms with maximal diameter <7 mm is rather low. However, the overall risks and long-term impact of unruptured aneurysms on lifetime quality of life are still unknown. A mathematical model of the natural history of intracranial aneurysms was constructed, in which the hypothetical individuals with or without unruptured aneurysm transit between discrete health states. The annual rupture rate of small aneurysms was assumed to be 0.5% in the baseline analysis, followed by the subsequent sensitivity analysis. The analyses were continued until cumulative death rate from subarachnoid hemorrhage or other causes reached 1.0. Age-specific ratios of death of subarachnoid hemorrhage in the individuals harboring unruptured aneurysm, if dying at 60 years old, were 25% in men and 43% in women. These ratios decreased rapidly with higher age. Most (more than 90%) patients with small aneurysms were expected to die of diseases other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the baseline analysis (60-year-old individuals), lifetime lost to small aneurysms could be estimated as 3.8% for men and 4.2% for women, but a somewhat larger impact could be identified in the young and/or female individuals compared with in the elderly and/or male individuals. Lifetime effects of small unruptured aneurysms without risk factors increasing the probability of rupture are relatively small, and most patients were expected to die of diseases other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Venous sinus stenting for reduction of intracranial pressure in IIH: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kenneth C; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Wang, Tony R; Ding, Dale; Crowley, R Webster; Newman, Steven A

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may cause blindness due to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). Venous sinus stenosis has been identified in select patients, leading to stenting as a potential treatment, but its effects on global ICP have not been completely defined. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the effects of venous sinus stenting on ICP in a small group of patients with IIH. METHODS Ten patients for whom medical therapy had failed were prospectively followed. Ophthalmological examinations were assessed, and patients with venous sinus stenosis on MR angiography proceeded to catheter angiography, venography with assessment of pressure gradient, and ICP monitoring. Patients with elevated ICP measurements and an elevated pressure gradient across the stenosis were treated with stent placement. RESULTS All patients had elevated venous pressure (mean 39.5 ± 14.9 mm Hg), an elevated gradient across the venous sinus stenosis (30.0 ± 13.2 mm Hg), and elevated ICP (42.2 ± 15.9 mm Hg). Following stent placement, all patients had resolution of the stenosis and gradient (1 ± 1 mm Hg). The ICP values showed an immediate decrease (to a mean of 17.0 ± 8.3 mm Hg), and further decreased overnight (to a mean of 8 ± 4.2 mm Hg). All patients had subjective and objective improvement, and all but one improved during follow-up (median 23.4 months; range 15.7-31.6 months). Two patients developed stent-adjacent stenosis; retreatment abolished the stenosis and gradient in both cases. Patients presenting with papilledema had resolution on follow-up funduscopic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and improvement on visual field testing. Patients presenting with optic atrophy had optic nerve thinning on follow-up OCT, but improved visual fields. CONCLUSIONS For selected patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis with an elevated pressure gradient and elevated ICP, venous sinus stenting results in resolution of the venous pressure

  15. Increased risk of cervical canal infections with intracervical Foley catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Salva; Zuberi, Nadeem Faiyaz; Zafar, Afia; Qureshi, Rahat Najam

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of intracervical Foley catheter insertion, for the induction of labor, on cervical canal infection. A prospective interventional study with paired analysis. The study was conducted in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, between June 1 and August 31, 2002. SUBJECTS AND METHODS In 45 women undergoing cervical ripening with intracervical Foley catheter for the induction of labour at term, cervical swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity before its insertion and again after its spontaneous expulsion or removal. Intracervical Foley catheter was retained for mean duration of 8.1 +/- 1.7 hours. There was a significant change in the pathogenic organisms (0 % v 16.3 %; p 0.016) from pre-Foley to post-Foley catheter cervical swab cultures. Growth of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus group-B, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Gardnerella vaginalis on cervical swab were considered pathogenic. One woman (2.2 %) developed fever following insertion of intracervical Foley catheter. No statistically significant effect of potential confounding factors was observed on change in growth of pathogenic organisms. Induction of labour at term with Foley catheter is associated with a significant increase in intracervical pathogenic organisms despite undertaking routine aseptic measures. We recommend evaluation of this technique for its potential infectious harm in larger studies. Meanwhile, extreme aseptic measures should be undertaken during its insertion to avoid maternal and possible neonatal infections.

  16. [Effectiveness of intracervical catheter as a labor preinduction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro-Małysza, Jolanta; Marciniak, Beata; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Bartosiewicz, Jacek; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the efficacy and safety of the Foley catheter as a cervical priming agent. Data analysis concern 327 women undergoing cervical ripening with intracervical Foley catheter. The primary measured outcome was ripening of the cervix as measured with the Bishop score. The secondary outcomes were the timings starting from balloon removal (or from spontaneous expulsion) to delivery the preinduction-delivery interval, mode of delivery frequency of side effects and neonatal outcome. The most common indications for induction were post-term and non-reassuring fetal status. Intracervical Foley catheter was retained for mean duration of 15 hours 35 minutes. Bishop score rise after preinduction time was statistically significant (3.29 +/- 1.16 at the balloon insertion; 6.85 +/- 1.7 at the removal of the Foley catheter). Mean Bishop score change was 3.56 +/- 1.58. The average interval from balloon expulsion to delivery was 8 hours 27 minutes, the preinduction-delivery interval - 24 hours 3 minutes. Out of 327 women undergoing cervical ripening with the Foley catheter 236 (72.17%) had vaginal delivery 91 (27.38%)--cesarean delivery. The rate of vaginal delivery was significantly higher in the multiparous group (85.32%) when compared to nulliparous (65.6%). In 312 neonates (94.8%), the Apgar score at 3 min was more than 8. Intracervical Foley catheter is an effective and safe agent for cervical ripening.

  17. Needle catheter duodenostomy: a technique for duodenal alimentation of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, R L; Goldman, A; Kaufman, K J; Roberts, C; Quesenberry, K E; Kollias, G V

    1986-11-01

    A technique for duodenal alimentation (needle catheter duodenostomy) of birds was developed, using the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) as the experimental model. A needle catheter was inserted into the descending duodenum of 5 pigeons and was secured to the body wall and dorsum of each bird. A liquid diet was administered daily (in equal amounts of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hours) for 14 days without adverse effects. On day 15, the catheters were removed, and the birds immediately resumed normal consumption of a pigeon ration and water diet. Although 4 of the 5 birds had minor weight loss, dietary alterations probably could be used on an individual basis to alleviate this problem. After oral alimentation was resumed, the 5 birds exceeded their initial body weight within 7 days. Four weeks after catheter removal, positive-contrast radiographic evaluations indicated that the duodenum of each pigeon appeared normal. Needle catheter duodenostomy was a viable method of alimentation in the domestic pigeon. This technique should be applicable for other avian species requiring bypass of the upper gastrointestinal tract proximal to the region of catheter insertion in the duodenum.

  18. [A blind point of vent catheter: air aspiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, K; Orita, H; Shimanuki, T; Fukasawa, M; Gotou, S; Nakamura, C; Washio, M

    1993-05-01

    We experienced a case of saphenous vein air embolism after coronary artery bypass graft, in which case we used vent catheter kept in the left atrium. Though it was considered that air bubbles were never aspirated through vent catheter, we speculated that the origin of air bubbles must be the vent catheter. And we made an experiment on the motion of air in the vent catheter using a model of left heart composed with soft reserver (atrium) and pulsatile pump (ventricle). When the pulsatile pump was arrest, the air bubbles were never aspirated from the vent catheter to the soft reserver even if we vented with strong negative pressure. But, when the pulsatile pump was in motion and the left atrium was vented with some negative pressure, some leaks of air bubbles were recognized. So we must pay much more attention to the degree of venting when the heart is in motion. Sometimes we use overpressure safety valve composed with vent catheter, but measured left atrial pressure showed that decreased left atrial pressure was only 2 mmHg. So its use should be restricted in the patients with good ventricular function.

  19. Placement peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC): the upper arm approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, In Wook; Choo, Sung Wook; Choi, Dong Il; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Hwang, Jae Woong; Lim, Jae Hoon; Andrews, James C.; Williams, David M.; Cho, Kyung J.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate a recently developed technique to place a medium-duration (weeks to months) central venous access. Within three-year period, 635 patients were referred to interventional radiology suite for placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). Contrast medium was injected into the peripheral intravenous line and a puncture was made into the opacified vein near the junction of the middle and upper thirds of the upper arm, either the brachial or basilic vein under fluoroscopic guidance. A 5.5-French peel-away sheath was inserted into the vein and a 5-French silicone catheter was introduced with its distal tip to the junction of the right atrium and superior vena cava. Catheter placement was successful in all patients unless there was a central venous obstruction. Catheters were maintained from 2 days to 5 months with a mean of 3 weeks. Complications included infection requiring removal of the PICC in 16 patients (2.5%), acute thrombosis of the subclavian vein in 3 (0.5%). Occluded catheters in 4 patients were easily cleared with urokinase in place. The PICC system is an excellent option for medium-duration central venous access. Patients were able to carry on normal activities with the catheters in place

  20. Placement peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC): the upper arm approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, In Wook; Choo, Sung Wook; Choi, Dong Il; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Hwang, Jae Woong; Lim, Jae Hoon [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Andrews, James C. [Mayo Clinic, Lansing (United States); Williams, David M.; Cho, Kyung J. [University of Michigan Hospital, Lansing (United States)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate a recently developed technique to place a medium-duration (weeks to months) central venous access. Within three-year period, 635 patients were referred to interventional radiology suite for placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). Contrast medium was injected into the peripheral intravenous line and a puncture was made into the opacified vein near the junction of the middle and upper thirds of the upper arm, either the brachial or basilic vein under fluoroscopic guidance. A 5.5-French peel-away sheath was inserted into the vein and a 5-French silicone catheter was introduced with its distal tip to the junction of the right atrium and superior vena cava. Catheter placement was successful in all patients unless there was a central venous obstruction. Catheters were maintained from 2 days to 5 months with a mean of 3 weeks. Complications included infection requiring removal of the PICC in 16 patients (2.5%), acute thrombosis of the subclavian vein in 3 (0.5%). Occluded catheters in 4 patients were easily cleared with urokinase in place. The PICC system is an excellent option for medium-duration central venous access. Patients were able to carry on normal activities with the catheters in place.