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Sample records for intracellular ph compartmentation

  1. Work-related pain in extrinsic finger extensor musculature of instrumentalists is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Moreno-Torres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although non-specific pain in the upper limb muscles of workers engaged in mild repetitive tasks is a common occupational health problem, much is unknown about the associated structural and biochemical changes. In this study, we compared the muscle energy metabolism of the extrinsic finger extensor musculature in instrumentalists suffering from work-related pain with that of healthy control instrumentalists using non-invasive phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS. We hypothesize that the affected muscles will show alterations related with an impaired energy metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 19 volunteer instrumentalists (11 subjects with work-related pain affecting the extrinsic finger extensor musculature and 8 healthy controls. We used (31P-MRS to find deviations from the expected metabolic response to exercise in phosphocreatine (PCr, inorganic phosphate (Pi, Pi/PCr ratio and intracellular pH kinetics. We observed a reduced finger extensor exercise tolerance in instrumentalists with myalgia, an intracellular pH compartmentation in the form of neutral and acid compartments, as detected by Pi peak splitting in (31P-MRS spectra, predominantly in myalgic muscles, and a strong association of this pattern with the condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Work-related pain in the finger extrinsic extensor muscles is associated with intracellular pH compartmentation during exercise, non-invasively detectable by (31P-MRS and consistent with the simultaneous energy production by oxidative metabolism and glycolysis. We speculate that a deficit in energy production by oxidative pathways may exist in the affected muscles. Two possible explanations for this would be the partial and/or local reduction of blood supply and the reduction of the muscle oxidative capacity itself.

  2. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular pH, phosphate compartmentation and phosphate transport in yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolay, K.; Scheffers, W.A.; Bruinenberg, P.M.; Kaptein, R.

    1982-01-01

    31p NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of Candida utilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii grown aerobically on glucose. Direct introduction of substrate into the cell suspension, without interruption of the measurements, revealed rapid changes in pH upon addition of the

  3. Intracellular transport and compartmentation of phosphate in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaw, Wayne K; Garcia, L Rene

    2017-10-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is an essential macronutrient with structural and metabolic roles within every compartment of the plant cell. Intracellular Pi transporters direct Pi to each organelle and also control its exchange between subcellular compartments thereby providing the means to coordinate compartmented metabolic processes, including glycolysis, photosynthesis, and respiration. In this review we summarize recent advances in the identification and functional analysis of Pi transporters that localize to vacuoles, chloroplasts, non-photosynthetic plastids, mitochondria, and the Golgi apparatus. Electrical potentials across intracellular membranes and the pH of subcellular environments will also be highlighted as key factors influencing the energetics of Pi transport, and therefore pose limits for Pi compartmentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...

  5. Mapping intracellular diffusion distribution using single quantum dot tracking: compartmentalized diffusion defined by endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-01-14

    The crowded intracellular environment influences the diffusion-mediated cellular processes, such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. The hindered diffusion of macromolecules in heterogeneous cytoplasm has been studied over years, but the detailed diffusion distribution and its origin still remain unclear. Here, we introduce a novel method to map rapidly the diffusion distribution in single cells based on single-particle tracking (SPT) of quantum dots (QDs). The diffusion map reveals the heterogeneous intracellular environment and, more importantly, an unreported compartmentalization of QD diffusions in cytoplasm. Simultaneous observations of QD motion and green fluorescent protein-tagged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dynamics provide direct evidence that the compartmentalization results from micron-scale domains defined by ER tubules, and ER cisternae form perinuclear areas that restrict QDs to enter. The same phenomenon was observed using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans, further confirming the compartmentalized diffusion. These results shed new light on the diffusive movements of macromolecules in the cell, and the mapping of intracellular diffusion distribution may be used to develop strategies for nanoparticle-based drug deliveries and therapeutics.

  6. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3 buff...

  9. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  10. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...... might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of p......H(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV...

  11. Regulation of the Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System by Intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; HELLINGWERF, KJ; KONINGS, WN

    Various methods of manipulation of the intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis result in a unique relationship between the rate of glutamate and glutamine transport and the cytoplasmic pH. The initial rate of glutamate uptake by S. lactis cells increases more than 30-fold when the intracellular pH

  12. Hyperpolarised organic phosphates as NMR reporters of compartmental pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Pernille Rose; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-02-07

    Organic phosphate metabolites contain functional groups with pKa values near the physiologic pH range, yielding pH-dependent (13)C chemical shift changes of adjacent quaternary carbon sites. When formed in defined cellular compartments from exogenous hyperpolarised (13)C substrates, metabolites can thus yield localised pH values and correlations of organelle pH and catalytic activity.

  13. Polymeric gel nanoparticle pH sensors for intracellular measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki

    pH range is approximately 4 pH units and thus a nanoparticle sensor with two pH sensitive fluorophores is appropriate. With one pH sensitive fluorophore the output from the sensor follows R=R0+R1/10(pKa-pH), where R is the ratio of fluorescence for the two fluorophores, R0 is the minimum value of R...

  14. Hyperpolarised Organic Phosphates as NMR Reporters of Compartmental pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Rose; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Organic phosphate metabolites contain functional groups withpKa values near the physiologic pH range, yielding pH-dependet 13C chemical shift changes of adjacent quaternary carbon sites.Whenformed in defined cellular compartmentsfrom exogenoushyperpolarised13Csubstrates,metabolites thuscanyieldlo......Organic phosphate metabolites contain functional groups withpKa values near the physiologic pH range, yielding pH-dependet 13C chemical shift changes of adjacent quaternary carbon sites.Whenformed in defined cellular compartmentsfrom exogenoushyperpolarised13Csubstrates...

  15. Evaluating Nanoparticle Sensor Design for Intracellular pH Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2011-01-01

    quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pKa to each sensor, seem to be a solution...

  16. Decreased intracellular pH is not due to increased H+ extrusion in preconditioned rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, S A; Cross, H R; London, R E; Steenbergen, C; Murphy, E

    1997-11-01

    Ischemic preconditioning reduces intracellular acidification during a subsequent, prolonged period of ischemia. This may reflect decreased anaerobic glycolysis or increased H+ efflux. To distinguish between these hypotheses, we monitored intracellular and extracellular pH during a sustained period of ischemia to determine whether the preconditioned hearts had increased H+ efflux compared with nonpreconditioned hearts. At the end of 20 min of ischemia, intracellular pH in nonpreconditioned hearts was 5.90 +/- 0.08 and extracellular pH was 5.51 +/- 0.21, whereas in preconditioned hearts, intracellular pH was 6.50 +/- 0.06 and extracellular pH was 6.62 +/- 0.06. To investigate whether an Na+/H+ exchange inhibitor would alter the reduced acidification during ischemia, we preconditioned hearts with and without dimethylamiloride (DMA). Intracellular pH during ischemia was similar in preconditioned hearts with and without DMA treatment (pH 6.42 +/- 0.02 vs. 6.45 +/- 0.03, respectively). These data do not support the hypothesis that enhanced proton efflux is responsible for the more alkaline intracellular pH during sustained ischemia in preconditioned hearts.

  17. Intracellular pH homeostasis in the filamentous fungus Aspergillys niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesse, S.J.A.; Ruijter, G.J.G.; Dijkema, C.; Visser, J.

    2002-01-01

    Intracellular pH homeostasis in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger was measured in real time by 31P NMR during perfusion in the NMR tube of fungal biomass immobilized in Ca2 -alginate beads. The fungus maintained constant cytoplasmic pH (pHcyt) and vacuolar pH (pHvac) values of 7.6 and 6.2,

  18. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on intracellular pH using 31P-MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Ito, Haruhide; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Kitahara, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Naoto; Saito, Kennichi

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the intracellular pH of the brain and cerebral blood flow (CBF); five normal volunteers were studied. Intracellular pH and CBF were measured by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) and stable xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT), respectively. Each individual received 7% sodium bicarbonate (3.5 ml/kg body weight), infused intravenously over a 15-min period. Intracellular pH, CBF, and physiological parameters were determined before and after the injection. Intracellular pH was significantly decreased and CBF was increased. Among the physiological parameters, the hematocrit was significantly decreased and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ), increased. These results suggest that increasing CO 2 contributes to the decrease in intracellular pH. In conclusion, three factors increase CBF during the administration of sodium bicarbonate to humans: arterial dilatation in response to carbon dioxide; decrease of the hematocrit, and intracellular cerebral acidosis. (author)

  19. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism.

  20. Intracellular compartmentation of cardiac fibres from rainbow trout and Atlantic cod - a general design of heart cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, R.; Gesser, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Previously identified, potentially neuroprotective reactions of neuroglobin require the existence of yet unknown redox partners. We show here that the reduction of ferric neuroglobin by cytochrome b5 is relatively slow (k=6×102M-1s-1 at pH 7.0) and thus is unlikely to be of physiological signific...

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular pH and pH homeostasis in the hog carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieder, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pH i ) is an important determinant of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractility and relaxation. Most NMR measurement of pH have been calculated from the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (P i ) in 31 P spectra. An alternative approach is to calculate pH from the difference in chemical shifts of signals in the 19 F spectrum of cells loaded with difluoromethylalanine. This technique has higher sensitivity to pH changes and provides better time resolution than other NMR methods. In this study we report simultaneous measurements of pH i and the contractile state of single, intact hog carotid arterial segments, closed at both ends and superfused with HCO 3 - -buffered Krebs solution at physiological pressures. At 28 degree C, resting arteries maintained a pH i of 7.15 ± 0.03 units (n = 16). In a parallel study, helically cut strips studied with 31 P NMR maintained a similar resting pH (7.18 ± 0.09)

  2. Intracellular pH Campylobacter jejuni when treated with aqueous chlorine dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smigic, Nada; Rajkovic, Andreja; Arneborg, Nils

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of Campylobacter jejuni at single-cell level when exposed to different concentrations of chlorine dioxide (ClO2). The parameter of choice, intracellular pH (pHi), was determined by using fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy with a p...

  3. Intracellular pH regulation in colonocytes of rat proximal colon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Vylitová-Pletichová, Martina; Beskid, Sergej; Zicha, Josef; Pácha, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 1536, 2-3 (2001), s. 103-115 ISSN 0925-4439 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011713 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : colon * sodium/hydrogen exchange * potassium-dependent intracellular pH regulation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.557, year: 2000

  4. Effect of altitude on brain intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xian-Feng; Carlson, Paul J; Kim, Tae-Suk; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L; Fiedler, Kristen K; Kim, Seong-Eun; Glaeser, Breanna; Wang, Kristina; Zuo, Chun S; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F; Kondo, Douglas G

    2014-06-30

    Normal brain activity is associated with task-related pH changes. Although central nervous system syndromes associated with significant acidosis and alkalosis are well understood, the effects of less dramatic and chronic changes in brain pH are uncertain. One environmental factor known to alter brain pH is the extreme, acute change in altitude encountered by mountaineers. However, the effect of long-term exposure to moderate altitude has not been studied. The aim of this two-site study was to measure brain intracellular pH and phosphate-bearing metabolite levels at two altitudes in healthy volunteers, using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Increased brain pH and reduced inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels were found in healthy subjects who were long-term residents of Salt Lake City, UT (4720ft/1438m), compared with residents of Belmont, MA (20ft/6m). Brain intracellular pH at the altitude of 4720ft was more alkaline than that observed near sea level. In addition, the ratio of inorganic phosphate to total phosphate signal also shifted toward lower values in the Salt Lake City region compared with the Belmont area. These results suggest that long-term residence at moderate altitude is associated with brain chemical changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nanoparticle-based luminescent probes for intracellular sensing and imaging of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäferling, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging microscopy is an essential tool in biomedical research. Meanwhile, various fluorescent probes are available for the staining of cells, cell membranes, and organelles. Though, to monitor intracellular processes and dysfunctions, probes that respond to ubiquitous chemical parameters determining the cellular function such as pH, pO2 , and Ca(2+) are required. This review is focused on the progress in the design, fabrication, and application of photoluminescent nanoprobes for sensing and imaging of pH in living cells. The advantages of using nanoprobes carrying fluorescent pH indicators compared to single molecule probes are discussed as well as their limitations due to the mostly lysosomal uptake by cells. Particular attention is paid to ratiometric dual wavelength nanosensors that enable intrinsic referenced measurements. Referencing and proper calibration procedures are basic prerequisites to carry out reliable quantitative pH determinations in complex samples such as living cells. A variety of examples will be presented that highlight the diverseness of nanocarrier materials (polymers, micelles, silica, quantum dots, carbon dots, gold, photon upconversion nanocrystals, or bacteriophages), fluorescent pH indicators for the weak acidic range, and referenced sensing mechanisms, that have been applied intracellularly up to now. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:378-413. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1366 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. In situ probing of intracellular pH by fluorescence from inorganic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junhong; Xiong, Shijie; Wu, Xinglong; Shen, Jiancang; Chu, Paul K

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) plays a critical role in the physiological processes of cells. Nanoscale sensors based on pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins attached on nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed but inorganic NP-dependent fluorescent nanosensors have not yet been explored. Herein we describe a pH sensitive inorganic semiconductor fluorescent probe based on ultrathin 3C-SiC NPs which can effectively monitor pH in the range of 5.6-7.4 by taking advantage of the linear dependence between the fluorescent intensity ratio of the surface OH(-) and H(+) bonding states to band-to-band recombination and pH. Detection of pHi is demonstrated in living HeLa cells. In particular, pHi measurements during apoptosis confirm the validity and sensitivity of this technique in monitoring real-time changes in the intracellular environment. Toxicity assessment and confocal laser scanning microscopy indicate that the 3C-SiC NPs have low cytotoxicity and are compatible with living cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasmalemmal V-H+-ATPases regulate intracellular pH in human lung microvascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sennoune, Souad R.; Maiti, Debasish; Martinez, Gloria M.; Bakunts, Karina; Wesson, Donald E.; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The lung endothelium layer is exposed to continuous CO 2 transit which exposes the endothelium to a substantial acid load that could be detrimental to cell function. The Na + /H + exchanger and HCO 3 - -dependent H + -transporting mechanisms regulate intracellular pH (pH cyt ) in most cells. Cells that cope with high acid loads might require additional primary energy-dependent mechanisms. V-H + -ATPases localized at the plasma membranes (pmV-ATPases) have emerged as a novel pH regulatory system. We hypothesized that human lung microvascular endothelial (HLMVE) cells use pmV-ATPases, in addition to Na + /H + exchanger and HCO 3 - -based H + -transporting mechanisms, to maintain pH cyt homeostasis. Immunocytochemical studies revealed V-H + -ATPase at the plasma membrane, in addition to the predicted distribution in vacuolar compartments. Acid-loaded HLMVE cells exhibited proton fluxes in the absence of Na + and HCO 3 - that were similar to those observed in the presence of either Na + , or Na + and HCO 3 - . The Na + - and HCO 3 - -independent pH cyt recovery was inhibited by bafilomycin A 1 , a V-H + -ATPase inhibitor. These studies show a Na + - and HCO 3 - -independent pH cyt regulatory mechanism in HLMVE cells that is mediated by pmV-ATPases

  8. The effects of extracellular pH and hydroxycinnamic acids influence the intracellular pH of Brettanomyces bruxellensis DSM 7001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolongo, Simona; Siegumfeldt, Henrik; Aabo, Thomas Ask

    2014-01-01

    and intracellular pH changes in B. bruxellensis DSM 7001, in response to extracellular pH, as well as to the presence of an energy source and hydroxycinnamic acids, have been investigated in this paper by means of Fluorescent Ratio Imaging Microscopy (FRIM). The results show that B. bruxellensis DSM 7001 is able...

  9. Effects of arachnotoxin on intracellular pH and calcium in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Fernando; Cunha, Maria Adelaide; Sanchez, Raul; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira; Schor, Nestor; Oshiro, Maria Etsuko Miyamoto

    2007-06-01

    To determine the effect of arachnotoxin (ATx), a venom extracted from the Chilean spider Latrodectus mactans, on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and pH (pH(i)) in capacitated human spermatozoa. Spermatozoa were collected from fertile adult men (n = 8). Mobile spermatozoa were collected by the "swim up" technique and stimulated with the crude extract of ATx and with progesterone (P). Hospital of the Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. [Ca(2+)](i) was measured in fura2-AM-loaded spermatozoa, and pH(i) was measured in spermatozoa loaded with the pH-sensitive dye [(2',7')-bis (carboxymethyl)-(5,6)-carboxyfluorescein]-AM (BCECF). The ATx and P induced a biphasic change in [Ca(2+)](i) consisting of a peak followed by a small but sustained elevation. The response to ATx was greatly reduced by pretreatment with P. The ATx caused intracellular acidification, whereas P induced alkalinization. Blockade of the NA(+)/H(+) exchanger with ethylisopropylamiloride (EIPA) sharply increased ATx-induced acidification. Arachnotoxin increased [Ca(2+)](i) through the opening of calcium channels and release of calcium from intracellular stores. The ATx reduced pH(i) in human sperm, possibly by inhibiting the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger.

  10. Compartmentalization today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2006-01-01

    For more than 30 years, the compartmentdization concept has helped tree care practitioners and land managers interpret patterns of decay in living trees. Understanding these patterns can help guide the selection of treatments that meet the needs of people and communities while respecting the underlying tree biology. At its simplest, compartmentalization resists the...

  11. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Effects of Oxygen Availability on Acetic Acid Tolerance and Intracellular pH in Dekkera bruxellensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capusoni, Claudia; Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Paolo; Moktaduzzaman, M.; Mora, Diego

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis, associated with wine and beer production, has recently received attention, because its high ethanol and acid tolerance enables it to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in distilleries that produce fuel ethanol. We investigated how different cultivation conditions affect the acetic acid tolerance of D. bruxellensis. We analyzed the ability of two strains (CBS 98 and CBS 4482) exhibiting different degrees of tolerance to grow in the presence of acetic acid under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. We found that the concomitant presence of acetic acid and oxygen had a negative effect on D. bruxellensis growth. In contrast, incubation under oxygen-limited conditions resulted in reproducible growth kinetics that exhibited a shorter adaptive phase and higher growth rates than those with cultivation under aerobic conditions. This positive effect was more pronounced in CBS 98, the more-sensitive strain. Cultivation of CBS 98 cells under oxygen-limited conditions improved their ability to restore their intracellular pH upon acetic acid exposure and to reduce the oxidative damage to intracellular macromolecules caused by the presence of acetic acid. This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can protect against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for optimizing industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. IMPORTANCE This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can have a protective role against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for the optimization of industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. PMID:27235432

  13. Cerebral NMR spectroscopy to study intracellular space in vivo: methodological development for diffusion weighted spectroscopy at short time scale and for pH measurement using 31P detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchadour, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a unique modality to evaluate intracellular environment in vivo. Indeed observed molecules are specifically intracellular and generally have a biochemistry role and a specific cellular compartmentation. That could be a useful tool to understand cell functioning in their environment. My thesis work consisted in development of new sequence in both diffusion and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy.My first study was to develop a diffusion-weighted spectroscopy at ultra-short diffusion time to look at the anomalous diffusion in the rat brain. ADC evolution as a function of time shows that brain metabolites motion is mainly due to random diffusion and that active transport (if exist) are negligible. Data modeling evidences that diffusion at short diffusion time is sensitive to cytoplasm viscosity and short scale crowding. In collaboration with the pharmaceutical company, this technique was chosen to follow up transgenic mice (rTg4510), model of tau pathology. Preliminary results show significant differences of ADC at an early stage of neuro-degenerescence (3 and 6 months).Phosphorus spectroscopy allows observation of metabolites directly implicated in energetic processes. During this thesis, localization sequences were developed to measure intracellular pH in the primate striatum. These sequences are supposed to be used to evaluate the potential of pH as a bio-marker of neuro-degenerescence in a phenotypic model of the Huntington disease in the non-human primate. (author) [fr

  14. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y ATP (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [ 14 C]acetate and [ 14 C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation

  15. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.B. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  16. NHE1, NHE2, and NHE3 contribute to regulation of intracellular pH in murine duodenal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praetorius, J; Andreasen, D; Jensen, B L

    2000-01-01

    ) molecular expression of NHE isoforms. By fluorescence spectroscopy the recovery of intracellular pH (pH(i)) was measured on suspensions of isolated acidified murine duodenal epithelial cells loaded with 2', 7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein. Expression of NHE isoforms was studied by RT...

  17. Medium pH in submerged cultivation modulates differences in the intracellular protein profile of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa-Garzon, Nathália Gonsales; Laure, Hélen Julie; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria de; Rosa, José César; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-08-09

    Fusarium oxysporum is a filamentous fungus that damages a wide range of plants and thus causes severe crop losses. In fungal pathogens, the genes and proteins involved in virulence are known to be controlled by environmental pH. Here, we report the influence of culture-medium pH (5, 6, 7, and 8) on the production of degradative enzymes involved in the pathogenesis of F. oxysporum URM 7401 and on the 2D-electrophoresis profile of intracellular proteins in this fungus. F. oxysporum URM 7401 was grown in acidic, neutral, and alkaline culture media in a submerged bioprocess. After 96 hr, the crude extract was processed to enzyme activity assays, while the intracellular proteins were obtained from mycelium and analyzed using 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We note that the diversity of secreted enzymes was changed quantitatively in different culture-medium pH. Also, the highest accumulated biomass and the intracellular protein profile of F. oxysporum URM 7401 indicate an increase in metabolism in neutral-alkaline conditions. The differential profiles of secreted enzymes and intracellular proteins under the evaluated conditions indicate that the global protein content in F. oxysporum URM 7401 is modulated by extracellular pH.

  18. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  19. Sodium coupled bicarbonate influx regulates intracellular and apical pH in cultured rat caput epididymal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Li, Sheng; Huang, Jie-Hong; Yang, Deng-Liang; Zhang, Geng; Chen, Si-Liang; Ruan, Ye-Chun; Ye, Ke-Nan; Cheng, Christopher H K; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2011-01-01

    The epithelium lining the epididymis provides an optimal acidic fluid microenvironment in the epididymal tract that enable spermatozoa to complete the maturation process. The present study aims to investigate the functional role of Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter in the pH regulation in rat epididymis. Immunofluorescence staining of pan cytokeratin in the primary culture of rat caput epididymal epithelium showed that the system was a suitable model for investigating the function of epididymal epithelium. Intracellular and apical pH were measured using the fluorescent pH sensitive probe carboxy-seminaphthorhodafluor-4F acetoxymethyl ester (SNARF-4F) and sparklet pH electrode respectively to explore the functional role of rat epididymal epithelium. In the HEPES buffered Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution, the intracellular pH (pHi) recovery from NH(4)Cl induced acidification in the cultured caput epididymal epithelium was completely inhibited by amiloride, the inhibitor of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE). Immediately changing of the KH solution from HEPES buffered to HCO(3)(-) buffered would cause another pHi recovery. The pHi recovery in HCO(3)(-) buffered KH solution was inhibited by 4, 4diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid (DIDS), the inhibitor of HCO(3)(-) transporter or by removal of extracellular Na(+). The extracellular pH measurement showed that the apical pH would increase when adding DIDS to the apical side of epididymal epithelial monolayer, however adding DIDS to the basolateral side had no effect on apical pH. The present study shows that sodium coupled bicarbonate influx regulates intracellular and apical pH in cultured caput epididymal epithelium.

  20. Functional and molecular characterization of transmembrane intracellular pH regulators in human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Huang, Shu-Fu; Chao, Shih-Chi; Chang, Chung-Yi; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Li, Chung-Hsing; Loh, Shih-Hurng

    2018-06-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular pH (pH i ) plays vital roles in many cell functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and metastasis. Thus far, Na + -H + exchanger (NHE), Na + -HCO 3 - co-transporter (NBC), Cl - /HCO 3 - exchanger (AE) and Cl - /OH - exchanger (CHE) have been identified to co-regulate pH i homeostasis. However, functional and biological pH i -regulators in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have yet to be identified. Microspectrofluorimetry technique with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye, BCECF, was used to detect pH i changes. NH 4 Cl and Na + -acetate pre-pulse were used to induce intracellular acidosis and alkalosis, respectively. Isoforms of pH i -regulators were detected by Western blot technique. The resting pH i was no significant difference between that in HEPES-buffered (nominal HCO 3 - -free) solution or CO 2 /HCO 3 -buffered system (7.42 and 7.46, respectively). The pH i recovery following the induced-intracellular acidosis was blocked completely by removing [Na + ] o , while only slowed (-63%) by adding HOE694 (a NHE1 specific inhibitor) in HEPES-buffered solution. The pH i recovery was inhibited entirely by removing [Na + ] o , while adding HOE 694 pulse DIDS (an anion-transporter inhibitor) only slowed (-55%) the acid extrusion. Both in HEPES-buffered and CO 2 /HCO 3 -buffered system solution, the pH i recovery after induced-intracellular alkalosis was entirely blocked by removing [Cl - ] o . Western blot analysis showed the isoforms of pH i regulators, including NHE1/2, NBCe1/n1, AE1/2/3/4 and CHE in the hDPSCs. We demonstrate for the first time that resting pH i is significantly higher than 7.2 and meditates functionally by two Na + -dependent acid extruders (NHE and NBC), two Cl - -dependent acid loaders (CHE and AE) and one Na + -independent acid extruder(s) in hDPSCs. These findings provide novel insight for basic and clinical treatment of dentistry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: role of intracellular pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize glass microelectrodes to characterize the intracellular pH (pHi) before and during recovery from fatigue in the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle. A second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pHi and contractile function. The frog ST muscle (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. Peak tetanic force (Po) was reduced to 8.5% of initial force and recovered in a biphasic manner, returning to the resting value by 40 min. Resting pHi was 7.00 +/- 0.02 (n = 37) and declined with fatigue to an average value of 6.42 at 3 min of recovery. During recovery pHi significantly increased and by 25 min had returned to the prefatigue value. The pHi recovery was highly correlated to the slow phase of Po recovery (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001). The mean resting membrane potential was -78 +/- 1.0 mV (n = 42) and at 3 min of recovery was depolarized to -67 +/- 4 mV. Both the peak rate of twitch force development (+dP/dt) (r = 0.99, P less than 0.001) and decline (-dP/dt) (r = 0.94, P less than 0.014) were highly correlated to pHi during the slow phase of recovery. Contraction time (CT) and one-half relaxation time (1/2RT) increased significantly and recovered exponentially. The recovery of CT and 1/2RT were both significantly correlated to pHi (r = -0.93, P less than 0.001 and r = -0.86, P less than 0.001 for CT and 1/2RT, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Intracellular electric field and pH optimize protein localization and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jessica; Estrella, Veronica; Lloyd, Mark; Gillies, Robert; Frieden, B Roy; Gatenby, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian cell function requires timely and accurate transmission of information from the cell membrane (CM) to the nucleus (N). These pathways have been intensively investigated and many critical components and interactions have been identified. However, the physical forces that control movement of these proteins have received scant attention. Thus, transduction pathways are typically presented schematically with little regard to spatial constraints that might affect the underlying dynamics necessary for protein-protein interactions and molecular movement from the CM to the N. We propose messenger protein localization and movements are highly regulated and governed by Coulomb interactions between: 1. A recently discovered, radially directed E-field from the NM into the CM and 2. Net protein charge determined by its isoelectric point, phosphorylation state, and the cytosolic pH. These interactions, which are widely applied in elecrophoresis, provide a previously unknown mechanism for localization of messenger proteins within the cytoplasm as well as rapid shuttling between the CM and N. Here we show these dynamics optimize the speed, accuracy and efficiency of transduction pathways even allowing measurement of the location and timing of ligand binding at the CM--previously unknown components of intracellular information flow that are, nevertheless, likely necessary for detecting spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations in ligand concentrations within the environment. The model has been applied to the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway and scaffolding protein KSR1 using computer simulations and in-vitro experiments. The computer simulations predicted distinct distributions of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated components of this transduction pathway which were experimentally confirmed in normal breast epithelial cells (HMEC).

  3. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bouret

    Full Text Available We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  4. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Médéric; Counillon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  5. Monitoring the intracellular pH of Zygosaccharomyces bailii by green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, T D T; De Maeseneire, S L; Zhang, B Y; De Vos, W H; Rajkovic, A; Vermeulen, A; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2012-06-01

    It is generally known that intracellular pH (pH(i)) plays a vital role in cell physiology and that pH(i) homeostasis is essential for normal cellular functions. Therefore, it is desirable to know the pH(i) during cell life cycle or under various growth conditions. Different methods to measure pH(i) have been developed and among these methods, the use of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a pH(i) indicator is a promising technique. By using this approach, not only can more accurate pH(i) results be obtained but also long-term experiments on pH(i) can be performed. In this study, the wild type Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a notorious food spoilage yeast, was transformed with a plasmid encoding a pH-sensitive GFP (i.e. pHluorin), enabling the pH(i) of the yeast to be determined based on cellular fluorescent signals. After the transformation, growth and pH(i) of the yeast were investigated in four different acidic conditions at 22°C during 26days. From the experimental results, the transformation effectiveness was verified and a good correlation between yeast growth and pH(i) was noticed. Particularly, it was observed that the yeast has an ability to tolerate a significant pH(i) drop during exponential phase and a subsequent pH(i) recovery in stationary phase, which may underlie the exceptional acid resistance of the yeast. This was the first time that a GFP-based approach for pH(i) measurement was applied in Z. bailii and that the pH(i) of the yeast was monitored during such a long period (26days). It can be expected that greater understanding of the physiological properties and mechanisms behind the special acid resistance of the yeast will be obtained from further studies on this new yeast strain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus deregulates the cell cycle by promoting the intracellular accumulation and re-compartmentalization of the cellular deubiquitinase USP37.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehul Saxena

    Full Text Available The HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B Virus has been accredited as one of the protagonists in driving hepatocarcinogenesis. HBx exerts its influence over the cell cycle progression by potentiating the activity of cyclin A/E-CDK2 complex, the Cyclin A partner of which is a well-known target of cellular deubiquitinase USP37. In the present study, we observed the intracellular accumulation of cyclin A and USP37 proteins under the HBx microenvironment. Flow cytometry analysis of the HBx-expressing cells showed deregulation of cell cycle apparently due to the enhanced gene expression and stabilization of USP37 protein and deubiquitination of Cyclin A by USP37. Our co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopic studies suggested a direct interaction between USP37 and HBx. This interaction promoted the translocation of USP37 outside the nucleus and prevented its association and ubiquitination by E3 ubiquitin ligases - APC/CDH1 and SCF/β-TrCP. Thus, HBx seems to control the cell cycle progression via the cyclin A-CDK2 complex by regulating the intracellular distribution and stability of deubiquitinase USP37.

  7. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points.

  8. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louisse, Jochem; Bai Yanqing; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Blaauboer, Bas J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH i ) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH i in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH i of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na + /H + -antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH i in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH i may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  9. Live-cell Microscopy and Fluorescence-based Measurement of Luminal pH in Intracellular Organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminal pH is an important functional feature of intracellular organelles. Acidification of the lumen of organelles such as endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus plays a critical role in fundamental cellular processes. As such, measurement of the luminal pH of these organelles has relevance to both basic research and translational research. At the same time, accurate measurement of intraorganellar pH in living cells can be challenging and may be a limiting hurdle for research in some areas. Here, we describe three powerful methods to measure rigorously the luminal pH of different intracellular organelles, focusing on endosomes, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. The described methods are based on live imaging of pH-sensitive fluorescent probes and include: (1 A protocol based on quantitative, ratiometric measurement of endocytosis of pH-sensitive and pH-insensitive fluorescent conjugates of transferrin; (2 A protocol for the use of proteins tagged with a ratiometric variant of the pH-sensitive intrinsically fluorescent protein pHluorin; and (3 A protocol using the fluorescent dye LysoSensor™. We describe necessary reagents, key procedures, and methods and equipment for data acquisition and analysis. Examples of implementation of the protocols are provided for cultured cells derived from a cancer cell line and for primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons. In addition, we present strengths and weaknesses of the different described intraorganellar pH measurement methods. These protocols are likely to be of benefit to many researchers, from basic scientists to those conducting translational research with a focus on diseases in patient-derived cells.

  10. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    system. The measurements were carried out during hyperventilation and with the subject breathing atmospheric air containing 5 vol. % and 7 vol. % carbon dioxide. Intracellular pH increased significantly during 15 min of hyper-ventilation and decreased significantly during 18 min respiration of air......The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...... containing 7 vol. % carbon dioxide. The intracellular buffer capacity was estimated. These results suggest that the ventilation response to carbon dioxide is correlated to changes in intracellular fluid pH....

  11. Cross-linked self-assembled micelle based nanosensor for intracellular pH measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Windschiegl, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A micelle based nanosensor was synthesized and investigated as a ratiometric pH sensor for use in measurements in living cells by fluorescent microscopy. The nanosensor synthesis was based on self-assembly of an amphiphilic triblock copolymer, which was chemically cross-linked after micelle......-linked by an amidation reaction using 3,6,9-trioxaundecandioic acid cross-linker. The cross-linked micelle was functionalized with two pH sensitive fluorophores and one reference fluorophore, which resulted in a highly uniform ratiometric pH nanosensor with a diameter of 29 nm. The use of two sensor fluorophores...... provided a sensor with a very broad measurement range that seems to be influenced by the chemical design of the sensor. Cell experiments show that the sensor is capable of monitoring the pH distributions in HeLa cells....

  12. NHE1, NHE2, and NHE3 contribute to regulation of intracellular pH in murine duodenal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praetorius, J; Andreasen, D; Jensen, B L

    2000-01-01

    ) molecular expression of NHE isoforms. By fluorescence spectroscopy the recovery of intracellular pH (pH(i)) was measured on suspensions of isolated acidified murine duodenal epithelial cells loaded with 2', 7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein. Expression of NHE isoforms was studied by RT...... inhibited H(+) efflux maximally by 57 and 80%, respectively. NHE1, NHE2, and NHE3 were expressed at the mRNA level (RT-PCR) as well as at the protein level (Western blot analysis). On the basis of the effects of low [Na(+)](o) and inhibitors we propose that acid extrusion in duodenal epithelial cells...

  13. Intracellular pH in increased after transformation of Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ober, S.S.; Pardee, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    These studies reveal that a series of tumorigenic Chinese hamster embryo fibroblast (CHEF) cell lines maintain an internal pH (pH/sub i/) that is 0.12 +/- 0.04 pH unit above that of the nontumorigenic CHEF/18 parental line. pH measurements were made with [ 14 C]-benzoic acid. This increase of pH/sub i/ in the tumorigenic CHEF cells is not due to autocrine growth factor production or to the persistent activation of pathways previously shown to modulate Na + /H + -antiporter activity present in the CHEF/18 line. These findings suggest that the defect in pH/sub i/ regulation in the tumorigenic CHEF/18 derivatives lies in the Na + /H + antiporter itself. Further studies to determine the biological significance of an increased pH/sub i/ show that the external pH (pH 0 )-dependence curve for initiation of DNA synthesis in the tumorigenic CHEF lines is shifted by approximately 0.2 pH unit toward acidic values relative to that of the nontumorigenic CHEF/18 parent. These data show a critical role for pH/sub i/ in the regulation of DNA synthesis in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts and demonstrate that aberrations in pH/sub i/ can contribute to the acquisition of altered growth properties

  14. Active potassium extrusion regulated by intracellular pH in Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Y; Igarashi, K

    1988-10-05

    Potassium extrusion in bacteria is thought to play a role in the regulation of the cytoplasmic pH; in several organisms, it has been ascribed to secondary antiport of K+ for protons. Streptococcus faecalis exhibited a distinctive pattern: potassium extrusion occurred only when the cytoplasmic pH was alkaline and required the generation of ATP. The key observation is that glycolyzing cells suspended in an alkaline medium extruded K+, even against a K+ concentration gradient, provided the medium contained a weak permeant base (e.g. diethanolamine or methylamine). The amines render the cytoplasmic pH alkaline; when conditions were arranged to keep the cytoplasm neutral, no K+ extrusion was seen. Potassium extrusion required the presence of either glucose or arginine and was unaffected by protonophores and by inhibition of the F1Fo-ATPase. When the medium contained [14C]methylamine, the cells accumulated the base to an extent stoichiometrically equivalent to the K+ lost. Concurrently, the cytoplasmic pH fell from 8.8 to 7.6, at which point K+ extrusion ceased. The results suggest that K+ extrusion is due to an ATP-driven transport system that expels K+ by exchange for H+ and is active only at alkaline cytoplasmic pH.

  15. Sodium/proton exchanger isoform 1 regulates intracellular pH and cell proliferation in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Toledo, Fernando; Beltrán, Ana R; Ramírez, Marco A; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells generate protons (H + ) that are extruded to the extracellular medium mainly via the Na + /H + exchanger 1 (NHE1), which regulates intracellular pH (pHi) and cell proliferation. In primary cultures of human ascites-derived ovarian cancer cells (haOC) we assayed whether NHE1 was required for pHi modulation and cell proliferation. Human ovary expresses NHE1, which is higher in haOC and A2780 (ovarian cancer cells) compared with HOSE cells (normal ovarian cells). Basal pHi and pHi recovery (following a NH 4 Cl pulse) was higher in haOC and A2780, compared with HOSE cells. Zoniporide (NHE1 inhibitor) caused intracellular acidification and pHi recovery was independent of intracellular buffer capacity, but reduced in NHE1 knockdown A2780 cells. Zoniporide reduced the maximal proliferation capacity, cell number, thymidine incorporation, and ki67 (marker of proliferation) fluorescence in haOC cells. SLC9A1 (for NHE1) amplification associated with lower overall patient survival. In conclusion, NHE1 is expressed in human ovarian cancer where it has a pro-proliferative role. Increased NHE1 expression and activity constitute an unfavourable prognostic factor in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracellular pH as an indicator of viability and resuscitation of Campylobacter jejuni after decontamination with lactic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smigic, Nada; Rajkovic, Andreja; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine intracellular pH (pH(i)) as an indicator of the physiological state of two Campylobacter jejuni strains (603 and 608) at the single cell level after bactericidal treatment with lactic acid (3% v/v lactic acid, pH 4.0, 0.85% w/v NaCl) and during recovery...... in increased pH(i) and colony count (recovery study). On the contrary, 24 h incubation at suboptimal temperature of 4 degrees C, showed pH(i) decrease to pH(ex)=6.0 (no pH gradient) in the whole population of C. jejuni cells. Rather than dying, cells exposed for longer time (72 and 120 h) to 4 degrees C...... increased the subpopulation of the cells with positive pH gradient, mostly comprised of the cells with DeltapH>0.5, indicating the ability of C. jejuni cells to regulate their metabolic activity under suboptimal conditions....

  17. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2014-01-01

    . This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine...

  18. STI571 (Glivec) affects histamine release and intracellular pH after alkalinisation in HMC-1560, 816.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löber, Kristin; Alfonso, Amparo; Escribano, Luis; Botana, Luis M

    2008-02-15

    The human mast cell line (HMC-1(560, 816)) was used to study the effect of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 (Glivec) on exocytosis, intracellular Ca(2+) and pH changes, because STI571 inhibits the proliferation of HMC-1(560) and induces its apoptosis. This drug does not have these effects on HMC-1(560, 816). Exocytosis in HMC-1(560, 816) cells can be stimulated by alkalinisation with NH(4)Cl as well as with ionomycin. Surprisingly 24-h pre-incubation with STI571 decreases spontaneous histamine release of HMC-1(560, 816) cells, but increases the histamine response after alkalinisation and not after ionomycin-stimulation. After addition of NH(4)Cl, pH(i) has a higher increase in STI571 pre-incubated cells, without changing intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Activation of PKC in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibition increases also histamine release in HMC-1(560, 816) cells. Strangely, STI571 pre-incubated cells with PKC inhibited by rottlerin show the same effects. In these cells, cytosolic pH increases more than in control cells. This is the first report of STI571 effect in HMC-1(560, 816) cells. It seems that different pathways modulate signals for proliferation and exocytosis. STI571 does not only inhibit KIT TyrK, but may also influence cytosolic pH after alkalinisation in both cell lines, HMC-1(560) and HMC-1(560, 816), and this ends in induced histamine release. This work is important since HMC-1(560, 816) cells are reported in 80% of aggressive systemic mastocytosis cases and the understanding of some signalling pathways involved in mast cell response could facilitate drug targeting. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Is central chemoreceptor sensitive to intracellular rather than extracellular pH?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1990-01-01

    of acetazolamide allows the dissociation of [pH]e from [pH]i. With acetazolamide a sharp acid shift of CSF pH [( pH]c) is measured and in two consonance with this shift a marked increase in CBF is seen. Comparing these two reactions to that obtained with CO2 breathing, it is apparent that 7% CO2 causes about...

  20. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...

  1. Effect of Cu2+ and pH on intracellular calcium content and lipid peroxidation in winter wheat roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Riazanova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the effect of copper ions and pH of external solution on intracellular calcium homeostasis and lipid peroxidation in winter wheat roots. Experiment was carried out with winter wheat. Sterile seeds were germinated in Petri dishes on the filter paper soaked with acetic buffer (pH 4.7 and 6.2 at 20 °Cin the dark for 48 hours. Copper was added as CuSO4. It’s concentrations varied from 0 to 50 µM. The Ca2+-fluorescent dye Fluo-3/AM ester was loaded on 60 hour. Root fluorescence with Fluo-3 loading was detected using X-Cite Series 120 Q unit attached to microscope Olympus BX53 with camera Olympus DP72. Imaging of root cells was achieved after exciting with 488 nm laser and collection of emission signals above 512 nm. Preliminary analysis of the images was performed using software LabSens; brightness (fluorescence intensity analysis was carried out by means of ImageJ. Peroxidation of lipids was determined according to Kumar and Knowles method. It was found that pH of solution had effect on release of calcium from intracellular stores. Low pH provokes an increase of [Ca2+]cyt which may be reaction of roots to acidic medium. Copper induces increase in non-selective permeability of plasma membrane and leads to its faster depolarization. This probably initiates Ca-dependent depolarization channels which are responsible for the influx of calcium from apoplast into the cell. Changing of the membrane permeability may occur due to interaction between Cu2+ ions and Ca-binding sites on plasma membrane or may be due to binding of copper with sulfhydryl groups and increasing of POL. Copper may also damage lipid bilayer and change the activity of some non-selective channels and transporters. Reactive oxygen species which are formed under some types of stress factors, especially the effect of heavy metals, can be activators of Ca-channels. Cu2+ ions rise MDA content and promote the oxidative stress. Low medium pH also induces its

  2. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  3. Determination of intracellular pH and PCO2 after metabolic inhibition by fluoride and nitrilotriacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, H O; Boutilier, R G; Tang, Y; Toews, D P

    1990-08-01

    Mean intracellular pH (pHi) and PCO2 (PiCO2) have been analysed based on pH and total CO2 measurements in tissue homogenates. Tissues were sampled from undisturbed worms (Sipunculus nudus), squid (Illex illecebrosus), trout (Salmo gairdneri), toads (Bufo marinus), and rats. Homogenate metabolism was inhibited by the addition of potassium fluoride and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). Model calculations revealed that the influence of dilution, medium buffers, and contamination by extracellular fluids was negligible. In white muscle tissue the resulting pHi values were virtually the same as found in studies using DMO (dimethyloxazolidinedione). If large fractions of mitochondria were present (e.g. in heart muscle), DMO derived pHi values were considerably higher, probably representing overestimates. Homogenate derived pHi values are concluded to represent the effective mean pHi by taking into account pH gradients, and the volumes and buffering of cellular compartments. High time resolution and small variability make this method especially useful to assess rapid changes in pHi, e.g. in exercising animals.

  4. In vivo measurement of cytosolic and mitochondrial pH using a pH-sensitive GFP derivative in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a relation between intracellular pH and growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orij, R.; Postmus, J.; ter Beek, A.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The specific pH values of cellular compartments affect virtually all biochemical processes, including enzyme activity, protein folding and redox state. Accurate, sensitive and compartment-specific measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) dynamics in living cells are therefore crucial to the

  5. Hypothesis on the relationship between the change in intracellular pH and incidence of sporadic Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Boyan; Wang, Dajiang; Huang, Meifeng; Yu, Guohua; Li, Hua

    2010-09-01

    In order to perform their normal physiological functions, it is important that cells maintain the intracellular pH within the physiological range. Intracellular enzyme activity, cytoskeleton component integration, and cellular growth and differentiation rates are all closely associated with the intracellular pH. It has been demonstrated that in nervous system diseases, such as ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), the common characteristics are decreased pH or acidosis at both tissular and cellular levels. Particularly, some AD-associated enzymes will have altered activities under acidic conditions. We inferred that aging or ischemia may cause intracellular acidification. This acidification not only induces apoptosis but also substantially alters enzyme activities and promotes the development of AD or vascular dementia. The hypothesis of an intracellular pH role in sporadic AD or vascular dementia will be discussed in this paper. If confirmed, this hypothesis may lead to the formulation of new pathogenesis and new therapeutic approaches to AD or vascular dementia.

  6. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1.

  7. Metabolic depression during environmental stress: the role of extracellular versus intracellular pH in Sipunculus nudus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ReipschlÄGer; PÖRtner

    1996-01-01

    Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or hypercapnia are known to cause acid-base disturbances and in several organisms they lead to metabolic depression. The present study was undertaken to quantify the influence of these changes in acid­p;base parameters on metabolic rate. We determined the rate of oxygen consumption in a non-perfused preparation of the body wall musculature of the marine worm Sipunculus nudus at various levels of extra- and intracellular pH (pHe and pHi, respectively), PCO2 and [HCO3-]. The acid­p;base status of the tissue was modified and clamped by long-term exposure to media set to specific values of extracellular pH, PCO2 and [HCO3-]. At a pHe of 7.90, which is equivalent to the normoxic normocapnic in vivo extracellular pH, and an ambient PCO2 of 0.03 kPa (control conditions), pHi was 7.26±0.02 (mean ± s.d., N=5). A reduction of extracellular pH from 7.90 to 7.20 resulted in a significant decrease of pHi to 7.17±0.05 at 0.03 kPa PCO2 (normocapnia) and to 7.20±0.02 at 1.01 kPa PCO2 (hypercapnia). At the same time, the rate of oxygen consumption of the tissue was significantly depressed by 18.7±4.7 % and 17.7±3.0 %, respectively. A significant depression of oxygen consumption by 13.7±4.7 % also occurred under hypercapnia at pHe 7.55 when pHi was elevated above control values (7.32±0.01). No significant changes in oxygen consumption were observed when pHe was either drastically elevated to 8.70 under normocapnia (pHi 7.36±0.05) or maintained at 7.90 during hypercapnia (pHi 7.37±0.03). ATP and phospho-l-arginine concentrations, as well as the Gibbs free energy change of ATP hydrolysis (dG/dATP), were maintained at high levels during all treatments, indicating an equilibrium between energy supply and demand. We conclude that the depression of aerobic energy turnover in isolated body wall musculature of S. nudus is induced by low extracellular pH. A model is proposed which could explain a reduced ATP cost of pHi regulation during

  8. The influence of low dose irradiation on intracellular pH level, synthesizing activity and ATP level in cultured chinese fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, I.M.; Perishvili, G.V.; Turovetskij, V.B.; Kudryashov, Yu.B.; Rubin, A.B.; Brovko, L.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    X-irradiation of Chinese fibroblasts with doses of 0.05-0.15 Gy was shown to cause intracellular pH (pH i ) changes: its diminishing during the first 40-60 min by 0.16-0.18 pH units, then the return to the control level 120 min after irradiation and, finally, the increase by 0.18-0.20 pH units. Simultaneously, the synthesizing activity of the cells changed in the same way. The ATP level changed in the opposite way: increased when pH fell and decreased when pH grew. It was shown that pH i changes were connected with the changes in Na + /H + -exchange system, and they seemed to be primary in the chain of the alterations observed

  9. Radiation-induced apoptosis of stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood is associated with alterations in reactive oxygen and intracellular pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Tomonori [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan)]. E-mail: tomo@rerf.or.jp; Hayashi, Ikue [Central Research Laboratory, Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry, Hiroshima (Japan); Shinohara, Tomoko [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Morishita, Yukari [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagamura, Hiroko [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Kyoizumi, Seishi [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Seyama, Toshio [Yasuda Women' s University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakachi, Kei [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2004-11-22

    To investigate the sensitivity of human hematopoietic stem cell populations to radiation and its relevance to intracellular events, specifically alteration in cellular energy production systems, we examined the frequency of apoptotic cells, generation of superoxide anions (O2-), and changes in cytosol pH in umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -}, CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup -}/CD38{sup +} cells before and after 5Gy of X-irradiation. Human UCB mononucleated cells were used in this study. After X-irradiation and staining subgroups of the cells with fluorescence (FITC, PE, or CY)-labeled anti-CD34 and anti-CD38 antibodies, analyses were performed by FACScan using as stains 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) for the detection of apoptosis, and hydroethidine (HE) for the measurement of O2- generation in the cells. For intracellular pH, image analysis was conducted using confocal laser microscopy after irradiation and staining with carboxy-SNAFR-1. The frequency of apoptotic cells, as determined by cell staining with 7-AAD, was highest in the irradiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} cell population, where the level of O2- detected by the oxidation of HE was also most highly elevated. Intracellular pH measured with carboxy-SNARF-1-AM by image cytometer appeared to be lowest in the same irradiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} cell population, and this intracellular pH decreased as early as 4h post-irradiation, virtually simultaneous with the significant elevation of O2- generation. These results suggest that the CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} stem cell population is sensitive to radiation-induced apoptosis as well as production of intracellular O2-, compare to more differentiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup -}/CD38{sup +} cells and that its intracellular pH declines at an early phase in the apoptosis process.

  10. Intracellular pH homeostasis plays a role in the tolerance ofDebaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides to acidified nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Jacobsen, Thomas; Koch, Anette Granly

    2008-01-01

    The effects of acidified-nitrite stress on the growth initiation and intracellular pH (pHi) of individual cells of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides were investigated. Our results show that 200 g/ml of nitrite caused pronounced growth inhibition and intracellular acidification of D....... hansenii at an external pH (pHex) value of 4.5 butdid not at pHex 5.5. These results indicate that nitrous acid as such plays an important role in the antifungal effect of acidified nitrite. Furthermore, both yeast species experienced severe growth inhibition and a pHi decrease at pHex 4.5, suggesting....... hansenii and C. zeylanoides. Possible mechanisms underlying the different abilities of the two yeast species to maintain their pHi homeostasis during acidified-nitrite stress, comprising the intracellular buffer capacity and the plasma membrane ATPase activity, were investigated, but none...

  11. Leucocins 4010 from Leuconostoc carnosum cause a matrix related decrease in intracellular pH of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Weihuan; Budde, Birgitte Bjørn; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A mixed culture of single cells of Listeria monocytogenes and the bacteriocin producing Leuconostoc carnosum 4010 showed growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes, although the intracellular pH (pHi) of L. monocytogenes followed by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy was not affected. Furthermore, L...

  12. Decreased Intracellular pH Induced by Cariporide Differentially Contributes to Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1 is an important regulator of intracellular pH (pHi. High pHi is required for cell proliferation and differentiation. Our previous study has proven that the pHi of mesenchymal stem cells is higher than that of normal differentiated cells and similar to tumor cells. NHE1 is highly expressed in both mesenchymal stem cells and tumor cells. Targeted inhibition of NHE1 could induce differentiation of K562 leukemia cells. In the present paper we explored whether inhibition of NHE1 could induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods: MSCs were obtained from human umbilical cord and both the surface phenotype and functional characteristics were analyzed. Selective NHE1 inhibitor cariporide was used to treat human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs. The pHi and the differentiation of hUC-MSCs were compared upon cariporide treatment. The putative signaling pathway involved was also explored. Results: The pHi of hUC-MSCs was decreased upon cariporide treatment. Cariporide up-regulated the osteogenic differentiation of hUC-MSCs while the adipogenic differentiation was not affected. For osteogenic differentiation, β-catenin expression was up-regulated upon cariporide treatment. Conclusion: Decreased pHi induced by cariporide differentially contributes to hUC-MSCs differentiation.

  13. The impact of pH inhomogeneities on CHO cell physiology and fed-batch process performance - two-compartment scale-down modelling and intracellular pH excursion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Matthias; Braun, Philipp; Doppler, Philipp; Posch, Christoph; Behrens, Dirk; Herwig, Christoph; Fricke, Jens

    2017-07-01

    Due to high mixing times and base addition from top of the vessel, pH inhomogeneities are most likely to occur during large-scale mammalian processes. The goal of this study was to set-up a scale-down model of a 10-12 m 3 stirred tank bioreactor and to investigate the effect of pH perturbations on CHO cell physiology and process performance. Short-term changes in extracellular pH are hypothesized to affect intracellular pH and thus cell physiology. Therefore, batch fermentations, including pH shifts to 9.0 and 7.8, in regular one-compartment systems are conducted. The short-term adaption of the cells intracellular pH are showed an immediate increase due to elevated extracellular pH. With this basis of fundamental knowledge, a two-compartment system is established which is capable of simulating defined pH inhomogeneities. In contrast to state-of-the-art literature, the scale-down model is included parameters (e.g. volume of the inhomogeneous zone) as they might occur during large-scale processes. pH inhomogeneity studies in the two-compartment system are performed with simulation of temporary pH zones of pH 9.0. The specific growth rate especially during the exponential growth phase is strongly affected resulting in a decreased maximum viable cell density and final product titer. The gathered results indicate that even short-term exposure of cells to elevated pH values during large-scale processes can affect cell physiology and overall process performance. In particular, it could be shown for the first time that pH perturbations, which might occur during the early process phase, have to be considered in scale-down models of mammalian processes. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors modify intracellular pH transients and contractions of rat middle cerebral arteries during CO2/HCO3- fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jacob K; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2018-03-01

    The CO 2 /HCO 3 - buffer minimizes pH changes in response to acid-base loads, HCO 3 - provides substrate for Na + ,HCO 3 - -cotransporters and Cl - /HCO 3 - -exchangers, and H + and HCO 3 - modify vasomotor responses during acid-base disturbances. We show here that rat middle cerebral arteries express cytosolic, mitochondrial, extracellular, and secreted carbonic anhydrase isoforms that catalyze equilibration of the CO 2 /HCO 3 - buffer. Switching from CO 2 /HCO 3 - -free to CO 2 /HCO 3 - -containing extracellular solution results in initial intracellular acidification due to hydration of CO 2 followed by gradual alkalinization due to cellular HCO 3 - uptake. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition decelerates the initial acidification and attenuates the associated transient vasoconstriction without affecting intracellular pH or artery tone at steady-state. Na + ,HCO 3 - -cotransport and Na + /H + -exchange activity after NH 4 + -prepulse-induced intracellular acidification are unaffected by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. Extracellular surface pH transients induced by transmembrane NH 3 flux are evident under CO 2 /HCO 3 - -free conditions but absent when the buffer capacity and apparent H + mobility increase in the presence of CO 2 /HCO 3 - even after the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. We conclude that (a) intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity accentuates pH transients and vasoconstriction in response to acute elevations of pCO 2 , (b) CO 2 /HCO 3 - minimizes extracellular surface pH transients without requiring carbonic anhydrase activity, and (c) carbonic anhydrases are not rate limiting for acid-base transport across cell membranes during recovery from intracellular acidification.

  15. Structure-activity relationships of dimethylsphingosine (DMS) derivatives and their effects on intracellular pH and Ca2+ in the U937 monocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young-Ja; Lee, Yun-Kyung; Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Jeong-Ju; Chung, Sung-Kee; Im, Dong-Soon

    2006-08-01

    We recently reported that dimethylsphingosine (DMS), a metabolite of sphingolipids, increased intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentration in U937 human monocytes. In the present study, we found that dimethylphytosphingosine (DMPH) induced the above responses more robustly than DMS. However, phytosphingosine, monomethylphytosphingosine or trimethylsphingosine showed little or no activity. Synthetic C3 deoxy analogues of sphingosine did show similar activities, with the C16 analogue more so than C18. The following structure-activity relationships were observed between DMS derivatives and the intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentrations in U937 monocytes; 1) dimethyl modification is important for the DMS-induced increase of intracellular pH and Ca2+, 2) the addition of an OH group on C4 enhances both activities, 3) the deletion of the OH group on C3 has a negligible effect on the activities, and 4) C16 appears to be more effective than C18. We also found that W-7, a calmodulin inhibitor, blocked the DMS-induced pH increase, whereas, KN-62, ML9, and MMPX, specific inhibitors for calmodulin-dependent kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase, respectively, did not affect DMS-induced increases of pH in the U937 monocytes.

  16. Role of Cl- -HCO3- exchanger AE3 in intracellular pH homeostasis in cultured murine hippocampal neurons, and in crosstalk to adjacent astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ahlam I; Hübner, Christian A; Boron, Walter F

    2017-01-01

    A polymorphism of human AE3 is associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Knockout of AE3 in mice lowers the threshold for triggering epileptic seizures. The explanations for these effects are elusive. Comparisons of cells from wild-type vs. AE3 -/- mice show that AE3 (present in hippocampal neurons, not astrocytes; mediates HCO 3 - efflux) enhances intracellular pH (pH i ) recovery (decrease) from alkali loads in neurons and, surprisingly, adjacent astrocytes. During metabolic acidosis (MAc), AE3 speeds initial acidification, but limits the extent of pH i decrease in neurons and astrocytes. AE3 speeds re-alkalization after removal of MAc in neurons and astrocytes, and speeds neuronal pH i recovery from an ammonium prepulse-induced acid load. We propose that neuronal AE3 indirectly increases acid extrusion in (a) neurons via Cl - loading, and (b) astrocytes by somehow enhancing NBCe1 (major acid extruder). The latter would enhance depolarization-induced alkalinization of astrocytes, and extracellular acidification, and thereby reduce susceptibility to epileptic seizures. The anion exchanger AE3, expressed in hippocampal (HC) neurons but not astrocytes, contributes to intracellular pH (pH i ) regulation by facilitating the exchange of extracellular Cl - for intracellular HCO 3 - . The human AE3 polymorphism A867D is associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Moreover, AE3 knockout (AE3 -/- ) mice are more susceptible to epileptic seizure. The mechanism of these effects has been unclear because the starting pH i in AE3 -/- and wild-type neurons is indistinguishable. The purpose of the present study was to use AE3 -/- mice to investigate the role of AE3 in pH i homeostasis in HC neurons, co-cultured with astrocytes. We find that the presence of AE3 increases the acidification rate constant during pH i recovery from intracellular alkaline loads imposed by reducing [CO 2 ]. The presence of AE3 also speeds intracellular acidification during the early phase of

  17. Effect of nitric oxide donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine, Spermine and PAPA NONOate on intracellular pH in cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Danijel, Pravdic; Nikolina, Vladic; Ivan, Cavar; Zeljko, Bosnjak J

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and NO-dependent signalling pathways modulate intracellular pH (pHi) in different cell types, but the role of NO in pHi regulation in the heart is poorly understood. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine, Spermine and PAPA NONOate on pHi in isolated rat ventricular myocytes.The cells were isolated from the hearts of adult Wistar rats, and pHi was monitored using a pH...

  18. PET kinetic analysis. Compartmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Hiroshi; Ikoma, Yoko; Shidahara, Miho; Kimura, Yuichi; Naganawa, Mika

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) enables not only visualization of the distribution of radiotracer, but also has ability to quantify several biomedical functions. Compartmental model is a basic idea to analyze dynamic PET data. This review describes the principle of the compartmental model and categorizes the techniques and approaches for the compartmental model according to various aspects: model design, experimental design, invasiveness, and mathematical solution. We also discussed advanced applications of the compartmental analysis with PET. (author)

  19. In vivo intracellular pH measurements in tobacco and Arabidopsis reveal an unexpected pH gradient in the endomembrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Bassil, Elias; Jublanc, Elodie; Alcon, Carine; Reguera, Maria; Sentenac, Hervé; Blumwald, Eduardo; Paris, Nadine

    2013-10-01

    The pH homeostasis of endomembranes is essential for cellular functions. In order to provide direct pH measurements in the endomembrane system lumen, we targeted genetically encoded ratiometric pH sensors to the cytosol, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the trans-Golgi, or the compartments labeled by the vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR), which includes the trans-Golgi network and prevacuoles. Using noninvasive live-cell imaging to measure pH, we show that a gradual acidification from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lytic vacuole exists, in both tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) epidermal (ΔpH -1.5) and Arabidopsis thaliana root cells (ΔpH -2.1). The average pH in VSR compartments was intermediate between that of the trans-Golgi and the vacuole. Combining pH measurements with in vivo colocalization experiments, we found that the trans-Golgi network had an acidic pH of 6.1, while the prevacuole and late prevacuole were both more alkaline, with pH of 6.6 and 7.1, respectively. We also showed that endosomal pH, and subsequently vacuolar trafficking of soluble proteins, requires both vacuolar-type H(+) ATPase-dependent acidification as well as proton efflux mediated at least by the activity of endosomal sodium/proton NHX-type antiporters.

  20. 31P NMR analysis of intracellular pH of Swiss Mouse 3T3 cells: effects of extracellular Na+ and K+ and mitogenic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Williams, S R; Gadian, D G; Rozengurt, E

    1986-01-01

    Swiss mouse 3T3 cells grown on microcarrier beads were superfused with electrolyte solution during continuous NMR analysis. Conventional 31P and 19F probes of intracellular pH (pHc) were found to be impracticable. Cells were therefore superfused with 1 to 4 mM 2-deoxyglucose, producing a large intracellular, pH-sensitive signal of 2-deoxyglucose phosphate (2DGP). The intracellular incorporation of 2DGP inhibited the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. However, intracellular ATP was at least in part retained and the cellular responsivity to changes in extracellular ionic composition and to the application of growth factors proved intact. Transient replacement of external Na+ with choline or K+ reversibly acidified the intracellular fluids. Quiescent cells and mitogenically stimulated cells displayed the same dependence of shifts in pHc on external Na+ concentration (CoNa). PHc also depended on intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa). Increasing ccNa by withdrawing external K+ (thereby inhibiting the Na,K-pump) caused reversible intracellular acidification; subsequently reducing CoNa produced a larger acid shift in pHc than with external K+ present. Comparison of separate preparations indicated that pHc was higher in stimulated than in quiescent cells. Transient administration of mitogens also reversibly alkalinized quiescent cells studied continuously. This study documents the feasibility of monitoring pHc of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells using 31P NMR analysis of 2DGP. The results support the concept of a Na/H antiport operative in these cells, both in quiescence and after mitogenic stimulation. The data document by an independent technique that cytoplasmic alkalinization is an early event in mitogenesis, and that full activity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is not required for the expression of this event.

  1. Zonation of gluconeogenesis, ketogenesis and intracellular pH in livers from normal and diabetic ketoacidotic rats: evidence for intralobular redistribution of metabolic events in ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S P; Cohen, R D; Iles, R A; Bailey, R A; Desai, M; Germain, J P; Going, T C

    1999-10-01

    The intralobular distribution of metabolism was examined in the livers from rats with severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), perfused at pH 6.8, and compared with that in livers from normal starved animals perfused at either pH 7.4 or 6.8. With lactate and palmitate as substrates, the perivenous uptake of periportally synthesized glucose seen in normal livers at pH 7.4 was abolished during DKA; indeed, gluconeogenesis was most active in the perivenous region. Whereas in normal livers perfused at pH 7.4 the periportal region showed a markedly elevated intracellular pH (pH(i)) compared with the perivenous zone, this distribution of pH(i) was reversed in DKA, with an intermediate distribution in normal livers perfused at pH 6. 8. 3-Hydroxybutyrate was generated throughout the lobule. Some acetoacetate generated periportally was converted to 3-hydroxybutyrate more perivenously. A steep gradient of oxygen uptake along the radius of the lobule was apparent in all three groups; oxygen uptake was greatly decreased perivenously despite adequate oxygen supply. These findings are consistent with our previous observations of the lobular co-location of high pH(i) and gluconeogenesis, and might offer an explanation of how high gluconeogenic rates can continue in spite of severe systemic acidosis in DKA. The findings provide direct evidence for a marked redistribution of intralobular metabolism in DKA.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes varies among strains to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis under stresses by different acids as analyzed by a high-throughput microplate-based fluorometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong eCheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne pathogen, has the capacity to maintain intracellular pH (pHi homeostasis in acidic environments, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report a simple microplate-based fluorescent method to determine pHi of listerial cells that were prelabeled with the fluorescent dye carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester and subjected to acid stress. We found that L. monocytogenes responds differently among strains toward organic and inorganic acids to maintain pHi homeostasis. The capacity of L. monocytogenes to maintain pHi at extracellular pH 4.5 (pHex was compromised in the presence of acetic acid and lactic acid, but not by hydrochloric acid and citric acid. Organic acids exhibited more inhibitory effects than hydrochloric acid at certain pH conditions. Furthermore, the virulent stains L. monocytogenes EGDe, 850658 and 10403S was more resistant to acidic stress than the avirulent M7 which showed a defect in maintaining pHi homeostasis. Deletion of sigB, a stress-responsive alternative sigma factor from 10403S, markedly altered intracellular pHi homeostasis, and showed a significant growth and survival defect under acidic conditions. Thus, this work provides new insights into bacterial survival mechanism to acidic stresses.

  3. Toxicity of fatty acid 18:5n3 from Gymnodinium cf. mikimotoi: II. Intracellular pH and K+ uptake in isolated trout hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossat, B; Porthé-Nibelle, J; Sola, F; Masoni, A; Gentien, P; Bodennec, G

    1999-01-01

    Effects of octadecapentaenoic acid 18:5n3 and other related polyunsaturated fatty acids present in gymnodinium cf. mikimotoi were tested in isolated trout hepatocytes. These exotoxins decreased intracellular pH followed by a slow recovery to initial value and alkalinization of acidic compartments, suggesting an inhibition of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases. Moreover, addition of 18:5n3 to the extracellular medium induced a decrease of K+ uptake into hepatocytes as a result of Na,K-ATPase inhibition. However, high concentrations (10(-5)-10(-3) M) are necessary to induce these effects.

  4. Unusual Fluorescent Responses of Morpholine-functionalized Fluorescent Probes to pH via Manipulation of BODIPY's HOMO and LUMO Energy Orbitals for Intracellular pH Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingtuo; Yang, Mu; Mazi, Wafa; Adhikari, Kapil; Fang, Mingxi; Xie, Fei; Valenzano, Loredana; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Luo, Fen-Tair; Liu, Haiying

    2016-02-26

    Three uncommon morpholine-based fluorescent probes ( A , B and C ) for pH were prepared by introducing morpholine residues to BODIPY dyes at 4,4'- and 2,6-positions, respectively. In contrast to morpholine-based fluorescent probes for pH reported in literature, these fluorescent probes display high fluorescence in a basic condition while they exhibit very weak fluorescence in an acidic condition. The theoretical calculation confirmed that morpholine is unable to function as either an electron donor or an electron acceptor to quench the BODIPY fluorescence in the neutral and basic condition via photo-induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism because the LUMO energy of morpholine is higher than those of the BODIPY dyes while its HOMO energy is lower than those of the BODIPY dyes. However, the protonation of tertiary amines of the morpholine residues in an acidic environment leads to fluorescence quenching of the BODIPY dyes via d-PET mechanism. The fluorescence quenching is because the protonation effectively decreases the LUMO energy which locates between the HOMO and LUMO energies of the BODIPY dyes. Fluorescent probe C with deep-red emission has been successfully used to detect pH changes in mammalian cells.

  5. Cadmium uptake in Elodea canadensis leaves and its interference with extra- and intra-cellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, M T; Lindberg, S; Greger, M

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated cadmium (Cd) uptake in Elodea canadensis shoots under different photosynthetic conditions, and its effects on internal (cytosolic) and external pH. The plants were grown under photosynthetic (light) or non-photosynthetic (dark or in the presence of a photosynthetic inhibitor) conditions in the presence or absence of CdCl2 (0.5 μm) in a medium with a starting pH of 5.0. The pH-sensitive dye BCECF-AM was used to monitor cytosolic pH changes in the leaves. Cadmium uptake in protoplasts and leaves was detected with a Cd-specific fluorescent dye, Leadmium Green AM, and with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. During cultivation for 3 days without Cd, shoots of E. canadensis increased the pH of the surrounding water, irrespective of the photosynthetic conditions. This medium alkalisation was higher in the presence of CdCl2 . Moreover, the presence of Cd also increased the cation exchange capacity of the shoots. The total Cd uptake by E. canadensis shoots was independent of photosynthetic conditions. Protoplasts from plants exposed to 0.5 μm CdCl2 for 3 days did not exhibit significant change in cytosolic [Cd(2+)] or pH. However, exposure to CdCl2 for 7 days resulted in increased cytosolic [Cd(2+) ] as well as pH. The results suggest that E. canadensis subjected to a low CdCl2 concentration initially sequesters Cd into the apoplasm, but under prolonged exposure, Cd is transported into the cytosol and subsequently alters cytosolic pH. In contrast, addition of 10-50 μm CdCl2 directly to protoplasts resulted in immediate uptake of Cd into the cytosol. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Bicarbonate/chloride antiport in Vero cells: II. Mechanisms for bicarbonate-dependent regulation of intracellular pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsnes, S.; Ludt, J.; Tonnessen, T.I.; Sandvig, K.

    1987-01-01

    The rates of bicarbonate-dependent uptake and efflux of 22 Na + in Vero cells were studied and compared with the uptake and efflux of 36 Cl - . Both processes were strongly inhibited by DIDS. Whereas the transport of chloride increased approximately ten-fold when the internal pH was increased over a narrow range around neutrality, the uptake of Na + was much less affected by changes in pH. The bicarbonate-linked uptake of 22 Na + was dependent on internal Cl- but not on internal Na + . At a constant external concentration of HCO 3 -, the amount of 22 Na + associated with the cells increased when the internal concentration of HCO 3 - decreased and vice versa, which is compatible with the possibility that the ion pair NaCO 3 - is the transported species and that the transport is symmetric across the membrane. Bicarbonate inhibited the uptake of 36 Cl - both in the absence and presence of Na + . At alkaline internal pH, HCO 3 - stimulated the efflux of 36 Cl - from preloaded cells, while at acidic internal pH both Na + and HCO 3 - were required to induce 36 Cl - efflux. We propose a model for how bicarbonate-dependent regulation of the internal pH may occur. This model implies the existence of two bicarbonate transport mechanisms that, under physiological conditions, transport OH(-)-equivalents in opposite directions across the plasma membrane

  7. Effective pH pretreatment and cell disruption method for real-time intracellular enzyme activity assay of a marine fungus covered with pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Gao, Yanyun; Yin, Ying; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2017-02-07

    Filamentous fungi are capable producers of many bioactive compounds, and real-time intracellular enzyme activity assay is an essential guidance for their bioprocess developments. However, there are many difficulties in preparing homogenate for enzyme activity assay, such as disrupting fungal cell with complicated cellular structure and solid cell wall, removing abundant extracellular metabolites accumulating on mycelia, and so on. Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403) was a marine-derived filamentous fungus producing a potential antitumor compound 1403C, and the deep red pigments (with main component of 1403C) covering on its mycelia showed strong absorption in a wide range, which critically affected the measurement of many enzyme activities. In this study, we developed an effective pH pretreatment and cell disruption method to prepare homogenate for enzyme activity assay. When mycelia were washed by the solution with pH 5.0 for 3 min, most pigments could be removed without severe loss on enzyme activities. Afterward, grinding with mini bead for 15 min with alternating cooling could effectively disrupt both cell wall and mitochondrial membrane. These methods have been successfully applied on real-time intracellular enzyme activity assay of Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403) and can offer enlightenment for other filamentous fungi with similar problems.

  8. The V-ATPase is expressed in the choroid plexus and mediates cAMP-induced intracellular pH alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henriette L; Păunescu, Teodor G; Matchkov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pH influences brain interstitial pH and, therefore, brain function. We hypothesized that the choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) expresses the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) as an acid extrusion mechanism in the luminal membrane to counteract detrimental elevations in CSF...... fraction in the luminal microvillus area. The vesicles did not translocate to the luminal membrane in two in vivo models of hypocapnia-induced alkalosis. The Na(+)-independent intracellular pH (pHi) recovery from acidification was studied in freshly isolated clusters of CPECs. At extracellular pH (pHo) 7.......4, the cells failed to display significant concanamycin A-sensitive pHi recovery (i.e., V-ATPase activity). The recovery rate in the absence of Na(+) amounted to Hi recovery rate observed in the presence of Na(+) Recovery of pHi was faster at pHo 7.8 and was abolished at pHo 7.0. The concanamycin...

  9. Role of Cl−–HCO3 − exchanger AE3 in intracellular pH homeostasis in cultured murine hippocampal neurons, and in crosstalk to adjacent astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ahlam I.; Hübner, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points A polymorphism of human AE3 is associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Knockout of AE3 in mice lowers the threshold for triggering epileptic seizures. The explanations for these effects are elusive.Comparisons of cells from wild‐type vs. AE3–/– mice show that AE3 (present in hippocampal neurons, not astrocytes; mediates HCO3 – efflux) enhances intracellular pH (pHi) recovery (decrease) from alkali loads in neurons and, surprisingly, adjacent astrocytes.During metabolic acidosis (MAc), AE3 speeds initial acidification, but limits the extent of pHi decrease in neurons and astrocytes.AE3 speeds re‐alkalization after removal of MAc in neurons and astrocytes, and speeds neuronal pHi recovery from an ammonium prepulse‐induced acid load.We propose that neuronal AE3 indirectly increases acid extrusion in (a) neurons via Cl– loading, and (b) astrocytes by somehow enhancing NBCe1 (major acid extruder). The latter would enhance depolarization‐induced alkalinization of astrocytes, and extracellular acidification, and thereby reduce susceptibility to epileptic seizures. Abstract The anion exchanger AE3, expressed in hippocampal (HC) neurons but not astrocytes, contributes to intracellular pH (pHi) regulation by facilitating the exchange of extracellular Cl– for intracellular HCO3 –. The human AE3 polymorphism A867D is associated with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Moreover, AE3 knockout (AE3–/–) mice are more susceptible to epileptic seizure. The mechanism of these effects has been unclear because the starting pHi in AE3–/– and wild‐type neurons is indistinguishable. The purpose of the present study was to use AE3–/– mice to investigate the role of AE3 in pHi homeostasis in HC neurons, co‐cultured with astrocytes. We find that the presence of AE3 increases the acidification rate constant during pHi recovery from intracellular alkaline loads imposed by reducing [CO2]. The presence of AE3 also speeds intracellular

  10. Individual cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii exhibit different short-term intracellular pH responses to acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneborg, N; Jespersen, L; Jakobsen, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of perfusion with 2.7 and 26 mM undissociated acetic acid in the absence or presence of glucose on short-term intracellular pH (pH(i)) changes in individual Saccharormyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii cells were studied using fluorescence-ratio-imaging microscopy and a perfusion system. In the S. cerevisiae cells, perfusion with acetic acid induced strong short-term pH(i) responses, which were dependent on the undissociated acetic acid concentration and the presence of glucose in the perfusion solutions. In the Z. bailii cells, perfusion with acetic acid induced only very weak short-term pH(i) responses, which were neither dependent on the undissociated acetic acid concentration nor on the presence of glucose in the perfusion solutions. These results clearly show that Z. bailii is more resistant than S. cerevisiae to short-term pH(i) changes caused by acetic acid.

  11. Mechanism of action of benzoic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects on glycolytic metabolite levels, energy production, and intracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, A D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of benzoic acid in the preservative-resistant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii were studied. At concentrations of benzoic acid up to 4 mM, fermentation was stimulated and only low levels of benzoate were accumulated. Near the MIC (10 mM), fermentation was inhibited, ATP levels declined, and benzoate was accumulated to relatively higher levels. Intracellular pH was reduced but not greatly. Changes in the levels of metabolites at different external benzoic acid levels showed that glycolysis was limited at pyruvate kinase and glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase-phosphoglycerate kinase steps. Inhibition of phosphofructokinase and several other glycolytic enzymes was not responsible for the inhibition of fermentation. Instead, the results suggest that the primary action of benzoic acid in Z. bailii is to cause a general energy loss, i.e., ATP depletion. PMID:1785916

  12. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    of the bacterium. In situ analyses of Listeria monocytogenes single cells were performed during exposure to different concentrations of the disinfectant Incimaxx DES to study a possible population subdivision. Bacterial survival was quantified with plate counting and disinfection stress at the single-cell level...... by measuring intracellular pH (pHi) over time by fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy. pHi values were initially 7 to 7.5 and decreased in both attached and planktonic L. monocytogenes cells during exposure to sublethal and lethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES. The response of the bacterial population...... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  13. The effect of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus plantarum strains on the intracellular pH of sessile and planktonic Listeria monocytongenes single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Hanak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    and/or bacteriocin-producing LAB as “natural” food preservatives in foods such as cheese, meat and ready-to-eat products. Some strains of Lactobacillus plantarum produce bacteriocins termed plantaricins. Using a single-cell based approach, the effect on the intracellular pH as a measure...... unaffected after 5 h of co-culturing and after 8 h 50% of the cells still maintained pHi = 7. Higher concentrations of lactic acid were produced in liquid compared to a solid surface, and the different response of EGDe and N53-1 to the activities of the two L. plantarum strains probably reflect higher...... of the physiological state of sessile and planktonic L. monocytogenes (strains EGDe and N53-1) during co-culturing with plantaricin-producing L. plantarum (strains BFE 5092 and PCS 20) was investigated using fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM). Mono-cultures of L. monocytogenes were used as control...

  14. Posttranslational protein S-palmitoylation and the compartmentalization of signaling molecules in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEAN I PATTERSON

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein domains play a fundamental role in the spatial and temporal organization of intracellular signaling systems. While protein phosphorylation has long been known to modify the interactions that underlie this organization, the dynamic cycling of lipids should now be included amongst the posttranslational processes determining specificity in signal transduction. The characteristics of this process are reminiscent of the properties of protein and lipid phosphorylation in determining compartmentalization through SH2 or PH domains. Recent studies have confirmed the functional importance of protein S-palmitoylation in the compartmentalization of signaling molecules that support normal physiological function in cell division and apoptosis, and synaptic transmission and neurite outgrowth. In neurons, S-palmitoylation and targeting of proteins to rafts are regulated differentially in development by a number of processes, including some related to synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Alterations in the S-palmitoylation state of proteins substantially affect their cellular function, raising the possibility of new therapeutic targets in cancer and nervous system injury and disease.

  15. Effect of GAPDH-derived antimicrobial peptides on sensitive yeasts cells: membrane permeability, intracellular pH and H+-influx/-efflux rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Patrícia; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils; Prista, Catarina

    2018-03-13

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), which induce death of several non-Saccharomyces yeasts. Previously, we demonstrated that the naturally-secreted GAPDH-derived AMPs (i.e. saccharomycin) caused a loss of culturability and decreased the intracellular pH (pHi) of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii cells. In this study, we show that chemically-synthesized analogues of saccharomycin also induce a pHi drop and loss of culturability in H. guilliermondii, although to a lesser extent than saccharomycin. To assess the underlying causes of the pHi drop, we evaluated the membrane permeability to H+ cations of H. guilliermondii cells, after being exposed to saccharomycin or its synthetic analogues. Results showed that the H+-efflux decreased by 75.6% and the H+-influx increased by 66.5% in cells exposed to saccharomycin at pH 3.5. Since H+-efflux via H+-ATPase is energy-dependent, reduced glucose consumption would decrease ATP production and consequently H+-ATPase activity. However, glucose uptake rates were not affected, suggesting that the AMPs rather than affecting glucose transporters may affect directly the plasma membrane H+-ATPase or increase ATP leakage due to cell membrane disturbance. Thus, our study revealed that both saccharomycin and its synthetic analogues induced cell death of H. guilliermondii by increasing the proton influx and inhibiting the proton efflux.

  16. Intracellular pH determination by a 31P-NMR technique. The second dissociation constant of phosphoric acid in a biological system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Y; Murakami, M; Watari, H; Imai, Y; Yoshizaki, K; Nishikawa, H; Morimoto, T

    1983-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of pH determination by 31P-NMR, factors which influence the pK value of phosphate were appraised on the basis of the titration of 1 mM phosphate buffer solution. When the method is used for the determination of cytoplasmic pH, ionic strength is the major factor causing shifts of apparent pK (pK') value, and the magnitude of the shift can be predicted from the ionic strength calculated by means of the Debye-Hückel equation. Ions (Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) and salivary protein affected the pK' value by 0.1 to 0.3 units in solution with a given ionic strength depending on the species of ion. The form of the titration curve varied with temperature. Based on these results, the value of 6.75 was obtained with the uncertainty of 0.12 for the intracellular pK' of frog muscle at 24 degrees C.

  17. Dual Role of CO2/HCO3− Buffer in the Regulation of Intracellular pH of Three-dimensional Tumor Growths*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Swietach, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi), a major modulator of cell function, is regulated by acid/base transport across membranes. Excess intracellular H+ ions (e.g. produced by respiration) are extruded by transporters such as Na+/H+ exchange, or neutralized by HCO3− taken up by carriers such as Na+-HCO3− cotransport. Using fluorescence pHi imaging, we show that cancer-derived cell lines (colorectal HCT116 and HT29, breast MDA-MB-468, pancreatic MiaPaca2, and cervical HeLa) extrude acid by H+ efflux and HCO3− influx, largely sensitive to dimethylamiloride and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS), respectively. The magnitude of HCO3− influx was comparable among the cell lines and may represent a constitutive element of tumor pHi regulation. In contrast, H+ efflux varied considerably (MDA-MB-468 > HCT116 > HT29 > MiaPaca2 > HeLa). When HCO3− flux was pharmacologically inhibited, acid extrusion in multicellular HT29 and HCT116 spheroids (∼10,000 cells) was highly non-uniform and produced low pHi at the core. With depth, acid extrusion became relatively more DIDS-sensitive because the low extracellular pH at the spheroid core inhibits H+ flux more than HCO3− flux. HCO3− flux inhibition also decelerated HCT116 spheroid growth. In the absence of CO2/HCO3−, acid extrusion by H+ flux in HCT116 and MDA-MB-468 spheroids became highly non-uniform and inadequate at the core. This is because H+ transporters require extracellular mobile pH buffers, such as CO2/HCO3−, to overcome low H+ ion mobility and chaperone H+ ions away from cells. CO2/HCO3− exerts a dual effect: as substrate for membrane-bound HCO3− transporters and as a mobile buffer for facilitating extracellular diffusion of H+ ions extruded from cells. These processes can be augmented by carbonic anhydrase activity. We conclude that CO2/HCO3− is important for maintaining uniformly alkaline pHi in small, non-vascularized tumor growths and may be important for cancer disease progression

  18. THE RESPONSE OF MEMBRANE POTENTIAL (Vm) AND INTRACELLULAR pH (pHi) TO HYPERCAPNIA IN NEURONS AND ASTROCYTES FROM RAT RETROTRAPEZOID NUCLEUS (RTN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritucci, Nick A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Leiter, J.C.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    We compared the response to hypercapnia (10%) in both neurons and astrocytes between a distinct area of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), the medio-caudal RTN (mcRTN) and more intermediate and rostral RTN areas (irRTN) in medullary brain slices from neonatal rats. Exposure to hypercapnic acidosis (HA) caused pHo to decline from 7.45 to 7.15 and caused a maintained, intracellular acidification of 0.15±0.02 pH unit in 90% of neurons from both areas of the RTN (n=16). HA excited 44% of mcRTN (7 of 16) and 38% of irRTN neurons (6 of 16), increasing firing rate by 167±75% (chemosensitivity index, CI, of 256±72%) and 310±93% (CI of 292±50%) respectively. These responses did not vary throughout neonatal development. We investigated the role of pHo by comparing the responses between HA (decreased pHi and pHo) and isohydric hypercapnia (IH; decreased pHi with constant pHo) in mcRTN neurons. Neurons excited by HA (firing rate increased by 156±46%; n=5) were excited to the same extent by IH (firing rate increased by 167±38%; n=5). Neurons insensitive to HA were also insensitive to IH. In astrocytes from both areas of the RTN, exposure to HA caused a maintained, intracellular acidification of 0.17±0.02 pH unit (n=6) and a depolarization of 5±1mV (n=12). In summary, a high percentage of neurons (42%) from the entire RTN are highly responsive (CI 248%) to HA; this may reflect both synaptically driven and intrinsic mechanisms of CO2 sensitivity. Changes of pHi appear to be a more significant stimulus than changes of pHo in chemosensory RTN neurons. Finally, the lack of astrocytic pHi regulation in response to HA suggests that astrocytes do not enhance extracellular acidification during hypercapnia in the RTN in the neonatal period. PMID:15905224

  19. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  20. Skeletal muscle intracellular pH and levels of high energy phosphates during hypercapnia in intact lizards by 31P NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Hitzig, B.M.; Elmden, K.; McFarland, E.; Koutcher, J.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-01-01

    Lizards have been shown to reduce ventilation during CO 2 breathing. This is thought to be detrimental to the maintenance of intracellular pH (pHi) and levels of high energy phosphates. The authors subjected chameleons (n=4) to 5% CO 2 breathing and made serial measurements of tail (skeletal) muscle pHi, levels of phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP utilizing high resolution 31 P NMR. pHi was unchanged from controls (7.27 +/- 0.06 units) (mean +/- SE) during 30 minutes of hypercapnia (7.19 +/- 0.09 units) (p>.2) demonstrating effective regulation of skeletal muscle pHi; however, there were significant decreases in the PCr/ATP ratios to 65% +/- 5% (p 2 availability because there were no increases in the levels of glycolytic intermediates and inorganic phosphate which would indicate tissue hypoxia. It is possible that an active process requiring ATP is required for the maintenance of pHi in the presence of hypercapnia and that the reduction of PCr/ATP ratio is a reflection of an increased utilization of ATP

  1. Skeletal muscle intracellular pH and levels of high energy phosphates during hypercapnia in intact lizards by /sup 31/P NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.C.; Hitzig, B.M.; Elmden, K.; McFarland, E.; Koutcher, J.; Kazemi, H.

    1986-03-05

    Lizards have been shown to reduce ventilation during CO/sub 2/ breathing. This is thought to be detrimental to the maintenance of intracellular pH (pHi) and levels of high energy phosphates. The authors subjected chameleons (n=4) to 5% CO/sub 2/ breathing and made serial measurements of tail (skeletal) muscle pHi, levels of phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP utilizing high resolution /sup 31/P NMR. pHi was unchanged from controls (7.27 +/- 0.06 units) (mean +/- SE) during 30 minutes of hypercapnia (7.19 +/- 0.09 units) (p>.2) demonstrating effective regulation of skeletal muscle pHi; however, there were significant decreases in the PCr/ATP ratios to 65% +/- 5% (p<.05) of control. The reduced PCr/ATP ratio does not appear due to decreased O/sub 2/ availability because there were no increases in the levels of glycolytic intermediates and inorganic phosphate which would indicate tissue hypoxia. It is possible that an active process requiring ATP is required for the maintenance of pHi in the presence of hypercapnia and that the reduction of PCr/ATP ratio is a reflection of an increased utilization of ATP.

  2. Nonnegative and Compartmental Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, Wassim M; Hui, Qing

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive book provides the first unified framework for stability and dissipativity analysis and control design for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems, which play a key role in a wide range of fields, including engineering, thermal sciences, biology, ecology, economics, genetics, chemistry, medicine, and sociology. Using the highest standards of exposition and rigor, the authors explain these systems and advance the state of the art in their analysis and active control design. Nonnegative and Compartmental Dynamical Systems presents the most complete treatment available o

  3. A pH and solvent optimized reverse-phase ion-paring-LC–MS/MS method that leverages multiple scan-types for targeted absolute quantification of intracellular metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Gangoiti, Jon A.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    existing reverse phase ion-paring liquid chromatography methods for separation and detection of polar and anionic compounds that comprise key nodes of intracellular metabolism by optimizing pH and solvent composition. In addition, the presented method utilizes multiple scan types provided by hybrid......Comprehensive knowledge of intracellular biochemistry is needed to accurately understand, model, and manipulate metabolism for industrial and therapeutic applications. Quantitative metabolomics has been driven by advances in analytical instrumentation and can add valuable knowledge...... to the understanding of intracellular metabolism. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC–MS and LC–MS/MS) has become a reliable means with which to quantify a multitude of intracellular metabolites in parallel with great specificity and accuracy. This work details a method that builds and extends upon...

  4. Spatial Cell Biology : Dissecting and directing intracellular transport mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, M.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular compartmentalization and intracellular transport mechanisms are important to establish and maintain the spatial organisation of proteins and organelles needed to ensure proper cellular functioning. Especially in polarized cells like neurons, the proper distribution of proteins into the

  5. Advanced compositional gradient and compartmentalization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canas, Jesus A.; Petti, Daniela; Mullins, Oliver [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Acquisition of hydrocarbons samples from the reservoir prior to oil or gas production is essential in order to design production strategies and production facilities. In addition, reservoir compartmentalization and hydrocarbon compositional grading magnify the necessity to map fluid properties vertically and laterally in the reservoir prior to production. Formation testers supply a wealth of information to observe and predict the state of fluids in hydrocarbon reservoirs, through detailed pressure and fluid analysis measurements. With the correct understanding of the state of fluids in the reservoirs, reserve calculations and adequate development plans can be prepared. Additionally, flow barriers may then be revealed. This paper describes a new Downhole Fluid Analysis technology (DFA) for improved reservoir management. DFA is a unique process that combines new fluid identification sensors, which allow real time monitoring of a wide range of parameters as GOR, fluid density, viscosity, fluorescence and composition (CH{sub 4}, C2- C5, C6 +, CO{sub 2}), free gas and liquid phases detection, saturation pressure, as well WBM and OBM filtrate differentiation and pH. This process is not limited to light fluid evaluation and we extended to heavy oil (HO) reservoirs analysis successfully. The combination of DFA Fluid Profiling with pressure measurements has shown to be very effective for compartmentalization characterization. The ability of thin barriers to hold off large depletion pressures has been established, as the gradual variation of hydrocarbon quality in biodegraded oils. In addition, heavy oils can show large compositional variation due to variations in source rock charging but without fluid mixing. Our findings indicates that steep gradients are common in gas condensates or volatile oils, and that biodegradation is more common in HO than in other hydrocarbons, which generate fluid gradients and heavy ends tars near the OWC, limiting the aquifer activity and

  6. CELLULAR COMPARTMENTALIZATION AND HEAVY METAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CELLULAR COMPARTMENTALIZATION AND HEAVY METAL LOAD IN THE MOSS. Barbula lambarenensis AROUND A MEGA CEMENT FACTORY IN SOUTHWEST NIGERIA. *. Ogunkunle, C. O. and Fatoba, P. O.. Department of Plant Biology, University of Ilorin .... the free transport of Zn across the cell wall as it.

  7. Bioelectric patterning during oogenesis: stage-specific distribution of membrane potentials, intracellular pH and ion-transport mechanisms in Drosophila ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Julia; Bohrmann, Johannes

    2015-01-16

    Bioelectric phenomena have been found to exert influence on various developmental and regenerative processes. Little is known about their possible functions and the cellular mechanisms by which they might act during Drosophila oogenesis. In developing follicles, characteristic extracellular current patterns and membrane-potential changes in oocyte and nurse cells have been observed that partly depend on the exchange of protons, potassium ions and sodium ions. These bioelectric properties have been supposed to be related to various processes during oogenesis, e. g. pH-regulation, osmoregulation, cell communication, cell migration, cell proliferation, cell death, vitellogenesis and follicle growth. Analysing in detail the spatial distribution and activity of the relevant ion-transport mechanisms is expected to elucidate the roles that bioelectric phenomena play during oogenesis. To obtain an overview of bioelectric patterning along the longitudinal and transversal axes of the developing follicle, the spatial distributions of membrane potentials (Vmem), intracellular pH (pHi) and various membrane-channel proteins were studied systematically using fluorescent indicators, fluorescent inhibitors and antisera. During mid-vitellogenic stages 9 to 10B, characteristic, stage-specific Vmem-patterns in the follicle-cell epithelium as well as anteroposterior pHi-gradients in follicle cells and nurse cells were observed. Corresponding distribution patterns of proton pumps (V-ATPases), voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+)-channels, amiloride-sensitive Na(+)-channels and Na(+),H(+)-exchangers (NHE) and gap-junction proteins (innexin 3) were detected. In particular, six morphologically distinguishable follicle-cell types are characterized on the bioelectric level by differences concerning Vmem and pHi as well as specific compositions of ion channels and carriers. Striking similarities between Vmem-patterns and activity patterns of voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels were found, suggesting

  8. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters intracellular pH and ion transport in the outer mantle epithelium of the bivalve Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marco G; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2014-09-01

    Bivalve molluscs, due to their sedentary mode of life and filter-feeding behavior, are very susceptible to pollutant bioaccumulation and used as sentinel organisms in the assessment of environment pollution. Herein we aimed to determine the in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a widely used herbicide, in Anodonta cygnea shell growth mechanisms. For that, we evaluated the effect of 2,4-D (100 μM) exposure on the transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc), potential (Vt) and conductance (Gt), as well as on OME ion transport systems and intracellular pH (pHi). In vivo exposure to 2,4-D caused an increase of 50% on the Isc generated by OME and ex vivo addition of that compound to the apical side of OME also induced an Isc increase. Furthermore, 2,4-D was able to cause a pHi increase in isolated cells of OME. Noteworthy, when 2,4-D was added following the exposure to specific inhibitors of several membrane transporters identified as responsible for pHi maintenance in these cells, no significant effect was observed on pHi except when the V-type ATPase inhibitor was used, indicating an overlap with the effect of 2,4-D. Thus, we concluded that 2,4-D is able of enhancing the activity of the V-ATPases present on the OME of A. cygnea and that this effect seems to be due to a direct stimulation of those H(+) transporters present on the apical portion of the membrane of OME cells, which are vital for shell maintenance and growth. This study allows us to better understand the molecular mechanisms behind 2,4-D toxicity and its deleterious effect in aquatic ecosystems, with particular emphasis on those involved in shell formation of bivalves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential role of sodium-proton exchangers in the low concentration arsenic trioxide-increased intracellular pH and cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Aravena

    Full Text Available Arsenic main inorganic compound is arsenic trioxide (ATO presented in solution mainly as arsenite. ATO increases intracellular pH (pHi, cell proliferation and tumor growth. Sodium-proton exchangers (NHEs modulate the pHi, with NHE1 playing significant roles. Whether ATO-increased cell proliferation results from altered NHEs expression and activity is unknown. We hypothesize that ATO increases cell proliferation by altering pHi due to increased NHEs-like transport activity. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells grown in 5 mmol/L D-glucose-containing DMEM were exposed to ATO (0.05, 0.5 or 5 µmol/L, 0-48 hours in the absence or presence of 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, 5-100 µmol/L, NHEs inhibitor, PD-98059 (30 µmol/L, MAPK1/2 inhibitor, Gö6976 (10 µmol/L, PKCα, βI and μ inhibitor, or Schering 28080 (10 µmol/L, H(+/K(+ATPase inhibitor plus concanamycin (0.1 µmol/L, V type ATPases inhibitor. Incorporation of [(3H]thymidine was used to estimate cell proliferation, and counting cells with a hemocytometer to determine the cell number. The pHi was measured by fluorometry in 2,7-bicarboxyethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein loaded cells. The Na(+-dependent HMA-sensitive NHEs-like mediated proton transport kinetics, NHE1 protein abundance in the total, cytoplasm and plasma membrane protein fractions, and phosphorylated and total p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44(mapk were also determined. Lowest ATO (0.05 µmol/L, ~0.01 ppm used in this study increased cell proliferation, pHi, NHEs-like transport and plasma membrane NHE1 protein abundance, effects blocked by HMA, PD-98059 or Gö6976. Cell-buffering capacity did not change by ATO. The results show that a low ATO concentration increases MDCK cells proliferation by NHEs (probably NHE1-like transport dependent-increased pHi requiring p42/44(mapk and PKCα, βI and/or μ activity. This finding could be crucial in diseases where uncontrolled cell growth occurs, such as tumor growth, and

  10. Compartmental modeling and tracer kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David H

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with mathematical aspects of compartmental an­ alysis. In particular, linear models are closely analyzed since they are fully justifiable as an investigative tool in tracer experiments. The objective of the monograph is to bring the reader up to date on some of the current mathematical prob­ lems of interest in compartmental analysis. This is accomplished by reviewing mathematical developments in the literature, especially over the last 10-15 years, and by presenting some new thoughts and directions for future mathematical research. These notes started as a series of lectures that I gave while visiting with the Division of Applied ~1athematics, Brown University, 1979, and have developed in­ to this collection of articles aimed at the reader with a beginning graduate level background in mathematics. The text can be used as a self-paced reading course. With this in mind, exercises have been appropriately placed throughout the notes. As an aid in reading the material, the e~d of a ...

  11. Current Ideas about Prebiological Compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Walde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary biological cells are highly sophisticated dynamic compartment systems which separate an internal volume from the external medium through a boundary, which controls, in complex ways, the exchange of matter and energy between the cell’s interior and the environment. Since such compartmentalization is a fundamental principle of all forms of life, scenarios have been elaborated about the emergence of prebiological compartments on early Earth, in particular about their likely structural characteristics and dynamic features. Chemical systems that consist of potentially prebiological compartments and chemical reaction networks have been designed to model pre-cellular systems. These systems are often referred to as “protocells”. Past and current protocell model systems are presented and compared. Since the prebiotic formation of cell-like compartments is directly linked to the prebiotic availability of compartment building blocks, a few aspects on the likely chemical inventory on the early Earth are also summarized. PMID:25867709

  12. Enhanced photoresponsive polyethyleneimine/citric acid co-carbonized dots for facile and selective sensing and intracellular imaging of cobalt ions at physiologic pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Wen-Sheng, E-mail: wszou@ahjzu.edu.cn; Zhao, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Shao-Hua; Wang, Ya-Qin, E-mail: yqwang@ahjzu.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Whether as an important biological element or as a radioactive source/medicine, the monitoring of trace levels of cobalt ions (Co) has become a non-negligible factor for human health and green environment. Current technologies for the detection of Co are cost-expensive and time-consuming, and require cumbersome sample pretreatment process. Herein a novel sensing platform has been developed for Co detection based on the quenching of the enhanced fluorescence signal of polyamine functionalized C-dots. Amine groups at the surface of the C-dots can capture Zn{sup 2+}/Cd{sup 2+} to form coordination compound, which can inhibit the photoinduced electron transfer pathways of C-dots and then induce the fluorescence enhancement of the C-dots by ∼80% margin. Also, Co interacts with these amine groups to form an absorbent complex, which can strongly quench the enhanced fluorescence of C-dots via an inner filter effect. This C-dots-based probe showed a wide linear response to Co with a concentration ranging from 0.012 to 12 μM, and a detection limit of 8.0 nM and RSD of 5.7% (n = 5). Significantly, the C-Dots exhibit excellent properties, such as negligible cytotoxicity, excellent biocompatibility, low-cost and high photostability, etc., which make C-dots favorable for label-free monitoring of Co and then successfully applied to the confocal imaging of intracellular Co. - Highlights: • Polyethyleneimine/citric acid co-carbonized dots were prepared. • Zn{sup 2+} can enhance fluorescence of C-dots by inhibiting PET pathways. • Co{sup 2+} can quench the enhanced fluorescence by an inner filter effect. • Bioprobe has been established for intracellular imaging Co.

  13. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-[ 3 H]ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-[ 3 H]ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO 2 , and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment

  14. Early events elicited by bombesin and structurally related peptides in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. II. Changes in Na+ and Ca2+ fluxes, Na+/K+ pump activity, and intracellular pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, S.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Lopez-Rivas, A.; Sinnett-Smith, J.W.; Rozengurt, E.

    1986-01-01

    The amphibian tetradecapeptide, bombesin, and structurally related peptides caused a marked increase in ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb + uptake (a measure of Na + /K + pump activity) in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. This effect occurred within seconds after the addition of the peptide and appeared to be mediated by an increase in Na + entry into the cells. The effect of bombesin on Na + entry and Na + /K + pump activity was concentration dependent with half-maximal stimulation occurring at 0.3-0.4 nM. The structurally related peptides litorin, gastrin-releasing peptide, and neuromedin B also stimulated ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb + uptake; the relative potencies of these peptides in stimulating the Na + /K + pump were comparable to their potencies in increasing DNA synthesis. Bombesin increased Na + influx, at least in part, through an Na + /H + antiport. The peptide augmented intracellular pH and this effect was abolished in the absence of extracellular Na + . In addition to monovalent ion transport, bombesin and the structurally related peptides rapidly increased the efflux of 45 Ca 2+ from quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. This Ca 2+ came from an intracellular pool and the efflux was associated with a 50% decrease in total intracellular Ca 2+ . The peptides also caused a rapid increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration. Prolonged pretreatment of Swiss 3T3 cells with phorbol dibutyrate, which causes a loss of protein kinase C activity, greatly decreased the stimulation of 86 Rb + uptake and Na + entry by bombesin implicating this phosphotransferase system in the mediation of part of these responses to bombesin. Since some activation of monovalent ion transport by bombesin was seen in phorbol dibutyrate-pretreated cells, it is likely that the peptide also stimulates monovalent ion transport by a second mechanism

  15. Co-targeting intracellular pH and essential amino acid uptake cooperates to induce cell death of T-ALL/LL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Véronique; Nebout, Marielle; Mary, Didier; Endou, Hitoshi; Wempe, Michael F; Supuran, Claudiu T; Winum, Jean-Yves; Peyron, Jean-François

    2018-02-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to optimize their growth and proliferation in the host microenvironment. For this purpose, they enhance the uptake of extracellular nutrients and deal with the metabolic waste products through the overexpression of numerous membrane proteins including amino-acid transporters (LAT1) and acid-base regulating enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Here we describe the anti-tumoral effects of a new class of CAXII inhibitors, the glycosyl coumarins on T-ALL/LL cells. These effects appeared to be mediated through inhibition of mTOR/Akt pathway and c-myc downregulation. Interestingly, we show that the combined targeting of amino acid fluxes and pH regulators provides a promising therapeutic strategy in the future of T-ALL/LL management.

  16. [Dependence of the intracellular concentrations of univalent ions and hydrogenase activity on the salt composition and pH of the medium in the haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, G S; Dulov, L E; Pusheva, M A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that the intracellular concentrations of Na+, K+, and Cl- ions in Desulfonatronum thiodismutans depend on the extracellular concentration of Na' ions. An increase in the extracellular concentration of Na+ results in the accumulation of K+ ions in cells, which points to the possibility that these ions perform an osmoprotective function. When the concentration of the NaCI added to the medium was increased to 4%, the concentration gradient of Cl- ions changed insignificantly. It was found that D. thiodismutans contains two forms of hydrogenase--periplasmic and cytoplasmic. Both enzymes are capable of functioning in solutions with high ionic force; however they exhibit different sensitivities to Na+, K+, and Li+ salts and pH. The enzymes were found to be resistant to high concentrations of Na+ and K+ chlorides and Na+ bicarbonate. The cytoplasmic hydrogenase differed significantly from the periplasmic one in having much higher salt tolerance and lower pH optimum. The activity of these enzymes depended on the nature of both the cationic and anionic components of the salts. For instance, the inhibitory effect of NaCl was less pronounced than that of LiCl, whereas Na+ and Li+ sulfates inhibited the activity of both hydrogenase types to an equal degree. The highest activity of these enzymes was observed at low Na+ concentrations, close to those typical of cells growing at optimal salt concentrations.

  17. Compartmentation of sucrose during radial transfer in mature sorghum culm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vietor Donald M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sucrose that accumulates in the culm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench and other large tropical andropogonoid grasses can be of commercial value, and can buffer assimilate supply during development. Previous study conducted with intact plants showed that sucrose can be radially transferred to the intracellular compartment of mature ripening sorghum internode without being hydrolysed. In this study, culm-infused radiolabelled sucrose was traced between cellular compartments and among related metabolites to determine if the compartmental path of sucrose during radial transfer in culm tissue was symplasmic or included an apoplasmic step. This transfer path was evaluated for elongating and ripening culm tissue of intact plants of two semidwarf grain sorghums. The metabolic path in elongating internode tissue was also evaluated. Results On the day after culm infusion of the tracer sucrose, the specific radioactivity of sucrose recovered from the intracellular compartment of growing axillary-branch tissue was greater (nearly twice than that in the free space, indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through symplasmic routes. In contrast, the sucrose specific radioactivity in the intracellular compartment of the mature (ripening culm tissue was probably less (about 3/4's than that in free space indicating that sucrose was preferentially transferred through routes that included an apoplasmic step. In growing internodes of the axillary branch of sorghum, the tritium label initially provided in the fructose moiety of sucrose molecules was largely (81% recovered in the fructose moiety, indicating that a large portion of sucrose molecules is not hydrolysed and resynthesized during radial transfer. Conclusion During radial transfer of sucrose in ripening internodes of intact sorghum plants, much of the sucrose is transferred intact (without hydrolysis and resynthesis and primarily through a path that includes an

  18. Surface interactions with compartmentalized cellular phosphates explain rare earth oxide nanoparticle hazard and provide opportunities for safer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibin; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dunphy, Darren R; Cai, Xiaoming; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Haiyuan; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, Andre; Xia, Tian

    2014-02-25

    Growing international exploitation of rare earth oxides (REOs) for commercial and biological use has increased the possibility of human exposure and adverse health effects. Occupational exposure to rare earth materials in miners and polishers leads to a severe form of pneumoconiosis, while gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal impairment. The mechanisms for inducing these adverse pro-fibrogenic effects are of considerable importance for the safety assessment of REO particles as well as presenting opportunities for safer design. In this study, using a well-prepared REO library, we obtained a mechanistic understanding of how REOs induce cellular and pulmonary damage by a compartmentalized intracellular biotransformation process in lysosomes that results in pro-fibrogenic growth factor production and lung fibrosis. We demonstrate that rare earth oxide ion shedding in acidifying macrophage lysosomes leads to biotic phosphate complexation that results in organelle damage due to stripping of phosphates from the surrounding lipid bilayer. This results in nanoparticle biotransformation into urchin shaped structures and setting in motion a series of events that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, IL-1β release, TGF-β1 and PDGF-AA production. However, pretreatment of REO nanoparticles with phosphate in a neutral pH environment prevents biological transformation and pro-fibrogenic effects. This can be used as a safer design principle for producing rare earth nanoparticles for biological use.

  19. Dynamic compartmentalization of DNA repair proteins within spiral ganglion neurons in response to noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, O'neil W

    2012-12-01

    ABSTRACT In response to stress, spiral ganglion neurons may remodel intracellular pools of DNA repair proteins. This hypothesis was addressed by determining the intracellular location of three classic DNA excision repair proteins (XPA, CSA, and XPC) within the neurons under normal conditions, one day after noise stress (105 dB/4 hr) and following DNA repair adjuvant therapy with carboxy alkyl esters (CAEs; 160 mg/kg/28 days). Under normal conditions, three intracellular compartments were enriched with at least one repair protein. These intracellular compartments were designated nuclear, cytoplasmic, and perinuclear. After the noise stress each repair protein aggregated in the cytoplasm. After CAE therapy each intracellular compartment was enriched with the three DNA repair proteins. Combining noise stress with CAE therapy resulted in the enrichment of at least two repair proteins in each intracellular compartment. The combined results suggest that in response to noise stress and/or otoprotective therapy, spiral ganglion neurons may selectively remodel compartmentalized DNA repair proteins.

  20. cGMP Signaling in the Cardiovascular System—The Role of Compartmentation and Its Live Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Nadja I.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquitous second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) regulates multiple physiologic processes in the cardiovascular system. Its intracellular effects are mediated by stringently controlled subcellular microdomains. In this review, we will illustrate the current techniques available for real-time cGMP measurements with a specific focus on live cell imaging methods. We will also discuss currently accepted and emerging mechanisms of cGMP compartmentation in the cardiovascular system. PMID:29534460

  1. [Compartmentalized organization of human corpus striatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Parent, A; Giménez-Amaya, J M

    The compartmentalization of the human striatum was first established thanks to the pioneer work of Graybiel and Ragsdale in 1978. These authors described in the human striatum, as well as in the cats and primates, zones poorly stained for the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which they termed striosomes, that lie in more intensely stained matrix. The striosome/matrix subdivision of the striatum is supported by the distribution of a wide variety of transmitter-related substances and by the organization of striatal afferent and efferent connections. The results of many studies performed in different species in the last twenty years have indicated that the chemical heterogeneity of striatum is more complex than the simple subdivision into striosomes and matrix compartments. Thus, a further subdivisions of the dual striosome/matrix system has been proposed on the basis of the results of a huge amount of works combining tract tracing methods with histochemical techniques. The matrix has been demonstrated to be heterogeneous by containing numerous functional modules that were termed matrisomes. Furthermore, the most recent study of the distribution of a wide variety of neurochemical markers in the striosomal compartment of the human striatum, has revealed that the striosomes are themselves heterogeneous, being composed of a central core and a peripheral region. Since it is now twenty years from the first description of the striosome/matrix organization of the striatum, in this review we intend to summarize the major finding regarding the compartmental organization of this subcortical structure that have been obtained during this period of time.

  2. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kehr

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Dual regulation of muscle glycogen synthase during exercise by activation and compartmentalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Helge, Jørn W; Nordby, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen synthase (GS) is considered the rate-limiting enzyme in glycogenesis but still today there is a lack of understanding on its regulation. We have previously shown phosphorylation-dependent GS intracellular redistribution at the start of glycogen re-synthesis in rabbit skeletal muscle (Prats......, C., Cadefau, J. A., Cussó, R., Qvortrup, K., Nielsen, J. N., Wojtaszewki, J. F., Wojtaszewki, J. F., Hardie, D. G., Stewart, G., Hansen, B. F., and Ploug, T. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 23165-23172). In the present study we investigate the regulation of human muscle GS activity by glycogen, exercise......, and insulin. Using immunocytochemistry we investigate the existence and relevance of GS intracellular compartmentalization during exercise and during glycogen re-synthesis. The results show that GS intrinsic activity is strongly dependent on glycogen levels and that such regulation involves associated...

  4. Clade-specific differences in active viral replication and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, Monica; Centlivre, Mireille; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the impact of HIV-1 clade-specific polymorphisms on the dynamics of viral replication and compartmentalization in vivo. HIV-1 transcription and compartmentalization are essentially modulated by interconnected parameters: cellular activation by T-cell receptor engagement or

  5. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mathematical basis for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers by compartmental analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    Using compartmental analysis methods, a mathematical basis is given for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers. Cardiac output is shown to be the product of the blood volume and the sum of the rate constants of tracer egress from blood, modified by a factor reflecting transcapillary diffusibility, the transfer fraction. The return of tracer to the blood and distant (intracellular) events are shown to play no role in the solution. Fractional cardiac output is the ratio of the rate constant of tracer egress from blood to an organ, divided by the sum of the egress constants from blood. Predominantly extracellular ions such as sodium or bromide are best suited for this technique, although theoretically any diffusible tracer whose compartmental model can be solved may be used. It is shown that fractional cardiac output is independent of the transfer fraction, and therefore can be measured accurately by tracers which are not freely diffusible

  7. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. W. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure (3 ACH50) for single-family and multifamily construction (in climate zones 3–8). The Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification program and ASHRAE Standard 189 have comparable compartmentalization requirements. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 will soon be responsible for all multifamily ventilation requirements (low rise and high rise); it has an exceptionally stringent compartmentalization requirement. These code and program requirements are driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  8. Drivers of compartmentalization in a Mediterranean pollination network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Ana M. Martin; Allesina, Stefano; Rodrigo, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    We study compartmentalization in a Mediterranean pollination network using three different analytical approaches: unipartite modularity (UM), bipartite modularity (BM) and the group model (GM). Our objectives are to compare compartments obtained with these three approaches and to explore the role...

  9. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  10. Proline accumulation, ions dynamics and sodium root-shoot partition and compartmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Emanuel eBojorquez Quintal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite its economic relevance, little is known about salt tolerance mechanisms in pepper plants. To address this question, we compared differences in responses to NaCl in two Capsicum chinense varieties: Rex (tolerant and Chichen-Itza (sensitive. Under salt stress (150 mM NaCl over 7 days roots of Rex variety accumulated 50 times more compatible solutes such as proline compared to Chichen-Itza. Mineral analysis indicated that Na+ is restricted to roots by preventing its transport to leaves. Fluorescence analysis suggested an efficient Na+ compartmentalization in vacuole-like structures and in small intracellular compartments in roots of Rex variety. At the same time, Na+ in Chichen-Itza plants was compartmentalized in the apoplast, suggesting substantial Na+ extrusion. Rex variety was found to retain more K+ in its roots under salt stress according to a mineral analysis and microelectrode ion flux estimation (MIFE. Vanadate-sensitive H+ efflux was higher in Chichen-Itza variety plants, suggesting a higher activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, which fuels the extrusion of Na+, and, possibly, also the re-uptake of K+. Our results suggest a combination of stress tolerance mechanisms, in order to alleviate the salt-induced injury. Furthermore, Na+ extrusion to apoplast does not appear to be an efficient strategy for salt tolerance in pepper plants.

  11. Compartmentalization of prostaglandins in the canine kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan-Boyd, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The kidney has been shown to synthesize all of the naturally occurring major prostaglandins which may be restricted to a discrete part of the kidney where their actions are physiologically important, such as the vascular compartment and the tubular compartment. In order to examine this concept of compartmentalization, the authors conducted a series of experiments to determine whether PGl 2 , measured as 6-keto-pGF/sub 1α/, produced in the kidney is restricted to the renal vascular compartment or whether it also has access to the tubular compartment. Experiments were performed in the pentobarbital-anesthetized dog. Increasing pre-glomerular levels of 6-keto-PFG/sub 1α/ caused marked increases in both the urinary excretion and the renal venous outflow to 6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/. When 3 H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/ was co-infused with inulin into the renal artery, 33% of the radioactivity and 23% of the inulin was recovered on first pass. With infusion of 3 H-PGl 2 and inulin, 20% of the radioactivity and 28% of the inulin reached the urine on first pass. Radioactive PGl 2 appeared to be less filterable at the glomeruli than either 3 H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/ or inulin. In the final set of experiments, in which dogs were prepared for a ureteral stopped-flow study, the PGE 2 /U/P/sub In/ ratio a peak was observed proximal to the Na + plateau but distal to the Na+ nadir. In light of the results from the stopped-flow study and the intrarenal infusion studies, they conclude that PGE 2 synthesized in the kidney enters both the renal and tubular compartments. In contrast, they find that 6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/ of renal origin enters only the renal origin enters only the renal vascular compartment and not the tubular compartment

  12. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...... and the phosphocreatine resonance frequencies was used for indirect assessment of the intracellular pH. The mean baseline intracellular pH was 7.05 +/- 0.04 (SD). The mean pH changes obtained at 15-min intervals within the first hour of acetazolamide administration were -0.03 +/- 0.04 (SD), -0.02 +/- 0.03 (SD), and 0...

  13. Compartmentation of membrane processes and nucleotide dynamics in diffusion-restricted cardiac cell microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Alexey E.; Reyes, Santiago; Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Dzeja, Petras P.; Terzic, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Orchestrated excitation–contraction coupling in heart muscle requires adequate spatial arrangement of systems responsible for ion movement and metabolite turnover. Co-localization of regulatory and transporting proteins into macromolecular complexes within an environment of microanatomical cell components raises intracellular diffusion barriers that hamper the mobility of metabolites and signaling molecules. Compared to substrate diffusion in the cytosol, diffusional restrictions underneath the sarcolemma are much larger and could impede ion and nucleotide movement by a factor of 103–105. Diffusion barriers thus seclude metabolites within the submembrane space enabling rapid and vectorial effector targeting, yet hinder energy supply from the bulk cytosolic space implicating the necessity for a shunting transfer mechanism. Here, we address principles of membrane protein compartmentation, phosphotransfer enzyme-facilitated interdomain energy transfer, and nucleotide signal dynamics at the subsarcolemma–cytosol interface. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Local Signaling in Myocytes’. PMID:21704043

  14. Compartmentalized Signaling in Neurons: From Cell Biology to Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenzio, Marco; Schiavo, Giampietro; Fainzilber, Mike

    2017-11-01

    Neurons are the largest known cells, with complex and highly polarized morphologies. As such, neuronal signaling is highly compartmentalized, requiring sophisticated transfer mechanisms to convey and integrate information within and between sub-neuronal compartments. Here, we survey different modes of compartmentalized signaling in neurons, highlighting examples wherein the fundamental cell biological processes of protein synthesis and degradation, membrane trafficking, and organelle transport are employed to enable the encoding and integration of information, locally and globally within a neuron. Comparisons to other cell types indicate that neurons accentuate widely shared mechanisms, providing invaluable models for the compartmentalization and transfer mechanisms required and used by most eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Approximations of kidney models and compartmental kidney models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahorski, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Compartmental models were proposed in sixties to model the flow of isotopes through the kidney. These models were then criticized to not conform to the physiology of the kidney flow of isotopes. That is why they were abandoned, even thought their fits to the measured data were usually good. In this paper it is shown that some approximations of a physiological model proposed earlier by the present author can be interpreted as equations describing compartmental models. Their parameters have, however, different interpretation than the rates of intercompartmental flows. Diagrams of the time variations of the isotope content in the kidney are compared for the exact and approximate model using computer simulation technique

  16. Proteolytic compartmentalization and activity in the midgut of Andrallus spinidens Fabricius (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sorkhabi-Abdolmaleki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Digestive proteolytic activity in the alimentary canal of Andrallus spinidens, a potential biocontrol agent of lepidopteran larvae, was studied by considering enzyme compartmentalization and diversity. The alimentary canal of adults consists of a foregut, a four- sectioned midgut, namely V1 to V4 (ventriculus, and a hindgut. The optimal pH for general proteolytic activity was found to be at pH 8 with a small peak at pH 6. Results revealed that there are several specific proteases in the midgut of A. spinidens, including trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, and elastase as serine proteases, and cathepsins B, L and D as cysteine proteases, in addition to two exopeptidases of carboxy- and aminopetidases. Compartmentalization of digestive proteolytic activity showed that V3 is the main area of proteolytic secretion for both general and specific proteases and that V4 has the lowest enzymatic role, so that four out of the eight specific proteases found showed no activity in this section. The lowest and the highest proteolytic activity was found to be in the 1st and 4th nymphal instars, respectively. Using the specific inhibitors phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, Na-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, Ntosyl- L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-( 4-guanidino-butane, cystatin, phenanthroline and ethylendiamidetetraacetic acid, we verified the presence of all specific proteases noted using both biochemical assays and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our findings demonstrated that A. spinidens could utilize several caterpillars because of the presence of various of proteases in its midgut.

  17. Immune regulation of Rab proteins expression and intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Gang; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2012-07-01

    Compartmentalization in cells of the immune system, the focus of this review, facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses essential for specialized immune functions. In this process of compartment maintenance, Rab proteins are central regulators of protein-mediated transport and fusion of intracellular structures. It is widely believed that the intracellular concentration of proteins that regulate intracellular transport, including Rab proteins, is constitutively mantained. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that transcriptional rates of Rab proteins can be modified. This process is especially evident during immune activation and argues that after activation, these cells require higher levels of Rab proteins. The aim of this review is to discuss evidence showing the increasing links between Rab protein expression and intracellular transport, particularly in monocytes and macrophages. We highlight here biological processes in which the expression of Rab GTPases is selectively regulated, leading to the activation of specific intracellular routes. Further, we focus on the immune regulation of intracellular transport after cytokine activation and microbial infection, with an emphasis in mycobacterial infection.

  18. Macroanatomy of compartmentalization in fire scars of three western conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Sutherland; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Donald. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Fire scars are visible evidence of compartmentalization and closure processes that contribute to tree survival after fire injury. Preliminary observations of dissected fire scars from trees injured within the last decade showed centripetal development of wound-initiated discoloration (WID) through 2-3 decades of former sapwood in Larix occidentalis and Pseudotsuga...

  19. Synthesis of copper and nickel complexes using compartmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Synthesis of copper and nickel complexes using compartmental ligands: X-ray, electrochemical and magnetic studies. J MANONMANI, V NARAYANAN and M KANDASWAMY. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus,. Chennai 600 025, India. The search for several synthetic routes leading ...

  20. Integration through compartmentalization? Pitfalls of 'poldering' in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The article sketches the history of the Flood Action Plan 20 (FAP-20), an experiment with polder compartmentalization, seeking to integrate flood management, drainage, and irrigation, and make it more democratic in response to the destructive 1987 and 1988 floods in Bangladesh. As a transferred

  1. Integration through Compartmentalization? Pitfalls of “Poldering” in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The article sketches the history of the Flood Action Plan 20 (FAP-20), an experiment with polder compartmentalization, seeking to integrate flood management, drainage, and irrigation, and make it more democratic in response to the destructive 1987 and 1988 floods in Bangladesh. As a transferred

  2. Compartmentalization of decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea in several tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo; Joanna T. Tippett

    1981-01-01

    Decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea was compartmentalized according to the CODIT (Compartmentalization Of Decay In Trees) model. Compartmentalization in the sapwood began after the tree walled off the area of dead cambium associated with the inflection of the fungus. The fungus spread into dying sapwood beneath and beyond the area of...

  3. The rare intracellular RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese Han ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... be cured by TT with MBiND, and that prophylactic VI compartmental dissection should be avoided when Ct levels are low. [Qi X-P, Zhang R-X, Cao J-L, Chen Z-G, Jin H-Y and Yang R-R 2014 The rare intracellular RET mutation p.S891A in a Chinese Han family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma.

  4. Functional Compartmentalization within Starburst Amacrine Cell Dendrites in the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Ding, Huayu; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2018-03-13

    Dendrites in many neurons actively compute information. In retinal starburst amacrine cells, transformations from synaptic input to output occur within individual dendrites and mediate direction selectivity, but directional signal fidelity at individual synaptic outputs and correlated activity among neighboring outputs on starburst dendrites have not been examined systematically. Here, we record visually evoked calcium signals simultaneously at many individual synaptic outputs within single starburst amacrine cells in mouse retina. We measure visual receptive fields of individual output synapses and show that small groups of outputs are functionally compartmentalized within starburst dendrites, creating distinct computational units. Inhibition enhances compartmentalization and directional tuning of individual outputs but also decreases the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations suggest, however, that the noise underlying output signal variability is well tolerated by postsynaptic direction-selective ganglion cells, which integrate convergent inputs to acquire reliable directional information. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Gas confinement in compartmentalized coordination polymers for highly selective sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Marqués, Mónica; Calvo Galve, Néstor; Palomino, Miguel; Valencia, Susana; Rey, Fernando; Sastre, Germán; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J; Jiménez-Ruiz, Mónica; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J Alberto; González, Miguel A; Jordá, José L; Coronado, Eugenio; Espallargas, Guillermo Mínguez

    2017-04-01

    Discrimination between different gases is an essential aspect for industrial and environmental applications involving sensing and separation. Several classes of porous materials have been used in this context, including zeolites and more recently MOFs. However, to reach high selectivities for the separation of gas mixtures is a challenging task that often requires the understanding of the specific interactions established between the porous framework and the gases. Here we propose an approach to obtain an enhanced selectivity based on the use of compartmentalized coordination polymers, named CCP-1 and CCP-2 , which are crystalline materials comprising isolated discrete cavities. These compartmentalized materials are excellent candidates for the selective separation of CO 2 from methane and nitrogen. A complete understanding of the sorption process is accomplished with the use of complementary experimental techniques including X-ray diffraction, adsorption studies, inelastic- and quasi-elastic neutron scattering, magnetic measurements and molecular dynamics calculations.

  6. The nigrostriatal pathway: axonal collateralization and compartmental specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Parent, A; Bernácer, J; Cebrián, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews two of the major features of the nigrostriatal pathway, its axonal collateralization, and compartmental specificity, as revealed by single-axon labeling experiments in rodents and immunocytological analysis of human postmortem tissue. The dorsal and ventral tiers of the substantia nigra pars compacta harbor various types of neurons the axons of which branch not only within the striatum but also in other major components of the basal ganglia. Furthermore, some nigrostriatal axons send collaterals both to thalamus and to brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. In humans, the compartmental specificity of the nigrostriatal pathway is revealed by the fact that the matrix compartment is densely innervated by dopaminergic fibers, whereas the striosomes display different densities of dopaminergic terminals depending on their location within the striatum. The nigral neurons most severely affected in Parkinson's disease are the ventral tier cells that project to the matrix and form deep clusters in the substantia nigra pars reticulata.

  7. A Novel Method for Performance Analysis of Compartmentalized Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahamat Mohammad Sadeq

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple analytical model for performance analysis of compartmentalized reservoirs producing under Constant Terminal Rate (CTR and Constant Terminal Pressure (CTP. The model is based on the well-known material balance and boundary dominated flow equations and is written in terms of capacitance and resistance of a production and a support compartment. These capacitance and resistance terms account for a combination of reservoir parameters which enable the developed model to be used for characterizing such systems. In addition to considering the properties contrast between the two reservoir compartments, the model takes into account existence of transmissibility barriers with the use of resistance terms. The model is used to analyze production performance of unconventional reservoirs, where the multistage fracturing of horizontal wells effectively creates a Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV with an enhanced permeability surrounded by a non-stimulated region. It can also be used for analysis of compartmentalized conventional reservoirs. The analytical solutions provide type curves through which the controlling reservoirs parameters of a compartmentalized system can be estimated. The contribution of the supporting compartment is modeled based on a boundary dominated flow assumption. The transient behaviour of the support compartment is captured by application of “distance of investigation” concept. The model shows that depletion of the production and support compartments exhibit two unit slopes on a log-log plot of pressure versus time for CTR. For CTP, however, the depletions display two exponential declines. The depletion signatures are separated by transition periods, which depend on the contribution of the support compartment (i.e. transient or boundary dominated flow. The developed equations can be implemented easily in a spreadsheet application, and are corroborated with the use of a numerical simulation. The study

  8. Animal-to-Human Extrapolation Using Compartmental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In this article, designates the excretory organ (for example, the kidney). The we will address the general methodology of extrapolation using symbol...must be true in any compartmental system because they are exposure (9). based on physical principles. In these equations the V1, Qj, k, In the setting...and diffusion approximation models to a simple perfusion-diffusion system governed by partial differential equations for v or, C,, which analytic

  9. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  10. Protective functions of intracellular heat-shock protein (HSP) 70-expression in patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer-Smith, S; Stüber, F; Schroeder, S

    2001-12-01

    Intracellular expression of heat-shock-protein 70 (HSP70) arose early in evolutionary development as a tool to protect cellular homeostasis. HSP70 detects proteins that are incorrectly folded or denatured. They form a complex with such proteins which can lead to correct folding, compartmentalization in organelles, or to proteolytic degradation. HSP70 also appears to protect proteins from degeneration. Intracellular HSP70-expression is induced by a wide variety of stimuli including heat, fever, hypoxia, oxygen radicals, endotoxins, cytokines, and heavy metal ions. Pre-emptive induction of HSP70-expression reduces organ dysfunction and mortality in animal models of sepsis.

  11. Dynamic PET scanning and compartmental model analysis to determine cellular level radiotracer distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.T.; Hubner, K.F.; Goodman, M.M.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to measure tissue radiotracer concentration in vivo. Radiochemical distribution can be determined with compartmental model analysis. A two compartment model describes the kinetics of N-13 ammonia ( 13 NH 3 ) in the myocardium. The model consists of a vascular space, Q 1 and a space for 13 NH 3 bound within the tissue, Q 2 . Differential equations for the model can be written: X(t) = AX(t) + BU( t), Y(t)= CX(t)+ DU(t) (1) where X(t) is a column vector [Q 1 (t); Q 2 (t)], U(t) is the arterial input activity measured from the left ventricular blood pool, and Y(t) is the measured tissue activity using PET. Matrices A, B, C, and D are dependent on physiological parameters describing the kinetics of 13 NH 3 in the myocardium. Estimated parameter matrices in Equation 1 have been validated in dog experiments by measuring myocardial perfusion with dynamic PET scanning and intravenous injection of 13 NH 3 . Tracer concentrations for each compartment can be calculated by direct integration of Equation 1. If the cellular level distribution of each compartment is known, the concentration of tracer within the intracellular and extracellular space can be determined. Applications of this type of modeling include parameter estimation for measurement of physiological processes, organ level dosimetry, and determination of cellular radiotracer distribution

  12. The iDuo Bi-compartmental Knee Replacement: Our Early Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jemmett

    2016-12-01

    Our early results suggest that the iDuo knee is a good option for those with isolated bi-compartmental disease and outcome scores are comparable with those reported for the BKA. This bi-compartmental design may bridge the gap between the uni-compartmental and total knee replacement. The choice between monolithic or modular designs remains in debate. We will continue to use this prosthesis for a carefully selected group of patients.

  13. Compartmentalization in PVC super-phylum: evolution and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinos, Sandrine; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Baudoin, Jean Pierre; Pagnier, Isabelle

    2016-08-09

    The PVC super-phylum gathers bacteria from seven phyla (Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobiae, Chlamydiae, Lentisphaera, Poribacteria, OP3, WWE2) presenting different lifestyles, cell plans and environments. Planctomyces and several Verrucomicrobiae exhibit a complex cell plan, with an intracytoplasmic membrane inducing the compartmentalization of the cytoplasm into two regions (pirellulosome and paryphoplasm). The evolution and function of this cell plan is still subject to debate. In this work, we hypothesized that it could play a role in protection of the bacterial DNA, especially against Horizontal Genes Transfers (HGT). Therefore, 64 bacterial genomes belonging to seven different phyla (whose four PVC phyla) were studied. We reconstructed the evolution of the cell plan as precisely as possible, thanks to information obtained by bibliographic study and electronic microscopy. We used a strategy based on comparative phylogenomic in order to determine the part occupied by the horizontal transfers for each studied genomes. Our results show that the bacteria Simkania negevensis (Chlamydiae) and Coraliomargarita akajimensis (Verrucomicrobiae), whose cell plan were unknown before, are compartmentalized, as we can see on the micrographies. This is one of the first indication of the presence of an intracytoplasmic membrane in a Chlamydiae. The proportion of HGT does not seems to be related to the cell plan of bacteria, suggesting that compartmentalization does not induce a protection of bacterial DNA against HGT. Conversely, lifestyle of bacteria seems to impact the ability of bacteria to exchange genes. Our study allows a best reconstruction of the evolution of intracytoplasmic membrane, but this structure seems to have no impact on HGT occurrences. This article was reviewed by Mircea Podar and Olivier Tenaillon.

  14. Effect of diphtheria toxin T-domain on endosomal pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Labyntsev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td, but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT. The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT, which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demons­trated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol.

  15. Lower extremity compartmental anatomy: clinical relevance to radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomayan, Glen A.; Robertson, Fabienne; Major, Nancy M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham (United States)

    2005-06-01

    A thorough understanding of compartmental anatomy is necessary for the radiologist participating in the care of a patient with a lower extremity musculoskeletal malignancy. Localization of tumor to compartment of origin and identification of extracompartmental spread preoperatively are needed to correctly stage a tumor and determine the appropriate surgical management. An understanding of the locations of fascial boundaries, extracompartmental tissues, and neurovascular structures of the thigh and lower leg facilitates this diagnostic process. For the radiologist planning to biopsy a suspicious musculoskeletal lesion, consultation with the referring orthopaedic surgeon is recommended in order to jointly select an appropriate percutaneous biopsy approach. Adequate preprocedural planning ensures selection of an approach which prevents iatrogenic tumor spread beyond the compartment of origin, protects neurovascular structures, and allows complete resection of the biopsy tract and scar at the time of surgical resection without jeopardizing a potential limb-sparing procedure. Cross-sectional anatomic review and case examples demonstrate the importance of a detailed understanding of compartmental anatomy when approaching the patient with a lower extremity musculoskeletal tumor. (orig.)

  16. Functional Compartmentalization within Starburst Amacrine Cell Dendrites in the Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Poleg-Polsky

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Dendrites in many neurons actively compute information. In retinal starburst amacrine cells, transformations from synaptic input to output occur within individual dendrites and mediate direction selectivity, but directional signal fidelity at individual synaptic outputs and correlated activity among neighboring outputs on starburst dendrites have not been examined systematically. Here, we record visually evoked calcium signals simultaneously at many individual synaptic outputs within single starburst amacrine cells in mouse retina. We measure visual receptive fields of individual output synapses and show that small groups of outputs are functionally compartmentalized within starburst dendrites, creating distinct computational units. Inhibition enhances compartmentalization and directional tuning of individual outputs but also decreases the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations suggest, however, that the noise underlying output signal variability is well tolerated by postsynaptic direction-selective ganglion cells, which integrate convergent inputs to acquire reliable directional information. : Poleg-Polsky et al. examine the directional signaling fidelity of individual synapses on starburst amacrine cell dendrites. They identify functionally and morphologically distinct signaling compartments within SAC dendrites and show that inhibition enhances reliable decoding by postsynaptic direction-selective ganglion cells. Keywords: retina, synaptic transmission, amacrine cell, correlation, visual processing, inhibition, direction selectivity

  17. Role of cellular compartmentalization in the trophic transfer of mercury species in a freshwater plant-crustacean food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais-Flück, Rebecca; Chaumot, Arnaud; Gimbert, Frédéric; Quéau, Hervé; Geffard, Olivier; Slaveykova, Vera I; Cosio, Claudia

    2016-12-15

    Mercury (Hg) represents an important risk for human health through the food webs contamination. Macrophytes bioaccumulate Hg and play a role in Hg transfer to food webs in shallow aquatic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the compartmentalization of Hg within macrophytes, notably major accumulation in the cell wall and its impact on trophic transfer to primary consumers are overlooked. The present work focusses on the trophic transfer of inorganic Hg (IHg) and monomethyl-Hg (MMHg) from the intracellular and cell wall compartments of the macrophyte Elodea nuttallii - considered a good candidate for phytoremediation - to the crustacean Gammarus fossarum. The results demonstrated that Hg accumulated in both compartments was trophically bioavailable to gammarids. Besides IHg from both compartments were similarly transferred to G. fossarum, while for MMHg, uptake rates were ∼2.5-fold higher in G. fossarum fed with the cell wall vs the intracellular compartment. During the depuration phase, Hg concentrations in G. fossarum varied insignificantly suggesting that both IHg and MMHg were strongly bound to biological ligands in the crustacean. Our data imply that cell walls have to be considered as an important source of Hg to consumers in freshwater food webs when developing procedures for enhancing aquatic environment protection during phytoremediation programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Compartmentalization of GPCR signalling controls unique cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellisdon, Andrew M; Halls, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    With >800 members, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell-surface signalling proteins, and their activation mediates diverse physiological processes. GPCRs are ubiquitously distributed across all cell types, involved in many diseases and are major drug targets. However, GPCR drug discovery is still characterized by very high attrition rates. New avenues for GPCR drug discovery may be provided by a recent shift away from the traditional view of signal transduction as a simple chain of events initiated from the plasma membrane. It is now apparent that GPCR signalling is restricted to highly organized compartments within the cell, and that GPCRs activate distinct signalling pathways once internalized. A high-resolution understanding of how compartmentalized signalling is controlled will probably provide unique opportunities to selectively and therapeutically target GPCRs. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. Synapse-specific and compartmentalized expression of presynaptic homeostatic potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiling; Goel, Pragya; Chen, Catherine; Angajala, Varun; Chen, Xun; Dickman, Dion K

    2018-04-05

    Postsynaptic compartments can be specifically modulated during various forms of synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear whether this precision is shared at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity (PHP) stabilizes neurotransmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release compensates for diminished postsynaptic receptor functionality. To test the specificity of PHP induction and expression, we have developed a genetic manipulation to reduce postsynaptic receptor expression at one of the two muscles innervated by a single motor neuron. We find that PHP can be induced and expressed at a subset of synapses, over both acute and chronic time scales, without influencing transmission at adjacent release sites. Further, homeostatic modulations to CaMKII, vesicle pools, and functional release sites are compartmentalized and do not spread to neighboring pre- or post-synaptic structures. Thus, both PHP induction and expression mechanisms are locally transmitted and restricted to specific synaptic compartments. © 2018, Li et al.

  20. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchwalow, Igor B.; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim; Punkt, Karla

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma

  1. Apartment Compartmentalization With an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Berger, D. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Harrington, C. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing.

  2. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde

    extracellular pH irrespective of the dye concentration. We showed that at pH stained 15 bacterial species frequently isolated from dental biofilm and visualized the entire bacterial biomass in dental biofilms grown intraorally on glass slabs mounted on individually designed lower jaw splints. We......pH in dental biofilm is a key virulence factor for the development of caries lesions. The complex three-dimensional architecture of dental biofilms leads to steep gradients of nutrients and metabolites, including organic acids, across the biofilm. For decades, measuring pH in dental biofilm has......H ratiometry, can be employed to map the pH landscape in dental biofilm with more detail. However, when pH sensitive fluorescent probes are used to visualize pH in biofilms, it is crucial to differentiate between extracellular and intracellular pH. Intracellular microbial pH and pH in the extracellular matrix...

  3. Diffusion and light-dependent compartmentalization of transducin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerov, Vasily; Artemyev, Nikolai O

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion and light-dependent compartmentalization of transducin are essential for phototransduction and light adaptation of rod photoreceptors. Here, transgenic Xenopus laevis models were designed to probe the roles of transducin/rhodopsin interactions and lipid modifications in transducin compartmentalization, membrane mobility, and light-induced translocation. Localization and diffusion of EGFP-fused rod transducin-α subunit (Gα(t1)), mutant Gα(t1) that is predicted to be N-acylated and S-palmitoylated (Gα(t1)A3C), and mutant Gα(t1) uncoupled from light-activated rhodopsin (Gα(t1)-Ctα(s)), were examined by EGFP-fluorescence imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Similar to Gα(t1), Gα(t1)A3C and Gα(t1)-Ctα(s) were correctly targeted to the rod outer segments in the dark, however the light-dependent translocation of both mutants was markedly impaired. Our analysis revealed a moderate acceleration of the lateral diffusion for the activated Gα(t1) consistent with the diffusion of the separated Gα(t1)GTP and Gβ(1)γ(1) on the membrane surface. Unexpectedly, the kinetics of longitudinal diffusion were comparable for Gα(t1)GTP with a single lipid anchor and heterotrimeric Gα(t1)β(1)γ(1) or Gα(t1)-Ctα(s)β(1)γ(1) with two lipid modifications. This contrasted the lack of the longitudinal diffusion of the Gα(t1)A3C mutant apparently caused by its stable two lipid attachment to the membrane and suggests the existence of a mechanism that facilitates axial diffusion of Gα(t1)β(1)γ(1). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Compartmental endoscopic surgical anatomy of the medial intraconal orbital space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Healy, David Y; Chhabra, Nipun; Freitag, Suzanne

    2014-07-01

    Surgical management of intraconal pathology represents the next frontier in endoscopic endonasal surgery. Despite this, the medial intraconal space remains a relatively unexplored region, secondary to its variable and technically demanding anatomy. The purpose of this study is to define the neurovascular structures in this region and introduce a compartmentalized approach to enhance surgical planning. This study was an institutional review board (IRB)-exempt endoscopic anatomic study in 10 cadaveric orbits. After dissection of the medial intraconal space, the pattern and trajectory of the oculomotor nerve and ophthalmic arterial arborizations were analyzed. The position of all vessels as well as the length of the oculomotor trunk and branches relative to the sphenoid face were calculated. A mean of 1.5 arterial branches were identified (n = 15; range, 1-4) at a mean of 8.8 mm from the sphenoid face (range, 4-15 mm). The majority of the arteries (n = 7) inserted adjacent to the midline of medial rectus. The oculomotor nerve inserted at the level of the sphenoid face and arborized with a large proximal trunk 5.5 ± 1.1 mm in length and multiple branches extending 13.2 ± 2.7 mm from the sphenoid face. The most anterior nerve and vascular pedicle were identified at 17.0 and 15.0 mm from the sphenoid face, respectively. The neurovascular supply to the medial rectus muscle describes a varied but predictable pattern. This data allows the compartmentalization of the medial intraconal space into 3 zones relative to the neurovascular supply. These zones inform the complexity of the dissection and provide a guideline for safe medial rectus retraction relative to the fixed landmark of the sphenoid face. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  5. Differential compartmentalization of Streptococcus pyogenes virulence factors and host protein binding properties as a mechanism for host adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsgård, Ola; Karlsson, Christofer; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although S. pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen with no other known animal reservoir, several murine infection models exist to explore different aspects of the bacterial pathogenesis. Inoculating mice with wild-type S. pyogenes strains can result in the generation of new bacterial phenotypes that are hypervirulent compared to the original inoculum. In this study, we used a serial mass spectrometry based proteomics strategy to investigate if these hypervirulent strains have an altered distribution of virulence proteins across the intracellular, surface associated and secreted bacterial compartments and if any change in compartmentalization can alter the protein-protein interaction network between bacteria and host proteins. Quantitative analysis of the S. pyogenes surface and secreted proteomes revealed that animal passaged strains are associated with significantly higher amount of virulence factors on the bacterial surface and in the media. This altered virulence factor compartmentalization results in increased binding of several mouse plasma proteins to the bacterial surface, a trend that was consistent for mouse plasma from several different mouse strains. In general, both the wild-type strain and animal passaged strain were capable of binding high amounts of human plasma proteins. However, compared to the non-passaged strains, the animal passaged strains displayed an increased ability to bind mouse plasma proteins, in particular for M protein binders, indicating that the increased affinity for mouse blood plasma proteins is a consequence of host adaptation of this pathogen to a new host. In conclusion, plotting the total amount of virulence factors against the total amount of plasma proteins associated to the bacterial surface could clearly separate out animal passaged strains from wild type strains indicating a virulence model that could

  6. A new approach to the compartmental analysis in pharmacokinetics: fractional time evolution of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Jovan K; Atanacković, Milica T; Pilipović, Ana S; Rapaić, Milan R; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M

    2010-04-01

    This study presents a new two compartmental model and its application to the evaluation of diclofenac pharmacokinetics in a small number of healthy adults, during a bioequivalence trial. In the model the integer order derivatives are replaced by derivatives of real order often called fractional order derivatives. Physically that means that a history (memory) of a biological process, realized as a transfer from one compartment to another one with the mass balance conservation, is taken into account. This kind of investigations in pharmacokinetics is founded by Dokoumetzidis and Macheras through the one compartmental models while our contribution is the analysis of multi-dimensional compartmental models with the applications of the two compartmental model in evaluation of diclofenac pharmacokinetics. Two experiments were preformed with 12 healthy volunteers with two slow release 100 mg diclofenac tablet formulations. The agreement of the values predicted by the proposed model with the values obtained through experiments is shown to be good. Thus, pharmacokinetics of slow release diclofenac can be described well by a specific two compartmental model with fractional derivatives of the same order. Parameters in the model are determined by the least-squares method and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) numerical procedure is used. The results show that the fractional order two compartmental model for diclofenac is superior in comparison to the classical two compartmental model. Actually this is true in general case since the classical one is a special case of the fractional one.

  7. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  8. Intracellular protein breakdown. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohley, P.; Kirschke, H.; Langner, J.; Wiederanders, B.; Ansorge, S.

    1976-01-01

    Double-labelled proteins from rat liver cytosol ( 14 C in long-lived, 3 H in short-lived proteins after in-vivo-labelling) are used as substrates for unlabelled proteinases in vitro. Differences in the degradation rates of short-lived and long-lived proteins in vitro by different proteinases and after addition of different effectors allow conclusions concerning their importance for the in-vivo-turnover of substrate proteins. The main activity (>90%) of soluble lysosomal proteinases at pH 6.1 and pH 6.9 is caused by thiolproteinases, which degrade preferentially short-lived cytosol proteins. These proteinases are inhibited by leupeptin. Autolysis of double-labelled cell fractions shows a remarkably faster breakdown of short-lived substrate proteins only in the soluble part of lysosomes. Microsomal fractions degrade in vitro preferentially long-lived substrate proteins. (author)

  9. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  10. Inositol lipid turnover and compartmentation in canine trachealis smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, C.B.; Pring, M.; Coburn, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    We established conditions for the study of metabolism and compartmentation of inositol phospholipids in canine trachealis muscle. Unstimulated muscle was incubated with myo-[3H]inositol for 30 min at 37 degrees C which resulted in labeling of the tissue free myo-inositol pool, whereas only a small amount of radioactivity was incorporated into inositol phospholipids or inositol phosphates. After addition of 5.5 microM carbachol, phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP), and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), specific radioactivities increased exponentially, reaching apparent constant values in 180-240 min. Initial rates of increases in PI, PIP, and PIP2 specific radioactivities were 39, 32, and 66 times that measured in unstimulated muscle. Metabolic flux rates (nmol.100 nmol total lipid Pi-1.min-1) during development of force averaged 0.42 +/- 0.09 and during force maintenance averaged 0.14 +/- 0.01. Fractions of total PI, PIP, and PIP2 pools that were linked to muscarinic cholinergic activation were estimated to be 0.97, 0.85, and 0.65, respectively. Initial rates of increase in specific radioactivities and specific radioactivities during carbachol activation were similar in PI, PIP, and PIP2 fast active compartments, suggesting metabolic flux from PI to PIP to PIP2 was in near chemical equilibrium. Turnover times for PI, PIP, and PIP2 fast active compartments were estimated to be 21, 1.6, and 4.0 min, respectively

  11. Compartmental models for assessing the fishery production in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Compartmental models for assessing the fishery production in the Indian Ocean is discussed. The article examines the theoretical basis on which modern fishery sciences is built. The model shows that, large changes in energy flux from one pathway...

  12. In or out? On the tightness of glycosomal compartmentalization of metabolites and enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jurgen R.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Michels, Paul A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids sequester large parts of glucose metabolism inside specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Many studies have shown that correct glycosomal compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucel. The recent finding of pore-forming

  13. Compartmental analysis to predict biodistribution in radiopharmaceutical design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marina F.; Pujatti, Priscilla B.; Araujo, Elaine B.; Mesquita, Carlos H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: mflima@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The use of compartmental analysis allows the mathematical separation of tissues and organs to determinate the concentration of activity in each fraction of interest. Although the radiochemical purity must observe Pharmacopoeia specification (values upper 95%), very lower contains of free radionuclides could contribute significantly as dose in the neighborhood organs and make tumor up take studies not viable in case of radiopharmaceutical on the basis of labeled peptides. Animal studies with a product of Lutetium-177 labeled Bombesin derivative ({sup 177}Lu-BBNP) developed in IPEN-CNEN/SP and free Lutetium-177 developed in CNEA/EZEIZA was used to show how subtract free {sup 177}Lu contribution over {sup 177}Lu-BBNP to estimate the radiopharmaceutical potential as diagnosis or therapy agent. The first approach of the studies included the knowledge of chemical kinetics and mimetism of the Lutetium and the possible targets of the diagnosis/therapy to choose the possible models to apply over the sampling standard methods used in experimental works. A model with only one physical compartment (whole body) and one chemical compartment ({sup 177}Lu-BBNP) generated with the compartmental analysis protocol ANACOMP showed high differences between experimental and theoretical values over 2.5 hours, in spite of the concentration of activity had been in a good statistics rang of measurement. The values used in this work were residence time from three different kinds of study with free {sup 177}Lu: whole body, average excretion and maximum excretion as a chemical compartment. Activity concentration values as time function in measurements of total whole body and activity measurement in samples of blood with projection to total circulating blood volume with {sup 177}Lu-BBNP. Considering the two sources of data in the same modeling a better consistence was obtained. The next step was the statistic treatment of biodistribution and dosimetry in mice (Balb C) considering three chemical

  14. Efficient Vaccine Distribution Based on a Hybrid Compartmental Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Yu

    Full Text Available To effectively and efficiently reduce the morbidity and mortality that may be caused by outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, it is very important for public health agencies to make informed decisions for controlling the spread of the disease. Such decisions must incorporate various kinds of intervention strategies, such as vaccinations, school closures and border restrictions. Recently, researchers have paid increased attention to searching for effective vaccine distribution strategies for reducing the effects of pandemic outbreaks when resources are limited. Most of the existing research work has been focused on how to design an effective age-structured epidemic model and to select a suitable vaccine distribution strategy to prevent the propagation of an infectious virus. Models that evaluate age structure effects are common, but models that additionally evaluate geographical effects are less common. In this paper, we propose a new SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious šC recovered model, named the hybrid SEIR-V model (HSEIR-V, which considers not only the dynamics of infection prevalence in several age-specific host populations, but also seeks to characterize the dynamics by which a virus spreads in various geographic districts. Several vaccination strategies such as different kinds of vaccine coverage, different vaccine releasing times and different vaccine deployment methods are incorporated into the HSEIR-V compartmental model. We also design four hybrid vaccination distribution strategies (based on population size, contact pattern matrix, infection rate and infectious risk for controlling the spread of viral infections. Based on data from the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza epidemic, we evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed HSEIR-V model and study the effects of different types of human behaviour in responding to epidemics.

  15. Proteolytische activiteit bij neutrale pH in rundermilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Jan

    1969-01-01

    Intracellular enzymes, hydrolysing proteins optimally at acid pH values (acid proteases), have been studied in detail by several investigators. The existence of proteolytic activity at neutral pH in animal tissue extracts, on the other hand, has often been mentioned, but with few reports on the

  16. Cytoplasmic compartmentalization of the fetal piRNA pathway in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei A Aravin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Derepression of transposable elements (TEs in the course of epigenetic reprogramming of the mouse embryonic germline necessitates the existence of a robust defense that is comprised of PIWI/piRNA pathway and de novo DNA methylation machinery. To gain further insight into biogenesis and function of piRNAs, we studied the intracellular localization of piRNA pathway components and used the combination of genetic, molecular, and cell biological approaches to examine the performance of the piRNA pathway in germ cells of mice lacking Maelstrom (MAEL, an evolutionarily conserved protein implicated in transposon silencing in fruit flies and mice. Here we show that principal components of the fetal piRNA pathway, MILI and MIWI2 proteins, localize to two distinct types of germinal cytoplasmic granules and exhibit differential association with components of the mRNA degradation/translational repression machinery. The first type of granules, pi-bodies, contains the MILI-TDRD1 module of the piRNA pathway and is likely equivalent to the enigmatic "cementing material" first described in electron micrographs of rat gonocytes over 35 years ago. The second type of granules, piP-bodies, harbors the MIWI2-TDRD9-MAEL module of the piRNA pathway and signature components of P-bodies, GW182, DCP1a, DDX6/p54, and XRN1 proteins. piP-bodies are found predominantly in the proximity of pi-bodies and the two frequently share mouse VASA homolog (MVH protein, an RNA helicase. In Mael-mutant gonocytes, MIWI2, TDRD9, and MVH are lost from piP-bodies, whereas no effects on pi-body composition are observed. Further analysis revealed that MAEL appears to specifically facilitate MIWI2-dependent aspects of the piRNA pathway including biogenesis of secondary piRNAs, de novo DNA methylation, and efficient downregulation of TEs. Cumulatively, our data reveal elaborate cytoplasmic compartmentalization of the fetal piRNA pathway that relies on MAEL function.

  17. The intracellular pharmacokinetics of terminally capped peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Witsenburg, J.J.; Glauner, H.B.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Ferro, E.S.; Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Brock, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    With significant progress in delivery technologies, peptides and peptidomimetics are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutics also for intracellular applications. However, analyses of the intracellular behavior of peptides are a challenge; therefore, knowledge on the intracellular

  18. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  19. Intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, S; Chevalier, J; Cremieux, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in mycobacteria, two methods were used with Mycobacterium smegmatis. A radiometric method (K. V. Cundy, C. E. Fasching, K. E. Willard, and L. R. Peterson, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:491-497, 1991) was used without great modification, but the fluorometric method (P. G. S. Mortimer and L. J. V. Piddock, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:639-653, 1991) was changed considerably. Indeed, adsorption of the quinolone to the bacterial surface was characterized by measuring the level of accumulation of 0 degree C. Taking into account the adsorption, the pH of the washing buffer was increased from 7.0 to 9.0 to improve the desorption of norfloxacin from the cell surface. Both the fluorometric method, with the technical improvement, and the radiometric method could be used to estimate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin, which resulted from the difference between the whole uptake measured at 37 degrees C and the adsorption measured at 0 degrees C. A total of 35 ng of norfloxacin per mg of cells (dry weight) penetrated into the M. smegmatis cell, and the steady state was achieved in 5 min. Use of inhibitors of the proton motive force revealed that transport of norfloxacin was energy independent. Thus, the same mechanisms of quinolone accumulation that occur in eubacteria seem to occur in mycobacteria, at least in M. smegmatis. PMID:8585727

  20. Global identifiability of linear compartmental models--a computer algebra algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoly, S; D'Angiò, L; Saccomani, M P; Cobelli, C

    1998-01-01

    A priori global identifiability deals with the uniqueness of the solution for the unknown parameters of a model and is, thus, a prerequisite for parameter estimation of biological dynamic models. Global identifiability is however difficult to test, since it requires solving a system of algebraic nonlinear equations which increases both in nonlinearity degree and number of terms and unknowns with increasing model order. In this paper, a computer algebra tool, GLOBI (GLOBal Identifiability) is presented, which combines the topological transfer function method with the Buchberger algorithm, to test global identifiability of linear compartmental models. GLOBI allows for the automatic testing of a priori global identifiability of general structure compartmental models from general multi input-multi output experiments. Examples of usage of GLOBI to analyze a priori global identifiability of some complex biological compartmental models are provided.

  1. Co-Compartmentation of Terpene Biosynthesis and Storage via Synthetic Droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Cheng [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Kim, YongKyoung [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Zeng, Yining [Biosciences; Li, Man [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Wang, Xin [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Hu, Cheng [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Gorman, Connor [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Dai, Susie Y. [State; Ding, Shi-You [Department; Yuan, Joshua S. [Texas; amp,M Agrilife Synthetic and Systems Biology Innovation Hub, Texas A& amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Department; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States; Institute; amp,M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United States

    2018-02-16

    Traditional bioproduct engineering focuses on pathway optimization, yet is often complicated by product inhibition, downstream consumption, and the toxicity of certain products. Here, we present the co-compartmentation of biosynthesis and storage via a synthetic droplet as an effective new strategy to improve the bioproduct yield, with squalene as a model compound. A hydrophobic protein was designed and introduced into the tobacco chloroplast to generate a synthetic droplet for terpene storage. Simultaneously, squalene biosynthesis enzymes were introduced to chloroplasts together with the droplet-forming protein to co-compartmentalize the biosynthesis and storage of squalene. The strategy has enabled a record yield of squalene at 2.6 mg/g fresh weight without compromising plant growth. Confocal fluorescent microscopy imaging, stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, and droplet composition analysis confirmed the formation of synthetic storage droplet in chloroplast. The co-compartmentation of synthetic storage droplet with a targeted metabolic pathway engineering represents a new strategy for enhancing bioproduct yield.

  2. The architecture of antagonistic networks: Node degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah Nuwagaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Describing complex ecosystems as networks of interacting components has proved fruitful - revealing many distinctive patterns and dynamics of ecological systems. Of these patterns, three have often been brought up in literature, including species degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness, due largely to their implications for the functionality and stability of communities. Here, using 61 empirical antagonistic networks, we aim to settle the inconsistency in literature by (i fitting their node degree distributions to five different parametric models and identifying the one fits the best, (ii measuring the levels of nestedness and compartmentalization of these 61 networks and testing their significance using different null models, and (iii exploring how network connectance affects these three network architecture metrics. This research showed that most antagonistic networks do not display power law degree distributions and that resource species are generally uniformly distributed. We also clearly showed that the conclusion of whether a network is significantly compartmentalized or nested depends largely on the null model used.

  3. Retinal ganglion cells: Energetics, compartmentation, axonal transport, cytoskeletons and vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dao-Yi; Cringle, Stephen J; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Morgan, William H; Yu, Paula K; Su, Er-Ning

    2013-09-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are specialized projection neurons that relay an immense amount of visual information from the retina to the brain. RGC signal inputs are collected by dendrites and output is distributed from the cell body via very thin (0.5-1 μm) and long (∼50 mm) axons. The RGC cell body is larger than other retinal neurons, but is still only a very small fraction (one ten thousandths) of the length and total surface area of the axon. The total distance traversed by RGCs extends from the retina, starting from synapses with bipolar and amacrine cells, to the brain, to synapses with neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus. This review will focus on the energy demands of RGCs and the relevant tissues that surround them. RGC survival and function unexceptionally depends upon free energy, predominantly adenosine triphosphate (ATP). RGC energy metabolism is vastly different when compared to that of the photoreceptors. Each subcellular component of the RGC is remarkably different in terms of structure, function and extracellular environment. The energy demands and distribution of each component are also distinct as evidenced by the uneven distribution of mitochondria and ATP within the RGC - signifying the presence of intracellular energy gradients. In this review we will describe RGCs as having four subcellular components, (1) Dendrites, (2) Cell body, (3) Non-myelinated axon, including intraocular and optic nerve head portions, and (4) Myelinated axon, including the intra-orbital and intracranial portions. We will also describe how RGCs integrate information from each subcellular component in order achieve intracellular homeostatic stability as well as respond to perturbations in the extracellular environment. The possible cellular mechanisms such as axonal transport and axonal cytoskeleton proteins that are involved in maintaining RGC energy homeostasis during normal and disease conditions will also be discussed in depth. The emphasis of this

  4. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  5. The Effect of Environmental pH on Polymeric Transfection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Han Chang; Samsonova, Olga; Kang, Sun-Woong; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    Although polymers, polyplexes, and cells are exposed to various extracellular and intracellular pH environments during polyplex preparation and polymeric transfection, the impact of environmental pH on polymeric transfection has not yet been investigated. This study aims to understand the influence of environmental pH on polymeric transfection by modulating the pH of the transfection medium or the culture medium. Changes in the extracellular pH affected polymeric transfection by way of comple...

  6. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  7. Metabolic data and retention functions for the intracellular alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report is a collection and discussion of the information needed for interpretation of bioassay results for the important radioelement cesium (Cs), as well as a comparison of the physiological behavior of Cs with that of potassium (K) and rubidium (Rb). This report is intended not only as an investigation of the metabolism of the intracellular alkali metals by humans, but also as a case study of the limitations inherent in applying ICRP 30 retention models in bioassay programs. In particular, the relationship between the mathematical components of the ICRP 30 retention model for Cs and actual physiological or anatomical entities is examined, and ways are suggested for modifying the ICRP 30 models for Cs, Rb, and K to yield better accuracy and to better account for biological variability among humans. Although the physiological behaviors of both Rb and Cs resemble that of K, quantitative differences arise because of differences in transport of K, Rb, and Cs by cell membranes. The resemblance is close enough, however, that total body K can be used as an index of whole-body retention times of Rb and Cs, and of compartmental fractions of Cs. The Cs half-time based on total body K appears to be within a factor of 1.5 for all adults. Total body K may be determined by whole-body gamma-ray counting techniques and hence is a reasonable index to use in many bioassay programs

  8. An actomyosin-based barrier inhibits cell mixing at compartmental boundaries in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Brand, Andrea H; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning tissues into compartments that do not intermix is essential for the correct morphogenesis of animal embryos and organs. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain compartmental cell sorting, mainly differential adhesion, but also regulation of the cytoskeleton or of cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries remain unclear. Here we demonstrate, in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos, that actomyosin-based barriers stop cells from invading neighbouring compartments. Our analysis shows that cells can transiently invade neighbouring compartments, especially when they divide, but are then pushed back into their compartment of origin. Actomyosin cytoskeletal components are enriched at compartmental boundaries, forming cable-like structures when the epidermis is mitotically active. When MyoII (non-muscle myosin II) function is inhibited, including locally at the cable by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), in live embryos, dividing cells are no longer pushed back, leading to compartmental cell mixing. We propose that local regulation of actomyosin contractibility, rather than differential adhesion, is the primary mechanism sorting cells at compartmental boundaries.

  9. Krebs cycle metabolon formation: metabolite concentration gradient enhanced compartmentation of sequential enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Pelster, Lindsey N; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-01-25

    Dynamics of metabolon formation in mitochondria was probed by studying diffusional motion of two sequential Krebs cycle enzymes in a microfluidic channel. Enhanced directional co-diffusion of both enzymes against a substrate concentration gradient was observed in the presence of intermediate generation. This reveals a metabolite directed compartmentation of metabolic pathways.

  10. Statistical properties of compartmental model parameters extracted from dynamic positron emission tomography experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazoyer, B.M.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.; Knittel, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past years a major focus of research in physiologic studies employing tracers has been the computer implementation of mathematical methods of kinetic modeling for extracting the desired physiological parameters from tomographically derived data. A study is reported of factors that affect the statistical properties of compartmental model parameters extracted from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) experiments

  11. The Contradictions and Compartmentalizing the Interactions between Integrated Business Structures: Aspect of Branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nifatova Olena M.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at identifying contradictions and developing a compartmentalizing as to the interaction between integrated business structures, taking into consideration the branding approach to management. The main specific features and contradictions that arise in the process of integration in the domestic market of mergers and acquisitions have been allocated. The contradictions identified were systematized and substantiated at three economic levels: macro-, meso-, and microeconomic. A compartmentalizing of the business units interaction in a merge or an acquisition process has been proposed. This compartmentalizing takes account of the branding aspect through the introduction of «brands interaction» – cluster interaction, circular interaction, holding interaction, linear interaction, which enhances the scientific view of exploring the problem of business units interaction in the process of the formations becoming integrated. The development of a compartmentalizing as to the interaction between integrated business structures, taking into consideration the branding approach to management, would provide a more effective use of the fundamental nature of branding as synergistic force in terms of the system of integration of business structures at the current stage of development of the national economy. Further development of branding issues in this sphere will have a significant impact on the functioning of the integrated business structures with the participation of Ukrainian companies.

  12. Heterogeneity and compartmentalization of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis genotypes in autopsy lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Lundgren, Bettina; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    2001-01-01

    . Not all genotypes present in the lungs at autopsy were detected in the diagnostic respiratory samples. Compartmentalization of specific ITS and mtLSU rRNA sequence types was observed in different lung segments. In conclusion, the interpretation of genotype data and in particular ITS sequence types...

  13. Sustainability of a Compartmentalized Host-Parasite Replicator System under Periodic Washout-Mixing Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Furubayashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and dominance of parasitic replicators are among the major hurdles for the proliferation of primitive replicators. Compartmentalization of replicators is proposed to relieve the parasite dominance; however, it remains unclear under what conditions simple compartmentalization uncoupled with internal reaction secures the long-term survival of a population of primitive replicators against incessant parasite emergence. Here, we investigate the sustainability of a compartmentalized host-parasite replicator (CHPR system undergoing periodic washout-mixing cycles, by constructing a mathematical model and performing extensive simulations. We describe sustainable landscapes of the CHPR system in the parameter space and elucidate the mechanism of phase transitions between sustainable and extinct regions. Our findings revealed that a large population size of compartments, a high mixing intensity, and a modest amount of nutrients are important factors for the robust survival of replicators. We also found two distinctive sustainable phases with different mixing intensities. These results suggest that a population of simple host–parasite replicators assumed before the origin of life can be sustained by a simple compartmentalization with periodic washout-mixing processes.

  14. Meningoencephalitis and Compartmentalization of the Cerebral Ventricles Caused by Enterobacter sakazakii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Martin B.; Allen, Stephen D.; Neal, Patricia; Reynolds, Janet

    1981-01-01

    A necrotizing meningoencephalitis complicated by ventricular compartmentalization and abscess formation caused by Enterobacter sakazakii in a previously healthy 5-week-old female is described. A detailed description of the isolate is presented. This communication firmly establishes the pathogenicity of E. sakazakii. PMID:7287892

  15. A new method to estimate parameters of linear compartmental models using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Keppenne, Christian L.; Phelps, Michael E.; Banerjee, Pranab K.

    1998-01-01

    At present, the preferred tool for parameter estimation in compartmental analysis is an iterative procedure; weighted nonlinear regression. For a large number of applications, observed data can be fitted to sums of exponentials whose parameters are directly related to the rate constants/coefficients of the compartmental models. Since weighted nonlinear regression often has to be repeated for many different data sets, the process of fitting data from compartmental systems can be very time consuming. Furthermore the minimization routine often converges to a local (as opposed to global) minimum. In this paper, we examine the possibility of using artificial neural networks instead of weighted nonlinear regression in order to estimate model parameters. We train simple feed-forward neural networks to produce as outputs the parameter values of a given model when kinetic data are fed to the networks' input layer. The artificial neural networks produce unbiased estimates and are orders of magnitude faster than regression algorithms. At noise levels typical of many real applications, the neural networks are found to produce lower variance estimates than weighted nonlinear regression in the estimation of parameters from mono- and biexponential models. These results are primarily due to the inability of weighted nonlinear regression to converge. These results establish that artificial neural networks are powerful tools for estimating parameters for simple compartmental models. (author)

  16. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  17. Reconstruction and modeling protein translocation and compartmentalization in Escherichia coli at the genome-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Joanne K.; O’Brien, Edward J.; Lerman, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    cell morphology. Comparison of computations performed with this expanded ME-model, named iJL1678-ME, against available experimental data reveals that the model accurately describes translocation pathway expression and the functional proteome by compartmentalized mass. Conclusion: iJL1678-ME enables...

  18. Compartmental Model For Uptake Of 137cs By Pine In Forest Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A compartmental model of soil to pine tree transfer of 137Cs following the Chernobyl nuclear accident is presented. The model was validated using data collected in 1996 at five sites in Northern Ukraine. The transfer constants of 137Cs between model compartments are estimated using a semi-empirical method.

  19. Compartmentalization: a conceptual framework for understanding how trees grow and defend themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe a conceptual framework for understanding how trees grow and how they and other perennial plants defend themselves. The concept of compartmentalization has developed over many years, a synthesis of ideas from a number of investigators. It is derived from detailed studies of the gross morphology and cellular anatomy of the wood...

  20. Compartmentalization and transport in β-lactam antibiotic biosynthesis by filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, Mart van de; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1999-01-01

    A proper description of the biosynthesis of fungal β-lactam antibiotics requires detailed knowledge of the cell biology of the producing organisms. This involves a delineation of the compartmentalization of the biosynthetic pathways, and of the consequential transport steps across the cell-boundary

  1. Compartmentation prevents a lethal turbo-explosion of glycolysis in trypanosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Haanstra (Jurgen); A. van Tuijl (Arjen); P. Kessler (Peter); W. Reijnders (Willem); P.A.M. Michels (Paul); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans); M. Parsons (Marilyn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractATP generation by both glycolysis and glycerol catabolism is autocatalytic, because the first kinases of these pathways are fuelled by ATP produced downstream. Previous modeling studies predicted that either feedback inhibition or compartmentation of glycolysis can protect cells from

  2. Xylem Vessel Diameter Affects the Compartmentalization of the Vascular Pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora in Grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Pouzoulet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungal wilt diseases are a threat to global food safety. Previous studies in perennial crops showed that xylem vessel diameter affects disease susceptibility. We tested the hypothesis that xylem vessel diameter impacts occlusion processes and pathogen compartmentalization in Vitis vinifera L. We studied the interaction between four grape commercial cultivars with the vascular wilt pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora. We used qPCR and wood necrotic lesion length to measure fungal colonization coupled with histological studies to assess differences in xylem morphology, pathogen compartmentalization, and fungal colonization strategy. We provided evidence that grape cultivar with wide xylem vessel diameter showed increased susceptibility to P. chlamydospora. The host response to pathogen included vessel occlusion with tyloses and gels, deposition of non-structural phenolic compounds and suberin in vessel walls and depletion of starch in parenchyma cells. Pathogen compartmentalization was less efficient in wide xylem vessels than in narrow diameter vessels. Large vessels displayed higher number of tyloses and gel pockets, which provided substrate for P. chlamydospora growth and routes to escape occluded vessels. We discuss in which capacity xylem vessel diameter is a key determinant of the compartmentalization process and in turn grape cultivar resistance to disease caused by P. chlamydospora.

  3. pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli: measurement by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance of methylphosphonate and phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slonczewski, J.L.; Rosen, B.P.; Alger, J.R.; Macnab, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The intracellular pH of Escherichia coli cells, respiring on endogenous energy sources, was monitored continuously by 31 P NMR over an extracellular pH range between 5.5 and 9. pH homeostasis was found to be good over the entire range, with the data conforming to the simple relationship intracellular pH = 7.6 + 0.1(external pH - 7.6) so that the extreme values observed for intracellular pH were 7.4 and 7.8 external pH 5.5 and 9, respectively. As well as inorganic phosphate, we employed the pH-sensitive NMR probe methylphosphonate, which was taken up by glycerol-grown cells and was nontoxic; its pK/sub a/ of 7.65 made it an ideal probe for measurement of cytoplasmic pH and alkaline external pH

  4. Elevated compartmentalization of Na+ into vacuoles improves salt and cold stress tolerance in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weijuan; Deng, Gaifang; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Salinity and low temperature are the main limiting factors for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) growth and agricultural productivity. Various studies have shown that plant NHX-type antiporter plays a crucial role in regulating plant tolerance to salt stress by intracellular Na(+) compartmentalization. The Arabidopsis thaliana AtNHX1 gene that encodes a vacuolar Na(+) /H(+) antiporter was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Xushu-22 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to confer abiotic stress tolerance. Stable insertion of AtNHX1 into the sweet potato genome and its expression was confirmed by Southern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A remarkably higher Na(+) /H(+) exchange activity of tonoplast membrane from transgenic sweet potato lines (NOE) in comparison with wild-type (WT) plants confirmed the vacuolar antiporter function in mediating Na(+) /H(+) exchange. Under salt stress, NOE plants accumulated higher Na(+) and K(+) levels in their tissues compared with WT plants, maintaining high K(+) /Na(+) ratios. Consequently, NOE plants showed enhanced protection against cell damage due to the increased proline accumulation, preserved cell membrane integrity, enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging (e.g. increased superoxide dismutase activity), and reduced H2 O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Moreover, the transgenic plants showed improved cold tolerance through multiple mechanisms of action, revealing the first molecular evidence for NHX1 function in cold response. The transgenic plants showed better biomass production and root yield under stressful conditions. These findings demonstrate that overexpressing AtNHX1 in sweet potato renders the crop tolerant to both salt and cold stresses, providing a greater capacity for the use of AtNHX1 in improving crop performance under combined abiotic stress conditions. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  5. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  6. Deciphering the Intracellular Fate of Propionibacterium acnes in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Natalie; Mak, Tim N.; Shinohara, Debika Biswal; Sfanos, Karen S.; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23862148

  7. Polycaprolactone/maltodextrin nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery: formulation, uptake mechanism, internalization kinetics, and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Gorantla, Yamini; Paulos, Simon A; Sharma, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Palaniappan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) disease progression is associated with significant changes in intracellular and extracellular proteins, intracellular signaling mechanism, and cancer cell phenotype. These changes may have direct impact on the cellular interactions with nanocarriers; hence, there is the need for a much-detailed understanding, as nanocarrier cellular internalization and intracellular sorting mechanism correlate directly with bioavailability and clinical efficacy. In this study, we report the differences in the rate and mechanism of cellular internalization of a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/maltodextrin (MD) nanocarrier system for intracellular drug delivery in LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines. PCL/MD nanocarriers were designed and characterized. PCL/MD nanocarriers significantly increased the intracellular concentration of coumarin-6 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, a model hydrophobic and large molecule, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis revealed rapid internalization of the nanocarrier. The extent of nanocarrier cellular internalization correlated directly with cell line aggressiveness. PCL/MD internalization was highest in PC3 followed by DU145 and LNCaP, respectively. Uptake in all PCa cell lines was metabolically dependent. Extraction of endogenous cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced uptake by 75%±4.53% in PC3, 64%±6.01% in LNCaP, and 50%±4.50% in DU145, indicating the involvement of endogenous cholesterol in cellular internalization. Internalization of the nanocarrier in LNCaP was mediated mainly by macropinocytosis and clathrin-independent pathways, while internalization in PC3 and DU145 involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-independent pathways, and macropinocytosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a very diffused and non-compartmentalized subcellular localization of the PCL/MD nanocarriers with possible intranuclear localization and minor colocalization in

  8. Diversity in the dynamical behaviour of a compartmentalized programmable biochemical oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Maximilian; Kim, Jongmin; Kapsner, Korbinian; Winfree, Erik; Franco, Elisa; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-04-01

    In vitro compartmentalization of biochemical reaction networks is a crucial step towards engineering artificial cell-scale devices and systems. At this scale the dynamics of molecular systems becomes stochastic, which introduces several engineering challenges and opportunities. Here we study a programmable transcriptional oscillator system that is compartmentalized into microemulsion droplets with volumes between 33 fl and 16 pl. Simultaneous measurement of large populations of droplets reveals major variations in the amplitude, frequency and damping of the oscillations. Variability increases for smaller droplets and depends on the operating point of the oscillator. Rather than reflecting the stochastic kinetics of the chemical reaction network itself, the variability can be attributed to the statistical variation of reactant concentrations created during their partitioning into droplets. We anticipate that robustness to partitioning variability will be a critical challenge for engineering cell-scale systems, and that highly parallel time-series acquisition from microemulsion droplets will become a key tool for characterization of stochastic circuit function.

  9. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves the production of branched-chain alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, José L; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeting metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production compared with overexpression of the enzymes involved in the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalization of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overproducing enzymes involved in only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains revealed that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves greater local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways.

  10. Spatial variability in compartmental fate modelling : Linking fugacity models and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wania, F

    1996-03-01

    A new approach is presented which is designed to address the spatial heterogeneity of the environment in compartmental mass balance models of chemical fate in the environment. It rests on the assumption of chemical equilibration within one phase despite prevailing environmental heterogeneity. Composite D- and Z-values are derived from sub-unit specific environmental parameters and are used to solve mass balance equations which can be adopted essentially unchanged from existing compartmental fugacity models. With the resulting common fugacity value for each compartment, sub-unit specific concentrations and process rates can be calculated. The approach is illustrated using the QWASI lake model to calculate the fate of hexachlorobenzene in a hypothetical lake sub-divided in four distinct sub-units. The approach allows the subdivision of each compartment in a large number of sub-units with distinct environmental characteristics without substantially increasing model complexity. This is a necessary condition for linking fugacity models to geographical information systems.

  11. Organization of parent knowledge: compartmentalization and integration in adult child-parent relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limke, Alicia; Showers, Carolin J

    2010-09-01

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between structure of beliefs about romantic partners and feelings for that partner. Here, the structure of college students' beliefs about their parents was linked to distinct types of ongoing parent-child relationships identified by cluster analysis. An integrative structure of mother knowledge was associated with an evaluatively complex type of relationship ("dealing"), characterized by greater liking and closeness and less cooperation and contact. Positive compartmentalization of mother knowledge was associated with mother relationships that were consistently positive ("denying") across different dimensions. In contrast, the most positive father relationships were reported by daughters with evaluatively integrative father structures. Possible reasons for daughters' tendency to integrate father structures and to compartmentalize mother structures are discussed.

  12. Etiopathogenical criteria in the early diagnosis of Compartmental Syndrome (CS of the shank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Șerban Al. O.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the evaluation of some etiopathogenic risk factors one can anticipate the evaluation of some fractures towards Compartmental Syndrome (CS and then their diagnosis in early stage, when the symptomatology is still unconvincing and the treatment reduces the risk of ischemia lesions. Based both on some prospective observations, using a group of shank fractures, and also on the clinical facts of constituted CS, there were made correlations, statistically reported in the case of some etiopathogenic risk factors represented by the fracture localization and its characteristics, traumatic mechanisms, soft tissue quality and polytraumatism, having an objective common denominator, the compartmental pressure level measured directly. The authors propose an etiopathogenic risk score of CS for the fractures reaching the pressure level of 20-30mmHg, recommending the pressional and clinical monitoring for a score of minimum 10 points. These fractures have a certain risk of CS.

  13. The architecture of antagonistic networks: Node degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness

    OpenAIRE

    Savannah Nuwagaba; Cang Hui

    2015-01-01

    Describing complex ecosystems as networks of interacting components has proved fruitful - revealing many distinctive patterns and dynamics of ecological systems. Of these patterns, three have often been brought up in literature, including species degree distribution, compartmentalization and nestedness, due largely to their implications for the functionality and stability of communities. Here, using 61 empirical antagonistic networks, we aim to settle the inconsistency in literature by (i) fi...

  14. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  15. A Residual Approach for Balanced Truncation Model Reduction (BTMR of Compartmental Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William La Cruz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a residual approach of the square root balanced truncation algorithm for model order reduction of continuous, linear and time-invariante compartmental systems. Specifically, the new approach uses a residual method to approximate the controllability and observability gramians, whose resolution is an essential step of the square root balanced truncation algorithm, that requires a great computational cost. Numerical experiences are included to highlight the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  16. Repurposing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome for compartmentalizing multi-enzyme pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLoache, William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Russ, Zachary [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Samson, Jennifer [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dueber, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-09-25

    The peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was targeted for repurposing in order to create a synthetic organelle that provides a generalizable compartment for engineered metabolic pathways. Compartmentalization of enzymes into organelles is a promising strategy for limiting metabolic crosstalk, improving pathway efficiency, and ultimately modifying the chemical environment to be distinct from that of the cytoplasm. We focused on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome, as this organelle is not required for viability when grown on conventional media. We identified an enhanced peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) for rapidly importing non-native cargo proteins. Additionally, we performed the first systematic in vivo measurements of nonspecific metabolite permeability across the peroxisomal membrane using a polymer exclusion assay and characterized the size dependency of metabolite trafficking. Finally, we applied these new insights to compartmentalize a two-enzyme pathway in the peroxisome and characterize the expression regimes where compartmentalization leads to improved product titer. This work builds a foundation for using the peroxisome as a synthetic organelle, highlighting both promise and future challenges on the way to realizing this goal.

  17. Self-concept structure and borderline personality disorder: evidence for negative compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Aline; Schröder-Abé, Michela; Weißgerber, Susan; Roepke, Stefan; Schütz, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by an unstable and incongruent self-concept. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies investigating self-concept in BPD. In order to bridge this research gap, the purpose of this study was to apply an in-depth analysis of structural aspects of the self-concept in BPD. We examined the degree of compartmentalization, i.e., a tendency to organize knowledge about the self into discrete, extremely valenced (i.e., either positive or negative) categories (Showers, 1992). We hypothesized and found that BPD patients had the most compartmentalized self-concept structure and a higher proportion of negative self-attributes relative to both a non-clinical and a depressed control group. Moreover, BPD patients rated negative self-aspects as more important than positive ones relative to non-clinical controls. We cannot determine whether causal relationships exist between psychological symptoms and self-concept structure. Moreover, further comparisons to patients with other psychiatric disorders are necessary in order to further confirm the clinical specificity of our results. Our findings indicate that a negative compartmentalized self-concept is a specific feature of BPD. Implications for future research, psychological assessment, and psychotherapeutic treatment are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intracellular ion channels and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eLeanza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K+ channels (Ca2+-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K+ channel-3 (TASK-3, Ca2+ uniporter MCU, Mg2+-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 receptor, the ER-located Ca2+ depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1, a component of the store-operated Ca2+ channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment.

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a Km of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a Km of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose.

  20. The pH partition theory predicts the accumulation and toxicity of doxorubicin in normal and low-pH-adapted cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gerweck, L E; Kozin, S V; Stocks, S J

    1999-01-01

    The accumulation and toxicity of the weak base doxorubicin has been investigated as a function of extracellular pH, intracellular pH and the cellular pH gradient in cells previously cultured under normal (pH 7.4) and low-pH (6.8) conditions. Low-pH-adapted cells exhibit transmembrane pH gradients which substantially differ from normal cells at the same extracellular pH. No relationship was obtained between intracellular pH and the uptake or toxicity of doxorubicin in the two cell types. In co...

  1. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  2. Organelles involved in the intracellular transport of newly synthesized aminopeptidase N and their acidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E M; Sjöström, H

    1989-01-01

    vesicles are exocytotic and that the low pH in the acid compartments is of no importance for intracellular transport and correct sorting of aminopeptidase N. Furthermore, our results show that the majority of the aminopeptidase N in the lysosomal/endosomal-like compartments is newly synthesized....

  3. Development of an intracellular glycolytic flux sensor for high throughput applications in E.coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehning, Christina Eva

    The aim of this PhD project was to construct, test and apply an intracellular, growth-­‐ independent and direct measureable glycolytic flux biosensor in E. coli. Studying the metabolic flux of bacterial cells is of growing interest as it is of fundamental importance to bacterial physiology as wel...

  4. Full-length cellular β-secretase has a trimeric subunit stoichiometry, and its sulfur-rich transmembrane interaction site modulates cytosolic copper compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Filip; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Bethge, Tobias; McGuire, Hugo; Scolari, Silvia; Herrmann, Andreas; Blunck, Rikard; Bowie, Derek; Multhaup, Gerd

    2017-08-11

    The β-secretase (BACE1) initiates processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) into Aβ peptides, which have been implicated as central players in the pathology of Alzheimer disease. BACE1 has been described as a copper-binding protein and its oligomeric state as being monomeric, dimeric, and/or multimeric, but the native cellular stoichiometry has remained elusive. Here, by using single-molecule fluorescence and in vitro cross-linking experiments with photo-activatable unnatural amino acids, we show that full-length BACE1, independently of its subcellular localization, exists as trimers in human cells. We found that trimerization requires the BACE1 transmembrane sequences (TMSs) and cytoplasmic domains, with residues Ala 463 and Cys 466 buried within the trimer interface of the sulfur-rich core of the TMSs. Our 3D model predicts that the sulfur-rich core of the trimeric BACE1 TMS is accessible to metal ions, but copper ions did not trigger trimerization. The results of functional assays of endogenous BACE1 suggest that it has a role in intracellular copper compartmentalization by transferring cytosolic copper to intracellular compartments, while leaving the overall cellular copper concentration unaltered. Adding to existing physiological models, our results provide novel insight into the atypical interactions between copper and BACE1 and into its non-enzymatic activities. In conclusion, therapeutic Alzheimer disease prevention strategies aimed at decreasing BACE1 protein levels should be regarded with caution, because adverse effects in copper homeostasis may occur. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Boron compartmentation in roots of sunflower plants of different boron status: A study using the stable isotopes 10B and 11B adopting two independent approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, H.; Dannel, F.; Roemheld, V.

    2001-01-01

    The intracellular compartmentation of boron (B) in roots of sunflower plants precultured with 100 μM B (high B) or 1 μM B (low B) was studied using two independent approaches. In the first approach, short-term efflux studies using the stable isotopes 11 B and 10 B were carried out. In roots of high B plants, the calculated concentrations of B (nmol g FW -1 ) were 52.6 in the cell wall, 7.5 in the vacuole, 27.1 in the cytosol and 48.0 in the free space. In roots of low B plants, the concentrations of B (nmol g FW -1 ) were 43.4 in the cell wall, 2.8 in the vacuole, 17.9 in the cytosol and almost zero in the free space. Although the B supply differed by a factor 100, the B concentrations in the cytosol and the vacuole of low B plants were 66 and 37% of the respective concentrations in high B plants. This suggests an additional role for B in plant metabolism, besides its function in the cell wall. In the second approach, root B pools (cell sap and water-insoluble residue) were determined for comparison, and found to be in good agreement with the results from the efflux study. (au)

  6. Activation of PKA in cell requires higher concentration of cAMP than in vitro: implications for compartmentalization of cAMP signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-10-26

    cAMP is a ubiquitous second messenger responsible for the cellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters via activation of its main effector, protein kinase A (PKA). Multiple studies have shown that the basal concentration of cAMP in several cell types is about 1 μM. This value is well above the reported concentration of cAMP required to half-maximally activate PKA, which measures in the 100-300 nM range. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain this apparent discrepancy including inaccurate measurements of intracellular free cAMP, inaccurate measurement of the apparent activation constant of PKA or shielding of PKA from bulk cytosolic cAMP via localization of the enzyme to microdomains with lower basal cAMP concentration. However, direct experimental evidence in support of any of these models is limited and a firm conclusion is missing. In this study we use multiple FRET-based reporters for the detection of cAMP and PKA activity in intact cells and we establish that the sensitivity of PKA to cAMP is almost twenty times lower when measured in cell than when measured in vitro. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of compartmentalized cAMP signalling.

  7. Coral calcifying fluid pH is modulated by seawater carbonate chemistry not solely seawater pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, S; Tambutté, E; Carpenter, R C; Edmunds, P J; Evensen, N R; Allemand, D; Ferrier-Pagès, C; Tambutté, S; Venn, A A

    2017-01-25

    Reef coral calcification depends on regulation of pH in the internal calcifying fluid (CF) in which the coral skeleton forms. However, little is known about calcifying fluid pH (pH CF ) regulation, despite its importance in determining the response of corals to ocean acidification. Here, we investigate pH CF in the coral Stylophora pistillata in seawater maintained at constant pH with manipulated carbonate chemistry to alter dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and therefore total alkalinity (A T ). We also investigate the intracellular pH of calcifying cells, photosynthesis, respiration and calcification rates under the same conditions. Our results show that despite constant pH in the surrounding seawater, pH CF is sensitive to shifts in carbonate chemistry associated with changes in [DIC] and [A T ], revealing that seawater pH is not the sole driver of pH CF Notably, when we synthesize our results with published data, we identify linear relationships of pH CF with the seawater [DIC]/[H + ] ratio, [A T ]/ [H + ] ratio and [[Formula: see text

  8. Intracellular Hyper-Acidification Potentiated by Hydrogen Sulfide Mediates Invasive and Therapy Resistant Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Wei Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Slow and continuous release of H2S by GYY4137 has previously been demonstrated to kill cancer cells by increasing glycolysis and impairing anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. This action is specific for cancer cells. The resulting lactate overproduction and defective pH homeostasis bring about intracellular acidification-induced cancer cell death. The present study investigated the potency of H2S released by GYY4137 against invasive and radio- as well as chemo-resistant cancers, known to be glycolytically active. We characterized and utilized cancer cell line pairs of various organ origins, based on their aggressive behaviors, and assessed their response to GYY4137. We compared glycolytic activity, via lactate production, and intracellular pH of each cancer cell line pair after exposure to H2S. Invasive and therapy resistant cancers, collectively termed aggressive cancers, are receptive to H2S-mediated cytotoxicity, albeit at a higher concentration of GYY4137 donor. While lactate production was enhanced, intracellular pH of aggressive cancers was only modestly decreased. Inherently, the magnitude of intracellular pH decrease is a key determinant for cancer cell sensitivity to H2S. We demonstrated the utility of coupling GYY4137 with either simvastatin, known to inhibit monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4, or metformin, to further boost glycolysis, in bringing about cell death for aggressive cancers. Simvastatin inhibiting lactate extrusion thence contained excess lactate induced by GYY4137 within intracellular compartment. In contrast, the combined exposure to both GYY4137 and metformin overwhelms cancer cells with lactate over-production exceeding its expulsion rate. Together, GYY4137 and simvastatin or metformin synergize to induce intracellular hyper-acidification-mediated cancer cell death.

  9. MR imaging of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janick, P.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Asakura, T.

    1989-01-01

    MR imaging was performed on varying concentrations of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin as well as varying proportions of deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in vitro at 1.5T with use of standard spin-echo and gradient-refocused spin sequences. This study indicates that susceptibility-induced T2 shortening occurs over a broad range of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin concentrations (maximal at hematocrits between 20% and 45%), reflecting diffusional effects at the cellular level. T2* gradient-echo imaging enhances the observed hypointensity in images of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin. The characteristic MR appearance of acute hemotomas can be modeled by the behavior of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin

  10. DISTING: A web application for fast algorithmic computation of alternative indistinguishable linear compartmental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Natalie R; Godfrey, Keith R; Alquaddoomi, Faisal; Nola, David; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2017-05-01

    We describe and illustrate use of DISTING, a novel web application for computing alternative structurally identifiable linear compartmental models that are input-output indistinguishable from a postulated linear compartmental model. Several computer packages are available for analysing the structural identifiability of such models, but DISTING is the first to be made available for assessing indistinguishability. The computational algorithms embedded in DISTING are based on advanced versions of established geometric and algebraic properties of linear compartmental models, embedded in a user-friendly graphic model user interface. Novel computational tools greatly speed up the overall procedure. These include algorithms for Jacobian matrix reduction, submatrix rank reduction, and parallelization of candidate rank computations in symbolic matrix analysis. The application of DISTING to three postulated models with respectively two, three and four compartments is given. The 2-compartment example is used to illustrate the indistinguishability problem; the original (unidentifiable) model is found to have two structurally identifiable models that are indistinguishable from it. The 3-compartment example has three structurally identifiable indistinguishable models. It is found from DISTING that the four-compartment example has five structurally identifiable models indistinguishable from the original postulated model. This example shows that care is needed when dealing with models that have two or more compartments which are neither perturbed nor observed, because the numbering of these compartments may be arbitrary. DISTING is universally and freely available via the Internet. It is easy to use and circumvents tedious and complicated algebraic analysis previously done by hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Directed clustering in driven compartmentalized granular gas systems in zero gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y; Hou, M; Evesque, P

    2011-01-01

    Clustering of shaken fluidized granular matter in connected compartments has been observed and studied in the laboratory. This clustering behavior in granular gas systems is related to the dissipative nature of granular system, and therefore shall not depend on gravity. This clustering phenomenon in compartmental configuration may provide a means for particle depletion and transportation in microgravity environment. In this work we propose different configurations for possible directed clustering in zero gravity. The related experiment has been planned for the Chinese satellite SJ-10.

  12. Incorporating hydraulic/hydromorphologic properties and their stage dependency into hydrologic compartmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, A.; Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    According to recent studies, the volumetric error of the predicted size of the spring flood in Sweden can be as large as 20%. A significant part of this error originates from simplifications in the spatial and hydrodynamic description of watercourse networks, as well as statistical problems to give proper weight to extreme flows. Possible ways to improve current hydrological modelling practises is by making models more adapted to varying flow conditions as well as by increasing the coupling between model parameters and physical catchment characteristics. This study formulates a methodology based in hydrodynamical/hydraulic theory to investigate how river network characteristics vary with flow stage and how to transfer this information to compartmental hydrologic models such as the HBV/HYPE models. This is particularly important during extreme flows when a significant portion of the water flows outside the normal stream channels. The aim is to combine knowledge about the hydrodynamics and hydro-morphology of watercourse networks to improve the predictions of peak flows. HYPE is a semi-distributed conceptual compartmental hydrological model which is currently being developed at the SMHI as a successor to the HBV model. The model (HYPE) is thought to be better adapted to varying flow conditions by using the dynamical response functions derived by the methodology described here. The distribution of residence times within the watercourse network - and how these depend on flow stage is analysed. This information is then incorporated into the response functions of the HYPE model, i.e. the compartmental model receives a dynamic transformation function relating river discharge to storativity within the sub-catchment. This response function hence reflects the topologic and hydromorphologic characteristics of the watercourse network as well as flow stage. Seven subcatchments in Rönne River basin (1900 km2) are studied to show how this approach can improve the prediction of

  13. Folded genome as a platform for the functional compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioudinkova E. S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In a number of recent studies a tight interconnection between the spatial organization of the eukaryotic genome and its functioning has been demonstrated. Moreover, it is becoming evident that the folded DNA by itself consti- tutes an important, if not the key, factor supporting the internal nuclear organization. In this review, we will discuss the current state of chromatin research with the special attention focused on chromosome territories, chromatin folding and dynamics, chromatin domains, transcription and replication factories. Based on this analysis we will show how interphase chromosomes define the assembly of different nuclear compartments and underlie the spatial compartmentalization of the cell nucleus.

  14. The kinetics of multi-compartmentalized systems, studied by radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouveia, A.S. de.

    1978-01-01

    The use of compartmental models to investigate kinetic problems is presented. This use is restricted, however, to linear models. As an application of different methods, the kinetic behaviour of haemaccel labelled with iodine 131 is studied, the interval of the physically viable solutions being established. The existence of a class of solutions is explained as a result of lack of knowledge of a complete data set. The possibility of obtaining a single solution is also discussed. The formalism of the program SAAM (Simulation, Analysis and modelling) now judged very important for the study of multi-compartimental analysis is presented. (I.C.R) [pt

  15. Intracellular Polyamines Enhance Astrocytic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Jan; Inyushin, Mikhail; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V.; Rivera, Yomarie; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y.; Nichols, Colin G.; Eaton, Misty J.; Skatchkov, Serguei N.

    2013-01-01

    Spermine (SPM) and spermidine (SPD), endogenous polyamines (PA) with the ability to modulate various ion channels and receptors in the brain, exert neuroprotective, antidepressant, antioxidant and other effects in vivo such as increasing longevity. These PA are preferably accumulated in astrocytes, and we hypothesized that SPM increases glial intercellular communication by interacting with glial gap junctions. Results obtained in situ, using Lucifer yellow propagation in the astrocytic syncitium of 21–25 day old rat CA1 hippocampal slices, showed reduced coupling when astrocytes were dialyzed with standard intracellular solutions (ICS) without SPM. However, there was a robust increase in the spreading of Lucifer yellow via gap junctions to neighboring astrocytes when the cells were patched with ICS containing 1 mM SPM; a physiological concentration in glia. Lucifer yellow propagation was inhibited by gap junction blockers. Our findings show that the glial syncitium propagates SPM via gap junctions and further suggest a new role of polyamines in the regulation of the astroglial network in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23076119

  16. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  17. Development of nanosensors for studying intracellular phosphate levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Hong

    Abstract Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential macronutrient that plays a central role in metabolism and signal transduction in plants. Uptake, compartmentation and transport are important players of cellular Pi homeostasis; however, methods to determine the cellular phosphate concentration...

  18. Compartmentalized metabolic network reconstruction of microbial communities to determine the effect of agricultural intervention on soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Silva, María Camila; Álvarez-Yela, Astrid Catalina; Gómez-Cano, Fabio; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Husserl, Johana; Danies, Giovanna; Restrepo, Silvia; González-Barrios, Andrés Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Soil microbial communities are responsible for a wide range of ecological processes and have an important economic impact in agriculture. Determining the metabolic processes performed by microbial communities is crucial for understanding and managing ecosystem properties. Metagenomic approaches allow the elucidation of the main metabolic processes that determine the performance of microbial communities under different environmental conditions and perturbations. Here we present the first compartmentalized metabolic reconstruction at a metagenomics scale of a microbial ecosystem. This systematic approach conceives a meta-organism without boundaries between individual organisms and allows the in silico evaluation of the effect of agricultural intervention on soils at a metagenomics level. To characterize the microbial ecosystems, topological properties, taxonomic and metabolic profiles, as well as a Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) were considered. Furthermore, topological and optimization algorithms were implemented to carry out the curation of the models, to ensure the continuity of the fluxes between the metabolic pathways, and to confirm the metabolite exchange between subcellular compartments. The proposed models provide specific information about ecosystems that are generally overlooked in non-compartmentalized or non-curated networks, like the influence of transport reactions in the metabolic processes, especially the important effect on mitochondrial processes, as well as provide more accurate results of the fluxes used to optimize the metabolic processes within the microbial community.

  19. Compartmentalized metabolic network reconstruction of microbial communities to determine the effect of agricultural intervention on soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Alvarez-Silva

    Full Text Available Soil microbial communities are responsible for a wide range of ecological processes and have an important economic impact in agriculture. Determining the metabolic processes performed by microbial communities is crucial for understanding and managing ecosystem properties. Metagenomic approaches allow the elucidation of the main metabolic processes that determine the performance of microbial communities under different environmental conditions and perturbations. Here we present the first compartmentalized metabolic reconstruction at a metagenomics scale of a microbial ecosystem. This systematic approach conceives a meta-organism without boundaries between individual organisms and allows the in silico evaluation of the effect of agricultural intervention on soils at a metagenomics level. To characterize the microbial ecosystems, topological properties, taxonomic and metabolic profiles, as well as a Flux Balance Analysis (FBA were considered. Furthermore, topological and optimization algorithms were implemented to carry out the curation of the models, to ensure the continuity of the fluxes between the metabolic pathways, and to confirm the metabolite exchange between subcellular compartments. The proposed models provide specific information about ecosystems that are generally overlooked in non-compartmentalized or non-curated networks, like the influence of transport reactions in the metabolic processes, especially the important effect on mitochondrial processes, as well as provide more accurate results of the fluxes used to optimize the metabolic processes within the microbial community.

  20. Compartmentalization of the gut viral reservoir in HIV-1 infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Tannika

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently there has been an increasing interest and appreciation for the gut as both a viral reservoir as well as an important host-pathogen interface in human immunodefiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection. The gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT is the largest lymphoid organ infected by HIV-1. In this study we examined if different HIV-1 quasispecies are found in different parts of the gut of HIV-1 infected individuals. Results Gut biopsies (esophagus, stomach, duodenum and colorectum were obtained from eight HIV-1 infected preHAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy patients. HIV-1 Nef and Reverse transcriptase (RT encoding sequences were obtained through nested PCR amplification from DNA isolated from the gut biopsy tissues. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced. The resulting sequences were subjected to various phylogenetic analyses. Expression of the nef gene and viral RNA in the different gut tissues was determined using real-time RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the Nef protein-encoding region revealed compartmentalization of viral replication in the gut within patients. Viral diversity in both the Nef and RT encoding region varied in different parts of the gut. Moreover, increased nef gene expression (p Conclusion Our results indicated that different HIV-1 quasispecies populate different parts of the gut, and that viral replication in the gut is compartmentalized. These observations underscore the importance of the gut as a host-pathogen interface in HIV-1 infection.

  1. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  2. A compartmental model of the cAMP/PKA/MAPK pathway in Bio-PEPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ciocchetta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of biochemical systems involve the exchange of information between different compartments, either in the form of transportation or via the intervention of membrane proteins which are able to transmit stimuli between bordering compartments. The correct quantitative handling of compartments is, therefore, extremely important when modelling real biochemical systems. The Bio-PEPA process algebra is equipped with the capability of explicitly defining quantitative information such as compartment volumes and membrane surface areas. Furthermore, the recent development of the Bio-PEPA Eclipse Plug-in allows us to perform a correct stochastic simulation of multi-compartmental models. Here we present a Bio-PEPA compartmental model of the cAMP/PKA/MAPK pathway. We analyse the system using the Bio-PEPA Eclipse Plug-in and we show the correctness of our model by comparison with an existing ODE model. Furthermore, we perform computational experiments in order to investigate certain properties of the pathway. Specifically, we focus on the system response to the inhibition and strengthening of feedback loops and to the variation in the activity of key pathway reactions and we observe how these modifications affect the behaviour of the pathway. These experiments are useful to understand the control and regulatory mechanisms of the system.

  3. Reconstruction of Arabidopsis metabolic network models accounting for subcellular compartmentalization and tissue-specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Oron, Shira; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Ruppin, Eytan; Aharoni, Asaph; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-03

    Plant metabolic engineering is commonly used in the production of functional foods and quality trait improvement. However, to date, computational model-based approaches have only been scarcely used in this important endeavor, in marked contrast to their prominent success in microbial metabolic engineering. In this study we present a computational pipeline for the reconstruction of fully compartmentalized tissue-specific models of Arabidopsis thaliana on a genome scale. This reconstruction involves automatic extraction of known biochemical reactions in Arabidopsis for both primary and secondary metabolism, automatic gap-filling, and the implementation of methods for determining subcellular localization and tissue assignment of enzymes. The reconstructed tissue models are amenable for constraint-based modeling analysis, and significantly extend upon previous model reconstructions. A set of computational validations (i.e., cross-validation tests, simulations of known metabolic functionalities) and experimental validations (comparison with experimental metabolomics datasets under various compartments and tissues) strongly testify to the predictive ability of the models. The utility of the derived models was demonstrated in the prediction of measured fluxes in metabolically engineered seed strains and the design of genetic manipulations that are expected to increase vitamin E content, a significant nutrient for human health. Overall, the reconstructed tissue models are expected to lay down the foundations for computational-based rational design of plant metabolic engineering. The reconstructed compartmentalized Arabidopsis tissue models are MIRIAM-compliant and are available upon request.

  4. Na+,HCO3--cotransport is functionally upregulated during human breast carcinogenesis and required for the inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Soojung; Mele, Marco; Vahl, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic and biochemical changes during breast carcinogenesis enhance cellular acid production. Extrusion of the acid load from the cancer cells raises intracellular pH, while it decreases extracellular pH creating an inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane compared to normal cells....... Intracellular pH was measured by fluorescence microscopy, while protein expression was investigated by immunofluorescence imaging and immunoblotting. We found that cellular net acid extrusion increased during human breast carcinogenesis due to enhanced Na(+),HCO3 (-)-cotransport, which created an alkaline shift...... (~0.3 units of magnitude) in steady-state intracellular pH of human primary breast carcinomas compared to normal breast tissue. Na(+)/H(+)-exchange activity and steady-state intracellular pH in the absence of CO2/HCO3 (-) were practically unaffected by breast carcinogenesis. These effects were evident...

  5. Intracellular calcium homeostasis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal carrier of biological information: it controls cell life from its origin at fertilization to its end in the process of programmed cell death. Ca(2+) is a conventional diffusible second messenger released inside cells by the interaction of first messengers with plasma membrane receptors. However, it can also penetrate directly into cells to deliver information without the intermediation of first or second messengers. Even more distinctively, Ca(2+) can act as a first messenger, by interacting with a plasma membrane receptor to set in motion intracellular signaling pathways that involve Ca(2+) itself. Perhaps the most distinctive property of the Ca(2+) signal is its ambivalence: while essential to the correct functioning of cells, Ca(2+) becomes an agent that mediates cell distress, or even (toxic) cell death, if its concentration and movements inside cells are not carefully tuned. Ca(2+) is controlled by reversible complexation to specific proteins, which could be pure Ca(2+) buffers, or which, in addition to buffering Ca(2+), also decode its signal to pass it on to targets. The most important actors in the buffering of cell Ca(2+) are proteins that transport it across the plasma membrane and the membrane of the organelles: some have high Ca(2+) affinity and low transport capacity (e.g., Ca(2+) pumps), others have opposite properties (e.g., the Ca(2+) uptake system of mitochondria). Between the initial event of fertilization, and the terminal event of programmed cell death, the Ca(2+) signal regulates the most important activities of the cell, from the expression of genes, to heart and muscle contraction and other motility processes, to diverse metabolic pathways involved in the generation of cell fuels.

  6. Utilization of stable isotopes for the study of in vivo compartmental metabolism of poly-insaturate fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossard, N.; Croset, M.; Lecerf, J.; Lagarde, M.; Pachiaudi, C.; Normand, S.; Riou, J.P.; Chirouze, V.; Tayot, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the compartmental metabolism of the 22:6n-3 fatty acid, and particularly the role of the transport plasmatic forms for the tissue uptake (especially brain), a technique is developed using carbon 13 stable isotope and an isotopic mass spectrometry coupled to gaseous chromatography technique. This method has been validated in rat with docosahexaenoic acid enriched in 13 C and esterified in triglycerides. The compartmental metabolism is monitored by measuring the variation of 22:6n-3 isotopic enrichment in the various lipoprotein lipidic fractions, in blood globules and in the brain. 1 fig., 1 tab., 12 refs

  7. Multi-compartmental transdermal patch for simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs: formulation and evaluation of newly developed novel dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan Venugopal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the formulation of multi-compartmental transdermal patches for simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs: aceclofenac and serratiopeptidase. Methods: The patch was prepared by simple solvent casting method using hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K100M as matrix forming agent and dimethyl sulphoxide as permeation enhancer. The prepared transdermal patch was evaluated by physiochemical parameters and in- vitro diffusion studies. Results: The multi-compartmental transdermal patch showed sustained drug release over the period of 12 h. Conclusions: Multicompartmental transdermal patches shows better bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy and very economic as compared with other dosage forms.

  8. Improvement of the respiration efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by decreasing the culture pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weijia; Li, Yu; Gao, Xueling; Fu, Ruiyan

    2016-03-01

    The growth characteristics and intracellular hemin concentrations of Lactococcus lactis grown under different culture pH and aeration conditions were examined to investigate the effect of culture pH on the respiration efficiency of L. lactis NZ9000 (pZN8148). Cell biomass and biomass yield of L. lactis grown with 4 μg hemin/ml and O2 were higher than those without aeration when the culture pH was controlled at 5-6.5. The culture pH affected the respiratory efficiency in the following order of pH: 5 > 5.5 > 6 > 6.5; the lag phase increased as the culture pH decreased. Hemin accumulation was sensitive to culture pH. Among the four pH conditions, pH 5.5 was optimal for hemin accumulation in the cells. The highest intracellular hemin level in L. lactis resting cells incubated at different pH saline levels (5-6.5) was at pH 5.5. The respiration efficiency of L. lactis under respiration-permissive conditions increases markedly as the culture pH decreases. These results may help develop high cell-density L. lactis cultures. Thus, this microorganism may be used for industrial applications.

  9. Intracellularly Induced Cyclophilins Play an Important Role in Stress Adaptation and Virulence of Brucella abortus

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells. PMID:23230297

  10. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  11. A mesoporous silica nanoparticle with charge-convertible pore walls for efficient intracellular protein delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sung; Kwon, Ick Chan [Biomedical Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Woo; Lee, Hong Jae; Yun, Young-Pil; Lee, Sang Cheon [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Hye [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Geun [Department of Nano Technology, Advanced Nano Materials Research Team, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seo Young, E-mail: syjeong@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: schlee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-04

    We report a smart mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) with a pore surface designed to undergo charge conversion in intracellular endosomal condition. The surface of mesopores in the silica nanoparticles was engineered to have pH-hydrolyzable citraconic amide. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses confirmed the successful modification of the pore surfaces. MSNs (MSN-Cit) with citraconic amide functionality on the pore surfaces exhibited a negative zeta potential (-10 mV) at pH 7.4 because of the presence of carboxylate end groups. At cellular endosomal pH ({approx}5.0), MSN-Cit have a positive zeta potential (16 mV) indicating the dramatic charge conversion from negative to positive by hydrolysis of surface citraconic amide. Cytochrome c (Cyt c) of positive charges could be incorporated into the pores of MSN-Cit by electrostatic interactions. The release of Cyt c can be controlled by adjusting the pH of the release media. At pH 7.4, the Cyt c release was retarded, whereas, at pH 5.0, MSN-Cit facilitated the release of Cyt c. The released Cyt c maintained the enzymatic activity of native Cyt c. Hemolytic activity of MSN-Cit over red blood cells (RBCs) was more pronounced at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.0, indicating the capability of intracellular endosomal escape of MSN carriers. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that MSN-Cit effectively released Cyt c in endosomal compartments after uptake by cancer cells. The MSN developed in this work may serve as efficient intracellular carriers of many cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins.

  12. Investigating Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Simon R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    for signal transduction. One of the major mechanisms for GPCR regulation involves their endocytic trafficking, which serves to internalize the receptors from the plasma membrane and thereby attenuate G protein-dependent signaling. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that GPCRs can signal...... independently of G proteins, as well as from intracellular compartments including endosomes. It is in this context that receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking have attracted renewed interest within the GPCR field. In this chapter, we will review the current understanding and methodologies...... that have been used to investigate internalization and intracellular signaling of GPCRs, with a particular focus on emerging real-time techniques. These recent developments have improved our understanding of the complexities of GPCR internalization and intracellular signaling and suggest that the broader...

  13. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  14. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  15. pH matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inaba, Masanori; Quinson, Jonathan; Arenz, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    to home-made catalysts does not lead to satisfying results, although reported work could be reproduced using commercial catalyst samples. It is demonstrated that the pH of the catalyst ink, which has not been addressed in previous TF-RDE studies, is an important parameter that needs to be carefully...

  16. pH Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  17. Mdm4 loss in the intestinal epithelium leads to compartmentalized cell death but no tissue abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Vega, Yasmine A.; Box, Neil; Terzian, Tamara; Lozano, Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Mdm4 is a critical inhibitor of the p53 tumor suppressor. Mdm4 null mice die early during embryogenesis due to increased p53 activity. In this study, we explore the role that Mdm4 plays in the intestinal epithelium by crossing mice carrying the Mdm4 floxed allele to mice with the Villin Cre transgene. Our data show that loss of Mdm4 (Mdm4intΔ) in this tissue resulted in viable animals with no obvious morphological abnormalities. However, these mutants displayed increased p53 levels and apoptosis exclusively in the proliferative compartment of the intestinal epithelium. This phenotype was completely rescued in a p53 null background. Notably, the observed compartmentalized apoptosis in proliferative intestinal epithelial cells was not due to restricted Mdm4 expression in this region. Thus, in this specific cellular context, p53 is negatively regulated by Mdm4 exclusively in highly proliferative cells. PMID:19371999

  18. Compartmentalized liquid crystal alignment induced by sparse polymer ribbons with surface relief gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhichao; Zhang, Xinzheng; Shi, Bin; Li, Wei; Luo, Weiwei; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-01-15

    We report on the liquid crystal (LC) alignment induced by sparse polymer ribbons fabricated by the two-photon polymerization-based direct laser writing method. Each ribbon is fabricated by a single scan of the laser through the photoresist and possesses surface relief gratings on both sides. The relief gratings are caused by the optical interference between the incident and reflected laser beams. With the aid of these relief gratings, LC molecules can be well aligned along the selected direction of the ribbons. LC cells with the Z-shaped and checkerboard-type microstructures are constructed based on the sparse out-of-plane polymeric ribbons. Our results show that with such polymer ribbons a compartmentalized LC alignment in the arbitrary microstructures can be realized.

  19. [Effect of NaCl stress on ion compartmentation, photosynthesis and growth of Salicornia bigelovii Torr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Yan; Zhao, Ke-Fu

    2004-02-01

    Seedlings of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. were treated with different concentrations of NaCl (0, 100, 300, 600 mmol/L). Ion contents, Na(+) subcelluar localization, photosynthetic rate, ultrastructure of chloroplast and other parameters were measured. The data showed both fresh and dry weight of whole plant of Salicornia bigelovii Torr. under salinity were higher than the control. When NaCl concentration is about 300 mmol/L Salicornia bigelovii Torr. grow strongest. The contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) and c(Na)/c(K) in shoots increased with the salinity. Both Na(+) and Cl(-) were mainly transported to shoots. Ion X-ray microanalysis indicated Na(+) was mainly compartmentalized into vacuoles. Photosynthetic rate increased with the salinity under NaCl 100-300 mmol/L, but declined under NaCl 600 mmol/L. Ultrastructure of chloroplast was destroyed by NaCl 600 mmol/L.

  20. Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways in yeast mitochondria improves production of branched chain alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, José L.; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to improve the production of a compound of interest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have mainly involved engineering or overexpression of cytoplasmic enzymes. We show that targeted expression of metabolic pathways to mitochondria can increase production levels compared with expression of the same pathways in the cytoplasm. Compartmentalisation of the Ehrlich pathway into mitochondria increased isobutanol production by 260%, whereas overexpression of the same pathway in the cytoplasm only improved yields by 10%, compared with a strain overexpressing only the first three steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Subcellular fractionation of engineered strains reveals that targeting the enzymes of the Ehrlich pathway to the mitochondria achieves higher local enzyme concentrations. Other benefits of compartmentalization may include increased availability of intermediates, removing the need to transport intermediates out of the mitochondrion, and reducing the loss of intermediates to competing pathways. PMID:23417095

  1. A comprehensive compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahidi, O; Kwok, K E; Gopaluni, R B

    2016-01-01

    We have expanded a former compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. The former model was a detailed physiological model which considered the interactions of three substances, glucose, insulin and glucagon on regulating the blood sugar. The main...... variations of blood glucose concentrations following an oral glucose intake. Another model representing the incretins production in the gastrointestinal tract along with their hormonal effects on boosting pancreatic insulin production is also added to the former model. We have used two sets of clinical data...... obtained during oral glucose tolerance test and isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion test from both type 2 diabetic and healthy subjects to estimate the model parameters and to validate the model results. The estimation of model parameters is accomplished through solving a nonlinear optimization...

  2. Geo-environmental zoning using physiographic compartmentalization: a proposal for supporting sustainable decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA V.S. CORRÊA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The geo-environmental zoning represents an important strategy in the territorial management. However, it requires a logical and structured procedure. Therefore, an approach using physiographic compartmentalization is proposed and applied as case study in a region covered by the topographic maps of São José dos Campos and Jacareí, Brazil. This region has great geological and geomorphological peculiarities, beyond being a place with large human interventions because of its quickly economic growth. The methodology is based on photointerpretation techniques and remote sensing in GIS environment. As a result, seven geo-environmental zones were obtained from a weighted integration by multicriteria analysis of physiographic units with land-use classes. In conclusion, taking into account potentialities and limitations, the proposed approach can be considered able to support sustainable decision-making, being applicable in other regions.

  3. Measurement of renal glomerular filtration rate using labelled substances with compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberstadt, P.L.

    1981-10-01

    Using a model for the two-compartmental open system and experiments on animals (rabbits and dogs) as well as on human healthy volunteers, an attempt was made to study the advantages and limitations of different radionuclide methods for glomerular filtration rate determination. Labelled compounds used in different combinations were: 3 H-inulin, sup(113m)In-EDTA, 131 I-iothalamate, sup(99m)Tc-DTPA and 14 C-creatinine. The results of the study lead to some working hypotheses concerning the value of creatinine and other labelled substances in the measurement of glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice. The advantages and disadvantages of individual methods summarized in the final report are generally in agreement with the present views of many research workers. Also the hypothesis can be justified that the different labelled compounds which have been studied might be handled independently by the membranes involved but at the long run produce similar homeostatic balance

  4. Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code: a compartmental pathways computer model of contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Root, R.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory DOSTOMAN code has been used since 1978 for environmental pathway analysis of potential migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals. The DOSTOMAN work is reviewed including a summary of historical use of compartmental models, the mathematical basis for the DOSTOMAN code, examples of exact analytical solutions for simple matrices, methods for numerical solution of complex matrices, and mathematical validation/calibration of the SRL code. The review includes the methodology for application to nuclear and hazardous chemical waste disposal, examples of use of the model in contaminant transport and pathway analysis, a user's guide for computer implementation, peer review of the code, and use of DOSTOMAN at other Department of Energy sites. 22 refs., 3 figs

  5. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the HIV infection and compartmentalization of HIV in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system plays an important role in HIV infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis in HIV infection in clinical practice. CSF analysis in HIV infection is indicated for the diagnosis of opportunistic infections and co-infections, diagnosis of meningitis caused by HIV, quantification of HIV viral load, and analysis of CNS HIV compartmentalization. Although several CSF biomarkers have been investigated, none are clinically applicable. The capacity of HIV to generate genetic diversity, in association with the constitutional characteristics of the CNS, facilitates the generation of HIV quasispecies in the CNS that are distinct from HIV in the systemic circulation. CSF analysis has a well-defined and valuable role in the diagnosis of CNS infections in HIV/AIDS patients. Further research is necessary to establish a clinically applicable biomarker for the diagnosis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  7. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  8. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are required for the dynamic regulation of neutral lipid compartmentation in plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols (TAGs) in seeds, their biogenesis and function in non-seed tissues is poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-sp...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3535 - Knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .../polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. 888.3535 Section 888.3535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial (uni-compartmental) metal/polymer porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace part of a knee joint. The device limits...

  10. Assessment of spatial heterogeneity in continuous twin screw wet granulation process using three-compartmental population balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Galbraith, Shaun C; Park, Seo-Young; Cha, Bumjoon; Huang, Zhuangrong; Meyer, Robert Frederick; Flamm, Matthew H; O'Connor, Thomas; Lee, Sau; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2018-01-25

    In this study, a novel three-compartmental population balance model (PBM) for a continuous twin screw wet granulation process is developed, combining the techniques of PBM and regression process modeling. The developed model links screw configuration, screw speed, and blend throughput with granule properties to predict the granule size distribution (GSD) and volume-average granule diameter. The granulator screw barrel was divided into three compartments along barrel length: wetting compartment, mixing compartment, and steady growth compartment. Different granulation mechanisms are assumed in each compartment. The proposed model therefore considers spatial heterogeneity, improving model prediction accuracy. An industrial data set containing 14 experiments is applied for model development. Three validation experiments show that the three-compartmental PBM can accurately predict granule diameter and size distribution at randomly selected operating conditions. Sixteen combinations of aggregation and breakage kernels are investigated in predicting the experimental GSD to best judge the granulation mechanism. The three-compartmental model is compared with a one-compartmental model in predicting granule diameter at different experimental conditions to demonstrate its advantage. The influence of the screw configuration, screw speed and blend throughput on the volume-average granule diameter is analyzed based on the developed model.

  11. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenli; Nehmeh, Sadek A; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Lee, Nancy Y; Humm, John L; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Timo; Narayanan, Manoj; Bal, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions-normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic-embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  12. Transit-time and age distributions for nonlinear time-dependent compartmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Holger; Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos A

    2018-02-06

    Many processes in nature are modeled using compartmental systems (reservoir/pool/box systems). Usually, they are expressed as a set of first-order differential equations describing the transfer of matter across a network of compartments. The concepts of age of matter in compartments and the time required for particles to transit the system are important diagnostics of these models with applications to a wide range of scientific questions. Until now, explicit formulas for transit-time and age distributions of nonlinear time-dependent compartmental systems were not available. We compute densities for these types of systems under the assumption of well-mixed compartments. Assuming that a solution of the nonlinear system is available at least numerically, we show how to construct a linear time-dependent system with the same solution trajectory. We demonstrate how to exploit this solution to compute transit-time and age distributions in dependence on given start values and initial age distributions. Furthermore, we derive equations for the time evolution of quantiles and moments of the age distributions. Our results generalize available density formulas for the linear time-independent case and mean-age formulas for the linear time-dependent case. As an example, we apply our formulas to a nonlinear and a linear version of a simple global carbon cycle model driven by a time-dependent input signal which represents fossil fuel additions. We derive time-dependent age distributions for all compartments and calculate the time it takes to remove fossil carbon in a business-as-usual scenario.

  13. PKA catalytic subunit compartmentation regulates contractile and hypertrophic responses to β-adrenergic signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jason H.; Polanowska-Grabowska, Renata K.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Shields, Charles W.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    β-adrenergic signaling is spatiotemporally heterogeneous in the cardiac myocyte, conferring exquisite control to sympathetic stimulation. Such heterogeneity drives the formation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling microdomains, which regulate Ca2+ handling and contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that the nucleus independently comprises a PKA signaling microdomain regulating myocyte hypertrophy. Spatially-targeted FRET reporters for PKA activity identified slower PKA activation and lower isoproterenol sensitivity in the nucleus (t50 = 10.60±0.68 min; EC50 = 89.00 nmol/L) than in the cytosol (t50 = 3.71±0.25 min; EC50 = 1.22 nmol/L). These differences were not explained by cAMP or AKAP-based compartmentation. A computational model of cytosolic and nuclear PKA activity was developed and predicted that differences in nuclear PKA dynamics and magnitude are regulated by slow PKA catalytic subunit diffusion, while differences in isoproterenol sensitivity are regulated by nuclear expression of protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). These were validated by FRET and immunofluorescence. The model also predicted differential phosphorylation of PKA substrates regulating cell contractility and hypertrophy. Ca2+ and cell hypertrophy measurements validated these predictions and identified higher isoproterenol sensitivity for contractile enhancements (EC50 = 1.84 nmol/L) over cell hypertrophy (EC50 = 85.88 nmol/L). Over-expression of spatially targeted PKA catalytic subunit to the cytosol or nucleus enhanced contractile and hypertrophic responses, respectively. We conclude that restricted PKA catalytic subunit diffusion is an important PKA compartmentation mechanism and the nucleus comprises a novel PKA signaling microdomain, insulating hypertrophic from contractile β-adrenergic signaling responses. PMID:24225179

  14. Cs-137 accumulation and elimination by Gracilaria caudata alga and Abudefduf saxatilis fish. Compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattiolo-Marchese, Sandra Regina

    1998-01-01

    From the ecological point of view, 137 Cs is a critical radionuclide because its physical half-life is long (30 years), and it has a high fission yield. Besides, it presents similar characteristics to sodium and potassium, fundamental elements for the living organisms, in great concentration in all cells. This work has as aim to study the 137 Cs accumulation and elimination by the alga Gracilaria caudata and by the fish Abudefduf saxatilis as well as to obtain the transfer constants of the 137 Cs from the water into the organisms. The concentration factor found for the fish was 5.6 +- 0.2 and for the alga, 13.0 +- 0,6. With 7 and 22 days, the fish and alga respectively had already eliminated half of the accumulated radionuclide. The 137 Cs ingestion efficiency by the fish was also studied and it was verified that the fish assimilated only 47.6 % of the cesium content in the food; and within of 4 days it had eliminated more than half of ingested cesium. A compartmental model was proposed to explain the distribution of cesium in the compartments (water - alga and water - fish). Data obtained from the experiments of 137 Cs accumulation and elimination were applied in the Ana Comp Program. This program permits the compartmental analysis, and quantifies the cesium distribution from the sea-water to the organisms, and vice versa, through the transfer constants (k). The Ana Comp Program also allowed to calculate the dose that one would receive by the consumption of fish contaminated by cesium. Levels of 137 Cs from the global fallout in environmental samples, from Sao Sebastiao, northern coast of Sao Paulo, (where the 'Centro de Biologia Marinha da Universidade de Sao Paulo - CEBIMar - USP' is located), were verified. (author)

  15. The construction of next-generation matrices for compartmental epidemic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, O; Heesterbeek, J A P; Roberts, M G

    2010-06-06

    The basic reproduction number (0) is arguably the most important quantity in infectious disease epidemiology. The next-generation matrix (NGM) is the natural basis for the definition and calculation of (0) where finitely many different categories of individuals are recognized. We clear up confusion that has been around in the literature concerning the construction of this matrix, specifically for the most frequently used so-called compartmental models. We present a detailed easy recipe for the construction of the NGM from basic ingredients derived directly from the specifications of the model. We show that two related matrices exist which we define to be the NGM with large domain and the NGM with small domain. The three matrices together reflect the range of possibilities encountered in the literature for the characterization of (0). We show how they are connected and how their construction follows from the basic model ingredients, and establish that they have the same non-zero eigenvalues, the largest of which is the basic reproduction number (0). Although we present formal recipes based on linear algebra, we encourage the construction of the NGM by way of direct epidemiological reasoning, using the clear interpretation of the elements of the NGM and of the model ingredients. We present a selection of examples as a practical guide to our methods. In the appendix we present an elementary but complete proof that (0) defined as the dominant eigenvalue of the NGM for compartmental systems and the Malthusian parameter r, the real-time exponential growth rate in the early phase of an outbreak, are connected by the properties that (0) > 1 if and only if r > 0, and (0) = 1 if and only if r = 0.

  16. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-05-27

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6-C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 &C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  17. Effects of Air Stacking Maneuver on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Compartmental Volumes of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Antonio; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dourado-Júnior, Mario; Saturnino, Lailane; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2017-11-01

    To assess the acute effects of air stacking on cough peak flow (CPF) and chest wall compartmental volumes of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) versus healthy subjects positioned at 45° body inclination. Cross-sectional study with a matched-pair design. University hospital. Persons (N=24) with ALS (n=12) and age-matched healthy subjects (n=12). CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, chest wall vital capacity, chest wall tidal volume and operational volumes, breathing pattern, and percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume were measured by optoelectronic plethysmography. Compared with healthy subjects, significantly lower CPF (P=.007), chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001), chest wall vital capacity (P<.001), and chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) were found in subjects with ALS. Immediately after air stacking, CPF (P<.001) and chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001) significantly increased in both groups, with values returning to basal only in healthy subjects. After air stacking, the abdominal compartment (P=.004) was determined to be responsible for the inspired volume in subjects with ALS. Significantly higher chest wall vital capacity (P=.05) was observed in subjects with ALS 5 minutes after air stacking, with the rib cage compartment (P=.049) being responsible for volume change. No differences were found in chest wall vital capacity and compartmental volumes of healthy subjects. Chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) significantly increased during the protocol in the healthy subjects, mainly because of end-inspiratory (P<.001) and abdominal volumes (P=.008). No significant differences were observed in percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume and end-expiratory volume of both groups. No significant differences were found in chest wall tidal volume, operational volume, and breathing pattern in persons with ALS. Air stacking is effective in increasing CPF

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility and intracellular localization of Diplorickettsia massiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Geetha; Barry, Abdoulaye O; Ghigo, Eric; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2012-02-01

    Diplorickettsia massiliensis is an obligate intracellular bacterium from the Coxiellaceae family recently isolated from Ixodes ricinus ticks. The inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents were assessed by two different methods, immunofluorescence and Gimenez staining assay. Different markers (EEA1, Lamp-1, Cathepsin D, and LysoTracker Red DND99) were used to reveal the nature of the vacuole containing the bacterium. Ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and rifampin had MIC values of 2 lg mL(-1). We found that 4 lg mL(-1) of Doxycycline inhibited the growth of D. massiliensis strain. Surprisingly, D. massiliensis was resistant to chloramphenicol up to the concentration of 64 lg mL(-1). We found that penicillin G, ammonium chloride, gentamycin, omeprazole, bafilomycin A1, and chloroquine were not active against D. massiliensis. Studies performed with markers EEA1, Lamp-1, Cathepsin D, and LysoTracker Red DND99 showed that D. massiliensis is localized within an acidic compartment that is not an early phagosome, but a late phagosome or a phagolysosome. Gimenez staining stays a good method that will work with a very low number of bacteria and can be used to determine the MICs of new therapeutic antibiotics precisely. The resistance profile of D. massiliensis was found to be quite unusual for intracellular Gram-negative bacterium with marked resistance to chloramphenicol. Despite of localization in acidic compartment, pH-neutralizing agents do not significantly inhibit intracellular growth of bacterium. The results of these studies prove that antibiotic resistance does not depend on pH of vacuole. This pH-related mechanism seems not to play a contributing role in the overall resistance of D. massiliensis.

  19. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    and thereby improving the efficacy of the treatment. By implementing what is known as a DNA nuclear targeting sequence (DTS) strategy, we found that we could utilize the SCLC cells own transportation system thereby manipulating the cancer cells to bring our therapeutic plasmids from the cytoplasm......Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately...... has to be able to repeated systemic delivery of gene therapy to cancer cells in a both safe and efficient way. Non-viral delivery vectors fulfill many of these requirements except the latter. It is currently very difficult to systemically transport sufficient amounts of therapeutic DNA, by a non...

  20. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately...... has to be able to repeated systemic delivery of gene therapy to cancer cells in a both safe and efficient way. Non-viral delivery vectors fulfill many of these requirements except the latter. It is currently very difficult to systemically transport sufficient amounts of therapeutic DNA, by a non......-viral delivery system, to the nuclei of the SCLC cells. As a result, the gene therapy expression obtained is too low to have any clinical relevance. We have at the Department of Radiation Biology developed a transcriptionally targeting suicide gene therapy system which is built on a double stranded DNA plasmid...

  1. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqin Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications.

  2. Intracellular sequestration of zinc, cadmium and silver in Hebeloma mesophaeum and characterization of its metallothionein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sácký, Jan; Leonhardt, Tereza; Borovička, Jan; Gryndler, Milan; Briksí, Aleš; Kotrba, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Sequestration of intracellular heavy metals in eukaryotes involves compartmentalization and binding with cytosolic, cysteine-rich metallothionein (MT) peptides. We examined the roles of these processes in handling of zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and silver (Ag) in sporocarps and a metal-exposed extraradical mycelium of Hebeloma mesophaeum, the Zn-accumulating ectomycorrhizal (EM) species frequently associated with metal disturbed sites. Size exclusion chromatography revealed that the majority of Zn and Cd in the sporocarps and mycelium was contained in a low molecular mass fraction attributable to compartmentalized metal. The staining of hyphal cells with the Zn-specific Zinquin and Cd-specific Leadmium fluorescent tracers labeled Zn and Cd in small, punctuated vesicles and vacuoles, respectively. By contrast, the sporocarp and mycelium Ag was associated with cysteine-rich, 5-kDa peptides. The peptides of the same size were also identified in minor Zn and Cd complexes from the metal-exposed mycelium. We have further isolated and characterized HmMT1, HmMT2 and HmMT3 genes coding for different 5-kDa MTs of H. mesophaeum collected at a lead smelter site. Heterologous complementation assays in metal-sensitive yeast mutants indicated that HmMTs encode functional, metal-specific peptides: only HmMT1 was able to complement sensitivity to Zn; HmMT1 conferred higher tolerance to Cd and Cu than HmMT2 or HmMT3; and both HmMT2 and HmMT3, but not HmMT1, conferred increased tolerance to Ag. The presence of HmMT1 and HmMT3, but not HmMT2, was also confirmed in a H. mesophaeum isolate from an unpolluted site. Gene expression analysis in the extraradical mycelium of this isolate revealed that the transcription of HmMT1 was preferentially induced in the presence of Zn and Cd, while Ag was a stronger inducer of HmMT3. Altogether, these results improve our understanding of the handling of intracellular Zn, Cd and Ag in Hebeloma and represent the first evidence suggesting involvement of MTs

  3. Lyophilized kits of diamino dithiol compounds for labelling with 99m-technetium. Pharmacokinetics studies and distribution compartmental models of the related complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    1995-01-01

    The present work reflects the clinical interest for labelling diamino dithiol compounds with technetium-99m. Both chosen compounds, L,L-Ethylene dicysteine (L,L-EC) and L,L-Ethylene dicysteine diethyl esther (L,L-ECD) were obtained with relative good yield and characterized by IR and NMR. The study of labelling conditions with technetium-99m showed the influence of the type and mass of reducing agent as well as the pH on the formation of complexes with desired biological characteristics. Radiochemical purity was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lyophilised kits of L,L-EC and L,L-ECD for labelling with 99m Tc were obtained, with stability superior to 120 days, when stored under refrigeration, enabling the kits marketing. The ideal formulation of the kits as well as the use of liquid nitrogen in the freezing process, determined the lyophilization success. Distribution biological studies of the 99m Tc complexes were performed on mice by invasive method and on bigger animals by scintigraphic evaluation. Biological distribution studies of the complex 99m Tc-L,L-EC showed fast blood clearance, with the elimination of about 90% of the administered dose after 60 minutes, almost exclusively by the urinary system. The biological distribution results were adjusted to a three compartmental distribution model, as expected for a radiopharmaceutical designed to renal dynamic studies, with tubular elimination. The complex interaction with renal tubular receptors is related with structural characteristics of the compound, more specifically with the presence and location of polar groups. In comparison with 99m Tc-L,L-EC, biological studies of the complex 99m Tc -L,L-ECD showed different distribution aspects, despite some structural similarities. The presence of ethyl groups confers to the complex neutrality and lipophilicity. It cross the intact blood brain barrier and is retained in the brain for enough period

  4. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  5. High Intracellular Seed Train BiP Levels Correlate with Poor Production Culture Performance in CHO Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Meg; Tang, Danming; Wang, Szu-Han; Zhan, Dejin; Kiplinger, Karen; Pan, Shu; Jing, Yifeng; Shen, Amy; Ahyow, Patrick; Snedecor, Brad; Gawlitzek, Martin; Misaghi, Shahram

    2018-04-10

    Consistent cell culture performance is a prerequisite to ensure product quality consistency and achieve productivity goals for the manufacture of recombinant protein therapeutics, including monoclonal antibodies. Here we report a peculiar observation where high levels of intracellular BiP in seed train cultures are consistently predictive of poor cell culture performance in the subsequent inoculum and production cultures for a monoclonal antibody produced in CHO cells. Our investigations suggest that in this cell line the high intracellular BiP levels in the seed train are triggered by a slightly lower culture pH, which interferes with proper antibody folding and secretion. While the seed train culture does not display any obvious signs of the problem at slightly lower culture pH, inoculum trains and production cultures sourced from these low pH seed trains display significantly lower cell growth and cell size. High intracellular BiP levels may interfere with UPR signaling, thereby hampering a proper and timely UPR response in the production media. Studies of other problematic cell lines have shown a similar correlation between intracellular BiP accumulation and poor production performance. We believe intracellular BiP levels in seed train should hence be low in order to increase the success rate in production. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracellular pH-sensing using core/shell silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, B; Woolley, R; DeCourcey, J; Wencel, D; Loscher, C E; McDonagh, C

    2014-07-01

    An in-depth understanding of biochemical processes occurring within biological systems is key for early diagnosis of disease and identification of appropriate treatments. Nanobiophotonics offers huge potential benefits for intracellular diagnostics and therapeutics. Intracellular sensing using fluorescent nanoparticles is a potentially useful tool for real-time, in vivo monitoring of important cellular analytes. This work is focused on synthesis of optical chemical nanosensors for the quantitative analysis of pH inside living cells. The structure of the nanosensor comprises a biofriendly silica matrix with co-encapsulated Texas Red, acting as a reference dye, and pH-sensitive fluorescein isothiocyanate enabling ratiometric quantitative environmental detection. In order to obtain silica-based nanoparticles -70 nm in size, a modified sol-gel-based Stöber method was employed. The potential of these nanosensors for intracellular pH monitoring is demonstrated inside a live human embryonic kidney cell line whereby a significant change in fluorescence is observed when the cell pH is switched from acidic to basic. High loading efficiencies of nanoparticles into the cells is seen, with little effect on cell morphology even following extended nanoparticle exposure (up to 72 h). Nanoparticle incubation time and the fast response of the nanosensor (-2 s) make it a very powerful tool in monitoring the processes occurring within the cytosol.

  7. Intracellular transport: from physics to ... biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Aurélien; Cuvelier, Damien; Bassereau, Patricia; Goud, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    Considerable effort over the past three decades has allowed the identification of the protein families that control the cellular machinery responsible for intracellular transport within eukaryotic cells. These proteins are estimated to represent about 10-20% of the human "proteome." The complexity of intracellular transport makes useful the development of model membranes. We describe here experimental systems based on lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), which are attached to kinesin molecules. These systems give rise to thin membrane tubes and to complex tubular networks when incubated in vitro with microtubules and ATP. This type of assay, which mimics key events occurring during intracellular transport, allows physicists and biologists to understand how the unique mechanical properties of lipid membranes could be involved in the budding process, the sorting of cargo proteins and lipids, and the separation of the buds from a donor membrane.

  8. Micro- and nanotechnologies for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lee, Chun-Sing; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-11-01

    The majority of drugs and biomolecules need to be delivered into cells to be effective. However, the cell membranes, a biological barrier, strictly resist drugs or biomolecules entering cells, resulting in significantly reduced intracellular delivery efficiency. To overcome this barrier, a variety of intracellular delivery approaches including chemical and physical ways have been developed in recent years. In this review, the focus is on summarizing the nanomaterial routes involved in making use of a collection of receptors for the targeted delivery of drugs and biomolecules and the physical ways of applying micro- and nanotechnologies for high-throughput intracellular delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fluorescent nanothermometers for intracellular thermal sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Rosal, Blanca Del; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Maestro, Laura Martínez; Haro-González, Patricia; Solé, José García

    2014-05-01

    The importance of high-resolution intracellular thermal sensing and imaging in the field of modern biomedicine has boosted the development of novel nanosized fluorescent systems (fluorescent nanothermometers) as the next generation of probes for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. This thermal mapping requires fluorescent nanothermometers with good biocompatibility and high thermal sensitivity in order to obtain submicrometric and subdegree spatial and thermal resolutions, respectively. This review describes the different nanosized systems used up to now for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. We also include the later advances in molecular systems based on fluorescent proteins for thermal mapping. A critical overview of the state of the art and the future perspective is also included.

  10. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. © 2015 The Authors

  11. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  12. Role of intracellular infections in premature childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurabishvili, S; Mamamtavrishvili, I; Apridonidze, K; Shanidze, L

    2005-09-01

    Vaginal Smear taken by sterile Folkman spoon from 15 women with premature birth was studied. The study was performed by the direct immune fluorescence method with the luminescence microscope. We aimed to study the effect of intracellular infections: ureaplasma urealitikum, mycoplasma hominis, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus of I and II type and cytomegalovirus. Intracellular infections were detected in at about 82% of cases, which included mono infections with cytomegalovirus and in 9 cases in the form of bi-component associations. The obtained results may be interesting from the etiologic point of view of premature births in Georgian population.

  13. Acute Effects of Vitamin C Exposure On Colonic Crypts: Direct Modulation of pH Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Aldajani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Colorectal cancer is still considered a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. One potential way to improve survival besides detection is to look to new therapeutic agents that can be taken prophylactically to reduce the risk of tumor formation. For cancer cells to grow and invade, a higher (more alkaline intracellular pH must occur. We chose to examine a specific nutraceutical agent, which is Vitamin C. The acute effect of Vitamin C exposure on normal colonic crypts has been studied, providing some insight into how Vitamin C achieve its effect. Methods: Distal colon was excised from rats. Following enzymatic digestion single colonic crypts were isolated. Colonic crypts were loaded with pH sensitive dye to measure the intracellular pH changes. Crypts were exposed to solutions +/- Vitamin C. Results: 10 mM Vitamin C decreased Na+-dependent intracellular pH recovery. Vitamin C modulates SVCT leading to changes in proton extrusion. Vitamin C entry occurs via either SVCT2 on the basolateral membrane or by transcellular passive diffusion through tight junctions to the apical membrane and then active transport via SVCT1. Conclusion: Acute addition of Vitamin C to the basolateral membrane maintains low intracellular pH for a longer period which could halt and/or prevent tumor formation.

  14. Effect of medium pH and cultivation period on mycelial biomass, polysaccharide, and ligninolytic enzyme production by Ganoderma lucidum from Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukojević Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of initial medium pH on biomass, extracellular and intracellular polysaccharide, and ligninolytic enzyme production by Ganoderma lucidum was investigated at different pH values after 7 and 14 days of cultivation. Maximal production of biomass was recorded at pH 4.5 and 5.0; maximal production of extracellular polysaccharides at pH 7.0 and 3.0; and maximal production of intracellular polysaccharides at pH 7.0 and 5.5. Ligninolytic enzymes were not produced at any pH of the medium. Maximal biomass production was obtained on the 11th day of cultivation; maximal extracellular polysaccharide production on the 7th day; and maximal intracellular polysaccharide production on the 6th and 10th day of cultivation. .

  15. Intracellular sucrose communicates metabolic demand to sucrose transporters in developing pea cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchan; Chan, Katie; Wang, Trevor L; Hedley, Cliff L; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2009-01-01

    Mechanistic inter-relationships in sinks between sucrose compartmentation/metabolism and phloem unloading/translocation are poorly understood. Developing grain legume seeds provide tractable experimental systems to explore this question. Metabolic demand by cotyledons is communicated to phloem unloading and ultimately import by sucrose withdrawal from the seed apoplasmic space via a turgor-homeostat mechanism. What is unknown is how metabolic demand is communicated to cotyledon sucrose transporters responsible for withdrawing sucrose from the apoplasmic space. This question was explored here using a pea rugosus mutant (rrRbRb) compromised in starch biosynthesis compared with its wild-type counterpart (RRRbRb). Sucrose influx into cotyledons was found to account for 90% of developmental variations in their absolute growth and hence starch biosynthetic rates. Furthermore, rr and RR cotyledons shared identical response surfaces, indicating that control of transporter activity was likely to be similar for both lines. In this context, sucrose influx was correlated positively with expression of a sucrose/H(+) symporter (PsSUT1) and negatively with two sucrose facilitators (PsSUF1 and PsSUF4). Sucrose influx exhibited a negative curvilinear relationship with cotyledon concentrations of sucrose and hexoses. In contrast, the impact of intracellular sugars on transporter expression was transporter dependent, with expression of PsSUT1 inhibited, PsSUF1 unaffected, and PsSUF4 enhanced by sugars. Sugar supply to, and sugar concentrations of, RR cotyledons were manipulated using in vitro pod and cotyledon culture. Collectively the results obtained showed that intracellular sucrose was the physiologically active sugar signal that communicated metabolic demand to sucrose influx and this transport function was primarily determined by PsSUT1 regulated at the transcriptional level.

  16. Micro-compartmentalized cultivation of cyanobacteria for mutant screening using glass slides with highly water-repellent mark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayuri Arai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria have attracted attention for their potential to produce biofuels and biochemicals directly from CO2. Cell isolation by colony has conventionally been used for selecting target cells. Colony isolation methods require a significant amount of time for cultivation, and the colony-forming ratio is potentially low for cyanobacteria. Here, we overcome such limitations by encapsulating and culturing cells in droplets with an overlay of dodecane using glass slides printed with highly water-repellent mark. In the compartmentalized culture, the oil phase protects the small volume of culture medium from drying and increases the CO2 supply. Since a difference in cell growth was observed with and without the addition of antibiotics, this compartmentalized culture method could be a powerful tool for mutant selection.

  17. Subcellular Optogenetic Stimulation for Activity-Dependent Myelination of Axons in a Novel Microfluidic Compartmentalized Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Ung; Nag, Sudip; Blasiak, Agata; Jin, Yan; Thakor, Nitish; Yang, In Hong

    2016-10-19

    Myelination is governed by neuron-glia communication, which in turn is modulated by neural activity. The exact mechanisms remain elusive. We developed a novel in vitro optogenetic stimulation platform that facilitates subcellular activity induction in hundreds of neurons simultaneously. The light isolation was achieved by creating a biocompatible, light-absorbent, black microfluidic device integrated with a programmable, high-power LED array. The system was applied to a compartmentalized culture of primary neurons whose distal axons were interacting with oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Neural activity was induced along whole neurons or was constrained to cell bodies with proximal axons or distal axons only. All three modes of stimulation promoted oligodendrocyte differentiation and the myelination of axons as evidenced by a decrease in the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells followed by increases in the number of mature oligodendrocytes and myelin sheath fragments. These results demonstrated the potential of our novel optogenetic stimulation system for the global and focal induction of neural activity in vitro for studying axon myelination.

  18. Linear least squares compartmental-model-independent parameter identification in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.; Smith, G.T.; Hubner, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified approach involving linear-regression straight-line parameter fitting of dynamic scan data is developed for both specific and nonspecific models. Where compartmental-model topologies apply, the measured activity may be expressed in terms of: its integrals, plasma activity and plasma integrals -- all in a linear expression with macroparameters as coefficients. Multiple linear regression, as in spreadsheet software, determines parameters for best data fits. Positron emission tomography (PET)-acquired gray-matter images in a dynamic scan are analyzed: both by this method and by traditional iterative nonlinear least squares. Both patient and simulated data were used. Regression and traditional methods are in expected agreement. Monte-Carlo simulations evaluate parameter standard deviations, due to data noise, and much smaller noise-induced biases. Unique straight-line graphical displays permit visualizing data influences on various macroparameters as changes in slopes. Advantages of regression fitting are: simplicity, speed, ease of implementation in spreadsheet software, avoiding risks of convergence failures or false solutions in iterative least squares, and providing various visualizations of the uptake process by straight line graphical displays. Multiparameter model-independent analyses on lesser understood systems is also made possible

  19. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  20. The Use of Metaphors in Poetry and Organization Theory: Toward De-Compartmentalization of Organizational Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Yazdani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the time of Western modernity, knowledge is compartmentalized into differentiated fields. This has however not mitigated the influence of natural science model of theorizing on social sciences. As a result, the discipline of organization theory has grown without the influence of abstract, ephemeral and metaphysical fields such as religion, history, mystic philosophy, arts and literature. With the rise of organizational cultural studies and the emergence of symbolic-interpretive view of organizing during the last three or four decades, the trend is however gradually shifting. Corporate aesthetics is a field within organization theory which places value on the aesthetical aspects of managing and organizing. Taking the lead from corporate aesthetics, this paper highlights the link between Organization theory and literature (poetry, both English and Urdu. The linguistic and conceptual instrument of metaphors is isolated as the underpinning tool of this link. The role of metaphors in organization theory seems to have further importance because of the emergence of „social construction‟ and „sense making‟ views of organizations. The paper reinforces the views of contemporary writers of organization theory that the field draws from multiple and diverse disciplines by highlighting the link between organization theory and poetry through employing metaphoricity.

  1. Compartmental analysis and dosimetric aspects applied to cholesterol with 3H labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Adriano dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are one of the major reasons of death around the world according to the World Health Organization (WHO). It is well known that changes in levels of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the transport of cholesterol into the bloodstream, are associated with cardiovascular diseases. For this reason to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deep understanding about the diseases associated with these disorders. The main aim of this study is to provide a biokinetic model and estimate the radiometric doses for 3 H-Cholesterol, a radioactive tracer widely used in physiological and metabolic studies. The model was based on [Schwartz et al. 2004] about the distribution of cholesterol by the lipoprotein and gastrointestinal model [ICRP 30, 1979]. The doses distribution in compartments of the model and other organs and tissues of a standard adult described in [ICRP 106, 2008] was calculated using MIRD method (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) and compartmental analysis using the computer program Matlab®. The dose coefficients were estimated for a standard phantom man (73 kg) described in [ICRP 60, 1991]. The estimated doses for both model and for other organs were low and did not exceed the highest dose obtained that was in the upper large intestine, as 44,8 μGy these parameters will assist in ethics committee's opinions on the use of works that use the 3 H-cholesterol which radioactive tracer. (author)

  2. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  3. Fault assessment for basement reservoir compartmentalization: Case study at Northeast Betara gas field, South Sumatra Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risyad, M.; Suta, I. N.; Haris, A.

    2017-07-01

    Northeast Betara field is situated on the northern part of prolific South Sumatra Basin. It has produced gas from Lower Talang Akar Formation sandstone and over 90 wells have been drilled. A 3D seismic data was acquired in 2000 and reprocessed in 2012 to enhance the subsurface image. In 2013 an exploratory well NEB Base-1 was drilled and made gas and condensate discovery from the subsequent pre-tertiary basement which is confirmed as granite. The well proved fractured basement reservoir play on paleo high of the structure. The absence of full-diameter conventional core prompts well logs and seismic data analysis by using a workstation. Main methods for fracture prediction have been seismic attributes extraction and structural geology studies of basement provided by image logs on a few exploration wells. Ant tracking attribute is widely employed to image seismic event discontinuities due to extensive faults which generated the natural fractures. Delineations well NEB Base-2 was drilled on second paleo high and unfortunately, it did not find any gas indication from pre-tertiary basement target. Seismic structural interpretation and seismic attributes are conducted to image distribution of event discontinuities related to faults or fracture. We found that compartmentalization on basement involved old faults and both paleo high have undergone different structural history and stress character which resulted in separated fractures distribution.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of symmetric dinuclear complexes derived from a novel macrocyclic compartmental ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mruthyunjayaswamy, B.H.M.; Ijare, Omkar B.; Jadegoud, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A phenol based novel macrocyclic binucleating compartmental ligand N,N-bis(2,6-diiminomethyl-4-methyl-1-hydroxyphenyl)malonoyldicarboxamide was prepared. The complexes were prepared by template method by reacting 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol, malonoyl dihydrazide and the metal chlorides of Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II) in methanol to get a series of dinuclear complexes. The complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic susceptibility data, IR, UV-Vis, ESR, NMR and FAB mass spectral data. The dinuclear nature of the complexes was confirmed on the basis of elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility, ESR and FAB mass spectral data. The ligand as well as Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal properties against Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium oxysporum. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes reveal that these complexes exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling behavior due to the presence of two metal ions in close proximity. FAB mass spectrum of the Cu(II) complex gave a clear evidence for the dinuclear nature. The ligand and the complexes were found to be less active against the tested bacteria, but the ligand alone was found active against the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. (author)

  5. PGI2 synthesis and excretion in dog kidney: evidence for renal PG compartmentalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.M.; Nasjletti, A.; Heerdt, P.M.; Baer, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the concept of compartmentalization of renal prostaglandins (PG), we compared entry of PGE2 and the PGI2 metabolite 6-keto-PGF1 alpha into the renal vascular and tubular compartments, in sodium pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Renal arterial 6-keto-PGF1 alpha infusion increased both renal venous and urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha outflow. In contrast, renal arterial infusion of arachidonic acid (AA) or bradykinin (BK) increased renal venous 6-keto-PGF1 alpha outflow but had no effect on its urinary outflow. Both urinary and renal venous PGE2 outflows increased during AA or BK infusion. Ureteral stopped-flow studies revealed no postglomerular 6-keto-PGF1 alpha entry into tubular fluid. During renal arterial infusion of [3H]PGI2 and inulin, first-pass 3H clearance was 40% of inulin clearance; 35% of urinary 3H was 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and two other urinary metabolites were found. During renal arterial infusion of [3H]6-keto-PGF1 alpha and inulin, first-pass 3H clearance was 150% of inulin clearance; 75% of urinary 3H was 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and only one other metabolite was found. We conclude that in the dog PGE2 synthesized in the kidney enters directly into both the renal vascular and tubular compartments, but 6-keto-PGF1 alpha of renal origin enters directly into only the renal vascular compartment

  6. Technology Solutions Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. This research study by Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings demonstrated the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis. CARB demonstrated this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  7. Identification of HIV-1 genitourinary tract compartmentalization by analyzing the env gene sequences in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Maria; Carpenter, J Harris; Balakumaran, Bala; Cara, Andrea; Gao, Feng; Klotman, Mary E

    2015-08-24

    HIV-1 persists indefinitely in memory CD4 T cells and other long-lived cellular reservoirs despite antiretroviral therapy. Our group had previously demonstrated that HIV-1 can establish a productive infection in renal epithelial cells and that the kidney represents a separate compartment for HIV-1 replication. Here, to better understand the viruses in this unique site, we genetically characterized and compared the viruses in blood and urine specimens from 24 HIV-1 infected patients with detectable viremia. Blood and urine samples were obtained from 35 HIV-1 positive patients. Single-genome amplification was performed on HIV-1 env RNA and DNA isolated from urine supernatants and urine-derived cell pellets, respectively, as well as from plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell from the same individuals. Neighbor-joining trees were constructed under the Kimura 2-parameter model. We amplified and sequenced the full-length HIV-1 envelope (env) gene from 12 of the 24 individuals, indicating that 50% of the viremic HIV-1-positive patients had viral RNA in their urine. Phylogenetic analysis of the env sequences from four individuals with more than 15 urine-derived env sequences showed that the majority of the sequences from urine formed distinct cluster(s) independent of those peripheral blood mononuclear cell and plasma-derived sequences, consistent with viral compartmentalization in the urine. Our results suggest the presence of a distinct HIV compartment in the genitourinary tract.

  8. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Compartmentalized system with membrane-bound glycerol kinase. Activity and product distribution versus asymmetrical substrate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A; Merchie, B; Maïsterrena, B

    1991-03-15

    An artificial-membrane-bound glycerokinase chosen as a membrane-bound two-substrate-enzyme model has been used to separate two unequal compartments of a specially designed diffusion cell. An interesting feature is the asymmetry of compartments and the existence of a diffusion layer adjacent to only one face of the enzymic membrane. In such a situation the apparent enzyme activity and the product distribution in the system have been studied versus all the possibilities of combination of ATP and glycerol supply. Our approach has lead us to differentiate two different roles played by a diffusion layer adjacent to a permeable enzymic membrane. Depending on the spatial origin of the enzymic substrates (i.e. from which compartment they derive), the diffusion layer can play either the role of a passive additional resistance to that of the membrane or the role of a third compartment in which the reaction product can partially accumulate before splitting on both parts of the membrane. Our results mainly demonstrate that a membrane-bound enzyme activity and the resulting product distribution occurring in a compartmentalized system may be regulated by the cumulative effect due to the asymmetry in volumes of the compartments, the presence of a diffusion layer and the different possibilities of substrate supply. With the topography studied, which is close to that reported for many 'in vivo' situations, the product may be diffused lead to vectorial metabolism processes.

  10. Three-compartmental analysis of effects of D-propranolol on thyroid hormone kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Heijden, J.T.M.; Krenning, E.P.; Van Toor, H.; Hennemann, G.; Docter, R.

    1988-01-01

    Tracer thyroxine (T 4 ), 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T 3 ), and 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (rT 3 ) kinetic studies were performed in normal T 4 substituted subjects before and during oral D-propranolol treatment to determine whether changes in thyroid hormone metabolism in a propranolol-induced low-T 3 syndrome result from inhibition of 5'-deiodination or inhibition of transport of iodothyronines into tissues. Data were analyzed according to a three-compartmental model of distribution and metabolism. No changes were observed in size of the three T 4 compartments or in fractional and mass transfer rates of T 4 from plasma to the rapidly (REP) and slowly (SEP) equilibrating pools. Serum T 3 , free T 3 , T 3 plasma pool, T 3 mass transfer rate to REP and SEP, and the T 3 pool masses were all significantly decreased during propranolol to a similar extent as the T 3 plasma production rate (PR). It is concluded that the D-propranolol-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism, resulting in a low-T 3 syndrome, are due to inhibition of thyroid hormone deiodination. This is in contrast to the low-T 3 syndrome during caloric deprivation, which results from inhibition of transport of iodothyronines into the liver

  11. A comprehensive compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi, O; Kwok, K E; Gopaluni, R B; Knop, F K

    2016-09-01

    We have expanded a former compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. The former model was a detailed physiological model which considered the interactions of three substances, glucose, insulin and glucagon on regulating the blood sugar. The main drawback of the former model was its restriction on the route of glucose entrance to the body which was limited to the intravenous glucose injection. To handle the oral glucose intake, we have added a model of glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract to the former model to address the resultant variations of blood glucose concentrations following an oral glucose intake. Another model representing the incretins production in the gastrointestinal tract along with their hormonal effects on boosting pancreatic insulin production is also added to the former model. We have used two sets of clinical data obtained during oral glucose tolerance test and isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion test from both type 2 diabetic and healthy subjects to estimate the model parameters and to validate the model results. The estimation of model parameters is accomplished through solving a nonlinear optimization problem. The results show acceptable precision of the estimated model parameters and demonstrate the capability of the model in accurate prediction of the body response during the clinical studies.

  12. Hydraulic characteristics and their effects on working performance of compartmentalized anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun-yuan; Zheng, Kai; Xing, Ya-juan; Zheng, Ping

    2012-07-01

    The compartmentalized anaerobic reactor (CAR) is a patent novel high-rate reactor and shows a great potential for its application. The hydraulic characteristics and their effects on the working performance of CAR were investigated. The flow pattern tended to plug flow at normal organic loading rate (OLR) and completely mixed flow at high OLRs. The relation of hydraulic dead space (HDS or V(h)) with hydraulic loading rate (HLR or L) and biogas production rate (BPR or G) was V(h) = 3.75 L + 0.19 G-9.47. The hydraulic efficiency of CAR was good or near to good. Both HLR and BPR had significant effects on the hydraulic efficiency, but their effect became less at super-high OLR. They also had a slight influence on the effective volume ratios of CAR, but the influence of BPR almost disappeared at super-high OLR. The good working performance of CAR was ascribed to the improved reactor configuration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  14. Hepatitis C virus intracellular host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefhebber, Johanna Maaike Pieternella

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects about 170 million people worldwide causing a major healthcare problem. The virus lifecycle is greatly dependent on the host-cell for effective replication. In this thesis, the intracellular interactions of the non-structural HCV proteins with the host-cell were

  15. Enhanced production of intracellular dextran dextrinase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhanced production of intracellular dextran dextrinase from Gluconobacter oxydans using statistical experimental methods. ... the Plackett-Burman screening. A four-factor five-level central composite design (CCD) was chosen to explain the combined effects of the four medium constituents. The optimum medium consisted ...

  16. Biological synthesis and characterization of intracellular gold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... nontoxic, safe, biocompatible and environmentally acceptable. In the present study, Aspergillus fumigatus was used for the intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Stable nanoparticles were produced when an aqueous solution of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) was reduced by A. fumigatus biomass as the reducing agent ...

  17. Efficient intracellular delivery of native proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Astolfo, Diego S; Pagliero, Romina J; Pras, Anita; Karthaus, Wouter R; Clevers, Hans; Prasad, Vikram; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Rehmann, Holger; Geijsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein function is used to intervene in cellular processes but is often done indirectly by means of introducing DNA or mRNA encoding the effector protein. Thus far, direct intracellular delivery of proteins has remained challenging. We developed a method termed iTOP, for induced

  18. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... [Ganguli P, Chowdhury S, Bhowmick R and Sarkar RR 2015 Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: A ... cells and tissues by studying different signalling pathways, such as Hedgehog ...... Murray JD 2003 On the mechanochemical theory of biological.

  19. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    OpenAIRE

    Heng Giap Woon; Asolina Braun; Jane Li; Corey Smith; Jarem Edwards; Frederic Sierro; Carl G Feng; Rajiv Khanna; Michael Elliot; Andrew Bell; Andrew D Hislop; Stuart G Tangye; Alan B Rickinson; Thomas Gebhardt; Warwick J Britton

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that...

  20. Compartmental Schiff-base ligands--a rich library of tectons in designing magnetic and luminescent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruh, Marius

    2011-03-21

    The binuclear complexes (3d-3d, 3d-3d', 3d-4f) with compartmental ligands can efficiently act as tectons in crystal engineering. Various high nuclearity clusters and coordination polymers can be easily obtained by choosing the appropriate spacers. The main interest in such systems arises from their magnetic and photophysical properties. Moreover, 3d-3d' and 3d-4f complexes are useful precursors in designing heterotrimetallic systems with relevance in molecular magnetism.

  1. Optimizing Nanoelectrode Arrays for Scalable Intracellular Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2018-03-20

    Electrode technology for electrophysiology has a long history of innovation, with some decisive steps including the development of the voltage-clamp measurement technique by Hodgkin and Huxley in the 1940s and the invention of the patch clamp electrode by Neher and Sakmann in the 1970s. The high-precision intracellular recording enabled by the patch clamp electrode has since been a gold standard in studying the fundamental cellular processes underlying the electrical activities of neurons and other excitable cells. One logical next step would then be to parallelize these intracellular electrodes, since simultaneous intracellular recording from a large number of cells will benefit the study of complex neuronal networks and will increase the throughput of electrophysiological screening from basic neurobiology laboratories to the pharmaceutical industry. Patch clamp electrodes, however, are not built for parallelization; as for now, only ∼10 patch measurements in parallel are possible. It has long been envisioned that nanoscale electrodes may help meet this challenge. First, nanoscale electrodes were shown to enable intracellular access. Second, because their size scale is within the normal reach of the standard top-down fabrication, the nanoelectrodes can be scaled into a large array for parallelization. Third, such a nanoelectrode array can be monolithically integrated with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics to facilitate the large array operation and the recording of the signals from a massive number of cells. These are some of the central ideas that have motivated the research activity into nanoelectrode electrophysiology, and these past years have seen fruitful developments. This Account aims to synthesize these findings so as to provide a useful reference. Summing up from the recent studies, we will first elucidate the morphology and associated electrical properties of the interface between a nanoelectrode and a cellular membrane

  2. pH sensitive quantum dot-anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pKa ranging ˜5-8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated.

  3. pH sensitive quantum dot–anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pK a ranging ∼5–8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated

  4. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  5. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Intracellular Spies: Quantitative Real-Time Measurement of Intracellular Parameters In Vivo during Interaction of the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus with Human Monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mohebbi

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging (HSI is a technique based on the combination of classical spectroscopy and conventional digital image processing. It is also well suited for the biological assays and quantitative real-time analysis since it provides spectral and spatial data of samples. The method grants detailed information about a sample by recording the entire spectrum in each pixel of the whole image. We applied HSI to quantify the constituent pH variation in a single infected apoptotic monocyte as a model system. Previously, we showed that the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus conidia interfere with the acidification of phagolysosomes. Here, we extended this finding to monocytes and gained a more detailed analysis of this process. Our data indicate that melanised A. fumigatus conidia have the ability to interfere with apoptosis in human monocytes as they enable the apoptotic cell to recover from mitochondrial acidification and to continue with the cell cycle. We also showed that this ability of A. fumigatus is dependent on the presence of melanin, since a non-pigmented mutant did not stop the progression of apoptosis and consequently, the cell did not recover from the acidic pH. By conducting the current research based on the HSI, we could measure the intracellular pH in an apoptotic infected human monocyte and show the pattern of pH variation during 35 h of measurements. As a conclusion, we showed the importance of melanin for determining the fate of intracellular pH in a single apoptotic cell.

  6. Studies of labelling conditions for gentamicin with sup(99m)Tc. Complexation with ruthexium. Establishment of pharmacokinetics parameters through compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, O.G. de.

    1988-01-01

    Gentamicin sulphate is an aminoglycoside antibiotic type specifically used for treatment of infections produced by Gram-negative bacterias but at the other hand it presents ototoxic reactions as a serious side effect. The main purpose of labelling gentamicin with sup(99m)Tc was to obtain a radioactive tracer to carry out biological studies and compartmental analysis of this antibiotic. The optimal labelling conditions of gentamicin sulphate with sup(99m)Tc, using sodium pertechnetate solution eluted from a sup(99)Mo- sup(99m)Tc generator, were stablished by testing different masses of antibiotic, and reduction agent (SnCl sub(2).2H sub(2)O), and also different reaction time and final labelling PH. The same labelling procedure was used with Re (amonium perrenate) in order to obtain some semi-quantitative approximations of the chemical structure of the complex formed, since Re and Tc present similar chemical characteristics. In this way it is possible to suggest the role that the groups NH2 and C-O bonding of the gentamicin play in the complexation process. From the studies of the biological uptake of sup(99m)Tc-gentamicin sulphate in rats, the kidneys showed the highest affinity for the antibiotic. The maximum uptake was observed in 180 to 240 minutes followed by a decrease of it afterwards. For the dose and time used, no significative uptake by the auricular region was detected. Curve of plasma decay of sup(99m)Tc-gentamicin was obtained, and from the exponentials of each beanch of this curve respective half-lives were calculated. Furthermore the apparent volume of distribution was determined, and with the residual radioactivity in the body, the biological half-life and total clearance were obtained. The distribution of sup(99m)Tc-gentamicin in rats was set in a bi-compartments in addition to a retention one for the 24 hours time interval studied. (author)

  7. pH regulation in sensitive and multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Pedersen, S F; Kramhøft, B

    1998-01-01

    Maintenance and regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) was studied in wild-type Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EHR2) and five progressively daunorubicin-resistant, P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-expressing strains, the maximally resistant of which is EHR2/1.3. Steady-state pHi was similar in cells expressing...

  8. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  9. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  10. The Importance of Bank Storage in Supplying Baseflow to Rivers Flowing Through Compartmentalized, Alluvial Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Kimberly A.; Proffitt, Tiffany; Rowley, Taylor; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Montiel, Daniel; Dimova, Natasha; Tebo, Daniel; Miller, Gretchen R.

    2017-12-01

    As water grows scarcer in semiarid and arid regions around the world, new tools are needed to quantify fluxes of water and chemicals between aquifers and rivers. In this study, we quantify the volumetric flux of subsurface water to a 24 km reach of the Brazos River, a lowland river that meanders through the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer (BRAA), with 8 months of high-frequency differential gaging measurements using fixed gaging stations. Subsurface discharge sources were determined using natural tracers and End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA). During a 4 month river stage recession following a high stage event, subsurface discharge decreased from 50 m3/s to 0, releasing a total of 1.0 × 108 m3 of water. Subsurface discharge dried up even as the groundwater table at two locations in the BRAA located 300-500 m from the river remained ˜4 m higher than the river stage. Less than 4% of the water discharged from the subsurface during the prolonged recession period resembled the chemical fingerprint of the alluvial aquifer. Instead, the chemistry of this discharged water closely resembled high stage "event" river water. Together, these findings suggest that the river is well connected to rechargeable bank storage reservoirs but disconnected from the broader alluvial aquifer. The average width of discrete bank storage zones on each side of the river, identified with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), was approximately 1.5 km. In such highly compartmentalized aquifers, groundwater pumping is unlikely to impact the exchange between the river and the alluvium.

  11. Relationships between metal compartmentalization and biomarkers in earthworms exposed to field-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumelle, Léa; Hedde, Mickaël; Vandenbulcke, Franck; Lamy, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    Partitioning tissue metal concentration into subcellular compartments reflecting toxicologically available pools may provide good descriptors of the toxicological effects of metals on organisms. Here we investigated the relationships between internal compartmentalization of Cd, Pb and Zn and biomarker responses in a model soil organism: the earthworm. The aim of this study was to identify metal fractions reflecting the toxic pressure in an endogeic, naturally occurring earthworm species (Aporrectodea caliginosa) exposed to realistic field-contaminated soils. After a 21 days exposure experiment to 31 field-contaminated soils, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations in earthworms and in three subcellular fractions (cytosol, debris and granules) were quantified. Different biomarkers were measured: the expression of a metallothionein gene (mt), the activity of catalase (CAT) and of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and the protein, lipid and glycogen reserves. Biomarkers were further combined into an integrated biomarker index (IBR). The subcellular fractionation provided better predictors of biomarkers than the total internal contents hence supporting its use when assessing toxicological bioavailability of metals to earthworms. The most soluble internal pools of metals were not always the best predictors of biomarker responses. metallothionein expression responded to increasing concentrations of Cd in the insoluble fraction (debris + granules). Protein and glycogen contents were also mainly related to Cd and Pb in the insoluble fraction. On the other hand, GST activity was better explained by Pb in the cytosolic fraction. CAT activity and lipid contents variations were not related to metal subcellular distribution. The IBR was best explained by both soluble and insoluble fractions of Pb and Cd. This study further extends the scope of mt expression as a robust and specific biomarker in an ecologically representative earthworm species exposed to field-contaminated soils. The

  12. Ocular pharmacokinetics of a novel tetrahydroquinoline analog in rabbit: absorption, disposition, and non-compartmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamulapati, Chandrasena R; Schoenwald, Ronald D

    2011-12-01

    The pharmacologically active compound (33% reduction in rabbit intraocular pressure recovery rate assay) 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (MC4), which showed ocular hypotensive action and had optimum physicochemical properties, was characterized for its ocular absorption and distribution properties to better understand its in vivo potency in comparison with an inactive compound, N-ethyl-1,4-benzoxazine (MC1). Tissue distribution to various ocular tissues was determined after absorption by both corneal and conjunctival-scleral routes, following administration by the "topical infusion" technique. The rank order of penetration for both the compounds was cornea > iris-ciliary body > aqueous humor > lens > conjunctiva-sclera. Overall, MC4 had significantly higher concentrations than MC1 in various ocular tissues, but particularly in the iris-ciliary body, which is the site of action (biophase). Ocular disposition studies of the active compound MC4 were then conducted to characterize its elimination kinetics, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by non-compartmental and moment analysis using equations specific to "topical infusion" technique: first-order absorption rate constant, 4.1 × 10(-4) min(-1) ; elimination rate constant, 0.012 min(-1) ; mean residence time, 39.6 min; steady-state volume of distribution, 0.721 mL; and aqueous humor ocular clearance, 8.44 µL/min. The results were consistent with the conclusion that MC4 is well absorbed and distributed to the active site. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Comparison of total and compartmental gastric emptying and antral motility between healthy men and women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennink, R.; Van den Maegdenbergh, V.; Roo, M. de; Mortelmans, L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, UZ KU Leuven (Belgium); Peeters, M.; Geypens, B.; Rutgeerts, P. [Department of Gastroenterology, UZ KU Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of gender-related differences in gastric emptying. The purpose of this study was first, to confirm the difference in gastric emptying for both solid and liquid test meals between healthy men and women, and secondly, to investigate the origin of this difference by studying regional gastric emptying and antral motility. A standard gastric emptying test with additional compartmental (proximal and distal) evaluation and dynamic imaging of the antrum was performed in 20 healthy women studied during the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle, and in 31 healthy age-matched men. In concordance with previous reports, women had a longer half-emptying time for solids as compared to men (86.2{+-}5.1 vs 52.2{+-}2.9 min, P<0.05). In our observations this seemed to be related to a significantly prolonged lag phase and a significant decrease in terminal slope. Dynamical antral scintigraphy did not show a significant difference. The distribution of the test meal within the stomach (proximal vs distal) showed more early proximal retention in women as compared to men. The terminal slope of the distal somach was significantly lower in women. We did not observe a significant difference in gastric emptying of the liquid test meal between men and women. Gastric emptying of solids is significantly slower in healthy women as compared to men. These findings emphasise the importance of using different normal values for clinical and research purposes in gastric emptying scintigraphy in men and women. The difference could not be explained by antral motility alone. Increased proximal retention and a lower terminal emptying rate in women are observations to be further investigated. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 36 refs.

  14. Distribution and compartmental organization of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons in the mouse Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eGangarossa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens (NAc is a critical brain region involved in many reward-related behaviors. The NAc comprises major compartments the core and the shell, which encompass several subterritories. GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs constitute the output neurons of the NAc core and shell. While the functional organization of the NAc core outputs resembles the one described for the dorsal striatum, a simple classification of the NAc shell neurons has been difficult to define due to the complexity of the compartmental segregation of cells. We used a variety of BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP or the Cre-recombinase (Cre under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors and of adenosine A2a receptor to dissect the microanatomy of the NAc. Moreover, using various immunological markers we characterized in detail the distribution of MSNs in the mouse NAc. In addition, cell-type specific ERK phosphorylation in the NAc subterritories was analyzed following acute administration of SKF81297 (a D1R-like agonist, quinpirole (a D2R-like agonist, apomorphine (a non-selective DA receptor agonist, raclopride (a D2R-like antagonist, and psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine and d-amphetamine. Each drug generated a unique topography and cell-type specific activation of ERK in the NAc. Our results show the existence of marked differences in the receptor expression pattern and functional activation of MSNs within the shell subterritories. This study emphasizes the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the NAc, which will have to be considered in its further study.

  15. Application of oil gas-chromatography in reservoir compartmentalization in a mature Venezuelan oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, N.G.; Mompart, L. [Maraven, Caracas (Venezuela); Talukdar, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Gas chromatographic oil {open_quotes}fingerprinting{close_quotes} was successfully applied in a multidisciplinary production geology project by Maraven, S.A. to define the extent of vertical and lateral continuity of Eocene and Miocene sandstone reservoirs in the highly faulted Bloque I field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela. Seventy-five non-biodegraded oils (20{degrees}-37.4{degrees} API) were analyzed with gas chromatography. Fifty were produced from the Eocene Misoa C-4, C-5, C-6 or C-7 horizons, fifteen from the Miocene basal La Rosa and ten from multizone completions. Gas chromatographic and terpane and sterane biomarker data show that all of the oils are genetically related. They were expelled from a type II, Upper Cretaceous marine La Luna source rock at about 0.80-0.90% R{sub o} maturity. Alteration in the reservoir by gas stripping with or without subsequent light hydrocarbons mixing was observed in some oils. Detailed chromatographic comparisons among the oils shown by star plots and cluster analysis utilizing several naphthenic and aromatic peak height ratios, resulted in oil pool groupings. This led to finding previously unknown lateral and vertical reservoir communication and also helped in checking and updating the scaling character of faults. In the commingled oils, percentages of each contributing zone in the mixture were also determined giving Maraven engineers a proven, rapid and inexpensive tool for production allocation and reservoir management The oil pool compartmentalization defined by the geochemical fingerprinting is in very good agreement with the sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the reservoirs and helped evaluate the influence of structure in oil migration and trapping.

  16. Dendritic compartmentalization of chloride cotransporters underlies directional responses of starburst amacrine cells in retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrikov, Konstantin E; Nilson, James E; Dmitriev, Andrey V; Zucker, Charles L; Mangel, Stuart C

    2006-12-05

    The mechanisms in the retina that generate light responses selective for the direction of image motion remain unresolved. Recent evidence indicates that directionally selective light responses occur first in the retina in the dendrites of an interneuron, i.e., the starburst amacrine cell, and that these responses are highly sensitive to the activity of Na-K-2Cl (NKCC) and K-Cl (KCC), two types of chloride cotransporter that determine whether the neurotransmitter GABA depolarizes or hyperpolarizes neurons, respectively. We show here that selective blockade of the NKCC2 and KCC2 cotransporters located on starburst dendrites consistently hyperpolarized and depolarized the starburst cells, respectively, and greatly reduced or eliminated their directionally selective light responses. By mapping NKCC2 and KCC2 antibody staining on these dendrites, we further show that NKCC2 and KCC2 are preferentially located in the proximal and distal dendritic compartments, respectively. Finally, measurements of the GABA reversal potential in different starburst dendritic compartments indicate that the GABA reversal potential at the distal dendrite is more hyperpolarized than at the proximal dendrite due to KCC2 activity. These results thus demonstrate that the differential distribution of NKCC2 on the proximal dendrites and KCC2 on the distal dendrites of starburst cells results in a GABA-evoked depolarization and hyperpolarization at the NKCC2 and KCC2 compartments, respectively, and underlies the directionally selective light responses of the dendrites. The functional compartmentalization of interneuron dendrites may be an important means by which the nervous system encodes complex information at the subcellular level.

  17. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: distribution and rates of equilibration between nucleus and cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeds, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid nuclear isolation technique was adapted in order to examine the question of DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells. By using this method a reproducible proportion of the cellular nucleotides remained associated with the isolated nuclei. Examination, at several different cell densities, of exponentially growing HeLa cells showed that the nuclei contained a constant but distinct proportion of each dNTP. The nuclear dATP and dTTP concentrations were equal at all densities examined even though the dTTP pool was 150% of the dATP whole-cell pool. The nuclear portion of the whole-cell pools was roughly equal to the volume occupied by the nucleus. The nuclear-cytoplasmic dNTP pool distribution did not change throughout the cell cycle of synchronized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rates at which either radiolabeled cytidine or deoxycytidine equilibrated with the nuclear and whole-cell dCTP pools of G1 and S phase CHO cells were compared. Experiments comparing the labeling kinetics of 3 H-thymidine in G1, S phase, and exponentially growing cells revealed that the S phase dTTP pool equilibrated with exogenously added thymidine faster than the G1 phase pool. The rate of equilibration in exponentially growing cells appeared to be a combination of that seen in G1 and S phases. A linear rate of 3 H-thymidine incorporation into DNA occurred at the same rate in S phase and exponentially growing cells

  18. Retinol metabolism in rats with low vitamin A status: A compartmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, K.C.; Green, M.H.; Green, J.B.; Zech, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    A compartmental model was developed to describe the metabolism of vitamin A in rats with low vitamin A status maintained by a low dietary intake of vitamin A (approximately 2 micrograms retinol equivalents/day). After the IV bolus injection of [3H]retinol in its physiological transport complex, tracer and trace data were obtained from plasma, organs (liver, kidneys, small intestine, eyes, adrenals, testes, lungs, carcass), and tracer data were obtained from urine and feces. The dietary protocol developed for this study resulted in animals having plasma vitamin A levels less than 10 micrograms retinol/dl and total liver vitamin A levels of approximately 1 microgram retinol equivalent. Four compartments were used to model the plasma: one to describe retinol, one to describe the nonphysiological portion of the dose, and two to simulate polar metabolites derived from retinol. The liver required two compartments and a delay, the carcass (small intestine, eyes, adrenals, testes, and lungs, plus remaining carcass) required three compartments, and the kidneys required two. The model predicted a vitamin A utilization rate of 1.65 micrograms retinol equivalents/day with the urine and feces accounting for most of the output. The plasma retinol turnover rate was approximately 20 micrograms retinol equivalents/day; this was 12 times greater than the utilization rate. This indicated that, of the large amount of retinol moving through the plasma each day, less than 10% of this was actually being irreversibly utilized. Similarly, as compared to the whole-body utilization rate, there was a relatively high turnover rate of retinol in the kidneys, carcass, and liver, coupled with a high degree of recycling of vitamin A through these tissues. Of the total vitamin A that entered the liver from all sources including the diet, approximately 86% was mobilized into the plasma

  19. Barcoding of GPCR trafficking and signaling through the various trafficking roadmaps by compartmentalized signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Suleiman W; Nooh, Mohammed M

    2017-08-01

    Proper signaling by G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is dependent on the specific repertoire of transducing, enzymatic and regulatory kinases and phosphatases that shape its signaling output. Activation and signaling of the GPCR through its cognate G protein is impacted by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-imprinted "barcodes" that recruit β-arrestins to regulate subsequent desensitization, biased signaling and endocytosis of the GPCR. The outcome of agonist-internalized GPCR in endosomes is also regulated by sequence motifs or "barcodes" within the GPCR that mediate its recycling to the plasma membrane or retention and eventual degradation as well as its subsequent signaling in endosomes. Given the vast number of diverse sequences in GPCR, several trafficking mechanisms for endosomal GPCR have been described. The majority of recycling GPCR, are sorted out of endosomes in a "sequence-dependent pathway" anchored around a type-1 PDZ-binding module found in their C-tails. For a subset of these GPCR, a second "barcode" imprinted onto specific GPCR serine/threonine residues by compartmentalized kinase networks was required for their efficient recycling through the "sequence-dependent pathway". Mutating the serine/threonine residues involved, produced dramatic effects on GPCR trafficking, indicating that they played a major role in setting the trafficking itinerary of these GPCR. While endosomal SNX27, retromer/WASH complexes and actin were required for efficient sorting and budding of all these GPCR, additional proteins were required for GPCR sorting via the second "barcode". Here we will review recent developments in GPCR trafficking in general and the human β 1 -adrenergic receptor in particular across the various trafficking roadmaps. In addition, we will discuss the role of GPCR trafficking in regulating endosomal GPCR signaling, which promote biochemical and physiological effects that are distinct from those generated by the GPCR signal transduction

  20. cAMP Signaling Compartmentation: Adenylyl Cyclases as Anchors of Dynamic Signaling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy B; Agarwal, Shailesh R; Harvey, Robert D; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2018-04-01

    It is widely accepted that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized within cells. However, our knowledge of how receptors, cAMP signaling enzymes, effectors, and other key proteins form specific signaling complexes to regulate specific cell responses is limited. The multicomponent nature of these systems and the spatiotemporal dynamics involved as proteins interact and move within a cell make cAMP responses highly complex. Adenylyl cyclases, the enzymatic source of cAMP production, are key starting points for understanding cAMP compartments and defining the functional signaling complexes. Three basic elements are required to form a signaling compartment. First, a localized signal is generated by a G protein-coupled receptor paired to one or more of the nine different transmembrane adenylyl cyclase isoforms that generate the cAMP signal in the cytosol. The diffusion of cAMP is subsequently limited by several factors, including expression of any number of phosphodiesterases (of which there are 24 genes plus spice variants). Finally, signal response elements are differentially localized to respond to cAMP produced within each locale. A-kinase-anchoring proteins, of which there are 43 different isoforms, facilitate this by targeting protein kinase A to specific substrates. Thousands of potential combinations of these three elements are possible in any given cell type, making the characterization of cAMP signaling compartments daunting. This review will focus on what is known about how cells organize cAMP signaling components as well as identify the unknowns. We make an argument for adenylyl cyclases being central to the formation and maintenance of these signaling complexes. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Reduction of intracellular glutathione content and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roos-Verheij, W.S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular glutathione (GSH) content of HeLa, CHO and V79 cells was reduced by incubating the cells in growth medium containing buthionine sulphoximine or diethyl maleate (DEM). Clonogenicity, single-strand DNA breaks (ssb) and double-strand DNA breaks (dsb) were used as criteria for radiation-induced damage after X- or γ-irradiation. In survival experiments, DEM gave a slightly larger sensitization although it gave a smaller reduction of the intracellular GSH. In general, sensitization was larger for dsb than for ssb, also the reduction of the o.e.r. was generally larger for dsb than for ssb. This may be due to the higher dose rate in case of dsb experiments resulting in a higher rate of radiochemical oxygen consumption. In general, no effect was found on post-irradiation repair of ssb and dsb. (author)

  2. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  3. Reduction of intracellular glutathione content and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roos-Verheij, W.S.D.

    1986-05-01

    The intracellular glutathione (GSH) content in HeLa, CHO and V79 cells was reduced by incubating the cells in growth medium containing buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or diethyl maleate (DEM). Clonogenicity, single strand DNA breaks (ssb) and double strand DNA breaks (dsb) were used as criteria for radiation induced damage after X- or γ irradiation. In survival experiments DEM gave a slightly larger sensitization although it gave a smaller reduction of the intracellular GSH. In general, sensitization was larger for dsb than for ssb, also the reduction of the OER was generally larger for dsb than for ssb. This may be due to the higher dose rate in case of dsb experiments resulting in a higher rate of radiochemical oxygen consumption. In general, no effect was found on post-irradiation repair of ssb and dsb. (Auth.)

  4. The Effect of Environmental pH on Polymeric Transfection Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Han Chang; Samsonova, Olga; Kang, Sun-Woong; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    Although polymers, polyplexes, and cells are exposed to various extracellular and intracellular pH environments during polyplex preparation and polymeric transfection, the impact of environmental pH on polymeric transfection has not yet been investigated. This study aims to understand the influence of environmental pH on polymeric transfection by modulating the pH of the transfection medium or the culture medium. Changes in the extracellular pH affected polymeric transfection by way of complex factors such as pH-induced changes in polymer characteristics (e.g., proton buffering capacity and ionization), polyplex characteristics (e.g., size, surface charge, and decomplexation), and cellular characteristics (e.g., cellular uptake, cell cycle phases, and intracellular pH environment). Notably, acidic medium delayed endocytosis, endosomal acidification, cytosolic release, and decomplexation of polyplexes, thereby negatively affecting gene expression. However, acidic medium inhibited mitosis and reduced dilution of gene expression, resulting in increased transfection efficiency. Compared to pH 7.4 medium, acidic transfection medium reduced gene expression 1.6~7.7-fold whereas acidic culture medium enhanced transfection efficiency 2.1~2.6-fold. Polymeric transfection was affected more by the culture medium than by the transfection medium. Understanding the effects of extracellular pH during polymeric transfection may stimulate new strategies for determining effective and safe polymeric gene carriers. PMID:22130563

  5. Compartmental and dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labelled with 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Graciela Barrio

    2016-01-01

    The radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses MAbs conjugated to radionuclides α or β - emitters, both for therapy. Your treatment is based on the irradiation and tumor destruction, preserving the normal organs as the excess radiation. Radionuclides β - emitters as 131 I, 90 Y, 188 Re 177 Lu and are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and, when coupled with MAb and Anti-CD20 it is important mainly for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). 188 Re (E β = 2.12 MeV; E γ = 155 keV; t1/2 = 16.9 h) is an attractive radionuclide for RIT. However, 188 Re can be obtained from a radionuclide generator of 188 W/ 188 Re, commercially available, making it convenient for use in research and for clinical routine. The CR of IPEN has a project aimed at the production of radiopharmaceutical 188 Re-Anti-CD20, where the radionuclide can be obtained from a generator system 188 W/ 188 Re. With this proposed a study to assess the efficiency of this labeling technique for treatment in accordance compartmental and dosimetry. The objective of this study was to compare the marking of anti-CD20 MAb with 188 Re with the marking of the antibody with 90 Y, 131 I, 177 Lu and 99m Tc (for their similar chemical characteristics) and 211 At, 213 Bi, 223 Ra and 225 Ac); through the study of labeling techniques reported in literature, the proposal of a compartmental model to evaluate its pharmacokinetic and dosimetric studies, high interest for therapy. The result of the study shows a favorable kinetics for 188 Re, by their physical and chemical characteristics compared to the other evaluated radionuclides. The compartment proposed study describes the metabolism of 188 Reanti- CD20 through a compartment mammillary model, which by their pharmacokinetic analysis, performed compared to products emitters β -131 I-labeled anti CD20, 177 Luanti- CD20, the γ emitter 99m Tc-Anti-CD20 and α emitter 211 At-Anti-CD20 presented a elimination constant of approximately 0.05 hours

  6. Design and application of optical nanosensors for pH imaging in cell compartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Almdal, Kristoffer

    charged nanosensor in six different cell lines as well as the profile of a hyaluronic acid conjugated nanosensor tested in one cell line. After 24 h of incubations all sensors resided in compartments with low pH, recognized as lysosomes in HeLa cells, and responded with an increase in pH to the treatment......Measurements of pH in acidic cellular compartments of mammalian cells is important for our understanding of cell metabolism, and organelle acidification is an essential event in living cells especially in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway where pH is critical for cellular sorting of internalized...... material. Intracellular pH can be measured by the use of fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM), however, available methods for pH measurements in living cells are not optimal. Nanoparticle based optical sensor technology for quantification of metabolites in living cells has been developed over...

  7. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular delivery of such proteins, including human tumor suppressors (such as p53) (Brown et al., 2009) and exogenous tumor-killing proteins...vivo systems. Nature materials 11, 1038-1043. Chorny, M., Hood, E., Levy, R.J., and Muzykantov, V.R. (2010). Endothelial delivery of antioxidant ...for the ntracellular delivery of such proteins, including human umor suppressors [7] and exogenous tumor-killing proteins 8—10]), is attractive as a

  8. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  9. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  10. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-03-15

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB-PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities.

  11. Changes in Intracellular Water Following Hemodialysis Treatment Lead to Changes in Estimates of Lean Tissue Using Bioimpedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kateb, Sally; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) devices are being introduced into hemodialysis (HD) centers to aid determining normohydrated weight and also provide body composition assessment by estimating lean tissue mass index (LTMI) and fat mass index (FMI). BIA devices differ, with most using a 2-body compartmental model, which can be affected by hydration status, and as such for reliable measurements, these should be made postdialysis when patients are not overhydrated, which is inconvenient for both patients and staff. The development of BIA devices using a 3-compartmental body model, separately estimating normohydrated LTMI potentially, now offers the advantage of making reliable measurements of body composition prior to dialysis. We measured body composition predialysis and postdialysis in 50 HD patients using a 3-body compartment model BIA device. Although there were no statistically significant differences for the whole cohort in LTMI and FMI (pre and post HD-13.5 ± 4.2 vs 13.9 ± 4.7 kg/m(2), and 10.5 ± 5.5 vs 10.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) respectively), the correlation (r(2)) between pre and post HD was only 0.27 and 0.37 kg/m(2) respectively, with a mean ± SD bias on Bland-Altman analysis, -0.67 ± 4.25 and 0.33 ± 4.77 kg/m(2) respectively. Changes in intracellular water were associated with changes in LTMI (r(2) = 0.99, P < .001). Similarly, a fall in LTMI was associated with a corresponding increase in FMI (r(2) = -0.86, P < .001). In clinical practice, predialysis bioimpedance measurements are more convenient. However, for more reliable and reproducible assessments of nutrition status, we suggest that measurements of body composition should be made when patients are not overhydrated. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertation. Laura Baietto Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Giuseppe Banfo Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Francesca Dell'Acqua La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001   Primo Giovanni Embriaco I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001   Antonella Ghignoli Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Vito Loré Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Rosaria Stracuzzi Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001   Stefania Tamburini Le "portate" ecclesiastiche nel piviere di San Giovanni in Firenze nel 1427. Spunti per una riflessione sul patrimonio ecclesiastico della diocesi fiorentina,Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e informatica, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001

  13. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging spectroscopy in living cells with particular regards to pH dependence and electric field effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Nobuhiro; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Oshita, Shugo; Kinjo, Masataka

    2010-02-01

    Intracellular pH of a single cell can be imaged using FLIM of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The correlation between the intracellular pH and the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP in HeLa cells is explained by considering the pH-dependent acid-base equilibrium of the p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone structure of the chromophore of EGFP. The equilibrium between different forms of chromophore depends on pH of the medium. The equilibrium constant between the neutral and anionic EGFP chromophores in HeLa cells is obtained by analyzing the fluorescence lifetimes observed with different values of intracellular pH. The intracellular pH dependence has been also observed in HeLa cells where enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) is expressed. The pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of EYFP may result from the pH dependence of the molecular structure of the protein bound ionic form of EYFP or the conformational change of the EYFP chromophore induced by lowering pH. The fluorescence lifetimes both of EGFP and of EYFP are not uniform in the cell. At each pH, for example, the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP located near the outer cell membrane is shorter than those located inside cell, whereas the lifetime of EYFP located near the outer cell membrane is longer than those located inside the cell. These differences are ascribed to the different distribution of the electric field surrounding the fluorescent chromophore in the cells, implying that the chromophores of EGFP and EYFP show the opposite electric field effects of the fluorescence lifetime to each other. The fact that the fluorescence lifetime of BCECF in solution is different from the one observed at the same pH in intact cells of Halobacterium salinarum has been also ascribed to the local field produced by membranes in vivo.

  16. Intracellular ion monitoring using a gold-core polymer-shell nanosensor architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanca, S E; Cranfield, C G; Biskup, C [Biomolecular Photonics Group, University Hospital Jena, Teichgraben 8, 07743 Jena (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Centre for Electron Microscopy, University Hospital Jena, Ziegel-muehlenweg 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, W, E-mail: sarmiza.stanca@mti.uni-jena.de, E-mail: charles.cranfield@mti.uni-jena.de, E-mail: christoph.biskup@mti.uni-jena.de [Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2010-02-05

    In this study, we describe the design of new ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors, whose architecture is based on a gold core surrounded by a poly(vinyl alcohol)-polyacetal shell. To the gold core, indicator dyes and reference dyes are attached via a cysteine linker. This nanosensor architecture is flexible with regards to the number and types of fluorophore linkages possible. The robust poly(vinyl alcohol)-polyacetal shell protects the fluorophores linked to the core from non-specific interactions with intracellular proteins. The nanosensors developed in this way are biocompatible and can be easily incorporated into mammalian cells without the use of transfection agents. Here, we show the application of these nanosensors for intracellular pH and sodium ion measurements.

  17. A quasi-3D compartmental multi-scale approach to detect and quantify diseased regional lung constriction using spirometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ravishekar Ravi; Singh, Narender; Przekwas, Andrzej

    2018-02-27

    Spirometry is a widely used pulmonary function test to detect the airflow limitations associated with various obstructive lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and even obesity-related complications. These conditions arise due to the change in the airway resistance, alveolar compliance, and inductance values. Currently, zero-dimensional (0D) compartmental models are commonly used for calibrating these resistance, compliance, and inductance values, i.e., solving the inverse spirometry problem. However, 0D compartments cannot capture the flow physics or the spatial geometry effects, thereby generating a low fidelity prediction of the diseased lung. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models offer higher fidelity solutions but may be impractical for certain applications due to the duration of these simulations. Recently, a novel, fast-running and robust Quasi-3D (Q3D) wire model for simulating the airflow in the human lung airway was developed by CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC). This Q3D method preserved the 3D spatial nature of the airways and was favorably validated against CFD solutions. In the present study, the Q3D compartmental multi-scale combination is further improved to predict regional lung constriction of diseased lungs using spirometry data. The Q3D mesh is resolved up to the eighth lung airway generation. The remainder of the airways and the alveoli sections are modeled using a compartmental approach. The Q3D geometry is then split into different spatial sections and the resistance values in these regions are obtained using parameter inversion. Finally, the airway diameter values are then reduced to create the actual diseased lung model, corresponding to these resistance values. This diseased lung model can be used for patient-specific drug deposition predictions and the subsequent optimization of the orally inhaled drug products. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Stratigraphic and structural compartmentalization observed within a model turbidite reservoir, Pennsylvanian Upper Jackfork Formation, Hollywood Quarry, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatt, R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Jordan, D. [Arco International Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (United States); Stone, C. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Hollywood Quarry is a 600 x 375 x 150 ft. (200 x 125 x 50m) excavation which provides a window into lower Pennsylvanian Jackfork Formation turbidite stratal architecture along the crest of a faulted anticlinal fold. A variety of turbidite facies are present, including: (a) lenticular, channelized sandstones, pebbly sandstones, and conglomerates within shale, (b) laterally continuous, interbedded thin sandstones and shales, and (c) thicker, laterally continuous shales. The sandstone and shale layers we broken by several strike-slip and reverse faults, with vertical displacements of up to several feet. This combination of facies and structural elements has resulted in a highly compartmentalized stratigraphic interval, both horizontally and vertically, along the anticlinal flexure. The quarry can be considered analogous to a scaled-down turbidite reservoir. Outcrop gamma-ray logs, measured sections, a fault map, and cross sections provide a database which is analogous to what would be available for a subsurface reservoir. Thus, the quarry provides an ideal outdoor geologic and engineering {open_quote}workshop{close_quote} venue for visualizing the potential complexities of a combination structural-stratigraphic (turbidite) reservoir. Since all forms of compartmentalization are readily visible in the quarry, problems related to management of compartmentalized reservoirs can be discussed and analyzed first-hand while standing in the quarry, within this {open_quote}model reservoir{close_quotes}. These problems include: (a) the high degree of stratigraphic and structural complexity that may be encountered, even at close well spacings, (b) uncertainty in well log correlations and log-shape interpretations, (c) variations in volumetric calculations as a function of amount of data available, and (d) potential production problems associated with specific {open_quote}field{close_quote} development plans.

  19. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  20. Multistimulative Nanogels with Enhanced Thermosensitivity for Intracellular Therapeutic Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Zhou, Bingjie; Zhan, Yuan; Wang, Yifeng; Zhang, Yuhong; Li, Yulin; He, Peixin

    2017-11-15

    The flexibility and hydrophilicity of nanogels suggest their potential for the creation of nanocarriers with good colloidal stability and stimulative ability. In the present study, biocompatible AGP and AGPA nanogels with triple-stimulative properties (thermosensitivity, pH sensitivity, and redox sensitivity) were prepared by incorporating poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) or poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(NIPAM-AA)) into alginate (AG) emulsion nanodrops, followed by fixation with a disulfide-containing molecule (cystamine dihydrochloride (Cys)). Compared to AG/PNIPAM(AGP) nanogels, AG/P(NIPAM-AA) (AGPA) nanogels exhibited more sensitive volumetric expansion by switching the temperature from 40 to 25 °C under physiological medium. This expansion occurs because P(NIPAM-AA) with -COOH groups can be fixed inside the nanogels via chemical bonding with Cys, whereas PNIPAM was encapsulated in the nanogels through simple physical interactions with the AG matrix. AGPA nanogels carrying an anticancer drug tend to easily enter cells upon heating, thereby exerting toxicity through a cold shock and reverse thermally induced release of an anticancer drug. Upon internalization inside cells, the nanogels use the reducible and acidic intracellular environments to effectively release the drug to the nucleus to impart anticancer activity. These results demonstrate that multifunctional nanogels may be used as a general platform for therapeutic delivery.

  1. Compartmentalization of innate immune responses in the central nervous system during cryptococcal meningitis/HIV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Chang, Christina C; Durgiah, Raveshni; Omarjee, Saleha; Lim, Andrew; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Elliot, Julian H; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Lewin, Sharon R; French, Martyn A; Carr, William H

    2014-03-13

    The role of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of cryptococcal meningitis is unclear. We hypothesized that natural killer (NK) cell and monocyte responses show central nervous system (CNS) compartment-specific profiles, and are altered by antifungal therapy and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) during cryptococcal meningitis/HIV coinfection. Substudy of a prospective cohort study of adults with cryptococcal meningitis/HIV coinfection in Durban, South Africa. We used multiparametric flow cytometry to study compartmentalization of subsets, CD69 (a marker of activation), CXCR3 and CX3CR1 expression, and cytokine secretion of NK cells and monocytes in freshly collected blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at diagnosis (n = 23), completion of antifungal therapy induction (n = 19), and after a further 4 weeks of cART (n = 9). Relative to blood, CSF was enriched with CD56(bright) (immunoregulatory) NK cells (P = 0.0004). At enrolment, CXCR3 expression was more frequent among blood CD56(bright) than either blood CD56(dim) (P pos) NK-cell proportions nor CX3CR1(pos) NK-cell proportions. CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells were more activated in CSF than blood (P < 0.0001). Antifungal therapy induction reduced CD56(dim) NK-cell activation in CSF (P = 0.02). Activation of blood CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells was diminished following cART commencement (P < 0.0001, P = 0.03). Immunoregulatory NK cells in CSF tended to secrete higher levels of CXCL10 (P = 0.06) and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor α (P = 0.06) than blood immunoregulatory NK cells. CSF was enriched with nonclassical monocytes (P = 0.001), but antifungal therapy restored proportions of classical monocytes (P = 0.007). These results highlight CNS activation, trafficking, and function of NK cells and monocytes in cryptococcal meningitis/HIV and implicate immunoregulatory NK cells and proinflammatory monocytes as potential modulators of cryptococcal meningitis pathogenesis during HIV coinfection.

  2. Foliar or root exposures to smelter particles: Consequences for lead compartmentalization and speciation in plant leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, Eva [Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS, EcoLab, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); Géosciences Environnement Toulouse (GET), Observatoire Midi Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, IRD, 14 Avenue E. Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Dappe, Vincent [LASIR (UMR CNRS 8516), Université de Lille 1, Bât. C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Sarret, Géraldine [ISTerre, UMR 5275, Université Grenoble I, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Sobanska, Sophie [LASIR (UMR CNRS 8516), Université de Lille 1, Bât. C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Jakub; Stefaniak, Elżbieta Anna [Department of Chemistry, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Al. Kraśnicka 102, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Magnin, Valérie [ISTerre, UMR 5275, Université Grenoble I, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Ranieri, Vincent [CEA-INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dumat, Camille, E-mail: camille.dumat@ensat.fr [Université de Toulouse, INP, UPS, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS, EcoLab, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France)

    2014-04-01

    better assess the health risks involved. - Highlights: • Plants were exposed to factory process particles via atmosphere or soil transfer. • Pathways of Pb uptake were investigated using microscopy and spectroscopy. • Contrary to lettuces, Pb speciation has changed in the leaf surfaces of rye-grass. • In the case of root exposure, pyromorphite was formed in the leaves of rye-grass. • Pb compartmentalization and speciation depend on transfer way and plant species.

  3. A PhD is a PhD is a PhD

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrow, Deborah Anne

    2017-01-01

    A PhD is a PhD is a PhD is a practice-based project that interrogates the process of an artist undertaking PhD research under established criteria. It consists of an exegesis, an original screenplay, and a digital film made for online viewing, with images drawn from a range of documentaries and films found on YouTube. They have been dissected, re-assembled and then re-embedded to YouTube. The source material covers topics such as medicalization of madness, the conspicuous appropriation of uni...

  4. High resolution sequencing of hepatitis C virus reveals limited intra-hepatic compartmentalization in end-stage liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Ditte L; Tully, Damien C; Rowe, Ian A; Reynolds, Gary M; Bean, David J; Hu, Ke; Davis, Christopher; Wilhelm, Annika; Ogilvie, Colin B; Power, Karen A; Tarr, Alexander W; Kelly, Deirdre; Allen, Todd M; Balfe, Peter; McKeating, Jane A

    2017-01-01

    The high replication and mutation rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in a heterogeneous population of viral sequences in vivo. HCV replicates in the liver and infected hepatocytes occur as foci surrounded by uninfected cells that may promote compartmentalization of viral variants. Given recent reports showing interferon stimulated gene (ISG) expression in chronic hepatitis C, we hypothesized that local interferon responses may limit HCV replication and evolution. To investigate the spatial influence of liver architecture on viral replication we measured HCV RNA and ISG mRNA from each of the 8 Couinaud segments of the liver from 21 patients undergoing liver transplant. HCV RNA and ISG mRNA levels were comparable across all sites from an individual liver but showed up to 500-fold difference between patients. Importantly, there was no association between ISG and HCV RNA expression across all sites in the liver or plasma. Deep sequencing of HCV RNA isolated from the 8 hepatic sites from two subjects showed a similar distribution of viral quasispecies across the liver and uniform sequence diversity. Single genome amplification of HCV E1E2-envelope clones from 6 selected patients at 2 hepatic sites supported these data and showed no evidence for HCV compartmentalization. We found no differences between the hepatic and plasma viral quasispecies in all patients sampled. We conclude that in end-stage liver disease HCV RNA levels and the genetic pool of HCV envelope sequences are indistinguishable between distant sites in the liver and plasma, arguing against viral compartmentalization. HCV is an RNA virus that exists as a quasispecies of closely related genomes that are under continuous selection by host innate and adaptive immune responses and antiviral drug therapy. The primary site of HCV replication is the liver and yet our understanding of the spatial distribution of viral variants within the liver is limited. High resolution sequencing of HCV and monitoring of

  5. Majorization and extremal PH distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Q.M.; Zhang, H.; Vera, J.C.; Latouche, G.; Ramaswami, V.; Sethuraman, J.; Sigman, K.; Squillante, M.S.; Yao, D.D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents majorization results for PH generators. Based on the majorization results, bounds on the moments and Laplace–Stieltjes transforms of phase-type distributions are found. Exponential distributions and Coxian distributions are identified to be extremal PH distributions with

  6. Cancer: fundamentals behind pH targeting and the double-edged approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The highly regulated pH of cells and the less-regulated pH of the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) is the result of a delicate balance between metabolic processes and proton production, proton transportation, chemical buffering, and vascular removal of waste products. Malignant cells show a pronounced increase in metabolic processes where the 10- to 15-fold rise in glucose consumption is only the tip of the iceberg. Aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) is one of the hallmarks of cancer metabolism that implies excessive production of protons, which if stayed inside the cells would result in fatal intracellular acidosis (maintaining a strict acid–base balance is essential for the survival of eukaryotic cells). Malignant cells solve this problem by increasing mechanisms of proton transportation which expel the excess acidity. This allows cancer cells to keep a normal intracellular pH, or even overshooting this mechanism permits a slightly alkaline intracellular tendency. The proton excess expelled from malignant cells accumulates in the ECM, where chronic hypoxia and relative lack of enough blood vessels impede adequate proton clearance, thus creating an acidic microenvironment. This microenvironment is quite heterogeneous due to the tumor’s metabolic heterogeneity and variable degrees of hypoxia inside the tumor mass. The acidic environment (plus other necessary cellular modifications) stimulates migration and invasion and finally intravasation of malignant cells which eventually may result in metastasis. Targeting tumor pH may go in two directions: 1) increasing extracellular pH which should result in less migration, invasion, and metastasis; and 2) decreasing intracellular pH which may result in acidic stress and apoptosis. Both objectives seem achievable at the present state of the art with repurposed drugs. This hypothesis analyzes the altered pH of tumors and its implications for progression and metastasis and also possible repurposed drug combinations

  7. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. PMID:26488648

  8. Intracellular bacteria: the origin of dinoflagellate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E S

    1990-01-01

    Dinoflagellate blooms of the same species have been registered either as toxic or nontoxic and, in the latter case, toxicity may be of different types. A hypothesis has been formulated according to which the bacteria having in some way taken part in the toxin formation are either inside the dinoflagellate cell or in the nutritive liquid. The presence of intracellular bacteria in those microorganisms has been studied mainly in material from cultures, a few from the sea, and several strains were isolated from different species. Experiments with crossed inoculations have shown that the bacterial strain from Gonyaulax tamarensis caused the cells of some other species to become toxic. From nontoxic clonal cultures of Prorocentrum balticum, Glenodinium foliaceum, and Gyrodinium instriatum, after inoculation of that bacterial strain, cultures were obtained whose cell extracts showed the same kind of toxicity as G. tamarensis. No toxic action could be found in the extracts of the bacterial cells form the assayed strains. The interference of intracellular bacteria in the metabolism of dinoflagellates must be the main cause of their toxicity.

  9. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Walters, Jamie D; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2012-11-02

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  13. Intra- and extracellular pH of the brain in vivo studied by 31P-NMR during hyper- and hypocapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portman, M A; Lassen, N A; Cooper, T G

    1991-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the pH relationships among the extracellular, intracellular, and arterial blood compartments in the brain in vivo. Resolution of the extracellular monophosphate resonance peak from the intracellular peak in 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sheep...... brain with the calvarium intact enabled pH measurement in these respective compartments. Sheep were then subjected to both hyper- and hypoventilation, which resulted in a wide range of arterial PCO2 and pH values. Linear regression analysis of pH in these compartments yielded slopes of 0.56 +/- 0.......05 for extracellular pH (pHe) vs. arterial pH, 0.43 +/- 0.078 for intracellular pH (pHi) vs. pHe, and 0.23 +/- 0.056 for pHi vs. arterial pH. These data indicate that CO2 buffering capacity is different and decreases from the intracellular to extracellular to arterial blood compartments. Separation...

  14. Dynamics of intracellular ionic concentrations in single living cells using videomicrofluorometry: application to pHi variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallet, Pierre M.; Yassine, Mohamed; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of ions such as H+, Mg2+, Ca2+, is known to monitor the activity of many fundamental enzymes. Furthermore these ions are generally considered as intracellular messengers involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. Recent technological progress, occulting the physicochemical properties of the probe, led to the feeling that accurate data on microvolumes are instantly accessible. Unfortunately fluorescent probes are supposed to fill up conflicting requirements for ionic affinity, absence of fading and intracellular calibration. Such a situation generally precludes the use of the simplest methods of data acquisition and treatment. This paper is based on the use of microspectrofluorometry, resolution of single cell complex fluorescence spectrum, and videomicrofluorometry. The methods of data handling allow us to demonstrate that most of the problems met in intracellular calibration come from the fighting of cells against the modification of the extracellular pH. Using these techniques allows us to restrict the need of comparison between results in cuvettes and intracellular results to the physiological pH range. A consequence of such an approach is that the effect with time of known concentrations of amiloride and nigericin on pHi became accessible. Data is presented allowing us to get information on the behavior of the ionic channels and/or cation/H+ exchangers involved in the pHi regulation. Such a method leads the way to direct investigations and monitoring of the different processes of regulation of the intracellular ionic concentrations in different cell lines at the level of single cells. Using different specific modifiers (activators or blocking agents) and convenient specific fluorescent probes, the efficiency of such pathways is expected to be checked at will. Compared to the patch clamp techniques, the method can be extended to the study of pathways located on the inner cell membranes.

  15. pH and the cytotoxicity of fluoride in an animal cell culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgeland, K.; Leirskar, J.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism for the toxicity of silicate cement as observed in a cell culture system, the effects of pH and fluoride were tested on human epithelial cells (NCTC 2544). At pH 7.3, fluoride concentrations from 15 to 25 μg/ml (0.79 to 1.3 mM) had a growth inhibitory effect. When the pH of the incubation medium was lowered to the range 7.0 to 6.4, an enhanced cytotoxic effect of fluoride was found, and even at 5 to 10 μg/ml growth inhibition occurred. Concomitant with the enhanced cytotoxicity of fluoride at low pH, there was an increased utilization of glucose and formation of lactate. Upon lowering the pH of the incubation medium from 7.4 to 6.7, a twofold increase in the intracellular concentration of fluoride was found. (author)

  16. Gadoxetate-enhanced MR imaging and compartmental modelling to assess hepatocyte bidirectional transport function in rats with advanced liver fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraudeau, Celine; Leporq, Benjamin; Doblas, Sabrina [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Hopital Beaujon, Laboratory of Imaging Biomarkers, UMR1149 Inserm, Clichy (France); Lagadec, Matthieu; Daire, Jean-Luc; Van Beers, Bernard E. [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Hopital Beaujon, Laboratory of Imaging Biomarkers, UMR1149 Inserm, Clichy (France); Beaujon University Hospital Paris Nord, Department of Radiology, Clichy (France); Pastor, Catherine M. [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Hopital Beaujon, Laboratory of Imaging Biomarkers, UMR1149 Inserm, Clichy (France); Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Departement d' Imagerie et des Sciences de l' Information Medicale, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    Changes in the expression of hepatocyte membrane transporters in advanced fibrosis decrease the hepatic transport function of organic anions. The aim of our study was to assess if these changes can be evaluated with pharmacokinetic analysis of the hepatobiliary transport of the MR contrast agent gadoxetate. Dynamic gadoxetate-enhanced MRI was performed in 17 rats with advanced fibrosis and 8 normal rats. After deconvolution, hepatocyte three-compartmental analysis was performed to calculate the hepatocyte influx, biliary efflux and sinusoidal backflux rates. The expression of Oatp1a1, Mrp2 and Mrp3 organic anion membrane transporters was assessed with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In the rats with advanced fibrosis, the influx and efflux rates of gadoxetate decreased and the backflux rate increased significantly (p = 0.003, 0.041 and 0.010, respectively). Significant correlations were found between influx and Oatp1a1 expression (r = 0.78, p < 0.001), biliary efflux and Mrp2 (r = 0.50, p = 0.016) and sinusoidal backflux and Mrp3 (r = 0.61, p = 0.002). These results show that changes in the bidirectional organic anion hepatocyte transport function in rats with advanced liver fibrosis can be assessed with compartmental analysis of gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. (orig.)

  17. Inter-compartmental transport of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in South China: Implications for a regional risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huizhen; Wei, Yanli; Lydy, Michael J.; You, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic flux of an organophosphate and four pyrethroid pesticides was determined in an air-(soil)-water-sediment system based on monitoring data from Guangzhou, China. The total air–water flux, including air–water gaseous exchange and atmospheric deposition, showed deposition from air to water for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and cypermethrin, but volatilization for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin. The transport of the pesticides from overlying water to sediment suggested that sediment acted as a sink for the pesticides. Additionally, distinct annual atmospheric depositional fluxes between legacy and current-use pesticides suggested the role of consumer usage in their transport throughout the system. Finally, pesticide toxicity was estimated from annual air–water-sediment flux within an urban stream in Guangzhou. A dynamic flux-based risk assessment indicated that inter-compartmental transport of chlorpyrifos decreased its atmospheric exposure, but had little influence on its aquatic toxicity. Instead, water-to-sediment transport of pyrethroids increased their sediment toxicity, which was supported by previously reported toxicity data. - Highlights: • Transport fluxes of chlorpyrifos and pyrethroids were assessed in Guangzhou, China. • Sediment acted as a sink for chlorpyrifos and pyrethroids. • Air-to-water transport decreased the exposure risk of atmospheric chlorpyrifos. • Dynamic transport might increase the risk of pyrethroids in air and sediment. • Flux-based pesticide concentrations provide a way to estimate sediment toxicity. - Regional risk assessment could be improved by integrating dynamic flux information derived from inter-compartmental models

  18. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  19. FITC and Ru(phen3 2+ co-doped silica particles as visualized ratiometric pH indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and tris(1, 10-phenanathroline ruthenium ion (Ru(phen3 2+ co-doped silica particles as pH indicator was evaluated. The emission intensity ratios of the pH sensitive dye (FITC and the reference dye (Ru(phen3 2+ in the particles were dependent on pH of the environment. The changes in emission intensity ratios of the two dyes under different pH could be measured under single excitation wavelength and readily visualized by naked eye under a 365-nm UV lamp. In particular, such FITC and Ru(phen3 2+ co-doped silica particles were identified to show high sensitivity to pH around the pKa of FITC (6.4, making them be potential useful as visualized pH indicator for detection of intracellular pH micro-circumstance.

  20. Role of intracellular sodium overload in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, A J; Dalton, G R; Hancox, J C; Mitcheson, J S; Issberner, J; Bates, J A; Evans, S J; Howarth, F C; Hobai, I A; Jones, J V

    1997-06-01

    A number of clinical cardiac disorders may be associated with a rise of the intracellular Na concentration (Na(i)) in heart muscle. A clear example is digitalis toxicity, in which excessive inhibition of the Na/K pump causes the Na(i) concentration to become raised above the normal level. Especially in digitalis toxicity, but also in many other situations, the rise of Na(i) may be an important (or contributory) cause of increased cardiac arrhythmias. In this review, we consider the mechanisms by which a raised Na(i) may cause cardiac arrhythmias. First, we describe the factors that regulate Na(i), and we demonstrate that the equilibrium level of Na(i) is determined by a balance between Na entry into the cell, and Na extrusion from the cell. A number of mechanisms are responsible for Na entry into the cell, whereas the Na/K pump appears to be the main mechanism for Na extrusion. We then consider the processes by which an increased level of Nai might contribute to cardiac arrhythmias. A rise of Na(i) is well known to result in an increase of intracellular Ca, via the important and influential Na/Ca exchange mechanism in the cell membrane of cardiac muscle cells. A rise of intracellular Ca modulates the activity of a number of sarcolemmal ion channels and affects release of intracellular Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, all of which might be involved in causing arrhythmia. It is possible that the increase in contractile force that results from the rise of intracellular Ca may initiate or exacerbate arrhythmia, since this will increase wall stress and energy demands in the ventricle, and an increase in wall stress may be arrhythmogenic. In addition, the rise of Na(i) is anticipated to modulate directly a number of ion channels and to affect the regulation of intracellular pH, which also may be involved in causing arrhythmia. We also present experiments in this review, carried out on the working rat heart preparation, which suggest that a rise of Na(i) causes an

  1. Computer Modeling of Sand Transport on Mars Using a Compart-Mentalized Fluids Algorithm (CFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Stratton, D.

    1999-01-01

    of sand comminution on Mars. A multiple-grain transport model using just the equations of grain motion describing lift and drag is impossible to develop owing to stochastic effects --the very effects we wish to model. Also, unless we were to employ supercomputing techniques and extremely complex computer codes that could deal with millions of grains simultaneously, it would also be difficult to model grain transport if we attempted to consider every grain in motion. No existing computer models were found that satisfactorily used the equations of motion to arrive at transport flux numbers for the different populations of saltation and reptation. Modeling all the grains in a transport system was an intractable problem within our resources, and thus we developed what we believe to be a new modeling approach to simulating grain transport. The CFA deals with grain populations, but considers them to belong to various compartmentalized fluid units in the boundary layer. In this way, the model circumvents the multigrain problem by dealing primarily with the consequences of grain transport --momentum transfer between air and grains, which is the physical essence of a dynamic grain-fluid mixture. We thus chose to model the aeolian transport process as a superposition of fluids. These fluids include the air as well as particle populations of various properties. The prime property distinguishing these fluids is upward and downward grain motion. In a normal saltation trajectory, a grain's downwind velocity increases with time, so a rising grain will have a smaller downwind velocity than a failing grain. Because of this disparity in rising and falling grain proper-ties, it seemed appropriate to track these as two separate grain populations within the same physical space. The air itself can be considered a separate fluid superimposed within and interacting with the various grain-cloud "fluids". Additional informaiton is contained in the original.

  2. The cell cycle of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus with respect to cell compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuerst John A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemmata obscuriglobus is a distinctive member of the divergent phylum Planctomycetes, all known members of which are peptidoglycan-less bacteria with a shared compartmentalized cell structure and divide by a budding process. G. obscuriglobus in addition shares the unique feature that its nucleoid DNA is surrounded by an envelope consisting of two membranes forming an analogous structure to the membrane-bounded nucleoid of eukaryotes and therefore G. obscuriglobus forms a special model for cell biology. Draft genome data for G. obscuriglobus as well as complete genome sequences available so far for other planctomycetes indicate that the key bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is not present in these planctomycetes, so the cell division process in planctomycetes is of special comparative interest. The membrane-bounded nature of the nucleoid in G. obscuriglobus also suggests that special mechanisms for the distribution of this nuclear body to the bud and for distribution of chromosomal DNA might exist during division. It was therefore of interest to examine the cell division cycle in G. obscuriglobus and the process of nucleoid distribution and nuclear body formation during division in this planctomycete bacterium via light and electron microscopy. Results Using phase contrast and fluorescence light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the cell division cycle of G. obscuriglobus was determined. During the budding process, the bud was formed and developed in size from one point of the mother cell perimeter until separation. The matured daughter cell acted as a new mother cell and started its own budding cycle while the mother cell can itself initiate budding repeatedly. Fluorescence microscopy of DAPI-stained cells of G. obscuriglobus suggested that translocation of the nucleoid and formation of the bud did not occur at the same time. Confocal laser scanning light microscopy applied to cells stained for membranes as

  3. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube About PHA Contact Join Careers Store My Account Donate Patients About PH Diagnosis Treatments Newly ... areas © 2017 Pulmonary Hypertension Association. All Rights Reserved. Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube

  4. Urine pH test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine test Male urinary tract References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky ... and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc . 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 ...

  5. Programmable pH buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  6. PhEDEx Data Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  7. Controlled synthesis of 3D multi-compartmental particles with centrifuge-based microdroplet formation from a multi-barrelled capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kazuki; Onoe, Hiroaki; Takinoue, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2012-03-08

    Controlled synthesis of micro multi-compartmental particles using a centrifuge droplet shooting device (CDSD) is reported. Sodium alginate solutions introduced in a multi-barreled capillary form droplets at the capillary orifice under ultrahigh gravity and gelify in a CaCl(2) solution. The size, shape, and compartmentalization of the particles are controlled. Co-encapsulation of Jurkat cells and magnetic colloids into Janus particles is demonstrated. The Janus particles present sensitive reaction toward magnetic fields, while the viability of the encapsulated cells is 91%. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  9. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  10. Intracellular Na⁺ and cardiac metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Johannes; Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2013-08-01

    In heart failure, alterations of excitation-contraction underlie contractile dysfunction. One important defect is an elevation of the intracellular Na(+) concentration in cardiac myocytes ([Na(+)]i), which has an important impact on cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis. While elevated [Na(+)]i is thought to compensate for decreased Ca(2+) load of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), it yet negatively affects energy supply-and-demand matching and can even induce mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying these pathophysiological changes. The chain of events may constitute a vicious cycle of ion dysregulation, oxidative stress and energetic deficit, resembling characteristic cellular deficits that are considered key hallmarks of the failing heart. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanobodies: Chemical Functionalization Strategies and Intracellular Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Schneider, Anselm F. L.; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Nanobodies can be seen as next‐generation tools for the recognition and modulation of antigens that are inaccessible to conventional antibodies. Due to their compact structure and high stability, nanobodies see frequent usage in basic research, and their chemical functionalization opens the way towards promising diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this Review, central aspects of nanobody functionalization are presented, together with selected applications. While early conjugation strategies relied on the random modification of natural amino acids, more recent studies have focused on the site‐specific attachment of functional moieties. Such techniques include chemoenzymatic approaches, expressed protein ligation, and amber suppression in combination with bioorthogonal modification strategies. Recent applications range from sophisticated imaging and mass spectrometry to the delivery of nanobodies into living cells for the visualization and manipulation of intracellular antigens. PMID:28913971

  12. Fluorescent ratiometric pH indicator SypHer2: Applications in neuroscience and regenerative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, Mikhail E; Bogdanova, Yulia A; Ermakova, Galina V; Mishina, Natalia M; Ermakova, Yulia G; Nikitin, Evgeny S; Balaban, Pavel M; Okabe, Shigeo; Lukyanov, Sergey; Enikolopov, Grigori; Zaraisky, Andrey G; Belousov, Vsevolod V

    2015-11-01

    SypHer is a genetically encoded fluorescent pH-indicator with a ratiometric readout, suitable for measuring fast intracellular pH shifts. However, the relatively low brightness of the indicator limits its use. Here we designed a new version of pH-sensor called SypHer-2, which has up to three times brighter fluorescence in cultured mammalian cells compared to the SypHer. Using the new indicator we registered activity-associated pH oscillations in neuronal cell culture. We observed prominent transient neuronal cytoplasm acidification that occurs in parallel with calcium entry. Furthermore, we monitored pH in presynaptic and postsynaptic termini by targeting SypHer-2 directly to these compartments and revealed marked differences in pH dynamics between synaptic boutons and dendritic spines. Finally, we were able to reveal for the first time the intracellular pH drop that occurs within an extended region of the amputated tail of the Xenopus laevis tadpole before it begins to regenerate. SypHer2 is suitable for quantitative monitoring of pH in biological systems of different scales, from small cellular subcompartments to animal tissues in vivo. The new pH-sensor will help to investigate pH-dependent processes in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Autophagy in Intracellular Pathogen Nutrient Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eSteele

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Following entry into host cells intracellular pathogens must simultaneously evade innate host defense mechanisms and acquire energy and anabolic substrates from the nutrient-limited intracellular environment. Most of the potential intracellular nutrient sources are stored within complex macromolecules that are not immediately accessible by intracellular pathogens. To obtain nutrients for proliferation, intracellular pathogens must compete with the host cell for newly-imported simple nutrients or degrade host nutrient storage structures into their constituent components (fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. It is becoming increasingly evident that intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide variety of strategies to accomplish this task. One recurrent microbial strategy is to exploit host degradative processes that break down host macromolecules into simple nutrients that the microbe can use. Herein we focus on how a subset of bacterial, viral and eukaryotic pathogens leverage the host process of autophagy to acquire nutrients that support their growth within infected cells

  14. Controlling composition and color characteristics of Monascus pigments by pH and nitrogen sources in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kan; Song, Da; Chen, Gong; Pistolozzi, Marco; Wu, Zhenqiang; Quan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Submerged fermentations of Monascus anka were performed with different nitrogen sources at different pH in 3 L bioreactors. The results revealed that the Monascus pigments dominated by different color components (yellow pigments, orange pigments or red pigments) could be selectively produced through pH control and nitrogen source selection. A large amount of intracellular pigments dominated by orange pigments and a small amount of water-soluble extracellular yellow pigments were produced at low pH (pH 2.5 and 4.0), independently of the nitrogen source employed. At higher pH (pH 6.5), the role of the nitrogen source became more significant. In particular, when ammonium sulfate was used as nitrogen source, the intracellular pigments were dominated by red pigments with a small amount of yellow pigments. Conversely, when peptone was used, intracellular pigments were dominated by yellow pigments with a few red pigments derivatives. Neither the presence of peptone nor ammonium sulfate promoted the production of intracellular orange pigments while extracellular pigments with an orangish red color were observed in both cases, with a higher yield when peptone was used. Two-stage pH control fermentation was then performed to improve desirable pigments yield and further investigate the effect of pH and nitrogen sources on pigments composition. These results provide a useful strategy to produce Monascus pigments with different composition and different color characteristics. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca2+ and H+ Microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I.; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca2+ and H+ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot®565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca2+ or H+ probes. These ‘Rubies’ are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid) for H+ or Ca2+ sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca2+ and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging. PMID:26404317

  16. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca2+ and H+ Microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsu I. Zamaleeva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs or quantum dots (QDs are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca2+ and H+ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot®565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca2+ or H+ probes. These ‘Rubies’ are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxyethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid for H+ or Ca2+ sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca2+ and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging.

  17. Highly Efficient Intracellular Protein Delivery by Cationic Polyethyleneimine-Modified Gelatin Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Chou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular protein delivery may provide a safe and non-genome integrated strategy for targeting abnormal or specific cells for applications in cell reprogramming therapy. Thus, highly efficient intracellular functional protein delivery would be beneficial for protein drug discovery. In this study, we generated a cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI-modified gelatin nanoparticle and evaluated its intracellular protein delivery ability in vitro and in vivo. The experimental results showed that the PEI-modified gelatin nanoparticle had a zeta potential of approximately +60 mV and the particle size was approximately 135 nm. The particle was stable at different biological pH values and temperatures and high protein loading efficiency was observed. The fluorescent image results revealed that large numbers of particles were taken up into the mammalian cells and escaped from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. In a mouse C26 cell-xenograft cancer model, particles accumulated in cancer cells. In conclusion, the PEI-modified gelatin particle may provide a biodegradable and highly efficient protein delivery system for use in regenerative medicine and cancer therapy.

  18. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  19. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, P.O. Box 352120, Seattle, Washington 98195-2120 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs’ size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ∼20.1 ± 0.98 to ∼18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  20. The Slow Dynamics of Intracellular Sodium Concentration Increase the Time Window of Neuronal Integration: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaph Zylbertal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i are rarely taken into account when neuronal activity is examined. As opposed to Ca2+, [Na+]i dynamics are strongly affected by longitudinal diffusion, and therefore they are governed by the morphological structure of the neurons, in addition to the localization of influx and efflux mechanisms. Here, we examined [Na+]i dynamics and their effects on neuronal computation in three multi-compartmental neuronal models, representing three distinct cell types: accessory olfactory bulb (AOB mitral cells, cortical layer V pyramidal cells, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. We added [Na+]i as a state variable to these models, and allowed it to modulate the Na+ Nernst potential, the Na+-K+ pump current, and the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger rate. Our results indicate that in most cases [Na+]i dynamics are significantly slower than [Ca2+]i dynamics, and thus may exert a prolonged influence on neuronal computation in a neuronal type specific manner. We show that [Na+]i dynamics affect neuronal activity via three main processes: reduction of EPSP amplitude in repeatedly active synapses due to reduction of the Na+ Nernst potential; activity-dependent hyperpolarization due to increased activity of the Na+-K+ pump; specific tagging of active synapses by extended Ca2+ elevation, intensified by concurrent back-propagating action potentials or complex spikes. Thus, we conclude that [Na+]i dynamics should be considered whenever synaptic plasticity, extensive synaptic input, or bursting activity are examined.

  1. Levels, spatial variation and compartmentalization of trace elements in brown algae Cystoseira from marine protected areas of Crimea (Black Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsova, Alexandra V; Milchakova, Nataliya A; Frontasyeva, Marina V

    2015-08-15

    Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in "branches" than in "stems". Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of flux analysis to study the compartmentation of copper in copper tolerant and non-tolerant Mimulus guttatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Collins, J.C.; Thurman, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Compartmental flux analysis using 64 Cu and a stereological study have been used to estimate the amount and concentrations of copper in the cell wall, cytoplasm and vacuole of roots of non-tolerant and copper tolerant clones of Mimulus guttatus. The cell wall was not found to be a major site of copper accumulation in either clone compared with the cytoplasmic and vacuolar phases. The cytoplasmic concentrations of copper in the non-tolerant clone were significantly grater than those of the tolerant clone when grown in 2.0 and 10.0 μM external copper. At all external copper concentrations and for both clones vacuolar levels of copper were lower than the cytoplasmic ones. At 10.0 μM external copper the vacuolar concentrations of the non-tolerant clone were significantly higher than those of the tolerant clone

  3. Use of a Distributed, Finite-Volume, Hydrologic Model to Assess the Sensitivity of the Everglades to De-compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, S. U.

    2002-12-01

    The Everglades, the only remaining subtropical wilderness in the continental USA, is the home to a number of threatened and endangered species. Although the pre-drainage Everglades covered an area of approximately 11,048 km2, urbanization and farming have reduced its area by approximately 50%. The remaining Everglades has also changed as a result of drainage and compartmentalization by over 2,200 km of levees and canals. This area is also adversely affected by exotic species, nutrient enrichment, contaminants and altered freshwater flows. The \\8 billion Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan provides a ``framework and guide to restore, protect, and preserve the water resources of central and southern Florida, including the Everglades.'' The success of this project, one of the largest eco-system restoration projects in the world, depends heavily on our understanding of the quantity, quality, timing and distribution of South Florida's pre-drainage freshwater flow. Consequently, accurate hydrologic modeling is crucial for the restoration of the greater Everglades ecosystem. The Regional Simulation Model (RSM) developed by the South Florida Water Management District is currently being used to investigate the effect of de-compartmentalization on freshwater flow dynamics in parts of the remaining Everglades which includes the Everglades National Park and the Big Cypress National Preserve. The RSM is an implicit, finite-volume, continuous, distributed, integrated surface/ground-water model, capable of simulating one-dimensional canal flow and two-dimensional overland flow in arbitrarily shaped areas using a variable triangular mesh. It has physically-based formulations for the simulation of overland and groundwater flow, evapo-transpiration, infiltration, levee seepage, and canal and structure flows. It is capable of simulating features that are unique to South Florida such as low-relief topography, high water tables, saturation-excess runoff, depth

  4. The cellular and compartmental profile of mouse retinal glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ~P transferring kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Elda M; Johnson, Jerry E; Giddabasappa, Anand; Swaroop, Anand; Brooks, Matthew J; Sigel, Irena; Chaney, Shawnta Y; Fox, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    The homeostatic regulation of cellular ATP is achieved by the coordinated activity of ATP utilization, synthesis, and buffering. Glucose is the major substrate for ATP synthesis through glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), whereas intermediary metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle utilizes non-glucose-derived monocarboxylates, amino acids, and alpha ketoacids to support mitochondrial ATP and GTP synthesis. Cellular ATP is buffered by specialized equilibrium-driven high-energy phosphate (~P) transferring kinases. Our goals were twofold: 1) to characterize the gene expression, protein expression, and activity of key synthesizing and regulating enzymes of energy metabolism in the whole mouse retina, retinal compartments, and/or cells and 2) to provide an integrative analysis of the results related to function. mRNA expression data of energy-related genes were extracted from our whole retinal Affymetrix microarray data. Fixed-frozen retinas from adult C57BL/6N mice were used for immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and enzymatic histochemistry. The immunoreactivity levels of well-characterized antibodies, for all major retinal cells and their compartments, were obtained using our established semiquantitative confocal and imaging techniques. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase (COX) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was determined histochemically. The Affymetrix data revealed varied gene expression patterns of the ATP synthesizing and regulating enzymes found in the muscle, liver, and brain. Confocal studies showed differential cellular and compartmental distribution of isozymes involved in glucose, glutamate, glutamine, lactate, and creatine metabolism. The pattern and intensity of the antibodies and of the COX and LDH activity showed the high capacity of photoreceptors for aerobic glycolysis and OXPHOS. Competition assays with pyruvate revealed that LDH-5 was localized in the photoreceptor inner segments. The

  5. Modulation of cytokine release by differentiated CACO-2 cells in a compartmentalized coculture model with mononuclear leucocytes and nonpathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Haller, D.; Brinz, S.

    2004-01-01

    To further investigate the interaction between human mononuclear leucocytes [peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)] and enterocytes, the effect of a confluent layer of differentiated CACO-2 cells on cytokine kinetics during challenge with bacteria in a compartmentalized coculture model...... was investigated. Nonpathogenic Escherichia coli were added either to the apical or the basolateral compartment of this transwell cell culture system, the latter of which contained human leucocytes. The synthesis of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-12 was significantly suppressed by CACO-2...... cells when leucocytes were stimulated directly with bacteria. This suppression was not paralleled by changes in the production of IL-10, IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. When the bacteria were applied apically to the CACO-2 cell layer, the production of TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta, IL-8...

  6. Add-in macros for rapid and versatile calculation of non-compartmental pharmacokinetic parameters on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Sato, S; Wang, Y M; Horikoshi, I

    1996-06-01

    We developed a package of macro programs (named PK_MOMENT) to automatically calculate non-compartmental pharmacokinetic parameters on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. These macros include rigorous algorithms to execute moment calculations in a comprehensive manner. An optimum number of terminal data points for infinite-time extrapolation can be calculated with one of these macros so that automatic calculation of infinite moment parameters is possible. The moment calculation with PK_MOMENT provided satisfactory results using the hybrid (mixed linear-logarithmic) trapezoidal method rather than the conventional linear trapezoidal method. The macro-aided pharmacokinetic analyses turned out to be useful in that the macro-containing cells can be easily copied and pasted to analyze other data sets and that powerful tools of Excel can be utilized. The use of our macros will be significantly time-saving for routine pharmacokinetic analyses, considering that pharmacokinetic data are usually stored in a spreadsheet format, typically with Excel.

  7. On the contributions of photorespiration and compartmentation to the contrasting intramolecular 2H profiles of C3 and C4 plant sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youping Zhou; Benli Zhang; Hilary Stuart-Williams; Kliti Grice; Charles H. Hocart; Arthur Gessler; Zachary E. Kayler; Graham D. Farquhar

    2018-01-01

    Compartmentation of C4 photosynthetic biochemistry into bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (M) cells, and photorespiration in C3 plants is predicted to have hydrogen isotopic consequences for metabolites at both molecular and site-specific levels. Molecular-level evidence was recently reported (Zhou et al., 2016), but...

  8. Subcellular compartmentation of sugar signalling: Links among carbon cellular status, route of sucrolysis, sink-source allocation, and metabolic partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eTiessen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that both subcellular compartmentation and route of sucrolysis are important for plant development, growth, and yield. Signalling effects are dependent on the tissue, cell type and stage of development. Downstream effects also depend on the amount and localisation of hexoses and disaccharides. All enzymes of sucrose metabolism (e.g. invertase, hexokinase, fructokinase, sucrose synthase, and sucrose 6-phosphate synthase are not produced from single genes, but from paralogue families in plant genomes. Each paralogue has unique expression across plant organs and developmental stages. Multiple isoforms can be targeted to different cellular compartments (e.g. plastids, mitochondria, nuclei, and cytosol. Many of the key enzymes are regulated by post-transcriptional modifications and associate in multimeric protein complexes. Some isoforms have regulatory functions, either in addition to or in replacement of their catalytic activity. This explains why some isozymes are not redundant, but also complicates elucidation of their specific involvement in sugar signalling. The subcellular compartmentation of sucrose metabolism forces refinement of some of the paradigms of sugar signalling during physiological processes. For example, the catalytic and signalling functions of diverse paralogues needs to be more carefully analysed in the context of post-genomic biology. It is important to note that it is the differential localization of both the sugars themselves as well as the sugar-metabolizing enzymes that ultimately led to sugar signalling. We conclude that a combination of subcellular complexity and gene duplication/subfunctionalization gave rise to sugar signalling as a regulatory mechanism in plant cells.

  9. Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins (LDAPs) Are Required for the Dynamic Regulation of Neutral Lipid Compartmentation in Plant Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunjung; Wu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols in seeds, their biogenesis and function in nonseed tissues are poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-specific, lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) that are abundant components of LDs in nonseed cell types. Here, we characterized the three LDAPs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to gain insight to their targeting, assembly, and influence on LD function and dynamics. While all three LDAPs targeted specifically to the LD surface, truncation analysis of LDAP3 revealed that essentially the entire protein was required for LD localization. The association of LDAP3 with LDs was detergent sensitive, but the protein bound with similar affinity to synthetic liposomes of various phospholipid compositions, suggesting that other factors contributed to targeting specificity. Investigation of LD dynamics in leaves revealed that LD abundance was modulated during the diurnal cycle, and characterization of LDAP misexpression mutants indicated that all three LDAPs were important for this process. LD abundance was increased significantly during abiotic stress, and characterization of mutant lines revealed that LDAP1 and LDAP3 were required for the proper induction of LDs during heat and cold temperature stress, respectively. Furthermore, LDAP1 was required for proper neutral lipid compartmentalization and triacylglycerol degradation during postgerminative growth. Taken together, these studies reveal that LDAPs are required for the maintenance and regulation of LDs in plant cells and perform nonredundant functions in various physiological contexts, including stress response and postgerminative growth. PMID:26896396

  10. Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins (LDAPs) Are Required for the Dynamic Regulation of Neutral Lipid Compartmentation in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidda, Satinder K; Park, Sunjung; Pyc, Michal; Yurchenko, Olga; Cai, Yingqi; Wu, Peng; Andrews, David W; Chapman, Kent D; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells compartmentalize neutral lipids into organelles called lipid droplets (LDs), and while much is known about the role of LDs in storing triacylglycerols in seeds, their biogenesis and function in nonseed tissues are poorly understood. Recently, we identified a class of plant-specific, lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) that are abundant components of LDs in nonseed cell types. Here, we characterized the three LDAPs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to gain insight to their targeting, assembly, and influence on LD function and dynamics. While all three LDAPs targeted specifically to the LD surface, truncation analysis of LDAP3 revealed that essentially the entire protein was required for LD localization. The association of LDAP3 with LDs was detergent sensitive, but the protein bound with similar affinity to synthetic liposomes of various phospholipid compositions, suggesting that other factors contributed to targeting specificity. Investigation of LD dynamics in leaves revealed that LD abundance was modulated during the diurnal cycle, and characterization of LDAP misexpression mutants indicated that all three LDAPs were important for this process. LD abundance was increased significantly during abiotic stress, and characterization of mutant lines revealed that LDAP1 and LDAP3 were required for the proper induction of LDs during heat and cold temperature stress, respectively. Furthermore, LDAP1 was required for proper neutral lipid compartmentalization and triacylglycerol degradation during postgerminative growth. Taken together, these studies reveal that LDAPs are required for the maintenance and regulation of LDs in plant cells and perform nonredundant functions in various physiological contexts, including stress response and postgerminative growth. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Molecular analysis reveals high compartmentalization in aphid-primary parasitoid networks and low parasitoid sharing between crop and noncrop habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derocles, Stephane A P; Le Ralec, Anne; Besson, Mathilde M; Maret, Marion; Walton, Alan; Evans, Darren M; Plantegenest, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    The ecosystem service of insect pest regulation by natural enemies, such as primary parasitoids, may be enhanced by the presence of uncultivated, semi-natural habitats within agro-ecosystems, although quantifying such host-parasitoid interactions is difficult. Here, we use rRNA 16S gene sequencing to assess both the level of parasitism by Aphidiinae primary parasitoids and parasitoid identity on a large sample of aphids collected in cultivated and uncultivated agricultural habitats in Western France. We used these data to construct ecological networks to assess the level of compartmentalization between aphid and parasitoid food webs of cultivated and uncultivated habitats. We evaluated the extent to which uncultivated margins provided a resource for parasitoids shared between pest and nonpest aphids. We compared the observed quantitative ecological network described by our molecular approach to an empirical qualitative network based on aphid-parasitoid interactions from traditional rearing data found in the literature. We found that the molecular network was highly compartmentalized and that parasitoid sharing is relatively rare between aphids, especially between crop and noncrop compartments. Moreover, the few cases of putative shared generalist parasitoids were questionable and could be due to the lack of discrimination of cryptic species or from intraspecific host specialization. Our results suggest that apparent competition mediated by Aphidiinae parasitoids is probably rare in agricultural areas and that the contribution of field margins as a source of these biocontrol agents is much more limited than expected. Further large-scale (spatial and temporal) studies on other crops and noncrop habitats are needed to confirm this. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Giap Woon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV and Cytomegalovirus (CMV. How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2. Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections.

  13. In Vivo Determination of Organellar pH Using a Universal Wavelength-Based Confocal Microscopy Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodó, A. P.; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2012), s. 1-12 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/0718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN * YEAST COLONY DEVELOPMENT * INTRACELLULAR PH Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  14. Intracellular Shuttle: The Lactate Aerobic Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Santos de Oliveira Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactate is a highly dynamic metabolite that can be used as a fuel by several cells of the human body, particularly during physical exercise. Traditionally, it has been believed that the first step of lactate oxidation occurs in cytosol; however, this idea was recently challenged. A new hypothesis has been presented based on the fact that lactate-to-pyruvate conversion cannot occur in cytosol, because the LDH enzyme characteristics and cytosolic environment do not allow the reaction in this way. Instead, the Intracellular Lactate Shuttle hypothesis states that lactate first enters in mitochondria and only then is metabolized. In several tissues of the human body this idea is well accepted but is quite resistant in skeletal muscle. In this paper, we will present not only the studies which are protagonists in this discussion, but the potential mechanism by which this oxidation occurs and also a link between lactate and mitochondrial proliferation. This new perspective brings some implications and comes to change our understanding of the interaction between the energy systems, because the product of one serves as a substrate for the other.

  15. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  16. Intracellular recording from a spider vibration receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Ewald; Burger, Anna-M; Barth, Friedrich G

    2006-05-01

    The present study introduces a new preparation of a spider vibration receptor that allows intracellular recording of responses to natural mechanical or electrical stimulation of the associated mechanoreceptor cells. The spider vibration receptor is a lyriform slit sense organ made up of 21 cuticular slits located on the distal end of the metatarsus of each walking leg. The organ is stimulated when the tarsus receives substrate vibrations, which it transmits to the organ's cuticular structures, reducing the displacement to about one tenth due to geometrical reasons. Current clamp recording was used to record action potentials generated by electrical or mechanical stimuli. Square pulse stimulation identified two groups of sensory cells, the first being single-spike cells which generated only one or two action potentials and the second being multi-spike cells which produced bursts of action potentials. When the more natural mechanical sinusoidal stimulation was applied, differences in adaptation rate between the two cell types remained. In agreement with prior extracellular recordings, both cell types showed a decrease in the threshold tarsus deflection with increasing stimulus frequency. Off-responses to mechanical stimuli have also been seen in the metatarsal organ for the first time.

  17. LIPID SYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND SECRETION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olga; Stein, Yechezkiel

    1967-01-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating albino mice injected intravenously with 9, 10-oleic acid-3H or 9, 10-palmitic acid-3H, it has been shown that the labeled fatty acids are incorporated into mammary gland glycerides. The labeled lipid in the mammary gland 1 min after injection was in esterified form (> 95%), and the radioautographic reaction was seen over the rough endoplasmic reticulum and over lipid droplets, both intracellular and intraluminal. At 10–60 min after injection, the silver grains were concentrated predominantly over lipid droplets. There was no concentration of radioactivity over the granules in the Golgi apparatus, at any time interval studied. These findings were interpreted to indicate that after esterification of the fatty acid into glycerides in the rough endoplasmic reticulum an in situ aggregation of lipid occurs, with acquisition of droplet form. The release of the lipid into the lumen proceeds directly and not through the Golgi apparatus, in contradistinction to the mode of secretion of casein in the mammary gland or of lipoprotein in the liver. The presence of strands of endoplasmic reticulum attached to intraluminal lipid droplets provides a structural counterpart to the milk microsomes described in ruminant milk. PMID:6033535

  18. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  19. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  20. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells...

  1. Intracellular angiotensin II inhibits heterologous receptor stimulated Ca2+ entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Brailoiu, E; Henning, RH; Deelman, LE; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies show that angiotensin II (AngII) can act from within the cell, possibly via intracellular receptors pharmacologically different from typical plasma membrane AngII receptors. The role of this intracellular AngII (AngII(i)) is unclear. Besides direct effects of AngII(i) on cellular

  2. Development of bacterial cell-based system for intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of bacterial cell-based system for intracellular antioxidant activity screening assay using green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter. ... Both strains demonstrated that quercetin and α- tocopherol exhibited the most potent and significant antioxidant activity with more than 60% reduction of intracellular superoxide ...

  3. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinu, Farhana R; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Aggio, Raphael

    2017-10-23

    Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  4. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts,

  5. Tenkir Bonger , (PhD)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Users

    ... of the market. As the ultimate beneficiaries of the process, employers, students and patients can enrich the institutional package. 1 Tenkir Bonger PhD(London). Professor of Development Economics &Dean of the School os Business Studies Mulunguhi. University, Kabwe ZAMBIA e-mail:kelemu70agere@yahoo.com ...

  6. Subtype-specific, bi-component inhibition of SK channels by low internal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peitersen, Torben; Jespersen, Thomas; Jorgensen, Nanna K

    2006-01-01

    The effects of low intracellular pH (pH(i) 6.4) on cloned small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel currents of all three subtypes (SK1, SK2, and SK3) were investigated in HEK293 cells using the patch-clamp technique. In 400 nM internal Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, all subtypes were inhibited by pH(i) 6...

  7. Production of citrinin-free Monascus pigments by submerged culture at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Biyu; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Zhilong; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-02-05

    Microbial fermentation of citrinin-free Monascus pigments is of great interest to meet the demand of food safety. In the present work, the effect of various nitrogen sources, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), cornmeal, (NH4)₂SO₄, and NaNO₃, on Monascus fermentation was examined under different initial pH conditions. The composition of Monascus pigments and the final pH of fermentation broth after Monascus fermentation were determined. It was found that nitrogen source was directly related to the final pH and the final pH regulated the composition of Monascus pigments and the biosynthesis of citrinin. Thus, an ideal nitrogen source can be selected to control the final pH and then the citrinin biosynthesis. Citrinin-free orange pigments were produced at extremely low initial pH in the medium with (NH4)₂SO₄ or MSG as nitrogen source. No citrinin biosynthesis at extremely low pH was further confirmed by extractive fermentation of intracellular pigments in the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution. This is the first report about the production of citrinin-free Monascus pigments at extremely low pH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phg1/TM9 proteins control intracellular killing of bacteria by determining cellular levels of the Kil1 sulfotransferase in Dictyostelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Le Coadic

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum has largely been used to study phagocytosis and intracellular killing of bacteria. Previous studies have shown that Phg1A, Kil1 and Kil2 proteins are necessary for efficient intracellular killing of Klebsiella bacteria. Here we show that in phg1a KO cells, cellular levels of lysosomal glycosidases and lysozyme are decreased, and lysosomal pH is increased. Surprisingly, overexpression of Kil1 restores efficient killing in phg1a KO cells without correcting these lysosomal anomalies. Conversely, kil1 KO cells are defective for killing, but their enzymatic content and lysosomal pH are indistinguishable from WT cells. The killing defect of phg1a KO cells can be accounted for by the observation that in these cells the stability and the cellular amount of Kil1 are markedly reduced. Since Kil1 is the only sulfotransferase characterized in Dictyostelium, an (unidentified sulfated factor, defective in both phg1a and kil1 KO cells, may play a key role in intracellular killing of Klebsiella bacteria. In addition, Phg1B plays a redundant role with Phg1A in controlling cellular amounts of Kil1 and intracellular killing. Finally, cellular levels of Kil1 are unaffected in kil2 KO cells, and Kil1 overexpression does not correct the killing defect of kil2 KO cells, suggesting that Kil2 plays a distinct role in intracellular killing.

  9. Harmonization of the intracellular cytokine staining assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welters, Marij J P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Letsch, Anne; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-07-01

    Active immunotherapy for cancer is an accepted treatment modality aiming to reinforce the T-cell response to cancer. T-cell reactivity is measured by various assays and used to guide the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. However, data obtained across different institutions may vary substantially making comparative conclusions difficult. The Cancer Immunotherapy Immunoguiding Program organizes proficiency panels to identify key parameters influencing the outcome of commonly used T-cell assays followed by harmonization. Our successes with IFNγ-ELISPOT and peptide HLA multimer analysis have led to the current study on intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). We report the results of three successive panels evaluating this assay. At the beginning, 3 out of 9 participants (33 %) were able to detect >6 out of 8 known virus-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. This increased to 50 % of the laboratories in the second phase. The reported percentages of cytokine-producing T cells by the different laboratories were highly variable with coefficients of variation well over 60 %. Variability could partially be explained by protocol-related differences in background cytokine production leading to sub-optimal signal-to-noise ratios. The large number of protocol variables prohibited identification of prime guidelines to harmonize the assays. In addition, the gating strategy used to identify reactive T cells had a major impact on assay outcome. Subsequent harmonization of the gating strategy considerably reduced the variability within the group of participants. In conclusion, we propose that first basic guidelines should be applied for gating in ICS experiments before harmonizing assay protocol variables.

  10. Variations of internal pH in typical Italian sourdough yeasts during co-fermentation with lactobacilli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valmorri, Sara; Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Jespersen, Lene

    2008-01-01

    The effects of organic acids (lactic and acetic) and extracellular pH (pHex) on the intracellular pH (pHi) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida milleri during co-fermentation with lactobacilli were investigated by using Fluorescence-Ratio-Imaging-Microscopy (FRIM). Yeasts were grown in a system...... that partially mimics sourdough composition, using individual fermentation and combinations with lactic acid bacteria. Fermentations were carried out at 25 C for 22 h at an initial pH of 5.3. The two yeast species grew equally well during the co-fermentations with lactobacilli. Our results reveal large...

  11. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  12. Dichloroacetate induced intracellular acidification in glioblastoma: in vivo detection using AACID-CEST MRI at 9.4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albatany, Mohammed; Li, Alex; Meakin, Susan; Bartha, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pH i ) plays an important role in the maintenance of normal cell function, and is maintained within a narrow range by the activity of transporters located at the plasma membrane. Modulation of tumor pH i may influence proliferation, apoptosis, chemotherapy resistance, and thermosensitivity. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a novel MRI contrast mechanism that is dependent on cellular pH. Amine and amide concentration-independent detection (AACID) is a recently developed CEST contrast method that is intracellular pH (pH i ) weighted. Dichloroacetate (DCA) can alter tumor pH i by inhibiting the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase causing reduced lactate (increasing pH i ), or by decreasing the expression of monocarboxylate transporters and vacuolar ATPase leading to reduced pH i . Since the net in vivo effect of DCA on pH i is difficult to predict, the purpose of this study was to quantify the magnitude of acute pH i change in glioblastoma after a single DCA injection using AACID CEST MRI. Using a 9.4T MRI scanner, CEST spectra were acquired in six mice approximately 14 days after implanting 10 5 U87 human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells in the brain, before and after intravenous injection of DCA (dose: 200 mg/kg). Three additional mice received only phosphate buffered saline (PBS) injection and were studied as controls. Repeated measures t test was used to compare AACID changes in tumor and contralateral tissue regions of interest. One hour after DCA injection there was a significant increase in tumor AACID level by 0.04 ± 0.01 corresponding to a 0.16 decrease in pH i , and no change in AACID in contralateral tissue. Inspection of AACID maps following PBS injection showed no differences. The use of DCA to induce a tumor specific pH change detectable by AACID CEST MRI is consistent with previous studies that have shown similar effects for lonidamine and topiramate. This study demonstrates that a single dose of DCA can be

  13. Functional conservation study of polarity protein Crumbs intracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi-ping; Cao, Hao-wei; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Dan-dan; Huang, Juan

    2017-01-20

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) plays key roles in the establishing and maintaining cell apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells by determining the apical plasma membrane identity. Although its intracellular domain contains only 37 amino acids, it is absolutely essential for its function. In Drosophila, mutations in this intracellular domain result in severe defects in epithelial polarity and abnormal embryonic development. The intracellular domain of Crb shows high homology across species from Drosophila to Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. However, the intracellular domains of the two Crb proteins in C. elegans are rather divergent from those of Drosophila and mammals, raising the question on whether the function of the intracellular domain of the Crb protein is conserved in C. elegans. Using genomic engineering approach, we replaced the intracellular domain of the Drosophila Crb with that of C. elegans Crb2 (CeCrb2), which has extremely low homology with those from the Crb proteins of Drosophila and mammals. Surprisingly, substituting the intracellular domain of Drosophila Crb with that of CeCrb2 did not cause any abnormalities in development of the Drosophila embryo, in terms of expression and localization of Crb and other polarity proteins and apical-basal polarity in embryonic epithelial cells. Our results support the notion that despite their extensive sequence variations, all functionally critical amino acid residues and motifs of the intercellular domain of Crb proteins are fully conserved between Drosophila and C. elegans.

  14. Engineering the Intracellular Micro- and Nano-environment via Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter

    Single cells, despite being the base unit of living organisms, possess a high degree of hierarchical structure and functional compartmentalization. This complexity exists for good reason: cells must respond efficiently and effectively to its surrounding environment by differentiating, moving, interacting, and more in order to survive or inhabit its role in the larger biological system. At the core of these responses is cellular decision-making. Cells process cues internally and externally from the environment and effect intracellular asymmetry in biochemistry and structure in order to carry out the proper biological responses. Functionalized magnetic particles have shown to be a powerful tool in interacting with biological matter, through either cell or biomolecule sorting, and the activation of biological processes. This dissertation reports on techniques utilizing manipulated magnetic nanoparticles (internalized by cells) to spatially and temporally localize intracellular cues, and examines the resulting asymmetry in biological processes generated by our methods. We first examine patterned micromagnetic elements as a simple strategy of rapidly manipulating magnetic nanoparticles throughout the intracellular space. Silicon or silicon dioxide substrates form the base for electroplated NiFe rods, which are repeated at varying size and pitch. A planarizing resin, initially SU-8, is used as the substrate layer for cellular adhesion. We demonstrate that through the manipulations of a simple external magnet, these micro-fabricated substrates can mediate rapid (under 2 s) and precise (submicron), reversible translation of magnetic nanoparticles through cellular space. Seeding cells on substrates composed of these elements allows simultaneous control of ensembles of nanoparticles over thousands of cells at a time. We believe such substrates could form the basis of magnetically based tools for the activation of biological matter. We further utilize these strategies to

  15. Contribution of pH, diprotonated phosphate and potassium for the reflex increase in blood pressure during handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Madsen, P; Nielsen, H B

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of pH, diprotonated phosphate (H2PO4-) and potassium (K+) for the reflex increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during exercise was evaluated in seven subjects during rhythmic handgrip at 15 and 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), followed by post-exercise muscle...... to the exercise levels. Analysis of each variable as a predictor of blood pressure indicated that only the intracellular pH and diprotonated phosphate were linked to the reflex elevation of blood pressure during handgrip....... and the venous [H2PO4-] from 0.14 +/- 0.01 to 0.16 +/- 0.01 mmol L-1 (P low intracellular and venous pH. However, venous [K+] and [H2PO4-] returned to the level at rest. During 30% MVC handgrip, MAP rose to 130 +/- 3 mm...

  16. Chapter 4: Multitasking by exploitation of intracellular transport functions the many faces of FcRn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2009-01-01

    The MHC Class I-related receptor, FcRn, transports antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class within and across a diverse array of different cell types. Through this transport, FcRn serves multiple roles throughout adult life that extend well beyond its earlier defined function of transcytosing IgGs from mother to offspring. These roles include the maintenance of IgG levels and the delivery of antigen in the form of immune complexes to degradative compartments within cells. Recent studies have led to significant advances in knowledge of the intracellular trafficking of FcRn and (engineered) IgGs at both the molecular and cellular levels. The engineering of FcRn-IgG (or Fc) interactions to generate antibodies of increased longevity represents an area of active interest, particularly in the light of the expanding use of antibodies in therapy. The strict pH dependence of FcRn-IgG interactions, with binding at pH 6 that becomes essentially undetectable as near neutral pH is approached, is essential for efficient transport. The requirement for retention of low affinity at near neutral pH increases the complexity of engineering antibodies for increased half-life. Conversely, engineered IgGs that have gained significant binding for FcRn at this pH can be potent inhibitors of FcRn that lower endogenous IgG levels and have multiple potential uses as therapeutics. In addition, molecular studies of FcRn-IgG interactions indicate that mice have limitations as preclinical models for FcRn function, primarily due to cross-species differences in FcRn-binding specificity.

  17. Multitasking by Exploitation of Intracellular Transport Functions: The Many Faces of FcRn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2015-01-01

    The MHC Class I-related receptor, FcRn, transports antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class within and across a diverse array of different cell types. Through this transport, FcRn serves multiple roles throughout adult life that extend well beyond its earlier defined function of transcytosing IgGs from mother to offspring. These roles include the maintenance of IgG levels and the delivery of antigen in the form of immune complexes to degradative compartments within cells. Recent studies have led to significant advances in knowledge of the intracellular trafficking of FcRn and (engineered) IgGs at both the molecular and cellular levels. The engineering of FcRn–IgG (or Fc) interactions to generate antibodies of increased longevity represents an area of active interest, particularly in the light of the expanding use of antibodies in therapy. The strict pH dependence of FcRn–IgG interactions, with binding at pH 6 that becomes essentially undetectable as near neutral pH is approached, is essential for efficient transport. The requirement for retention of low affinity at near neutral pH increases the complexity of engineering antibodies for increased half-life. Conversely, engineered IgGs that have gained significant binding for FcRn at this pH can be potent inhibitors of FcRn that lower endogenous IgG levels and have multiple potential uses as therapeutics. In addition, molecular studies of FcRn–IgG interactions indicate that mice have limitations as preclinical models for FcRn function, primarily due to cross-species differences in FcRn-binding specificity. PMID:19755184

  18. New perspective in the assessment of total intracellular magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Sargenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is essential for biological processes, but its cellular homeostasis has not been thoroughly elucidated, mainly because of the inadequacy of the available techniques to map intracellular Mg distribution. Recently, particular interest has been raised by a new family of fluorescent probes, diaza-18-crown-hydroxyquinoline (DCHQ, that shows remarkably high affinity and specificity for Mg, thus permitting the detection of the total intracellular Mg. The data obtained by fluori- metric and cytofluorimetric assays performed with DCHQ5 are in good agreement with atomic absorption spectroscopy, confirming that DCHQ5 probe allows both qualitative and quantitative determination of total intracellular Mg.

  19. Peptidases Compartmentalized to the Ascaris suum Intestinal Lumen and Apical Intestinal Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode intestine is a tissue of interest for developing new methods of therapy and control of parasitic nematodes. However, biological details of intestinal cell functions remain obscure, as do the proteins and molecular functions located on the apical intestinal membrane (AIM), and within the intestinal lumen (IL) of nematodes. Accordingly, methods were developed to gain a comprehensive identification of peptidases that function in the intestinal tract of adult female Ascaris suum. Peptidase activity was detected in multiple fractions of the A. suum intestine under pH conditions ranging from 5.0 to 8.0. Peptidase class inhibitors were used to characterize these activities. The fractions included whole lysates, membrane enriched fractions, and physiological- and 4 molar urea-perfusates of the intestinal lumen. Concanavalin A (ConA) was confirmed to bind to the AIM, and intestinal proteins affinity isolated on ConA-beads were compared to proteins from membrane and perfusate fractions by mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine predicted peptidases were identified including aspartic, cysteine, and serine peptidases, and an unexpectedly high number (16) of metallopeptidases. Many of these proteins co-localized to multiple fractions, providing independent support for localization to specific intestinal compartments, including the IL and AIM. This unique perfusion model produced the most comprehensive view of likely digestive peptidases that function in these intestinal compartments of A. suum, or any nematode. This model offers a means to directly determine functions of these proteins in the A. suum intestine and, more generally, deduce the wide array functions that exist in these cellular compartments of the nematode intestine. PMID:25569475

  20. Intracellular proton conductance of the hepatitis C virus p7 protein and its contribution to infectious virus production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann L Wozniak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV p7 protein is critical for virus production and an attractive antiviral target. p7 is an ion channel when reconstituted in artificial lipid bilayers, but channel function has not been demonstrated in vivo and it is unknown whether p7 channel activity plays a critical role in virus production. To evaluate the contribution of p7 to organelle pH regulation and virus production, we incorporated a fluorescent pH sensor within native, intracellular vesicles in the presence or absence of p7 expression. p7 increased proton (H(+ conductance in vesicles and was able to rapidly equilibrate H(+ gradients. This conductance was blocked by the viroporin inhibitors amantadine, rimantadine and hexamethylene amiloride. Fluorescence microscopy using pH indicators in live cells showed that both HCV infection and expression of p7 from replicon RNAs reduced the number of highly acidic (pH<5 vesicles and increased lysosomal pH from 4.5 to 6.0. These effects were not present in uninfected cells, sub-genomic replicon cells not expressing p7, or cells electroporated with viral RNA containing a channel-inactive p7 point mutation. The acidification inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, partially restored virus production to cells electroporated with viral RNA containing the channel inactive mutation, yet did not in cells containing p7-deleted RNA. Expression of influenza M2 protein also complemented the p7 mutant, confirming a requirement for H(+ channel activity in virus production. Accordingly, exposure to acid pH rendered intracellular HCV particles non-infectious, whereas the infectivity of extracellular virions was acid stable and unaffected by incubation at low pH, further demonstrating a key requirement for p7-induced loss of acidification. We conclude that p7 functions as a H(+ permeation pathway, acting to prevent acidification in otherwise acidic intracellular compartments. This loss of acidification is required for productive HCV infection

  1. Compartmental and noncompartmental modeling of 13C-lycopene absorption, isomerization, and distribution kinetics in healthy adults123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy E; Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Kenneth M; Grainger, Elizabeth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Novotny, Janet A; Erdman, John W; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lycopene, which is a red carotenoid in tomatoes, has been hypothesized to mediate disease-preventive effects associated with tomato consumption. Lycopene is consumed primarily as the all-trans geometric isomer in foods, whereas human plasma and tissues show greater proportions of cis isomers. Objective: With the use of compartmental modeling and stable isotope technology, we determined whether endogenous all-trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization or isomeric-bioavailability differences underlie the greater proportion of lycopene cis isomers in human tissues than in tomato foods. Design: Healthy men (n = 4) and women (n = 4) consumed 13C-lycopene (10.2 mg; 82% all-trans and 18% cis), and plasma was collected over 28 d. Unlabeled and 13C-labeled total lycopene and lycopene-isomer plasma concentrations, which were measured with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, were fit to a 7-compartment model. Results: Subjects absorbed a mean ± SEM of 23% ± 6% of the lycopene. The proportion of plasma cis-13C-lycopene isomers increased over time, and all-trans had a shorter half-life than that of cis isomers (5.3 ± 0.3 and 8.8 ± 0.6 d, respectively; P isomerization was predictive of plasma 13C and unlabeled cis- and all-trans-lycopene concentrations. Although the bioavailability of cis (24.5% ± 6%) and all-trans (23.2% ± 8%) isomers did not differ, endogenous isomerization (0.97 ± 0.25 μmol/d in the fast-turnover tissue lycopene pool) drove tissue and plasma isomeric profiles. Conclusion: 13C-Lycopene combined with physiologic compartmental modeling provides a strategy for following complex in vivo metabolic processes in humans and reveals that postabsorptive trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization, and not the differential bioavailability of isomers, drives tissue and plasma enrichment of cis-lycopene. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01692340. PMID:26561629

  2. Compartmental and noncompartmental modeling of ¹³C-lycopene absorption, isomerization, and distribution kinetics in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy E; Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Kenneth M; Grainger, Elizabeth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Novotny, Janet A; Erdman, John W; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-12-01

    Lycopene, which is a red carotenoid in tomatoes, has been hypothesized to mediate disease-preventive effects associated with tomato consumption. Lycopene is consumed primarily as the all-trans geometric isomer in foods, whereas human plasma and tissues show greater proportions of cis isomers. With the use of compartmental modeling and stable isotope technology, we determined whether endogenous all-trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization or isomeric-bioavailability differences underlie the greater proportion of lycopene cis isomers in human tissues than in tomato foods. Healthy men (n = 4) and women (n = 4) consumed (13)C-lycopene (10.2 mg; 82% all-trans and 18% cis), and plasma was collected over 28 d. Unlabeled and (13)C-labeled total lycopene and lycopene-isomer plasma concentrations, which were measured with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, were fit to a 7-compartment model. Subjects absorbed a mean ± SEM of 23% ± 6% of the lycopene. The proportion of plasma cis-(13)C-lycopene isomers increased over time, and all-trans had a shorter half-life than that of cis isomers (5.3 ± 0.3 and 8.8 ± 0.6 d, respectively; P isomerization was predictive of plasma (13)C and unlabeled cis- and all-trans-lycopene concentrations. Although the bioavailability of cis (24.5% ± 6%) and all-trans (23.2% ± 8%) isomers did not differ, endogenous isomerization (0.97 ± 0.25 μmol/d in the fast-turnover tissue lycopene pool) drove tissue and plasma isomeric profiles. (13)C-Lycopene combined with physiologic compartmental modeling provides a strategy for following complex in vivo metabolic processes in humans and reveals that postabsorptive trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization, and not the differential bioavailability of isomers, drives tissue and plasma enrichment of cis-lycopene. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01692340. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Metabolic hormones, apolipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokines in the alveolar lining fluid of healthy adults: compartmentalization and physiological correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O Mendivil

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of hormone regulation in lung parenchyma is quite limited. We aimed to quantify a diverse array of biologically relevant protein mediators in alveolar lining fluid (ALF, compared to serum concentrations, and explore factors associated with protein compartmentalization on either side of the air-blood barrier.Participants were 24 healthy adult non-smoker volunteers without respiratory symptoms or significant medical conditions, with normal lung exams and office spirometry. Cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were analyzed for 24 proteins (including enteric and metabolic hormones, apolipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokines using a highly sensitive multiplex ELISA. Measurements were normalized to ALF concentrations. The ALF:serum concentration ratios were examined in relation to measures of protein size, hydrophobicity, charge, and to participant clinical and spirometric values.ALF measurements from 24 individuals detected 19 proteins, including adiponectin, adipsin, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoB, apoC-II, apoC-III, apoE, C-reactive protein, ghrelin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, glucagon, insulin, leptin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, resistin, and visfatin. C-peptide and serpin E1 were not detected in ALF for any individual, and IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-alpha were not detected in either ALF or serum for any individual. In general, ALF levels were similar or lower in concentration for most proteins compared to serum. However, ghrelin, resistin, insulin, visfatin and GLP-1 had ALF concentrations significantly higher compared to serum. Importantly, elevated ALF:serum ratios of ghrelin, visfatin and resistin correlated with protein net charge and isoelectric point, but not with molecular weight or hydrophobicity.Biologically relevant enteric and metabolic hormones, apolipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokines can be detected in the ALF of

  4. Intracellular pH and its relationship to regulation of ion transport in normal and cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Boucher, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    potential (Va) of -19 +/- 2 mV, a basolateral membrane potential (Vb) of -37 +/- 2 mV, a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of 253 +/- 15 omega cm2, a fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) of 0.40 +/- 0.04 and an equivalent short circuit current (Ieq) of -73 +/- 7 microA cm-2. 3. CF preparations (n = 13......) were characterized by a Vt of -46 +/- 7 mV, a Va of 3 +/- 5 mV, a Vb of -43 +/- 3 mV, Rt of 373 +/- 47 omega cm2, fRa of 0.44 +/- 0.04 and an Ieq of -130 +/- 16 microA cm-2. All parameters except Vb and fRa were significantly different (P ... differences in electrochemical driving force for proton flow across the apical cell membranes between normal and CF preparations (-4 +/- 3 mV and 20 +/- 7 mV, respectively), pHi was similar (7.15 +/- 0.02 and 7.11 +/- 0.05, respectively). The driving force across the basolateral membrane was similar in normal...

  5. Vcx1 and ESCRT components regulate intracellular pH homeostasis in the response of yeast cells to calcium stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papoušková, Klára; Jiang, L.; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2015), fov007 ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0307; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14297; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium * ESCRT * pHin * Vcx1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2015

  6. Dual-layered nanogel-coated hollow lipid/polypeptide conjugate assemblies for potential pH-triggered intracellular drug release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsuan Chiang

    Full Text Available To achieve effective intracellular anticancer drug delivery, the polymeric vesicles supplemented with the pH-responsive outlayered gels as a delivery system of doxorubicin (DOX were developed from self-assembly of the lipid/polypeptide adduct, distearin grafted poly(γ-glutamic acid (poly(γ-GA, followed by sequential deposition of chitosan and poly(γ-GA-co-γ-glutamyl oxysuccinimide-g-monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol in combination with in situ covalent cross-linking on assembly surfaces. The resultant gel-caged polymeric vesicles (GCPVs showed superior performance in regulating drug release in response to the external pH change. Under typical physiological conditions (pH 7.4 and 37 °C at which the γ-GA/DOX ionic pairings remained mostly undisturbed, the dense outlayered gels of GCPVs significantly reduced the premature leakage of the uncomplexed payload. With the environmental pH being reduced from pH 7.4 to 4.7, the drug liberation was appreciably promoted by the massive disruption of the ionic γ-GA/DOX complexes along with the significant swelling of nanogel layers upon the increased protonation of chitosan chain segments. After being internalized by HeLa cells via endocytosis, GCPVs exhibited cytotoxic effect comparable to free DOX achieved by rapidly releasing the payload in intracellular acidic endosomes and lysosomes. This strongly implies the great promise of such unique GCPVs as an intracellular drug delivery carrier for potential anticancer treatment.

  7. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  8. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  9. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  10. Intracellular Renin Disrupts Chemical Communication between Heart Cells. Pathophysiological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, Walmor C

    2014-01-01

    HighlightsIntracellular renin disrupts chemical communication in the heartAngiotensinogen enhances the effect of reninIntracellular enalaprilat reduces significantly the effect of reninIntracellular renin increases the inward calcium currentHarmful versus beneficial effect during myocardial infarction The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; (1) under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell to cell through gap junctions; (2) the intracellular dialysis of renin (100 nM) disrupts chemical communication - an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100 nM); (3) enalaprilat (10(-9) M) administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; (4) aliskiren (10(-8) M) inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication; (5) the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II) was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; (6) the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed; (7) the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  11. Western Analysis of Intracellular Interleukin-8 in Human Mononuclear Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Miskolci, Veronika; Hodgson, Louis; Cox, Dianne; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Most cytokines are stored in the cytoplasm until their release into the extracellular environment; however, some cytokines have been reported to localize in the nucleus. Traditional whole cell extract preparation does not provide information about the intracellular localization of cytokines. Here, we describe how to prepare cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts that can be analyzed by immunoblotting. While in this chapter we use this method to analyze intracellular localization of interleukin-8 (I...

  12. Acquisition of an animal gene by microsporidian intracellular parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Selman, Mohammed; Pombert, Jean-François; Solter, Leellen; Farinelli, Laurent; Weiss, Louis M.; Keeling, Patrick; Corradi, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Parasites have adapted to their specialised way of life by a number of means, including the acquisition of genes by horizontal gene transfer. These newly acquired genes seem to come from a variety of sources, but seldom from the host, even in the most intimate associations between obligate intracellular parasite and host [1]. Microsporidian intracellular parasites have acquired a handful of genes, mostly from bacteria, that help them take energy from their hosts or protect them from the envir...

  13. Anti-tuberculosis drug combination for controlled oral delivery using 3D printed compartmental dosage forms: From drug product design to in vivo testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Boetker, Johan Peter; Colombo, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The design and production of an oral dual-compartmental dosage unit (dcDU) was examined in vitro and in vivo with the purpose of physically isolating and modulating the release profile of an anti-tuberculosis drug combination. Rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (ISO) are first line combination drugs...... for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) that negatively interact with each other upon simultaneous release in acidic environment. The dcDUs were designed in silico by computer aided design (CAD) and fabricated in two steps; first three-dimensional (3D) printing of the outer structure, followed by hot-melt extrusion...... (HME) of the drug-containing filaments. The structure of the fabricated dcDUs was visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3D printed compartmentalized shells were loaded with filaments containing active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and selectively sealed to modulate drug dissolution...

  14. Fault seal analysis to predict the compartmentalization of gas reservoir: Case study of Steenkool formation Bintuni Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanjar, W. C. B.; Haris, A.; Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    This study is aimed to analyze the mechanism of hydrocarbons trapping in the field on a relatively new play in the Bintuni basin particularly Steenkool formation. The first well in this field has been drilled with a shallow target in the Steenkool formation and the drilling is managed to find new gas reserves in the shale-sandstone layer. In the structure of this gas discovery, there is the potential barrier for compartmentalization that draws attention to analyze how the patterns of structural of fault become a part of reservoir compartment. In order to measure the risk associated with prospects on a field bounded by faults, it is important to understand the processes that contribute to fault seal. The method of Fault Seal Analysis (FSA) is one of the methods used for the analysis of the nature of a fault whether the fault is sealing or leaking the fluid flow in the reservoir. Trapping systems that are limited by faults play an important role in creating a trap of hydrocarbon. The ability of a fault to seal fluid is quantitatively reflected by the value of Shale Gouge Ratio (SGR). SGR is the calculation of the amount of fine-grained material that fills fault plane (fault gouge) as a result of the movement mechanism of fault. The result of this study is a valuable resource for the systematic evaluation of the analysis of hydrocarbon prospects in the field.

  15. Drug compartmentalization as strategy to improve the physico-chemical properties of diclofenac sodium loaded niosomes for topical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, Lorena; de Cindio, Bruno; Picci, Nevio; Ioele, Giuseppina; Muzzalupo, Rita

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of diclofenac sodium compartmentalization on the physico-chemical properties (such as size, drug entrapment efficiency and percutaneous permeation across rabbit skin) of niosomal vesicles used as carriers. Niosomes were prepared starting from nonionic commercial surfactants belonging to the class of Polysorbates and Pluronics: mixtures of Span 60/F127 and Tween 60/F127 at different ratios were used to obtain vesicles and all formulations were compared in terms of dimensions, morphology, polydispersity index and entrapment efficiency. Moreover, the enhancing effect of niosomes on the ex vivo percutaneous penetration of diclofenac sodium was investigated using Franz-type diffusion chambers and compared to that obtained by using the corresponding drug solution. Results demonstrated that niosomes were spherical and homogeneous in shape. Their size was found to be dependent on the hydrophile-lipophile balance of the surfactant mixture: increasing hydrophobicity resulted in smaller vesicles. Drug incorporation led to a significant variation in vesicle size dependently from the compartment in which the drug was located. The permeation of diclofenac from free solution used as control was found to be lower respect to that obtained for all niosomal formulations, that can be considered as percutaneous permeation enhancers. In particular, the results indicated that the highest cumulative amounts of diclofenac permeated across rabbit skin after 24 h were obtained by formulations in which the drug was located in the aqueous core.

  16. Levels, spatial variation and compartmentalization of trace elements in brown algae Cystoseira from marine protected areas of Crimea (Black Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsova, Alexandra V.; Milchakova, Nataliya A.; Frontasyeva, Marina V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 19 trace elements were determined in Cystoseira spp. from marine protected areas. • Levels of 10 elements were lower than reported data for Black Sea Cystoseira spp. • Concentrations of most trace elements were higher in “branches” than in “stems”. • Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities. • Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th, U varied depending on geological composition of the coast. - Abstract: Levels of Al, Sc, V, Co, Ni, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, Th and U that were rarely or never studied, as well as the concentrations of classically investigated Mn, Fe and Zn in brown algae Cystoseira barbata C. Ag. and Cystoseira crinita (Desf.) Bory from the coastal waters of marine protected areas (Crimea, Black Sea), were determined using neutron activation analysis. Spatial variation and compartmentalization were studied for all 19 trace elements (TE). Concentrations of most TE were higher in “branches” than in “stems”. Spatial variations of V, Co, Ni and Zn can be related to anthropogenic activities while Al, Sc, Fe, Rb, Cs, Th and U varied depending on chemical peculiarities of the coastal zone rocks. TE concentrations in C. crinita from marine protected areas near Tarkhankut peninsula and Cape Fiolent, identified as the most clean water areas, are submitted as the background concentrations

  17. Estimate of FDG Excretion by means of Compartmental Analysis and Ant Colony Optimization of Nuclear Medicine Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Sara; Caviglia, Giacomo; Brignone, Massimo; Massollo, Michela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Piana, Michele

    2013-01-01

    [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is one of the most utilized tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) applications in oncology. FDG-PET relies on higher glycolytic activity in tumors compared to normal structures as the basis of image contrast. As a glucose analog, FDG is transported into malignant cells which typically exhibit an increased radioactivity. However, different from glucose, FDG is not reabsorbed by the renal system and is excreted to the bladder. The present paper describes a novel computational method for the quantitative assessment of this excretion process. The method is based on a compartmental analysis of FDG-PET data in which the excretion process is explicitly accounted for by the bladder compartment and on the application of an ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm for the determination of the tracer coefficients describing the FDG transport effectiveness. The validation of this approach is performed by means of both synthetic data and real measurements acquired by a PET device for small animals (micro-PET). Possible oncological applications of the results are discussed in the final section. PMID:24191175

  18. Lipid droplet-associated proteins (LDAPs) are involved in the compartmentalization of lipophilic compounds in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidda, Satinder K; Watt, Samantha; Collins-Silva, Jillian; Kilaru, Aruna; Arondel, Vincent; Yurchenko, Olga; Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Shintani, David; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D; Mullen, Robert T; Dyer, John M

    2013-11-01

    While lipid droplets have traditionally been considered as inert sites for the storage of triacylglycerols and sterol esters, they are now recognized as dynamic and functionally diverse organelles involved in energy homeostasis, lipid signaling, and stress responses. Unlike most other organelles, lipid droplets are delineated by a half-unit membrane whose protein constituents are poorly understood, except in the specialized case of oleosins, which are associated with seed lipid droplets. Recently, we identified a new class of lipid-droplet associated proteins called LDAPs that localize specifically to the lipid droplet surface within plant cells and share extensive sequence similarity with the small rubber particle proteins (SRPPs) found in rubber-accumulating plants. Here, we provide additional evidence for a role of LDAPs in lipid accumulation in oil-rich fruit tissues, and further explore the functional relationships between LDAPs and SRPPs. In addition, we propose that the larger LDAP/SRPP protein family plays important roles in the compartmentalization of lipophilic compounds, including triacylglycerols and polyisoprenoids, into lipid droplets within plant cells. Potential roles in lipid droplet biogenesis and function of these proteins also are discussed.

  19. Acute effects of incremental inspiratory loads on compartmental chest wall volume and predominant activity frequency of inspiratory muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Gama, Alana Elza Fontes; de Andrade Carvalho, Larissa; Feitosa, Larissa Andrade; do Nascimento Junior, Jasiel Frutuoso; da Silva, Marilú Gomes Netto Monte; Amorim, César F; Aliverti, Andréa; Lambertz, Daniel; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Benedetti; de Andrade, Armèle Dornelas

    2013-12-01

    This research aims to analyze the acute effect of incremental inspiratory loads on respiratory pattern and on the predominant activity frequency of inspiratory muscle, taking into account differences in gender responses. Optoelectronic Plethysmography was performed during loads in 39 healthy subjects (20 women), placing 89 markers on the thoracic-abdominal wall to obtain total and regional volumes. Surface electromyography (SEMG) was taken simultaneously on the Sternocleidomastoid and Diaphragm muscles, to calculate the predominant muscle activity frequency through wavelet analysis. Inspiratory loads were performed using Threshold(®)with 2 min of breathing at different levels, ranging from a load of 10 cmH(2)O plus 5 cmH(2)O to 40 cmH(2)O or fatigue. Inspiratory Time increased during loads. Total and compartmental volumes increased with different regions, changing at different loads. These changes in volume occur earlier in women (20 cmH(2)O) than in men (30 cmH(2)O). The predominant activity frequency of Sternocleidmastoid muscle decreased at 30 cmH(2)O, while Diaphragm activity decreased at 40 cmH(2)O. The acute effects of incremental inspiratory loads are increases of total and regional volumes and inspiratory time. As for muscle activity, the predominant activity frequency declined in Sternocleidomastoid and Diaphragm muscles, but at different loads. Such respiratory and SEMG patterns and gender differences should be considered when clinical interventions are performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inter-compartmental transport of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in South China: implications for a regional risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huizhen; Wei, Yanli; Lydy, Michael J; You, Jing

    2014-07-01

    The dynamic flux of an organophosphate and four pyrethroid pesticides was determined in an air-(soil)-water-sediment system based on monitoring data from Guangzhou, China. The total air-water flux, including air-water gaseous exchange and atmospheric deposition, showed deposition from air to water for chlorpyrifos, bifenthrin and cypermethrin, but volatilization for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin. The transport of the pesticides from overlying water to sediment suggested that sediment acted as a sink for the pesticides. Additionally, distinct annual atmospheric depositional fluxes between legacy and current-use pesticides suggested the role of consumer usage in their transport throughout the system. Finally, pesticide toxicity was estimated from annual air-water-sediment flux within an urban stream in Guangzhou. A dynamic flux-based risk assessment indicated that inter-compartmental transport of chlorpyrifos decreased its atmospheric exposure, but had little influence on its aquatic toxicity. Instead, water-to-sediment transport of pyrethroids increased their sediment toxicity, which was supported by previously reported toxicity data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human cystatin C forms an inactive dimer during intracellular trafficking in transfected CHO cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merz, G S; Benedikz, Eirikur; Schwenk, V

    1997-01-01

    To define the cellular processing of human cystatin C as well as to lay the groundwork for investigating its contribution to lcelandic Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis (HCHWA-I), we have characterized the trafficking, secretion, and extracellular fate of human cystatin C...... that the cystatin C dimer, formed during intracellular trafficking, is converted to monomer at or before secretion. Cells in which exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was blocked with brefeldin A contained the 33 kDa species, indicating that cystatin C dimerization occurs in the ER. After removal of brefeldin......, presumably as a consequence of the low pH of late endosome/lysosomes. As a dimer, cystatin C would be prevented from inhibiting the lysosomal cysteine proteases. These results reveal a novel mechanism, transient dimerization, by which cystatin C is inactivated during the early part of its trafficking through...

  3. Fully synthetic polymer vesicles for intracellular delivery of antibodies in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Irene; Massignani, Marzia; Patikarnmonthon, Nisa; Chierico, Luca; Robertson, James; Renshaw, Stephen A; Warren, Nicholas J; Madsen, Jeppe P; Armes, Steven P; Lewis, Andrew L; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    There is an emerging need both in pharmacology and within the biomedical industry to develop new tools to target intracellular mechanisms. The efficient delivery of functionally active proteins within cells is potentially a powerful research strategy, especially through the use of antibodies. In this work, we report on a nanovector for the efficient encapsulation and delivery of antibodies into live cells with no significant loss of cell viability or any deleterious effect on cell metabolic activity. This delivery system is based on poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine]-block-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PMPC-PDPA), a pH-sensitive diblock copolymer that self-assembles to form nanometer-sized vesicles, also known as polymersomes, at physiological pH. Polymersomes can successfully deliver relatively high antibody payloads within different types of live cells. We demonstrate that these antibodies can target their respective epitope showing immunolabeling of γ-tubulin, actin, Golgi protein, and the transcription factor NF-κB in live cells. Finally, we demonstrate that intracellular delivery of antibodies can control specific subcellular events, as well as modulate cell activity and proinflammatory processes.

  4. Inhibition of Candida albicans by Fluvastatin Is Dependent on pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cholesterol-lowering drug fluvastatin (FS has an inhibitory effect on the growth of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans that is dependent on the pH of the medium. At the low pH value of the vagina, FS is growth inhibitory at low and at high concentrations, while at intermediate concentrations (1–10 mM, it has no inhibitory effect. Examination of the effect of the common antifungal drug fluconazole in combination with FS demonstrates drug interactions in the low concentration range. Determination of intracellular stress and the activity of the FS target enzyme HMG-CoA reductase confirm our hypothesis that in the intermediate dose range adjustments to the sterol biosynthesis pathway can compensate for the action of FS. We conclude that the pH dependent uptake of FS across yeast membranes might make FS combination therapy an attractive possibility for treatment of vaginal C. albicans infections.

  5. Intracellular processing of growth hormone receptors by adipocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupas, P; Herington, A C

    1988-05-01

    Rat adipocytes in primary culture have been used to study the intracellular processing of growth hormone (GH) receptors. Pretreatment of adipocytes with 20 micrograms/ml cycloheximide resulted in a rapid decline (t1/2 approximately 45 min) of the 125I-human growth hormone (hGH) binding capacity of the cells. This decline occurred at a faster rate in the presence of extracellular unlabeled hGH (400 ng/ml) and was not due to receptor occupancy. These data suggest that GH receptors turn over rapidly and constitutively on the plasma membrane and in the absence of protein synthesis are not replaced. Dissociation of GH-receptor complexes was shown not to occur at pH 5.5, the pH encountered in the acidic pre-lysosomal compartments (endosomes) where intracellular dissociation of many hormone-receptor complexes takes place. These data, together, suggest that the majority of GH receptors are not recycled but instead suffer the same fate as the majority of GH, i.e. degradation. To determine the rate of appearance of GH receptors at the cell surface, adipocytes were first treated with trypsin and then incubated at 37 degrees C to permit incorporation of any available GH receptors into the plasma membrane. Binding of 125I-hGH recovered to pre-trypsin levels by 2 h. This recovery was completely blocked by concomitant treatment with monensin, cytochalasin B, colchicine and 2,4-dinitrophenol. NH4Cl had no effect on receptor recovery. These data suggest that once GH receptors are synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, they travel via the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane (by processes involving both microfilaments and microtubules) and are then inserted into the plasma membrane in an energy-dependent step.

  6. Acid loading test (pH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  7. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena

    2014-01-01

    cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca2+ influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu......Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca2+ outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Acting as Ca2+/H+ counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four......+-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient...

  8. pH sensor calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Artero Delgado, Carola; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Prat Farran, Joana d'Arc

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration of pH sensor located at the OBSEA marine Observatory. This instrument is based on an industrial pH electrode that is connected to a CTD instrument (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth ). The calibration of the pH sensor has been done using a high precision spectrophotometer pH meter from Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM), and in this way it has been obtained a numerical function for the p H sensor propor...

  9. AMPA receptor pHluorin-GluA2 reports NMDA receptor-induced intracellular acidification in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathje, Mette; Fang, Huaqiang; Bachman, Julia L

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling...... recovery was eliminated in the presence of the NHE1 inhibitor zoniporide. Our results indicate that the pH-GluA2 recycling assay is an unreliable assay for studying AMPA receptor trafficking and also suggest a role for PICK1 in regulating intracellular pH via modulation of NHE activity....

  10. PhD students and integrative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fry, G.; Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2006-01-01

    The training of PhD students is currently very dynamic and varies widely from place to place. We present some examples of this variation and comment on how it may affect the way PhD students cope with integrative studies. Our focus is on the training needs of PhD students studying integrative

  11. Intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles in macrophages: intracellular uptake, exocytosis, and intercellular transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LQ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Li Qun Jiang,1 Ting Yu Wang,1 Thomas J Webster,2 Hua-Jian Duan,1 Jing Ying Qiu,1 Zi Ming Zhao,1 Xiao Xing Yin,1,* Chun Li Zheng3,* 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Biodegradable nanomaterials have been widely used in numerous medical fields. To further improve such efforts, this study focused on the intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles (CsNPs in macrophages, a primary cell of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS. Such interactions with the MPS determine the nanoparticle retention time in the body and consequently play a significant role in their own clinical safety. In this study, various dye-labeled CsNPs (about 250 nm were prepared, and a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 was selected as a model macrophage. The results showed two mechanisms of macrophage incorporation of CsNPs, ie, a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway (the primary and phagocytosis. Following internalization, the particles partly dissociated in the cells, indicating cellular digestion of the nanoparticles. It was proved that, after intracellular uptake, a large proportion of CsNPs were exocytosed within 24 h; this excretion induced a decrease in fluorescence intensity in cells by 69%, with the remaining particles possessing difficulty being cleared. Exocytosis could be inhibited by both wortmannin and vacuolin-1, indicating that CsNP uptake was mediated by lysosomal and multivesicular body pathways, and after exocytosis, the reuptake of CsNPs by neighboring cells was verified by further experiments. This study, thus, elucidated the fate of CsNPs in macrophages as well as identified cellular disposition

  12. The alteration of intracellular enzymes. III. The effect of temperature on the kinetics of altered and unaltered yeast catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRASER, M J; KAPLAN, J G

    1955-03-20

    the case of catalase, of desorbing the enzyme from the interface into its rolled-up, soluble, highly specific configuration. While the interfacial hypothesis has successfully withstood this experimental attack, the present data do not provide its unequivocal proof, since they are consistent with any hypothesis of alteration in which the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in a relatively disordered state by comparison to the altered enzyme. While evidence of an interfacial process in enzyme alteration has been adduced previously, critical proof of the interfacial hypothesis awaits creation of a model system, in which most of the aspects of intracellular alteration can be reproduced. 6. Certain of the changes in kinetic properties following alteration of the intracellular enzyme, such as increased activity and the modified energies and entropies of activation of both enzyme-substrate system and heat destruction of the catalase itself, might be explained by a decrease (two orders of magnitude) in the effective hydrogen ion concentration, allowing the intracellular enzyme to be brought to the same pH as the extracellular medium. If such a pH change does, in fact, occur, it is necessary to invoke the interfacial hypothesis to explain why the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in equilibrium with a medium whose pH is approximately 2 units lower than that of the cytoplasm itself. 7. It is concluded that kinetic data of this kind may be used to shed light on the structure of a soluble, cytoplasmic enzyme, not attached to any of the formed elements within the cell, yet organized within it in a condition of relatively low structural specificity; further, that information obtained exclusively from a study of the kinetics of the extracted or crystalline enzymes may not, in the case of this enzyme, at least, be extrapolated to the same enzyme within the intact cell.

  13. Analysis of intracellular expressed proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal Neelja

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is the most threatening infectious disease globally. Although progress has been made to reduce global incidence of TB, emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR TB threatens to undermine these advances. To combat the disease, novel intervention strategies effective against drug resistant and sensitive subpopulations of M. tuberculosis are urgently required as adducts in the present treatment regimen. Using THP-1 cells we have analyzed and compared the global protein expression profile of broth-cultured and intraphagosomally grown drug resistant and sensitive M.tuberculosis clinical isolates. Results On comparing the two dimensional (2-DE gels, many proteins were found to be upregulated/expressed during intracellular state which were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS. Four proteins (adenosylhomocysteinase, aspartate carbomyltransferase, putatitive thiosulfate sulfurtransferase and universal stress protein were present in both intracellular MDR and sensitive isolates and three of these belonged to intermediary metabolism and respiration category. Two proteins (alanine dehydrogenase and adenosine kinase of intracellular MDR isolate and two (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and ATP synthase epsilon chain of intracellular sensitive isolate belonged to intermediary metabolism and respiration category. One protein (Peroxidase/Catalase of intracellular MDR and three (HSPX, 14 kDa antigen and 10 kDa chaperonin of sensitive isolate belonged to virulence, detoxification and adaptation category. ESAT-6 of intracellular MDR belonged to cell wall and cell processes category. Two proteins (Antigen 85-C and Antigen 85-A of intracellular sensitive isolate were involved in lipid metabolism while probable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A was involved in information pathways. Four (Rv0635, Rv1827, Rv0036c and Rv2032 of intracellular MDR and two proteins (Rv2896c and Rv2558c of

  14. Effect of systemic pH on pHi and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH i ), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH 4 Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO 3 (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH i and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH i did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability

  15. The Molecular Basis of pH Sensing, Signaling, and Homeostasis in Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignell, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Fungi mount efficient responses to altered extracellular pH. Characterization of the underlying mechanisms is fundamentally important in terms of understanding the molecular basis of pH homeostasis in higher eukaryotic cells, and for optimizing industrial processes which utilize fungi such as the production of pharmaceutical agents and food-use enzymes. Fungal pH adaptation is also a key requisite for establishment of multiple plant, insect, animal, and human diseases. Due to the differential reliance, respectively, of human and fungal cells upon electroneutral Na(+)-H(+) antiporters and outwardly directed electrogenic proton pumps, fundamental differences in the circuitry of pH homeostasis and adaptation exist, and these might be exploitable from a therapeutic perspective. At the molecular level, fungal pH tolerance is mediated by distinct but complementary homeostatic responses and highly conserved intracellular signaling pathways. Although traditionally studied as independent regulatory entities, the advent of systems biology has fuelled a new awareness of the interconnectivity between these very different modes of regulation. This review focuses upon the most recent advances in molecular understanding of three specific aspects of fungal pH adaptation, namely, sensing, signaling, and homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The final frontier of pH and the undiscovered country beyond.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Bal

    Full Text Available The comparison of volumes of cells and subcellular structures with the pH values reported for them leads to a conflict with the definition of the pH scale. The pH scale is based on the ionic product of water, K(w = [H(+]×[OH(-].We used K(w [in a reversed way] to calculate the number of undissociated H(2O molecules required by this equilibrium constant to yield at least one of its daughter ions, H(+ or OH(- at a given pH. In this way we obtained a formula that relates pH to the minimal volume V(pH required to provide a physical meaning to K(w, V(pH=10(pH-pK(w/2 x 10(pK(w/2/N(A (where N(A is Avogadro's number. For example, at pH 7 (neutral at 25°C V(pH =16.6 aL. Any deviation from neutral pH results in a larger V(pH value. Our results indicate that many subcellular structures, including coated vesicles and lysosomes, are too small to contain free H(+ ions at equilibrium, thus the definition of pH based on K(w is no longer valid. Larger subcellular structures, such as mitochondria, apparently contain only a few free H(+ ions. These results indicate that pH fails to describe intracellular conditions, and that water appears to be dissociated too weakly to provide free H(+ ions as a general source for biochemical reactions. Consequences of this finding are discussed.

  17. The Final Frontier of pH and the Undiscovered Country Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Wojciech; Kurowska, Ewa; Maret, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The comparison of volumes of cells and subcellular structures with the pH values reported for them leads to a conflict with the definition of the pH scale. The pH scale is based on the ionic product of water, K w = [H+]×[OH−].We used K w [in a reversed way] to calculate the number of undissociated H2O molecules required by this equilibrium constant to yield at least one of its daughter ions, H+ or OH− at a given pH. In this way we obtained a formula that relates pH to the minimal volume VpH required to provide a physical meaning to K w, (where N A is Avogadro’s number). For example, at pH 7 (neutral at 25°C) VpH = 16.6 aL. Any deviation from neutral pH results in a larger VpH value. Our results indicate that many subcellular structures, including coated vesicles and lysosomes, are too small to contain free H+ ions at equilibrium, thus the definition of pH based on K w is no longer valid. Larger subcellular structures, such as mitochondria, apparently contain only a few free H+ ions. These results indicate that pH fails to describe intracellular conditions, and that water appears to be dissociated too weakly to provide free H+ ions as a general source for biochemical reactions. Consequences of this finding are discussed. PMID:23049874

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide-conjugated chitosan-hydrazone-mPEG copolymer nanoparticles as pH-responsive carriers for intracellular delivery of prednisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Gover Antoniraj; C, Senthil Kumar; Henry, Linda Jeeva Kumari; Natesan, Subramanian; Kandasamy, Ruckmani

    2017-02-10

    A chitosan-hydrazone-mPEG (CH-Hz-mPEG) copolymer which is stable at extracellular pH and cleaves at slightly acidic intracellular pH was synthesized and characterized. Blank polymeric nanoparticles (B-PNPs) and prednisone-loaded polymeric nanoparticles (P-PNPs) were then formulated by dialysis/precipitation method. The cell-specific ligand, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was then conjugated to P-PNPs (ANP-P-PNPs) by a coupling reaction. Particle size and morphological analyses revealed uniform spherical shape of PNPs. In vitro pH dependent degradation of PNPs was investigated. Drug release profile of ANP-P-PNPs indicated a slow release of prednisone at pH 7.4, but a rapid release at pH 5.0 due to the cleavage of hydrazone linkage. Cytotoxicity studies demonstrated greater compatibility of B-PNPs compared to ANP-P-PNPs. Cellular internalization of ANP-P-PNPs was higher than P-PNPs owing to receptor-mediated endocytosis. The results from this investigation support the hypothesis that chitosan based ANP-P-PNPs could act as an intracellular pH-responsive and targeted drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane enhances capsaicin-induced intracellular Ca2+ influx through transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Murakami

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV cation channels are activated by various insults, including exposure to heat, acidity, and the compound capsaicin, resulting in sensations of pain in the skin, visceral organs, and oral cavity. Recently, TRPV1 activation was also demonstrated in response to basic pH elicited by ammonia and intracellular alkalization. Tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane (THAM is widely used as an alkalizing agent; however, the effects of THAM on TRPV1 channels have not been defined. In this study, we characterized the effects of THAM-induced TRPV1 channel activation in baby hamster kidney cells expressing human TRPV1 (hTRPV1 and the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent sensor GCaMP2 by real-time confocal microscopy. Notably, both capsaicin (1 μM and pH 6.5 buffer elicited steep increases in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, while treatment with THAM (pH 8.5 alone had no effect. However, treatment with THAM (pH 8.5 following capsaicin application elicited a profound, long-lasting increase in [Ca2+]i that was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Taken together, these results suggest that hTRPV1 pre-activation is required to provoke enhanced, THAM-induced [Ca2+]i increases, which could be a mechanism underlying pain induced by basic pH.

  20. Intracellular renin disrupts chemical communication between heart cells. Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; 1 under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell-to-cell through gap junctions; 2 the intracellular dialysis of renin (100nM disrupts chemical communication-an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100nM; 3 enalaprilat (10-9M administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; 4 aliskiren (10-8M inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication;5 the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; 6 the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed;7 the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis, causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  1. Surveillance for Intracellular Antibody by Cytosolic Fc Receptor TRIM21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. McEwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY domain. Following binding of intracellular antibody, TRIM21 acts as both antiviral effector and sensor for innate immune signalling. These activities serve to reduce viral replication by orders of magnitude in vitro and contribute to host survival during in vivo infection. Neutralization occurs rapidly after detection and requires the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The microbial targets of this arm of intracellular immunity are still being identified: TRIM21 activity has been reported following infection by several non-enveloped viruses and intracellular bacteria. These findings extend the sphere of influence of antibodies to the intracellular domain and have broad implications for immunity. TRIM21 has been implicated in the chronic auto-immune condition systemic lupus erythematosus and is itself an auto-antigen in Sjögren’s syndrome. This review summarises our current understanding of TRIM21’s role as a cytosolic Fc receptor and briefly discusses pathological circumstances where intracellular antibodies have been described, or are hypothesized to occur, and may benefit from further investigations of the role of TRIM21.

  2. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca 2+ on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery

  3. Intracellular transport of fat-soluble vitamins A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nozomu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that are essential for the normal growth, reproduction and functioning of the human body. Of the 13 known vitamins, vitamins A, D, E and K are lipophilic compounds and are therefore called fat-soluble vitamins. Because of their lipophilicity, fat-soluble vitamins are solubilized and transported by intracellular carrier proteins to exert their actions and to be metabolized properly. Vitamin A and its derivatives, collectively called retinoids, are solubilized by intracellular retinoid-binding proteins such as cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) and cellular retinal-binding protein (CRALBP). These proteins act as chaperones that regulate the metabolism, signaling and transport of retinoids. CRALBP-mediated intracellular retinoid transport is essential for vision in human. α-Tocopherol, the main form of vitamin E found in the body, is transported by α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) in hepatic cells. Defects of α-TTP cause vitamin E deficiency and neurological disorders in humans. Recently, it has been shown that the interaction of α-TTP with phosphoinositides plays a critical role in the intracellular transport of α-tocopherol and is associated with familial vitamin E deficiency. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms and biological significance of the intracellular transport of vitamins A and E. © 2014 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  5. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  6. Catalases are NAD(PH-dependent tellurite reductases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván L Calderón

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(PH is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(PH protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(PH-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3(2- to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o, in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical.

  7. Compartmentalized self-replication (CSR) selection of Thermococcus litoralis Sh1B DNA polymerase for diminished uracil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubeleviciute, Agne; Skirgaila, Remigijus

    2010-08-01

    The thermostable archaeal DNA polymerase Sh1B from Thermococcus litoralis has a typical uracil-binding pocket, which in nature plays an essential role in preventing the accumulation of mutations caused by cytosine deamination to uracil and subsequent G-C base pair transition to A-T during the genomic DNA replication. The uracil-binding pocket recognizes and binds uracil base in a template strand trapping the polymerase. Since DNA replication stops, the repair systems have a chance to correct the promutagenic event. Archaeal family B DNA polymerases are employed in various PCR applications. Contrary to nature, in PCR the uracil-binding property of archaeal polymerases is disadvantageous and results in decreased DNA amplification yields and lowered sensitivity. Furthermore, in diagnostics qPCR, RT-qPCR and end-point PCR are performed using dNTP mixtures, where dTTP is partially or fully replaced by dUTP. Uracil-DNA glycosylase treatment and subsequent heating of the samples is used to degrade the DNA containing uracil and prevent carryover contamination, which is the main concern in diagnostic laboratories. A thermostable archaeal DNA polymerase with the abolished uracil binding would be a highly desirable and commercially interesting product. An attempt to disable uracil binding in DNA polymerase Sh1B from T. litoralis by generating site-specific mutants did not yield satisfactory results. However, a combination of random mutagenesis of the whole polymerase gene and compartmentalized self-replication was successfully used to select variants of thermostable Sh1B polymerase capable of performing PCR with dUTP instead of dTTP.

  8. Comparison of linear and nonlinear implementation of the compartmental tissue uptake model for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallehauge, Jesper F; Sourbron, Steven; Irving, Benjamin; Tanderup, Kari; Schnabel, Julia A; Chappell, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Fitting tracer kinetic models using linear methods is much faster than using their nonlinear counterparts, although this comes often at the expense of reduced accuracy and precision. The aim of this study was to derive and compare the performance of the linear compartmental tissue uptake (CTU) model with its nonlinear version with respect to their percentage error and precision. The linear and nonlinear CTU models were initially compared using simulations with varying noise and temporal sampling. Subsequently, the clinical applicability of the linear model was demonstrated on 14 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer examined with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Simulations revealed equal percentage error and precision when noise was within clinical achievable ranges (contrast-to-noise ratio >10). The linear method was significantly faster than the nonlinear method, with a minimum speedup of around 230 across all tested sampling rates. Clinical analysis revealed that parameters estimated using the linear and nonlinear CTU model were highly correlated (ρ ≥ 0.95). The linear CTU model is computationally more efficient and more stable against temporal downsampling, whereas the nonlinear method is more robust to variations in noise. The two methods may be used interchangeably within clinical achievable ranges of temporal sampling and noise. Magn Reson Med 77:2414-2423, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Morphological features, distribution and compartmental organization of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced-diaphorase interneurons in the human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2005-08-29

    Striatal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced-diaphorase (NADPH-d)-positive (+) cells are one of the major classes of striatal interneurons. The present study analyzes their somatodendritic morphology, distribution pattern, and compartmental organization in the caudate nucleus (CN) and putamen (Put) of nine normal human brains. The following striatal territories are examined: 1) the precommissural head of the CN; 2) the postcommissural head of the CN; 3) the body of the CN; 4) the gyrus of the CN; 5) the tail of the CN; 6) the precommissural Put; and 7) the postcommissural Put. Three morphologically distinct types of NADPH-d+ neurons were found in each of these territories. The two most common NADPH-d+ neurons displayed an ovoid or triangular perikaryon from which several thick primary dendrites emerged, although much less numerous, bipolar-shaped NADPH-d+ cells were also observed. The highest density of NADPH-d+ neurons was found in the gyrus of the CN, followed by the body of the CN, tail of the CN, postcommissural head of the CN, postcommissural Put, precommissural head of the CN, and precommissural Put. The matrix was the striatal compartment with the densest NADPH-d+ neuronal population. Some of these cells also occurred in the center and peripheral regions of the striosomes located in the head of the CN and in the Put. In the body and gyrus of the CN, the striosomes were largely devoid of these striatal interneurons. Knowledge of the density and distribution of these interneurons should advance our understanding of the organization of the normal human striatum and help to evaluate the effects of neurodegenerative processes on cell density. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Gait analysis of patients with an off-the-shelf total knee replacement versus customized bi-compartmental knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Foster, Jonathan; Franksen, Natasha; Estes, Jill; Rolston, Lindsey

    2017-09-04

    Newer TKR designs have been introduced to the market with the aim of overcoming common sizing problems with older TKR designs. Furthermore, since a sizable percentage of patients with OA present with disease limited to the medial/lateral knee compartment in addition to the patellofemoral joint, for whom, a customized bi-compartmental knee replacement (BKR) is available as a treatment option. To date, there is very little information regarding knee strength and mechanics during gait for patients implanted with these modern TKR and BKR designs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate knee strength and mechanics during walking for patients with either a modern off the shelf TKR or a customized BKR and compare these findings to a cohort of healthy controls. Twelve healthy controls, eight BKR, and nine TKR patients participated in the study. Maximal isometric knee strength was evaluated. 3D kinematic and kinetic analyses were conducted for level walking. The TKR knee exhibited less peak extensor torque when compared to, both the BKR and control limbs (p < 0.05). The TKR knee had less extensor moment at stance than both the BKR and control knees (p < 0.05). Both the BKR and control knees displayed larger internal rotation at stance than that of the TKR knee (p < 0.05). This study suggests that, for patients that exhibit isolated OA of the tibiofemoral joint, using a customized BKR implant is a viable treatment option and may contribute to superior mechanical advantages.

  11. pH-sensitivity of YFP provides an intracellular indicator of programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcel Sydney B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death (PCD is an essential process for the life cycle of all multicellular organisms. In higher plants however, relatively little is known about the cascade of genes and signalling molecules responsible for the initiation and execution of PCD. To aid with the discovery and analysis of plant PCD regulators, we have designed a novel cell death assay based on low cytosolic pH as a marker of PCD. Results The acidification that occurs in the cytosol during plant PCD was monitored by way of the extinction of YFP fluorescence at low pH. This fluorescence was recovered experimentally when bringing the intracellular pH back to 7, demonstrating that there was no protein degradation of YFP. Because it uses YFP, the assay is none-destructive, does not interfere with the PCD process and allows time-lapse studies to be carried out. In addition, changes of sub-cellular localisation can be visualised during PCD using the protein of interest fused to RFP. Coupled to a transient expression system, this pH-based assay can be used to functionally analyse genes involved in PCD, using point mutations or co-expressing PCD regulators. Transfecting mBAX and AtBI-1in onion epidermal cells showed that the pH shift is downstream of PCD suppression by AtBI-1. In addition, this method can be used to score PCD in tissues of stably transformed transgenic lines. As proof of principle, we show the example of YFP extinction during xylogenesis in Arabidopsis. This demonstrates that the assay is applicable to PCD studies in a variety of tissues. Conclusions The observation that YFP fluorescence is lost during the plant PCD process provides a new tool to study the genetic regulation and cell biology of the process. In addition, plant cell biologists should make a note of this effect of PCD on YFP fluorescence to avoid misinterpretation of their data and to select a pH insensitive reporter if appropriate. This method represents an efficient and

  12. Intracellular alkaline proteases produced by thermoacidophiles: detection of protease heterogeneity by gelatin zymography and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocab, S.; Erdem, B. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2002-08-01

    In this study 24 thermoacidophilic archeal and bacterial strains isolated from hot-springs and hot-soils were screened for their ability to produce intracellular alkaline proteases. The protease activities of the strains, based on azocasein hydrolysis, showed a variation from 0.6 to 5.1 U. The cell extracts of three most potent producers were further examined and it was found that their proteases exhibited maximum activity at 60-70{sup o}C and showed a pH optimum over a range of pH 7.0-8.5. Gelatin zymography revealed that two of the selected archeal strains produced multiple active SDS-resistant proteases. On the other hand, PCR amplification of alkaline serine protease gene sequences of total DNA from all isolates yielded four distinct amplification fragments of 650, 450, 400 and 300 bp, which might have been derived from different serine protease genes. (author)

  13. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Zhang, Ellisa W.; Dudley, Anne G.; Dixon, Beverly R. E. A.; Guckes, Kirsten R.; Breland, Erin J.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Casella, Daniel P.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Clayton, Douglass B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. PMID:27795353

  14. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed.

  15. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K.; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies. PMID:25460730

  16. Genome expression analysis of nonproliferating intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium unravels an acid pH-dependent PhoP-PhoQ response essential for dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Tierrez, Alberto; Ortega, Alvaro D; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; Godoy, Marta; Eisman, Blanca; Casadesús, Josep; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide expression analyses have provided clues on how Salmonella proliferates inside cultured macrophages and epithelial cells. However, in vivo studies show that Salmonella does not replicate massively within host cells, leaving the underlying mechanisms of such growth control largely undefined. In vitro infection models based on fibroblasts or dendritic cells reveal limited proliferation of the pathogen, but it is presently unknown whether these phenomena reflect events occurring in vivo. Fibroblasts are distinctive, since they represent a nonphagocytic cell type in which S. enterica serovar Typhimurium actively attenuates intracellular growth. Here, we show in the mouse model that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth within nonphagocytic cells positioned in the intestinal lamina propria. This response requires a functional PhoP-PhoQ system and is reproduced in primary fibroblasts isolated from the mouse intestine. The fibroblast infection model was exploited to generate transcriptome data, which revealed that ∼2% (98 genes) of the S. Typhimurium genome is differentially expressed in nongrowing intracellular bacteria. Changes include metabolic reprogramming to microaerophilic conditions, induction of virulence plasmid genes, upregulation of the pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, and shutdown of flagella production and chemotaxis. Comparison of relative protein levels of several PhoP-PhoQ-regulated functions (PagN, PagP, and VirK) in nongrowing intracellular bacteria and extracellular bacteria exposed to diverse PhoP-PhoQ-inducing signals denoted a regulation responding to acidic pH. These data demonstrate that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth in vivo and support a model in which dormant intracellular bacteria could sense vacuolar acidification to stimulate the PhoP-PhoQ system for preventing intracellular overgrowth.

  17. Genome Expression Analysis of Nonproliferating Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Unravels an Acid pH-Dependent PhoP-PhoQ Response Essential for Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Hernández, Cristina; Tierrez, Alberto; Ortega, Álvaro D.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; Godoy, Marta; Eisman, Blanca; Casadesús, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide expression analyses have provided clues on how Salmonella proliferates inside cultured macrophages and epithelial cells. However, in vivo studies show that Salmonella does not replicate massively within host cells, leaving the underlying mechanisms of such growth control largely undefined. In vitro infection models based on fibroblasts or dendritic cells reveal limited proliferation of the pathogen, but it is presently unknown whether these phenomena reflect events occurring in vivo. Fibroblasts are distinctive, since they represent a nonphagocytic cell type in which S. enterica serovar Typhimurium actively attenuates intracellular growth. Here, we show in the mouse model that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth within nonphagocytic cells positioned in the intestinal lamina propria. This response requires a functional PhoP-PhoQ system and is reproduced in primary fibroblasts isolated from the mouse intestine. The fibroblast infection model was exploited to generate transcriptome data, which revealed that ∼2% (98 genes) of the S. Typhimurium genome is differentially expressed in nongrowing intracellular bacteria. Changes include metabolic reprogramming to microaerophilic conditions, induction of virulence plasmid genes, upregulation of the pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, and shutdown of flagella production and chemotaxis. Comparison of relative protein levels of several PhoP-PhoQ-regulated functions (PagN, PagP, and VirK) in nongrowing intracellular bacteria and extracellular bacteria exposed to diverse PhoP-PhoQ-inducing signals denoted a regulation responding to acidic pH. These data demonstrate that S. Typhimurium restrains intracellular growth in vivo and support a model in which dormant intracellular bacteria could sense vacuolar acidification to stimulate the PhoP-PhoQ system for preventing intracellular overgrowth. PMID:23090959

  18. Cadmium Induces Transcription Independently of Intracellular Calcium Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvermoes, Brooke E.; Bird, Gary S.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca2+]i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60), which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca2+]i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription. PMID:21694771

  19. Smart Nanoparticles Undergo Phase Transition for Enhanced Cellular Uptake and Subsequent Intracellular Drug Release in a Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guihua; Jiang, Yajun; Yang, Xiaoying; Hu, Hongxiang; Wang, Beibei; Sun, Lu; Yang, Victor C; Sun, Duxin; Gao, Wei

    2018-01-10

    Inefficient cellular uptake and intracellular drug release at the tumor site are two major obstacles limiting the antitumor efficacy of nanoparticle delivery systems. To overcome both problems, we designed a smart nanoparticle that undergoes phase transition in a tumor microenvironment (TME). The smart nanoparticle is generated using a lipid-polypetide hybrid nanoparticle, which comprises a PEGylated lipid monolayer shell and a pH-sensitive hydrophobic poly-l-histidine core and is loaded with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX). The smart nanoparticle undergoes a two-step phase transition at two different pH values in the TME: (i) At the TME (pH e : 7.0-6.5), the smart nanoparticle swells, and its surface potential turns from negative to neutral, facilitating the cellular uptake; (ii) After internalization, at the acid endolysosome (pH endo : 6.5-4.5), the smart nanoparticle dissociates and induces endolysosome escape to release DOX into the cytoplasm. In addition, a tumor-penetrating peptide iNRG was modified on the surface of the smart nanoparticle as a tumor target moiety. The in vitro studies demonstrated that the iNGR-modified smart nanoparticles promoted cellular uptake in the acidic environment (pH 6.8). The in vivo studies showed that the iNGR-modified smart nanoparticles exerted more potent antitumor efficacy against late-stage aggressive breast carcinoma than free DOX. These data suggest that the smart nanoparticles may serve as a promising delivery system for sequential uptake and intracellular drug release of antitumor agents. The easy preparation of these smart nanoparticles may also have advantages in the future manufacture for clinical trials and clinical use.

  20. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.