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Sample records for intracellular macrophage parasitism

  1. Arginase in Parasitic Infections: Macrophage Activation, Immunosuppression, and Intracellular Signals

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    Cinthia C. Stempin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A type 1 cytokine-dependent proinflammatory response inducing classically activated macrophages (CaMϕs is crucial for parasite control during protozoan infections but can also contribute to the development of immunopathological disease symptoms. Type 2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 antagonize CaMϕs inducing alternatively activated macrophages (AaMϕs that upregulate arginase-1 expression. During several infections, induction of arginase-1-macrophages was showed to have a detrimental role by limiting CaMϕ-dependent parasite clearance and promoting parasite proliferation. Additionally, the role of arginase-1 in T cell suppression has been explored recently. Arginase-1 can also be induced by IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β or even directly by parasites or parasite components. Therefore, generation of alternative activation states of macrophages could limit collateral tissue damage because of excessive type 1 inflammation. However, they affect disease outcome by promoting parasite survival and proliferation. Thus, modulation of macrophage activation may be instrumental in allowing parasite persistence and long-term host survival.

  2. Delineation of diverse macrophage activation programs in response to intracellular parasites and cytokines.

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    Shuyi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically

  3. Yersinia pestis intracellular parasitism of macrophages from hosts exhibiting high and low severity of plague.

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    Duraisamy Ponnusamy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis causes severe disease in natural rodent hosts, but mild to inapparent disease in certain rodent predators such as dogs. Y. pestis initiates infection in susceptible hosts by parasitizing and multiplying intracellularly in local macrophages prior to systemic dissemination. Thus, we hypothesize that Y. pestis disease severity may depend on the degree to which intracellular Y. pestis overcomes the initial host macrophage imposed stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, the progression of in vitro infection by Y. pestis KIM62053.1+ of mouse splenic and RAW264.7 tissue culture macrophages and dog peripheral blood-derived and DH82 tissue culture macrophages was studied using microscopy and various parameters of infection. The study showed that during the early stage of infection, intracellular Y. pestis assumed filamentous cellular morphology with multiple copies of the genome per bacterium in both mouse and dog macrophages. Later, in mouse macrophages, the infection elicited spacious vacuolar extension of Yersinia containing vacuoles (YCV, and the filamentous Y. pestis reverted to coccobacillary morphology with genomic equivalents approximately equaling colony forming units. In contrast, Y. pestis infected dog macrophages did not show noticeable extension of YCV, and intracellular Y. pestis retained the filamentous cellular morphology for the entire experiment in DH82 cells or were killed by blood-derived macrophages. In addition, during the later stage of infection, Y. pestis infected mouse macrophages exhibited cell lysis whereas dog macrophages did not. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these results support our hypothesis that Y. pestis in mouse macrophages can overcome the initial intracellular stress necessary for subsequent systemic infection. However, in dogs, failure of Y. pestis to overcome macrophage imposed stress may result in mild or in apparent disease in dogs.

  4. Leishmania panamensis infection and antimonial drugs modulate expression of macrophage drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes: impact on intracellular parasite survival

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    Gómez, Maria Adelaida; Navas, Adriana; Márquez, Ricardo; Rojas, Laura Jimena; Vargas, Deninson Alejandro; Blanco, Victor Manuel; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment failure is multifactorial. Despite the importance of host cell drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the accumulation, distribution and metabolism of drugs targeting intracellular pathogens, their impact on the efficacy of antileishmanials is unknown. We examined the contribution of pharmacologically relevant determinants in human macrophages in the antimony-mediated killing of intracellular Leishmania panamensis and its relationship with the outcome of treatment with meglumine antimoniate. Methods Patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis who failed (n = 8) or responded (n = 8) to treatment were recruited. Gene expression profiling of pharmacological determinants in primary macrophages was evaluated by quantitative RT–PCR and correlated to the drug-mediated intracellular parasite killing. Functional validation was conducted through short hairpin RNA gene knockdown. Results Survival of L. panamensis after exposure to antimonials was significantly higher in macrophages from patients who failed treatment. Sixteen macrophage drug-response genes were modulated by infection and exposure to meglumine antimoniate. Correlation analyses of gene expression and intracellular parasite survival revealed the involvement of host cell metallothionein-2A and ABCB6 in the survival of Leishmania during exposure to antimonials. ABCB6 was functionally validated as a transporter of antimonial compounds localized in both the cell and phagolysosomal membranes of macrophages, revealing a novel mechanism of host cell-mediated regulation of intracellular drug exposure and parasite survival within phagocytes. Conclusions These results provide insight into host cell mechanisms regulating the intracellular exposure of Leishmania to antimonials and variations among individuals that impact parasite survival. Understanding of host cell determinants of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics opens new avenues to improved drug efficacy for intracellular

  5. Amastin Knockdown in Leishmania braziliensis Affects Parasite-Macrophage Interaction and Results in Impaired Viability of Intracellular Amastigotes.

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    Rita Marcia Cardoso de Paiva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a human parasitic disease with manifestations ranging from cutaneous ulcerations to fatal visceral infection, is caused by several Leishmania species. These protozoan parasites replicate as extracellular, flagellated promastigotes in the gut of a sandfly vector and as amastigotes inside the parasitophorous vacuole of vertebrate host macrophages. Amastins are surface glycoproteins encoded by large gene families present in the genomes of several trypanosomatids and highly expressed in the intracellular amastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp. Here, we showed that the genome of L. braziliensis contains 52 amastin genes belonging to all four previously described amastin subfamilies and that the expression of members of all subfamilies is upregulated in L. braziliensis amastigotes. Although primary sequence alignments showed no homology to any known protein sequence, homology searches based on secondary structure predictions indicate that amastins are related to claudins, a group of proteins that are components of eukaryotic tight junction complexes. By knocking-down the expression of δ-amastins in L. braziliensis, their essential role during infection became evident. δ-amastin knockdown parasites showed impaired growth after in vitro infection of mouse macrophages and completely failed to produce infection when inoculated in BALB/c mice, an attenuated phenotype that was reverted by the re-expression of an RNAi-resistant amastin gene. Further highlighting their essential role in host-parasite interactions, electron microscopy analyses of macrophages infected with amastin knockdown parasites showed significant alterations in the tight contact that is normally observed between the surface of wild type amastigotes and the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole.

  6. Filopodia and membrane blebs drive efficient matrix invasion of macrophages transformed by the intracellular parasite Theileria annulata.

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    Min Ma

    Full Text Available Recent technical advances have broadened our understanding of processes that govern mammalian cell migration in health and disease but many of the molecular and morphological alterations that precede and accompany movement of cells - in particular in three-dimensional (3D environments - are still incompletely understood. In this manuscript, using high-resolution and time-lapse microscopy imaging approaches, we describe morphodynamic processes during rounded/amoeboid cell invasion and molecules associated with the cellular invasion structures. We used macrophages infected with the intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, which causes Tropical Theileriosis in susceptible ruminants such as domestic cattle. T. annulata transforms its host cell that, as a result, acquires many characteristics of human cancer cells including a markedly increased potential to migrate, disseminate and expand in the body of the host animal. Hence, virulence of the disease is associated with the capability of infected cells to disseminate inside the host. Using T. annulata-transformed macrophages as a model system, we described a novel mode of rounded/amoeboid macrophage migration. We show that filopodia-like membrane extensions at the leading edge lead the way and further evolve in blebbing membrane protrusions to promote progressive expansion of the matrix. Associated with focal invasion structures we detected ezrin, radixin, moesin-family proteins and their regulatory kinase MAP4K4. Furthermore, we linked Rho-kinase activity to contractile force generation, which is essential for infected cell motility. Thus, the motility mode of these parasite-transformed macrophages contrasts with those described so far in human macrophages such as the tunneling or mesenchymal modes, which require engulfment, compaction and ingestion of matrix or proteolytic matrix degradation, respectively. Together, our data reveal protrusion dynamics at the leading edge of invading

  7. Efficient drug targeting to rat alveolar macrophages by pulmonary administration of ciprofloxacin incorporated into mannosylated liposomes for treatment of respiratory intracellular parasitic infections.

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    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-04-01

    The efficacy of pulmonary administration of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) incorporated into mannosylated liposomes (mannosylated CPFX-liposomes) for the treatment of respiratory intracellular parasitic infections was evaluated. In brief, mannosylated CPFX-liposomes with 4-aminophenyl-a-d-mannopyranoside (particle size: 1000 nm) were prepared, and the drug targeting to alveolar macrophages (AMs) following pulmonary administration was examined in rats. Furthermore, the antibacterial and mutant prevention effects of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes in AMs were evaluated by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. The targeting efficiency of CPFX to rat AMs following pulmonary administration of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes was significantly greater than that of CPFX incorporated into unmodified liposomes (unmodified CPFX-liposomes; particle size: 1000 nm). According to PK/PD analysis, the mannosylated CPFX-liposomes exhibited potent antibacterial effects against many bacteria although unmodified CPFX-liposomes were ineffective against several types of bacteria, and the probability of microbial mutation by mannosylated CPFX-liposomes was extremely low. The present study indicates that mannosylated CPFX-liposomes as pulmonary administration system could be useful for the treatment of respiratory intracellular parasitic infections.

  8. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

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    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  9. Invasion and intracellular survival by protozoan parasites.

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    Sibley, L David

    2011-03-01

    Intracellular parasitism has arisen only a few times during the long ancestry of protozoan parasites including in diverse groups such as microsporidians, kinetoplastids, and apicomplexans. Strategies used to gain entry differ widely from injection (e.g. microsporidians), active penetration of the host cell (e.g. Toxoplasma), recruitment of lysosomes to a plasma membrane wound (e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi), to host cell-mediated phagocytosis (e.g. Leishmania). The resulting range of intracellular niches is equally diverse ranging from cytosolic (e.g. T. cruzi) to residing within a non-fusigenic vacuole (e.g. Toxoplasma, Encephalitozoon) or a modified phagolysosome (e.g. Leishmania). These lifestyle choices influence access to nutrients, interaction with host cell signaling pathways, and detection by pathogen recognition systems. As such, intracellular life requires a repertoire of adaptations to assure entry-exit from the cell, as well as to thwart innate immune mechanisms and prevent clearance. Elucidating these pathways at the cellular and molecular level may identify key steps that can be targeted to reduce parasite survival or augment immunologic responses and thereby prevent disease.

  10. Leishmania-mediated inhibition of iron export promotes parasite replication in macrophages.

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    Rym Ben-Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania parasites infect macrophages, cells that play an important role in organismal iron homeostasis. By expressing ferroportin, a membrane protein specialized in iron export, macrophages release iron stored intracellularly into the circulation. Iron is essential for the intracellular replication of Leishmania, but how the parasites compete with the iron export function of their host cell is unknown. Here, we show that infection with Leishmania amazonensis inhibits ferroportin expression in macrophages. In a TLR4-dependent manner, infected macrophages upregulated transcription of hepcidin, a peptide hormone that triggers ferroportin degradation. Parasite replication was inhibited in hepcidin-deficient macrophages and in wild type macrophages overexpressing mutant ferroportin that is resistant to hepcidin-induced degradation. Conversely, intracellular growth was enhanced by exogenously added hepcidin, or by expression of dominant-negative ferroportin. Importantly, dominant-negative ferroportin and macrophages from flatiron mice, a mouse model for human type IV hereditary hemochromatosis, restored the infectivity of mutant parasite strains defective in iron acquisition. Thus, inhibition of ferroportin expression is a specific strategy used by L. amazonensis to inhibit iron export and promote their own intracellular growth.

  11. Macrophage polarisation: immune responses of carp against parasites

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    Joerink, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the studies described in this thesis we used a natural host-parasite model of two parasites ( Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii ) infecting common carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.), to obtain more knowledge about the phenomenon of macrophage polarisation in 'the evolutionary older' teleosts

  12. Modulation of mammalian apoptotic pathways by intracellular protozoan parasites.

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    Rodrigues, V; Cordeiro-da-Silva, A; Laforge, M; Ouaissi, A; Silvestre, R; Estaquier, J

    2012-03-01

    During intracellular parasitic infections, pathogens and host cells take part in a complex web of events that are crucial for the outcome of the infection. Modulation of host cell apoptosis by pathogens attracted the attention of scientists during the last decade. Apoptosis is an efficient mechanism used by the host to control infection and limit pathogen multiplication and dissemination. In order to ensure completion of their complex life cycles and to guarantee transmission between different hosts, intracellular parasites have developed mechanisms to block apoptosis and sustain the viability of their host cells. Here, we review how some of the most prominent intracellular protozoan parasites modulate the main mammalian apoptotic pathways by emphasizing the advances from the last decade, which have begun to dissect this dynamic and complex interaction.

  13. Intracellular water motion decreases in apoptotic macrophages after caspase activation.

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    Hortelano, S; García-Martín, M L; Cerdán, S; Castrillo, A; Alvarez, A M; Boscá, L

    2001-10-01

    Triggering of the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma promoted apoptosis that was prevented by inhibitors of type 2 nitric oxide synthase or caspase. Using (1)H NMR analysis, we have investigated the changes of the intracellular transverse relaxation time (T(2)) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) as parameters reflecting the rotational and translational motions of water in apoptotic macrophages. T(2) values decreased significantly from 287 to 182 ms in cells treated for 18 h with NO-donors. These changes of T(2) were prevented by caspase inhibitors and were not due to mitochondrial depolarization or microtubule depolymerization. The decrease of the intracellular values of T(2) and ADC in apoptotic macrophages was observed after caspase activation, but preceded phosphatidylserine exposure and nucleosomal DNA cleavage. The changes of water motion were accompanied by an enhancement of the hydrophobic properties of the intracellular milieu, as detected by fluorescent probes. These results indicate the occurrence of an alteration in the physicochemical properties of intracellular water during the course of apoptosis.

  14. Deciphering the Intracellular Fate of Propionibacterium acnes in Macrophages

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    Natalie Fischer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases.

  15. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

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    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  16. 17-AAG Kills Intracellular Leishmania amazonensis while Reducing Inflammatory Responses in Infected Macrophages

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    Petersen, Antonio Luis de Oliveira Almeida; Guedes, Carlos Eduardo Sampaio; Versoza, Carolina Leite; Lima, José Geraldo Bomfim; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Borges, Valéria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a neglected endemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Pentavalent antimonials have been the treatment of choice for the past 70 years and, due to the emergence of resistant cases, the efficacy of these drugs has come under scrutiny. Second-line drugs are less efficacious, cause a range of side effects and can be costly. The formulation of new generations of drugs, especially in developing countries, has become mandatory. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the anti-leishmanial effect of 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an HSP90 inhibitor, in vitro. This inhibitor is currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment; however, its effects against intracellular Leishmania remain untested. Macrophages infected with L. amazonensis were treated with 17-AAG (25–500 nM) and parasite load was quantified using optical microscopy. Parasite load declined in 17-AAG-treated macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular parasite death became irreversible after 4 h of treatment with 17-AAG, and occurred independent of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2−) production. Additionally, intracellular parasite viability was severely reduced after 48 h of treatment. Interestingly, treatment with 17-AAG reduced pro-inflammatory mediator production, including TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1, yet IL-12 remained unaffected. Electron microscopy revealed morphological alterations, such as double-membrane vacuoles and myelin figures at 24 and 48 h after 17-AAG treatment. Conclusions/Significance The HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, possesses high potency under low dosage and reduces both pro-inflammatory and oxidative molecule production. Therefore, further studies are warranted to investigate this inhibitor’s potential in the development of new generations of anti-leishmanials. PMID:23152914

  17. Macrophage polarisation: immune responses of carp against parasites

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    Joerink, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the studies described in this thesis we used a natural host-parasite model of two parasites ( Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii ) infecting common carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.), to obtain more knowledge about the phenomenon of macrophage polarisation in 'the evolutionary older' teleosts and the consequences of differential activation for the individual host.The general aspects of the teleost immune system are very similar to those of the mammalian immune system. Polarisation of m...

  18. Host lipid bodies as platforms for intracellular survival of protozoan parasites

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    Daniel A.M. Toledo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens induce several changes in the host cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms in order to evade and manipulate the immune response. One prominent pathogen-mediated change is the formation of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies or lipid droplets, in the host cell cytoplasm. Protozoan parasites, which contribute expressively to the burden of infectious diseases worldwide, are able to induce lipid body genesis in non-immune and immune cells, mainly macrophages, key players in the initial resistance to the infection. Under host-parasite interaction, lipid bodies not only accumulate in the host cytoplasm but also relocate around and move into parasitophorous vacuoles. There is increasing evidence that protozoan parasites may target host-derived lipid bodies either for gaining nutrients or for escaping the host immune response. Newly formed, parasite-induced lipid bodies may serve as lipid sources for parasite growth and also produce inflammatory mediators that potentially act in the host immune response deactivation. In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the formation and role of host lipid bodies as sites exploited by intracellular protozoan parasites as a strategy to maintain their own survival.

  19. Host Lipid Bodies as Platforms for Intracellular Survival of Protozoan Parasites.

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    Toledo, Daniel A M; D'Avila, Heloísa; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens induce several changes in the host cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms in order to evade and manipulate the immune response. One prominent pathogen-mediated change is the formation of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets, in the host cell cytoplasm. Protozoan parasites, which contribute expressively to the burden of infectious diseases worldwide, are able to induce LB genesis in non-immune and immune cells, mainly macrophages, key players in the initial resistance to the infection. Under host-parasite interaction, LBs not only accumulate in the host cytoplasm but also relocate around and move into parasitophorous vacuoles. There is increasing evidence that protozoan parasites may target host-derived LBs either for gaining nutrients or for escaping the host immune response. Newly formed, parasite-induced LBs may serve as lipid sources for parasite growth and also produce inflammatory mediators that potentially act in the host immune response deactivation. In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the formation and role of host LBs as sites exploited by intracellular protozoan parasites as a strategy to maintain their own survival.

  20. Leishmania eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF inhibits parasite growth in murine macrophages.

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    Olga Koutsoni

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases constitute neglected global public health problems that require adequate control measures, prophylactic clinical vaccines and effective and non-toxic drug treatments. In this study, we explored the potential of Leishmania infantum eukaryotic initiation factor (LieIF, an exosomal protein, as a novel anti-infective therapeutic molecule. More specifically, we assessed the efficacy of recombinant LieIF, in combination with recombinant IFN-γ, in eliminating intracellular L. donovani parasites in an in vitro macrophage model. J774A.1 macrophages were initially treated with LieIF/IFN-γ prior to in vitro infection with L. donovani stationary phase promastigotes (pre-infection treatment, and resistance to infection was observed 72 h after infection. J774A.1 macrophages were also treated with LieIF/IFN-γ after L. donovani infection (post-infection treatment, and resistance to infection was also observed at both time points tested (19 h and 72 h after infection. To elucidate the LieIF/IFN-γ-induced mechanism(s that mediate the reduction of intracellular parasite growth, we examined the generation of potent microbicidal molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS, within infected macrophages. Furthermore, macrophages pre-treated with LieIF/IFN-γ showed a clear up-regulation in macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α expression. However, significant different protein levels were not detected. In addition, macrophages pre-treated with LieIF/IFN-γ combined with anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody produced significantly lower amounts of ROS. These data suggest that during the pre-treatment state, LieIF induces intramacrophage parasite growth inhibition through the production of TNF-α, which induces microbicidal activity by stimulating NO and ROS production. The mechanisms of NO and ROS production when macrophages are treated with LieIF after infection are probably

  1. Simultaneous gene expression profiling in human macrophages infected with Leishmania major parasites using SAGE

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    Smandi Sondos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania (L are intracellular protozoan parasites that are able to survive and replicate within the harsh and potentially hostile phagolysosomal environment of mammalian mononuclear phagocytes. A complex interplay then takes place between the macrophage (MΦ striving to eliminate the pathogen and the parasite struggling for its own survival. To investigate this host-parasite conflict at the transcriptional level, in the context of monocyte-derived human MΦs (MDM infection by L. major metacyclic promastigotes, the quantitative technique of serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE was used. Results After extracting mRNA from resting human MΦs, Leishmania-infected human MΦs and L. major parasites, three SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced generating up to 28,173; 57,514 and 33,906 tags respectively (corresponding to 12,946; 23,442 and 9,530 unique tags. Using computational data analysis and direct comparison to 357,888 publicly available experimental human tags, the parasite and the host cell transcriptomes were then simultaneously characterized from the mixed cellular extract, confidently discriminating host from parasite transcripts. This procedure led us to reliably assign 3,814 tags to MΦs' and 3,666 tags to L. major parasites transcripts. We focused on these, showing significant changes in their expression that are likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of parasite infection: (i human MΦs genes, belonging to key immune response proteins (e.g., IFNγ pathway, S100 and chemokine families and (ii a group of Leishmania genes showing a preferential expression at the parasite's intra-cellular developing stage. Conclusion Dual SAGE transcriptome analysis provided a useful, powerful and accurate approach to discriminating genes of human or parasitic origin in Leishmania-infected human MΦs. The findings presented in this work suggest that the Leishmania parasite modulates key transcripts in human MΦs that may

  2. Soluble CD40 Ligand in Sera of Subjects Exposed to Leishmania infantum Infection Reduces the Parasite Load in Macrophages.

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    Fabrícia Alvisi de Oliveira

    Full Text Available While CD40L is typically a membrane glycoprotein expressed on activated T cells and platelets that binds and activates CD40 on the surface on antigen presenting cells, a soluble derivative (sCD40L that appears to retain its biological activity after cleavage from cell membrane also exists. We recently reported that sCD40L is associated with clinical resolution of visceral leishmaniasis and protection against the disease. In the present study we investigated if this sCD40L is functional and exerts anti-parasitic effect in L. infantum-infected macrophages.Macrophages from normal human donors were infected with L. infantum promastigotes and incubated with either sera from subjects exposed to L. infantum infection, monoclonal antibodies against human CD40L, or an isotype control antibody. We then evaluated infection by counting the number of infected cells and the number of parasites in each cell. We also measured a variety of immune modulatory cytokines in these macrophage culture supernatants by Luminex assay. The addition of sCD40L, either recombinant or from infected individuals' serum, decreased both the number of infected macrophages and number of intracellular parasites. Moreover, this treatment increased the production of IL-12, IL-23, IL-27, IL-15, and IL1β such that negative correlations between the levels of these cytokines with both the infection ratio and number of intracellular parasites were observed.sCD40L from sera of subjects exposed to L. infantum is functional and improves both the control of parasite and production of inflamatory cytokines of infected macrophages. Although the mechanisms involved in parasite killing are still unclear and require further exploration, these findings indicate a protective role of sCD40L in visceral leishmaniasis.

  3. The role of TREM-2 in internalization and intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

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    Wei, Pan; Lu, Qiang; Cui, Guimei; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Changjiang; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-02-15

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) is a cell surface receptor primarily expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. TREM-2 functions as a phagocytic receptor for bacteria as well as an inhibitor of Toll like receptors (TLR) induced inflammatory cytokines. However, the role of TREM-2 in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. To investigate whether TREM-2 is involved in Brucella intracellular survival, we chose bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs), in which TREM-2 is stably expressed, as cell model. Colony formation Units (CFUs) assay suggests that TREM-2 is involved in the internalization of Brucella abortus (B. abortus) by macrophages, while silencing of TREM-2 decreases intracellular survival of B. abortus. To further study the underlying mechanisms of TREM-2-mediated bacterial intracellular survival, we examined the activation of B. abortus-infected macrophages through determining the kinetics of activation of the three MAPKs, including ERK, JNK and p38, and measuring TNFα production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Brucella (BrLPS) or B. abortus stimulation. Our data show that TREM-2 deficiency promotes activation of Brucella-infected macrophages. Moreover, our data also demonstrate that macrophage activation promotes killing of Brucella by enhancing nitric oxygen (NO), but not reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, macrophage apoptosis or cellular death. Taken together, these findings provide a novel interpretation of Brucella intracellular growth through inhibition of NO production produced by TREM-2-mediated activated macrophages.

  4. Intracellular survival and persistence of Chlamydia muridarum is determined by macrophage polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gracey

    Full Text Available Macrophages can display a number of distinct phenotypes, known collectively as polarized macrophages. The best defined of these phenotypes are the classically-activated, interferon gamma (IFNγ/LPS induced (M1 and alternatively-activated, IL-4 induced (M2 macrophages. The goal of this study is to characterize macrophage-Chlamydia interactions in the context of macrophage polarization. Here we use Chlamydia muridarum and murine bone-marrow derived macrophages to show Chlamydia does not induce M2 polarization in macrophages as a survival strategy. Unexpectedly, the infection of macrophages was silent with no upregulation of M1 macrophage-associated genes. We further demonstrate that macrophages polarized prior to infection have a differential capacity to control Chlamydia. M1 macrophages harbor up to 40-fold lower inclusion forming units (IFU than non-polarized or M2 polarized macrophages. Gene expression analysis showed an increase in 16sRNA in M2 macrophages with no change in M1 macrophages. Suppressed Chlamydia growth in M1 macrophages correlated with the induction of a bacterial gene expression profile typical of persistence as evident by increased Euo expression and decreased Omp1 and Tal expression. Observations of permissive Chlamydia growth in non-polarized and M2 macrophages and persistence in M1 macrophages were supported through electron microscopy. This work supports the importance of IFNγ in the innate immune response to Chlamydia. However, demonstration that the M1 macrophages, despite an antimicrobial signature, fail to eliminate intracellular Chlamydia supports the notion that host-pathogen co-evolution has yielded a pathogen that can evade cellular defenses against this pathogen, and persist for prolonged periods of time in the host.

  5. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  6. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  7. Role of intracellular free calcium in killing Penicillium marneffei within human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) promote phagocyte antimicrobial responses. Here, we investigated macrophages stimulated by Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei). [Ca(2+)]c was determined in macrophages loaded with the fluorescent calcium probe Fura 2/AM as they were stimulated by P. marneffei. We found that P. marneffei induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in human macrophages. Further, increased [Ca(2+)]c with the ionophore A23187 promoted phagosomal acidification and maturation and reduced intracellular replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages, whereas decreased [Ca(2+)]c with the chelation MAPTAM decreased TNF-α production, inhibited phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular replication of P. marneffei. These data indicate that Ca(2+) signaling may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei within macrophages.

  8. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  9. Eradication of intracellular Francisella tularensis in THP-1 human macrophages with a novel autophagy inducing agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunn John S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autophagy has been shown recently to play an important role in the intracellular survival of several pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effect of a novel small-molecule autophagy-inducing agent, AR-12, on the survival of Francisella tularensis, the causative bacterium of tularemia in humans and a potential bioterrorism agent, in macrophages. Methods and results Our results show that AR-12 induces autophagy in THP-1 macrophages, as indicated by increased autophagosome formation, and potently inhibits the intracellular survival of F. tularensis (type A strain, Schu S4 and F. novicida in macrophages in association with increased bacterial co-localization with autophagosomes. The effect of AR-12 on intracellular F. novicida was fully reversed in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyl adenine or the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine. Intracellular F. novicida were not susceptible to the inhibitory activity of AR-12 added at 12 h post-infection in THP-1 macrophages, and this lack of susceptibility was independent of the intracellular location of bacteria. Conclusion Together, AR-12 represents a proof-of-principle that intracellular F. tularensis can be eradicated by small-molecule agents that target innate immunity.

  10. Intracellular pathogens within alveolar macrophages in a patient with HIV infection: diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shinha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-infected individuals, macrophages, the key defense effector cells, manifest defective activity in their interactions with a wide variety of opportunistic pathogens, including fungi and protozoa. Understanding the morphological characteristics of intracellular opportunistic pathogens in addition to their pathogenesis is of critical importance to provide optimal therapy, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. We herein present a case of disseminated histoplasmosis confused with disseminated visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected individual from Guyana who developed intracellular organisms within alveolar macrophages

  11. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show that sideroc......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...... findings are consistent with an important role for siderocalin in protection against M.tb infection and suggest that exogenously administered siderocalin may have therapeutic applications in tuberculosis....

  12. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show...... findings are consistent with an important role for siderocalin in protection against M.tb infection and suggest that exogenously administered siderocalin may have therapeutic applications in tuberculosis....

  13. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae.

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    Tanja Buchacher

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection

  14. A highly conserved Toxo1 haplotype directs resistance to toxoplasmosis and its associated caspase-1 dependent killing of parasite and host macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavailles, Pierre; Flori, Pierre; Papapietro, Olivier; Bisanz, Cordelia; Lagrange, Dominique; Pilloux, Ludovic; Massera, Céline; Cristinelli, Sara; Jublot, Delphine; Bastien, Olivier; Loeuillet, Corinne; Aldebert, Delphine; Touquet, Bastien; Fournié, Gilbert J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Natural immunity or resistance to pathogens most often relies on the genetic make-up of the host. In a LEW rat model of refractoriness to toxoplasmosis, we previously identified on chromosome 10 the Toxo1 locus that directs toxoplasmosis outcome and controls parasite spreading by a macrophage-dependent mechanism. Now, we narrowed down Toxo1 to a 891 kb interval containing 29 genes syntenic to human 17p13 region. Strikingly, Toxo1 is included in a haplotype block strictly conserved among all refractory rat strains. The sequencing of Toxo1 in nine rat strains (5 refractory and 4 susceptible) revealed resistant-restricted conserved polymorphisms displaying a distribution gradient that peaks at the bottom border of Toxo1, and highlighting the NOD-like receptor, Nlrp1a, as a major candidate. The Nlrp1 inflammasome is known to trigger, upon pathogen intracellular sensing, pyroptosis programmed-cell death involving caspase-1 activation and cleavage of IL-1β. Functional studies demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent refractoriness in vivo correlated with both the ability of macrophages to restrict T. gondii growth and a T. gondii-induced death of intracellular parasites and its host macrophages. The parasite-induced cell death of infected macrophages bearing the LEW-Toxo1 alleles was found to exhibit pyroptosis-like features with ROS production, the activation of caspase-1 and IL1-β secretion. The pharmacological inactivation of caspase-1 using YVAD and Z-VAD inhibitors prevented the death of both intravacuolar parasites and host non-permissive macrophages but failed to restore parasite proliferation. These findings demonstrated that the Toxo1-dependent response of rat macrophages to T. gondii infection may trigger two pathways leading to the control of parasite proliferation and the death of parasites and host macrophages. The NOD-like receptor NLRP1a/Caspase-1 pathway is the best candidate to mediate the parasite-induced cell death. These data represent new insights

  15. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40.

  16. Leishmania Donovani Cell Surface Sialoglycans Regulate Susceptibility for Siglec Mediated Macrophage Invasion and Parasite Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti De

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in the survival of Leishmania parasites in destructive surroundings. An important constituent present on many glycoconjugates is sialic acid. By virtue of their peripheral position on oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates, sialic acids are well suited as molecular determinants of specific biological processes, including the interaction of pathogenic microorganisms with sialylated cellular receptors. Differences in a2,3- and a2,6-sialoglycan patterns detected in clonal virulent Leishmania donovani promastigotes, correlated with the level of a2,3- and a2,6-sialyltransferase activity present in these parasites. The role of macrophage sialic acid-receptors in uptake and survival of L.donovani was studied in the murine macrophage cell line raw 264.7. Macrophage invasion was dependent on the binding to Siglec-1, while suppression of MAPK signaling was mediated through Siglec-5. Sialic acid removal by neuraminidase treatment reduced parasite infectivity. The presence of trypsin resistant sialic acid residues in the neuraminidase treated parasites grown in a serum free medium in presence of sialoglycoconjugates indicated that the parasites could salvage sialic acid from exogenous sialoglycans and reutilize it for de novo glycoprotein sialylation in L.donovani parasites. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of sialoglycans in the invasion as well as the survival process of L.donovani parasites.

  17. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  18. Phenylbutyrate induces LL-37-dependent autophagy and intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Rao Muvva, S S V Jagadeeswara; Wan, Min; Raqib, Rubhana; Bergman, Peter; Brighenti, Susanna; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    LL-37 is a human antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the cathelicidin family with multiple activities including a mediator of vitamin D-induced autophagy in human macrophages, resulting in intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In a previous trial in healthy volunteers, we have shown that LL-37 expression and subsequent Mtb-killing can be further enhanced by 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), also an inducer of LL-37 expression. Here, we explore a potential mechanism(s) behind PBA and LL-37-induced autophagy and intracellular killing of Mtb. Mtb infection of macrophages downregulated the expression of both the CAMP transcript and LL-37 peptide as well as certain autophagy-related genes (BECN1 and ATG5) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, activation of LC3-II in primary macrophages and THP-1 cells was not detected. PBA and the active form of vitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3), separately or particularly in combination, were able to overcome Mtb-induced suppression of LL-37 expression. Notably, reactivation of autophagy occurred by stimulation of macrophages with PBA and promoted colocalization of LL-37 and LC3-II in autophagosomes. Importantly, PBA treatment failed to induce autophagy in Mtb-infected THP-1 cells, when the expression of LL-37 was silenced. However, PBA-induced autophagy was restored when the LL-37 knockdown cells were supplemented with synthetic LL-37. Interestingly, we have found that LL-37-induced autophagy was mediated via P2RX7 receptor followed by enhanced cytosolic free Ca(2+), and activation of AMPK and PtdIns3K pathways. Altogether, these results suggest a novel activity for PBA as an inducer of autophagy, which is LL-37-dependent and promotes intracellular killing of Mtb in human macrophages.

  19. The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis resists phagosome acidification and autophagy to promote intracellular survival in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Shankar, Nathan

    2016-06-01

    While many strains of Enterococcus faecalis have been reported to be capable of surviving within macrophages for extended periods, the exact mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In this study, we found that after phagocytosis by macrophages, enterococci-containing vacuoles resist acidification, and E. faecalis is resistant to low pH. Ultrastructural examination of the enterococci-containing vacuole by transmission electron microscopy revealed a single membrane envelope, with no evidence of the classical double-membraned autophagosomes. Western blot analysis further confirmed that E. faecalis could trigger inhibition of the production of LC3-II during infection. By employing cells transfected with RFP-LC3 plasmid and infected with GFP-labelled E. faecalis, we also observed that E. faecalis was not delivered into autophagosomes during macrophage infection. While these observations indicated no role for autophagy in elimination of intracellular E. faecalis, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were keys to this process. Stimulation of autophagy suppressed the intracellular survival of E. faecalis in macrophages in vitro and decreased the burden of E. faecalis in vivo. In summary, the results from this study offer new insights into the interaction of E. faecalis with host cells and may provide a new approach to treatment of enterococcal infections.

  20. Neutrophils activate macrophages for intracellular killing of Leishmania major through recruitment of TLR4 by neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia L; Moniz-de-Souza, Maria Carolina A; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Dias, Wagner B; Lopes, Marcela F; Nunes, Marise P; Lungarella, Giuseppe; DosReis, George A

    2007-09-15

    We investigated the role of neutrophil elastase (NE) in interactions between murine inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages infected with the parasite Leishmania major. A blocker peptide specific for NE prevented the neutrophils from inducing microbicidal activity in macrophages. Inflammatory neutrophils from mutant pallid mice were defective in the spontaneous release of NE, failed to induce microbicidal activity in wild-type macrophages, and failed to reduce parasite loads upon transfer in vivo. Conversely, purified NE activated macrophages and induced microbicidal activity dependent on secretion of TNF-alpha. Induction of macrophage microbicidal activity by either neutrophils or purified NE required TLR4 expression by macrophages. Injection of purified NE shortly after infection in vivo reduced the burden of L. major in draining lymph nodes of TLR4-sufficient, but not TLR4-deficient mice. These results indicate that NE plays a previously unrecognized protective role in host responses to L. major infection.

  1. The intracellular sRNA transcriptome of Listeria monocytogenes during growth in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Billion, André; Mohamed, Walid; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Kuenne, Carsten; Pischimarov, Jordan; Krawitz, Christian; Retey, Julia; Hartsch, Thomas; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are widespread effectors of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. Currently extensive information exists on the sRNAs of Listeria monocytogenes expressed during growth in extracellular environments. We used deep sequencing of cDNAs obtained from fractioned RNA (<500 nt) isolated from extracellularly growing bacteria and from L. monocytogenes infected macrophages to catalog the sRNA repertoire during intracellular bacterial growth. Here, we report on the discovery of 150 putative regulatory RNAs of which 71 have not been previously described. A total of 29 regulatory RNAs, including small non-coding antisense RNAs, are specifically expressed intracellularly. We validated highly expressed sRNAs by northern blotting and demonstrated by the construction and characterization of isogenic mutants of rli31, rli33-1 and rli50* for intracellular expressed sRNA candidates, that their expression is required for efficient growth of bacteria in macrophages. All three mutants were attenuated when assessed for growth in mouse and insect models of infection. Comparative genomic analysis revealed the presence of lineage specific sRNA candidates and the absence of sRNA loci in genomes of naturally occurring infection-attenuated bacteria, with additional loss in non-pathogenic listerial genomes. Our analyses reveal extensive sRNA expression as an important feature of bacterial regulation during intracellular growth. PMID:21278422

  2. Distinct immunoregulatory properties of macrophage migration inhibitory factors encoded by Eimeria parasites and their chicken host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in host defense against a variety of microorganisms including protozoan parasites. Interestingly, some microbial pathogens also express a MIF-like protein, although its role in disease pathogenesi...

  3. Inflammation and Cancer: Extra- and Intracellular Determinants of Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Tumor Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizler, Csaba; Kitajka, Klara; Puskas, Laszlo G.

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer-related inflammation is the recruitment of monocyte-macrophage lineage cells to the tumor microenvironment. These tumor infiltrating myeloid cells are educated by the tumor milieu, rich in cancer cells and stroma components, to exert functions such as promotion of tumor growth, immunosuppression, angiogenesis, and cancer cell dissemination. Our review highlights the ontogenetic diversity of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and describes their main phenotypic markers. We cover fundamental molecular players in the tumor microenvironment including extra- (CCL2, CSF-1, CXCL12, IL-4, IL-13, semaphorins, WNT5A, and WNT7B) and intracellular signals. We discuss how these factors converge on intracellular determinants (STAT3, STAT6, STAT1, NF-κB, RORC1, and HIF-1α) of cell functions and drive the recruitment and polarization of TAMs. Since microRNAs (miRNAs) modulate macrophage polarization key miRNAs (miR-146a, miR-155, miR-125a, miR-511, and miR-223) are also discussed in the context of the inflammatory myeloid tumor compartment. Accumulating evidence suggests that high TAM infiltration correlates with disease progression and overall poor survival of cancer patients. Identification of molecular targets to develop new therapeutic interventions targeting these harmful tumor infiltrating myeloid cells is emerging nowadays. PMID:28197019

  4. Sensitivity of Francisella tularensis to ultrapure water and deoxycholate: implications for bacterial intracellular growth assay in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabaev, Sabina; Anderson, Christine A.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Francisella tularensis to replicate in macrophages is critical for its pathogenesis, therefore intracellular growth assays are important tools for assessing virulence. We show that two lysis solutions commonly used in these assays, deionized water and deoxycholate in PBS, lead to highly inaccurate measurements of intracellular bacterial survival. PMID:21420447

  5. Dramatic Transcriptional Changes in an Intracellular Parasite Enable Host Switching between Plant and Insect

    OpenAIRE

    Kenro Oshima; Yoshiko Ishii; Shigeyuki Kakizawa; Kyoko Sugawara; Yutaro Neriya; Misako Himeno; Nami Minato; Chihiro Miura; Takuya Shiraishi; Yasuyuki Yamaji; Shigetou Namba

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens that have devastating effects on the yields of crops and plants worldwide. They are intracellular parasites of both plants and insects, and are spread among plants by insects. How phytoplasmas can adapt to two diverse environments is of considerable interest; however, the mechanisms enabling the "host switching" between plant and insect hosts are poorly understood. Here, we report that phytoplasmas dramatically alter their gene expression in response...

  6. IL-17A promotes intracellular growth of Mycobacterium by inhibiting apoptosis of infected macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eCruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The fate of infected macrophages is a critical aspect of immunity to mycobacteria. By depriving the pathogen of its intracellular niche, apoptotic death of the infected macrophage has been shown to be an important mechanism to control bacterial growth. Here we show that IL-17 inhibits apoptosis of Mycobacterium bovis BCG- or M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages thus hampering their ability to control bacterial growth. Mechanistically, we show that IL-17 inhibits p53, and impacts on the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, by increasing the Bcl2 and decreasing Bax expression, decreasing cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. The same effect of IL-17 was observed in infected macrophages upon blockade of p53 nuclear translocation. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the IL-17/p53 axis in the regulation of mycobacteria-induced apoptosis and can have important implications in a broad spectrum of diseases where apoptosis of the infected cell is an important host defense mechanism. .

  7. Transcription of innate immunity genes and cytokine secretion by canine macrophages resistant or susceptible to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Andréia Pereira; da Costa, Luciana Fachini; Romão, Everton de Lima; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2015-01-15

    In this study we assessed the basal transcription of genes associated with innate immunity (i.e. Nramp1, NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9) in canine monocyte-derived macrophages from Leishmania-free dogs. Additionally, secretion of cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ) and nitric oxide in culture supernatants of macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of Leishmania infantum was also measured. Constitutive transcription of TLR9 and NOD2 were negligible; NOD1, TLR1, and TLR7 had low levels of transcription, whereas Nramp1 and TLR2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 had higher levels of constitutive transcription in canine monocyte-derived macrophages. There were no significant differences in transcription between macrophages with higher or lower resistance to intracellular survival of L. infantum. Secretion of TNF-α was higher in more resistant macrophages (designated as resistant) at 24h after infection when compared to less resistant macrophages (designated as susceptible), as well as the secretion of IFN-γ at 72 h post infection. Secretion of IL-10 was lower in resistant macrophages at 24h after infection. No detectable production of nitric oxide was observed. Interestingly, there was a negative correlation between NOD2 transcript levels and intracellular survival of L. infantum in resistant macrophages. This study demonstrated that decreased intracellular survival of L. infantum in canine macrophages was associated with increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and decreased production of IL-10; and that constitutive transcription of Nramp1, TLR and NLR does not interfere in intracellular survival of L. infantum.

  8. Role of extracellular nucleotides in the immune response against intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ojcius, David M

    2012-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are danger signals involved in recognition and control of intracellular pathogens. They are an important component of the innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, inducing the recruitment of inflammatory cells, stimulating secretion of cytokines, and producing inflammatory mediators such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In the case of extracellular ATP, some of the immune responses are mediated through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of the cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), through a mechanism dependent on ligation of the P2X7 receptor. Here we review the role of extracellular nucleotides as sensors of intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites, and discuss how these pathogens manipulate purinergic signaling to diminish the immune response against infection.

  9. Differences in Intracellular Fate of Two Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia in Macrophage-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Pedro; Simões, Isaura; Riley, Sean P.; Martinez, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of human tick-borne diseases worldwide, such as Mediterranean spotted fever (Rickettsia conorii) and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (Rickettsia rickettsii). Recent studies in several animal models have provided evidence of non-endothelial parasitism by pathogenic SFG Rickettsia species, suggesting that the interaction of rickettsiae with cells other than the endothelium may play an important role in pathogenesis of rickettsial diseases. These studies raise the hypothesis that the role of macrophages in rickettsial pathogenesis may have been underappreciated. Herein, we evaluated the ability of two SFG rickettsial species, R. conorii (a recognized human pathogen) and Rickettsia montanensis (a non-virulent member of SFG) to proliferate in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, or within non-phagocytic cell lines. Our results demonstrate that R. conorii was able to survive and proliferate in both phagocytic and epithelial cells in vitro. In contrast, R. montanensis was able to grow in non-phagocytic cells, but was drastically compromised in the ability to proliferate within both undifferentiated and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Interestingly, association assays revealed that R. montanensis was defective in binding to THP-1-derived macrophages; however, the invasion of the bacteria that are able to adhere did not appear to be affected. We have also demonstrated that R. montanensis which entered into THP-1-derived macrophages were rapidly destroyed and partially co-localized with LAMP-2 and cathepsin D, two markers of lysosomal compartments. In contrast, R. conorii was present as intact bacteria and free in the cytoplasm in both cell types. These findings suggest that a phenotypic difference between a non-pathogenic and a pathogenic SFG member lies in their respective ability to proliferate in macrophage-like cells, and may provide an explanation as to why certain SFG rickettsial species are not associated

  10. Differences in intracellular fate of two spotted fever group Rickettsia in macrophage-like cells

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    Pedro Curto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spotted fever group (SFG rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of human tick-borne diseases worldwide, such as Mediterranean spotted fever (R. conorii and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R. rickettsii. Recent studies in several animal models have provided evidence of non-endothelial parasitism by pathogenic SFG Rickettsia species, suggesting that the interaction of rickettsiae with cells other than the endothelium may play an important role in pathogenesis of rickettsial diseases. These studies raise the hypothesis that the role of macrophages in rickettsial pathogenesis may have been underappreciated. Herein, we evaluated the ability of two SFG rickettsial species, R. conorii (a recognized human pathogen and R. montanensis (a non-virulent member of SFG to proliferate in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, or within non-phagocytic cell lines. Our results demonstrate that R. conorii was able to survive and proliferate in both phagocytic and epithelial cells in vitro. In contrast, R. montanensis was able to grow in non-phagocytic cells, but was drastically compromised in the ability to proliferate within both undifferentiated and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Interestingly, association assays revealed that R. montanensis was defective in binding to THP-1-derived macrophages; however, the invasion of the bacteria that are able to adhere did not appear to be affected. We have also demonstrated that R. montanensis which entered into THP-1-derived macrophages were rapidly destroyed and partially co-localized with LAMP-2 and cathepsin D, two markers of lysosomal compartments. In contrast, R. conorii was present as intact bacteria and free in the cytoplasm in both cell types. These findings suggest that a phenotypic difference between a non-pathogenic and a pathogenic SFG member lies in their respective ability to proliferate in macrophage-like cells, and may provide an explanation as to why certain SFG rickettsial species are not associated with

  11. Trade-Offs of Escherichia coli Adaptation to an Intracellular Lifestyle in Macrophages.

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    M Azevedo

    Full Text Available The bacterium Escherichia coli exhibits remarkable genomic and phenotypic variation, with some pathogenic strains having evolved to survive and even replicate in the harsh intra-macrophage environment. The rate and effects of mutations that can cause pathoadaptation are key determinants of the pace at which E. coli can colonize such niches and become pathogenic. We used experimental evolution to determine the speed and evolutionary paths undertaken by a commensal strain of E. coli when adapting to intracellular life. We estimated the acquisition of pathoadaptive mutations at a rate of 10-6 per genome per generation, resulting in the fixation of more virulent strains in less than a hundred generations. Whole genome sequencing of independently evolved clones showed that the main targets of intracellular adaptation involved loss of function mutations in genes implicated in the assembly of the lipopolysaccharide core, iron metabolism and di- and tri-peptide transport, namely rfaI, fhuA and tppB, respectively. We found a substantial amount of antagonistic pleiotropy in evolved populations, as well as metabolic trade-offs, commonly found in intracellular bacteria with reduced genome sizes. Overall, the low levels of clonal interference detected indicate that the first steps of the transition of a commensal E. coli into intracellular pathogens are dominated by a few pathoadaptive mutations with very strong effects.

  12. The Brucella suis virB operon is induced intracellularly in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Foulongne, Vincent; Michaux-Charachon, Sylvie; Bourg, Gisele; Allardet-Servent, Annick; Cazevieille, Chantal; Liautard, Jean Pierre; Ramuz, Michel; O'Callaghan, David

    2002-01-01

    A type IV secretion system similar to the VirB system of the phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens is essential for the intracellular survival and multiplication of the mammalian pathogen Brucella. Reverse transcriptase–PCR showed that the 12 genes encoding the Brucella suis VirB system form an operon. Semiquantitative measurements of virB mRNA levels by slot blotting showed that transcription of the virB operon, but not the flanking genes, is regulated by environmental factors in vitro. Flow cytometry used to measure green fluorescent protein expression from the virB promoter confirmed the data from slot blots. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and fluorescence microscopy showed that the virB promoter is induced in macrophages within 3 h after infection. Induction only occurred once the bacteria were inside the cells, and phagosome acidification was shown to be the major signal inducing intracellular expression. Because phagosome acidification is essential for the intracellular multiplication of Brucella, we suggest that it is the signal that triggers the secretion of unknown effector molecules. These effector molecules play a role in the remodeling of the phagosome to create the unique intracellular compartment in which Brucella replicates. PMID:11830669

  13. Chromerid genomes reveal the evolutionary path from photosynthetic algae to obligate intracellular parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Yong

    2015-07-15

    The eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa encompasses thousands of obligate intracellular parasites of humans and animals with immense socio-economic and health impacts. We sequenced nuclear genomes of Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, free-living non-parasitic photosynthetic algae closely related to apicomplexans. Proteins from key metabolic pathways and from the endomembrane trafficking systems associated with a free-living lifestyle have been progressively and non-randomly lost during adaptation to parasitism. The free-living ancestor contained a broad repertoire of genes many of which were repurposed for parasitic processes, such as extracellular proteins, components of a motility apparatus, and DNA- and RNA-binding protein families. Based on transcriptome analyses across 36 environmental conditions, Chromera orthologs of apicomplexan invasion-related motility genes were co-regulated with genes encoding the flagellar apparatus, supporting the functional contribution of flagella to the evolution of invasion machinery. This study provides insights into how obligate parasites with diverse life strategies arose from a once free-living phototrophic marine alga. © Woo et al.

  14. Chromerid genomes reveal the evolutionary path from photosynthetic algae to obligate intracellular parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Yong H; Ansari, Hifzur; Otto, Thomas D; Klinger, Christen M; Kolisko, Martin; Michálek, Jan; Saxena, Alka; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Tayyrov, Annageldi; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Ali, Shahjahan; Bernal, Axel; del Campo, Javier; Cihlář, Jaromír; Flegontov, Pavel; Gornik, Sebastian G; Hajdušková, Eva; Horák, Aleš; Janouškovec, Jan; Katris, Nicholas J; Mast, Fred D; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mourier, Tobias; Naeem, Raeece; Nair, Mridul; Panigrahi, Aswini K; Rawlings, Neil D; Padron-Regalado, Eriko; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Samad, Nadira; Tomčala, Aleš; Wilkes, Jon; Neafsey, Daniel E; Doerig, Christian; Bowler, Chris; Keeling, Patrick J; Roos, David S; Dacks, Joel B; Templeton, Thomas J; Waller, Ross F; Lukeš, Julius; Oborník, Miroslav; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa encompasses thousands of obligate intracellular parasites of humans and animals with immense socio-economic and health impacts. We sequenced nuclear genomes of Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, free-living non-parasitic photosynthetic algae closely related to apicomplexans. Proteins from key metabolic pathways and from the endomembrane trafficking systems associated with a free-living lifestyle have been progressively and non-randomly lost during adaptation to parasitism. The free-living ancestor contained a broad repertoire of genes many of which were repurposed for parasitic processes, such as extracellular proteins, components of a motility apparatus, and DNA- and RNA-binding protein families. Based on transcriptome analyses across 36 environmental conditions, Chromera orthologs of apicomplexan invasion-related motility genes were co-regulated with genes encoding the flagellar apparatus, supporting the functional contribution of flagella to the evolution of invasion machinery. This study provides insights into how obligate parasites with diverse life strategies arose from a once free-living phototrophic marine alga. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06974.001 PMID:26175406

  15. Hijacking of host cellular functions by an intracellular parasite, the microsporidian Anncaliia algerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Johan; El Alaoui, Hicham; Mone, Anne; Urbach, Serge; Demettre, Edith; Texier, Catherine; Brun, Christine; Zanzoni, Andreas; Peyretaillade, Eric; Parisot, Nicolas; Lerat, Emmanuelle; Peyret, Pierre; Delbac, Frederic; Biron, David G

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens including bacteria, viruses and protozoa hijack host cell functions to access nutrients and to bypass cellular defenses and immune responses. These strategies have been acquired through selective pressure and allowed pathogens to reach an appropriate cellular niche for their survival and growth. To get new insights on how parasites hijack host cellular functions, we developed a SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell culture) quantitative proteomics workflow. Our study focused on deciphering the cross-talk in a host-parasite association, involving human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF) and the microsporidia Anncaliia algerae, a fungus related parasite with an obligate intracellular lifestyle and a strong host dependency. The host-parasite cross-talk was analyzed at five post-infection times 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-infection (hpi) and 8 days post-infection (dpi). A significant up-regulation of four interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3 and MX1 was observed at 8 dpi suggesting a type 1 interferon (IFN) host response. Quantitative alteration of host proteins involved in biological functions such as signaling (STAT1, Ras) and reduction of the translation activity (EIF3) confirmed a host type 1 IFN response. Interestingly, the SILAC approach also allowed the detection of 148 A. algerae proteins during the kinetics of infection. Among these proteins many are involved in parasite proliferation, and an over-representation of putative secreted effectors proteins was observed. Finally our survey also suggests that A. algerae could use a transposable element as a lure strategy to escape the host innate immune system.

  16. Hijacking of host cellular functions by an intracellular parasite, the microsporidian Anncaliia algerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Panek

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens including bacteria, viruses and protozoa hijack host cell functions to access nutrients and to bypass cellular defenses and immune responses. These strategies have been acquired through selective pressure and allowed pathogens to reach an appropriate cellular niche for their survival and growth. To get new insights on how parasites hijack host cellular functions, we developed a SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell culture quantitative proteomics workflow. Our study focused on deciphering the cross-talk in a host-parasite association, involving human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF and the microsporidia Anncaliia algerae, a fungus related parasite with an obligate intracellular lifestyle and a strong host dependency. The host-parasite cross-talk was analyzed at five post-infection times 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-infection (hpi and 8 days post-infection (dpi. A significant up-regulation of four interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3 and MX1 was observed at 8 dpi suggesting a type 1 interferon (IFN host response. Quantitative alteration of host proteins involved in biological functions such as signaling (STAT1, Ras and reduction of the translation activity (EIF3 confirmed a host type 1 IFN response. Interestingly, the SILAC approach also allowed the detection of 148 A. algerae proteins during the kinetics of infection. Among these proteins many are involved in parasite proliferation, and an over-representation of putative secreted effectors proteins was observed. Finally our survey also suggests that A. algerae could use a transposable element as a lure strategy to escape the host innate immune system.

  17. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

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    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  18. Monitoring intra-cellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman- and CARS-microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in lipid metabolism in vessel wall tissues. Macrophages can take up lipids by various mechanisms. As phagocytes, macrophages are important for the decomposition of lipid plaques within arterial walls that contribute to arteriosclerosis. Of special interest are uptake dynamics and intra-cellular fate of different individual types of lipids as, for example, fatty acids, triglycerides or free and esterified cholesterol. Here we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and follow subsequent storage or degradation patterns. The combination of optical microscopy with Raman spectroscopy allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through the associated spectral information. Relatively long measuring times, due to the weakness of Raman scattering can be overcome by non-linear effects such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). With this contribution we introduce first results to monitor the incorporation of lipid components into individual cells employing Raman and CARS microscopy.

  19. Degranulating Neutrophils Promote Leukotriene B4 Production by Infected Macrophages To Kill Leishmania amazonensis Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Natália; Afonso, Lilian; Suarez, Martha; Ampuero, Mariana; Prates, Deboraci Brito; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Barral-Netto, Manoel; DosReis, George A; Borges, Valéria Matos; Brodskyn, Cláudia

    2016-02-15

    Neutrophils mediate early responses against pathogens, and they become activated during endothelial transmigration toward the inflammatory site. In the current study, human neutrophils were activated in vitro with immobilized extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN), collagen, and laminin. Neutrophil activation by FN, but not other extracellular matrix proteins, induces the release of the granules' contents, measured as matrix metalloproteinase 9 and neutrophil elastase activity in culture supernatant, as well as reactive oxygen species production. Upon contact with Leishmania amazonensis-infected macrophages, these FN-activated neutrophils reduce the parasite burden through a mechanism independent of cell contact. The release of granule proteases, such as myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, activates macrophages through TLRs, leading to the production of inflammatory mediators, TNF-α and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), which are involved in parasite killing by infected macrophages. The pharmacological inhibition of degranulation reverted this effect, abolishing LTB4 and TNF production. Together, these results suggest that FN-driven degranulation of neutrophils induces the production of LTB4 and TNF by infected macrophages, leading to the control of Leishmania infection.

  20. Effects of age and macrophage lineage on intracellular survival and cytokine induction after infection with Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Sturgill, Tracy L

    2014-07-15

    Rhodococcus equi, a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, causes life-threatening pneumonia in foals and in people with underlying immune deficiencies. As a basis for this study, we hypothesized that macrophage lineage and age would affect intracellular survival of R. equi and cytokine induction after infection. Monocyte-derived and bronchoalveolar macrophages from 10 adult horses and from 10 foals (sampled at 1-3 days, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 5 months of age) were infected ex vivo with virulent R. equi. Intracellular R. equi were quantified and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IL-18, IFN-γ, and TNF-α was measured. Intracellular replication of R. equi was significantly (Pequi was significantly (P=0.002) higher in 3-month-old foals than in 3-day old foals, 2-week-old foals, 1-month-old foals, and adult horses. Expression of IL-4 mRNA was significantly higher in monocyte-derived macrophages whereas expression of IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-α was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar macrophages. Induction of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and IL-8 mRNA in bronchoalveolar macrophages of 1-3-day old foals was significantly higher than in older foals or adult horses. Preferential intracellular survival of R. equi in bronchoalveolar macrophages of juvenile horses may play a role in the pulmonary tropism of the pathogen and in the window of age susceptibility to infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel amidines and analogues as promising agents against intracellular parasites: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro, M N C; Werbovetz, K; Boykin, D W; Wilson, W D; Wang, M Z; Hemphill, A

    2013-07-01

    Parasitic protozoa comprise diverse aetiological agents responsible for important diseases in humans and animals including sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, malaria, toxoplasmosis and others. They are major causes of mortality and morbidity in tropical and subtropical countries, and are also responsible for important economic losses. However, up to now, for most of these parasitic diseases, effective vaccines are lacking and the approved chemotherapeutic compounds present high toxicity, increasing resistance, limited efficacy and require long periods of treatment. Many of these parasitic illnesses predominantly affect low-income populations of developing countries for which new pharmaceutical alternatives are urgently needed. Thus, very low research funding is available. Amidine-containing compounds such as pentamidine are DNA minor groove binders with a broad spectrum of activities against human and veterinary pathogens. Due to their promising microbicidal activity but their rather poor bioavailability and high toxicity, many analogues and derivatives, including pro-drugs, have been synthesized and screened in vitro and in vivo in order to improve their selectivity and pharmacological properties. This review summarizes the knowledge on amidines and analogues with respect to their synthesis, pharmacological profile, mechanistic and biological effects upon a range of intracellular protozoan parasites. The bulk of these data may contribute to the future design and structure optimization of new aromatic dicationic compounds as novel antiparasitic drug candidates.

  2. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

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    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  3. Kinetic studies of Candida parapsilosis phagocytosis by macrophages and detection of intracellular survival mechanisms

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    Renata eToth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though the number of Candida infections due to non-albicans species like C. parapsilosis has been increasing, little is known about their pathomechanisms. Certain aspects of C. parapsilosis and host interactions have already been investigated; however we lack information about the innate cellular responses towards this species. The aim of our project was to dissect and compare the phagocytosis of C. parapsilosis to C. albicans and to another Candida species C. glabrata by murine and human macrophages by live cell video microscopy. We broke down the phagocytic process into three stages: macrophage migration, engulfment of fungal cells and host cell killing after the uptake. Our results showed increased macrophage migration towards C. parapsilosis and we observed differences during the engulfment processes when comparing the three species. The engulfment time of C. parapsilosis was comparable to that of C. albicans regardless of the pseudohypha length and spatial orientation relative to phagocytes, while the rate of host cell killing and the overall uptake regarding C. parapsilosis showed similarities mainly with C. glabrata. Furthermore, we observed difference between human and murine phagocytes in the uptake of C. parapsilosis. UV-treatment of fungal cells had varied effects on phagocytosis dependent upon which Candida strain was used. Besides statistical analysis, live cell imaging videos showed that this species similarly to the other two also has the ability to survive in host cells via the following mechanisms: yeast replication, and pseudohypha growth inside of phagocytes, exocytosis of fungal cells and also abortion of host cell mitosis following the uptake. According to our knowledge this is the first study that provides a thorough examination of C. parapsilosis phagocytosis and reports intracellular survival mechanisms associated with this species.

  4. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Kathleen A; Szumowski, Suzannah C; Troemel, Emily R

    2011-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo.

  5. An intracellular arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum yeast-aggregates generates nuclear damage to the cultured murine alveolar macrophages

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    Nayla De Souza Pitangui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a crown. This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast’s persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms.

  6. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  7. The β-hemolysin and intracellular survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sagar

    Full Text Available S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches.

  8. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74.

  9. A detailed view of the intracellular transcriptome of Listeria monocytogenes in murine macrophages using RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Gunter Schultze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen and causative agent for the foodborne infection listeriosis, which is mainly a threat for pregnant, elderly or immunocompromised individuals. Due to its ability to invade and colonize diverse eukaryotic cell types including cells from invertebrates, L. monocytogenes has become a well-established model organism for intracellular growth. Almost ten years ago, we and others presented the first whole-genome microarray-based intracellular transcriptome of L. monocytogenes. With the advent of newer technologies addressing transcriptomes in greater detail, we revisit this work, and analyze the intracellular transcriptome of L. monocytogenes during growth in murine macrophages using a deep sequencing based approach.We detected 656 differentially expressed genes of which 367 were upregulated during intracellular growth in macrophages compared to extracellular growth in BHI. This study confirmed ~64% of all regulated genes previously identified by microarray analysis. Many of the regulated genes that were detected in the current study involve transporters for various metals, ions as well as complex sugars such as mannose. We also report changes in antisense transcription, especially upregulations during intracellular bacterial survival. A notable finding was the detection of regulatory changes for a subset of temperate A118-like prophage genes, thereby shedding light on the transcriptional profile of this bacteriophage during intracellular growth. In total, our study provides an updated genome-wide view of the transcriptional landscape of L. monocytogenes during intracellular growth and represents a rich resource for future detailed analysis.

  10. Modulation of Macrophage Inflammatory Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling by Intracellular Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, James B; Sircy, Linda M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Ding, Wandi; Leander, Rachel N; McClelland, Erin E; Nelson, David E

    2016-07-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a common facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause life-threatening fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Shortly after infection, Cn is detectable as both extra- and intracellular yeast particles, with Cn being capable of establishing long-lasting latent infections within host macrophages. Although recent studies have shown that shed capsular polysaccharides and intact extracellular Cn can compromise macrophage function through modulation of NF-κB signaling, it is currently unclear whether intracellular Cn also affects NF-κB signaling. Utilizing live cell imaging and computational modeling, we find that extra- and intracellular Cn support distinct modes of NF-κB signaling in cultured murine macrophages. Specifically, in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages treated with extracellular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major Cn capsular polysaccharide, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is inhibited, whereas in cells with intracellular Cn, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is both amplified and sustained. Mathematical simulations and quantification of nascent protein expression indicate that this is a possible consequence of Cn-induced "translational interference," impeding IκBα resynthesis. We also show that long term Cn infection induces stable nuclear localization of p65 and IκBα proteins in the absence of additional pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this case, nuclear localization of p65 is not accompanied by TNFα or inducible NOS (iNOS) expression. These results demonstrate that capsular polysaccharides and intact intracellular yeast manipulate NF-κB via multiple distinct mechanisms and provide new insights into how Cn might modulate cellular signaling at different stages of an infection.

  11. Dextran sulfate sodium upregulates MAPK signaling for the uptake and subsequent intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Hop, Huynh Tan; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Kim, Dong Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-02-01

    Brucellosis is one of the major zoonoses worldwide that inflicts important health problems in animal and human. Here, we demonstrated that dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) significantly increased adhesion of Brucella (B.) abortus in murine macrophages compared to untreated cells. Even without infection, Brucella uptake into macrophages increased and F-actin reorganization was induced compared with untreated cells. Furthermore, DSS increased the phosphorylation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and p38α) in Brucella-infected, DSS-treated cells compared with the control cells. Lastly, DSS markedly increased the intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in macrophages by up to 48 h. These results suggest that DSS enhanced the adhesion and phagocytosis of B. abortus into murine macrophages by stimulating the MAPK signaling proteins phospho-ERK1/2 and p38α and that DSS increased the intracellular survival of B. abortus by inhibiting colocalization of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) with the late endosome marker LAMP-1. This study emphasizes the enhancement of the phagocytic and intracellular modulatory effects of DSS, which may suppress the innate immune system and contribute to prolonged Brucella survival and chronic infection.

  12. Alternative activation and increase of Trypanosoma cruzi survival in murine macrophages stimulated by cruzipain, a parasite antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempin, Cinthia; Giordanengo, Laura; Gea, Susana; Cerbán, Fabio

    2002-10-01

    We studied the macrophage (Mo) activation pathways through Mo interaction with immunogenic Trypanosoma cruzi antigens as cruzipain (Cz) and R13. J774 cells, peritoneal and spleen Mo from normal mice, were used. Although Mo classic activation was observed in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, evaluated through nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-12 production, Cz and R13 did not activate Mo in this way. To study the alternative pathway, we examined the arginase activity in Mo cultured with Cz. An increase of arginase activity was detected in all Mo sources assayed. An increase of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta in culture supernatants from Mo stimulated with Cz was observed. The study of expression of B7.1 and B7.2 in spleen Mo revealed that Cz induces preferential expression of B7.2. In vitro studies revealed that Cz stimulated J774 cells and then, infected with trypomastigotes of T. cruzi, developed a higher number of intracellular parasites than unstimulated infected Mo. Thus, Cz favors the perpetuation of T. cruzi infection. In addition, a down-regulation of inducible NO synthase was observed in J774 cells stimulated with Cz. These results suggest that Cz interaction with Mo could modulate the immune response generated against T. cruzi through the induction of a preferential metabolic pathway in Mo.

  13. Differences in the antigenic profile and infectivity of murine macrophages of Leishmania (Viannia) parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Nubia E; Cysne-Finkelstein, Lea; Machado, Gerzia Maria C; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Leon, Leonor

    2010-06-01

    The antigenic profile and infectivity were compared between 3 recent Leishmania (Viannia) isolates from the Amazonian region (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia [INPA] strains) and 3 World Health Organization (WHO) reference species (Leishmania guyanensis, Leishmania braziliensis, and Leishmania naiffi). Differences were observed in the peak and extent of promastigote growth. The WHO reference strains exhibited significantly higher exponential growth as promastigotes than INPA strains. In the immunoblot analyses, the INPA strains revealed several specific peptide fragments, as well as the greatest recognition frequencies by sera from Leishmania sp.-infected patients; among the latter, antigens derived from L. naiffi were the most frequently recognized. In vitro infection was carried out using mice peritoneal macrophages; all strains were able to enter the macrophages, but only L. amazonensis was able to reproduce. A striking observation was that L. naiffi exhibited the longest survival time inside the macrophages. Our data strongly suggest the application of recently isolated parasites as sources of antigen for diagnosis procedures. Moreover, L. naiffi species possesses several characteristics relevant for its use as a source of novel antigens to be explored in the design of diagnostic tools and vaccines.

  14. Eimeria tenella: parasite-specific incorporation of /sup 3/H-uracil as a quantitative measure of intracellular development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmatz, D.M.; Crane, M.S.; Murray, P.K.

    1986-02-01

    An assay has been developed using parasite-specific incorporation of /sup 3/H-uracil to assess the intracellular growth of Eimeria tenella in vitro. As shown by both scintillation counts and autoradiography, /sup 3/H-uracil was incorporated specifically into intracellular parasites from the onset of infection and continued throughout development of the first generation schizonts. Mature schizonts and first generation merozoites did not continue to incorporate additional /sup 3/H-uracil, indicating that RNA synthesis had halted in these stages. Based on these findings, a semi-automated microscale uracil incorporation assay was developed to determine parasite viability. This method should be useful for biochemical studies with intracellular parasites and for screening compounds for anticoccidial activity. The ease, rapidity, and quantitative nature of this assay contrasts favorably with standard morphometric approaches of determining parasite development. In addition, parallel studies using host cell incorporation of /sup 3/H-uridine have been introduced as a method of determining whether antiparasitic activity is direct or indirect in relation to effects on the host cell.

  15. A Parasite Rescue and Transformation Assay for Antileishmanial Screening Against Intracellular Leishmania donovani Amastigotes in THP1 Human Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Surendra K.; Sahu, Rajnish; Walker, Larry A.; Tekwani, Babu L.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the world's most neglected diseases, largely affecting the poorest of the poor, mainly in developing countries. Over 350 million people are considered at risk of contracting leishmaniasis, and approximately 2 million new cases occur yearly1. Leishmania donovani is the causative agent for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the most fatal form of the disease. The choice of drugs available to treat leishmaniasis is limited 2;current treatments provide limited efficacy and many are toxic at therapeutic doses. In addition, most of the first line treatment drugs have already lost their utility due to increasing multiple drug resistance 3. The current pipeline of anti-leishmanial drugs is also severely depleted. Sustained efforts are needed to enrich a new anti-leishmanial drug discovery pipeline, and this endeavor relies on the availability of suitable in vitro screening models. In vitro promastigotes 4 and axenic amastigotes assays5 are primarily used for anti-leishmanial drug screening however, may not be appropriate due to significant cellular, physiological, biochemical and molecular differences in comparison to intracellular amastigotes. Assays with macrophage-amastigotes models are considered closest to the pathophysiological conditions of leishmaniasis, and are therefore the most appropriate for in vitro screening. Differentiated, non-dividing human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP1) (make an attractive) alternative to isolated primary macrophages and can be used for assaying anti-leishmanial activity of different compounds against intracellular amastigotes. Here, we present a parasite-rescue and transformation assay with differentiated THP1 cells infected in vitro with Leishmania donovani for screening pure compounds and natural products extracts and determining the efficacy against the intracellular Leishmania amastigotes. The assay involves the following steps: (1) differentiation of THP1 cells to non-dividing macrophages, (2) infection of

  16. The C-terminal tail of tetraspanin proteins regulates their intracellular distribution in the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceres, V M; Alonso, A M; Nievas, Y R; Midlej, V; Frontera, L; Benchimol, M; Johnson, P J; de Miguel, N

    2015-08-01

    The parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, a prevalent sexually transmitted infection. Here, we report the cellular analysis of T.vaginalis tetraspanin family (TvTSPs). This family of membrane proteins has been implicated in cell adhesion, migration and proliferation in vertebrates. We found that the expression of several members of the family is up-regulated upon contact with vaginal ectocervical cells. We demonstrate that most TvTSPs are localized on the surface and intracellular vesicles and that the C-terminal intracellular tails of surface TvTSPs are necessary for proper localization. Analyses of full-length TvTSP8 and a mutant that lacks the C-terminal tail indicates that surface-localized TvTSP8 is involved in parasite aggregation, suggesting a role for this protein in parasite : parasite interaction.

  17. Differential contribution of neutrophilic granulocytes and macrophages to nitrosative stress in a host-parasite animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forlenza, M.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Kachamakova, N.; Scharsack, J.P.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a hallmark for nitrosative stress caused by the release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by activated macrophages and neutrophilic granulocytes at sites of inflammation and infection. In the first part of the study, we used an informative host¿parasite animal model to

  18. Restoration of IFNγR subunit assembly, IFNγ signaling and parasite clearance in Leishmania donovani infected macrophages: role of membrane cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Sen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the presence of significant levels of systemic Interferon gamma (IFNγ, the host protective cytokine, Kala-azar patients display high parasite load with downregulated IFNγ signaling in Leishmania donovani (LD infected macrophages (LD-MØs; the cause of such aberrant phenomenon is unknown. Here we reveal for the first time the mechanistic basis of impaired IFNγ signaling in parasitized murine macrophages. Our study clearly shows that in LD-MØs IFNγ receptor (IFNγR expression and their ligand-affinity remained unaltered. The intracellular parasites did not pose any generalized defect in LD-MØs as IL-10 mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 phosphorylation remained unaltered with respect to normal. Previously, we showed that LD-MØs are more fluid than normal MØs due to quenching of membrane cholesterol. The decreased rigidity in LD-MØs was not due to parasite derived lipophosphoglycan (LPG because purified LPG failed to alter fluidity in normal MØs. IFNγR subunit 1 (IFNγR1 and subunit 2 (IFNγR2 colocalize in raft upon IFNγ stimulation of normal MØs, but this was absent in LD-MØs. Oddly enough, such association of IFNγR1 and IFNγR2 could be restored upon liposomal delivery of cholesterol as evident from the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiment and co-immunoprecipitation studies. Furthermore, liposomal cholesterol treatment together with IFNγ allowed reassociation of signaling assembly (phospho-JAK1, JAK2 and STAT1 in LD-MØs, appropriate signaling, and subsequent parasite killing. This effect was cholesterol specific because cholesterol analogue 4-cholestene-3-one failed to restore the response. The presence of cholesterol binding motifs [(L/V-X(1-5-Y-X(1-5-(R/K] in the transmembrane domain of IFNγR1 was also noted. The interaction of peptides representing this motif of IFNγR1 was studied with cholesterol-liposome and analogue-liposome with difference of two orders of

  19. Phylogenomics of the intracellular parasite Mikrocytos mackini reveals evidence for a mitosome in rhizaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Fabien; Corradi, Nicolas; Sierra, Roberto; Pawlowski, Jan; Meyer, Gary R; Abbott, Cathryn L; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-08-19

    Mikrocytos mackini is an intracellular protistan parasite of oysters whose position in the phylogenetic tree of eukaryotes has been a mystery for many years [1,2]. M. mackini is difficult to isolate, has not been cultured, and has no defining morphological feature. Furthermore, its only phylogenetic marker that has been successfully sequenced to date (the small subunit ribosomal RNA) is highly divergent and has failed to resolve its evolutionary position [2]. M. mackini is also one of the few eukaryotes that lacks mitochondria [1], making both its phylogenetic position and comparative analysis of mitochondrial function particularly important. Here, we have obtained transcriptomic data for M. mackini from enriched isolates and constructed a 119-gene phylogenomic data set. M. mackini proved to be among the fastest-evolving eukaryote lineages known to date, but, nevertheless, our analysis robustly placed it within Rhizaria. Searching the transcriptome for genetic evidence of a mitochondrion-related organelle (MRO) revealed only four mitochondrion-derived genes: IscS, IscU, mtHsp70, and FdxR. Interestingly, all four genes are involved in iron-sulfur cluster formation, a biochemical pathway common to other highly reduced "mitosomes" in unrelated MRO-containing lineages [7]. This is the first evidence of MRO in Rhizaria, and it suggests the parallel evolution of mitochondria to mitosomes in this supergroup.

  20. DMPD: Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18573338 Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. Curr Opin Im...munol. 2008 Aug;20(4):383-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular DNA sensors ...in immunity. PubmedID 18573338 Title Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Authors Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. P

  1. DMPD: Intracellular TLR signaling: a structural perspective on human disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16785490 Intracellular TLR signaling: a structural perspective on human disease. La...sker MV, Nair SK. J Immunol. 2006 Jul 1;177(1):11-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular TLR si...gnaling: a structural perspective on human disease. PubmedID 16785490 Title Intracellular TLR signaling: a s

  2. DMPD: Intracellular NOD-like receptors in host defense and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17967410 Intracellular NOD-like receptors in host defense and disease. Kanneganti T...D, Lamkanfi M, Nunez G. Immunity. 2007 Oct;27(4):549-59. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular NO...D-like receptors in host defense and disease. PubmedID 17967410 Title Intracellular NOD-like receptors in ho

  3. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  4. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  5. Advanced Glycation in macrophages induces intracellular accumulation of 7-ketocholesterol and total sterols by decreasing the expression of ABCA-1 and ABCG-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Advanced glycation end products (AGE) alter lipid metabolism and reduce the macrophage expression of ABCA-1 and ABCG-1 which impairs the reverse cholesterol transport, a system that drives cholesterol from arterial wall macrophages to the liver, allowing its excretion into the bile and feces. Oxysterols favors lipid homeostasis in macrophages and drive the reverse cholesterol transport, although the accumulation of 7-ketocholesterol, 7alpha- hydroxycholesterol and 7beta- hydroxycholesterol is related to atherogenesis and cell death. We evaluated the effect of glycolaldehyde treatment (GAD; oxoaldehyde that induces a fast formation of intracellular AGE) in macrophages overloaded with oxidized LDL and incubated with HDL alone or HDL plus LXR agonist (T0901317) in: 1) the intracellular content of oxysterols and total sterols and 2) the contents of ABCA-1 and ABCG-1. Methods Total cholesterol and oxysterol subspecies were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and HDL receptors content by immunoblot. Results In control macrophages (C), incubation with HDL or HDL + T0901317 reduced the intracellular content of total sterols (total cholesterol + oxysterols), cholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol, which was not observed in GAD macrophages. In all experimental conditions no changes were found in the intracellular content of other oxysterol subspecies comparing C and GAD macrophages. GAD macrophages presented a 45% reduction in ABCA-1 protein level as compared to C cells, even after the addition of HDL or HDL + T0901317. The content of ABCG-1 was 36.6% reduced in GAD macrophages in the presence of HDL as compared to C macrophages. Conclusion In macrophages overloaded with oxidized LDL, glycolaldehyde treatment reduces the HDL-mediated cholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol efflux which is ascribed to the reduction in ABCA-1 and ABCG-1 protein level. This may contribute to atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus. PMID:21957962

  6. Arcobacter butzleri induces a pro-inflammatory response in THP-1 derived macrophages and has limited ability for intracellular survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Alter, Thomas; Gölz, Greta; Sharbati, Soroush

    2014-11-01

    Recent case reports have identified Arcobacter (A.) butzleri to be another emerging pathogen of the family Campylobacteraceae causing foodborne diseases. However, little is known about its interaction with the human immune system. As macrophages act as first defense against bacterial infections, we studied for the first time the impact of A. butzleri on human macrophages using THP-1 derived macrophages as an in vitro infection model. Our investigations considered the inflammatory response, intracellular survival and activation of caspases as potential virulence mechanisms employed by A. butzleri. Induction of IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12ß and TNFα demonstrated a pro-inflammatory response of infected macrophages towards A. butzleri. gentamycin protection assays revealed the ability of A. butzleri strains to survive and resist the hostile environment of phagocytic immune cells for up to 22 h. Moreover, initial activation of intitiator- (CASP8) as well as effector caspases (CASP3/7) was observed without the onset of DNA damage, suggesting a potential counter regulation. Intriguingly, we recognized distinct strain specific differences in invasion and survival capabilities. This suggests the existence of isolate dependent phenotype variations and different virulence potentials as known for other intestinal pathogens such as Salmonella enterica ssp.

  7. Dramatic transcriptional changes in an intracellular parasite enable host switching between plant and insect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenro Oshima

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens that have devastating effects on the yields of crops and plants worldwide. They are intracellular parasites of both plants and insects, and are spread among plants by insects. How phytoplasmas can adapt to two diverse environments is of considerable interest; however, the mechanisms enabling the "host switching" between plant and insect hosts are poorly understood. Here, we report that phytoplasmas dramatically alter their gene expression in response to "host switching" between plant and insect. We performed a detailed characterization of the dramatic change that occurs in the gene expression profile of Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris OY-M strain (approximately 33% of the genes change upon host switching between plant and insect. The phytoplasma may use transporters, secreted proteins, and metabolic enzymes in a host-specific manner. As phytoplasmas reside within the host cell, the proteins secreted from phytoplasmas are thought to play crucial roles in the interplay between phytoplasmas and host cells. Our microarray analysis revealed that the expression of the gene encoding the secreted protein PAM486 was highly upregulated in the plant host, which is also observed by immunohistochemical analysis, suggesting that this protein functions mainly when the phytoplasma grows in the plant host. Additionally, phytoplasma growth in planta was partially suppressed by an inhibitor of the MscL osmotic channel that is highly expressed in the plant host, suggesting that the osmotic channel might play an important role in survival in the plant host. These results also suggest that the elucidation of "host switching" mechanism may contribute to the development of novel pest controls.

  8. Dramatic transcriptional changes in an intracellular parasite enable host switching between plant and insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kenro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Sugawara, Kyoko; Neriya, Yutaro; Himeno, Misako; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens that have devastating effects on the yields of crops and plants worldwide. They are intracellular parasites of both plants and insects, and are spread among plants by insects. How phytoplasmas can adapt to two diverse environments is of considerable interest; however, the mechanisms enabling the "host switching" between plant and insect hosts are poorly understood. Here, we report that phytoplasmas dramatically alter their gene expression in response to "host switching" between plant and insect. We performed a detailed characterization of the dramatic change that occurs in the gene expression profile of Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris OY-M strain (approximately 33% of the genes change) upon host switching between plant and insect. The phytoplasma may use transporters, secreted proteins, and metabolic enzymes in a host-specific manner. As phytoplasmas reside within the host cell, the proteins secreted from phytoplasmas are thought to play crucial roles in the interplay between phytoplasmas and host cells. Our microarray analysis revealed that the expression of the gene encoding the secreted protein PAM486 was highly upregulated in the plant host, which is also observed by immunohistochemical analysis, suggesting that this protein functions mainly when the phytoplasma grows in the plant host. Additionally, phytoplasma growth in planta was partially suppressed by an inhibitor of the MscL osmotic channel that is highly expressed in the plant host, suggesting that the osmotic channel might play an important role in survival in the plant host. These results also suggest that the elucidation of "host switching" mechanism may contribute to the development of novel pest controls.

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in human monocyte-derived macrophages by parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Andreani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p99% being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (approximately 90% for BaL and approximately 85% for VSV-G infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01. By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05. Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a approximately 60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in macrophages, a major cell target for both pathogens.

  10. The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 (MGL1 Recognizes Taenia crassiceps Antigens, Triggers Intracellular Signaling, and Is Critical for Resistance to This Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Montero-Barrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1 recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1−/− mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1−/− macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1−/− mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1−/− mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1−/− macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  11. The macrophage galactose-type lectin-1 (MGL1) recognizes Taenia crassiceps antigens, triggers intracellular signaling, and is critical for resistance to this infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Barrera, Daniel; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, César A; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Vera-Arias, Laura; Carrasco-Yépez, Maricela; Gómez-García, Lorena; Martínez-Saucedo, Diana; Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Terrazas, Luis I

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1(-/-) mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1(-/-) macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1(-/-) mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1(-/-) mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1(-/-) macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  12. 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits in vitro and in vivo intracellular growth of apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Rohan; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Andarawewa, Kumari L; Rajapakse, R P; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Marcellin, Luc; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2007-03-01

    The hormonal form of vitamin D, 1,25-dyhydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), is implicated in a wide range of functions other than its classical role in calcium and phosphorous homeostasis. When Toxoplasma gondii-infected BALB/c mice were treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, they succumb to death sooner than their counterparts. But they showed less parasite burden in tissues which was further supported by mild pathological lesions. As an effort to understand the physiological mechanism for the above observation an in vitro study was performed. Fewer parasites were observed when 1,25(OH)2D3 pre-treated murine intestinal epithelial cells were challenged with parasites. Moreover, the observed inhibition was dose-dependent and had a maximum effect with 10(-7)M of 1,25(OH)2D3. However, no observable difference was observed, when pre-incubated parasites were added to cells suggesting that the observed inhibition was a result of an effect from 1,25(OH)2D3 on Toxoplasma intracellular growth. Our data support the notion that 1,25(OH)2D3 may inhibit intra cellular T. gondii parasite proliferation in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Infected dendritic cells facilitate systemic dissemination and transplacental passage of the obligate intracellular parasite Neospora caninum in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Collantes-Fernandez

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular parasite Neospora caninum disseminates across the placenta and the blood-brain barrier, to reach sites where it causes severe pathology or establishes chronic persistent infections. The mechanisms used by N. caninum to breach restrictive biological barriers remain elusive. To examine the cellular basis of these processes, migration of different N. caninum isolates (Nc-1, Nc-Liverpool, Nc-SweB1 and the Spanish isolates: Nc-Spain 3H, Nc-Spain 4H, Nc-Spain 6, Nc-Spain 7 and Nc-Spain 9 was studied in an in vitro model based on a placental trophoblast-derived BeWo cell line. Here, we describe that infection of dendritic cells (DC by N. caninum tachyzoites potentiated translocation of parasites across polarized cellular monolayers. In addition, powered by the parasite's own gliding motility, extracellular N. caninum tachyzoites were able to transmigrate across cellular monolayers. Altogether, the presented data provides evidence of two putative complementary pathways utilized by N. caninum, in an isolate-specific fashion, for passage of restrictive cellular barriers. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of tachyzoite-infected DC in mice resulted in increased parasitic loads in various organs, e.g. the central nervous system, compared to infections with free parasites. Inoculation of pregnant mice with infected DC resulted in an accentuated vertical transmission to the offspring with increased parasitic loads and neonatal mortality. These findings reveal that N. caninum exploits the natural cell trafficking pathways in the host to cross cellular barriers and disseminate to deep tissues. The findings are indicative of conserved dissemination strategies among coccidian apicomplexan parasites.

  14. Infected Dendritic Cells Facilitate Systemic Dissemination and Transplacental Passage of the Obligate Intracellular Parasite Neospora caninum in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes-Fernandez, Esther; Arrighi, Romanico B. G.; Álvarez-García, Gema; Weidner, Jessica M.; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Boothroyd, John C.; Ortega-Mora, Luis M.; Barragan, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Neospora caninum disseminates across the placenta and the blood-brain barrier, to reach sites where it causes severe pathology or establishes chronic persistent infections. The mechanisms used by N. caninum to breach restrictive biological barriers remain elusive. To examine the cellular basis of these processes, migration of different N. caninum isolates (Nc-1, Nc-Liverpool, Nc-SweB1 and the Spanish isolates: Nc-Spain 3H, Nc-Spain 4H, Nc-Spain 6, Nc-Spain 7 and Nc-Spain 9) was studied in an in vitro model based on a placental trophoblast-derived BeWo cell line. Here, we describe that infection of dendritic cells (DC) by N. caninum tachyzoites potentiated translocation of parasites across polarized cellular monolayers. In addition, powered by the parasite's own gliding motility, extracellular N. caninum tachyzoites were able to transmigrate across cellular monolayers. Altogether, the presented data provides evidence of two putative complementary pathways utilized by N. caninum, in an isolate-specific fashion, for passage of restrictive cellular barriers. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of tachyzoite-infected DC in mice resulted in increased parasitic loads in various organs, e.g. the central nervous system, compared to infections with free parasites. Inoculation of pregnant mice with infected DC resulted in an accentuated vertical transmission to the offspring with increased parasitic loads and neonatal mortality. These findings reveal that N. caninum exploits the natural cell trafficking pathways in the host to cross cellular barriers and disseminate to deep tissues. The findings are indicative of conserved dissemination strategies among coccidian apicomplexan parasites. PMID:22403627

  15. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701 after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages.

  16. Glibenclamide decreases ATP-induced intracellular calcium transient elevation via inhibiting reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial activity in macrophages.

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    Duo-ling Li

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has revealed that glibenclamide has a wide range of anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is unclear whether glibenclamide can affect the resting and adenosine triphosphate (ATP-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i handling in Raw 264.7 macrophages. In the present study, [Ca(2+]i transient, reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondrial activity were measured by the high-speed TILLvisION digital imaging system using the indicators of Fura 2-am, DCFDA and rhodamine-123, respectively. We found that glibenclamide, pinacidil and other unselective K(+ channel blockers had no effect on the resting [Ca(2+]i of Raw 264.7 cells. Extracellular ATP (100 µM induced [Ca(2+]i transient elevation independent of extracellular Ca(2+. The transient elevation was inhibited by an ROS scavenger (tiron and mitochondria inhibitor (rotenone. Glibenclamide and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD also decreased ATP-induced [Ca(2+]i transient elevation, but pinacidil and other unselective K(+ channel blockers had no effect. Glibenclamide also decreased the peak of [Ca(2+]i transient induced by extracellular thapsigargin (Tg, 1 µM. Furthermore, glibenclamide decreased intracellular ROS and mitochondrial activity. When pretreated with tiron and rotenone, glibenclamide could not decrease ATP, and Tg induced maximal [Ca(2+]i transient further. We conclude that glibenclamide may inhibit ATP-induced [Ca(2+]i transient elevation by blocking mitochondria KATP channels, resulting in decreased ROS generation and mitochondrial activity in Raw 264.7 macrophages.

  17. Transcriptomic Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Biovar 1B Infecting Murine Macrophages Reveals New Mechanisms of Extracellular and Intracellular Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Zachary W; Poorey, Kunal; Brazel, David M; LaBauve, Annette E; Sinha, Anupama; Curtis, Deanna J; House, Samantha E; Tew, Karen E; Hamblin, Rachelle Y; Williams, Kelly P; Branda, Steven S; Young, Glenn M; Meagher, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is typically considered an extracellular pathogen; however, during the course of an infection, a significant number of bacteria are stably maintained within host cell vacuoles. Little is known about this population and the role it plays during an infection. To address this question and to elucidate the spatially and temporally dynamic gene expression patterns of Y. enterocolitica biovar 1B through the course of an in vitro infection, transcriptome sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of bacteria infecting murine macrophage cells were performed under four distinct conditions. Bacteria were first grown in a nutrient-rich medium at 26 °C to establish a baseline of gene expression that is unrelated to infection. The transcriptomes of these bacteria were then compared to bacteria grown in a conditioned cell culture medium at 37 °C to identify genes that were differentially expressed in response to the increased temperature and medium but not in response to host cells. Infections were then performed, and the transcriptomes of bacteria found on the extracellular surface and intracellular compartments were analyzed individually. The upregulated genes revealed potential roles for a variety of systems in promoting intracellular virulence, including the Ysa type III secretion system, the Yts2 type II secretion system, and the Tad pilus. It was further determined that mutants of each of these systems had decreased virulence while infecting macrophages. Overall, these results reveal the complete set of genes expressed by Y. enterocolitica in response to infection and provide the groundwork for future virulence studies.

  18. In vivo transfer of intracellular labels from locally implanted bone marrow stromal cells to resident tissue macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Pawelczyk

    Full Text Available Intracellular labels such as dextran coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU or green fluorescent protein (GFP are frequently used to study the fate of transplanted cells by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescent microscopy. Bystander uptake of labeled cells by resident tissue macrophages (TM can confound the interpretation of the presence of intracellular labels especially during direct implantation of cells, which can result in more than 70% cell death. In this study we determined the percentages of TM that took up SPION, BrdU or GFP from labeled bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that were placed into areas of angiogenesis and inflammation in a mouse model known as Matrigel plaque perfusion assay. Cells recovered from digested plaques at various time points were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The analysis of harvested plaques revealed 5% of BrdU(+, 5-10% of GFP(+ and 5-15% of dextran(+ macrophages. The transfer of the label was not dependent on cell dose or viability. Collectively, this study suggests that care should be taken to validate donor origin of cells using an independent marker by histology and to assess transplanted cells for TM markers prior to drawing conclusions about the in vivo behavior of transplanted cells.

  19. Mycobacterium leprae intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation in infected macrophages: a potential target for new drugs for leprosy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Katherine A; Oliveira, Viviane C G; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Amaral, Julio J; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Melo, Rossana C N; Acosta, Chyntia C D; Moura, Danielle F; Olmo, Roberta; Han, Jun; Rosa, Patricia S; Almeida, Patrícia E; Finlay, B Brett; Borchers, Christoph H; Sarno, Euzenir N; Bozza, Patricia T; Atella, Georgia C; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that Mycobacterium leprae (ML) is able to induce lipid droplet formation in infected macrophages. We herein confirm that cholesterol (Cho) is one of the host lipid molecules that accumulate in ML-infected macrophages and investigate the effects of ML on cellular Cho metabolism responsible for its accumulation. The expression levels of LDL receptors (LDL-R, CD36, SRA-1, SR-B1, and LRP-1) and enzymes involved in Cho biosynthesis were investigated by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot and shown to be higher in lepromatous leprosy (LL) tissues when compared to borderline tuberculoid (BT) lesions. Moreover, higher levels of the active form of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptional factors, key regulators of the biosynthesis and uptake of cellular Cho, were found in LL skin biopsies. Functional in vitro assays confirmed the higher capacity of ML-infected macrophages to synthesize Cho and sequester exogenous LDL-Cho. Notably, Cho colocalized to ML-containing phagosomes, and Cho metabolism impairment, through either de novo synthesis inhibition by statins or depletion of exogenous Cho, decreased intracellular bacterial survival. These findings highlight the importance of metabolic integration between the host and bacteria to leprosy pathophysiology, opening new avenues for novel therapeutic strategies to leprosy. PMID:24552180

  20. Activated Macrophages Destroy Intracellular Leishmania Major Amastigotes by an l-Arginine-Dependent Killing Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    conversion of site from one that is supportive of replication, to one that the sandfly -adapted promastigote to the amastigote form is hostile to...Inaddiion th cometiivein-room temperature for 5 min. Absorbance at 543 om was measured.activated macrophages. In addition, t e p titi e tn- No2- was qu

  1. Protein trafficking through the endosomal system prepares intracellular parasites for a home invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomavo, Stanislas; Slomianny, Christian; Meissner, Markus; Carruthers, Vern B

    2013-10-01

    Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis) and Plasmodium (malaria) use unique secretory organelles for migration, cell invasion, manipulation of host cell functions, and cell egress. In particular, the apical secretory micronemes and rhoptries of apicomplexan parasites are essential for successful host infection. New findings reveal that the contents of these organelles, which are transported through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi, also require the parasite endosome-like system to access their respective organelles. In this review, we discuss recent findings that demonstrate that these parasites reduced their endosomal system and modified classical regulators of this pathway for the biogenesis of apical organelles.

  2. Protein trafficking through the endosomal system prepares intracellular parasites for a home invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislas Tomavo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis and Plasmodium (malaria use unique secretory organelles for migration, cell invasion, manipulation of host cell functions, and cell egress. In particular, the apical secretory micronemes and rhoptries of apicomplexan parasites are essential for successful host infection. New findings reveal that the contents of these organelles, which are transported through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi, also require the parasite endosome-like system to access their respective organelles. In this review, we discuss recent findings that demonstrate that these parasites reduced their endosomal system and modified classical regulators of this pathway for the biogenesis of apical organelles.

  3. The genome of the obligate intracellular parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: new insights into microsporidian genome dynamics and reductive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Eva; Williams, Tom A; Nakjang, Sirintra; Noël, Christophe J; Swan, Daniel C; Goldberg, Alina V; Harris, Simon R; Weinmaier, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie; Becher, Dörte; Bernhardt, Jörg; Dagan, Tal; Hacker, Christian; Lucocq, John M; Schweder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Hall, Neil; Hirt, Robert P; Embley, T Martin

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome) making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome architecture in some, but

  4. Protein trafficking through the endosomal system prepares intracellular parasites for a home invasion.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomavo, S; Slomianny, C; Meissner, M.; Carruthers, V B

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis) and Plasmodium (malaria) use unique secretory organelles for migration, cell invasion, manipulation of host cell functions, and cell egress. In particular, the apical secretory micronemes and rhoptries of apicomplexan parasites are essential for successful host infection. New findings reveal that the contents of these organelles, which are transported through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi, also require the parasite endosome-like system to access their res...

  5. Novel amidines and analogues as promising agents against intracellular parasites: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Soeiro, M. N. C.; Werbovetz, K.; Boykin, D W; Wilson, W. D.; Wang, M. Z.(Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617, Taipei, Taiwan); Hemphill, A

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic protozoa comprise diverse aetiological agents responsible for important diseases in humans and animals including sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, malaria, toxoplasmosis and others. They are major causes of mortality and morbidity in tropical and subtropical countries, and are also responsible for important economic losses. However, up to now, for most of these parasitic diseases, effective vaccines are lacking and the approved chemotherapeutic compounds present high...

  6. IL-4 Induces Metallothionein 3- and SLC30A4-Dependent Increase in Intracellular Zn2+ that Promotes Pathogen Persistence in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Subramanian Vignesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Alternative activation of macrophages promotes wound healing but weakens antimicrobial defenses against intracellular pathogens. The mechanisms that suppress macrophage function to create a favorable environment for pathogen growth remain elusive. We show that interleukin (IL-4 triggers a metallothionein 3 (MT3- and Zn exporter SLC30A4-dependent increase in the labile Zn2+ stores in macrophages and that intracellular pathogens can exploit this increase in Zn to survive. IL-4 regulates this pathway by shuttling extracellular Zn into macrophages and by activating cathepsins that act on MT3 to release bound Zn. We show that IL-4 can modulate Zn homeostasis in both human monocytes and mice. In vivo, MT3 can repress macrophage function in an M2-polarizing environment to promote pathogen persistence. Thus, MT3 and SLC30A4 dictate the size of the labile Zn2+ pool and promote the survival of a prototypical intracellular pathogen in M2 macrophages.

  7. Bis(Monoacylglycero)Phosphate, oxysterols and ORP11 : a threesome regulating intracellular cholesterol traffic in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Arnal, Maud

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular complication in increased oxidative stress-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In these situations, the low density lipoproteins (LDL) undergo oxidation and their high uptake induces cholesterol accumulation in subendothelial macrophages. On the other hand, oxidized LDL are enriched in cholesterol oxidation products called oxysterols, some of them are involved in the ability of oxidized LDL to induce cellular oxidative str...

  8. Induction of DKK1 by ox-LDL negatively regulates intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Ge, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Xinxin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Mengmeng; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist, is closely associated with cardiovascular disease and adipogenesis. We performed an in vitro study to determine whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) increased the expression of DKK1 in macrophages and whether β-catenin and liver X receptor α (LXRα) were involved in this regulation. Induction of DKK1 expression by ox-LDL decreased the level of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) via a Wnt/β-catenin pathway and increased ATP-binding cassette transporter A/G1 (ABCA/G1) levels via a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Lower LOX-1 and higher ABCA/G1 levels inhibited cholesterol loading in macrophages. In conclusion, ox-LDL may induce DKK1 expression in macrophages to inhibit the accumulation of lipids through a mechanism that involves downregulation of LOX-1-mediated lipid uptake and upregulation of ABCA/G1-dependent cholesterol efflux.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii peroxiredoxin promotes altered macrophage function, caspase-1-dependent IL-1β secretion enhances parasite replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Edward S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM are a key feature Th2 immunity and have been associated with a variety of roles during helminth infection. The role this cell subset plays in protzoan infection remain relatively unexplored, herein we describe the effects of a redox enzyme (rTgPrx derived from Toxoplasma gondii on murine macrophage phenotype in vitro. RTgPrx has been previously associated with the maintainence of parasite oxidative balance. Here our experiments show that rTgPrx promotes AAM as indicated by high arginase-1 (arg-1, YM1 and FIZZ expression via both signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT6-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Additionally rTgPrx treatment reduced caspase-1 activity and IL-1β secretion, while simultaneously increasing IL-10 release. Furthermore the in vitro replication of T. gondii (RH strain was enhanced when macrophages were treated with rTgPrx. This is in contrast with the previously described effects of a Plasmodium berghei ANKA 2-cys-peroxiredoxin that promotes pro-inflammatory cytokine production. These results highlight the role of T. gondii derived redox enzymes as important immune modulators and potentially indicate a role for AAM in modulating immunopathology and promoting parasite replication during T. gondii infection.

  10. Ultrastructure of a novel tube-forming, intracellular parasite of dinoflagellates: Parvilucifera prorocentri sp. nov. (Alveolata, Myzozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, Brian S; Hoppenrath, Mona

    2008-02-01

    We have characterized the intracellular development and ultrastructure of a novel parasite that infected the marine benthic dinoflagellate Prorocentrum fukuyoi. The parasite possessed a combination of features described for perkinsids and syndineans, and also possessed novel characters associated with its parasitic life cycle. Reniform zoospores, about 4 microm long, possessed a transverse flagellum, alveoli, a refractile body, a mitochondrion with tubular cristae, a syndinean-like nucleus with condensed chromatin, micronemes, bipartite trichocysts with square profiles (absent in perkinsids) and oblong microbodies. Like Parvilucifera, the zoospores also possessed a shorter posterior flagellum, a heteromorphic pair of central microtubules in the anterior axoneme and a reduced pseudoconoid positioned directly above an orthogonal pair of basal bodies. Early developmental stages consisted of a sporangium about 5-15 microm in diam that contained spherical bodies and amorphous spaces. The undifferentiated sporangium increased to about 20-25 microm in diam before being enveloped by a wall with a convoluted mid-layer. The sporangium differentiated into an unordered mass of zoospores that escaped from the cyst through a pronounced germ tube about 4-5 microm in diam and 10-15 microm long. Weakly developed germ tubes have been described in Perkinsus but are absent altogether in Parvilucifera and syndineans. Comparison of these data with other myzozoans led us to classify the parasite as Parvilucifera prorocentri sp. nov., Myzozoa. Although we were hesitant to erect a new genus name in the absence of molecular sequence data, our ultrastructural data strongly indicated that this parasite is most closely related to perkinsids and syndineans, and represents an intriguing candidate for the cellular identity of a major subclade of Group I alveolates.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles from a Helminth Parasite Suppress Macrophage Activation and Constitute an Effective Vaccine for Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Gillian; McCaskill, Jana L; Borger, Jessica G; Simbari, Fabio; Robertson, Elaine; Millar, Marissa; Harcus, Yvonne; McSorley, Henry J; Maizels, Rick M; Buck, Amy H

    2017-05-23

    Recent studies have demonstrated that many parasites release extracellular vesicles (EVs), yet little is known about the specific interactions of EVs with immune cells or their functions during infection. We show that EVs secreted by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are internalized by macrophages and modulate their activation. EV internalization causes downregulation of type 1 and type 2 immune-response-associated molecules (IL-6 and TNF, and Ym1 and RELMα) and inhibits expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit ST2. Co-incubation with EV antibodies abrogated suppression of alternative activation and was associated with increased co-localization of the EVs with lysosomes. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with EV-alum generated protective immunity against larval challenge, highlighting an important role in vivo. In contrast, ST2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to infection, and they are unable to clear parasites following EV vaccination. Hence, macrophage activation and the IL-33 pathway are targeted by H. polygyrus EVs, while neutralization of EV function facilitates parasite expulsion. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. pH-Dependent Toxicity of High Aspect Ratio ZnO Nanowires in Macrophages Due to Intracellular Dissolution

    KAUST Repository

    H. Müller, Karin

    2010-11-23

    High-aspect ratio ZnO nanowires have become one of the most promising products in the nanosciences within the past few years with a multitude of applications at the interface of optics and electronics. The interaction of zinc with cells and organisms is complex, with both deficiency and excess causing severe effects. The emerging significance of zinc for many cellular processes makes it imperative to investigate the biological safety of ZnO nanowires in order to guarantee their safe economic exploitation. In this study, ZnO nanowires were found to be toxic to human monocyte macrophages (HMMs) at similar concentrations as ZnCl2. Confocal microscopy on live cells confirmed a rise in intracellular Zn2+ concentrations prior to cell death. In vitro, ZnO nanowires dissolved very rapidly in a simulated body fluid of lysosomal pH, whereas they were comparatively stable at extracellular pH. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a rapid macrophage uptake of ZnO nanowire aggregates by phagocytosis. Nanowire dissolution occurred within membrane-bound compartments, triggered by the acidic pH of the lysosomes. ZnO nanowire dissolution was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Deposition of electron-dense material throughout the ZnO nanowire structures observed by TEM could indicate adsorption of cellular components onto the wires or localized zinc-induced protein precipitation. Our study demonstrates that ZnO nanowire toxicity in HMMs is due to pH-triggered, intracellular release of ionic Zn2+ rather than the high-aspect nature of the wires. Cell death had features of necrosis as well as apoptosis, with mitochondria displaying severe structural changes. The implications of these findings for the application of ZnO nanowires are discussed. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Differences in Intracellular Fate of Two Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia in Macrophage-Like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Curto; Isaura Simoes; Riley, Sean P; Juan Jose Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are recognized as important agents of human tick-borne diseases worldwide, such as Mediterranean spotted fever (Rickettsia conorii) and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (Rickettsia rickettsii). Recent studies in several animal models have provided evidence of non-endothelial parasitism by pathogenic SFG Rickettsia species, suggesting that the interaction of rickettsiae with cells other than the endothelium may play an important role in pathogenesis of rickett...

  14. Differential Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Macrophages in Response to Intestinal Parasite Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Xing; Png, Chin Wen; Tay, Crispina Yan Bing; Teo, Joshua Ding Wei; Jiao, Huipeng; Lehming, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common enteric protistan parasite that can cause acute, as well as chronic, infection and is associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the pathogenic status of Blastocystis infection remains unclear. In this study, we found that Blastocystis antigens induced abundant expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in mouse intestinal explants, in mouse colitis colon, and in macrophages. Further investigation utilizing RAW264.7 murine macrophages showed that Blastocystis treatment in RAW264.7 macrophages induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38, the three major groups of mammalian mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases that play essential roles in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. ERK inhibition in macrophages significantly suppressed both mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α and mRNA expression of IL-1β. On the other hand, JNK inhibition resulted in reductions in both c-Jun and ERK activation and significant suppression of all three proinflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of p38 suppressed only IL-6 protein expression with no effect on the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Furthermore, we found that serine proteases produced by Blastocystis play an important role in the induction of ERK activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression by macrophages. Our study thus demonstrated for the first time that Blastocystis could induce the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines via the activation of MAP kinases and that infection with Blastocystis may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory intestinal diseases through the activation of inflammatory pathways in host immune cells, such as macrophages. PMID:25156742

  15. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  16. Carbon black nanoparticles promote endothelial activation and lipid accumulation in macrophages independently of intracellular ROS production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh;

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) may cause vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation, with oxidative stress and inflammation as supposed central mechanisms. We investigated oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation caused by nano-sized carbon...... and WST-1 assays, especially in THP-1 and THP-1a cells. The CB exposure decreased the glutathione (GSH) content in THP-1 and THP-1a cells, whereas GSH was increased in HUVECs. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased in all cell types after CB exposure. A reduction of the intracellular...

  17. Development of growth rate measuring method for intracellular, parasitic acid-fast bacteria using radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Noboru; Fukutomi, Yasuo [National Inst. of Infectious Deseases, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To prevent and treat infections diseases caused by pathogenic acid-fast bacteria such as Mycobacterium leprae, Tubercle bacillus, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms of intracellular proliferations of these bacteria. This research project was started to make DNA library using a new constructed shuttle vector. Development of in vitro evaluation method for intracellular proliferation of mycobacterium and its transformed cells was attempted on the basis of Buddemeyer method. This method was able to precisely determine the metabolic activities as low as those in leprae and its modified method using {sup 14}C-palmitic acid was highly sensitive and the results were obtainable in a shorter period. The generated CO{sub 2} was satisfactorily absorbed into scintillator without using a filter paper. A new culture medium from which arginine, a NO-producing compound was eliminated was used to repress the sterilizing effects of NO, but the metabolic activities of leprae was not enhanced. (M.N.)

  18. Intracellular killing of bacteria: is Dictyostelium a model macrophage or an alien?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Pierre; Lima, Wanessa C

    2014-01-01

    Predation of bacteria by phagocytic cells was first developed during evolution by environmental amoebae. Many of the core mechanisms used by amoebae to sense, ingest and kill bacteria have also been conserved in specialized phagocytic cells in mammalian organisms. Here we focus on recent results revealing how Dictyostelium discoideum senses and kills non-pathogenic bacteria. In this model, genetic analysis of intracellular killing of bacteria has revealed a surprisingly complex array of specialized mechanisms. These results raise new questions on these processes, and challenge current models based largely on studies in mammalian phagocytes. In addition, recent studies suggest one additional level on complexity by revealing how Dictyostelium recognizes specifically various bacterial species and strains, and adapts its metabolism to process them. It remains to be seen to what extent mechanisms uncovered in Dictyostelium are also used in mammalian phagocytic cells. PMID:24628900

  19. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); He, Chao [Department of Cardiology, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 433000 (China); Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Kejian [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Shihezi University (China); Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China); Guo, Xiaomei, E-mail: xmguo@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cardiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  20. 'Candidatus Odyssella thessalonicensis' gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligate intracellular parasite of Acanthamoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtles, R J; Rowbotham, T J; Michel, R; Pitcher, D G; Lascola, B; Alexiou-Daniel, S; Raoult, D

    2000-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium, strain L13, was observed infecting an environmental isolate of an Acanthamoeba species. The bacterium could not be recovered on axenic medium but was recovered and cultivated in vitro using cultures of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of L13 was found to be new, sharing less than 84% similarity with other sequences in the GenBank/EMBL database. L13 was found to be a member of the alpha-Proteobacteria, sharing an evolutionary line of descent with a group of uniquely obligate intracellular organisms comprised of Caedibacter and Holospora species and the NHP bacterium. Viable bacteria appeared to be highly motile within amoebae. Ultrastructural analysis of the bacterium demonstrated that it is rod-shaped and possesses a typical Gram-negative cell wall, but has no other outstanding features except small vesicle-like structures often associated with the outer surface of each bacterium. The host range of L13 was found to be limited to the genus Acanthamoeba. In A. polyphaga, L13 infection was slow to manifest when cultures were incubated below 30 degrees C, but at higher temperatures bacteria multiplied prolifically and induced host cell lysis. The protein profile of the bacterium purified from the amoebae was assessed by SDS-PAGE and its G+C content was estimated to be 41 mol%. Although these results support the proposal of L13 as a new species, its obligate intracellular nature prevented isolation of a definitive type strain. L13 is therefore proposed as 'Candidatus Odyssella thessalonicensis' gen. nov., sp. nov.

  1. A hyperspectral and toxicological analysis of protein corona impact on silver nanoparticle properties, intracellular modifications, and macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    The inevitable adsorption of biomolecules on nanomaterials results in the formation of a protein corona (PC), which modifies the nanoparticle (NP)-cell interface resulting in modified uptake, activity, clearance, and toxicity. While the physicochemical properties of the NP govern the composition of PC, the formation of PC in turn alters the characteristics of the NP by imparting a new unique "biological" identity. To assess how the PC influences AgNP properties, intracellular modifications, and cellular responses, we utilized a combination of hyperspectral and toxicological analyses. AgNPs were coated with a complex PC (multiple proteins, eg, 10% fetal bovine serum) or a simple PC (single protein, eg, bovine serum albumin [BSA]) and evaluated by hyperspectral and dynamic light scattering for modifications in AgNP properties. Mouse macrophages were exposed to AgNPs with PCs and examined for differences in uptake, cytotoxicity, and cell activation. Hyperspectral imaging revealed intracellular modifications to AgNPs that were found to spectrally match alterations in AgNPs following incubation in lysosomal fluid. Addition of the PC influenced AgNP uptake and cytotoxicity; however, hydrodynamic size and surface charge did not contribute to these responses. Assessments of all endpoints demonstrated differences between complex and BSA PC, suggesting that these responses are not purely driven by the primary protein component of the complex PC (ie, BSA). Alterations in cellular-NP uptake/interactions may be driven through cell surface receptor recognition of protein constituents that make up the PC rather than the physicochemical differences in AgNPs.

  2. A hyperspectral and toxicological analysis of protein corona impact on silver nanoparticle properties, intracellular modifications, and macrophage activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannahan JH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan H Shannahan,1 Ramakrishna Podila,2,3 Jared M Brown1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, 3Clemson Nanomaterials Center and COMSET, Clemson University, Anderson, SC, USA Abstract: The inevitable adsorption of biomolecules on nanomaterials results in the formation of a protein corona (PC, which modifies the nanoparticle (NP–cell interface resulting in modified uptake, activity, clearance, and toxicity. While the physicochemical properties of the NP govern the composition of PC, the formation of PC in turn alters the characteristics of the NP by imparting a new unique “biological” identity. To assess how the PC influences AgNP properties, intracellular modifications, and cellular responses, we utilized a combination of hyperspectral and toxicological analyses. AgNPs were coated with a complex PC (multiple proteins, eg, 10% fetal bovine serum or a simple PC (single protein, eg, bovine serum albumin [BSA] and evaluated by hyperspectral and dynamic light scattering for modifications in AgNP properties. Mouse macrophages were exposed to AgNPs with PCs and examined for differences in uptake, cytotoxicity, and cell activation. Hyperspectral imaging revealed intracellular modifications to AgNPs that were found to spectrally match alterations in AgNPs following incubation in lysosomal fluid. Addition of the PC influenced AgNP uptake and cytotoxicity; however, hydrodynamic size and surface charge did not contribute to these responses. Assessments of all endpoints demonstrated differences between complex and BSA PC, suggesting that these responses are not purely driven by the primary protein component of the complex PC (ie, BSA. Alterations in cellular–NP uptake/interactions may be driven through cell surface receptor recognition of protein constituents

  3. Disruption of the phagosomal membrane and egress of Legionella pneumophila into the cytoplasm during the last stages of intracellular infection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, Maëlle; Bitar, Dina M; Han, Lihui; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2004-07-01

    Although the early stages of intracellular infection by Legionella pneumophila are well established at the ultrastructural level, a detailed ultrastructural analysis of late stages of intracellular replication has never been done. Here we show that the membrane of the L. pneumophila-containing phagosome (LCP) is intact for up to 8 h postinfection of macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. At 12 h, 71 and 74% of the LCPs are disrupted within macrophages and A. polyphaga, respectively, while the plasma membrane remains intact. At 18 and 24 h postinfection, cytoplasmic elements such as mitochondria, lysosomes, vesicles, and amorphous material are dispersed among the bacteria and these bacteria are considered cytoplasmic. At 18 h, 77% of infected macrophages and 32% of infected A. polyphaga amoebae harbor cytoplasmic bacteria. At 24 h, 99 and 78% of infected macrophages and amoebae, respectively, contain cytoplasmic bacteria. On the basis of lysosomal acid phosphatase staining of infected macrophages and A. polyphaga, the lysosomal enzyme is present among the bacteria when host vesicles are dispersed among bacteria. Our data indicate that bacterial replication proceeds despite physical disruption of the phagosomal membrane. We also show that an lspG mutant that is defective in the type II secretion system and therefore does not secrete the hydrolytic enzymes metalloprotease, p-nitrophenol phosphorylcholine hydrolase, lipase, phospholipase A, and lysophospholipase A is as efficient as the wild-type strain in disruption of the LCP. Therefore, L. pneumophila disrupts the phagosomal membrane and becomes cytoplasmic at the last stages of infection in both macrophages and A. polyphaga. Lysosomal elements, mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles, and amorphous material are all dispersed among the bacteria, after phagosomal disruption, within both human macrophages and A. polyphaga. The disruption of the LCP is independent of the hydrolytic enzymes exported by the type II secretion

  4. Attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of Helicobacter pylori by human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, M; Paziak-Domanska, B; Wadström, T

    1995-02-01

    The different steps of phagocytosis, attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of cells of Helicobacter pylori strain 17874 (expressing sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) and cells of H. pylori strain 17875 (expressing non-sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) have been studied. More cells of sialopositive H. pylori strain 17874 have been found attached to human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBM) and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (PIM) than cells of sialonegative H. pylori strain 17875. Binding of cells of H. pylori strain 17874 has been significantly inhibited by treatment of phagocytes with neuraminidase. Inhibition of adhesion of these bacteria preincubated with foetuin to normal phagocytic cells has also been found. Well adhering cells of H. pylori strain 17874 were more resistant to killing mechanisms of human PBM and mouse PIM than cells of strain 17875. Good, probably sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin dependent, adhesion of H. pylori bacteria to phagocytes can be considered as an important virulence factor which facilitates the pathogen to avoid the defence mechanisms.

  5. Parasites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-06

    In this podcast, a listener wants to know what to do if he thinks he has a parasite or parasitic disease.  Created: 5/6/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/6/2010.

  6. Identification of Leptospira interrogans phospholipase C as a novel virulence factor responsible for intracellular free calcium ion elevation during macrophage death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Fang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptospira-induced macrophage death has been confirmed to play a crucial role in pathogenesis of leptospirosis, a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease. Intracellular free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]i elevation induced by infection can cause cell death, but [Ca(2+]i changes and high [Ca(2+]i-induced death of macrophages due to infection of Leptospira have not been previously reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first used a Ca(2+-specific fluorescence probe to confirm that the infection of L. interrogans strain Lai triggered a significant increase of [Ca(2+]i in mouse J774A.1 or human THP-1 macrophages. Laser confocal microscopic examination showed that the [Ca(2+]i elevation was caused by both extracellular Ca(2+ influx through the purinergic receptor, P2X7, and Ca(2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, as seen by suppression of [Ca(2+]i elevation when receptor-gated calcium channels were blocked or P2X7 was depleted. The LB361 gene product of the spirochete exhibited phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (L-PI-PLC activity to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 into inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3, which in turn induces intracellular Ca(2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum, with the Km of 199 µM and Kcat of 8.566E-5 S(-1. Secretion of L-PI-PLC from the spirochete into supernatants of leptospire-macrophage co-cultures and cytosol of infected macrophages was also observed by Western Blot assay. Lower [Ca(2+]i elevation was induced by infection with a LB361-deficient leptospiral mutant, whereas transfection of the LB361 gene caused a mild increase in [Ca(2+]i. Moreover, PI-PLCs (PI-PLC-β3 and PI-PLC-γ1 of the two macrophages were activated by phosphorylation during infection. Flow cytometric detection demonstrated that high [Ca(2+]i increases induced apoptosis and necrosis of macrophages, while mild [Ca(2+]i elevation only caused apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrated that L

  7. The application of high-content analysis in the study of targeted particulate delivery systems for intracellular drug delivery to alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Sullivan, Mary P; Sivadas, Neera; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Keane, Joseph; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-08-01

    With an ever increasing number of particulate drug delivery systems being developed for the intracellular delivery of therapeutics a robust high-throughput method for studying particle-cell interactions is urgently required. Current methods used for analyzing particle-cell interaction include spectrofluorimetry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence/confocal microscopy, but these methods are not high throughput and provide only limited data on the specific number of particles delivered intracellularly to the target cell. The work herein presents an automated high-throughput method to analyze microparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) uptake byalveolar macrophages. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were prepared in a range of sizes using a solvent evaporation method. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was differentiated into macrophage like cells using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and cells were treated with microparticles for 1 h and studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), spectrofluorimetry and a high-content analysis (HCA). PLGA microparticles within the size range of 0.8-2.1 μm were found to be optimal for macrophage targeting (p quantitative data on the influence of carrier design on cell targeting that can be gathered in a high-throughput format and therefore has great potential in the screening of intracellularly targeted DDS.

  8. MECANISMOS DE SALIDA DE PARÁSITOS INTRACELULARES DE SU CÉLULA HOSPEDERA Exit Mechanisms of Intracellular Parasites from their Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA DEL PILAR QUINTANA

    Full Text Available Algunos parásitos intracelulares durante la infección en hospederos vertebrados se localizan al interior de sus células hospederas en un compartimiento intracelular rodeado por membrana denominado vacuola parasitófora. Para el sostenimiento e incremento de las infecciones causadas por estos parásitos es necesario que se dé un evento de liberación/salida de las formas infectivas, para que estas reinicien la infección en nuevas células. Para dicho fenómeno de liberación se han planteado dos mecanismos básicos: 1. la salida se da por eventos de ruptura de la membrana de la vacuola parasitófora (MVP y de la membrana plasmática de la célula hospedera y/o 2. la salida se da por un proceso de fusión entre la MVP y la membrana de la célula hospedera, de forma que la luz de la VP y el espacio extracelular se hacen continuos, permitiendo la liberación del parásito. En esta revisión se presenta la evidencia que apoya estos modelos en bacterias y protozoarios intracelulares obligatorios, con especial énfasis en la salida de Leishmania.Some intracellular parasites inhabit intracellular compartments known as parasitophorous vacuoles. To maintain and amplify infection, infective forms of the parasite must exit from the host cell to infect new cells. During parasite egress, two main mechanisms have been proposed: lysis of the membranes of the parasitophorus vacuole and the plasma membrane of the cell host, or fusion of these two membranes providing continuity between the lumen of the parasitophorous vacuole and the extracellular compartment. In this review we present evidence supporting these models for intracellular parasites of human importance with particular emphasis on Leishmania exit.

  9. Role of Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi amastigote cysteine protease in intracellular parasite survival: studies by gene disruption and antisense mRNA inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucknoor Ashwini S

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parasitic protozoa belonging to Leishmania (L. donovani complex possess abundant, developmentally regulated cathepsin L-like cysteine proteases. Previously, we have reported the isolation of cysteine protease gene, Ldccys2 from Leishmania (L. chagasi. Here, we have further characterized this cysteine protease gene and demonstrated its role during infection and survival of Leishmania (L. chagasi within the U937 macrophage cells. Results The amastigote specific Ldccys2 genes of L. (L. chagasi and L. (L. donovani have identical gene organization, as determined by southern blots. In vivo expression analyses by Northern blots showed that Ldccys2 is amastigote specific. Western blot using anti-Ldccys2 antibody confirmed the amastigote specific protein expression. Recombinant expression of Ldccys2, a 30 kDA protein, was functionally active in a gelatin assay. Results from Ldccys2 heterozygous knockout mutants showed its role during macrophage infection and in intra-macrophage survival of the parasites. Since attempts to generate null mutants failed, we used antisense RNA inhibition to regulate Ldcccys2 gene expression. Not surprisingly, the results from antisense studies further confirmed the results from heterozygous knockout mutants, reiterating the importance of amastigote specific cysteine proteases in Leishmania infection and pathogenesis. Conclusions The study shows that Ldccys2 is a developmentally regulated gene and that Ldccys2 is expressed only in infectious amastigote stages of the parasite. The collective results from both the heterozygous knockout mutants and antisense mRNA inhibition studies shows that Ldccys2 helps in infection and survival of L. (L. chagasi amastigotes within the macrophage cells. Finally, antisense RNA technique can be used as an alternate approach to gene knockout, for silencing gene expression in L. (L. chagasi, especially in cases such as this, where a null mutant cannot be achieved by

  10. Anti-parasitic action and elimination of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii in the presence of novel thiosemicarbazone and its 4-thiazolidinone derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Carvalho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma, which infects all eukaryotic cells, is considered to be a good system for the study of drug action and of the behavior of infected host cells. In the present study, we asked if thiosemicarbazone derivatives can be effective against tachyzoites and which morphological and ultrastructural features of host cells and parasites are associated with the destruction of Toxoplasma. The compounds were tested in infected Vero cell culture using concentration screens (0.1 to 20 mM. The final concentration of 1 mM was chosen for biological assay. The following results were obtained: 1 These new derivatives decreased T. gondii infection with an in vitro parasite IC50% of 0.2-0.7 mM, without a significant effect on host cells and the more efficient compounds were 2, 3 (thiosemicarbazone derivatives and 4 (thiazolidinone derivative; 2 The main feature observed during parasite elimination was continuous morphological disorganization of the tachyzoite secretory system, progressive organelle vesiculation, and then complete disruption; 3 Ultrastructural assays also revealed that progressive vesiculation in the cytoplasm of treated parasites did not occur in the host cell; 4 Vesiculation inside the parasite resulted in death, but this feature occurred asynchronously in different intracellular tachyzoites; 5 The death and elimination of T. gondii was associated with features such as apoptosis-like stage, acidification and digestion of parasites into parasitophorous vacuoles. Our results suggest that these new chemical compounds are promising for the elimination of intracellular parasites by mainly affecting tachyzoite development at 1 mM concentration for 24 h of treatment.

  11. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 1698221...1 Title Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Author

  12. Plasmodium falciparum 19-kilodalton merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1)-specific antibodies that interfere with parasite growth in vitro can inhibit MSP1 processing, merozoite invasion, and intracellular parasite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, David K; Remarque, Edmond J; Faber, Bart W; Cavanagh, David R; Arnot, David E; Thomas, Alan W; Holder, Anthony A

    2012-03-01

    Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is a target for malaria vaccine development. Antibodies to the 19-kDa carboxy-terminal region referred to as MSP1(19) inhibit erythrocyte invasion and parasite growth, with some MSP1-specific antibodies shown to inhibit the proteolytic processing of MSP1 that occurs at invasion. We investigated a series of antibodies purified from rabbits immunized with MSP1(19) and AMA1 recombinant proteins for their ability to inhibit parasite growth, initially looking at MSP1 processing. Although significant inhibition of processing was mediated by several of the antibody samples, there was no clear relationship with overall growth inhibition by the same antibodies. However, no antibody samples inhibited processing but not invasion, suggesting that inhibition of MSP1 processing contributes to but is not the only mechanism of antibody-mediated inhibition of invasion and growth. Examining other mechanisms by which MSP1-specific antibodies inhibit parasite growth, we show that MSP1(19)-specific antibodies are taken up into invaded erythrocytes, where they persist for significant periods and result in delayed intracellular parasite development. This delay may result from antibody interference with coalescence of MSP1(19)-containing vesicles with the food vacuole. Antibodies raised against a modified recombinant MSP1(19) sequence were more efficient at delaying intracellular growth than those to the wild-type protein. We propose that antibodies specific for MSP1(19) can mediate inhibition of parasite growth by at least three mechanisms: inhibition of MSP1 processing, direct inhibition of invasion, and inhibition of parasite development following invasion. The balance between mechanisms may be modulated by modifying the immunogen used to induce the antibodies.

  13. Efficient intracellular drug-targeting of macrophages using stealth liposomes directed to the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Anders; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov;

    2012-01-01

    by hydrophobic linkage of CD163-binding monoclonal antibodies to polyethylene glycol-coated liposomes ('stealth liposomes'). Targeting to the endocytic CD163 protein greatly increased the uptake of liposomes in CD163 transfected cells and macrophages as visualized by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry...

  14. Intracellular NAD+ levels are associated with LPS-induced TNF-α release in pro-inflammatory macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabany, Abbas Jawad; Moody, Alan John; Foey, Andrew David; Billington, Richard Andrew

    2016-01-13

    Metabolism and immune responses have been shown to be closely linked and as our understanding increases, so do the intricacies of the level of linkage. NAD(+) has previously been shown to regulate tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) synthesis and TNF-α has been shown to regulate NAD(+) homoeostasis providing a link between a pro-inflammatory response and redox status. In the present study, we have used THP-1 differentiation into pro- (M1-like) and anti- (M2-like) inflammatory macrophage subset models to investigate this link further. Pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages showed different resting NAD(+) levels and expression levels of NAD(+) homoeostasis enzymes. Challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a pro-inflammatory stimulus for macrophages, caused a large, biphasic and transient increase in NAD(+) levels in pro- but not anti-inflammatory macrophages that were correlated with TNF-α release and inhibition of certain NAD(+) synthesis pathways blocked TNF-α release. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation also caused changes in mRNA levels of some NAD(+) homoeostasis enzymes in M1-like cells. Surprisingly, despite M2-like cells not releasing TNF-α or changing NAD(+) levels in response to lipopolysaccharide, they showed similar mRNA changes compared with M1-like cells. These data further strengthen the link between pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and NAD(+). The agonist-induced rise in NAD(+) shows striking parallels to well-known second messengers and raises the possibility that NAD(+) is acting in a similar manner in this model.

  15. First report of the intracellular fish parasite Sphaerothecum destruens associated with the invasive topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charrier Amélie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphaerothecum destruens has emerged as a serious parasite of fish. Its life cycle, as well as its association with Asian cyprinids, allows it to infect a wide range of hosts. The topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva, an invasive species that has rapidly colonized Europe, has been shown to be a healthy carrier of the parasite. However, in France, the presence of S. destruens and its possible association with P. parva have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we screened topmouth gudgeon DNA for S. destruens using PCR amplification of an 18S rRNA gene fragment of the parasite. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of S. destruens in the invasive fish species. Our results suggest that P. parva can be a potent vector of the parasite, and has the potential to become a major ecological and economic threat to the French fish population.

  16. Forward genetics screens using macrophages to identify Toxoplasma gondii genes important for resistance to IFN-γ-dependent cell autonomous immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Odaelys; Skariah, Sini; Lynch, Brian; Kim, Nathaniel; Ueda, Yukari; Vohora, Neal; Choe, Josh; Mordue, Dana G

    2015-03-12

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen. The parasite invades and replicates within virtually any warm blooded vertebrate cell type. During parasite invasion of a host cell, the parasite creates a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that originates from the host cell membrane independent of phagocytosis within which the parasite replicates. While IFN-dependent-innate and cell mediated immunity is important for eventual control of infection, innate immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells, can also serve as vehicles for systemic dissemination of the parasite early in infection. An approach is described that utilizes the host innate immune response, in this case macrophages, in a forward genetic screen to identify parasite mutants with a fitness defect in infected macrophages following activation but normal invasion and replication in naïve macrophages. Thus, the screen isolates parasite mutants that have a specific defect in their ability to resist the effects of macrophage activation. The paper describes two broad phenotypes of mutant parasites following activation of infected macrophages: parasite stasis versus parasite degradation, often in amorphous vacuoles. The parasite mutants are then analyzed to identify the responsible parasite genes specifically important for resistance to induced mediators of cell autonomous immunity. The paper presents a general approach for the forward genetics screen that, in theory, can be modified to target parasite genes important for resistance to specific antimicrobial mediators. It also describes an approach to evaluate the specific macrophage antimicrobial mediators to which the parasite mutant is susceptible. Activation of infected macrophages can also promote parasite differentiation from the tachyzoite to bradyzoite stage that maintains chronic infection. Therefore, methodology is presented to evaluate the importance of the identified

  17. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time.

  18. Induction of cell-mediated immunity during early stages of infection with intracellular protozoa

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    Gazzinelli R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma cruzi are intracellular parasites which, as part of their life cycle, induce a potent cell-mediated immunity (CMI maintained by Th1 lymphocytes and IFN-g. In both cases, induction of a strong CMI is thought to protect the host against rapid parasite multiplication and consequent pathology and lethality during the acute phase of infection. However, the parasitic infection is not eliminated by the immune system and the vertebrate host serves as a parasite reservoir. In contrast, Leishmania sp, which is a slow growing parasite, appears to evade induction of CMI during early stages of infection as a strategy for surviving in a hostile environment (i.e., inside the macrophages which are their obligatory niche in the vertebrate host. Recent reports show that the initiation of IL-12 synthesis by macrophages during these parasitic infections is a key event in regulating CMI and disease outcome. The studies reviewed here indicate that activation/inhibition of distinct signaling pathways and certain macrophage functions by intracellular protozoa are important events in inducing/modulating the immune response of their vertebrate hosts, allowing parasite and host survival and therefore maintaining parasite life cycles.

  19. Activities of ceftobiprole and other cephalosporins against extracellular and intracellular (THP-1 macrophages and keratinocytes) forms of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Glupczynski, Youri; Duval, Valérie; Joris, Bernard; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2009-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic intracellular organism. Although they poorly accumulate in eukaryotic cells, beta-lactams show activity against intracellular methicillin (methicillin)-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) if the exposure times and the drug concentrations are sufficient. Intraphagocytic methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains are susceptible to penicillins and carbapenems because the acidic pH favors the acylation of PBP 2a by these beta-lactams through pH-induced conformational changes. The intracellular activity (THP-1 macrophages and keratinocytes) of ceftobiprole, which shows almost similar in vitro activities against MRSA and MSSA in broth, was examined against a panel of hospital-acquired and community-acquired MRSA strains (MICs, 0.5 to 2.0 mg/liter at pH 7.4 and 0.25 to 1.0 mg/liter at pH 5.5) and was compared with its activity against MSSA isolates. The key pharmacological descriptors {relative maximal efficacy (E(max)), relative potency (the concentration causing a reduction of the inoculum halfway between E(0) and E(max) [EC(50)]), and static concentration (C(s))} were measured. All strains showed sigmoidal dose-responses, with E(max) being about a 1 log(10) CFU decrease from the postphagocytosis inoculum, and EC(50) and C(s) being 0.2 to 0.3x and 0.6 to 0.9x the MIC, respectively. Ceftobiprole effectively competed with Bocillin FL (a fluorescent derivative of penicillin V) for binding to PBP 2a at both pH 5.5 and pH 7.4. In contrast, cephalexin, cefuroxime, cefoxitin, or ceftriaxone (i) were less potent in PBP 2a competitive binding assays, (ii) showed only partial restoration of the activity against MRSA in broth at acidic pH, and (iii) were collectively less effective against MRSA in THP-1 macrophages and were ineffective in keratinocytes. The improved activity of ceftobiprole toward intracellular MRSA compared with the activities of conventional cephalosporins can be explained, at least in part, by its greater ability to bind

  20. Involvement of β-defensin 130 (DEFB130) in the macrophage microbicidal mechanisms for killing Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Takano, Ryo; Furukawa, Atsushi; Murakoshi, Fumi; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the molecular defense mechanism of macrophages and identifying their effector molecules against malarial parasites may provide important clues for the discovery of new therapies. To analyze the immunological responses of malarial parasite-induced macrophages, we used DNA microarray technology to examine the gene profile of differentiated macrophages phagocytizing Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized erythrocytes (iRBC). The transcriptional gene profile of macrophages in response to iRBCs represented 168 down-regulated genes, which were mainly involved in the cellular immune response, and 216 upregulated genes, which were involved in cellular proteolysis, growth, and adhesion. Importantly, the specific upregulation of β-defensin 130 (DEFB130) in these macrophages suggested a possible role for DEFB130 in malarial parasite elimination. Differentiated macrophages phagocytizing iRBCs exhibited an increase in intracellular DEFB130 levels and DEFB130 appeared to accumulate at the site of iRBC engulfment. Transfection of esiRNA-mediated knockdown of DEFB130 into macrophages resulted in a remarkable reduction in their antiplasmodial activity in vitro. Furthermore, DEFB130 synthetic peptide exhibited a modest toxic effect on P. falciparum in vitro and P. yoelii in vivo, unlike scrambled DEFB130 peptide, which showed no antiplasmodial activity. Together, these results suggest that DEFB130 might be one of the macrophage effector molecules for eliminating malarial parasites. Our data broaden our knowledge of the immunological response of macrophages to iRBCs and shed light on a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28181499

  1. Leishmania infantum modulates host macrophage mitochondrial metabolism by hijacking the SIRT1-AMPK axis.

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    Diana Moreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic manipulation of host cells by intracellular pathogens is currently recognized to play an important role in the pathology of infection. Nevertheless, little information is available regarding mitochondrial energy metabolism in Leishmania infected macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that during L. infantum infection, macrophages switch from an early glycolytic metabolism to an oxidative phosphorylation, and this metabolic deviation requires SIRT1 and LKB1/AMPK. SIRT1 or LBK1 deficient macrophages infected with L. infantum failed to activate AMPK and up-regulate its targets such as Slc2a4 and Ppargc1a, which are essential for parasite growth. As a result, impairment of metabolic switch caused by SIRT1 or AMPK deficiency reduces parasite load in vitro and in vivo. Overall, our work demonstrates the importance of SIRT1 and AMPK energetic sensors for parasite intracellular survival and proliferation, highlighting the modulation of these proteins as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  2. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

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    Auricelio A Macedo

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi. In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment.

  3. Intracellular Propionibacterium acnes infection in glandular epithelium and stromal macrophages of the prostate with or without cancer.

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    Yuan Bae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reports on Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes suggest that this bacterium is prevalent in the prostate, is associated with acute and chronic prostatic inflammation, and might have a role in prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS: To evaluate the pathogenic role of this indigenous bacterium, we screened for the bacterium in radical prostatectomy specimens using enzyme immunohistochemistry with a novel P. acnes-specific monoclonal antibody (PAL antibody, together with an anti-nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB antibody. We examined formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections of radical prostatectomy specimens from 28 patients with prostate cancer and 18 age-matched control patients with bladder cancer, but without prostate cancer. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry with the PAL antibody revealed small round bodies within some non-cancerous glandular epithelium and stromal macrophages in most prostate samples. Prostate cancer samples had higher frequencies of either cytoplasmic P. acnes or nuclear NF-κB expression of glandular epithelium and higher numbers of stromal macrophages with P. acnes than control samples. These parameters were also higher in the peripheral zone than in the transitional zone of the prostate, especially in prostate cancer samples. Nuclear NF-κB expression was more frequent in glands with P. acnes than in glands without P. acnes. The number of stromal macrophages with the bacterium correlated with the grade of chronic inflammation in both the PZ and TZ areas and with the grade of acute inflammation in the TZ area. CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistochemical analysis with a novel monoclonal antibody for detecting P. acnes in the prostate suggested that intraepithelial P. acnes infection in non-cancerous prostate glands and inflammation caused by the bacterium may contribute to the development of prostate cancer.

  4. Innate invariant NKT cells recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages, produce interferon-gamma, and kill intracellular bacteria.

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    Isabel Sada-Ovalle

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb requires a coordinated response between the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, resulting in a type 1 cytokine response, which is associated with control of infection. The contribution of innate lymphocytes to immunity against Mtb remains controversial. We established an in vitro system to study this question. Interferon-gamma is produced when splenocytes from uninfected mice are cultured with Mtb-infected macrophages, and, under these conditions, bacterial replication is suppressed. This innate control of bacterial replication is dependent on CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT cells, and their activation requires CD1d expression by infected macrophages as well as IL-12 and IL-18. We show that iNKT cells, even in limiting quantities, are sufficient to restrict Mtb replication. To determine whether iNKT cells contribute to host defense against tuberculosis in vivo, we adoptively transferred iNKT cells into mice. Primary splenic iNKT cells obtained from uninfected mice significantly reduce the bacterial burden in the lungs of mice infected with virulent Mtb by the aerosol route. Thus, iNKT cells have a direct bactericidal effect, even in the absence of synthetic ligands such as alpha-galactosylceramide. Our finding that iNKT cells protect mice against aerosol Mtb infection is the first evidence that CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate protection against Mtb in vivo.

  5. Intracellular levels of the viral symbiont CPV in Cryptosporidium parvum correlate with fecundity of the parasite in dairy calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous reports have cited differences in clinical signs and oocyst output among strains of Cryptosporidium parvum. The purpose of this study was to determine if levels of the C. parvum intracellular viral symbiont CPV correlated with observed clinical and parasitological differences. Calves infe...

  6. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

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    Adele Goldman-Pinkovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3, as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade.

  7. Macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha inhibits postentry steps of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection via suppression of intracellular cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amella, Carol-Ann; Sherry, Barbara; Shepp, David H; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2005-05-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) predominantly use chemokine receptor CCR5 to enter target cells. The natural ligands of CCR5, the beta-chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, and RANTES, interfere with HIV-1 binding to CCR5 receptors and decrease the amount of virions entering cells. Although the inhibition of HIV-1 entry by beta-chemokines is well documented, their effects on postentry steps of the viral life cycle and on host cell components that control the outcome of infection after viral entry are not well defined. Here, we show that all three beta-chemokines, and MIP-1alpha in particular, inhibit postentry steps of the HIV-1 life cycle in primary lymphocytes, presumably via suppression of intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Productive HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes requires cellular activation. Cell activation increases intracellular cAMP, which is required for efficient synthesis of proviral DNA during early steps of viral infection. Binding of MIP-1alpha to cognate receptors decreases activation-induced intracellular cAMP levels through the activation of inhibitory G proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of one of the downstream targets of cAMP, cAMP-dependent PKA, significantly inhibits synthesis of HIV-1-specific DNA without affecting virus entry. These data reveal that beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of virus replication in primary lymphocytes combines inhibitory effects at the entry and postentry levels and imply the involvement of beta-chemokine-induced signaling in postentry inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  8. Differential intracellular fate of Burkholderia pseudomallei 844 and Burkholderia thailandensis UE5 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

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    Engering Anneke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp is a category B biothreat organism that causes a potentially fatal disease in humans and animals, namely melioidosis. Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt is another naturally occurring species that is very closely related to Bp. However, despite this closely related genotype, Bt is considered avirulent as it does not cause the disease. In the present study, we compared the growth kinetics of B. pseudomallei strain 844 (Bp-844 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs and macrophages (Mφs, as well as its ability to stimulate host cell responses with those of B. thailandensis strain UE5 (Bt-UE5. Results Primary human MoDCs and Mφs were infected with Bp-844 and its intracellular growth kinetics and ability to induce host cell responses were evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using the Bt-UE5. In human MoDCs, both bacteria were similar in respect to their ability to survive and replicate intracellularly, induce upregulation of costimulatory molecules and cytokines and bias T helper cell differentiation toward a Th1 phenotype. By contrast, the two bacteria exhibited different growth kinetics in human Mφs, where the intracellular growth of Bt-UE5, but not Bp-844, was significantly suppressed. Moreover, the ability of Mφs to kill Bp-844 was markedly enhanced following stimulation with IFN-γ. Conclusion The data presented showed that while both strains were similar in their ability to survive and replicate in human MoDCs, only Bp-844 could readily replicate in human Mφs. Both bacteria induced similar host cellular responses, particularly with regard to their ability to bias T cell differentiation toward a Th1 phenotype.

  9. Dynamics of Salmonella infection of macrophages at the single cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gog, Julia R; Murcia, Alicia; Osterman, Natan; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Achouri, Sarra; Wei, Bin; Mastroeni, Pietro; Wood, James L N; Maskell, Duncan J; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E

    2012-10-07

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of diseases. Salmonellae are intracellular parasites of macrophages, and the control of bacteria within these cells is critical to surviving an infection. The dynamics of the bacteria invading, surviving, proliferating in and killing macrophages are central to disease pathogenesis. Fundamentally important parameters, however, such as the cellular infection rate, have not previously been calculated. We used two independent approaches to calculate the macrophage infection rate: mathematical modelling of Salmonella infection experiments, and analysis of real-time video microscopy of infection events. Cells repeatedly encounter salmonellae, with the bacteria often remain associated with the macrophage for more than ten seconds. Once Salmonella encounters a macrophage, the probability of that bacterium infecting the cell is remarkably low: less than 5%. The macrophage population is heterogeneous in terms of its susceptibility to the first infection event. Once infected, a macrophage can undergo further infection events, but these reinfection events occur at a lower rate than that of the primary infection.

  10. Inhibitory activity of lipid fractions myobacterium avium complex against macrophage respiratory burst

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Toshiaki; 冨岡, 治明

    1998-01-01

    To explore possible mechanisms of the resistance of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) intracellular parasites to the antimicrobial activity of macrophages (MΦs), effects of the lipid components of these parasites on the MΦ respiratory burst were investigated. In this study, the MΦ respiratory burst was measured by luminoldependent chemiluminescence generated through the peroxidase-mediated halogenation reaction in murine peritoneal MΦs in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) triggering...

  11. Nitric oxide from IFNγ-primed macrophages modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactams against the intracellular pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Nontyphoidal Salmonella.

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    Jessica Jones-Carson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Our investigations show that nonlethal concentrations of nitric oxide (NO abrogate the antibiotic activity of β-lactam antibiotics against Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli and nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. NO protects B. pseudomallei already exposed to β-lactams, suggesting that this diatomic radical tolerizes bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of this important class of antibiotics. The concentrations of NO that elicit antibiotic tolerance repress consumption of oxygen (O2, while stimulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 synthesis. Transposon insertions in genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase-related functions and molybdenum assimilation confer B. pseudomallei a selective advantage against the antimicrobial activity of the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem. Cumulatively, these data support a model by which NO induces antibiotic tolerance through the inhibition of the electron transport chain, rather than by potentiating antioxidant defenses as previously proposed. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of terminal oxidases and nitrate reductases tolerizes aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to β-lactams. The degree of NO-induced β-lactam antibiotic tolerance seems to be inversely proportional to the proton motive force (PMF, and thus the dissipation of ΔH+ and ΔΨ electrochemical gradients of the PMF prevents β-lactam-mediated killing. According to this model, NO generated by IFNγ-primed macrophages protects intracellular Salmonella against imipenem. On the other hand, sublethal concentrations of imipenem potentiate the killing of B. pseudomallei by NO generated enzymatically from IFNγ-primed macrophages. Our investigations indicate that NO modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactam antibiotics.

  12. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Plays a Critical Role in Mediating Protection against the Helminth Parasite Taenia crassiceps

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Rosas, Lucia E.; David, John R; Bojalil, Rafael; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the role of endogenous migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in regulation of immune response during murine cysticercosis caused by the helminth parasite Taenia crassiceps, we analyzed the course of T. crassiceps infection in MIF−/− BALB/c mice. MIF−/− mice were highly susceptible to T. crassiceps and developed significantly higher parasite loads compared to similarly infected MIF+/+ mice. Throughout the course of infection, Taenia crassiceps soluble antigen-stimulated spleen cells f...

  13. Phosphoproteomic analysis of differentiating Leishmania parasites reveals a unique stage-specific phosphorylation motif

    OpenAIRE

    Tsigankov, Polina; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Späth, Gerald F; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Protists of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cause a wide range of cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral diseases in humans. They cycle between phagolysosomes of mammalian macrophages and the sand fly midgut, proliferating as intracellular amastigotes and extracellular promastigotes, respectively. Exposure to a lysosomal environment, i.e. acidic pH and body temperature, signals promastigotes to differentiate into amastigotes. Time cours...

  14. Pitting of malaria parasites and spherocyte formation

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    Gichuki Charity W

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high prevalence of spherocytes was detected in blood smears of children enrolled in a case control study conducted in the malaria holoendemic Lake Victoria basin. It was speculated that the spherocytes reflect intraerythrocytic removal of malarial parasites with a concurrent removal of RBC membrane through a process analogous to pitting of intraerythrocytic inclusion bodies. Pitting and re-circulation of RBCs devoid of malaria parasites could be a host mechanism for parasite clearance while minimizing the anaemia that would occur were the entire parasitized RBC removed. The prior demonstration of RBCs containing ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (pf 155 or RESA but no intracellular parasites, support the idea of pitting. Methods An in vitro model was developed to examine the phenomenon of pitting and spherocyte formation in Plasmodium falciparum infected RBCs (iRBC co-incubated with human macrophages. In vivo application of this model was evaluated using blood specimens from patients attending Kisumu Ditrict Hospital. RBCs were probed with anti-RESA monoclonal antibody and a DNA stain (propidium iodide. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy was used to compare RBCs containing both the antigen and the parasites to those that were only RESA positive. Results Co-incubation of iRBC and tumor necrosis factor-alpha activated macrophages led to pitting (14% ± 1.31% macrophages with engulfed trophozoites as opposed to erythrophagocytosis (5.33% ± 0.95% (P Conclusion It is proposed that in malaria holoendemic areas where prevalence of asexual stage parasites approaches 100% in children, RBCs with pitted parasites are re-circulated and pitting may produce spherocytes.

  15. Inflammasome sensor NLRP1 controls rat macrophage susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Kimberly M Cirelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that infects a wide range of warm-blooded species. Rats vary in their susceptibility to this parasite. The Toxo1 locus conferring Toxoplasma resistance in rats was previously mapped to a region of chromosome 10 containing Nlrp1. This gene encodes an inflammasome sensor controlling macrophage sensitivity to anthrax lethal toxin (LT induced rapid cell death (pyroptosis. We show here that rat strain differences in Toxoplasma infected macrophage sensitivity to pyroptosis, IL-1β/IL-18 processing, and inhibition of parasite proliferation are perfectly correlated with NLRP1 sequence, while inversely correlated with sensitivity to anthrax LT-induced cell death. Using recombinant inbred rats, SNP analyses and whole transcriptome gene expression studies, we narrowed the candidate genes for control of Toxoplasma-mediated rat macrophage pyroptosis to four genes, one of which was Nlrp1. Knockdown of Nlrp1 in pyroptosis-sensitive macrophages resulted in higher parasite replication and protection from cell death. Reciprocally, overexpression of the NLRP1 variant from Toxoplasma-sensitive macrophages in pyroptosis-resistant cells led to sensitization of these resistant macrophages. Our findings reveal Toxoplasma as a novel activator of the NLRP1 inflammasome in rat macrophages.

  16. An Emerging Approach for Parallel Quantification of Intracellular Protozoan Parasites and Host Cell Characterization Using TissueFAXS Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Maximilian; Dufner, Bianca; Dürk, Julius; Bedal, Konstanze; Stricker, Kristina; Prokoph, Lukas Ali; Koch, Christoph; Wege, Anja K; Zirpel, Henner; van Zandbergen, Ger; Ecker, Rupert; Boghiu, Bogdan; Ritter, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of host-pathogen interactions is a fundamental approach in microbiological and immunological oriented disciplines. It is commonly accepted that host cells start to change their phenotype after engulfing pathogens. Techniques such as real time PCR or ELISA were used to characterize the genes encoding proteins that are associated either with pathogen elimination or immune escape mechanisms. Most of such studies were performed in vitro using primary host cells or cell lines. Consequently, the data generated with such approaches reflect the global RNA expression or protein amount recovered from all cells in culture. This is justified when all host cells harbor an equal amount of pathogens under experimental conditions. However, the uptake of pathogens by phagocytic cells is not synchronized. Consequently, there are host cells incorporating different amounts of pathogens that might result in distinct pathogen-induced protein biosynthesis. Therefore, we established a technique able to detect and quantify the number of pathogens in the corresponding host cells using immunofluorescence-based high throughput analysis. Paired with multicolor staining of molecules of interest it is now possible to analyze the infection profile of host cell populations and the corresponding phenotype of the host cells as a result of parasite load.

  17. DNA from protozoan parasites Babesia bovis, Trypanosoma cruzi, and T. brucei is mitogenic for B lymphocytes and stimulates macrophage expression of interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, L K; Kegerreis, K A; Suarez, C E; Roditi, I; Corral, R S; Bertot, G M; Norimine, J; Brown, W C

    2001-04-01

    The activation of innate immune responses by genomic DNA from bacteria and several nonvertebrate organisms represents a novel mechanism of pathogen recognition. We recently demonstrated the CpG-dependent mitogenic activity of DNA from the protozoan parasite Babesia bovis for bovine B lymphocytes (W. C. Brown, D. M. Estes, S. E. Chantler, K. A. Kegerreis, and C. E. Suarez, Infect. Immun. 66:5423-5432, 1998). However, activation of macrophages by DNA from protozoan parasites has not been demonstrated. The present study was therefore conducted to determine whether DNA from the protozan parasites B. bovis, Trypanosoma cruzi, and T. brucei activates macrophages to secrete inflammatory mediators associated with protective immunity. DNA from Escherichia coli and all three parasites stimulated B-lymphocyte proliferation and increased macrophage production of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitric oxide (NO). Regulation of IL-12 and NO production occurred at the level of transcription. The amounts of IL-12, TNF-alpha, and NO induced by E. coli and protozoal DNA were strongly correlated (r2 > 0.9) with the frequency of CG dinucleotides in the genome, and immunostimulation by DNA occurred in the order E. coli > or = T. cruzi > T. brucei > B. bovis. Induction of inflammatory mediators by E. coli, T. brucei, and B. bovis DNA was dependent on the presence of unmethylated CpG dinucleotides. However, at high concentrations, E. coli and T. cruzi DNA-mediated macrophage activation was not inhibited following methylation. The recognition of protozoal DNA by B lymphocytes and macrophages may provide an important innate defense mechanism to control parasite replication and promote persistent infection.

  18. INTRACELLULAR Leishmania amazonensis KILLING INDUCED BY THE GUANINE NUCLEOSIDE 8-BROMOGUANOSINE

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    GIORGIO Selma

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effect of 8-Bromoguanosine, an immunostimulatory compound, on the cytotoxicity of macrophages against Leishmania amazonensis in an in vitro system. The results showed that macrophages treated with 8-Bromoguanosine before or after infection are capable to reduce parasite load, as monitored by the number of amastigotes per macrophage and the percentage of infected cells (i.e. phagocytic index. Since 8-Bromoguanosine was not directly toxic to the promastigotes, it was concluded that the ribonucleoside induced macrophage activation. Presumably, 8-Bromoguanosine primed macrophages by inducing interferon alpha and beta which ultimately led to L. amazonensis amastigote killing. The results suggest that guanine ribonucleosides may be useful to treat infections with intracellular pathogens.

  19. Characterization of the intracellular survival of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis: phagosomal pH and fusogenicity in J774 macrophages compared with other mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnel, M P; Goethe, R; Habermann, A; Mueller, E; Rohde, M; Griffiths, G; Valentin-Weigand, P

    2001-08-01

    The phagosomes containing viable pathogenic mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (M. avium), are known to be limited in their ability to both acidify and fuse with late (but not early) endocytic organelles. Here, we analysed the pH and fusogenicity of phagosomes containing M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis (M. ptb), the causative agent of paratuberculosis in ruminants. Using the murine J774 macrophage cell line, we compared viable and heat-killed M. ptb and, in addition, viable or dead M. avium, as well as two non-pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium gordonae. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that M. ptb persisted intracellularly in phagosomes for up to 15 days. The phagosomes containing live M. ptb and M. avium were significantly reduced in their ability to acquire some markers for the endocytic pathway, such as internalized calcein, BSA-gold or the membrane protein Lamp 2. However, they were almost completely accessible to 70 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran and Lamp 1. Overall, the phagosomes containing dead pathogenic mycobacteria behaved similarly to the ones containing live non-pathogenic mycobacteria in all experiments. Using FITC-dextran in a novel fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based method, we could also show that the bulk of endocytic compartments, including phagosomes, were only very mildly acidified to approximately pH 6.3 over at least 72 h in J774 cells infected with live M. ptb and M. avium. In contrast, J774 cells treated with heat-killed M. ptb or BSA-coated latex beads showed substantial acidification of the phagosome/endocytic compartments to a pH value of approximately 5.2. After infection with M. smegmatis and M. gordonae, acidification was initially (1-5 h after infection) inhibited, but increased after longer infection to levels similar to those with dead mycobacteria.

  20. In vivo rescue of alveolar macrophages from SP-A knockout mice with exogenous SP-A nearly restores a wild type intracellular proteome; actin involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floros Joanna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking surfactant protein-A (SP-A-/-; knockout; KO exhibit increased vulnerability to infection and injury. Although many bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL protein differences between KO and wild-type (WT are rapidly reversed in KO after infection, their clinical course is still compromised. We studied the impact of SP-A on the alveolar macrophage (AM proteome under basal conditions. Male SP-A KO mice were SP-A-treated (5 micrograms/mouse and sacrificed in 6 or 18 hr. The AM proteomes of KO, SP-A-treated KO, and WT mice were studied by 2D-DIGE coupled with MALDI-ToF/ToF and AM actin distribution was examined by phalloidon staining. Results We observed: a significant differences from KO in WT or exogenous SP-A-treated in 45 of 76 identified proteins (both increases and decreases. These included actin-related/cytoskeletal proteins (involved in motility, phagocytosis, endocytosis, proteins of intracellular signaling, cell differentiation/regulation, regulation of inflammation, protease/chaperone function, and proteins related to Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway; b SP-A-induced changes causing the AM proteome of the KO to resemble that of WT; and c that SP-A treatment altered cell size and F-actin distribution. Conclusions These differences are likely to enhance AM function. The observations show for the first time that acute in vivo SP-A treatment of KO mice, under basal or unstimulated conditions, affects the expression of multiple AM proteins, alters F-actin distribution, and can restore much of the WT phenotype. We postulate that the SP-A-mediated expression profile of the AM places it in a state of "readiness" to successfully conduct its innate immune functions and ensure lung health.

  1. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Rabhi

    Full Text Available Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source.

  2. DMPD: Manipulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB-signalingcascades during intracellular Toxoplasma gondii infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nalingcascades during intracellular Toxoplasma gondii infection. Denkers EY, Butcher BA, Del Rio L, Kim L. I...in kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB-signalingcascades during intracellular Toxoplasma...appaB-signalingcascades during intracellular Toxoplasma gondii infection. Authors Denkers EY, Butcher BA, De

  3. Activation of Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase Activity Attenuates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and Inhibits c-FOS and Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Macrophages Infected with Leishmania donovani

    OpenAIRE

    Nandan, Devki; Lo, Raymond; Reiner, Neil E

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania antagonize host defense mechanisms by interfering with cell signaling in macrophages. In this report, the impact of Leishmania donovani on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in the macrophage cell line RAW 264 was investigated. Overnight infection of cells with leishmania led to a significant decrease in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated MAP kinase activity and inhibited PM...

  4. The circadian clock in immune cells controls the magnitude of Leishmania parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Silke; Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Ohm, Hyejee; Labrecque, Nathalie; Olivier, Martin; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2017-09-07

    The intracellular parasite Leishmania uses neutrophils and macrophages as host cells upon infection. These immune cells harbour their own intrinsic circadian clocks, known to influence many aspects of their functions. Therefore, we tested whether the host circadian clocks regulate the magnitude of Leishmania major infection in mice. The extent of parasitic infection varied over 24 h in bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro and in two different in vivo models, footpad and peritoneal cavity infection. In vivo this was paralleled by time of day-dependent neutrophil and macrophage infiltration to the infection site and rhythmic chemokine expression. Thus, rhythmic parasitic infection observed in vivo was likely initiated by the circadian expression of chemoattractants and the subsequent rhythmic infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. Importantly, all rhythms were abolished in clock-deficient macrophages and when mice lacking the circadian clock in immune cells were infected. Therefore we demonstrated a critical role for the circadian clocks in immune cells in modulating the magnitude of Leishmania infection. To our knowledge this is the first report showing that the circadian clock controls infection by protozoan parasites in mammals. Understanding the timed regulation of host-parasite interactions will allow developing better prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to fight off vector-borne diseases.

  5. Ly6C- Monocytes Regulate Parasite-Induced Liver Inflammation by Inducing the Differentiation of Pathogenic Ly6C+ Monocytes into Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Morias

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes consist of two well-defined subsets, the Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes. Both CD11b+ myeloid cells populations have been proposed to infiltrate tissues during inflammation. While infiltration of Ly6C+ monocytes is an established pathogenic factor during hepatic inflammation, the role of Ly6C- monocytes remains elusive. Mice suffering experimental African trypanosome infection die from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that is initiated by phagocytosis of parasites by liver myeloid cells and culminates in apoptosis/necrosis of liver myeloid and parenchymal cells that reduces host survival. C57BL/6 mice are considered as trypanotolerant to Trypanosoma congolense infection. We have reported that in these animals, IL-10, produced among others by myeloid cells, limits the liver damage caused by pathogenic TNF-producing Ly6C+ monocytes, ensuring prolonged survival. Here, the heterogeneity and dynamics of liver myeloid cells in T. congolense-infected C57/BL6 mice was further dissected. Moreover, the contribution of Ly6C- monocytes to trypanotolerance was investigated. By using FACS analysis and adoptive transfer experiments, we found that the accumulation of Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages in the liver of infected mice coincided with a drop in the pool of Ly6C+ monocytes. Pathogenic TNF mainly originated from Ly6C+ monocytes while Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages were major and equipotent sources of IL-10 within myeloid cells. Moreover, Nr4a1 (Nur77 transcription factor-dependent Ly6C- monocytes exhibited IL-10-dependent and cell contact-dependent regulatory properties contributing to trypanotolerance by suppressing the production of TNF by Ly6C+ monocytes and by promoting the differentiation of the latter cells into macrophages. Thus, Ly6C- monocytes can dampen liver damage caused by an extensive Ly6C+ monocyte-associated inflammatory immune response in T. congolense trypanotolerant animals. In a more general context, Ly6C- or Ly6C

  6. Morin, a Bioflavonoid Suppresses Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Inflammatory Immune Response in RAW 264.7 Macrophages through the Inhibition of Inflammatory Mediators, Intracellular ROS Levels and NF-κB Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Dhanasekar

    Full Text Available Our previous studies had reported that morin, a bioflavanoid exhibited potent anti-inflammatory effect against adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. In this current study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of morin against monosodium urate crystal (MSU-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells, an in vitro model for acute gouty arthritis. For comparison purpose, colchicine was used as a reference drug. We have observed that morin (100-300 μM treatment significantly suppressed the levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1 and VEGF, inflammatory mediators (NO and PEG2, and lysosomal enzymes (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosamindase and cathepsin D in MSU-crystals stimulated macrophage cells. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2, and NF-κBp65 was found downregulated in MSU crystal stimulated macrophage cells by morin treatment, however, the mRNA expression of hypoxanthine phospho ribosyl transferse (HPRT was found to be increased. The flow cytometry analysis revealed that morin treatment decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in MSU crystal stimulated macrophage cells. The western blot analysis clearly showed that morin mainly exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the MSU crystal-induced COX-2 and TNF-α protein expression through the inactivation of NF-κB signaling pathway in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells similar to that of BAY 11-7082 (IκB kinase inhibitor. Our results collectively suggest that morin can be a potential therapeutic agent for inflammatory disorders like acute gouty arthritis.

  7. Imipramine exploits histone deacetylase 11 to increase the IL-12/IL-10 ratio in macrophages infected with antimony-resistant Leishmania donovani and clears organ parasites in experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Mukherjee, Budhaditya; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Naskar, Kshudiram; Sundar, Shyam; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Roy, Syamal

    2014-10-15

    The efflux of antimony through multidrug resistance protein (MDR)-1 is the key factor in the failure of metalloid treatment in kala-azar patients infected with antimony-resistant Leishmania donovani (Sb(R)LD). Previously we showed that MDR-1 upregulation in Sb(R)LD infection is IL-10-dependent. Imipramine, a drug in use for the treatment of depression and nocturnal enuresis in children, inhibits IL-10 production from Sb(R)LD-infected macrophages (Sb(R)LD-Mϕs) and favors accumulation of surrogates of antimonials. It inhibits IL-10-driven nuclear translocation of c-Fos/c-Jun, critical for enhanced MDR-1 expression. The drug upregulates histone deacetylase 11, which inhibits acetylation of IL-10 promoter, leading to a decrease in IL-10 production from Sb(R)LD-Mϕs. It abrogates Sb(R)LD-mediated p50/c-Rel binding to IL-10 promoter and preferentially recruits p65/RelB to IL-12 p35 and p40 promoters, causing a decrease in IL-10 and overproduction of IL-12 in Sb(R)LD-Mϕs. Histone deacetylase 11 per se does not influence IL-12 promoter activity. Instead, a imipramine-mediated decreased IL-10 level allows optimal IL-12 production in Sb(R)LD-Mϕs. Furthermore, exogenous rIL-12 inhibits intracellular Sb(R)LD replication, which can be mimicked by the presence of Ab to IL-10. This observation indicated that reciprocity exists between IL-10 and IL-12 and that imipramine tips the balance toward an increased IL-12/IL-10 ratio in Sb(R)LD-Mϕs. Oral treatment of infected BALB/c mice with imipramine in combination with sodium stibogluconate cleared organ Sb(R)LD parasites and caused an expansion of the antileishmanial T cell repertoire where sodium stibogluconate alone had no effect. Our study deciphers a detailed molecular mechanism of imipramine-mediated regulation of IL-10/IL-12 reciprocity and its impact on Sb(R)LD clearance from infected hosts.

  8. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  9. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Shiby M; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease.

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) of the protozoan parasite Eimeria influences the components of the immune system of its host, the chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble factor produced by sensitized T lymphocytes that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. Homologues of MIF from invertebrates have been identified making it an interesting molecule from a functional perspective. In the present study, ...

  11. Development of a method to measure intracellular growth rate of parasitic acid-fast bacteria using radio-isotope and its improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Noboru; Fukutomi, Yasuo [National Inst. of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Development of measurement method for intracellular growth rate was attempted using gene-transfected acid-fast bacteria and Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae was inoculated into a well, which was filled with fetus bovine serum containing a cover slip pasted with mouse monocyte-derived malignant cell lines, J774 and P388D1 and cultured for 3-4 hours. Then, the cells on the cover slip were mobilized with 0.1 N NaOH. The metabolic activity of M. leprae was assessed based on the {beta}-oxidation activity of {sup 14}C-palmitic acid. Then, it was investigated whether TNF is produced by the cell culture added with M. leprae or LPS. J774 cells abundantly produced TNF after sensitization with LPS and its production was depending on the amount of added bacteria, whereas TNF production after sensitization with LPS or M. leprae was little in P388D1 cells. Staining for acid-fast bacteria revealed that either of these cell lines has phagocytic activity for M. leprae. To identify the bacterial factor involved to the intracellular proliferation of acid-fast bacteria, transposon insertion mutagenesis was attempted to M. avium complex (MAC) and the degrees of drug-resistance in M. avium mino, M. intracellulare JATA-52 and 8 clinically isolated M. intracellulare strains were determined. M. intracellulare JATA-52 was resistant to kanamycin and plasmid pAL8 and pYT937 were both able to transform the strain with dose-dependency. Since M. intracellulare is pathogenic to human and the strain proliferates with a generation time shorter than that of M. tuberculosis, the former strain is thought suitable for the analysis of a mutated gene. Thus, it became possible to study transposition insertion mutagenesis in M. intracellulare. (M.N.)

  12. Downregulation of host tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO gene restricts the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in human macrophage model

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    Venkateswara Reddy Gogulamudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites of mammalian hosts. Promastigotes of Leishmania are internalized by macrophages and transformed into amastigotes in phagosomes, and replicate in phagolysosomes. Phagosomal maturation arrest is known to play a central role in the survival of pathogenic Leishmania within activated macrophages. Recently, tryptophan-aspartate containing coat (TACO gene has been recognized as playing a crucial role in the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages by arresting the phagosome maturation process. We postulated that a similar association of TACO gene with phagosomes would prevent the vacuole from maturation in the case of Leishmania. In this study we attempted to define the effect of TACO gene downregulation on the uptake/survival of Leishmania donovani intracellularly, by treatment with Vitamin D3/Retinoic acid (RA & Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA/Retinoic acid (RA combinations in human THP-1 macrophages (in vitro. Treatment with these molecules downregulated the TACO gene in macrophages, resulting in reduced parasite load and marked reduction of disease progression in L. donovani infected macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that TACO gene downregulation may play a role in subverting macrophage machinery in establishing the L.donovani replicative niche inside the host. Our study is the first to highlight the importantrole of the TACO gene in Leishmania entry, and to identify TACO gene downregulation as potential drug target against leishmaniasis.

  13. Role of Tellurite Resistance Operon in Filamentous Growth of Yersinia pestis in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis initiates infection by parasitism of host macrophages. In response to macrophage infections, intracellular Y. pestis can assume a filamentous cellular morphology which may mediate resistance to host cell innate immune responses. We previously observed the expression of Y. pestis tellurite resistance proteins TerD and TerE from the terZABCDE operon during macrophage infections. Others have observed a filamentous response associated with expression of tellurite resistance operon in Escherichia coli exposed to tellurite. Therefore, in this study we examine the potential role of Y. pestis tellurite resistance operon in filamentous cellular morphology during macrophage infections. In vitro treatment of Y. pestis culture with sodium tellurite (Na2TeO3) caused the bacterial cells to assume a filamentous phenotype similar to the filamentous phenotype observed during macrophage infections. A deletion mutant for genes terZAB abolished the filamentous morphologic response to tellurite exposure or intracellular parasitism, but without affecting tellurite resistance. However, a terZABCDE deletion mutant abolished both filamentous morphologic response and tellurite resistance. Complementation of the terZABCDE deletion mutant with terCDE, but not terZAB, partially restored tellurite resistance. When the terZABCDE deletion mutant was complemented with terZAB or terCDE, Y. pestis exhibited filamentous morphology during macrophage infections as well as while these complemented genes were being expressed under an in vitro condition. Further in E. coli, expression of Y. pestis terZAB, but not terCDE, conferred a filamentous phenotype. These findings support the role of Y. pestis terZAB mediation of the filamentous response phenotype; whereas, terCDE confers tellurite resistance. Although the beneficial role of filamentous morphological responses by Y. pestis during macrophage infections is yet to be fully defined, it may be a bacterial adaptive strategy to macrophage

  14. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 1α Inhibits Postentry Steps of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection via Suppression of Intracellular Cyclic AMP

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) predominantly use chemokine receptor CCR5 to enter target cells. The natural ligands of CCR5, the β-chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and RANTES, interfere with HIV-1 binding to CCR5 receptors and decrease the amount of virions entering cells. Although the inhibition of HIV-1 entry by β-chemokines is well documented, their effects on postentry steps of the viral life cycle and on host cell components...

  15. Evaluation of Boldine Activity against Intracellular Amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Isabel Cristina; Arrais-Lima, Cristina; Arrais-Silva, Wagner Welber

    2017-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected and endemic disease that affects poorest population mainly in developing countries. A lack of adequate and definitive chemotherapeutic agents to fight against this infection has led to the investigation of numerous compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro activity of boldine against Leishmania amazonensis murine cell infection. Boldine ((S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine) is an aporphine alkaloid found abundantly in the leaves/bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Molina), a widely distributed tree native to Chile. The in vitro system consisted of murine macrophage infection with amastigotes of L. amazonensis treated with different concentrations from 50 to 600 μg/ml of boldine for 24 hr. Intracellular parasite destruction was assessed by morphological examination and boldine cytotoxicity to macrophages was tested by the MTT viability assay. When cells were treated with 100 μg/ml of boldine the reduction of parasite infection was 81% compared with untreated cultures cells. Interestingly, boldine-treatment caused a concentration-dependent decrease of macrophage infection that culminated with 96% of reduction when cells were submitted to 600 μg/ml of boldine. Cell cultures exposed to 100 μg/ml of boldine and 300 μg/ml of Glucantime(®) during 24 hr showed a significant reduction of 50% in parasitized cells compared with cell cultures exposed just to Glucantime(®). The study showed that treatment with boldine produces a better effect than treatment with the reference antimonial drug, glucantime, in L. amazonensis infected macrophage. Our results suggest that boldine is a potentially useful agent for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  16. Leishmania donovani activates SREBP2 to modulate macrophage membrane cholesterol and mitochondrial oxidants for establishment of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Madhuchhanda; Basu Ball, Writoban; Das, Pijush K

    2014-10-01

    Establishment of infection by an intracellular pathogen depends on successful internalization with a concomitant neutralization of host defense machinery. Leishmania donovani, an intramacrophage pathogen, targets host SREBP2, a critical transcription factor, to regulate macrophage plasma membrane cholesterol and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, favoring parasite invasion and persistence. Leishmania infection triggered membrane-raft reorientation-dependent Lyn-PI3K/Akt pathway activation which in turn deactivated GSK3β to stabilize nuclear SREBP2. Moreover, cells perceiving less available intracellular cholesterol due to its sequestration at the plasma membrane resulted in the deregulation of the ER-residing SCAP-SREBP2-Insig circuit thereby assisting increased nuclear translocation of SREBP2. Both increased nuclear transport and stabilization of SREBP2 caused HMGCR-catalyzed cholesterol biosynthesis-mediated plasma membrane cholesterol enrichment leading to decreased membrane-fluidity and plausibly assisting delay in phagosomal acidification. Parasite survival ensuing entry was further ensured by SREBP2-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of UCP2, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation, one of the primary microbicidal molecules in macrophages recognized for its efficacy against Leishmania. Functional knock-down of SREBP2 both in vitro and in vivo was associated with reduction in macrophage plasma membrane cholesterol, increased ROS production and lower parasite survival. To our knowledge, this study, for the first time, reveals that Leishmania exploits macrophage cholesterol-dependent SREBP2 circuit to facilitate its entry and survival within the host.

  17. The PmrA/PmrB Two-Component System of Legionella pneumophila Is a Global Regulator Required for Intracellular Replication within Macrophages and Protozoa▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Al-khodor, Souhaila; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Price, Christopher T.; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2008-01-01

    To examine the role of the PmrA/PmrB two-component system (TCS) of Legionella pneumophila in global gene regulation and in intracellular infection, we constructed pmrA and pmrB isogenic mutants by allelic exchange. Genome-wide microarray gene expression analyses of the pmrA and pmrB mutants at both the exponential and the postexponential phases have shown that the PmrA/PmrB TCS has a global effect on the expression of 279 genes classified into nine groups of genes encoding eukaryotic-like pro...

  18. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristina Abreu Moreira-Souza

    Full Text Available Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane--subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies--whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection.

  19. Type II Toxoplasma gondii induction of CD40 on infected macrophages enhances interleukin-12 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Pedro; Sudarshana, Dattanand M; Gov, Lanny; Harker, Katherine S; Lam, Tonika; Casali, Paolo; Boyle, Jon P; Lodoen, Melissa B

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe neurological disease in infected humans. CD40 is a receptor on macrophages that plays a critical role in controlling T. gondii infection. We examined the regulation of CD40 on the surface of T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMdMs). T. gondii induced CD40 expression both at the transcript level and on the cell surface, and interestingly, the effect was parasite strain specific: CD40 levels were dramatically increased in type II T. gondii-infected BMdMs compared to type I- or type III-infected cells. Type II induction of CD40 was specific to cells harboring intracellular parasites and detectable as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi) at the transcript level. CD40 protein expression peaked at 18 hpi. Using forward genetics with progeny from a type II × type III cross, we found that CD40 induction mapped to a region of chromosome X that included the gene encoding the dense granule protein 15 (GRA15). Using type I parasites stably expressing the type II allele of GRA15 (GRA15II), we found that type I GRA15II parasites induced the expression of CD40 on infected cells in an NF-κB-dependent manner. In addition, stable expression of hemagglutinin-tagged GRA15II in THP-1 cells resulted in CD40 upregulation in the absence of infection. Since CD40 signaling contributes to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production, we examined IL-12 from infected macrophages and found that CD40L engagement of CD40 amplified the IL-12 response in type II-infected cells. These data indicate that GRA15II induction of CD40 promotes parasite immunity through the production of IL-12. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Apoptotic-like Leishmania exploit the host´s autophagy machinery to reduce T-cell-mediated parasite elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crauwels, Peter; Bohn, Rebecca; Thomas, Meike; Gottwalt, Stefan; Jäckel, Florian; Krämer, Susi; Bank, Elena; Tenzer, Stefan; Walther, Paul; Bastian, Max; van Zandbergen, Ger

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a well-defined cellular process in which a cell dies, characterized by cell shrinkage and DNA fragmentation. In parasites like Leishmania, the process of apoptosis-like cell death has been described. Moreover upon infection, the apoptotic-like population is essential for disease development, in part by silencing host phagocytes. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism of how apoptosis in unicellular organisms may support infectivity remains unclear. Therefore we investigated the fate of apoptotic-like Leishmania parasites in human host macrophages. Our data showed—in contrast to viable parasites—that apoptotic-like parasites enter an LC3+, autophagy-like compartment. The compartment was found to consist of a single lipid bilayer, typical for LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). As LAP can provoke anti-inflammatory responses and autophagy modulates antigen presentation, we analyzed how the presence of apoptotic-like parasites affected the adaptive immune response. Macrophages infected with viable Leishmania induced proliferation of CD4+ T-cells, leading to a reduced intracellular parasite survival. Remarkably, the presence of apoptotic-like parasites in the inoculum significantly reduced T-cell proliferation. Chemical induction of autophagy in human monocyte-derived macrophage (hMDM), infected with viable parasites only, had an even stronger proliferation-reducing effect, indicating that host cell autophagy and not parasite viability limits the T-cell response and enhances parasite survival. Concluding, our data suggest that apoptotic-like Leishmania hijack the host cells´ autophagy machinery to reduce T-cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overall population survival is guaranteed, explaining the benefit of apoptosis-like cell death in a single-celled parasite and defining the host autophagy pathway as a potential therapeutic target in treating Leishmaniasis. PMID:25801301

  1. Transcriptional Profiling in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis Reveals a Broad Splenic Inflammatory Environment that Conditions Macrophages toward a Disease-Promoting Phenotype

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    Spratt, Heidi; Travi, Bruno L.; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL), caused by the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani, is characterized by relentlessly increasing visceral parasite replication, cachexia, massive splenomegaly, pancytopenia and ultimately death. Progressive disease is considered to be due to impaired effector T cell function and/or failure of macrophages to be activated to kill the intracellular parasite. In previous studies, we used the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) as a model because it mimics the progressive nature of active human VL. We demonstrated previously that mixed expression of macrophage-activating (IFN-γ) and regulatory (IL-4, IL-10, IL-21) cytokines, parasite-induced expression of macrophage arginase 1 (Arg1), and decreased production of nitric oxide are key immunopathologic factors. Here we examined global changes in gene expression to define the splenic environment and phenotype of splenic macrophages during progressive VL. We used RNA sequencing coupled with de novo transcriptome assembly, because the Syrian hamster does not have a fully sequenced and annotated reference genome. Differentially expressed transcripts identified a highly inflammatory spleen environment with abundant expression of type I and type II interferon response genes. However, high IFN-γ expression was ineffective in directing exclusive M1 macrophage polarization, suppressing M2-associated gene expression, and restraining parasite replication and disease. While many IFN-inducible transcripts were upregulated in the infected spleen, fewer were induced in splenic macrophages in VL. Paradoxically, IFN-γ enhanced parasite growth and induced the counter-regulatory molecules Arg1, Ido1 and Irg1 in splenic macrophages. This was mediated, at least in part, through IFN-γ-induced activation of STAT3 and expression of IL-10, which suggests that splenic macrophages in VL are conditioned to respond to macrophage activation signals with a counter-regulatory response that is ineffective and even

  2. Disruption of oxidative balance in the gut of the western honeybee Apis mellifera exposed to the intracellular parasite Nosema ceranae and to the insecticide fipronil.

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    Paris, Laurianne; Roussel, Michaël; Pereira, Bruno; Delbac, Frédéric; Diogon, Marie

    2017-07-24

    The causes underlying the increased mortality of honeybee colonies remain unclear and may involve multiple stressors acting together, including both pathogens and pesticides. Previous studies suggested that infection by the gut parasite Nosema ceranae combined with chronic exposure to sublethal doses of the insecticide fipronil generated an increase in oxidative stress in the midgut of honeybees. To explore the impact of these two stressors on oxidative balance, we experimentally infected bees with N. ceranae and/or chronically exposed to fipronil at low doses for 22 days, and we measured soluble reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS damage by quantifying both protein and lipid oxidation in the midgut. Our results revealed a disruption of the oxidative balance, with a decrease in both the amount of ROS and ROS damage in the presence of the parasite alone. However, protein oxidation was significantly increased in the N. ceranae/fipronil combination, revealing an increase in oxidative damage and suggesting higher fipronil toxicity in infected bees. Furthermore, our results highlighted a temporal order in the appearance of oxidation events in the intestinal cells and revealed that all samples tended to undergo protein oxidation during ageing, regardless of treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

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    Kumagai Yoshinori

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium, several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica.

  4. Functional activity of monocytes and macrophages in HTLV-1 infected subjects.

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    Camila F Amorim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC, 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the

  5. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites.

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    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A; Duthie, Malcolm S; Laurance, John D; Favila, Michelle A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-09-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. Copyright © 2016 Hofmeyer et al.

  6. Splenic CD4+ T Cells in Progressive Visceral Leishmaniasis Show a Mixed Effector-Regulatory Phenotype and Impair Macrophage Effector Function through Inhibitory Receptor Expression

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    Osorio, Elvia Y.; Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Travi, Bruno L.; Kong, Fanping; Spratt, Heidi; Soong, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by infection with the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani, is a chronic progressive disease with a relentlessly increasing parasite burden in the spleen, liver and bone marrow. The disease is characterized by fever, splenomegaly, cachexia, and pancytopenia, and progresses to death if not treated. Control of Leishmania infection is mediated by Th1 (IFNγ-producing) CD4+ T cells, which activate macrophages to produce nitric oxide and kill intracellular parasites. However, despite expansion of CD4+ T cells and increased IFNγ expression in the spleen, humans with active VL do not control the infection. We used an experimental model of chronic progressive VL in hamsters, which mimics clinical and pathological features seen in humans, to better understand the mechanisms that lead to progressive disease. Transcriptional profiling of the spleen during chronic infection revealed expression of markers of both T cell activation and inhibition. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleen during chronic progressive VL showed mixed expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and chemokines, and were marginally effective in controlling infection in an ex vivo T cell-macrophage co-culture system. Splenic CD4+ T cells and macrophages from hamsters with VL showed increased expression of inhibitory receptors and their ligands, respectively. Blockade of the inhibitory receptor PD-L2 led to a significant decrease in parasite burden, revealing a pathogenic role for the PD-1 pathway in chronic VL. PD-L2 blockade was associated with a dramatic reduction in expression of host arginase 1, but no change in IFNγ and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the expression of counter-regulatory molecules on splenic CD4+ T cells and macrophages promotes a more permissive macrophage phenotype and attenuates intracellular parasite control in chronic progressive VL. Host-directed adjunctive therapy targeting the PD-1 regulatory pathway may be efficacious for VL. PMID

  7. Aspirin Modulates Innate Inflammatory Response and Inhibits the Entry of Trypanosoma cruzi in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

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    Aparecida Donizette Malvezi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, a serious disorder that affects millions of people in Latin America. Cell invasion by T. cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential to the parasite’s life cycle and for the development of Chagas disease. Here, we present evidence suggesting the involvement of the host’s cyclooxygenase (COX enzyme during T. cruzi invasion. Pharmacological antagonist for COX-1, aspirin (ASA, caused marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection when peritoneal macrophages were pretreated with ASA for 30 min at 37°C before inoculation. This inhibition was associated with increased production of IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO∙ by macrophages. The treatment of macrophages with either NOS inhibitors or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 restored the invasive action of T. cruzi in macrophages previously treated with ASA. Lipoxin ALX-receptor antagonist Boc2 reversed the inhibitory effect of ASA on trypomastigote invasion. Our results indicate that PGE2, NO∙, and lipoxins are involved in the regulation of anti-T. cruzi activity by macrophages, providing a better understanding of the role of prostaglandins in innate inflammatory response to T. cruzi infection as well as adding a new perspective to specific immune interventions.

  8. Nutrient salvaging and metabolism by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila.

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    Fonseca, Maris V; Swanson, Michele S

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneumophila alternates between at least two distinct forms: a transmissive form equipped to infect host cells and evade lysosomal degradation, and a replicative form that multiplies within a phagosomal compartment that it has retooled to its advantage. The efficient changeover between transmissive and replicative states is fundamental to L. pneumophila's fitness as an intracellular pathogen. The transmission and replication programs of L. pneumophila are governed by a number of metabolic cues that signal whether conditions are favorable for replication or instead trigger escape from a spent host. Several lines of experimental evidence gathered over the past decade establish strong links between metabolism, cellular differentiation, and virulence of L. pneumophila. Herein, we focus on current knowledge of the metabolic components employed by intracellular L. pneumophila for cell differentiation, nutrient salvaging and utilization of host factors. Specifically, we highlight the metabolic cues that are coupled to bacterial differentiation, nutrient acquisition systems, and the strategies utilized by L. pneumophila to exploit host metabolites for intracellular replication.

  9. Kharon1 null mutants of Leishmania mexicana are avirulent in mice and exhibit a cytokinesis defect within macrophages.

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    Khoa D Tran

    Full Text Available In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis.

  10. Monarch-1 Activation in Murine Macrophage Cell Line (J774 A.1 Infected with Iranian Strain of Leishmania Major

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    A Fata

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmania major is an intracellular parasite transmitted through the bite of the female phlebotomine sand flies. Leishmania major is able to escape the host immune defense and survive within macrophages. Modulation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor-Kappa B activation and suppression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines by L. major are the main evasion mechanisms that remain to be explored. This study aims to examine the expression level of the Monarch-1 in L. major-infected macrophages, as a negative regulator of the NF-κB activation.Methods: Murine macrophage cell line (J774 A.1 was infected by metacyclic form of Leishmania promasti­gotes at macrophage/parasite ratio of 1:10. After harvesting infected cells at different times, total RNA was extracted and converted to cDNA. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was performed for Monarch-1 by specific primers. Hypoxanthine Phospho-Ribosyl Transferase (HPRT was used as an internal control to adjust the amount of mRNA in each sample.Results: Semiquantitive analysis of Monarch-1 mRNA expression level showed a significant expres­sion increase within 6 to 30 hours after L. major infection of macrophages when compared to the con­trol macrophages.Conclusion: Monarch-1 expression level reveals a significant increase in the early phase of macro­phage infection with L. major, which in turn may suppress IL-12 production in Leishmania infected macrophages and deeply influence the relationship between host and parasite.

  11. Neutrophils and intracellular pathogens: beyond phagocytosis and killing.

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    Appelberg, Rui

    2007-02-01

    Neutrophils are not simply scavenging phagocytes that clear extracellular spaces of rapidly proliferating microbes; they are also active in the control of infections by intracellular pathogens. Several mechanisms for nonphagocytic roles of neutrophils in protective immunity have been put forth over the years but further evidence has recently been accumulating at an increasing pace. In this review, I present the evidence that suggests neutrophils are involved in pathogen shuttling into the lymphoid tissues, in antigen presentation, and in early T cell recruitment and initiation of granuloma organization. Also, a clearer view on the antimicrobial molecules that can be acquired by macrophages to enhance their antimicrobial activity is now emerging. Finally, neutrophils can adversely affect immunity against certain parasites by causing immune deviation.

  12. CK2 Secreted by Leishmania braziliensis Mediates Macrophage Association Invasion: A Comparative Study between Virulent and Avirulent Promastigotes

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    Ana Madeira Brito Zylbersztejn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CK2 is a protein kinase distributed in different compartments of Leishmania braziliensis: an externally oriented ecto-CK2, an intracellular CK2, and a secreted CK2. This latter form is constitutively secreted from the parasite (CsCK2, but such secretion may be highly enhanced by the association of specific molecules, including enzyme substrates, which lead to a higher enzymatic activity, called inductively secreted CK2 (IsCK2. Here, we examined the influence of secreted CK2 (sCK2 activity on the infectivity of a virulent L. braziliensis strain. The virulent strain presented 121-fold higher total CK2 activity than those found in an avirulent strain. The use of specific CK2 inhibitors (TBB, DRB, or heparin inhibited virulent parasite growth, whereas no effect was observed in the avirulent parasites. When these inhibitors were added to the interaction assays between the virulent L. braziliensis strain and macrophages, association index was drastically inhibited. Polyamines enhanced sCK2 activity and increased the association index between parasites and macrophages. Finally, sCK2 and the supernatant of the virulent strain increased the association index between the avirulent strain and macrophages, which was inhibited by TBB. Thus, the kinase enzyme CK2 seems to be important to invasion mechanisms of L. braziliensis.

  13. Direct visualization of peptide/MHC complexes at the surface and in the intracellular compartments of cells infected in vivo by Leishmania major.

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    Eric Muraille

    Full Text Available Protozoa and bacteria infect various types of phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells and eosinophils. However, it is not clear which of these cells process and present microbial antigens in vivo and in which cellular compartments parasite peptides are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules. To address these issues, we have infected susceptible BALB/c (H-2d mice with a recombinant Leishmania major parasite expressing a fluorescent tracer. To directly visualize the antigen presenting cells that present parasite-derived peptides to CD4+ T cells, we have generated a monoclonal antibody that reacts to an antigenic peptide derived from the parasite LACK antigen bound to I-Ad Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecule. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of in vivo infected cells showed that intracellular I-Ad/LACK complexes were present in the membrane of amastigote-containing phagosomes in dendritic cells, eosinophils and macrophages/monocytes. In both dendritic cells and macrophages, these complexes were also present in smaller vesicles that did not contain amastigote. The presence of I-Ad/LACK complexes at the surface of dendritic cells, but neither on the plasma membrane of macrophages nor eosinophils was independently confirmed by flow cytometry and by incubating sorted phagocytes with highly sensitive LACK-specific hybridomas. Altogether, our results suggest that peptides derived from Leishmania proteins are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules in the phagosomes of infected phagocytes. Although these complexes are transported to the cell surface in dendritic cells, therefore allowing the stimulation of parasite-specific CD4+ T cells, this does not occur in other phagocytic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules bound to peptides derived from a parasite protein have been visualized within and

  14. An inside job: hacking into Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling cascades by the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Denkers, Eric Y; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A; Butcher, Barbara A

    2012-02-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype.

  15. An Inside Job: Hacking into Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Signaling Cascades by the Intracellular Protozoan Toxoplasma gondii

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    Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.; Butcher, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype. PMID:22104110

  16. A novel role for Stat1 in phagosome acidification and natural host resistance to intracellular infection by Leishmania major.

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    Gerald F Späth

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular parasites of the genus Leishmania generate severe diseases in humans, which are associated with a failure of the infected host to induce a protective interferon gamma (IFNgamma-mediated immune response. We tested the role of the JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway in Leishmania pathogenesis by utilizing knockout mice lacking the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1 and derived macrophages. Unexpectedly, infection of Stat1-deficient macrophages in vitro with promastigotes from Leishmania major and attenuated LPG1 knockout mutants (lpg(- specifically lacking lipophosphoglycan (LPG resulted in a twofold increased intracellular growth, which was independent of IFNgamma and associated with a substantial increase in phagosomal pH. Phagosomes in Stat1-/- macrophages showed normal maturation as judged by the accumulation of the lysosomal marker protein rab7, and provided normal vATPase activity, but were defective in the anion conductive pathway required for full vesicular acidification. Our results suggest a role of acidic pH in the control of intracellular Leishmania growth early during infection and identify for the first time an unexpected role of Stat1 in natural anti-microbial resistance independent from its function as IFNgamma-induced signal transducer. This novel Stat1 function may have important implications to studies of other pathogens, as the acidic phagolysosomal pH plays an important role in antigen processing and the uncoating process of many viruses.

  17. l-Arginine Uptake by Cationic Amino Acid Transporter Promotes Intra-Macrophage Survival of Leishmania donovani by Enhancing Arginase-Mediated Polyamine Synthesis.

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    Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Kumar, Ajay; Roy, Saptarshi; Verma, Sudha; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Abhishek, Kumar; Saini, Savita; Sardar, Abul Hasan; Purkait, Bidyut; Kumar, Ashish; Mandal, Chitra; Das, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    The survival of intracellular protozoan parasite, Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian visceral leishmaniasis (VL), depends on the activation status of macrophages. l-Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid plays a crucial regulatory role for activation of macrophages. However, the role of l-arginine transport in VL still remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that intra-macrophage survival of L. donovani depends on the availability of extracellular l-arginine. Infection of THP-1-derived macrophage/human monocyte-derived macrophage (hMDM) with Leishmania, resulted in upregulation of l-arginine transport. While investigating the involvement of the transporters, we observed that Leishmania survival was greatly impaired when the transporters were blocked either using inhibitor or siRNA-mediated downregulation. CAT-2 was found to be the main isoform associated with l-arginine transport in L. donovani-infected macrophages. l-arginine availability and its transport regulated the host arginase in Leishmania infection. Arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were reciprocally regulated when assayed using specific inhibitors and siRNA-mediated downregulation. Interestingly, induction of iNOS expression and nitric oxide production were observed in case of inhibition of arginase in infected macrophages. Furthermore, inhibition of l-arginine transport as well as arginase resulted in decreased polyamine production, limiting parasite survival inside macrophages. l-arginine availability and transport regulated Th1/Th2 cytokine levels in case of Leishmania infection. Upregulation of l-arginine transport, induction of host arginase, and enhanced polyamine production were correlated with increased level of IL-10 and decreased level of IL-12 and TNF-α in L. donovani-infected macrophages. Our findings provide clear evidence for targeting the metabolism of l-arginine and l-arginine-metabolizing enzymes as an important therapeutic and

  18. Mycobacterium lepraemurium uses tlr-6 and mr, but not lipid rafts or dc-sign, to gain access into mouse macrophages

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    Mayra Silva-Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective/Background: Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM, the etiologic agent of murine leprosy, is an intracellular parasite of macrophages; the mechanism used by this bacterium to enter macrophages is not known. The fate of the MLM phagosome inside macrophages is also unknown. This study was conducted to investigate how MLM enters macrophages and to define the maturation process of MLM phagosome inside macrophages. Materials and Methods: Peritoneal macrophages were incubated in the presence of mannan–bovine serum albumin (BSA, and antibodies to known macrophage receptors, including, anti-FcγRIII/RII (anti-CD16/32, anti-CD35 (anti-CR1, anti-TLR2, anti-TLR4, anti-TLR6, anti-CD14, and anti-dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN. Then, macrophages were challenged with Iris Fuchsia-stained MLM, at a multiplicity of infection of 50:1. The blocking effect of the antibodies (and mannan–BSA used was analyzed using direct microscopy and flow cytometry. The maturation process of MLM phagosomes was visualized by their interaction with antibodies to Rab5, Rab7, proton ATPase, and cathepsin D, by confocal microscopy. Results: Only mannan–BSA and anti-TLR6 antibody significantly blocked the entry of MLM into macrophages. None of the other antibodies, including that for DC-SIGN, meaningfully inhibited the endocytic process. We also found that MLM is a fusiogenic mycobacterium. This was deduced from the orderly association of MLM phagosomes with Rab5, Rab7, Proton ATPase, and lysosomes (cathepsin D. Conclusion: Fusion of MLM phagosomes with lysosomes seems to be a necessary event for the intracellular multiplication of MLM; similar to Mycobacterium leprae, this microorganism hardly grows on artificial, synthetic, bacteriologic media.

  19. Parasitic Diseases

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    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  20. Contrary to BCG, MLM fails to induce the production of TNF alpha and NO by macrophages.

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    Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Wek-Rodríguez, Kendy; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Aguilar-Torrentera, Fabiola; Truyens, Carine; Carlier, Yves

    2002-06-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must possess efficient survival mechanisms to resist the harsh conditions of the intraphagosomal milieu. In this sense, Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) is one of the most evolved intracellular parasites of murine macrophages; this microorganism has developed a series of properties that allows it not only to resist, but also to multiply within the inhospitable environment of the phagolysosome. Inside the macrophages, MLM appears surrounded by a thick lipid-envelope that protects the microorganism from the digestive effect of the phagosomal hydrolases and the acid pH. MLM produces a disease in which the loss of specific cell-mediated immunity ensues, thus preventing activation of macrophages. In vitro, and possibly also in vivo, MLM infects macrophages without triggering the oxidative (respiratory burst) response of these cells, thus preventing the production of the toxic reactive oxygen intermediaries (ROI). Supporting the idea that MLM is within the most evolved pathogenic microorganisms, in the present study we found, that contrary to BCG, M. lepraemurium infects macrophages without stimulating these cells to produce meaningful levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) or nitric oxide (NO). Thus, the ability of the microorganisms to stimulate in their cellular hosts, the production of ROI and RNI (reactive nitrogen intermediates), seems to be an inverse correlate of their pathogenicity; the lesser their ability, the greater their pathogenicity.

  1. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Protozoan Infections

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    Marcelo T. Bozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. In the present paper, we discussed the participation of MIF in the immune response to protozoan parasite infections. As a general trend, MIF participates in the control of parasite burden at the expense of promoting tissue damage due to increased inflammation.

  2. Naloxonazine, an Amastigote-Specific Compound, Affects Leishmania Parasites through Modulation of Host-Encoded Functions

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    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Caljon, Guy; Wolfe, Alan R.; McKerrow, James; Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Host-directed therapies (HDTs) constitute promising alternatives to traditional therapy that directly targets the pathogen but is often hampered by pathogen resistance. HDT could represent a new treatment strategy for leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease caused by the obligate intracellular parasite Leishmania. This protozoan develops exclusively within phagocytic cells, where infection relies on a complex molecular interplay potentially exploitable for drug targets. We previously identified naloxonazine, a compound specifically active against intracellular but not axenic Leishmania donovani. We evaluated here whether this compound could present a host cell-dependent mechanism of action. Microarray profiling of THP-1 macrophages treated with naloxonazine showed upregulation of vATPases, which was further linked to an increased volume of intracellular acidic vacuoles. Treatment of Leishmania-infected macrophages with the vATPase inhibitor concanamycin A abolished naloxonazine effects, functionally demonstrating that naloxonazine affects Leishmania amastigotes indirectly, through host cell vacuolar remodeling. These results validate amastigote-specific screening approaches as a powerful way to identify alternative host-encoded targets. Although the therapeutic value of naloxonazine itself is unproven, our results further demonstrate the importance of intracellular acidic compartments for host defense against Leishmania, highlighting the possibility of targeting this host cell compartment for anti-leishmanial therapy. PMID:28036391

  3. Host-lipidome as a potential target of protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rub, Abdur; Arish, Mohd; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Ahmed, Niyaz; Akhter, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Host-lipidome caters parasite interaction by acting as first line of recognition, attachment on the cell surface, intracellular trafficking, and survival of the parasite inside the host cell. Here, we summarize how protozoan parasites exploit host-lipidome by suppressing, augmenting, engulfing, remodeling and metabolizing lipids to achieve successful parasitism inside the host.

  4. Monocytes/macrophages infected with Toxoplasma gondii do not increase co-stimulatory molecules while maintaining their migratory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, Daniele; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia Lima; Barcelos, Michelle Willmen; Ramalho, André Villaça; Kanashiro, Milton M; Kipnis, Thereza Liberman; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Veto

    2009-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells and use them for dispersal throughout the body, but the activation state of those cells is unknown. We investigated the ability of human and murine cells from monocytic/macrophage lineages that had not previously been exposed to inflammatory cytokines to up-regulate co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules upon infection. Toxoplasma gondii-infected human monocytes (freshly isolated and THP1 lineage) were unable to up-regulate CD86, CD83, CD40 or CD1a. CD80 expression increased in infected cells but expression of l-selectin and beta2 integrin was unaltered. We evaluated the ability of infected macrophages from wild type C57/BL/6 or CD14(-/-) mice to migrate in 8 mum transwells. Infected cells from CD14(-/-) mice were more likely to de-adhere than infected cells from wild type mice but they did not show any increase in migratory ability. The non-stimulatory profile of these infected cells may contribute to parasite spread throughout the lymphatic circulation in the initial phases of infection.

  5. Secretion of multi-protein migratory complex induced by Toxoplasma gondii infection in macrophages involves the uPA/uPAR activation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuindt, Sara Hellen Santos; Oliveira, Bruno Cabral de Lima; Pimentel, Pollyana Maria de Oliveira; Resende, Thatiane Lacerda; Retamal, Cláudio A; DaMatta, Renato A; Seipel, Daniele; Arnholdt, Andrea Cristina Vetö

    2012-05-25

    Toxoplasmosis is a world wide spread zoonosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite that is able to disseminate into deep tissues and cross biological barriers, reaching immunoprivileged sites such as the brain and retina. The parasite is able to infect macrophages and dendritic cells for dispersal throughout the body. However, the molecular mechanisms or outcomes of the subversion of the host cell are largely unknown. Recently our group established that metalloproteinases are involved in migration of infected macrophages. Herein, we evaluated the recruitment of host invasive machinery components in T. gondii infected murine macrophages. We showed by immunoprecipitation assays that MMP-9, CD44 TIMP-1 and uPAR were secreted as a multi-protein complex by infected macrophages. Zymographic analysis revealed that MMP-9 was present in its pro- and active form. Moreover, inhibition of uPA/uPAR pathway by PAI-1 decreased secretion of MMP-9 active forms, as well those associated to uPAR and TIMP-1, but not to CD44. Data presented here suggest that MMP-9 is secreted as a multiprotein complex by T. gondii infected macrophages, similar to that observed in metastatic cells. We further speculate that uPA/uPAR system is involved in the expression/secretion of complexes containing active MMP-9 forms.

  6. Sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein inhibits the TRIF-dependent downregulation of signal regulatory protein α to interfere with intracellular bacterial elimination in Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Pankaj; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2013-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, evades macrophage killing by suppressing the TRIF-dependent pathway, leading to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We previously demonstrated that virulent wild-type B. pseudomallei inhibits the TRIF-dependent pathway by upregulating sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) and by inhibiting downregulation of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα); both molecules are negative regulators of Toll-like receptor signaling. In contrast, the less virulent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant of B. pseudomallei is unable to exhibit these features and is susceptible to macrophage killing. However, the functional relationship of these two negative regulators in the evasion of macrophage defense has not been elucidated. We demonstrated here that SIRPα downregulation was observed after inhibition of SARM expression by small interfering RNA in wild-type-infected macrophages, indicating that SIRPα downregulation is regulated by SARM. Furthermore, this downregulation requires activation of the TRIF signaling pathway, as we observed abrogation of SIRPα downregulation as well as restricted bacterial growth in LPS mutant-infected TRIF-depleted macrophages. Although inhibition of SARM expression is correlated to SIRPα downregulation and iNOS upregulation in gamma interferon-activated wild-type-infected macrophages, these phenomena appear to bypass the TRIF-dependent pathway. Similar to live bacteria, the wild-type LPS is able to upregulate SARM and to prevent SIRPα downregulation, implying that the LPS of B. pseudomallei may play a crucial role in regulating the expression of these two negative regulators. Altogether, our findings show a previously unrecognized role of B. pseudomallei-induced SARM in inhibiting SIRPα downregulation-mediated iNOS upregulation, facilitating the ability of the bacterium to multiply in macrophages.

  7. MicroRNA expression profile in human macrophages in response to Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Lemaire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. are intracellular protozoan parasites able to survive and replicate in the hostile phagolysosomal environment of infected macrophages. They cause leishmaniasis, a heterogeneous group of worldwide-distributed affections, representing a paradigm of neglected diseases that are mainly embedded in impoverished populations. To establish successful infection and ensure their own survival, Leishmania have developed sophisticated strategies to subvert the host macrophage responses. Despite a wealth of gained crucial information, these strategies still remain poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, an evolutionarily conserved class of endogenous 22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs, are described to participate in the regulation of almost every cellular process investigated so far. They regulate the expression of target genes both at the levels of mRNA stability and translation; changes in their expression have a profound effect on their target transcripts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report in this study a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in L. major-infected human primary macrophages of three healthy donors assessed at different time-points post-infection (three to 24 h. We show that expression of 64 out of 365 analyzed miRNAs was consistently deregulated upon infection with the same trends in all donors. Among these, several are known to be induced by TLR-dependent responses. GO enrichment analysis of experimentally validated miRNA-targeted genes revealed that several pathways and molecular functions were disturbed upon parasite infection. Finally, following parasite infection, miR-210 abundance was enhanced in HIF-1α-dependent manner, though it did not contribute to inhibiting anti-apoptotic pathways through pro-apoptotic caspase-3 regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that alteration in miRNA levels likely plays an important role in regulating macrophage functions following L. major

  8. IFN-γ-induced macrophage antileishmanial mechanisms in mice: A role for immunity-related GTPases, Irgm1 and Irgm3, in Leishmania donovani infection in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Henry W; Mitchell-Flack, Marisa; Taylor, Gregory A; Ma, Xiaojing

    2015-10-01

    In C57BL/6 mice, Leishmania donovani infection in the liver provoked IFN-γ-induced expression of the immunity-related GTPases (IRG), Irgm1 and Irgm3. To gauge the antileishmanial effects of these macrophage factors in the liver, intracellular infection was analyzed in IRG-deficient mice. In early- (but not late-) stage infection, Irgm3(-/-) mice failed to properly control parasite replication, generated little tissue inflammation and were hyporesponsive to pentavalent antimony (Sb) chemotherapy. Observations limited to early-stage infection in Irgm1(-/-) mice demonstrated increased susceptibility and virtually no inflammatory cell recruitment to heavily-parasitized parenchymal foci but an intact response to chemotherapy. In L. donovani infection in the liver, the absence of either Irgm1 or Irgm3 impairs early inflammation and initial resistance; the absence of Irgm3, but not Irgm1, also appears to impair the intracellular efficacy of Sb chemotherapy.

  9. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarina Pena DaMata

    Full Text Available Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6, whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection.

  10. Breach of IL-12 monopoly in the initiation of type 1 immunity to intracellular infections: IL-12 is not required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Z

    2001-06-01

    IL-12 is believed to play an important role in type 1 T-cell differentiation and type 1 cytokine IFN-gamma release by T- and NK-cells and macrophages in host defense against intracellular infections by bacteria, parasites, fungi and viruses. However, recent studies by us and others have provided unequivocal evidence that while IL- 12 is critically required for the development of type 1 immunity to the majority of intracellular bacterial, parasitic and fungal infections, it is not required for anti-viral type 1 immune responses. These findings have provoked our re-thinking about the role of IL-12 in type 1 immunity and the search for additional cytokines capable of initiating anti-viral type 1 immunity. We hypothesize that there exist multiple cytokines including IL-12 which play a redundant role in the initiation of type 1 immunity against viral infection. These cytokines are likely released from not only antigen-presenting macrophages/dendritic cells but many other cell types, which suits the mode of viral infection. The existence of multiple factors capable of driving type 1 immunity endows the host with additional safeguards to cope with prevalent viral foes.

  11. Subcellular distribution of azithromycin and clarithromycin in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM), a 15-membered ring macrolide antimicrobial agent, has an antibacterial spectrum that includes intracellular parasitic pathogens that survive or intracellularly multiply in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The subcellular distribution of AZM in AMs was evaluated in vitro in comparison with clarithromycin (CAM). AZM and CAM (50 µM) were applied to the NR8383 cells, used as an in vitro model of AMs, followed by incubation at 37°C or 4°C. The total amount of AZM in cells and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) was determined after incubation. High level of AZM accumulation was observed in the NR8383 cells at 37°C, and the equilibrium intracellular to extracellular concentration ratio (I/E ratio) was approximately 680, which was remarkably higher than that of CAM (equilibrium I/E ratio=28). The intracellular accumulation of AZM and CAM was temperature dependent. In addition, AZM distributed to the granules fraction including organelles and soluble fraction including cytosol in the NR8383 cells, whereas CAM mainly distributed in soluble fraction. The amount of AZM in the granules fraction was markedly reduced in the presence of ammonium chloride for increase in intracellular pH. These results indicate that AZM is distributed in acidic compartment in AMs. This study suggests that high AZM accumulation in the NR8383 cells is due to the trapping and/or binding in acidic organelles, such as lysosomes.

  12. Parasites: Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  13. Playing hide-and-seek with host macrophages through the use of mycobacterial cell envelope phthiocerol dimycocerosates and phenolic glycolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa eARBUES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, have evolved a remarkable ability to evade the immune system in order to survive and to colonize the host. Among the most important evasion strategies is the capacity of these bacilli to parasitize host macrophages, since these are major effector cells against intracellular pathogens that can be used as long-term cellular reservoirs. Mycobacterial pathogens employ an array of virulence factors that manipulate macrophage function to survive and establish infection. Until recently, however, the role of mycobacterial cell envelope lipids as virulence factors in macrophage subversion has remained elusive. Here, we will address exclusively the proposed role for phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM in the modulation of the resident macrophage response and that of phenolic glycolipids (PGL in the regulation of the recruitment and phenotype of incoming macrophage precursors to the site of infection. We will provide a unique perspective of potential additional functions for these lipids, and highlight obstacles and opportunities to further understand their role in the pathogenesis of TB and other mycobacterial diseases.

  14. Workshop on Cytokines and Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Research Institute, Seattle, WA) demonstra- ted that GM-CSF, greater than 500 U/ml, induced the intracellular destruction of Trypanosoma cruzi by...increases the uptake of Trypanosoma cruzi by ,crophaqes, and induces a modest killing of the intracellular parasite. Dr. Gerald Byrne (University of...diseases by describing an exceedingly complex interaction of TNF and Trypanosoma musculi. TNF administered to mice early during disease actually enhanced

  15. Dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi entry into peritoneal macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile S Barrias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite that, like some other intracellular pathogens, targets specific proteins of the host cell vesicular transport machinery, leading to a modulation of host cell processes that results in the generation of unique phagosomes. In mammalian cells, several molecules have been identified that selectively regulate the formation of endocytic transport vesicles and the fusion of such vesicles with appropriate acceptor membranes. Among these, the GTPase dynamin plays an important role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and it was recently found that dynamin can participate in a phagocytic process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a compound called dynasore that has the ability to block the GTPase activity of dynamin. Dynasore acts as a potent inhibitor of endocytic pathways by blocking coated vesicle formation within seconds of its addition. Here, we investigated whether dynamin is involved in the entry process of T. cruzi in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells by using dynasore. In this aim, peritoneal macrophages and LLC-MK2 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of dynasore before interaction with trypomastigotes, amastigotes or epimastigotes. We observed that, in both cell lines, the parasite internalization was drastically diminished (by greater than 90% in LLC-MK2 cells and 70% in peritoneal macrophages when we used 100 microM dynasore. The T. cruzi adhesion index, however, was unaffected in either cell line. Analyzing these interactions by scanning electron microscopy and comparing peritoneal macrophages to LLC-MK2 cells revealed differences in the stage at which cell entry was blocked. In LLC-MK2 cells, this blockade is observed earlier than it is in peritoneal macrophages. In LLC-MK2 cells, the parasites were only associated with cellular microvilli, whereas in peritoneal macrophages, trypomastigotes were not completely engulfed by a host cell plasma membrane. CONCLUSIONS

  16. Parasite fate and involvement of infected cells in the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Dupont

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During infection with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the presentation of parasite-derived antigens to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is essential for long-term resistance to this pathogen. Fundamental questions remain regarding the roles of phagocytosis and active invasion in the events that lead to the processing and presentation of parasite antigens. To understand the most proximal events in this process, an attenuated non-replicating strain of T. gondii (the cpsII strain was combined with a cytometry-based approach to distinguish active invasion from phagocytic uptake. In vivo studies revealed that T. gondii disproportionately infected dendritic cells and macrophages, and that infected dendritic cells and macrophages displayed an activated phenotype characterized by enhanced levels of CD86 compared to cells that had phagocytosed the parasite, thus suggesting a role for these cells in priming naïve T cells. Indeed, dendritic cells were required for optimal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, and the phagocytosis of heat-killed or invasion-blocked parasites was not sufficient to induce T cell responses. Rather, the selective transfer of cpsII-infected dendritic cells or macrophages (but not those that had phagocytosed the parasite to naïve mice potently induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, and conferred protection against challenge with virulent T. gondii. Collectively, these results point toward a critical role for actively infected host cells in initiating T. gondii-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses.

  17. Unresponsiveness to Glucantime treatment in Iranian cutaneous leishmaniasis due to drug-resistant Leishmania tropica parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramtin Hadighi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent circumstantial evidence suggests that an increasing number of Iranian patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis are unresponsive to meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime, the first line of treatment in Iran. This study was designed to determine whether the clinical responses (healing, or non-healing were correlated with the susceptibility of Leishmania parasites to Glucantime. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In vitro susceptibility testing was first performed on 185 isolated parasites in the intracellular mouse peritoneal macrophage model. A strong correlation between the clinical outcome and the in vitro effective concentration 50% (EC50 values was observed. Parasites derived from patients with non-healing lesions had EC50 values at least 4-fold higher than parasites derived from lesions of healing patients. A selection of these strains was typed at the molecular level by pulsed-field gels and by sequencing the pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1 gene. These techniques indicated that 28 out of 31 selected strains were Leishmania tropica and that three were Leishmania major. The L. major isolates were part of a distinct pulsed-field group, and the L. tropica isolates could be classified in three related additional pulsed-field groups. For each pulsed-field karyotype, we selected sensitive and resistant parasites in which we transfected the firefly luciferase marker to assess further the in vitro susceptibility of field isolates in the monocyte cell line THP1. These determinations confirmed unequivocally that patients with non-healing lesions were infected with L. tropica parasites resistant to Glucantime. Additional characterization of the resistant isolates showed that resistance is stable and can be reversed by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of proven resistant parasites contributing to treatment failure for cutaneous leishmaniasis and shows that

  18. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of ether lipid edelfosine against Leishmania spp. and SbV-resistant parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén E Varela-M

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The leishmaniases are a complex of neglected tropical diseases caused by more than 20 Leishmania parasite species, for which available therapeutic arsenal is scarce and unsatisfactory. Pentavalent antimonials (SbV are currently the first-line pharmacologic therapy for leishmaniasis worldwide, but resistance to these compounds is increasingly reported. Alkyl-lysophospoholipid analogs (ALPs constitute a family of compounds with antileishmanial activity, and one of its members, miltefosine, has been approved as the first oral treatment for visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, its clinical use can be challenged by less impressive efficiency in patients infected with some Leishmania species, including L. braziliensis and L. mexicana, and by proneness to develop drug resistance in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that ALPs ranked edelfosine>perifosine>miltefosine>erucylphosphocholine for their antileishmanial activity and capacity to promote apoptosis-like parasitic cell death in promastigote and amastigote forms of distinct Leishmania spp., as assessed by proliferation and flow cytometry assays. Effective antileishmanial ALP concentrations were dependent on both the parasite species and their development stage. Edelfosine accumulated in and killed intracellular Leishmania parasites within macrophages. In vivo antileishmanial activity was demonstrated following oral treatment with edelfosine of mice and hamsters infected with L. major, L. panamensis or L. braziliensis, without any significant side-effect. Edelfosine also killed SbV-resistant Leishmania parasites in in vitro and in vivo assays, and required longer incubation times than miltefosine to generate drug resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data reveal that edelfosine is the most potent ALP in killing different Leishmania spp., and it is less prone to lead to drug resistance development than miltefosine. Edelfosine is effective in killing Leishmania

  19. Parasitic Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; McQuade, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  20. Parasitic Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; McQuade, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complication...

  1. Cat parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Vošická, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    The content of this bachelor thesis describes a different variety of cat parasites. This study discovers that the most infected group of the outdoor cats due to the fact that these animals are not provided with the same care as the household pets. Those cats are usually not vaccinated, not rid of worms, no one takes care of their fur and so they tend to become a host for the parasites. There are several kinds of parasites which attack cats. Among those belong the skin parasites like a cat fle...

  2. Bifunctional effect of E2 on macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinHONG; QuanZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Our previous study showed that the effect of 1713-estradiol(E2) on macrophage does not strengthen when concentrationincreased. So the effect of E2 on cytokines, intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and morphological change of macrophages at differentconcentrations were studied. METHODS: TNF-α was measured by MTT via L929 cell. Nitrate and nitrite level(NO) wasmeasured by the method of Griess. [Ca2+]i was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy(LSCM). Fluorescent microscopy

  3. Leishmania major CorA-like magnesium transporters play a critical role in parasite development and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Davis, Antony; Smith, Brian J; Curtis, Joan; Handman, Emanuela

    2009-05-01

    Establishment of infection by Leishmania depends on the transformation of the invading metacyclic promastigotes into the obligatory intracellular amastigotes, and their subsequent survival in the macrophage phagolysosome, which is low in magnesium. We show that two Leishmania major proteins designated MGT1 and MGT2, which play a critical role in these processes, belong to the two-transmembrane domain (2-TM-GxN) cation transporter family and share homology with the major bacterial magnesium transporter CorA. Although both are present in the endoplasmic reticulum throughout the life cycle of the parasite, MGT1 is more highly expressed in the infectious metacyclic parasites, while MGT2 is enriched in the immature procyclic stages. The two proteins, although predicted to be structurally similar, have features that suggest different regulatory or gating mechanisms. The two proteins may also be functionally distinct, since only MGT1 complements an Escherichia coli DeltaCorA mutant. In addition, deletion of one mgt1 allele from L. major led to increased virulence, while deletion of one allele of mgt2 resulted in slower growth and total loss of virulence in vitro and in vivo. This loss of virulence may be due to an impaired transformation of the parasites into amastigotes. Deletion of both mgt1 alleles in the hemizygous MGT2 knockdown parasites reversed the growth defect and partially restored virulence. Our data indicate that the MGTs play a critical role in parasite growth, development and virulence.

  4. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  5. Ex Vivo Host and Parasite Response to Antileishmanial Drugs and Immunomodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic response in infectious disease involves host as well as microbial determinants. Because the immune and inflammatory response to Leishmania (Viannia) species defines the outcome of infection and efficacy of treatment, immunomodulation is considered a promising therapeutic strategy. However, since Leishmania infection and antileishmanial drugs can themselves modulate drug transport, metabolism and/or immune responses, immunotherapeutic approaches require integrated assessment of host and parasite responses. Methodology To achieve an integrated assessment of current and innovative therapeutic strategies, we determined host and parasite responses to miltefosine and meglumine antimoniate alone and in combination with pentoxifylline or CpG 2006 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. Parasite survival and secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-13 were evaluated concomitantly in PBMCs infected with Luc-L. (V.) panamensis exposed to meglumine antimoniate (4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 μg SbV/mL) or miltefosine (2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 μM HePC). Concentrations of 4 μM of miltefosine and 8 μg SbV/mL were selected for evaluation in combination with immunomodulators based on the high but partial reduction of parasite burden by these antileishmanial concentrations without affecting cytokine secretion of infected PBMCs. Intracellular parasite survival was determined by luminometry and cytokine secretion measured by ELISA and multiplex assays. Principal Findings Anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of L. (V.) panamensis infection were evaluable concomitantly with viability of Leishmania within monocyte-derived macrophages present in PBMC cultures. Both antileishmanial drugs reduced the parasite load of macrophages; miltefosine also suppressed IL-10 and IL-13 secretion in a dose dependent manner. Pentoxifylline did not affect parasite survival or alter antileishmanial effects of miltefosine or meglumine

  6. Induction of a stringent metabolic response in intracellular stages of Leishmania mexicana leads to increased dependence on mitochondrial metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor C Saunders

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania parasites alternate between extracellular promastigote stages in the insect vector and an obligate intracellular amastigote stage that proliferates within the phagolysosomal compartment of macrophages in the mammalian host. Most enzymes involved in Leishmania central carbon metabolism are constitutively expressed and stage-specific changes in energy metabolism remain poorly defined. Using (13C-stable isotope resolved metabolomics and (2H2O labelling, we show that amastigote differentiation is associated with reduction in growth rate and induction of a distinct stringent metabolic state. This state is characterized by a global decrease in the uptake and utilization of glucose and amino acids, a reduced secretion of organic acids and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. Isotopomer analysis showed that catabolism of hexose and fatty acids provide C4 dicarboxylic acids (succinate/malate and acetyl-CoA for the synthesis of glutamate via a compartmentalized mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In vitro cultivated and intracellular amastigotes are acutely sensitive to inhibitors of mitochondrial aconitase and glutamine synthetase, indicating that these anabolic pathways are essential for intracellular growth and virulence. Lesion-derived amastigotes exhibit a similar metabolism to in vitro differentiated amastigotes, indicating that this stringent response is coupled to differentiation signals rather than exogenous nutrient levels. Induction of a stringent metabolic response may facilitate amastigote survival in a nutrient-poor intracellular niche and underlie the increased dependence of this stage on hexose and mitochondrial metabolism.

  7. Induction of a Stringent Metabolic Response in Intracellular Stages of Leishmania mexicana Leads to Increased Dependence on Mitochondrial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Eleanor C.; Ng, William W.; Kloehn, Joachim; Chambers, Jennifer M.; Ng, Milica; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania parasites alternate between extracellular promastigote stages in the insect vector and an obligate intracellular amastigote stage that proliferates within the phagolysosomal compartment of macrophages in the mammalian host. Most enzymes involved in Leishmania central carbon metabolism are constitutively expressed and stage-specific changes in energy metabolism remain poorly defined. Using 13C-stable isotope resolved metabolomics and 2H2O labelling, we show that amastigote differentiation is associated with reduction in growth rate and induction of a distinct stringent metabolic state. This state is characterized by a global decrease in the uptake and utilization of glucose and amino acids, a reduced secretion of organic acids and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. Isotopomer analysis showed that catabolism of hexose and fatty acids provide C4 dicarboxylic acids (succinate/malate) and acetyl-CoA for the synthesis of glutamate via a compartmentalized mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In vitro cultivated and intracellular amastigotes are acutely sensitive to inhibitors of mitochondrial aconitase and glutamine synthetase, indicating that these anabolic pathways are essential for intracellular growth and virulence. Lesion-derived amastigotes exhibit a similar metabolism to in vitro differentiated amastigotes, indicating that this stringent response is coupled to differentiation signals rather than exogenous nutrient levels. Induction of a stringent metabolic response may facilitate amastigote survival in a nutrient-poor intracellular niche and underlie the increased dependence of this stage on hexose and mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:24465208

  8. A method for generation of bone marrow-derived macrophages from cryopreserved mouse bone marrow cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Marim

    Full Text Available The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L. amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells.

  9. The Increase in Mannose Receptor Recycling Favors Arginase Induction and Trypanosoma Cruzi Survival in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina V. Garrido, Laura R. Dulgerian, Cinthia C. Stempin, Fabio M. Cerbán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The macrophage mannose receptor (MR is a pattern recognition receptor of the innate immune system that binds to microbial structures bearing mannose, fucose and N-acetylglucosamine on their surface. Trypanosoma cruzi antigen cruzipain (Cz is found in the different developmental forms of the parasite. This glycoprotein has a highly mannosylated C-terminal domain that participates in the host-antigen contact. Our group previously demonstrated that Cz-macrophage (Mo interaction could modulate the immune response against T. cruzi through the induction of a preferential metabolic pathway. In this work, we have studied in Mo the role of MR in arginase induction and in T. cruzi survival using different MR ligands. We have showed that pre-incubation of T. cruzi infected cells with mannose-Bovine Serum Albumin (Man-BSA, MR specific ligand biased nitric oxide (NO/urea balance towards urea production and increased intracellular amastigotes growth. The study of intracellular signals showed that pre-incubation with Man-BSA in T. cruzi J774 infected cells induced down-regulation of JNK and p44/p42 phosphorylation and increased of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These results are coincident with previous data showing that Cz also modifies the MAPK phosphorylation profile induced by the parasite. In addition, we have showed by confocal microscopy that Cz and Man-BSA enhance MR recycling. Furthermore, we studied MR behavior during T. cruzi infection in vivo. MR was up-regulated in F4/80+ cells from T. cruzi infected mice at 13 and 15 days post infection. Besides, we investigated the effect of MR blocking antibody in T. cruzi infected peritoneal Mo. Arginase activity and parasite growth were decreased in infected cells pre-incubated with anti-MR antibody as compared with infected cells treated with control antibody. Therefore, we postulate that during T. cruzi infection, Cz may contact with MR, increasing MR recycling which leads to arginase activity up-regulation and

  10. Pervasiveness of parasites in pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evison, Sophie E F; Roberts, Katherine E; Laurenson, Lynn; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Hui, Jeffrey; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C; Smith, Judith E; Budge, Giles; Hughes, William O H

    2012-01-01

    Many pollinator populations are declining, with large economic and ecological implications. Parasites are known to be an important factor in the some of the population declines of honey bees and bumblebees, but little is known about the parasites afflicting most other pollinators, or the extent of interspecific transmission or vectoring of parasites. Here we carry out a preliminary screening of pollinators (honey bees, five species of bumblebee, three species of wasp, four species of hoverfly and three genera of other bees) in the UK for parasites. We used molecular methods to screen for six honey bee viruses, Ascosphaera fungi, Microsporidia, and Wolbachia intracellular bacteria. We aimed simply to detect the presence of the parasites, encompassing vectoring as well as actual infections. Many pollinators of all types were positive for Ascosphaera fungi, while Microsporidia were rarer, being most frequently found in bumblebees. We also detected that most pollinators were positive for Wolbachia, most probably indicating infection with this intracellular symbiont, and raising the possibility that it may be an important factor in influencing host sex ratios or fitness in a diversity of pollinators. Importantly, we found that about a third of bumblebees (Bombus pascuorum and Bombus terrestris) and a third of wasps (Vespula vulgaris), as well as all honey bees, were positive for deformed wing virus, but that this virus was not present in other pollinators. Deformed wing virus therefore does not appear to be a general parasite of pollinators, but does interact significantly with at least three species of bumblebee and wasp. Further work is needed to establish the identity of some of the parasites, their spatiotemporal variation, and whether they are infecting the various pollinator species or being vectored. However, these results provide a first insight into the diversity, and potential exchange, of parasites in pollinator communities.

  11. Pervasiveness of parasites in pollinators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E F Evison

    Full Text Available Many pollinator populations are declining, with large economic and ecological implications. Parasites are known to be an important factor in the some of the population declines of honey bees and bumblebees, but little is known about the parasites afflicting most other pollinators, or the extent of interspecific transmission or vectoring of parasites. Here we carry out a preliminary screening of pollinators (honey bees, five species of bumblebee, three species of wasp, four species of hoverfly and three genera of other bees in the UK for parasites. We used molecular methods to screen for six honey bee viruses, Ascosphaera fungi, Microsporidia, and Wolbachia intracellular bacteria. We aimed simply to detect the presence of the parasites, encompassing vectoring as well as actual infections. Many pollinators of all types were positive for Ascosphaera fungi, while Microsporidia were rarer, being most frequently found in bumblebees. We also detected that most pollinators were positive for Wolbachia, most probably indicating infection with this intracellular symbiont, and raising the possibility that it may be an important factor in influencing host sex ratios or fitness in a diversity of pollinators. Importantly, we found that about a third of bumblebees (Bombus pascuorum and Bombus terrestris and a third of wasps (Vespula vulgaris, as well as all honey bees, were positive for deformed wing virus, but that this virus was not present in other pollinators. Deformed wing virus therefore does not appear to be a general parasite of pollinators, but does interact significantly with at least three species of bumblebee and wasp. Further work is needed to establish the identity of some of the parasites, their spatiotemporal variation, and whether they are infecting the various pollinator species or being vectored. However, these results provide a first insight into the diversity, and potential exchange, of parasites in pollinator communities.

  12. Particulate Systems for Targeting of Macrophages: Basic and Therapeutic Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Parhamifar, Ladan; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2012-01-01

    and intracellular drug release processes can be optimized through modifications of the drug carrier physicochemical properties, which include hydrodynamic size, shape, composition and surface characteristics. Through such modifications together with understanding of macrophage cell biology, targeting may be aimed...... at a particular subset of macrophages. Advances in basic and therapeutic concepts of particulate targeting of macrophages and related nanotechnology approaches for immune cell modifications are discussed.Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  13. Dynamic characteristics of intracellular complement components mRNA in different mouse macrophage ANA-1 polarization%小鼠ANA-1巨噬细胞不同极化状态下补体组分mRNA动态分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁梦娇; 商正玲; 马亚萍; 吴家红

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To reveal the dynamic characteristics of the intracellular complement mRNA from mouse macrophage ANA-1 treated with LPS or IL-4. Methods:The polarization models of macrophage ANA-1 were established by treating with LPS(1μg/ml) and IL-4(20 ng/ml),respectively. After treating at 3,8,12 and 24 h,the total RNA were abstracted by Trizol lysis methods . The macrophage polarization were estimated by the expression of IL-1β, CCL2 and Arg-1 mRNA detected by Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The intracellular complement C1q, C3, CfB and CRIg mRNA were quantitatively analyzed. Results: The mouse macrophage ANA-1 cells treated with LPS was polarized to M1 since the levels of IL-1β and CCL2 mRNA were up-regulated significantly,in which their 2-△△Ct value were up to 297. 0±31. 0 and 19. 9±3. 3 respectively at 12 h. On the other hand,the ANA-1 cells treated with IL-4 was polarized to M2 because the level of Arg-1 mRNA was obviously higher( the 2-△△Ct value of Arg-1 mRNA was up to 27.3±9.1 at 24 h)(P<0.05).The intracellular complement C1q,C3,CfB and CRIg mRNAs all were up-regulated in different polarized macrophages. The intracellular C1q and C3 mRNA in polarized M2 were significantly higher,in which the peak value of C1q and C3 were to 94. 9±12. 9 and 11. 3±2. 4 at 12 h,respectively(P<0. 05). Reversely,the CfB mRNA in polarized M1 increased obviously,in which its 2-△△Ct was to 61. 4±6. 2 at 12 h. In addition,the CRIg mRNA in both groups was only up-regulated at 24 h,in which the 2-△△Ct value was 6. 5±1. 8 in M1 and 10. 8±3. 2 in M2(P<0. 05). Conclusion: The macrophage ANA-1 cell polarization models were successfully established by treated with LPS or IL-4. The intracellular complement C1q,C3 and CRIg mRNA in polarized M2 were transcripted more than in M1. But the intracellular CfB mRNA in polarized M1 was up-regulated significantly. These results suggested that the dynamic characteristic of complement components in different polarized

  14. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  15. Experimental Trichinellosis in rats: Peritoneal macrophage activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden-Movsesijan Alisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Trichinella spiralis infection on macrophage activity in rats during the first 28 days of infection was examined by measuring the production of NO and IL-6, as well as the expression of mannose receptor on the surface of peritoneal macrophages. During the course of a dynamic shift in the 3 life-cycle stages of the parasite, intermittent variations in NO production were observed but ended with increased values that coincided with the highest values for IL-6 release in the final, muscle phase of infection. No change in mannose receptor expression was observed during the course of infection. These results confirm that the Trichinella spiralis infection provokes changes in macrophage activity that could influence not only the course of the parasitic disease but also the overall immune status of the host.

  16. IFNγ: Issuing macrophages a license to kill

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    T cells tell macrophages when to start making the toxic soup of lysosomal enzymes, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide that destroys intracellular pathogens. In 1983, Carl Nathan proved that this start signal comes in the form of the secreted cytokine IFNγ.

  17. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol.

  19. A screen against Leishmania intracellular amastigotes: comparison to a promastigote screen and identification of a host cell-specific hit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine De Muylder

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to screen compounds in a high-throughput manner is essential in the process of small molecule drug discovery. Critical to the success of screening strategies is the proper design of the assay, often implying a compromise between ease/speed and a biologically relevant setting. Leishmaniasis is a major neglected disease with limited therapeutic options. In order to streamline efforts for the design of productive drug screens against Leishmania, we compared the efficiency of two screening methods, one targeting the free living and easily cultured promastigote (insect-infective stage, the other targeting the clinically relevant but more difficult to culture intra-macrophage amastigote (mammal-infective stage. Screening of a 909-member library of bioactive compounds against Leishmania donovani revealed 59 hits in the promastigote primary screen and 27 in the intracellular amastigote screen, with 26 hits shared by both screens. This suggested that screening against the promastigote stage, although more suitable for automation, fails to identify all active compounds and leads to numerous false positive hits. Of particular interest was the identification of one compound specific to the infective amastigote stage of the parasite. This compound affects intracellular but not axenic parasites, suggesting a host cell-dependent mechanism of action, opening new avenues for anti-leishmanial chemotherapy.

  20. J774 macrophages secrete antibiotics via organic anion transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C X; Silverstein, S C; Neu, H C; Steinberg, T H

    1992-02-01

    Mouse macrophages and J774 macrophage-like cells express probenecid-inhibitable organic anion transporters that remove anionic dyes from the cells' cytoplasmic matrix and secrete these dyes into the extracellular medium. The present studies show that these transporters also secrete antibiotics from J774 macrophages. Penicillin G permeates J774 cells poorly, but after it was introduced into the cell cytoplasm, it was secreted in a probenecid-inhibitable fashion. The quinolone norfloxacin enters macrophages readily. Probenecid retarded the secretion of intracellular norfloxacin by J774 cells and enhanced norfloxacin accumulation three- to fourfold. Thus the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin is regulated in part by organic anion transporters that secrete norfloxacin (and penicillin G) from J774 cells. This transport process may have clinical significance, as fluoroquinolones inhibit growth of intracellular pathogens such as mycobacteria and Brucella organisms in vitro but fail to arrest infections with these organisms in vivo.

  1. Hypoxia and classical activation limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival by Akt-dependent glycolytic shift in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Matta, S K; Kumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major antibacterial defense mechanism used by macrophages upon activation. Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages to hypoxia is known to compromise the survival of the pathogen. Here we report that the hypoxia-induced control of intracellular Mtb load in RAW 264.7 macrophages was mediated by regulating the cellular ROS levels. We show that similar to classical activation, hypoxia incubation of macrophages resulted in decre...

  2. Using a non-image-based medium-throughput assay for screening compounds targeting N-myristoylation in intracellular Leishmania amastigotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paape

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have refined a medium-throughput assay to screen hit compounds for activity against N-myristoylation in intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. Using clinically-relevant stages of wild type parasites and an Alamar blue-based detection method, parasite survival following drug treatment of infected macrophages is monitored after macrophage lysis and transformation of freed amastigotes into replicative extracellular promastigotes. The latter transformation step is essential to amplify the signal for determination of parasite burden, a factor dependent on equivalent proliferation rate between samples. Validation of the assay has been achieved using the anti-leishmanial gold standard drugs, amphotericin B and miltefosine, with EC50 values correlating well with published values. This assay has been used, in parallel with enzyme activity data and direct assay on isolated extracellular amastigotes, to test lead-like and hit-like inhibitors of Leishmania N-myristoyl transferase (NMT. These were derived both from validated in vivo inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei NMT and a recent high-throughput screen against L. donovani NMT. Despite being a potent inhibitor of L. donovani NMT, the activity of the lead T. brucei NMT inhibitor (DDD85646 against L. donovani amastigotes is relatively poor. Encouragingly, analogues of DDD85646 show improved translation of enzyme to cellular activity. In testing the high-throughput L. donovani hits, we observed macrophage cytotoxicity with compounds from two of the four NMT-selective series identified, while all four series displayed low enzyme to cellular translation, also seen here with the T. brucei NMT inhibitors. Improvements in potency and physicochemical properties will be required to deliver attractive lead-like Leishmania NMT inhibitors.

  3. [Parasites and cancer: is there a causal link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Kevin; Certad, Gabriela; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2016-10-01

    Over 20 % of cancers have infectious origins, including well-known examples of microbes such as viruses (HPV, EBV) and bacteria (H. pylori). The contribution of intracellular eukaryotic parasites to cancer etiology is largely unexplored. Epidemiological and clinical reports indicate that eukaryotic protozoan, such as intracellular apicomplexan that cause diseases of medical or economic importance, can be linked to various cancers: Theileria and Cryptosporidium induce host cell transformation while Plasmodium was linked epidemiologically to the "African lymphoma belt" over fifty years ago. These intracellular eukaryotic parasites hijack cellular pathways to manipulate the host cell epigenome, cellular machinery, signaling pathways and epigenetic programs and marks, such as methylation and acetylation, for their own benefit. In doing so, they tinker with the same pathways as those deregulated during cancer onset. Here we discuss how epidemiological evidence linking eukaryotic intracellular parasites to cancer onset are further strengthened by recent mechanistic studies in three apicomplexan parasites. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. Influence of particle size on drug delivery to rat alveolar macrophages following pulmonary administration of ciprofloxacin incorporated into liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-09-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) incorporated into liposomes (CPFX-liposomes) for treatment of respiratory intracellular parasite infections, the influence of particle size on drug delivery to rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) following pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes was investigated. CPFX-liposomes were prepared with hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC), cholesterol (CH) and dicetylphosphate (DCP) in a lipid molar ratio of 7/2/1 by the hydration method and then adjusted to five different particle sizes (100, 200, 400, 1000 and 2000 nm). In the pharmacokinetic experiment, the delivery efficiency of CPFX to rat AMs following pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes increased with the increase in the particle size over the range 100-1000 nm and became constant at over 1000 nm. The concentrations of CPFX in rat AMs until 24 h after pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes with a particle size of 1000 nm were higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration of CPFX against various intracellular parasites. In a cytotoxic test, no release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from rat lung tissues by pulmonary administration of CPFX-liposomes with a particle size of 1000 nm was observed. These findings indicate that efficient delivery of CPFX to AMs by CPFX-liposomes with a particle size of 1000 nm induces an excellent antibacterial effect without any cytotoxic effects on lung tissues. Therefore, CPFX-liposomes may be useful in the development of drug delivery systems for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by intracellular parasites, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes.

  5. Comprehensive insights into transcriptional adaptation of intracellular mycobacteria by microbe-enriched dual RNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienksma, R.A.; Suarez Diez, M.; Mollenkopf, H.J.; Dolganov, G.M.; Dorhoi, A.; Schoolnik, G.K.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Kaufmann, S.; Schaap, P.J.; Gengenbacher, M.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundThe human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis has the capacity to escape eradication by professional phagocytes. During infection, M. tuberculosis resists the harsh environment of phagosomes and actively manipulates macrophages and dendritic cells to ensure prolonged intracellular survival

  6. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... the United States cannot diagnose parasites? How are parasitic diseases diagnosed? Many kinds of lab tests are available ...

  7. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Ziltener

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and reactive oxygen species (ROS are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs, as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection.

  8. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  9. Brucella infection inhibits macrophages apoptosis via Nedd4-dependent degradation of calpain2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guimei; Wei, Pan; Zhao, Yuxi; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Wanchun; Wang, Shuangxi; Peng, Qisheng

    2014-11-07

    The calcium-dependent protease calpain2 is involved in macrophages apoptosis. Brucella infection-induced up-regulation of intracellular calcium level is an essential factor for the intracellular survival of Brucella within macrophages. Here, we hypothesize that calcium-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 ubiquitinates calpain2 and inhibits Brucella infection-induced macrophage apoptosis via degradation of calpain2.Our results reveal that Brucella infection induces increases in Nedd4 activity in an intracellular calcium dependent manner. Furthermore, Brucella infection-induced degradation of calpain2 is mediated by Nedd4 ubiquitination of calpain2. Brucella infection-induced calpain2 degradation inhibited macrophages apoptosis. Treatment of Brucella infected macrophages with calcium chelator BAPTA or Nedd4 knock-down decreased Nedd4 activity, prevented calpain2 degradation, and resulted in macrophages apoptosis.

  10. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-06-23

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches.

  11. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases, macrophages are a main producer of a range of cytokines regulating the inflammatory state. This also includes inflammation induced by tumor growth, which recruits so-called tumor-associated macrophages supporting tumor growth. Macrophages are therefore relevant targets for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches. PMID:26111002

  12. Autophagic digestion of Leishmania major by host macrophages is associated with differential expression of BNIP3, CTSE, and the miRNAs miR-101c, miR-129, and miR-210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Benjamin; Marcu, Ana; de Oliveira Almeida Petersen, Antonio Luis; Weber, Heike; Stigloher, Christian; Mottram, Jeremy C; Scholz, Claus Juergen; Schurigt, Uta

    2015-07-31

    Autophagy participates in innate immunity by eliminating intracellular pathogens. Consequently, numerous microorganisms have developed strategies to impair the autophagic machinery in phagocytes. In the current study, interactions between Leishmania major (L. m.) and the autophagic machinery of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were analyzed. BMDM were generated from BALB/c mice, and the cells were infected with L. m. promastigotes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography were used to investigate the ultrastructure of BMDM and the intracellular parasites. Affymetrix chip analyses were conducted to identify autophagy-related messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). The protein expression levels of autophagy related 5 (ATG5), BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), cathepsin E (CTSE), mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR), microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3B), and ubiquitin (UB) were investigated through western blot analyses. BMDM were transfected with specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against autophagy-related genes and with mimics or inhibitors of autophagy-associated miRNAs. The infection rates of BMDM were determined by light microscopy after a parasite-specific staining. The experiments demonstrated autophagy induction in BMDM after in vitro infection with L. m.. The results suggested a putative MTOR phosphorylation-dependent counteracting mechanism in the early infection phase and indicated that intracellular amastigotes were cleared by autophagy in BMDM in the late infection phase. Transcriptomic analyses and specific downregulation of protein expression with siRNAs suggested there is an association between the infection-specific over expression of BNIP3, as well as CTSE, and the autophagic activity of BMDM. Transfection with mimics of mmu-miR-101c and mmu-miR-129-5p, as well as with an inhibitor of mmu-miR-210-5p, demonstrated direct effects of the respective miRNAs on

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Needs a Signal Provided by Reactive Oxygen Species to Infect Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Grazielle R.; Rocha, Peter S.; Diniz, Aline R. S.; Aguiar, Pedro H. N.; Machado, Carlos R.; Vieira, Leda Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a process called respiratory burst. Several works have aimed to elucidate the role of ROS during T. cruzi infection and the results obtained are sometimes contradictory. T. cruzi has a highly efficiently regulated antioxidant machinery to deal with the oxidative burst, but the parasite macromolecules, particularly DNA, may still suffer oxidative damage. Guanine (G) is the most vulnerable base and its oxidation results in formation of 8-oxoG, a cellular marker of oxidative stress. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the contribution of ROS in T. cruzi survival and infection, we utilized mice deficient in the gp91phox (Phox KO) subunit of NADPH oxidase and parasites that overexpress the enzyme EcMutT (from Escherichia coli) or TcMTH (from T. cruzi), which is responsible for removing 8-oxo-dGTP from the nucleotide pool. The modified parasites presented enhanced replication inside murine inflammatory macrophages from C57BL/6 WT mice when compared with control parasites. Interestingly, when Phox KO macrophages were infected with these parasites, we observed a decreased number of all parasites when compared with macrophages from C57BL/6 WT. Scavengers for ROS also decreased parasite growth in WT macrophages. In addition, treatment of macrophages or parasites with hydrogen peroxide increased parasite replication in Phox KO mice and in vivo. Conclusions Our results indicate a paradoxical role for ROS since modified parasites multiply better inside macrophages, but proliferation is significantly reduced when ROS is removed from the host cell. Our findings suggest that ROS can work like a signaling molecule, contributing to T. cruzi growth inside the cells. PMID:27035573

  14. Salmonella typhimurium Invasion Induces Apoptosis in Infected Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monack, Denise M.; Raupach, Barbel; Hromockyj, Alexander E.; Falkow, Stanley

    1996-09-01

    Invasive Salmonella typhimurium induces dramatic cytoskeletal changes on the membrane surface of mammalian epithelial cells and RAW264.7 macrophages as part of its entry mechanism. Noninvasive S. typhimurium strains are unable to induce this membrane ruffling. Invasive S. typhimurium strains invade RAW264.7 macrophages in 2 h with 7- to 10-fold higher levels than noninvasive strains. Invasive S. typhimurium and Salmonella typhi, independent of their ability to replicate intracellularly, are cytotoxic to RAW264.7 macrophages and, to a greater degree, to murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. Here, we show that the macrophage cytotoxicity mediated by invasive Salmonella is apoptosis, as shown by nuclear morphology, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and host cell DNA fragmentation. S. typhimurium that enter cells causing ruffles but are mutant for subsequent intracellular replication also initiate host cell apoptosis. Mutant S. typhimurium that are incapable of inducing host cell membrane ruffling fail to induce apoptosis. The activation state of the macrophage plays a significant role in the response of macrophages to Salmonella invasion, perhaps indicating that the signal or receptor for initiating programmed cell death is upregulated in activated macrophages. The ability of Salmonella to promote apoptosis may be important for the initiation of infection, bacterial survival, and escape of the host immune response.

  15. ACAT1 deficiency increases cholesterol synthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Dwayne E; Su, Yan Ru; Swift, Larry L; Linton, MacRae F; Fazio, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) esterifies free cholesterol and stores cholesteryl esters in lipid droplets. Macrophage ACAT1 deficiency results in increased atherosclerotic lesion area in hyperlipidemic mice via disrupted cholesterol efflux, increased lipoprotein uptake, accumulation of intracellular vesicles, and accelerated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lipid synthesis is affected by ACAT1. The synthesis, esterification, and efflux of new cholesterol were measured in peritoneal macrophages from ACAT1(-/-) mice. Cholesterol synthesis was increased by 134% (p=0.001) in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages. Increased synthesis resulted in a proportional increase in the efflux of newly synthesized cholesterol. Although the esterification of new cholesterol was reduced by 93% (pSREBP1a mRNA was increased 6-fold in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages compared to wildtype macrophages, suggesting an up-regulation of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages. Increased cholesterol synthesis and up-regulation of SREBP in ACAT1(-/-) macrophages suggests that ACAT1 affects the regulation of lipid metabolism in macrophages. This change in cholesterol homeostasis may contribute to the atherogenic potential of ACAT1(-/-) macrophages.

  16. Intracellular Bacteria in Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Brigge, Theo

    Intracellular bacteria in humans are typically detrimental, and such infections are regarded by the patients as accidental and abnormal. In protozoa it seems obvious that many bacteria have coevolved with their hosts and are well adapted to the intracellular way of life. Manifold interactions between hosts and intracellular bacteria are found, and examples of antibacterial resistance of unknown mechanisms are observed. The wide diversity of intracellular bacteria in protozoa has become particularly obvious since they have begun to be classified by molecular techniques. Some of the bacteria are closely related to pathogens; others are responsible for the production of toxins.

  17. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet(+) cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-γ was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue.

  18. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

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    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a

  19. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

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    An

    2015-07-01

    expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (P<0.05 in production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic activity, and Toll-like receptor expression was observed in host cells incubated with iron-saturated lactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05 change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein.Conclusion: The present study details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study reveals the possible mechanism of action against various intracellular pathogens such as Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Mycobacterium. The presence of iron in lactoferrin plays an important role in enhancing the various activities taking place inside these cells. This work provides a lot of information about targeting lactoferrin against many parasitic infections which can rule out the exact pathways for inhibition of diseases caused by intracellular microbes mainly targeting RBCs and macrophages for their survival. Therefore, this initial study can serve as a baseline for further evaluation of the mechanism of action of lactoferrin against parasitic diseases, which is not fully understood to date.Keywords: lactoferrin, phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, morphometric analysis

  20. Macrophage mannose receptor-specific gene delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Gui-Xin; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Yao, Xing-Lei; Du, Anariwa; Tang, Gu-Ping; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Macrophages are the most plastic cells in the hematopoietic system and they exhibit great functional diversity. They have been extensively applied in anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-cancer therapies. However, the application of macrophages is limited by the efficiency of their engineering. The macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206), a C-type lectin receptor, is ubiquitously expressed on macrophages and has a high affinity for mannose oligosaccharides. In the present study, we developed a novel non-viral vehicle with specific affinity for MMR. Mannan was cationized with spermine at a grafted ratio of ∼12% to deliver DNA and was characterized as a stable system for delivery. This spermine-mannan (SM)-based delivery system was evaluated as a biocompatible vehicle with superior transfection efficiency on murine macrophages, up to 28.5-fold higher than spermine-pullulan, 11.5-fold higher than polyethylenimine and 3.0-fold higher than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We confirmed that the SM-based delivery system for macrophages transfection was MMR-specific and we described the intracellular transport of the delivery system. To our knowledge, this is the first study using SM to demonstrate a mannose receptor-specific gene delivery system, thereby highlighting the potential of a novel specific non-viral delivery vehicle for macrophage engineering.

  1. Transcriptional signatures of BALB/c mouse macrophages housing multiplying Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes

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    Lang Thierry

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammal macrophages (MΦ display a wide range of functions which contribute to surveying and maintaining tissue integrity. One such function is phagocytosis, a process known to be subverted by parasites like Leishmania (L. Indeed, the intracellular development of L. amazonensis amastigote relies on the biogenesis and dynamic remodelling of a phagolysosome, termed the parasitophorous vacuole, primarily within dermal MΦ. Results Using BALB/c mouse bone marrow-derived MΦ loaded or not with amastigotes, we analyzed the transcriptional signatures of MΦ 24 h later, when the amastigote population was growing. Total RNA from MΦ cultures were processed and hybridized onto Affymetrix Mouse430_2 GeneChips®, and some transcripts were also analyzed by Real-Time quantitative PCR (RTQPCR. A total of 1,248 probe-sets showed significant differential expression. Comparable fold-change values were obtained between the Affymetrix technology and the RTQPCR method. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software® pinpointed the up-regulation of the sterol biosynthesis pathway (p-value = 1.31e-02 involving several genes (1.95 to 4.30 fold change values, and the modulation of various genes involved in polyamine synthesis and in pro/counter-inflammatory signalling. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the amastigote growth relies on early coordinated gene expression of the MΦ lipid and polyamine pathways. Moreover, these MΦ hosting multiplying L. amazonensis amastigotes display a transcriptional profile biased towards parasite-and host tissue-protective processes.

  2. Interferon-¿ production by human T cells and natural killer cells in vitro in response to antigens from the two intracellular pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Hviid, L; Kharazmi, A

    1997-01-01

    protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and Leishmania antigens. It was found that IFN-gamma was produced in response to both PPD and Leishmania stimulant by T cells in the cultures. Activation of IFN-gamma producing natural killer (NK) cells was demonstrated only in some cultures, and only......Acquired resistance to both mycobacteria and Leishmania is primarily mediated by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which triggers mechanisms leading to the death of the microorganism in macrophages. In this study, cell activation and IFN-gamma production was investigated in human peripheral blood...... mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals previously sensitized to tuberculin and without known exposure to Leishmania parasites. Immune staining for intracellular IFN-gamma and surface markers allowed flow cytometric identification of the cellular sources of IFN-gamma in cell cultures incubated with purified...

  3. Azithromycin effectiveness against intracellular infections of Francisella

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    Mann Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrolide antibiotics are commonly administered for bacterial respiratory illnesses. Azithromycin (Az is especially noted for extremely high intracellular concentrations achieved within macrophages which is far greater than the serum concentration. Clinical strains of Type B Francisella (F. tularensis have been reported to be resistant to Az, however our laboratory Francisella strains were found to be sensitive. We hypothesized that different strains/species of Francisella (including Type A may have different susceptibilities to Az, a widely used and well-tolerated antibiotic. Results In vitro susceptibility testing of Az confirmed that F. tularensis subsp. holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS (Type B was not sensitive while F. philomiragia, F. novicida, and Type A F. tularensis (NIH B38 and Schu S4 strain were susceptible. In J774A.1 mouse macrophage cells infected with F. philomiragia, F. novicida, and F. tularensis LVS, 5 μg/ml Az applied extracellularly eliminated intracellular Francisella infections. A concentration of 25 μg/ml Az was required for Francisella-infected A549 human lung epithelial cells, suggesting that macrophages are more effective at concentrating Az than epithelial cells. Mutants of RND efflux components (tolC and ftlC in F. novicida demonstrated less sensitivity to Az by MIC than the parental strain, but the tolC disc-inhibition assay demonstrated increased sensitivity, indicating a complex role for the outer-membrane transporter. Mutants of acrA and acrB mutants were less sensitive to Az than the parental strain, suggesting that AcrAB is not critical for the efflux of Az in F. novicida. In contrast, F. tularensis Schu S4 mutants ΔacrB and ΔacrA were more sensitive than the parental strain, indicating that the AcrAB may be important for Az efflux in F. tularensis Schu S4. F. novicida LPS O-antigen mutants (wbtN, wbtE, wbtQ and wbtA were found to be less sensitive in vitro to Az compared to the wild

  4. Metabolism of myo-Inositol by Legionella pneumophila Promotes Infection of Amoebae and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Christian; Schell, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is a natural parasite of environmental amoebae and the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The facultative intracellular pathogen employs a bipartite metabolism, where the amino acid serine serves as the major energy supply, while glycerol and glucose are mainly utilized for anabolic processes. The L. pneumophila genome harbors the cluster lpg1653 to lpg1649 putatively involved in the metabolism of the abundant carbohydrate myo-inositol (here termed inositol). To assess inositol metabolism by L. pneumophila, we constructed defined mutant strains lacking lpg1653 or lpg1652, which are predicted to encode the inositol transporter IolT or the inositol-2-dehydrogenase IolG, respectively. The mutant strains were not impaired for growth in complex or defined minimal media, and inositol did not promote extracellular growth. However, upon coinfection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the mutants were outcompeted by the parental strain, indicating that the intracellular inositol metabolism confers a fitness advantage to the pathogen. Indeed, inositol added to L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages promoted intracellular growth of the parental strain, but not of the ΔiolT or ΔiolG mutant, and growth stimulation by inositol was restored by complementation of the mutant strains. The expression of the Piol promoter and bacterial uptake of inositol required the alternative sigma factor RpoS, a key virulence regulator of L. pneumophila. Finally, the parental strain and ΔiolG mutant bacteria but not the ΔiolT mutant strain accumulated [U-14C6]inositol, indicating that IolT indeed functions as an inositol transporter. Taken together, intracellular L. pneumophila metabolizes inositol through the iol gene products, thus promoting the growth and virulence of the pathogen. IMPORTANCE The environmental bacterium Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The

  5. Alteration of human macrophages microRNA expression profile upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Lucinda Furci

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This study signifies the miRNA host response upon intracellular mycobacterial infection in macrophages, providing new aspects of regulation in host-pathogen interactions, at post-transcriptional levels.

  6. Gene targeting in malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, R; Janse, C

    1997-10-01

    Gene targeting, which permits alteration of a chosen gene in a predetermined way by homologous recombination, is an emerging technology in malaria research. Soon after the development of techniques for stable transformation of red blood cell stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei, genes of interest were disrupted in the two species. The main limitations of gene targeting in malaria parasites result from the intracellular growth and slow replication of these parasites. On the other hand, the technology is facilitated by the very high rate of homologous recombination following transformation with targeting constructs (approximately 100%). Here, we describe (i) the vector design and the type of mutation that may be generated in a target locus, (ii) the selection and screening strategies that can be used to identify clones with the desired modification, and (iii) the protocol that was used for disrupting the circumsporozoite protein (CS) and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) genes of P. berghei.

  7. Parasitism and mutualism in Wolbachia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Paraskevopoulos, Charalampos; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C;

    2009-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume the existe......Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume...... the existence of genetic or environmental variation that can spur incipient changes in symbiotic lifestyle. However, for obligate intracellular bacteria whose genomes are highly reduced, studies specify that discrete symbiotic associations can be evolutionarily stable for hundreds of millions of years...... in symbiotic lifestyle with a comprehensive, phylogenomic analysis. Contrary to previous claims, we show unequivocally that the transition in lifestyle cannot be reconstructed with current methods due to long-branch attraction (LBA) artifacts of the distant Anaplasma and Ehrlichia outgroups. Despite the use...

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

  9. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  10. The human parasite Leishmania amazonensis downregulates iNOS expression via NF-κB p50/p50 homodimer: role of the PI3K/Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari-Silva, Teresa C.; Vivarini, Áislan C.; Miqueline, Marina; Dos Santos, Guilherme R. R. M.; Teixeira, Karina Luiza; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos; Nunes de Carvalho, Simone; de Carvalho, Laís; Lopes, Ulisses G.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis activates the NF-κB transcriptional repressor homodimer (p50/p50) and promotes nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) downregulation. We investigated the role of PI3K/Akt in p50/p50 NF-κB activation and the effect on iNOS expression in L. amazonensis infection. The increased occupancy of p50/p50 on the iNOS promoter of infected macrophages was observed and we demonstrated that both p50/p50 NF-κB induction and iNOS downregulation in infected macrophages depended on PI3K/Akt activation. Importantly, the intracellular growth of the parasite was also impaired during PI3K/Akt signalling inhibition and in macrophages knocked-down for Akt 1 expression. It was also observed that the increased nuclear levels of p50/p50 in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages were associated with reduced phosphorylation of 907 Ser p105, the precursor of p50. Corroborating these data, we demonstrated the increased levels of phospho-9 Ser GSK3β in infected macrophages, which is associated with GSK3β inhibition and, consequently, its inability to phosphorylate p105. Remarkably, we found that the levels of pPTEN 370 Ser, a negative regulator of PI3K, increased due to L. amazonensis infection. Our data support the notion that PI3K/Akt activity is sustained during the parasite infection, leading to NF-κB 105 phosphorylation and further processing to originate p50/p50 homodimers and the consequent downregulation of iNOS expression. PMID:26400473

  11. DNA topology and adaptation of Salmonella typhimurium to an intracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D G; Bowe, F; Hale, C; Dougan, G; Dorman, C J

    2000-01-01

    The expression of genes coding for determinants of DNA topology in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was studied during adaptation by the bacteria to the intracellular environment of J774A.1 macrophage-like cells. A reporter plasmid was used to monitor changes in DNA supercoiling during intracellular growth. Induction of the dps and spv genes, previously shown to be induced in the macrophage, was detected, as was expression of genes coding for DNA gyrase, integration host factor and the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. The topA gene, coding for the DNA relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, was not induced. Reporter plasmid data showed that bacterial DNA became relaxed following uptake of S. typhimurium cells by the macrophage. These data indicate that DNA topology in S. typhimurium undergoes significant changes during adaptation to the intracellular environment. A model describing how this process may operate is discussed. PMID:10874730

  12. Cyclobenzaprine Raises ROS Levels in Leishmania infantum and Reduces Parasite Burden in Infected Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Júnior, Edézio Ferreira; Andrade-Neto, Valter Viana; Lima, Marta Lopes; da Costa-Silva, Thais Alves; Galisteo Junior, Andres J.; Abengózar, Maria A.; Barbas, Coral; Rivas, Luis; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo; Tempone, Andre Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Background The leishmanicidal action of tricyclic antidepressants has been studied and evidences have pointed that their action is linked to inhibition of trypanothione reductase, a key enzyme in the redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Cyclobenzaprine (CBP) is a tricyclic structurally related to the antidepressant amitriptyline, differing only by the presence of a double bond in the central ring. This paper describes the effect of CBP in experimental visceral leishmaniasis, its inhibitory effect in trypanothione reductase and the potential immunomodulatory activity. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro antileishmanial activity was determined in promastigotes and in L. infantum-infected macrophages. For in vivo studies, L. infantum-infected BALB/c mice were treated with CBP by oral gavage for five days and the parasite load was estimated. Trypanothione reductase activity was assessed in the soluble fraction of promastigotes of L. infantum. For evaluation of cytokines, L. infantum-infected macrophages were co-cultured with BALB/c splenocytes and treated with CBP for 48 h. The supernatant was analyzed for IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1, IFN-γ and TNF-α. CBP demonstrated an IC50 of 14.5±1.1μM and an IC90 of 74.5±1.2 μM in promastigotes and an IC50 of 12.6±1.05 μM and an IC90 of 28.7±1.3 μM in intracellular amastigotes. CBP also reduced the parasite load in L. infantum-infected mice by 40.4±10.3% and 66.7±10.5% in spleen at 24.64 and 49.28 mg/kg, respectively and by 85.6±5.0 and 89.3±4.8% in liver at 24.64 and 49.28mg/kg, after a short-term treatment. CBP inhibited the trypanothione reductase activity with a Ki of 86 ± 7.7 μM and increased the ROS production in promastigotes. CBP inhibited in 53% the production of IL-6 in infected macrophages co-culture. Conclusion/Significance To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report of the in vivo antileishmanial activity of the FDA-approved drug CBP. Modulation of immune response and induction of

  13. The Ca2+ Antagonizing Effect of Chinese Cobra Venom Factor on Formation of Macrophage-derived Foam Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭健苗; 杨向东; 姜志胜; 李亮

    2007-01-01

    Purpose CCVF was isolated from Chinese cobra (Naja naja) venom, its Ca2+ antagonizing effect on formation of macrophage-derived foam cells was explored in these studies. Methods Foam cell models were induced with C57BL/6J mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated in 10mg/L oxidized low density lipoprotein (OLDL), and their intracellular Ca2+ levels influenced both slowly and transiently by CCVF were determined with the technique of Ca2+ fluorescent indicator. Results The intracellular Ca2+ level with the macrophages incubated in 10mg/L OLDL and 10mg/L CCVF was 40.2% of the macrophages incubated in 10mg/L OLDL (P<0.05); While the transient influence of CCVF on the intracellular Ca2+ levels were not significant. Conclusion CCVF exerted a long-lasting antagonizing role on the enhancement of intracellular Ca2+ levels, thus inhibited the formation of macrophage-derived foam cell.

  14. Leishmania donovani infection enhances lateral mobility of macrophage membrane protein which is reversed by liposomal cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moumita Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani (LD reduces cellular cholesterol of the host possibly for its own benefit. Cholesterol is mostly present in the specialized compartment of the plasma membrane. The relation between mobility of membrane proteins and cholesterol depletion from membrane continues to be an important issue. The notion that leishmania infection alters the mobility of membrane proteins stems from our previous study where we showed that the distance between subunits of IFNγ receptor (R1 and R2 on the cell surface of LD infected cell is increased, but is restored to normal by liposomal cholesterol treatment.We determined the lateral mobility of a membrane protein in normal, LD infected and liposome treated LD infected cells using GFP-tagged PLCδ1 as a probe. The mobility of PLCδ1 was computationally analyzed from the time lapse experiment using boundary distance plot and radial profile movement. Our results showed that the lateral mobility of the membrane protein, which is increased in infection, is restored to normal upon liposomal cholesterol treatment. The results of FRAP experiment lent further credence to the above notion. The membrane proteins are intimately linked with cellular actin and alteration of cellular actin may influence lateral mobility. We found that F-actin is decreased in infection but is restored to normal upon liposomal cholesterol treatment as evident from phalloidin staining and also from biochemical analysis by immunoblotting.To our knowledge this is the first direct demonstration that LD parasites during their intracellular life cycle increases lateral mobility of membrane proteins and decreases F-actin level in infected macrophages. Such defects may contribute to ineffective intracellular signaling and other cellular functions.

  15. Small ruminant macrophage polarization may play a pivotal role on lentiviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Helena; Bertolotti, Luigi; Juganaru, Magda; Glaria, Idoia; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz; Rosati, Sergio; Reina, Ramsés

    2013-09-26

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) infect the monocyte/macrophage lineage inducing a long-lasting infection affecting body condition, production and welfare of sheep and goats all over the world. Macrophages play a pivotal role on the host's innate and adaptative immune responses against parasites by becoming differentially activated. Macrophage heterogeneity can tentatively be classified into classically differentiated macrophages (M1) through stimulation with IFN-γ displaying an inflammatory profile, or can be alternatively differentiated by stimulation with IL-4/IL-13 into M2 macrophages with homeostatic functions. Since infection by SRLV can modulate macrophage functions we explored here whether ovine and caprine macrophages can be segregated into M1 and M2 populations and whether this differential polarization represents differential susceptibility to SRLV infection. We found that like in human and mouse systems, ovine and caprine macrophages can be differentiated with particular stimuli into M1/M2 subpopulations displaying specific markers. In addition, small ruminant macrophages are plastic since M1 differentiated macrophages can express M2 markers when the stimulus changes from IFN-γ to IL-4. SRLV replication was restricted in M1 macrophages and increased in M2 differentiated macrophages respectively according to viral production. Identification of the infection pathways in macrophage populations may provide new targets for eliciting appropriate immune responses against SRLV infection.

  16. Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Haidee

    2016-02-01

    • Stool antigen detection for Cryptosporidium sp, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are now commercially available, have better sensitivity and specificity than the traditional stool microscopy, and are less dependent on personnel skill. Tests employing newer techniques with faster turnaround time are also available for diagnosing trichomoniasis.• Nitazoxanide, the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for therapy of cryptosporidiosis, is effective among immunocompetent patients. However, on the basis of strong evidence from multiple clinical trials, nitazoxanide is considered ineffective among immunocompromised patients. (14) • Giardiasis can be asymptomatic or have a chronic course leading to malabsorption and failure to thrive. It can be treated with metronidazole, tinidazole, or nitazoxanide. On the basis of growing observational studies, postinfectious and extraintestinal manifestations of giardiasis occur, but the mechanisms are unclear. Given the high prevalence of giardiasis, public health implications need to be defined. (16) • Eradicating E histolytica from the gastrointestinal tract requires only intraluminal agent therapy. Therapy for invasive illnesses requires use of imidazole followed by intraluminal agents to eliminate persistent intraluminal parasites. • Malaria is considered the most lethal parasitic infection, with Plasmodium falciparum as the predominant cause of mortality. P vivax and P ovale can be dormant in the liver, and primaquine is necessary to resolve infection by P vivax and P ovale. • Among immunocompetent patients, infection with Toxoplasma gondii may be asymptomatic, involve localized lymphadenopathy, or cause ocular infection. In immunocompromised patients, reactivation or severe infection is not uncommon. On the basis of limited observational studies (there are no well-controlled randomized trials), therapy is recommended for acute infection during pregnancy to prevent transmission to the

  17. The outcome of Cryptococcus neoformans intracellular pathogenesis in human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirofski Liise-anne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that is a facultative intracellular pathogen. The interaction between macrophages and C. neoformans is critical for extrapulmonary dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. C. neoformans can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. However, most studies of intracellular pathogenesis have been made with mouse cells and their relevance to human infection is uncertain. In this study we extended studies of C. neoformans-macrophage cellular interaction/s to human peripheral blood monocytes. Results This study demonstrated that C. neoformans can shed polysaccharide within human monocytes, spread from cell to cell, and be extruded from them. Furthermore, human monocytes responded to ingestion of C. neoformans with cell cycle progression from G1 to S. Conclusion Similarities between mouse and human cells support the suitability of mouse cells for the study of intracellular pathogenesis mechanisms. Given that these hosts diverged over 70 million years ago, the similar pathogenic strategies for C. neoformans in murine and human cells supports the hypothesis that the mechanism that underlies the mammalian intracellular pathogenesis of C. neoformans originated from interactions with a third host, possibly soil amoeboid predators, before the mammalian radiation.

  18. HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors interfere with cellular proliferation, ultrastructure and macrophage infection of Leishmania amazonensis.

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    Lívia O Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania is the etiologic agent of leishmanisais, a protozoan disease whose pathogenic events are not well understood. Current therapy is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the increase in the number of cases of Leishmania-HIV coinfection, due to the overlap between the AIDS epidemic and leishmaniasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we have investigated the effect of HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors (PIs on the Leishmania amazonensis proliferation, ultrastructure, interaction with macrophage cells and expression of classical peptidases which are directly involved in the Leishmania pathogenesis. All the HIV PIs impaired parasite growth in a dose-dependent fashion, especially nelfinavir and lopinavir. HIV PIs treatment caused profound changes in the leishmania ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including cytoplasm shrinking, increase in the number of lipid inclusions and some cells presenting the nucleus closely wrapped by endoplasmic reticulum resembling an autophagic process, as well as chromatin condensation which is suggestive of apoptotic death. The hydrolysis of HIV peptidase substrate by L. amazonensis extract was inhibited by pepstatin and HIV PIs, suggesting that an aspartyl peptidase may be the intracellular target of the inhibitors. The treatment with HIV PIs of either the promastigote forms preceding the interaction with macrophage cells or the amastigote forms inside macrophages drastically reduced the association indexes. Despite all these beneficial effects, the HIV PIs induced an increase in the expression of cysteine peptidase b (cpb and the metallopeptidase gp63, two well-known virulence factors expressed by Leishmania spp. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the face of leishmaniasis/HIV overlap, it is critical to further comprehend the sophisticated interplays among Leishmania

  19. Effect of BMAP-28 antimicrobial peptides on Leishmania major promastigote and amastigote growth: role of leishmanolysin in parasite survival.

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    Miriam A Lynn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protozoan parasites, such as Leishmania, still pose an enormous public health problem in many countries throughout the world. Current measures are outdated and have some associated drug resistance, prompting the search into novel therapies. Several innovative approaches are under investigation, including the utilization of host defence peptides (HDPs as emerging anti-parasitic therapies. HDPs are characterised by their small size, amphipathic nature and cationicity, which induce permeabilization of cell membranes, whilst modulating the immune response of the host. Recently, members of the cathelicidin family of HDPs have demonstrated significant antimicrobial activities against various parasites including Leishmania. The cathelicidin bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28 has broad antimicrobial activities and confers protection in animal models of bacterial infection or sepsis. We tested the effectiveness of the use of BMAP-28 and two of its isomers the D-amino acid form (D-BMAP-28 and the retro-inverso form (RI-BMAP-28, as anti-leishmanial agents against the promastigote and amastigote intracellular Leishmania major lifecycle stages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An MTS viability assay was utilized to show the potent antiparasitic activity of BMAP-28 and its protease resistant isomers against L. major promastigotes in vitro. Cell membrane permeability assays, caspase 3/7, Tunel assays and morphologic studies suggested that this was a late stage apoptotic cell death with early osmotic cell lysis caused by the antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, BMAP-28 and its isomers demonstrated anti-leishmanial activities against intracellular amastigotes within a macrophage infection model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Interestingly, D-BMAP-28 appears to be the most potent antiparasitic of the three isomers against wild type L. major promastigotes and amastigotes. These exciting results suggest that BMAP-28 and its protease resistant

  20. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  1. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

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    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  2. Mycobacteria, metals, and the macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyrolles, Olivier; Wolschendorf, Frank; Mitra, Avishek; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that thrives inside host macrophages. A key trait of M. tuberculosis is to exploit and manipulate metal cation trafficking inside infected macrophages to ensure survival and replication inside the phagosome. Here, we describe the recent fascinating discoveries that the mammalian immune system responds to infections with M. tuberculosis by overloading the phagosome with copper and zinc, two metals which are essential nutrients in small quantities but are toxic in excess. M. tuberculosis has developed multi-faceted resistance mechanisms to protect itself from metal toxicity including control of uptake, sequestration inside the cell, oxidation, and efflux. The host response to infections combines this metal poisoning strategy with nutritional immunity mechanisms that deprive M. tuberculosis from metals such as iron and manganese to prevent bacterial replication. Both immune mechanisms rely on the translocation of metal transporter proteins to the phagosomal membrane during the maturation process of the phagosome. This review summarizes these recent findings and discusses how metal-targeted approaches might complement existing TB chemotherapeutic regimens with novel anti-infective therapies.

  3. One Health: parasites and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Damer P; Betson, Martha

    2017-01-01

    The field of parasitism is broad, encompassing relationships between organisms where one benefits at the expense of another. Traditionally the discipline focuses on eukaryotes, with the study of bacteria and viruses complementary but distinct. Nonetheless, parasites vary in size and complexity from single celled protozoa, to enormous plants like those in the genus Rafflesia. Lifecycles range from obligate intracellular to extensive exoparasitism. Examples of parasites include high-profile medical and zoonotic pathogens such as Plasmodium, veterinary pathogens of wild and captive animals and many of the agents which cause neglected tropical diseases, stretching to parasites which infect plants and other parasites (e.g. Kikuchi et al. 2011; Hotez et al. 2014; Blake et al. 2015; Hemingway, 2015; Meekums et al. 2015; Sandlund et al. 2015). The breadth of parasitology has been matched by the variety of ways in which parasites are studied, drawing upon biological, chemical, molecular, epidemiological and other expertise. Despite such breadth bridging between disciplines has commonly been problematic, regardless of extensive encouragement from government agencies, peer audiences and funding bodies promoting multidisciplinary research. Now, progress in understanding and collaboration can benefit from establishment of the One Health concept (Zinsstag et al. 2012; Stark et al. 2015). One Health draws upon biological, environmental, medical, veterinary and social science disciplines in order to improve human, animal and environmental health, although it remains tantalizingly difficult to engage many relevant parties. For infectious diseases traditional divides have been exacerbated as the importance of wildlife reservoirs, climate change, food production systems and socio-economic diversity have been recognized but often not addressed in a multidisciplinary manner. In response the 2015 Autumn Symposium organized by the British Society for Parasitology (BSP; https

  4. Characterization of effector mechanisms at the host: parasite interface during the immune response to tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protective immune response that develops following infection with many tissue dwelling intestinal nematode parasites is characterized by elevations in IL-4 and IL-13 and increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, granulocytes, and macrophages. These cells accumulate at the site of infection, and in many...

  5. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated P. aeruginosa killing is functional in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Cifani

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen for chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. About 80% of adult CF patients have chronic P. aeruginosa infection, which accounts for much of the morbidity and most of the mortality. Both bacterial genetic adaptations and defective innate immune responses contribute to the bacteria persistence. It is well accepted that CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR dysfunction impairs the airways-epithelium-mediated lung defence; however, other innate immune cells also appear to be affected, such as neutrophils and macrophages, which thus contribute to this infectious pathology in the CF lung. In macrophages, the absence of CFTR has been linked to defective P. aeruginosa killing, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production. To learn more about macrophage dysfunction in CF patients, we investigated the generation of the oxidative burst and its impact on bacterial killing in CF macrophages isolated from peripheral blood or lung parenchyma of CF patients, after P. aeruginosa infection. Our data demonstrate that CF macrophages show an oxidative response of similar intensity to that of non-CF macrophages. Intracellular ROS are recognized as one of the earliest microbicidal mechanisms against engulfed pathogens that are activated by macrophages. Accordingly, NADPH inhibition resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular bacteria survival in CF and non-CF macrophages, both as monocyte-derived macrophages and as lung macrophages. These data strongly suggest that the contribution of ROS to P. aeruginosa killing is not affected by CFTR mutations.

  6. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death.

  7. Intracellular drug release nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghua Meng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to elicit therapeutic effects, many drugs including small molecule anticancer drugs, proteins, siRNA, and DNA have to be delivered and released into the specific cellular compartments typically the cytoplasm or nucleus of target cells. Intracellular environment-responsive nanosystems that exhibit good extracellular stability while rapidly releasing drugs inside cancer cells have been actively pursued for effective cancer therapy. Here, we highlight novel designs of smart nanosystems that release drugs in response to an intracellular biological signal of cancer cells such as acidic pH in endo/lysosomal compartments, enzymes in lysosomes, and redox potential in cytoplasm and the cell nucleus.

  8. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission. PMID:27799922

  9. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...examine the mechanisms in which viruses replicate, assemble, and traffic through the cell. An additional benefit of this method is that the robust...Visualization of single RNA transcripts in situ. Science, 1998. 280(5363): p. 585-90. 4. Jambo, K.C., et al., Small alveolar macrophages are infected

  10. Minor effect of depletion of resident macrophages from peritoneal cavioty on resistance of common carp Cyprinus carpio to blood flagellates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeij, J.P.J.; Groeneveld, A.; Rooijen, van N.; Haenen, O.L.M.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2003-01-01

    Carp Cyprinus carpio macrophages were depleted by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clodronate-liposomes for the in vivo study of the effect of macrophage depletion on the resistance of carp to infection with blood flagellate parasites. Clodronate released inside the cell induces apoptosis of

  11. Minor effect of depletion of resident macrophages from peritoneal cavioty on resistance of common carp Cyprinus carpio to blood flagellates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeij, J.P.J.; Groeneveld, A.; Rooijen, van N.; Haenen, O.L.M.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2003-01-01

    Carp Cyprinus carpio macrophages were depleted by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clodronate-liposomes for the in vivo study of the effect of macrophage depletion on the resistance of carp to infection with blood flagellate parasites. Clodronate released inside the cell induces apoptosis of (mur

  12. Chloroquine interference with hemoglobin endocytic trafficking suppresses adaptive heme and iron homeostasis in macrophages: the paradox of an antimalarial agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Christian A; Laczko, Endre; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schaer, Dominik J; Vallelian, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb), which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM). We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  13. Chloroquine Interference with Hemoglobin Endocytic Trafficking Suppresses Adaptive Heme and Iron Homeostasis in Macrophages: The Paradox of an Antimalarial Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A. Schaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb, which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM. We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  14. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection.

  15. Transfer of cholesterol from macrophages to lymphocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bittencourt Júnior, P I; Curi, R

    1998-02-01

    -cultivation with macrophages decreased the basal incorporation of [2-14C]thymidine into lymphocyte DNA and the addition of cholesterol to lymphocyte culture media also impaired the lymphocyte proliferative response to the mitogens concanavalin A (Con A) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The above results suggest that macrophages may transfer cholesterol to lymphocytes (from both lymph nodes and blood), thus regulating lymphocyte function by raising the intracellular cholesterol content and suppressing lymphocyte proliferative activity. If this is so, a modulatory role for the transfer of cholesterol in both physiological (e.g. immune response) and pathological conditions (e.g. atherosclerosis) may be postulated. This hypothesis is currently under investigation in our laboratory.

  16. Functional analysis of the murine T lymphocyte immune response to a protozoan parasite, Leishmania tropica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Engers

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The results presented in this review summarize a seirs of experiments designed to characterize the murine T cell imune response to the protozoan parasite Leishmania tropica. Enriched T cell populations and T cell clones specific for L. tropica antigens were derived from lymph nodes of primed mice and maintained in continous culture in vitro. These T lymphocytes were shown (A to express the Lyt 1+ 3- cell surface phenotype, (B to proliferate specifically in vitro in response to parasite antigens, together with a source of irradiated syngeneic macrophages, (C to transfer antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses to normal syngeneic mice, (D to induce specific activation of parasitized macrophages in vitro resulting in the destruction of intracellular parasites, (E to provide specific helper activity for antibody responses in vitro in a hapten-carrier system. Protection studies using these defiened T cell populations should allow the characterization of parasite antigen(s implicated in the induction of cellular immune responses beneficial for the host.Os resultados apresentados nesta revisão, sumariam uma série de experimentos planejados no sentido de caracterizar a resposta imune de linfócitos T de camundongos, para o protozoário parasita Leishmania tropica. Populações enriquecidas de linfócitos T e clones de linfócitos T específicos para antígenos de L. tropica foram derivados de gânglios linfáticos de camundongos primados e a seguir mantidos em cultura contínua in vivo. Ficou demonstrado que estes linfócitos T eram capazes de: A Expressar o fenótipo de superfície celular Lyt 1+ 2-, B Proliferar en vitro especificamente em resposta aos antígenos parasitários quando em presença de macrófagos singênicos irradiados, C Transferir uma resposta tipo hipersensibilidade retardada antiígeno especifico à camundongos normais singênicos, D Induzir ativação específica de macrófagos parasitizados in vitro

  17. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multicellular organism that is generally visible to the naked eye in its adult stages. Helminths can be ... with parasites such as Cyclospora and Cryptosporidium . (Also see " coccidian " and " sporulation .") Back To Top P Parasite: ...

  18. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources How to Find A Physician Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Statistics More Information Get Email Updates To receive ... often need special consideration when being treated for parasitic diseases in order to avoid harm to the fetus, ...

  19. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Parasites About Parasites Animals Blood Food Insects Water Education and Training CDC Bottle Bioassay References ... flowing water. It can cause itching and impaired vision in children, and lead to blindness in adulthood. ...

  20. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    ... be manipulated to develop therapeutic interventions against parasitic infection. For easy reference, the most commonly studied parasites are examined in individual chapters written by investigators at the forefront of their field...

  1. A transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression controls macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Anup; Bose, Mainak; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2013-11-01

    In mammalian macrophages, the expression of a number of cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Upon macrophage activation, proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs are translated, although the expression of miRNAs targeting these mRNAs remains largely unaltered. We show that there is a transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression during the early phase of the inflammatory response in macrophages, which leads to the protection of cytokine mRNAs from miRNA-mediated repression. This derepression occurs through Ago2 phosphorylation, which results in its impaired binding to miRNAs and to the corresponding target mRNAs. Macrophages expressing a mutant, non-phosphorylatable AGO2--which remains bound to miRNAs during macrophage activation--have a weakened inflammatory response and fail to prevent parasite invasion. These findings highlight the relevance of the transient relief of miRNA repression for macrophage function.

  2. Protein Kinase A Dependent Phosphorylation of Apical Membrane Antigen 1 Plays an Important Role in Erythrocyte Invasion by the Malaria Parasite

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstin Leykauf; Moritz Treeck; Gilson, Paul R.; Thomas Nebl; Thomas Braulke; Cowman, Alan F; Gilberger, Tim W; Brendan S Crabb

    2010-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are obligate intracellular parasites that infect a variety of hosts, causing significant diseases in livestock and humans. The invasive forms of the parasites invade their host cells by gliding motility, an active process driven by parasite adhesion proteins and molecular motors. A crucial point during host cell invasion is the formation of a ring-shaped area of intimate contact between the parasite and the host known as a tight junction. As the invasive zoite propels i...

  3. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  4. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-05

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs, activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  6. Characterization of metabolically quiescent Leishmania parasites in murine lesions using heavy water labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Kloehn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Information on the growth rate and metabolism of microbial pathogens that cause long-term chronic infections is limited, reflecting the absence of suitable tools for measuring these parameters in vivo. Here, we have measured the replication and physiological state of Leishmania mexicana parasites in murine inflammatory lesions using 2H2O labeling. Infected BALB/c mice were labeled with 2H2O for up to 4 months, and the turnover of parasite DNA, RNA, protein and membrane lipids estimated from the rate of deuterium enrichment in constituent pentose sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids, respectively. We show that the replication rate of parasite stages in these tissues is very slow (doubling time of ~12 days, but remarkably constant throughout lesion development. Lesion parasites also exhibit markedly lower rates of RNA synthesis, protein turnover and membrane lipid synthesis than parasite stages isolated from ex vivo infected macrophages or cultured in vitro, suggesting that formation of lesions induces parasites to enter a semi-quiescent physiological state. Significantly, the determined parasite growth rate accounts for the overall increase in parasite burden indicating that parasite death and turnover of infected host cells in these lesions is minimal. We propose that the Leishmania response to lesion formation is an important adaptive strategy that minimizes macrophage activation, providing a permissive environment that supports progressive expansion of parasite burden. This labeling approach can be used to measure the dynamics of other host-microbe interactions in situ.

  7. The P2X7 receptor and intracellular pathogens: a continuing struggle

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Corrêa, Gladys; Sater, Ali Abdul; Ojcius, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The purinergic receptor, P2X7, has recently emerged as an important component of the innate immune response against microbial infections. Ligation of P2X7 by ATP can stimulate inflammasome activation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, but it can also lead directly to killing of intracellular pathogens in infected macrophages and epithelial cells. Thus, while some intracellular pathogens evade host defense responses by modulating with membrane trafficking or cell signaling in the infe...

  8. Analysing intracellular deformation of polymer capsules using structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Yan, Yan; Noi, Ka Fung; Ping, Yuan; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces, which induce capsule deformation during cell uptake, vary between cell lines, indicating that the capsules are exposed to higher mechanical forces in HeLa cells, followed by RAW264.7 and then differentiated THP-1 cells. Our study demonstrates the use of super-resolution SIM in analysing intracellular capsule deformation, offering important insights into the cellular processing of drug carriers in cells and providing fundamental knowledge of intracellular mechanobiology. Furthermore, this study may aid in the design of novel drug carriers that are sensitive to deformation for enhanced drug release properties.Understanding the behaviour of therapeutic carriers is important in elucidating their mechanism of action and how they are processed inside cells. Herein we examine the intracellular deformation of layer-by-layer assembled polymer capsules using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Spherical- and cylindrical-shaped capsules were studied in three different cell lines, namely HeLa (human epithelial cell line), RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage cell line) and differentiated THP-1 (human monocyte-derived macrophage cell line). We observed that the deformation of capsules was dependent on cell line, but independent of capsule shape. This suggests that the mechanical forces

  9. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  10. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  11. The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii increases dopamine metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emese Prandovszky

    Full Text Available The highly prevalent parasite Toxoplasma gondii manipulates its host's behavior. In infected rodents, the behavioral changes increase the likelihood that the parasite will be transmitted back to its definitive cat host, an essential step in completion of the parasite's life cycle. The mechanism(s responsible for behavioral changes in the host is unknown but two lines of published evidence suggest that the parasite alters neurotransmitter signal transduction: the disruption of the parasite-induced behavioral changes with medications used to treat psychiatric disease (specifically dopamine antagonists and identification of a tyrosine hydroxylase encoded in the parasite genome. In this study, infection of mammalian dopaminergic cells with T. gondii enhanced the levels of K+-induced release of dopamine several-fold, with a direct correlation between the number of infected cells and the quantity of dopamine released. Immunostaining brain sections of infected mice with dopamine antibody showed intense staining of encysted parasites. Based on these analyses, T. gondii orchestrates a significant increase in dopamine metabolism in neural cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis, was also found in intracellular tissue cysts in brain tissue with antibodies specific for the parasite-encoded tyrosine hydroxylase. These observations provide a mechanism for parasite-induced behavioral changes. The observed effects on dopamine metabolism could also be relevant in interpreting reports of psychobehavioral changes in toxoplasmosis-infected humans.

  12. The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pain, A; Böhme, U; Berry, A E

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite ...

  13. Survival of Enterococcus faecalis in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry-Weeks, Claudia R.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn; Pikis, Andreas; Estay, Monica; Keith, Jerry M.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis was tested for the ability to persist in mouse peritoneal macrophages in two separate studies. In the first study, the intracellular survival of serum-passaged E. faecalis 418 and two isogenic mutants [cytolytic strain FA2-2(pAM714) and non-cytolytic strain FA2-2(pAM771)] was compared with that of Escherichia coli DH5α by infecting BALB/c mice intraperitoneally and then monitoring the survival of the bacteria within lavaged peritoneal macrophages over a 72-h period. All ...

  14. In vitro Leishmania major promastigote-induced macrophage migration is modulated by sensory and autonomic neuropeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, A A; Wahbi, A; Nordlind, K

    1998-01-01

    the chemotactic activities of live, killed and sonicated Leishmania major promastigotes and of the promastigote culture supernatant as well as the L. major surface protease gp63 towards a murine macrophage cell line, Raw 264.7, were investigated, using the Boyden technique. The sensory neuropeptides SOM, CGRP...... and SP, and the autonomic neuropeptides VIP and NPY, were also investigated for possible modulatory effects on this chemotaxis, using the living promastigotes. Living promastigotes were the most efficient attractants for macrophages compared with other forms of the parasites. Prior incubation...... of the macrophages with the parasites completely abolished the chemotactic activity. This might indicate that the living promastigote chemotaxis is a receptor-mediated process. On the other hand, paraformaldehyde-killed promastigotes not only failed to induce macrophage chemotaxis but also inhibited it in comparison...

  15. HIV-1 activates macrophages independent of Toll-like receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages provide an interface between innate and adaptive immunity and are important long-lived reservoirs for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1. Multiple genetic networks involved in regulating signal transduction cascades and immune responses in macrophages are coordinately modulated by HIV-1 infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate complex interrelated processes and to assemble an integrated view of activated signaling networks, a systems biology strategy was applied to genomic and proteomic responses by primary human macrophages over the course of HIV-1 infection. Macrophage responses, including cell cycle, calcium, apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, and cytokines/chemokines, to HIV-1 were temporally regulated, in the absence of cell proliferation. In contrast, Toll-like receptor (TLR pathways remained unaltered by HIV-1, although TLRs 3, 4, 7, and 8 were expressed and responded to ligand stimulation in macrophages. HIV-1 failed to activate phosphorylation of IRAK-1 or IRF-3, modulate intracellular protein levels of Mx1, an interferon-stimulated gene, or stimulate secretion of TNF, IL-1beta, or IL-6. Activation of pathways other than TLR was inadequate to stimulate, via cross-talk mechanisms through molecular hubs, the production of proinflammatory cytokines typical of a TLR response. HIV-1 sensitized macrophage responses to TLR ligands, and the magnitude of viral priming was related to virus replication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1 induced a primed, proinflammatory state, M1(HIV, which increased the responsiveness of macrophages to TLR ligands. HIV-1 might passively evade pattern recognition, actively inhibit or suppress recognition and signaling, or require dynamic interactions between macrophages and other cells, such as lymphocytes or endothelial cells. HIV-1 evasion of TLR recognition and simultaneous priming of macrophages may represent a strategy for viral survival, contribute

  16. Parasites: evolution's neurobiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Shelley Anne

    2013-01-01

    For millions of years, parasites have altered the behaviour of their hosts. Parasites can affect host behaviour by: (1) interfering with the host's normal immune-neural communication, (2) secreting substances that directly alter neuronal activity via non-genomic mechanisms and (3) inducing genomic- and/or proteomic-based changes in the brain of the host. Changes in host behaviour are often restricted to particular behaviours, with many other behaviours remaining unaffected. Neuroscientists can produce this degree of selectivity by targeting specific brain areas. Parasites, however, do not selectively attack discrete brain areas. Parasites typically induce a variety of effects in several parts of the brain. Parasitic manipulation of host behaviour evolved within the context of the manipulation of other host physiological systems (especially the immune system) that was required for a parasite's survival. This starting point, coupled with the fortuitous nature of evolutionary innovation and evolutionary pressures to minimize the costs of parasitic manipulation, likely contributed to the complex and indirect nature of the mechanisms involved in host behavioural control. Because parasites and neuroscientists use different tactics to control behaviour, studying the methods used by parasites can provide novel insights into how nervous systems generate and regulate behaviour. Studying how parasites influence host behaviour will also help us integrate genomic, proteomic and neurophysiological perspectives on behaviour.

  17. Leukotriene B4 modulates P2X7 receptor-mediated Leishmania amazonensis elimination in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Mariana M; Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Canetti, Cláudio; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2014-05-15

    ATP is an important signaling molecule in the immune system, and it is able to bind the P2X7 purinergic receptor. Recently, our group showed that ATP-treated macrophages eliminate Leishmania amazonensis. It has been reported that leukotriene B4 (LTB4) reduces the parasitic load of infected macrophages. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the P2X7 receptor can induce PLA2 activation and arachidonic acid mobilization. Based on these findings, we investigated whether LTB4 is produced upon P2X7 receptor activation and examined whether LTB4 modulates parasite elimination. Using macrophages lacking the P2X7 receptor, we observed that ATP was not able to reduce L. amazonensis load. This result suggests a role of the P2X7 purinergic receptor in parasite elimination. In addition, ATP was sufficient to induce LTB4 release from infected control macrophages but not from macrophages lacking the P2X7 receptor. Moreover, we found that ATP failed to decrease the parasitic load in 5-lipoxygenase (LO)-deficient macrophages. Treatment with the 5-LO inhibitor AA861 also impairs the ATP effect on parasitic loads. Furthermore, macrophages from 5-LO knockout mice eliminated L. amazonensis in the presence of exogenous LTB4, and macrophages obtained from P2X7 receptor knockout mice eliminated L. amazonensis when incubated with ionomycin. Finally, we demonstrated that in the presence of CP105696, an antagonist for LTB4 high-affinity receptor, ATP was not able to reduce parasitic load. These results indicate that P2X7 receptor activation leads to LTB4 formation, which is required for L. amazonensis elimination.

  18. Impact of Leishmania metalloprotease GP63 on macrophage signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Isnard, Amandine; Shio, Marina T.; Olivier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The intramacrophage protozoan parasites of Leishmania genus have developed sophisticated ways to subvert the innate immune response permitting their infection and propagation within the macrophages of the mammalian host. Several Leishmania virulence factors have been identified and found to be of importance for the development of leishmaniasis. However, recent findings are now further reinforcing the critical role played by the zinc-metalloprotease GP63 as a virulence factor that greatly infl...

  19. Cystatins of parasitic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Christian; Ziegler, Thomas; Daniłowicz-Luebert, Emilia; Hartmann, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily comprises several groups of protease inhibitors. In this chapter we will focus on I25 family members, which consist predominantly of the type 2 cystatins. Recently, a wealth of information on these molecules and their activities has been described. Parasite cystatins are shown to have dual functions via interaction with both parasite and host proteases. Thereby, parasite cystatins are not only essentially involved in the regulation of physiological processes during parasite development, but also represent important pathogenicity factors. Interestingly, some studies indicate that parasite cystatins evolved exceptional immuno-modulatory properties. these capacities could be exploited to interfere with unwanted immune responses in unrelated human inflammatory diseases. We highlight the different biological roles of parasite cystatins and the anticipated future developments.

  20. Evolution of intracellular compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2013-01-15

    Cells compartmentalize their biochemical functions in a variety of ways, notably by creating physical barriers that separate a compartment via membranes or proteins. Eukaryotes have a wide diversity of membrane-based compartments, many that are lineage- or tissue-specific. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that membrane-based compartmentalization of the cytosolic space is observed in multiple prokaryotic lineages, giving rise to several types of distinct prokaryotic organelles. Endosymbionts, previously believed to be a hallmark of eukaryotes, have been described in several bacteria. Protein-based compartments, frequent in bacteria, are also found in eukaryotes. In the present review, we focus on selected intracellular compartments from each of these three categories, membrane-based, endosymbiotic and protein-based, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We review their diversity and the current theories and controversies regarding the evolutionary origins. Furthermore, we discuss the evolutionary processes acting on the genetic basis of intracellular compartments and how those differ across the domains of life. We conclude that the distinction between eukaryotes and prokaryotes no longer lies in the existence of a compartmentalized cell plan, but rather in its complexity.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis exploits the PPM1A signaling pathway to block host macrophage apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Smith, Samuel R.; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Wolschendorf, Frank; Westfall, Andrew O.; Kutsch, Olaf; Sun, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The ability to suppress host macrophage apoptosis is essential for M. tuberculosis (Mtb) to replicate intracellularly while protecting it from antibiotic treatment. We recently described that Mtb infection upregulated expression of the host phosphatase PPM1A, which impairs the antibacterial response of macrophages. Here we establish PPM1A as a checkpoint target used by Mtb to suppress macrophage apoptosis. Overproduction of PPM1A suppressed apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages by a mechanism that involves inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Targeted depletion of PPM1A by shRNA or inhibition of PPM1A activity by sanguinarine restored JNK activation, resulting in increased apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages. We also demonstrate that activation of JNK by subtoxic concentrations of anisomycin induced selective apoptotic killing of Mtb-infected human macrophages, which was completely blocked in the presence of a specific JNK inhibitor. Finally, selective killing of Mtb-infected macrophages and subsequent bacterial release enabled rifampicin to effectively kill Mtb at concentrations that were insufficient to act against intracellular Mtb, providing proof of principle for the efficacy of a “release and kill” strategy. Taken together, these findings suggest that drug-induced selective apoptosis of Mtb-infected macrophages is achievable. PMID:28176854

  2. Foodborne parasites from wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    The majority of wild foods consumed by humans are sourced from intensively managed or semi-farmed populations. Management practices inevitably affect wildlife density and habitat characteristics, which are key elements in the transmission of parasites. We consider the risk of transmission...... of foodborne parasites to humans from wildlife maintained under natural or semi-natural conditions. A deeper understanding will be useful in counteracting foodborne parasites arising from the growing industry of novel and exotic foods....

  3. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethanol and isopropanol trigger rapid egress of intracellular Eimeria tenella sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinlei; Liu, Xianyong; Ji, Yongsheng; Tao, Geru; Suo, Xun

    2015-02-01

    Egress from host cells is a vital step of the intracellular life cycle of apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii. This phenomenon has attracted attentions from many research groups. Previous studies have shown that ethanol could stimulate the release of microneme proteins by elevating intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of T. gondii, resulting in the parasite egress from host cells. However, little information about egress is known on Eimeria species, the causative agent of coccidiosis in poultry and livestock. In this report, we studied the effect of ethanol and isopropanol on the egress of eimerian parasites. Eimeria tenella sporozoites cultured in primary chicken kidney cells were treated with ethanol and isopropanol, then the egressed parasites were analyzed. Ethanol and isopropanol could induce the rapid egress of E. tenella sporozoites from host cells. No substantial damage was found in parasite-egressed host cells. Compared to the freshly isolated sporozoites, the re-invading ability and reproductivity of the egressed parasites significantly decreased by 43.4 and 44.1 % individually. We also found that fewer sporozoites egressed from host cells when the parasites developed for a longer time before the alcohol treatment. These results demonstrate an in vitro egress mode different from that of T. gondii, facilitating the deciphering of the mechanisms of egress of eimerian parasites.

  5. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-05

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.  Created: 1/5/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM); Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/9/2012.

  6. Paraoxsonase2 (PON2) and oxidative stress involvement in pomegranate juice protection against cigarette smoke-induced macrophage cholesterol accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Aviram, Michael

    2016-11-25

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) promotes various stages of atherosclerosis development. Macrophages are the predominant cells in early atherogenesis, and the polyphenolic-rich pomegranate juice (PJ) is known for its protective role against macrophage atherogenicity. The aim of the current study was to examine the atherogenic effects of CS on macrophages, and to evaluate the protective effects of PJ against CS-induced macrophage atherogenicity. Murine J774A.1 macrophages were treated with CS-exposed medium in the absence or presence of PJ. Parameters of lipid peroxidation in CS-exposed medium were measured by the lipid peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assays. Atherogenicity of macrophages incubated with increasing concentrations of CS-exposed medium was assessed by cytotoxicity, oxidative stress determined by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using DCFH-DA, activity of the cellular anti-oxidant paraoxonase2 (PON2), macrophage accumulation of cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as through high density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux from the cells. CS exposure resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in lipid peroxides and TBARS medium levels (up to 3 and 8-fold, respectively). Incubation of macrophages with CS-exposed medium resulted in dose-dependent increases in macrophage damage/injury (up to 6-fold), intracellular ROS levels (up to 31%), PON2 activity (up to 2-fold), and macrophage cholesterol content (up to 24%). The latter might be explained by reduced HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from CS-exposed macrophages (by 21%). PJ protected macrophages from CS-induced increases in intracellular ROS levels and cholesterol accumulation, as well as the attenuated efflux of cholesterol. These data indicate that CS stimulates macrophage oxidation and activates PON2 as a possible compensatory response to the oxidative burden. CS impairs HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages leading to cellular

  7. The IFN-γ-inducible GTPase, Irga6, protects mice against Toxoplasma gondii but not against Plasmodium berghei and some other intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Liesenfeld

    Full Text Available Clearance of infection with intracellular pathogens in mice involves interferon-regulated GTPases of the IRG protein family. Experiments with mice genetically deficient in members of this family such as Irgm1(LRG-47, Irgm3(IGTP, and Irgd(IRG-47 has revealed a critical role in microbial clearance, especially for Toxoplasma gondii. The in vivo role of another member of this family, Irga6 (IIGP, IIGP1 has been studied in less detail. We investigated the susceptibility of two independently generated mouse strains deficient in Irga6 to in vivo infection with T. gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Leishmania mexicana, L. major, Listeria monocytogenes, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Plasmodium berghei. Compared with wild-type mice, mice deficient in Irga6 showed increased susceptibility to oral and intraperitoneal infection with T. gondii but not to infection with the other organisms. Surprisingly, infection of Irga6-deficient mice with the related apicomplexan parasite, P. berghei, did not result in increased replication in the liver stage and no Irga6 (or any other IRG protein was detected at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane in IFN-γ-induced wild-type cells infected with P. berghei in vitro. Susceptibility to infection with T. gondii was associated with increased mortality and reduced time to death, increased numbers of inflammatory foci in the brains and elevated parasite loads in brains of infected Irga6-deficient mice. In vitro, Irga6-deficient macrophages and fibroblasts stimulated with IFN-γ were defective in controlling parasite replication. Taken together, our results implicate Irga6 in the control of infection with T. gondii and further highlight the importance of the IRG system for resistance to this pathogen.

  8. The IFN-γ-Inducible GTPase, Irga6, Protects Mice against Toxoplasma gondii but Not against Plasmodium berghei and Some Other Intracellular Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong-Ji; Heinrich, Frederik; Muñoz, Melba; Kaiser, Frank; Aebischer, Toni; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Reichmann, Gaby; Utermöhlen, Olaf; von Stebut, Esther; von Loewenich, Friederike D.; Bogdan, Christian; Specht, Sabine; Saeftel, Michael; Hoerauf, Achim; Mota, Maria M.; Könen-Waisman, Stephanie; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Howard, Jonathan C.

    2011-01-01

    Clearance of infection with intracellular pathogens in mice involves interferon-regulated GTPases of the IRG protein family. Experiments with mice genetically deficient in members of this family such as Irgm1(LRG-47), Irgm3(IGTP), and Irgd(IRG-47) has revealed a critical role in microbial clearance, especially for Toxoplasma gondii. The in vivo role of another member of this family, Irga6 (IIGP, IIGP1) has been studied in less detail. We investigated the susceptibility of two independently generated mouse strains deficient in Irga6 to in vivo infection with T. gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Leishmania mexicana, L. major, Listeria monocytogenes, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Plasmodium berghei. Compared with wild-type mice, mice deficient in Irga6 showed increased susceptibility to oral and intraperitoneal infection with T. gondii but not to infection with the other organisms. Surprisingly, infection of Irga6-deficient mice with the related apicomplexan parasite, P. berghei, did not result in increased replication in the liver stage and no Irga6 (or any other IRG protein) was detected at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane in IFN-γ-induced wild-type cells infected with P. berghei in vitro. Susceptibility to infection with T. gondii was associated with increased mortality and reduced time to death, increased numbers of inflammatory foci in the brains and elevated parasite loads in brains of infected Irga6-deficient mice. In vitro, Irga6-deficient macrophages and fibroblasts stimulated with IFN-γ were defective in controlling parasite replication. Taken together, our results implicate Irga6 in the control of infection with T. gondii and further highlight the importance of the IRG system for resistance to this pathogen. PMID:21698150

  9. Exploring anti-bacterial compounds against intracellular Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Harrison

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an 'accidental' human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target.

  10. Exploring Anti-Bacterial Compounds against Intracellular Legionella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher F.; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Berschl, Kathrin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Ackermann, Nikolaus; Hedberg, Christian; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous fresh-water bacterium which reproduces within its erstwhile predators, environmental amoeba, by subverting the normal pathway of phagocytosis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms which confer resistance to amoeba are apparently conserved and also allow replication within macrophages. Thus, L. pneumophila can act as an ‘accidental’ human pathogen and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular localisation of L. pneumophila protects it from some antibiotics, and this fact must be taken into account to develop new anti-bacterial compounds. In addition, the intracellular lifestyle of L. pneumophila may render the bacteria susceptible to compounds diminishing bacterial virulence and decreasing intracellular survival and replication of this pathogen. The development of a single infection cycle intracellular replication assay using GFP-producing L. pneumophila and Acanthamoebacastellanii amoeba is reported here. This fluorescence-based assay allows for continuous monitoring of intracellular replication rates, revealing the effect of bacterial gene deletions or drug treatment. To examine how perturbations of the host cell affect L. pneumophila replication, several known host-targeting compounds were tested, including modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle scission and Ras GTPase localisation. Our results reveal a hitherto unrealized potential antibiotic property of the β-lactone-based Ras depalmitoylation inhibitor palmostatin M, but not the closely related inhibitor palmostatin B. Further characterisation indicated that this compound caused specific growth inhibition of Legionella and Mycobacterium species, suggesting that it may act on a common bacterial target. PMID:24058631

  11. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Casadevall Arturo; Alvarez Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the ...

  12. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  13. Entrance and survival of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett K Larsen

    Full Text Available Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis and cetaceans (B. ceti from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17 by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1, two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1, and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3 were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72-96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3, suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary.

  14. TLR signaling augments macrophage bactericidal activity through mitochondrial ROS

    OpenAIRE

    West, A. Phillip; Brodsky, Igor E.; Rahner, Christoph; Woo, Dong Kyun; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Walsh, Matthew C; Choi, Yongwon; Shadel, Gerald S.; Ghosh, Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential components of the innate immune response against intracellular bacteria, and it is thought that professional phagocytes generate ROS primarily via the phagosomal NADPH oxidase (Phox) machinery 1 . However, recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial ROS (mROS) also contribute to macrophage bactericidal activity, although the mechanisms linking innate immune signaling to mitochondria for mROS generation remain unclear 2-4 . Here we demonstrate t...

  15. [Macrophages in asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  16. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  17. Parasites and marine invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchin, M.E.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduced marine species are a major environmental and economic problem. The rate of these biological invasions has substantially increased in recent years due to the globalization of the world's economies. The damage caused by invasive species is often a result of the higher densities and larger sizes they attain compared to where they are native. A prominent hypothesis explaining the success of introduced species is that they are relatively free of the effects of natural enemies. Most notably, they may encounter fewer parasites in their introduced range compared to their native range. Parasites are ubiquitous and pervasive in marine systems, yet their role in marine invasions is relatively unexplored. Although data on parasites of marine organisms exist, the extent to which parasites can mediate marine invasions, or the extent to which invasive parasites and pathogens are responsible for infecting or potentially decimating native marine species have not been examined. In this review, we present a theoretical framework to model invasion success and examine the evidence for a relationship between parasite presence and the success of introduced marine species. For this, we compare the prevalence and species richness of parasites in several introduced populations of marine species with populations where they are native. We also discuss the potential impacts of introduced marine parasites on native ecosystems.

  18. PARASITES OF FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intent of this chapter is to describe the parasites of importance to fishes maintained and used in laboratory settings. In contrast to the frist edition, the focus will be only on those parasites that pose a serious threat to or are common in fishes held in these confined en...

  19. Parasites from the Past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Nejsum, Peter

    will investigate how the diversity of food-borne parasitic infections has changed with cultural and dietary habits, hunting practice and intensity of animal husbandry. This is done by isolating and typing ancient DNA remains from parasite eggs found in archeological samples from across Denmark....

  20. Parasite infections revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, G.F.; Forlenza, M.; Joerink, M.; Scharsack, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Studying parasites helps reveal basic mechanisms in immunology. For long this has been recognized for studies on the immune system of mice and man. But it is not true for immunological studies on fish. To support this argument we discuss selected examples of parasite infections not only in warm-bloo

  1. Interactions between Leishmania braziliensis and Macrophages Are Dependent on the Cytoskeleton and Myosin Va

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisama Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease with no effective vaccines. Actin, microtubules and the actin-based molecular motor myosin Va were investigated for their involvement in Leishmania braziliensis macrophage interactions. Results showed a decrease in the association index when macrophages were without F-actin or microtubules regardless of the activation state of the macrophage. In the absence of F-actin, the production of NO in non-activated cells increased, while in activated cells, the production of NO was reduced independent of parasites. The opposite effect of an increased NO production was observed in the absence of microtubules. In activated cells, the loss of cytoskeletal components inhibited the release of IL-10 during parasite interactions. The production of IL-10 also decreased in the absence of actin or microtubules in non-activated macrophages. Only the disruption of actin altered the production of TNF-α in activated macrophages. The expression of myosin Va tail resulted in an acute decrease in the association index between transfected macrophages and L. braziliensis promastigotes. These data reveal the importance of F-actin, microtubules, and myosin-Va suggesting that modulation of the cytoskeleton may be a mechanism used by L. braziliensis to overcome the natural responses of macrophages to establish infections.

  2. AIDS - associated parasitic diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of human immunodeficiency virus infection, with its profound and progressive effect on the cellular immune system, a group of human opportunistic pathogens has come into prominence. Opportunistic parasitic infection can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Because many of these infections are treatable, an early and accurate diagnosis is important. This can be accomplished by a variety of methods such as direct demonstration of parasites and by serological tests to detect antigen and/or specific antibodies. However, antibody response may be poor in these patients and therefore immunodiagnostic tests have to be interpreted with caution. Cryptosporidium parvum , Isospora belli , Cyclospora cayetanensis , Microsporidia, Entamoeba histolytica and Strongyloides stercoralis are the commonly detected parasites. Detection of these parasites will help in proper management of these patients because drugs are available for most of these parasitic infections.

  3. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acid mixture, (/sup 14/C)leucine, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and carrier-free /sup 32/P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli.

  4. Cell elasticity determines macrophage function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naimish R Patel

    Full Text Available Macrophages serve to maintain organ homeostasis in response to challenges from injury, inflammation, malignancy, particulate exposure, or infection. Until now, receptor ligation has been understood as being the central mechanism that regulates macrophage function. Using macrophages of different origins and species, we report that macrophage elasticity is a major determinant of innate macrophage function. Macrophage elasticity is modulated not only by classical biologic activators such as LPS and IFN-γ, but to an equal extent by substrate rigidity and substrate stretch. Macrophage elasticity is dependent upon actin polymerization and small rhoGTPase activation, but functional effects of elasticity are not predicted by examination of gene expression profiles alone. Taken together, these data demonstrate an unanticipated role for cell elasticity as a common pathway by which mechanical and biologic factors determine macrophage function.

  5. Bordetella pertussis modulates human macrophage defense gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Hugo Alberto; Oviedo, Juan Marcos; Gorgojo, Juan Pablo; Lamberti, Yanina; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough, still causes outbreaks. We recently found evidence that B. pertussis can survive and even replicate inside human macrophages, indicating that this host cell might serve as a niche for persistence. In this work, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) that differentiates into macrophages in culture in order to investigate the host cell response to the infection and the mechanisms that promote that intracellular survival. To that end, we investigated the expression profile of a selected number of genes involved in cellular bactericidal activity and the inflammatory response during the early and late phases of infection. The bactericidal and inflammatory response of infected macrophages was progressively downregulated, while the number of THP-1 cells heavily loaded with live bacteria increased over time postinfection. Two of the main toxins of B. pertussis, pertussis toxin (Ptx) and adenylate cyclase (CyaA), were found to be involved in manipulating the host cell response. Therefore, failure to express either toxin proved detrimental to the development of intracellular infections by those bacteria. Taken together, these results support the relevance of host defense gene manipulation to the outcome of the interaction between B. pertussis and macrophages.

  6. Towards an unbiased metabolic profiling of protozoan parasites : optimisation of a Leishmania sampling protocol for HILIC-orbitrap analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    t'Kindt, Ruben; Jankevics, Andris; Scheltema, Richard A.; Zheng, Liang; Watson, David G.; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Breitling, Rainer; Coombs, Graham H.; Decuypere, Saskia; Kindt, Ruben t’

    2010-01-01

    Comparative metabolomics of Leishmania species requires the simultaneous identification and quantification of a large number of intracellular metabolites. Here, we describe the optimisation of a comprehensive metabolite extraction protocol for Leishmania parasites and the subsequent optimisation of

  7. Identification of host-targeted small molecules that restrict intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Stanley

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant threat to global health. Macrophages are the host cell for M. tuberculosis infection, and although bacteria are able to replicate intracellularly under certain conditions, it is also clear that macrophages are capable of killing M. tuberculosis if appropriately activated. The outcome of infection is determined at least in part by the host-pathogen interaction within the macrophage; however, we lack a complete understanding of which host pathways are critical for bacterial survival and replication. To add to our understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracellular infection, we performed a chemical screen using a high-content microscopic assay to identify small molecules that restrict mycobacterial growth in macrophages by targeting host functions and pathways. The identified host-targeted inhibitors restrict bacterial growth exclusively in the context of macrophage infection and predominantly fall into five categories: G-protein coupled receptor modulators, ion channel inhibitors, membrane transport proteins, anti-inflammatories, and kinase modulators. We found that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, enhances secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and induces autophagy in infected macrophages, and gefitinib, an inhibitor of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, also activates autophagy and restricts growth. We demonstrate that during infection signaling through EGFR activates a p38 MAPK signaling pathway that prevents macrophages from effectively responding to infection. Inhibition of this pathway using gefitinib during in vivo infection reduces growth of M. tuberculosis in the lungs of infected mice. Our results support the concept that screening for inhibitors using intracellular models results in the identification of tool compounds for probing pathways during in vivo infection and may also result in the identification of new anti

  8. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) associates with NADPH oxidase and is required for phagocytosis of Leishmania chagasi promastigotes by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Célio X C; Stolf, Beatriz S; Takemoto, Paulo V A; Amanso, Angélica M; Lopes, Lucia R; Souza, Edna B; Goto, Hiro; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2009-10-01

    PDI, a redox chaperone, is involved in host cell uptake of bacteria/viruses, phagosome formation, and vascular NADPH oxidase regulation. PDI involvement in phagocyte infection by parasites has been poorly explored. Here, we investigated the role of PDI in in vitro infection of J774 macrophages by amastigote and promastigote forms of the protozoan Leishmania chagasi and assessed whether PDI associates with the macrophage NADPH oxidase complex. Promastigote but not amastigote phagocytosis was inhibited significantly by macrophage incubation with thiol/PDI inhibitors DTNB, bacitracin, phenylarsine oxide, and neutralizing PDI antibody in a parasite redox-dependent way. Binding assays indicate that PDI preferentially mediates parasite internalization. Bref-A, an ER-Golgi-disrupting agent, prevented PDI concentration in an enriched macrophage membrane fraction and promoted a significant decrease in infection. Promastigote phagocytosis was increased further by macrophage overexpression of wild-type PDI and decreased upon transfection with an antisense PDI plasmid or PDI siRNA. At later stages of infection, PDI physically interacted with L. chagasi, as revealed by immunoprecipitation data. Promastigote uptake was inhibited consistently by macrophage preincubation with catalase. Additionally, loss- or gain-of-function experiments indicated that PMA-driven NADPH oxidase activation correlated directly with PDI expression levels. Close association between PDI and the p22phox NADPH oxidase subunit was shown by confocal colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation. These results provide evidence that PDI not only associates with phagocyte NADPH oxidase but also that PDI is crucial for efficient macrophage infection by L. chagasi.

  9. Macrophage models of Gaucher disease for evaluating disease pathogenesis and candidate drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-06-11

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development.

  10. Quercetin uptake and metabolism by murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Jung Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin (Q, a bioflavonoid ubiquitously distributed in vegetables, fruits, leaves, and grains, can be absorbed, transported, and excreted after oral intake. However, little is known about Q uptake and metabolism by macrophages. To clarify the puzzle, Q at its noncytotoxic concentration (44μM was incubated without or with mouse peritoneal macrophages for different time periods. Medium alone, extracellular, and intracellular fluids of macrophages were collected to detect changes in Q and its possible metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that Q was unstable and easily oxidized in either the absence or the presence of macrophages. The remaining Q and its metabolites, including isorhamnetin and an unknown Q metabolite [possibly Q– (O-semiquinone], might be absorbed by macrophages. The percentage of maximal Q uptake by macrophages was found to be 2.28% immediately after incubation; however, Q uptake might persist for about 24 hours. Q uptake by macrophages was greater than the uptake of its methylated derivative isorhamnetin. As Q or its metabolites entered macrophages, those compounds were metabolized primarily into isorhamnetin, kaempferol, or unknown endogenous Q metabolites. The present study, which aimed to clarify cellular uptake and metabolism of Q by macrophages, may have great potential for future practical applications for human health and immunopharmacology.

  11. New Data on Human Macrophages Polarization by Hymenolepis diminuta Tapeworm—An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Basałaj, Katarzyna; Strojny, Barbara; Młocicki, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Helminths and their products can suppress the host immune response to escape host defense mechanisms and establish chronic infections. Current studies indicate that macrophages play a key role in the immune response to pathogen invasion. They can be polarized into two distinct phenotypes: M1 and M2. The present paper examines the impact of the adult Hymenolepis diminuta (HD) tapeworm and its excretory/secretory products (ESP) on THP-1 macrophages. Monocytes were differentiated into macrophages and cultured with a living parasite or its ESP. Our findings indicate that HD and ESP have a considerable impact on human THP-1 macrophages. Macrophages treated with parasite ESP (with or without LPS) demonstrated reduced expression of cytokines (i.e., IL-1α, TNFα, TGFβ, IL-10) and chemokines (i.e., IL-8, MIP-1α, RANTES, and IL-1ra), while s-ICAM and CxCL10 expression rose after ESP stimulation. In addition, inflammatory factor expression rose significantly when macrophages were exposed to living parasites. Regarding induced and repressed pathways, significant differences were found between HD and ESP concerning their influence on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, STAT2, STAT3, AMPKα1, Akt 1/2/3 S473, Hsp60, and Hck. The superior immunosuppressive properties of ESP compared to HD were demonstrated with lower levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23, and IL-12p70 following stimulation. The presence of HD and its ESP were found to stimulate mixed M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes. Our findings indicate new molecular mechanisms involved in the response of human macrophages to tapeworm infection, this could be a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms underlying the processes of immune regulation during cestodiasis. PMID:28265273

  12. A sensitive flow cytometric methodology for studying the binding of L. chagasi to canine peritoneal macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosser David M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Leishmania promastigote-macrophage interaction occurs through the association of multiple receptors on the biological membrane surfaces. The success of the parasite infection is dramatically dependent on this early interaction in the vertebrate host, which permits or not the development of the disease. In this study we propose a novel methodology using flow cytometry to study this interaction, and compare it with a previously described "in vitro" binding assay. Methods To study parasite-macrophage interaction, peritoneal macrophages were obtained from 4 dogs and adjusted to 3 × 106 cells/mL. Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi parasites (stationary-phase were adjusted to 5 × 107 cells/mL. The interaction between CFSE-stained Leishmania chagasi and canine peritoneal macrophages was performed in polypropylene tubes to avoid macrophage adhesion. We carried out assays in the presence or absence of normal serum or in the presence of a final concentration of 5% of C5 deficient (serum from AKR/J mice mouse serum. Then, the number of infected macrophages was counted in an optical microscope, as well as by flow citometry. Macrophages obtained were stained with anti-CR3 (CD11b/CD18 antibodies and analyzed by flow citometry. Results Our results have shown that the interaction between Leishmania and macrophages can be measured by flow cytometry using the fluorescent dye CFSE to identify the Leishmania, and measuring simultaneously the expression of an important integrin involved in this interaction: the CD11b/CD18 (CR3 or Mac-1 β2 integrin. Conclusion Flow cytometry offers rapid, reliable and sensitive measurements of single cell interactions with Leishmania in unstained or phenotypically defined cell populations following staining with one or more fluorochromes.

  13. [Parasitism and ecological parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Parasitism as one of the life modes is a general biological phenomenon and is a characteristic of all viruses, many taxa of bacteria, fungi, protists, metaphytes, and metazoans. Zooparasitology is focused on studies of parasitic animals, particularly, on their taxonomy, anatomy, life cycles, host-parasite relations, biocoenotic connections, and evolution. Ecological parasitology is a component of ecology, as the scientific study of the relation of living organisms with each other and their surroundings. In the present paper, critical analysis of the problems, main postulates, and terminology of the modern ecological parasitology is given.

  14. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  15. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain by molecular techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, M C; Palenque, E; Navarro, M C; Nuñez, M C; Rebollo, M J; Garcia, M J

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members.

  16. [Present status and new approach to anti-parasite therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touze, J E

    New highly effective molecules have been developed for the treatment of human parasites due to the development resistances and newly described types of parasitosis. In man as in animals, chemoresistant strains of parasites are rare, even for Plasmodium species where decreased sensibility has been observed basically due to monotherapies given for too short periods. Many resistance mechanisms have been elucidated. Most antiparasite drugs are metabolized in the liver and alterations in the mitochondrial oxidative system, particularly in hepatic fasciolasis and amibiasis, may limit the production of active derivatives. Modifications in the host-parasite relations may also have an effect as has been observed in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Several approaches suggest new therapeutic perspectives. Since most protozoa require large amounts of energy to maintain motility and asexual reproduction, blocking aerobic glycolysis has been suggested but is limited by toxic effects. Blocking protein metabolism is another possibility since intracellular protozoa cannot synthesize purines. Parasites also rely on the host for cholesterol, phospholipids and other lipids and blocking their uptake into the parasite is another possibility. Promising results have been obtained in vitro against Plasmodium berghei and P. chabaudi. Other approaches include inhibiting drug outflow from the parasite incapable of metabolizing it. Nonesense oligonuclides could be coupled with active drugs and induce irreparable damage to the parasite. In addition to these new therapeutic possibilities, better use of traditional drugs should be emphasized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  18. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  19. Metabolomics and protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Timothy; Haroune, Nicolas; Bagchi, Sushmita; Jarroll, Edward

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we examine the state-of-the-art technologies (gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, etc.) in the well-established area of metabolomics especially as they relate to protozoan parasites.

  20. Transfection of malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, A P; Thomas, A W; van Dijk, M R; Janse, C J

    1997-10-01

    The stable genetic transformation of three phylogenetically diverse species of Plasmodium, the parasitic etiological agent of malaria, is now possible. The parasite is haploid throughout the vast majority of its life cycle. Therefore with the single selectable marker activity and protocols currently available, it is possible not only to express introduced transgenes but also to study the effects of site-specific homologous recombination such as gene knockout. Transgene expression will allow the detailed study of many aspects of the cellular biology of malaria parasites, for example, the mechanisms underlying drug resistance and protein trafficking. We describe here the methods for propagation of the two animal models (Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium knowlesi) and for transfection of these two species and the human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Examples of transgene expression are given.

  1. Leishmania mexicana infection induces IgG to parasite surface glycoinositol phospholipids that can induce IL-10 in mice and humans.

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    Laurence U Buxbaum

    Full Text Available Infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana causes chronic disease in C57BL/6 mice, in which cutaneous lesions persist for many months with high parasite burdens (10(7-10(8 parasites. This chronic disease process requires host IL-10 and FcγRIII. When Leishmania amastigotes are released from cells, surface-bound IgG can induce IL-10 and suppress IL-12 production from macrophages. These changes decrease IFN-γ from T cells and nitric oxide production in infected cells, which are both required for Leishmania control. However, antibodies targets and the kinetics of antibody production are unknown. Several groups have been unsuccessful in identifying amastigote surface proteins that bind IgG. We now show that glycoinositol phospholipids (GIPLs of L. mexicana are recognized by mouse IgG1 by 6 weeks of infection, with a rapid increase between 12 and 16 weeks, consistent with the timing of chronic disease in C57BL/6 mice vs. healing in FcγRIII-deficient mice. A single prominent spot on TLC is recognized by IgG, and the glycolipid is a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol containing a branched mannose structure. We show that the lipid structure of the GIPL (the sn-2 fatty acid is required for antibody recognition. This GIPL is abundant in L. mexicana amastigotes, rare in stationary-phase promastigotes, and absent in L. major, consistent with a role for antibodies to GIPLs in chronic disease. A mouse monoclonal anti-GIPL IgG recognizes GIPLs on the parasite surface, and induces IL-10 from macrophages. The current work also extends this mouse analysis to humans, finding that L. mexicana-infected humans with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis have antibodies that recognize GIPLs, can bind to the surface of amastigotes, and can induce IL-10 from human monocytes. Further characterization of the target glycolipids will have important implications for drug and vaccine development and will elucidate the poorly understood role of

  2. LOX-1 in macrophage migration in response to ox-LDL and the involvement of calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Ding, Zufeng; Lin, Juntang; Guo, Zhikun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2015-11-06

    Previous studies have shown that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) inhibits macrophage migration, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. Lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor that is expressed in macrophages and binds ox-LDL. Calpains, a family of calcium-dependent proteases, influence several aspects of cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of LOX-1 in macrophage migration in response to ox-LDL and the involvement of calpains in this process. Peritoneal macrophages from wild type C57BL/6 mice were exposed to different concentrations of ox-LDL (1-20 μg/mL), and expression of LOX-1 and calpain-1 and -2, cell migration and intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)in) were measured. Our results showed that ox-LDL stimulated LOX-1 and calpain-2 expression, and inhibited calpain-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, ox-LDL inhibited macrophage migration and increased Ca(2+)in concentration in macrophages. To further elucidate the role of LOX-1 in ox-LDL-impaired macrophage migration, we isolated peritoneal macrophages from LOX-1 knockout mice, and treated them with ox-LDL. Interestingly, calpain-1 expression was much higher, and calpain-2 expression was lower in LOX-1 knockout macrophages than in wild-type macrophages following exposure to ox-LDL. LOX-1 deletion significantly improved macrophage migration and decreased Ca(2+)in concentration. These data indicate that LOX-1 is, at least in part, responsible for the inhibitory effect of ox-LDL on macrophage migration and this process involves calpain-1 and -2.

  3. Ciprofloxacin nano-niosomes for targeting intracellular infections: an in vitro evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Vajihe; Abedi, Daryoush [Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pardakhty, Abbas [Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Pharmaceutics Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat, E-mail: sadeghi@pharm.mui.ac.ir [Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In order to propose non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) for the treatment of intracellular infections, a remote loading method (active drug encapsulation) followed by sonication was used to prepare nano-niosome formulations containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Size analysis, size distribution and zeta potentials of niosomes were evaluated and then their antimicrobial activity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular distribution, and antibacterial activity against intracellular Staphylococcus aureus infection of murine macrophage-like, J774, cells were investigated in comparison to free drug. Our findings reveal that size and composition of the niosome formula can influence their in vitro biological properties. Vesicles in the 300-600 nm size range were phagocytosed to a greater degree by macrophages in comparison to other size vesicles. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPFX-loaded niosomes were two to eightfold lower than MICs of free CPFX. In addition, niosome encapsulation of CPFX provided high intracellular antimicrobial activities while free CPFX is ineffective for eradicating intracellular forms of S. aureus. Encapsulation of CPFX in niosomes generally decreased its in vitro cytotoxicity. Our results show that niosomes are suitable drug delivery systems with good efficacy and safety properties to be proposed for drug targeting against intracellular infections.

  4. Ciprofloxacin nano-niosomes for targeting intracellular infections: an in vitro evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Vajihe; Abedi, Daryoush; Pardakhty, Abbas; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat

    2013-04-01

    In order to propose non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) for the treatment of intracellular infections, a remote loading method (active drug encapsulation) followed by sonication was used to prepare nano-niosome formulations containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX). Size analysis, size distribution and zeta potentials of niosomes were evaluated and then their antimicrobial activity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, intracellular distribution, and antibacterial activity against intracellular Staphylococcus aureus infection of murine macrophage-like, J774, cells were investigated in comparison to free drug. Our findings reveal that size and composition of the niosome formula can influence their in vitro biological properties. Vesicles in the 300-600 nm size range were phagocytosed to a greater degree by macrophages in comparison to other size vesicles. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CPFX-loaded niosomes were two to eightfold lower than MICs of free CPFX. In addition, niosome encapsulation of CPFX provided high intracellular antimicrobial activities while free CPFX is ineffective for eradicating intracellular forms of S. aureus. Encapsulation of CPFX in niosomes generally decreased its in vitro cytotoxicity. Our results show that niosomes are suitable drug delivery systems with good efficacy and safety properties to be proposed for drug targeting against intracellular infections.

  5. Pathoecology of Chiribaya parasitism

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    Martinson Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The excavations of Chiribaya culture sites in the Osmore drainage of southern Peru focused on the recovery of information about prehistoric disease, including parasitism. The archaeologists excavated human, dog, guinea pig, and llama mummies. These mummies were analyzed for internal and external parasites. The results of the analysis and reconstruction of prehistoric life from the excavations allows us to interpret the pathoecology of the Chiribaya culture.

  6. EXPOSURE TO SWINE HOUSING DUST MODULATES MACROPHAGE MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth J. Pender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine Confinement Facility (SCF dust consists of a complex mixture of feed grain particles, bacterial components, organic particulates and gases. When these particles are inhaled they deposit along the respiratory tract and mediate respiratory symptoms and disease in swine farmers and facility workers. Macrophages ingest and eliminate microbes and debris under chronic conditions; however, the role of macrophages in agricultural-related respiratory disease has not been fully elucidated. The goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that chronic exposure to SCF dust causes inflammation by modulating pulmonary protein levels and macrophage function. Balb/c mice were exposed to 5, 12.5 and 25% SCF Dust Extract (DE via nebulization 30 min/day five days a week, for eight weeks with weekends excluded. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF was collected and analyzed for protein concentration, leukocyte distribution and macrophage morphology. For comparison, THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to 0.1-10% DE overnight and evaluated for phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species production. Repeated exposure to DE via nebulizer caused a significant increase in protein concentration and inflammatory cell number, namely macrophages, in a dose-dependent manner within the lung as compared to controls. Macrophages with pseudopods and vacuoles were the most abundant leukocytes within BALF of mice exposed to DE. Similarly, in vitro studies with 10% DE treated THP-1 cells revealed enhanced phagocytosis (p<0.05, pseudopodia and vacuolization following exposure to compared to control cells. In addition, there were time- and dose-dependent increases of intracellular ROS production by THP-1 cells exposed to 5 and 10% DE compared to control (p<0.01. These findings indicate repeated, long-term inhalation of swine confinement facility dust may mediate chronic airway and lung inflammation through modulation of protein concentration and macrophage function. The aerosolized dust

  7. Cytoplasmic free Ca2+ is essential for multiple steps in malaria parasite egress from infected erythrocytes

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    Glushakova Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Egress of Plasmodium falciparum, from erythrocytes at the end of its asexual cycle and subsequent parasite invasion into new host cells, is responsible for parasite dissemination in the human body. The egress pathway is emerging as a coordinated multistep programme that extends in time for tens of minutes, ending with rapid parasite extrusion from erythrocytes. While the Ca2+ regulation of the invasion of P. falciparum in erythrocytes is well established, the role of Ca2+ in parasite egress is poorly understood. This study analysed the involvement of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ in infected erythrocytes during the multistep egress programme of malaria parasites. Methods Live-cell fluorescence microscopy was used to image parasite egress from infected erythrocytes, assessing the effect of drugs modulating Ca2+ homeostasis on the egress programme. Results A steady increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ is found to precede parasite egress. This increase is independent of extracellular Ca2+ for at least the last two hours of the cycle, but is dependent upon Ca2+ release from internal stores. Intracellular BAPTA chelation of Ca2+ within the last 45 minutes of the cycle inhibits egress prior to parasitophorous vacuole swelling and erythrocyte membrane poration, two characteristic morphological transformations preceding parasite egress. Inhibitors of the parasite endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-ATPase accelerate parasite egress, indicating that Ca2+ stores within the ER are sufficient in supporting egress. Markedly accelerated egress of apparently viable parasites was achieved in mature schizonts using Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Ionophore treatment overcomes the BAPTA-induced block of parasite egress, confirming that free Ca2+ is essential in egress initiation. Ionophore treatment of immature schizonts had an adverse effect inducing parasitophorous vacuole swelling and killing the parasites within the host cell. Conclusions The parasite egress

  8. Intracellular replication-deficient Leishmania donovani induces long lasting protective immunity against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Nylen, Susanne; Duncan, Robert; Sacks, David; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2009-08-01

    No vaccine is currently available for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. This study addresses whether a live attenuated centrin gene-deleted L. donovani (LdCen1(-/-)) parasite can persist and be both safe and protective in animals. LdCen1(-/-) has a defect in amastigote replication both in vitro and ex vivo in human macrophages. Safety was shown by the lack of parasites in spleen and liver in susceptible BALB/c mice, immune compromised SCID mice, and human VL model hamsters 10 wk after infection. Mice immunized with LdCen1(-/-) showed early clearance of virulent parasite challenge not seen in mice immunized with heat killed parasites. Upon virulent challenge, the immunized mice displayed in the CD4(+) T cell population a significant increase of single and multiple cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF) producing cells and IFN-gamma/IL10 ratio. Immunized mice also showed increased IgG2a immunoglobulins and NO production in macrophages. These features indicated a protective Th1-type immune response. The Th1 response correlated with a significantly reduced parasite burden in the spleen and no parasites in the liver compared with naive mice 10 wk post challenge. Protection was observed, when challenged even after 16 wk post immunization, signifying a sustained immunity. Protection by immunization with attenuated parasites was also seen in hamsters. Immunization with LdCen1(-/-) also cross-protected mice against infection with L. braziliensis that causes mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Results indicate that LdCen1(-/-) can be a safe and effective vaccine candidate against VL as well as mucocutaneous leishmaniasis causing parasites.

  9. Echinacea purpurea Extract Polarizes M1 Macrophages in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Through the Activation of JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Aikun; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yanping; Chen, Hongliang; Zheng, Shasha; Li, Yali; Xu, Xin; Li, Weifen

    2017-09-01

    Echinacea purpurea is an indigenous North American purple cone flower used by North Americans for treatment of various infectious diseases and wounds. This study investigated the effect of polysaccharide enriched extract of Echinacea purpurea (EE) on the polarization of macrophages. The results showed that 100 µg/mL of EE could markedly activate the macrophage by increasing the expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, EE upregulated the markers of classically activated macrophages (M1) such as CCR7 and the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p70, TNF-αand NO. The functional tests showed that EE enhanced the phagocytic and intracellular bactericidal activity of macrophage against ST. Furthermore, we demonstrated that JNK are required for EE-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production. Together, these results demonstrated that EE can polarize macrophages towards M1 phenotype, which is dependent on the JNK signaling pathways. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2664-2671, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Parasites and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  11. Replication of Yersinia pestis in interferon gamma-activated macrophages requires ripA, a gene encoded in the pigmentation locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Céline; Grabenstein, Jens P; Perry, Robert D; Bliska, James B

    2005-09-06

    Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that can replicate in macrophages. Little is known about the mechanism by which Y. pestis replicates in macrophages, and macrophage defense mechanisms important for limiting intracellular survival of Y. pestis have not been characterized. In this work, we investigated the ability of Y. pestis to replicate in primary murine macrophages that were activated with IFN-gamma. Y. pestis was able to replicate in macrophages that were activated with IFN-gamma after infection (postactivated). A region of chromosomal DNA known as the pigmentation (pgm) locus was required for replication in postactivated macrophages, and this replication was associated with reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels but not with reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression. Y. pestis delta pgm replicated in iNOS-/- macrophages that were postactivated with IFN-gamma, suggesting that killing of delta pgm Y. pestis is NO-dependent. A specific genetic locus within pgm, which shares similarity to a pathogenicity island in Salmonella, was shown to be required for replication of Y. pestis and restriction of NO levels in postactivated macrophages. These data demonstrate that intracellular Y. pestis can evade killing by macrophages that are exposed to IFN-gamma and identify a potential virulence gene encoded in the pgm locus that is required for this activity.

  12. Parasites in marine food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Most species interactions probably involve parasites. This review considers the extent to which marine ecologists should consider parasites to fully understand marine communities. Parasites are influential parts of food webs in estuaries, temperate reefs, and coral reefs, but their ecological importance is seldom recognized. Though difficult to observe, parasites can have substantial biomass, and they can be just as common as free-living consumers after controlling for body mass and trophic level. Parasites have direct impacts on the energetics of their hosts and some affect host behaviors, with ecosystem-level consequences. Although they cause disease, parasites are sensitive components of ecosystems. In particular, they suffer secondary extinctions due to biodiversity loss. Some parasites can also return to a system after habitat restoration. For these reasons, parasites can make good indicators of ecosystem integrity. Fishing can indirectly increase or decrease parasite populations and the effects of climate change on parasites are likely to be equally as complex.

  13. Inflammasomes in host response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Dario S; Lima-Junior, Djalma S

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric complexes of proteins that are assembled in the host cell cytoplasm in response to specific stress signals or contamination of the cytoplasm by microbial molecules. The canonical inflammasomes are composed of at least three main components: an inflammatory caspase (caspase-1, caspase-11), an adapter molecule (such as ASC), and a sensor protein (such as NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP12, NAIP1, NAIP2, NAIP5, or AIM2). The sensor molecule determines the inflammasome specificity by detecting specific microbial products or cell stress signals. Upon activation, these molecular platforms facilitate restriction of microbial replication and trigger an inflammatory form of cell death called pyroptosis, thus accounting for the genesis of inflammatory processes. Inflammasome activation has been widely reported in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, recent reports have highlighted the important role of the inflammasomes in the host response to the pathogenesis of infections caused by intracellular protozoan parasites. Herein, we review the activation and specific roles of inflammasomes in recognition and host responses to intracellular protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., and Leishmania spp.

  14. The Salmonella effector AvrA mediates bacterial intracellular survival during infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huixia; Jones, Rheinallt M; Neish, Andrew S

    2012-01-01

    The enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium secretes the preformed AvrA effector protein into host cells. This acetyltransferase has been shown to modulate mammalian intestinal immune and survival responses by inhibition of JNK MAPK. To study the role of this effector in natural enteric infection, we used a mouse model to compare wild-type S. typhimurium to an isogenic AvrA null Salmonella mutant. Salmonella lacking AvrA induced increased intestinal inflammation, more intense systemic cytokine responses, and increased apoptosis in epithelial cells. Increased apoptosis was also observed in extra epithelial macrophages. AvrA null-infected mice consistently showed higher bacterial burden within mucosal lymphoid tissues, spleen and liver by 5 days post infection, which indicated a more severe clinical course. To study the molecular mechanisms involved, recombinant adenoviruses expressing AvrA or mutant AvrA proteins were constructed, which showed appropriate expression and mediated the expected inhibition of JNK signalling. Cultured epithelial cells and macrophages transduced with AvrA expressing adenovirus were protected from apoptosis induced by exogenous stimuli. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that Salmonella AvrA modulates survival of infected macrophages likely via JNK suppression, and prevents macrophage death and rapid bacterial dissemination. AvrA suppression of apoptosis in infected macrophages may allow for establishment of a stable intracellular niche typical of intracellular pathogens.

  15. An Historical Perspective on How Advances in Microscopic Imaging Contributed to Understanding the Leishmania Spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Host-Parasite Relationship

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    P. T. V. Florentino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature has identified complex aspects of intracellular host-parasite relationships, which require systematic, nonreductionist approaches and spatial/temporal information. Increasing and integrating temporal and spatial dimensions in host cell imaging have contributed to elucidating several conceptual gaps in the biology of intracellular parasites. To access and investigate complex and emergent dynamic events, it is mandatory to follow them in the context of living cells and organs, constructing scientific images with integrated high quality spatiotemporal data. This review discusses examples of how advances in microscopy have challenged established conceptual models of the intracellular life cycles of Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi protozoan parasites.

  16. Opposing Biological Functions of Tryptophan Catabolizing Enzymes During Intracellular Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divanovic, Senad; Sawtell, Nancy M.; Trompette, Aurelien; Warning, Jamie I.; Dias, Alexandra; Cooper, Andrea M.; Yap, George S.; Arditi, Moshe; Shimada, Kenichi; DuHadaway, James B.; Prendergast, George C.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Mellor, Andrew L.; Munn, David H.; Aliberti, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have underscored physiological and pathophysiological roles for the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in immune counterregulation. However, IDO was first recognized as an antimicrobial effector, restricting tryptophan availability to Toxoplasma gondii and other pathogens in vitro. The biological relevance of these findings came under question when infectious phenotypes were not forthcoming in IDO-deficient mice. The recent discovery of an IDO homolog, IDO-2, suggested that the issue deserved reexamination. IDO inhibition during murine toxoplasmosis led to 100% mortality, with increased parasite burdens and no evident effects on the immune response. Similar studies revealed a counterregulatory role for IDO during leishmaniasis (restraining effector immune responses and parasite clearance), and no evident role for IDO in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Thus, IDO plays biologically important roles in the host response to diverse intracellular infections, but the dominant nature of this role—antimicrobial or immunoregulatory—is pathogen-specific. PMID:21990421

  17. Computational modeling and analysis of iron release from macrophages.

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    Alka A Potdar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A major process of iron homeostasis in whole-body iron metabolism is the release of iron from the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Macrophages recognize and phagocytose senescent or damaged erythrocytes. Then, they process the heme iron, which is returned to the circulation for reutilization by red blood cell precursors during erythropoiesis. The amount of iron released, compared to the amount shunted for storage as ferritin, is greater during iron deficiency. A currently accepted model of iron release assumes a passive-gradient with free diffusion of intracellular labile iron (Fe2+ through ferroportin (FPN, the transporter on the plasma membrane. Outside the cell, a multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (Cp, oxidizes ferrous to ferric ion. Apo-transferrin (Tf, the primary carrier of soluble iron in the plasma, binds ferric ion to form mono-ferric and di-ferric transferrin. According to the passive-gradient model, the removal of ferrous ion from the site of release sustains the gradient that maintains the iron release. Subcellular localization of FPN, however, indicates that the role of FPN may be more complex. By experiments and mathematical modeling, we have investigated the detailed mechanism of iron release from macrophages focusing on the roles of the Cp, FPN and apo-Tf. The passive-gradient model is quantitatively analyzed using a mathematical model for the first time. A comparison of experimental data with model simulations shows that the passive-gradient model cannot explain macrophage iron release. However, a facilitated-transport model associated with FPN can explain the iron release mechanism. According to the facilitated-transport model, intracellular FPN carries labile iron to the macrophage membrane. Extracellular Cp accelerates the oxidation of ferrous ion bound to FPN. Apo-Tf in the extracellular environment binds to the oxidized ferrous ion, completing the release process. Facilitated-transport model can

  18. Morphological changes and parasite load of the adrenal from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, Claudia; Rocha, Nathália Alves de Souza; Moreira, Pamela Rodrigues Reina; Munari, Danísio Prado; Bomfim, Suely Regina Mogami; Rozza, Daniela Bernadete; Vasconcelos, Rosemeri de Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze morphological changes and parasite loads in the adrenal gland from 45 dogs with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The animals were from the Zoonosis Control Center of Araçatuba, state of São Paulo, which is an endemic region for the disease. These animals were euthanized due to positive diagnoses of VL. The dogs were classified into asymptomatic, oligosymptomatic and symptomatic groups. The parasite load was determined by immunohistochemistry, using VL-positive dog hyperimmune serum. Nine dogs showed an inflammatory infiltrate composed, predominantly, of plasma cells and macrophages. However, only eight dogs showed macrophages with amastigote forms of the parasite, immunolabeled in the cytoplasm. The medullary and reticular layers were the most affected areas, possibly due to a favorable microenvironment created by hormones in these regions. The density of parasites in the glandular tissue was not associated with clinical signs of VL (P > 0.05). However, the presence of the parasite was always associated with the presence of a granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate. This gland may not be an ideal place for the parasite's multiplication, but the presence of injuries to the glandular tissue could influence the dog's immune system, thus favoring the parasite's survival in the host's different organs.

  19. Morphological changes and parasite load of the adrenal from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Momo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze morphological changes and parasite loads in the adrenal gland from 45 dogs with visceral leishmaniasis (VL. The animals were from the Zoonosis Control Center of Araçatuba, state of São Paulo, which is an endemic region for the disease. These animals were euthanized due to positive diagnoses of VL. The dogs were classified into asymptomatic, oligosymptomatic and symptomatic groups. The parasite load was determined by immunohistochemistry, using VL-positive dog hyperimmune serum. Nine dogs showed an inflammatory infiltrate composed, predominantly, of plasma cells and macrophages. However, only eight dogs showed macrophages with amastigote forms of the parasite, immunolabeled in the cytoplasm. The medullary and reticular layers were the most affected areas, possibly due to a favorable microenvironment created by hormones in these regions. The density of parasites in the glandular tissue was not associated with clinical signs of VL (P > 0.05. However, the presence of the parasite was always associated with the presence of a granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate. This gland may not be an ideal place for the parasite's multiplication, but the presence of injuries to the glandular tissue could influence the dog's immune system, thus favoring the parasite's survival in the host's different organs.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae) against the infection and infectivity of macrophages by Leishmania amazonensis

    OpenAIRE

    BERNARDO MELO NETO; JOSEANA M.S.R. LEITÃO; OLIVEIRA,LUCIANO G.C.; SANTOS,SÉRGIO E.M.; SABRINA M.P. CARNEIRO; Rodrigues, Klinger A. F.; Chaves, Mariana H.; DANIEL D.R. ARCANJO; CARVALHO,FERNANDO A.A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (Rutaceae) has been traditionally used in the treatment of microbial infections and parasitic diseases. In the present study, the antileishmanial effect induced by the ethanol extract of stem barks from Z. rhoifolium (ZR-EEtOH) and its n-hexane fraction (ZR-FHEX) on infection and infectivity of murine macrophages by promastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis were investigated. In different set of experiments, macrophages or promastigotes were pretreated ...

  1. Extracellular functions of glycolytic enzymes of parasites: unpredicted use of ancient proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arreaza, Amaranta; Acosta, Hector; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis; Michels, Paul A M; Avilán, Luisana

    2014-02-01

    In addition of their usual intracellular localization where they are involved in catalyzing reactions of carbohydrate and energy metabolism by glycolysis, multiple studies have shown that glycolytic enzymes of many organisms, but notably pathogens, can also be present extracellularly. In the case of parasitic protists and helminths, they can be found either secreted or attached to the surface of the parasites. At these extracellular localizations, these enzymes have been shown to perform additional, very different so-called "moonlighting" functions, such as acting as ligands for a variety of components of the host. Due to this recognition, different extracellular glycolytic enzymes participate in various important parasite-host interactions such as adherence and invasion of parasites, modulation of the host's immune and haemostatic systems, promotion of angiogenesis, and acquisition of specific nutrients by the parasites. Accordingly, extracellular glycolytic enzymes are important for the invasion of the parasites and their establishment in the host, and in determining their virulence.

  2. Overexpressed PLTP in macrophage may promote cholesterol accumulation by prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinquan; Yu, Yang; Wang, Daxin; Qin, Shucun

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is involved in the lipid metabolism and development of atherosclerosis (AS). Abundant PLTP is considered to be expressed on the foam cells derived from monocyte/macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques, suggesting that high level of active PLTP may promote the formation of foam cells. However, the exact role of PLTP on the process of macrophage derived foam cell formation remains unclear. The accumulation of free cholesterol (FC) in the cytoplasm may lead to the prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERs) and the imbalance of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Different PLTP level definitely alternates the phospholipids (PL) and cholesterol level in plasma, strongly suggesting that active PLTP may change the level of FC and PL intracellularly, which subsequently induced the ERs in macrophage. Thus, we hypothesize that high level of PLTP may promote the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophage via the alteration ratio of FC to PL. Therefore, validating this hypothesis may clarify the role of PLTP in macrophage ERs in AS and also raise a novel strategy in the regression of AS plaques via restoring intracellular membrane lipid homeostasis and attenuating ERs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracellular Theileria annulata promote invasive cell motility through kinase regulation of the host actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular, protozoan Theileria species parasites are the only eukaryotes known to transform another eukaryotic cell. One consequence of this parasite-dependent transformation is the acquisition of motile and invasive properties of parasitized cells in vitro and their metastatic dissemination in the animal, which causes East Coast Fever (T. parva or Tropical Theileriosis (T. annulata. These motile and invasive properties of infected host cells are enabled by parasite-dependent, poorly understood F-actin dynamics that control host cell membrane protrusions. Herein, we dissected functional and structural alterations that cause acquired motility and invasiveness of T. annulata-infected cells, to understand the molecular basis driving cell dissemination in Tropical Theileriosis. We found that chronic induction of TNFα by the parasite contributes to motility and invasiveness of parasitized host cells. We show that TNFα does so by specifically targeting expression and function of the host proto-oncogenic ser/thr kinase MAP4K4. Blocking either TNFα secretion or MAP4K4 expression dampens the formation of polar, F-actin-rich invasion structures and impairs cell motility in 3D. We identified the F-actin binding ERM family proteins as MAP4K4 downstream effectors in this process because TNFα-induced ERM activation and cell invasiveness are sensitive to MAP4K4 depletion. MAP4K4 expression in infected cells is induced by TNFα-JNK signalling and maintained by the inhibition of translational repression, whereby both effects are parasite dependent. Thus, parasite-induced TNFα promotes invasive motility of infected cells through the activation of MAP4K4, an evolutionary conserved kinase that controls cytoskeleton dynamics and cell motility. Hence, MAP4K4 couples inflammatory signaling to morphodynamic processes and cell motility, a process exploited by the intracellular Theileria parasite to increase its host cell's dissemination capabilities.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of responses to infectious salmon anemia virus infection in macrophage-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an important pathogen for salmonid aquaculture, however little is known about protective and pathological host responses to infection. We have investigated intracellular responses during cytopathic ISAV infection in the macrophage-l...

  5. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods.......Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells......, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped...

  6. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L; Jensen, Kaare H; Knoblauch, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells, however, remains difficult or impossible due to their small size and/or sensitivity to manipulation. Here, we report on a method that allows precise measurements in basically any cell type over all ranges of pressure. It is based on the compression of nanoliter and picoliter volumes of oil entrapped in the tip of microcapillaries, which we call pico gauges. The production of pico gauges can be accomplished with standard laboratory equipment, and measurements are comparably easy to conduct. Example pressure measurements are performed on cells that are difficult or impossible to measure with other methods.

  7. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  8. Macrophagic enhancement in optical coherence tomography imaging by means of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Chico, Juan Luis; Jaguszewski, Milosz; Comesaña-Hermo, Miguel; Correa-Duarte, Miguel Ángel; Mariñas-Pardo, Luis; Hermida-Prieto, Manuel

    2017-05-12

    The ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to visualise macrophages in vivo in coronary arteries is still controversial. We hypothesise that imaging of macrophages in OCT could be enhanced by means of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. We compared the optical backscattering and attenuation of cell pellets containing RAW 264.7 macrophages with those of macrophagic cell pellets labelled with very small superparamagnetic oxydised nanoparticles (VSOP) by means of light intensity analysis in OCT. The labelled macrophages were incubated with VSOP at a concentration of 1 mM Fe, corresponding to intracellular iron concentrations of 8.8 pg/cell. To study the effect of intracellular accumulation on the backscattering, VSOP dilutions without cells were also compared. OCT pullbacks of the PCR tubes containing the cell pellets were obtained and light intensity analysis was performed on raw OCT images in polar view, after normalisation by the backscattering of the PCR tube. The backscattering was estimated by the peak normalised intensity, whilst the attenuation was estimated by the number of pixels between the peak and the normalised intensity 1 (peak-to-one). VSOP-loaded macrophages have higher backscattering than the corresponding unlabelled macrophages (peak normalised intensity 6.30 vs. 3.15) with also slightly higher attenuation (peak-to-one 61 vs. 66 pixels). The backscattering of the nanoparticles in suspension was negligible in the light intensity analysis. VSOP increase significantly the optical backscattering of macrophages in the near-infrared region, with minimal increase in signal attenuation. This finding enables the enhancement of macrophages in conventional OCT imaging with an easily implementable methodology.

  9. The antileishmanial agent licochalcone A interferes with the function of parasite mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, L; Blom, J; Chen, M

    1995-01-01

    the ultrastructure of Leishmania major promastigote and amastigote mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner without damaging the organelles of macrophages or the phagocytic function of these cells. Studies on the function of the parasite mitochondria showed that licochalcone A inhibited the respiration....... Khrazmi, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1339-1344, 1994) and antimalarial (M. Chen, T.G. Theander, S.B. Christensen, L. Hviid, L. Zhai, and A. Kaharazmi, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1470-1475, 1994) activities. We have observed that licochalcone A alters the ultrastructure of the mitochondria...... of the parasite by the parasites. Moreover, licochalcone A inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the activity of the parasite mitochondrial enzyme correlated well with the changes in the ultrastructure of the mitochondria shown by electron microscopy. These findings...

  10. The endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer thapsigargin enhances the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to macrophages and macrophage-endothelial co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui; Shen, Yuexin; Li, Xiyue; Jiang, Qin; Cheng, Shanshan; Gu, Yuxiu; Liu, Liangliang; Cao, Yi

    2017-03-01

    It was recently shown that exposure to ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) could induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress both in vivo and in vitro, but the role of ER stress in ZnO NP induced toxicity remains unclear. Because macrophages are sensitive to ER stress, we hypothesized that stressing macrophages with ER stress inducer could enhance the toxicity of ZnO NPs. In this study, the effects of ER stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) on the toxicity of ZnO NPs to THP-1 macrophages were investigated. The results showed that TG enhanced ZnO NP induced cytotoxicity as revealed by water soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) and neutral red uptake assays, but not lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. ZnO NPs dose-dependently enhanced the accumulation of intracellular Zn ions without the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the presence of TG did not significantly affect these effects. In the co-culture, exposure of THP-1 macrophages in the upper chamber to ZnO NPs and TG significantly reduced the viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in the lower chamber, but the release of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was not induced. In summary, our data showed that stressing THP-1 macrophages with TG enhanced the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs to macrophages and macrophage-endothelial co-cultures.

  11. Identification and Characterization of miRNAs in Response to Leishmania donovani Infection: Delineation of Their Roles in Macrophage Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Neeraj; Kumar, Vinod; Gedda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Singh, Ashish K.; Singh, Vijay K.; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Singh, Surya P.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of Leishmania infection depends on parasite abilities to evade host immune response and its survival in hostile environment of host macrophages. Despite a wealth of gained crucial information, parasite strategies by which it dampens host macrophage functions remain poorly understood. Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved class of endogenous 22-nucleotide small non-coding RNA gene products, described to participate in the regulation of almost every cellular process investigated so far. In this study, we identified 940 miRNAs in Leishmania donovani infected macrophages by de novo sequencing out of which levels of 85 miRNAs were found to be consistently modified by parasite infection. Herein, we report the functional characteristics of 10 miRNAs i.e., mir-3620, mir-6385, mir-6973a, mir-6996, mir-328, mir-8113, mir-3473f, mir-763, mir-6540, and mir-1264 that were differentially but constantly regulated in infected macrophages for their role in regulation of macrophage effector functions. The target gene prediction and biological interaction analysis revealed involvement of these miRNAs in various biological processes such as apoptosis inhibition, phagocytosis, drug response, and T cell phenotypic transitions. These findings could contribute for the better understanding of macrophages dysfunction and leishmanial pathogenesis. Further, the identified miRNAs could also be used as biomarker/s in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics of Leishmania infection. PMID:28303124

  12. Zinc and zinc transporters in macrophages and their roles in efferocytosis in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhys Hamon

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that nutritional zinc restriction exacerbates airway inflammation accompanied by an increase in caspase-3 activation and an accumulation of apoptotic epithelial cells in the bronchioles of the mice. Normally, apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared by macrophage efferocytosis, limiting any secondary necrosis and inflammation. We therefore hypothesized that zinc deficiency is not only pro-apoptotic but also impairs macrophage efferocytosis. Impaired efferocytic clearance of apoptotic epithelial cells by alveolar macrophages occurs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cigarette-smoking and other lung inflammatory diseases. We now show that zinc is a factor in impaired macrophage efferocytosis in COPD. Concentrations of zinc were significantly reduced in the supernatant of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with COPD who were current smokers, compared to healthy controls, smokers or COPD patients not actively smoking. Lavage zinc was positively correlated with AM efferocytosis and there was decreased efferocytosis in macrophages depleted of Zn in vitro by treatment with the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN. Organ and cell Zn homeostasis are mediated by two families of membrane ZIP and ZnT proteins. Macrophages of mice null for ZIP1 had significantly lower intracellular zinc and efferocytosis capability, suggesting ZIP1 may play an important role. We investigated further using the human THP-1 derived macrophage cell line, with and without zinc chelation by TPEN to mimic zinc deficiency. There was no change in ZIP1 mRNA levels by TPEN but a significant 3-fold increase in expression of another influx transporter ZIP2, consistent with a role for ZIP2 in maintaining macrophage Zn levels. Both ZIP1 and ZIP2 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm in normal human lung alveolar macrophages. We propose that zinc homeostasis in macrophages involves the coordinated action of ZIP1 and ZIP2

  13. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor inhibits neurotoxicity of LPS-activated macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persidsky Yuri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, can activate immune cells including macrophages. Activation of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS contributes to neuronal injury. Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI, a soybean-derived protease inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether BBI has the ability to inhibit LPS-mediated macrophage activation, reducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and subsequent neurotoxicity in primary cortical neural cultures. Methods Mixed cortical neural cultures from rat were used as target cells for testing neurotoxicity induced by LPS-treated macrophage supernatant. Neuronal survival was measured using a cell-based ELISA method for expression of the neuronal marker MAP-2. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production in macrophages was measured via 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH2DA oxidation. Cytokine expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and of ROS. In contrast, BBI pretreatment (1-100 μg/ml of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines and ROS. Further, supernatant from BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-BBI-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. BBI, when directly added to the neuronal cultures (1-100 μg/ml, had no protective effect on neurons with or without LPS-activated macrophage supernatant treatment. In addition, BBI (100 μg/ml had no effect on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that BBI, through its anti-inflammatory properties, protects neurons from neurotoxicity mediated by activated macrophages.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes infection of HD11, chicken macrophage-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, N A; Donaldson, J R; O'Bryan, C A; Ricke, S C; Crandall, P G

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be carried by and infect poultry, although the clinical disease in birds is rare. Escape from macrophage phagocytosis is a key step in pathogenesis for L. monocytogenes. Therefore, we investigated the infection of the chicken macrophage-like cell line HD11 with 2 strains of L. monocytogenes EGD-e and Scott A. After infection, L. monocytogenes was quantified by spread plating and HD11 was quantified with trypan blue exclusion stain before enumeration. The standard macrophage killing protocols require washing the cell monolayers 3 times with PBS, which was found to negatively influence HD11 monolayers. Maximum bacterial densities within macrophages were not different between the 2 Listeria strains. HD11 required more than 11 h to effectively reduce intracellular L. monocytogenes Scott A, and Scott A was more susceptible to HD11 killing than EGD-e. It appears that Listeria infection initially causes attenuation of HD11 growth, and infected HD11 cells do not begin to lyse until at least 11 h post infection. These results suggest that there are subtle strain to strain differences in response to HD11 macrophage phagocytosis. The long lead-time required for HD11 to kill L. monocytogenes cells means that there is sufficient time available for chicken macrophages to circulate in the blood and transfer the intracellular Listeria to multiple tissues. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  17. Responses of macrophages against Salmonella infection compared with phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Maozhi; Yang, Yun; Meng, Chuang; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2013-12-01

    To explore the responses of host cell after infection with live Salmonella compared with phagocytosis to dead bacteria, the responses of mouse macrophage after infection with Salmonella enteritidis C50041 and the fixed C50041 (C50041-d) were analyzed. Results indicated that the cytotoxicity induced by C50041 was stronger than C50041-d. Similar changing trends of mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular concentration of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide were found between C50041 and C50041-d infection. But the cell responses against C50041 were earlier and stronger than C50041-d. LC3 expression of macrophage induced by C50041 was lower than C50041-d. C50041 significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6. Whereas intracellular caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release induced by C50041 were stronger than C50041-d, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release are the innate defense responses of macrophage. Therefore, it will be beneficial to explore the use of this pathway in the control of Salmonella infection.

  18. Internal parasites of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raś-Noryńska, Małgorzata; Sokół, Rajmund

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a growing number of exotic reptiles are kept as pets. The aim of this study was to determine the species of parasites found in reptile patients of veterinary practices in Poland. Fecal samples obtained from 76 lizards, 15 turtles and 10 snakes were examined by flotation method and direct smear stained with Lugol's iodine. In 63 samples (62.4%) the presence of parasite eggs and oocysts was revealed. Oocysts of Isospora spp. (from 33% to 100% of the samples, depending on the reptilian species) and Oxyurids eggs (10% to 75%) were predominant. In addition, isolated Eimeria spp. oocysts and Giardia intestinalis cysts were found, as well as Strongylus spp. and Hymenolepis spp. eggs. Pet reptiles are often infected with parasites, some of which are potentially dangerous to humans. A routine parasitological examination should be done in such animals.

  19. Quantitative analysis of hemocyte morphological abnormalities associated with Campoletis sonorensis parasitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Turnbull

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoparasitoids of arthropods evoke host cellular immune responses that result in hemocytic encapsulation of the endoparasitoid, unless these responses are disrupted by the parasite. Our interest has focused on mutualistic viruses found in some hymenopteran endoparasitoids that disrupt hemocyte function and prevent encapsulation. Specifically, the Campoletis sonorensis polydnavirus interacts with wasp factors to suppress immunity via expression of intracellular and secreted viral proteins. To study the roles of specific parasitization-associated factors on immunocyte morphology, fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the actin cytoskeleton in infected and uninfected cells, or after treatment with C. sonorensis ovarian proteins or plasma from infected larvae. The titer and distribution of F- and G-actin were altered in hemocytes from parasitized insects relative to control cells, with plasma from parasitized larvae having an intermediate effect. This suggests that intracellular and secreted factors contribute to suppression of cellular immune responses in C. sonorensis.

  20. Antimalarial drugs disrupt ion homeostasis in malarial parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos L Gazarini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium chabaudi malaria parasite organelles are major elements for ion homeostasis and cellular signaling and also target for antimalarial drugs. By using confocal imaging of intraerythrocytic parasites we demonstrated that the dye acridine orange (AO is accumulated into P. chabaudi subcellular compartments. The AO could be released from the parasite organelles by collapsing the pH gradient with the K+/H+ ionophore nigericin (20 µM, or by inhibiting the H+-pump with bafilomycin (4 µM. Similarly, in isolated parasites loaded with calcium indicator Fluo 3-AM, bafilomycin caused calcium mobilization of the acidic calcium pool that could also be release with nigericin. Interestingly after complete release of the acidic compartments, addition of thapsigargin at 10 µM was still effective in releasing parasite intracellular calcium stores in parasites at trophozoite stage. The addition of antimalarial drugs chloroquine and artemisinin resulted in AO release from acidic compartments and also affected maintenance of calcium in ER store by using different drug concentrations.

  1. The roles of intramembrane proteases in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, L David

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is widely conserved throughout different forms of life, with three major types of proteases being known for their ability to cleave peptide bonds directly within the transmembrane domains of their substrates. Although intramembrane proteases have been extensively studied in humans and model organisms, they have only more recently been investigated in protozoan parasites, where they turn out to play important and sometimes unexpected roles. Signal peptide peptidases are involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and signal peptide degradation from exported proteins. Recent studies suggest that repurposing inhibitors developed for blocking presenilins may be useful for inhibiting the growth of Plasmodium, and possibly other protozoan parasites, by blocking signal peptide peptidases. Rhomboid proteases, originally described in the fly, are also widespread in parasites, and are especially expanded in apicomplexans. Their study in parasites has revealed novel roles that expand our understanding of how these proteases function. Within this diverse group of parasites, rhomboid proteases contribute to processing of adhesins involved in attachment, invasion, intracellular replication, phagocytosis, and immune evasion, placing them at the vertex of host-parasite interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR): Balance for Survival in Parasitic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marion M.; Evans, Kyle W.; Moore, Andrea R.; Fong, Dunne

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic infections induce a magnitude of host responses. At the opposite ends of the spectrum are those that ensure the host's needs to eliminate the invaders and to minimize damage to its own tissues. This review analyzes how parasites would manipulate immunity by activating the immunosuppressive nuclear factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) with type 2 cytokines and free fatty acids from arachidonic acid metabolism. PPARs limit the action of type 1 immunity, in which classically activated macrophages act through the production of proinflammatory signals, to spare the parasites. They also favor the development of alternately activated macrophages which control inflammation so the host would not be destroyed. Possibly, the nuclear factors hold a pivotal role in the establishment of chronic infection by delicately balancing the pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling mechanisms and their ligands may be used as combination therapeutics to limit host pathology. PMID:20169106

  3. Foodborne protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David

    2005-08-25

    This report addresses Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Cyclospora, and more briefly, Toxoplasma as the main parasitic protozoa of concern to food production worldwide. Other parasitic protozoa may be spread in food or water but are not considered as great a risk to food manufacture. The protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have proven potential to cause waterborne and foodborne disease. Toxoplasma gondii has been considered a risk in specific cases, but humans are not its primary host. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are widespread in the environment, particularly the aquatic environment, and major outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis have occurred as a result of contaminated drinking water. Large outbreaks of waterborne cyclosporiasis have not been identified. Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have potential significance in the preparation and consumption of fresh produce and in catering practice, in which ready-to-eat foods may be served that have not received heat treatment. None of the three organisms Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora has been shown to be a problem for heat processed food or tap water that has undergone appropriate treatment at a water treatment works. All three are sensitive to standard pasteurisation techniques. Although humans are not a primary host for T. gondii, the potential exists for both waterborne and foodborne toxoplasmosis. Parasitic protozoa do not multiply in foods, but they may survive in or on moist foods for months in cool, damp environments. Their ecology makes control of these parasites difficult. For general control of parasitic protozoa in the food chain, the following steps are necessary: - Follow good hygienic practice in food service and catering industries.- Minimise dissemination of cysts and oocysts in the farming environment and via human waste management.- Include these microorganisms in Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plans of water suppliers, industries or sectors

  4. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadevall Arturo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the pathogen, and this commonly occurs with the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. In this report we have used time-lapse imaging to determine if this occurs with Cn. Results Live imaging of Cryptococcus neoformans interactions with murine macrophages revealed cell-to-cell spread of yeast cells from infected donor cells to uninfected cells. Although this phenomenon was relatively rare its occurrence documents a new capacity for this pathogen to infect adjacent cells without exiting the intracellular space. Cell-to-cell spread appeared to be an actin-dependent process. In addition, we noted that cryptococcal phagosomal extrusion was followed by the formation of massive vacuoles suggesting that intracellular residence is accompanied by long lasting damage to host cells. Conclusion C. neoformans can escape the intracellular confines of macrophages in an actin dependent manner by cell-to-cell transfer of the yeast leading to infection of adjacent cells. In addition, complete extrusion of internalized Cn cells can lead to the formation of a massive vacuole which may be a sign of damage to the host macrophage. These observations document new outcomes for the interaction of C. neoformans with host cells that provide precedents for cell biological effects that may contribute to the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections.

  5. Human infection with Trypanosoma cruzi induces parasite antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Experimental models of Chagas' disease, an infection caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, have demonstrated the crucial immunoprotective role played by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. These cells dominate inflammatory foci in parasitized tissues and their elimination from mice leads to uncontrolled parasite replication and subsequent death of the infected host. A trypomastigote surface antigen, TSA-1, and two amastigote surface molecules, ASP-1 and ASP-2, were recently identified as...

  6. Type II fatty acid synthesis is essential only for malaria parasite late liver stage development

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Ashley M.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Tarun, Alice S.; Camargo, Nelly; Phuong, Thuan M; Aly, Ahmed S I; Cowman, Alan F.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular malaria parasites require lipids for growth and replication. They possess a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS II) pathway that localizes to the apicoplast plastid organelle and is assumed to be necessary for pathogenic blood stage replication. However, the importance of FAS II throughout the complex parasite life cycle remains unknown. We show in a rodent malaria model that FAS II enzymes localize to the sporozoite and liver stage apicoplast. Targeted deletion of Fab...

  7. Impairment of T cell function in parasitic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Rodrigues

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammals subverted as hosts by protozoan parasites, the latter and/or the agonists they release are detected and processed by sensors displayed by many distinct immune cell lineages, in a tissue(s-dependent context. Focusing on the T lymphocyte lineage, we review our present understanding on its transient or durable functional impairment over the course of the developmental program of the intracellular parasites Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi in their mammalian hosts. Strategies employed by protozoa to down-regulate T lymphocyte function may act at the initial moment of naïve T cell priming, rendering T cells anergic or unresponsive throughout infection, or later, exhausting T cells due to antigen persistence. Furthermore, by exploiting host feedback mechanisms aimed at maintaining immune homeostasis, parasites can enhance T cell apoptosis. We will discuss how infections with prominent intracellular protozoan parasites lead to a general down-regulation of T cell function through T cell anergy and exhaustion, accompanied by apoptosis, and ultimately allowing pathogen persistence.

  8. Temperature-induced protein secretion by Leishmania mexicana modulates macrophage signalling and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Kasra; Antoniak, Elisabeth; Jardim, Armando; Olivier, Martin

    2011-05-03

    Protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania are the causative agents of leishmaniasis. These digenetic microorganisms undergo a marked environmental temperature shift (TS) during transmission from the sandfly vector (ambient temperature, 25-26°C) to the mammalian host (37°C). We have observed that this TS induces a rapid and dramatic increase in protein release from Leishmania mexicana (cutaneous leishmaniasis) within 4 h. Proteomic identification of the TS-induced secreted proteins revealed 72 proteins, the majority of which lack a signal peptide and are thus thought to be secreted via nonconventional mechanisms. Interestingly, this protein release is accompanied by alterations in parasite morphology including an augmentation in the budding of exovesicles from its surface. Here we show that the exoproteome of L. mexicana upon TS induces cleavage and activation of the host protein tyrosine phosphatases, specifically SHP-1 and PTP1-B, in a murine bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line. Furthermore, translocation of prominent inflammatory transcription factors, namely NF-κB and AP-1 is altered. The exoproteome also caused inhibition of nitric oxide production, a crucial leishmanicidal function of the macrophage. Overall, our results provide strong evidence that within early moments of interaction with the mammalian host, L. mexicana rapidly releases proteins and exovesicles that modulate signalling and function of the macrophage. These modulations can result in attenuation of the inflammatory response and deactivation of the macrophage aiding the parasite in the establishment of infection.

  9. Temperature-induced protein secretion by Leishmania mexicana modulates macrophage signalling and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasra Hassani

    Full Text Available Protozoan parasites of genus Leishmania are the causative agents of leishmaniasis. These digenetic microorganisms undergo a marked environmental temperature shift (TS during transmission from the sandfly vector (ambient temperature, 25-26°C to the mammalian host (37°C. We have observed that this TS induces a rapid and dramatic increase in protein release from Leishmania mexicana (cutaneous leishmaniasis within 4 h. Proteomic identification of the TS-induced secreted proteins revealed 72 proteins, the majority of which lack a signal peptide and are thus thought to be secreted via nonconventional mechanisms. Interestingly, this protein release is accompanied by alterations in parasite morphology including an augmentation in the budding of exovesicles from its surface. Here we show that the exoproteome of L. mexicana upon TS induces cleavage and activation of the host protein tyrosine phosphatases, specifically SHP-1 and PTP1-B, in a murine bone-marrow-derived macrophage cell line. Furthermore, translocation of prominent inflammatory transcription factors, namely NF-κB and AP-1 is altered. The exoproteome also caused inhibition of nitric oxide production, a crucial leishmanicidal function of the macrophage. Overall, our results provide strong evidence that within early moments of interaction with the mammalian host, L. mexicana rapidly releases proteins and exovesicles that modulate signalling and function of the macrophage. These modulations can result in attenuation of the inflammatory response and deactivation of the macrophage aiding the parasite in the establishment of infection.

  10. Macrophages in protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Ito, A; Okamoto, K

    1992-12-01

    When mice were treated with carrageenan just before infection with eggs of Hymenolepis nana, they failed to exhibit sterile immunity to the egg challenge, with evidence of a decrease in the number of peripheral macrophages (Mø) and the rate of carbon clearance. Although there were high levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) released into the intestinal tracts of the parasitized mice at challenge infection, there was almost no release of IL-1 in those treated with carrageenan just before challenge. These results strongly suggest that Mø have an important role in protective immunity to H. nana in mice.

  11. From amoeba to macrophages: exploring the molecular mechanisms of Legionella pneumophila infection in both hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoll, Pedro; Rolando, Monica; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. It replicates within amoeba and infects accidentally human macrophages. Several similarities are seen in the L. pneumophila-infection cycle in both hosts, suggesting that the tools necessary for macrophage infection may have evolved during co-evolution of L. pneumophila and amoeba. The establishment of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) within the host cytoplasm requires the remodeling of the LCV surface and the hijacking of vesicles and organelles. Then L. pneumophila replicates in a safe intracellular niche in amoeba and macrophages. In this review we will summarize the existing knowledge of the L. pneumophila infection cycle in both hosts at the molecular level and compare the factors involved within amoeba and macrophages. This knowledge will be discussed in the light of recent findings from the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome analyses suggesting the existence of a primitive immune-like system in amoeba.

  12. Interactions between Leishmania mexicana mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes and murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Grimaldi Junior

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Unstimulated adherent mouse peritoneal cells were cultured in vitro and infected with equal numbers of a single strain of Leishmania m. mexicana amastigotes (AM, virulent promastigotes (VP, avirulent promastigotes (AVP and fixed promastigotes (FP. Duplicate May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained coverslips were examined at time intervals up to 13 days. By 3 hr post infection, the number of macrophages containing parasites varied between 60.5% (VP and 84% (AM for macrophages exposed to living parasites, compared to 6.5% for macrophages exposed for FP. However, variable numbers of parasites showed degenerative changes by 3 hr, and the number of macrophages containing morphologically intact parasites varied significantly between cells infected with AM (84% and those infected with VP (42% or AVP(40%. The mean number on intacte parasites/macrophage also differed significantly between AM-infected cells and living or fixed promastigotes-infected cells. Quantitation of intact and degenerated parasites indicated parasite multiplication, as well as destruction, in VP-infected cells and parasite survival and multiplication in AM-infecte monolayers; in contrast no evidence of parasite multiplication was seen in AVP-infected cells. Changes in the mono layer itself (cell loss and macrophage vacuolization were also evaluated. These results suggest that crucial events determining the outcome of infection occur in the host-parasite relationship during the fist 24 hours of infection. These events are apparently influenced not only by parasite or host strain but by environmentally induced variation within a given strain.Células peritoneais de camundongos cultivadas in vitro foram infectadas com inóculos idênticos de amastigotas (AM e de promastigotas, respectivamente, virulentas (VP, avirulentas (AVP e fixadas (FP de uma mesma cepa de Leishmania m. mexicana. As monocamadas coradas com May-Grunwald-Giemsa foram examinadas em diferentes intervalos de tempo. Ao nível de 3

  13. Metallochaperones regulate intracellular copper levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Lee Pang

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an important enzyme co-factor that is also extremely toxic at high intracellular concentrations, making active efflux mechanisms essential for preventing Cu accumulation. Here, we have investigated the mechanistic role of metallochaperones in regulating Cu efflux. We have constructed a computational model of Cu trafficking and efflux based on systems analysis of the Cu stress response of Halobacterium salinarum. We have validated several model predictions via assays of transcriptional dynamics and intracellular Cu levels, discovering a completely novel function for metallochaperones. We demonstrate that in addition to trafficking Cu ions, metallochaperones also function as buffers to modulate the transcriptional responsiveness and efficacy of Cu efflux. This buffering function of metallochaperones ultimately sets the upper limit for intracellular Cu levels and provides a mechanistic explanation for previously observed Cu metallochaperone mutation phenotypes.

  14. Mechanisms of Intracellular Chlamydiae Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukic Ruzica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiae are Gram-negative, non-motile, obligate intracellular, and spherically shaped bacteria with a diameter of 0.2-1.5 μm. Chlamydiae are present in several different morphological forms: the elementary body, the reticular body, and in the last several years, there has been the observation of a third form known as the persistent or atypical form. The intracellular localization of Chlamydia provides a unique replication cycle that occurs inside a membrane-surrounded vacuole in the host cell cytoplasm and is significantly different from the method of multiplication of other microorganisms. Chlamydiae are capable of manipulating different signalling pathways inside the infected cell, thus avoiding the host immune response. This ensures intracellular multiplication, survival, and long-term persistence of Chlamydiae. There are two basic means of achieving this persistence: inhibition of apoptosis and manipulation of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B-mediated signals in the host.

  15. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  16. On biomass of parasitic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, J H [Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China); Mo, L-F [School of Information Engineering, Zhejiang Forestry College, Lin' an 311300, Zhejiang (China)], E-mail: jhhe@dhu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    An extremely simple and elementary but rigorous derivation of maximal biomass of parasitic plants is given using an assumption that metabolic rate of the parasite should not be larger than that of its host organ.

  17. On biomass of parasitic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J. H.; Mo, L.-F.

    2008-02-01

    An extremely simple and elementary but rigorous derivation of maximal biomass of parasitic plants is given using an assumption that metabolic rate of the parasite should not be larger than that of its host organ

  18. Enteric parasites and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Cimerman

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on the importance of intestinal parasites in patients with AIDS, showing relevant data in the medical literature, with special emphasis on epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of enteroparasitosis, especially cryptosporidiasis, isosporiasis, microsporidiasis and strongyloidiasis. DESIGN: Narrative review.

  19. Parasites and the skin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... remind you of those rare and wonderful infestations that you might never see. ... from a burrow, mounted on a glass slide. The findings are ... Parasitic infections may be confined to the skin or may have skin involvement as part ...

  20. Parasites and Foodborne Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called "Crypto", is a one-celled, microscopic shelled parasite and a significant cause of waterborne and foodborne illness worldwide. It is found in the intestines of many herd animals including cows, sheep, goats, deer, and elk. The illness could be intestinal, ...

  1. Ungulate malaria parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Thomas J.; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  2. Mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells turn activated macrophages into a regulatory-like profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Maggini

    Full Text Available In recent years it has become clear that the therapeutic properties of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are related not only to their ability to differentiate into different lineages but also to their capacity to suppress the immune response. We here studied the influence of MSC on macrophage function. Using mouse thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (M stimulated with LPS, we found that MSC markedly suppressed the production of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p70 and interferon-gamma while increased the production of IL-10 and IL-12p40. Similar results were observed using supernatants from MSC suggesting that factor(s constitutively released by MSC are involved. Supporting a role for PGE(2 we observed that acetylsalicylic acid impaired the ability of MSC to inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines and to stimulate the production of IL-10 by LPS-stimulated M. Moreover, we found that MSC constitutively produce PGE2 at levels able to inhibit the production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 by activated M. MSC also inhibited the up-regulation of CD86 and MHC class II in LPS-stimulated M impairing their ability to activate antigen-specific T CD4+ cells. On the other hand, they stimulated the uptake of apoptotic thymocytes by M. Of note, MSC turned M into cells highly susceptible to infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi increasing more than 5-fold the rate of M infection. Using a model of inflammation triggered by s.c. implantation of glass cylinders, we found that MSC stimulated the recruitment of macrophages which showed a low expression of CD86 and the MHC class II molecule Ia(b and a high ability to produce IL-10 and IL-12p40, but not IL-12 p70. In summary, our results suggest that MSC switch M into a regulatory profile characterized by a low ability to produce inflammatory cytokines, a high ability to phagocyte apoptotic cells, and a marked increase in their susceptibility to infection by

  3. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection.

  4. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    34,.,-’,,’ -, #.’-.,-’..’..., . .-- -.. ’’_-.r.¢. .’_’, - e. -. v. .- ,- .- ’ ._ -_.-.- .- . - . . . . . . .. . . . SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Whm Data EantoreQd macrophages...erythrocyte and the merozoite membranes observed in thin sections and may represent the anchorage sites of the contractile proteins within the erythrocyte...erythro- cyte and the merozoite membranes observed in thin sections and may represent the anchorage sites of the contractile proteins within the

  5. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  6. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  7. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Braukmann

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2 for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S. Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, interleukin (IL-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  8. IcgA is a virulence factor of Rhodococcus equi that modulates intracellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Coulson, Garry B; Miranda-Casoluengo, Aleksandra A; Miranda-Casoluengo, Raúl; Hondalus, Mary K; Meijer, Wim G

    2014-05-01

    Virulence of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi depends on a 21.3-kb pathogenicity island located on a conjugative plasmid. To date, the only nonregulatory pathogenicity island-encoded virulence factor identified is the cell envelope-associated VapA protein. Although the pathogenicity islands from porcine and equine R. equi isolates have undergone major rearrangements, the virR operon (virR-icgA-vapH-orf7-virS) is highly conserved in both, suggesting these genes play an important role in pathogenicity. VirR and VirS are transcriptional regulators controlling expression of pathogenicity island genes, including vapA. Here, we show that while vapH and orf7 are dispensable for intracellular growth of R. equi, deletion of icgA, formerly known as orf5, encoding a major facilitator superfamily transport protein, elicited an enhanced growth phenotype in macrophages and a significant reduction in macrophage viability, while extracellular growth in broth remained unaffected. Transcription of virS, located downstream of icgA, and vapA was not affected by the icgA deletion during growth in broth or in macrophages, showing that the enhanced growth phenotype caused by deletion of icgA was not mediated through abnormal transcription of these genes. Transcription of icgA increased 6-fold within 2 h following infection of macrophages and remained significantly higher 48 h postinfection compared to levels at the start of the infection. The major facilitator superfamily transport protein IcgA is the first factor identified in R. equi that negatively affects intracellular replication. Aside from VapA, it is only the second pathogenicity island-encoded structural protein shown to play a direct role in intracellular growth of this pathogenic actinomycete.

  9. Dysfunctional CFTR alters the bactericidal activity of human macrophages against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Del Porto

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation of the lung, as a consequence of persistent bacterial infections by several opportunistic pathogens represents the main cause of mortality and morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Mechanisms leading to increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in CF are not completely known, although the involvement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR in microbicidal functions of macrophages is emerging. Tissue macrophages differentiate in situ from infiltrating monocytes, additionally, mature macrophages from different tissues, although having a number of common activities, exhibit variation in some molecular and cellular functions. In order to highlight possible intrinsic macrophage defects due to CFTR dysfunction, we have focused our attention on in vitro differentiated macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes. Here we report on the contribution of CFTR in the bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa of monocyte derived human macrophages. At first, by real time PCR, immunofluorescence and patch clamp recordings we demonstrated that CFTR is expressed and is mainly localized to surface plasma membranes of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM where it acts as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel. Next, we evaluated the bactericidal activity of P. aeruginosa infected macrophages from healthy donors and CF patients by antibiotic protection assays. Our results demonstrate that control and CF macrophages do not differ in the phagocytic activity when infected with P. aeruginosa. Rather, although a reduction of intracellular live bacteria was detected in both non-CF and CF cells, the percentage of surviving bacteria was significantly higher in CF cells. These findings further support the role of CFTR in the fundamental functions of innate immune cells including eradication of bacterial infections by macrophages.

  10. microRNAs in parasites and parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong; Cai, Xuepeng; Bradley, Janette E

    2013-03-01

    miRNAs, a subclass of small regulatory RNAs, are present from ancient unicellular protozoans to parasitic helminths and parasitic arthropods. The miRNA-silencing mechanism appears, however, to be absent in a number of protozoan parasites. Protozoan miRNAs and components of their silencing machinery possess features different from other eukaryotes, providing some clues on the evolution of the RNA-induced silencing machinery. miRNA functions possibly associate with neoblast biology, development, physiology, infection and immunity of parasites. Parasite infection can alter host miRNA expression that can favor both parasite clearance and infection. miRNA pathways are, thus, a potential target for the therapeutic control of parasitic diseases.

  11. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body’s iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation.

  12. Differential Macrophage Response to Slow- and Fast-Growing Pathogenic Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cecilia Helguera-Repetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM have recently been recognized as important species that cause disease even in immunocompetent individuals. The mechanisms that these species use to infect and persist inside macrophages are not well characterised. To gain insight concerning this process we used THP-1 macrophages infected with M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. celatum, and M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that slow-growing mycobacteria gained entrance into these cells with more efficiency than fast-growing mycobacteria. We have also demonstrated that viable slow-growing M. celatum persisted inside macrophages without causing cell damage and without inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS, as M. tuberculosis caused. In contrast, fast-growing mycobacteria destroyed the cells and induced high levels of ROS. Additionally, the macrophage cytokine pattern induced by M. celatum was different from the one induced by either M. tuberculosis or fast-growing mycobacteria. Our results also suggest that, in some cases, the intracellular survival of mycobacteria and the immune response that they induce in macrophages could be related to their growth rate. In addition, the modulation of macrophage cytokine production, caused by M. celatum, might be a novel immune-evasion strategy used to survive inside macrophages that is different from the one reported for M. tuberculosis.

  13. ROP18 is a rhoptry kinase controlling the intracellular proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba El Hajj

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite for which the discharge of apical organelles named rhoptries is a key event in host cell invasion. Among rhoptry proteins, ROP2, which is the prototype of a large protein family, is translocated in the parasitophorous vacuole membrane during invasion. The ROP2 family members are related to protein-kinases, but only some of them are predicted to be catalytically active, and none of the latter has been characterized so far. We show here that ROP18, a member of the ROP2 family, is located in the rhoptries and re-localises at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane during invasion. We demonstrate that a recombinant ROP18 catalytic domain (amino acids 243-539 possesses a protein-kinase activity and phosphorylate parasitic substrates, especially a 70-kDa protein of tachyzoites. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of ROP18 in transgenic parasites causes a dramatic increase in intra-vacuolar parasite multiplication rate, which is correlated with kinase activity. Therefore, we demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that rhoptries can discharge active protein-kinases upon host cell invasion, which can exert a long-lasting effect on intracellular parasite development and virulence.

  14. The interactions of intracellular Protista and their host cells, with special reference to heterotrophic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, L H

    1979-04-11

    Intracellular genera are found in all the major groups of Protista, but are particularly common among the dinoflagellates, trypanosomatid zooflagellates and suctorian ciliates; the Sporozoa are nearly all intracellular at some stage of their life, and the Microspora entirely so. Intracellular forms can dwell in the nucleus, within phagosomal or other vacuoles or may lie free in the hyaloplasm of their host cells. Organisms tend to select their hosts from a restricted taxonomic range although there are some notable exceptions. There is also great variation in the types of host cell inhabited. There are various reasons for both host and cell selectivity including recognition phenomena at the cell surfaces. Invasion of host cells is usually preceded by surface interactions with the invader. Some organisms depend upon phagocytosis for entry, but others induce host cells to engulf them by non-phagocytic means or invade by microinjection through the host plasma membrane. Protista avoid lysosomal destruction by their resistance to enzyme attack, by surrounding themselves with lysosome-inhibiting vacuoles, by escaping from the phagosomal system into the hyaloplasm and by choosing host cells which lack lysosomes. Nutrition of intracellular heterotrophic organisms involves some degree of competition with the host cell's metabolism as well as erosion of host cell cytoplasm. In Plasmodium infections, red cells are made more permeable to required nutrients by the action of the parasite on the host cell membrane. The parasite is often dependent upon the host cell for complex nutrients which it cannot synthesize for itself. Intracellular forms often profoundly modify the structure and metabolism of the host cell or interfere with its growth and multiplication. This may result in the final lysis of the host cell at the end of the intracellular phase or before the infection of other cells. Certain types of intracellular organisms may have arisen initially as forms attached to the

  15. Role of parasites in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandong, B M; Ngbea, J A; Raymond, Vhriterhire

    2013-01-01

    In areas of parasitic endemicity, the occurrence of cancer that is not frequent may be linked with parasitic infection. Epidemiological correlates between some parasitic infections and cancer is strong, suggesting a strong aetiological association. The common parasites associated with human cancers are schistosomiasis, malaria, liver flukes (Clonorchis sinenses, Opistorchis viverrini). To review the pathology, literature and methods of diagnosis. Literature review from peer reviewed Journals cited in PubMed and local journals. Parasites may serve as promoters of cancer in endemic areas of infection.

  16. Metazoan Parasites of Antarctic Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğuz, Mehmet Cemal; Tepe, Yahya; Belk, Mark C; Heckmann, Richard A; Aslan, Burçak; Gürgen, Meryem; Bray, Rodney A; Akgül, Ülker

    2015-06-01

    To date, there have been nearly 100 papers published on metazoan parasites of Antarctic fishes, but there has not yet been any compilation of a species list of fish parasites for this large geographic area. Herein, we provide a list of all documented occurrences of monogenean, cestode, digenean, acanthocephalan, nematode, and hirudinean parasites of Antarctic fishes. The list includes nearly 250 parasite species found in 142 species of host fishes. It is likely that there are more species of fish parasites, which are yet to be documented from Antarctic waters.

  17. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimulatin

  18. How do antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBasore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Drugs represent the primary treatment available for human malaria, as caused by Plasmodium spp. Currently approved drugs and antimalarial drug leads generally work against parasite enzymes or activities within infected erythrocytes. To reach their specific targets, these chemicals must cross at least three membranes beginning with the host cell membrane. Uptake at each membrane may involve partitioning and diffusion through the lipid bilayer or facilitated transport through channels or carriers. Here, we review the features of available antimalarials and examine whether transporters may be required for their uptake. Our computational analysis suggests that most antimalarials have high intrinsic membrane permeability, obviating the need for uptake via transporters; a subset of compounds appear to require facilitated uptake. We also review parasite and host transporters that may contribute to drug uptake. Broad permeability channels at the erythrocyte and parasitophorous vacuolar membranes of infected cells relax permeability constraints on antimalarial drug design; however, this uptake mechanism is prone to acquired resistance as the parasite may alter channel activity to reduce drug uptake. A better understanding of how antimalarial drugs reach their intracellular targets is critical to prioritizing drug leads for antimalarial development and may reveal new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  20. AFAP-1L1-mediated actin filaments crosslinks hinder Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion and intracellular multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Karine Canuto Loureiro; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; da Silva, Aline Alves; Quintal, Amanda Pifano Neto; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Host actin cytoskeleton polymerization has been shown to play an important role during Trypanosoma cruzi internalization into mammalian cell. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in cells are regulated by a vast number of actin-binding proteins. Here we aimed to verify the impact of AFAP-1L1, during invasion and multiplication of T. cruzi. Knocking-down AFAP-1L1 increased parasite cell invasion and intracellular multiplication. Thus, we have shown that the integrity of the machinery formed by AFAP-1L1 in actin cytoskeleton polymerization is important to hinder parasite infection.

  1. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohammad

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the status and epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Iran. The information was driven from an extensive Health Survey which was done by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, deputy of Research Affairs in 1990-92. Sampling fraction was 1 per 1000 of individuals aged between 2 and 69, the sampling method was cluster sampling and each cluster consisted of 7 families. Formal-ether was the method of finding parasites which included: Oxior, Ascariasis, Giardiasis, Entamoeba-histolytica, Tinea, Strongyloidiasis, Ancylostoma, and Trichocephaliasis. The highest prevalence rate belonged to Giardiasis with 14.4% and the lowest one belonged to Tinea and Ancylostoma with 0.2%. The prevalence rate in rural area was significantly lower than urban area (p<0.0001.

  2. Plants, endosymbionts and parasites: Abscisic acid and calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamune, Kisaburo; Xiong, Liming; Chini, Eduardo; Sibley, L David

    2008-01-01

    It was recently discovered that the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii produces and uses the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA), for communication. Following intracellular replication, ABA production influences the timing of parasite egress from the host cell. This density-dependent signal may serve to coordinate exit from the host cell in a synchronous manner by triggering calcium-dependent activation of motility. In the absence of ABA production, parasites undergo differentiation to the semidormant, tissue cyst. The pathway for ABA production in T. gondii may be derived from a relict endosymbiont, acquired by ingestion of a red algal cell. Although the parasite has lost the capacity for photosynthesis, the plant-like nature of this signaling pathway may be exploited to develop new drugs. In support of this idea, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis protected mice against lethal infection with T. gondii. Here, we compare the role of ABA in parasites to its activities in plants, where it is know to control development and stress responses.

  3. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokil, Nilesh J; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J; Stacey, Katryn J; Hancock, Viktoria; Saunders, Bernadette M; Ravasi, Timothy; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1(+) vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival.

  5. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-15

    when passively transferred to normal owl monkeys. When immune serum was added to partially synchronized cuitures of P. falciparum, parasites matured...are resistant to subsequent challenge with the same organ- 1ism. Serum from such immune animals protects against initial infection, when passively ...remission, and without nephrotic syndrome. The first two groups had high levCls, of IgM, antiplasn-iodial antibody and inmune co)mplex deposits in renal

  6. Yersinia pestis Requires Host Rab1b for Survival in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Connor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease known as plague. During infection of macrophages Y. pestis actively evades the normal phagosomal maturation pathway to establish a replicative niche within the cell. However, the mechanisms used by Y. pestis to subvert killing by the macrophage are unknown. Host Rab GTPases are central mediators of vesicular trafficking and are commonly targeted by bacterial pathogens to alter phagosome maturation and killing by macrophages. Here we demonstrate for the first time that host Rab1b is required for Y. pestis to effectively evade killing by macrophages. We also show that Rab1b is specifically recruited to the Yersinia containing vacuole (YCV and that Y. pestis is unable to subvert YCV acidification when Rab1b expression is knocked down in macrophages. Furthermore, Rab1b knockdown also altered the frequency of association between the YCV with the lysosomal marker Lamp1, suggesting that Rab1b recruitment to the YCV directly inhibits phagosome maturation. Finally, we show that Rab1b knockdown also impacts the pH of the Legionella pneumophila containing vacuole, another pathogen that recruits Rab1b to its vacuole. Together these data identify a novel role for Rab1b in the subversion of phagosome maturation by intracellular pathogens and suggest that recruitment of Rab1b to the pathogen containing vacuole may be a conserved mechanism to control vacuole pH.

  7. Etude des intéractions entre le parasite Bonamia ostreae et son hôte, huître plate Ostrea edulis in vitro (Diaporama)

    OpenAIRE

    Morga, Benjamin; Arzul, Isabelle; Chollet, Bruno; Gagnaire, Beatrice; Renault, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Bonamiosis is a disease affecting the flat oyster Ostrea edulis and caused by the protozoa parasite Bonamia ostreae, which is affiliated to the haplosporidia order and the cercozoa phylum. This parasite is mainly intracellular, infecting haemocytes, circulating cells playing an important role in the oyster's defence mechanisms. Even though the parasite's cycle has not been completely understood yet, direct infection from infected oysters to healthy oysters is possible. This leads us to think ...

  8. Etude des intéractions entre le parasite Bonamia ostreae et son hôte, huître plate Ostrea edulis in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Morga, Benjamin; Arzul, Isabelle; Chollet, Bruno; Gagnaire, Beatrice; Renault, Tristan

    2007-01-01

    Bonamiosis is a disease affecting the flat oyster Ostrea edulis and caused by the protozoa parasite Bonamia ostreae, which is affiliated to the haplosporidia order and the cercozoa phylum. This parasite is mainly intracellular, infecting haemocytes, circulating cells playing an important role in the oyster's defence mechanisms. Even though the parasite's cycle has not been completely understood yet, direct infection from infected oysters to healthy oysters is possible. This leads us to think ...

  9. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Induces Arginase Activity in Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote-Infected Macrophages through a Cytokine-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Vieira Vendrame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis exhibits peculiarities in its interactions with hosts. Because amastigotes are the primary form associated with the progression of infection, we studied the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I on interactions between L. (L. amazonensis amastigotes and macrophages. Upon stimulation of infected macrophages with IGF-I, we observed decreased nitric oxide production but increased arginase expression and activity, which lead to increased parasitism. However, stimulation of amastigote-infected macrophages with IGF-I did not result in altered cytokine levels compared to unstimulated controls. Because IGF-I is present in tissue fluids and also within macrophages, we examined the possible effect of this factor on phosphatidylserine (PS exposure on amastigotes, seen previously in tissue-derived amastigotes leading to increased parasitism. Stimulation with IGF-I induced PS exposure on amastigotes but not on promastigotes. Using a PS-liposome instead of amastigotes, we observed that the PS-liposome but not the control phosphatidylcholine-liposome led to increased arginase activity in macrophages, and this process was not blocked by anti-TGF-β antibodies. Our results suggest that in L. (L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages, IGF-I induces arginase activity directly in amastigotes and in macrophages through the induction of PS exposure on amastigotes in the latter, which could lead to the alternative activation of macrophages through cytokine-independent mechanisms.

  10. Recent advances in understanding apicomplexan parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Frank; Steinfelder, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular single-celled parasites belonging to the large phylum Apicomplexa are amongst the most prevalent and morbidity-causing pathogens worldwide. In this review, we highlight a few of the many recent advances in the field that helped to clarify some important aspects of their fascinating biology and interaction with their hosts. Plasmodium falciparum causes malaria, and thus the recent emergence of resistance against the currently used drug combinations based on artemisinin has been of major interest for the scientific community. It resulted in great advances in understanding the resistance mechanisms that can hopefully be translated into altered future drug regimens. Apicomplexa are also experts in host cell manipulation and immune evasion. Toxoplasma gondii and Theileria sp., besides Plasmodium sp., are species that secrete effector molecules into the host cell to reach this aim. The underlying molecular mechanisms for how these proteins are trafficked to the host cytosol ( T. gondii and Plasmodium) and how a secreted protein can immortalize the host cell ( Theileria sp.) have been illuminated recently. Moreover, how such secreted proteins affect the host innate immune responses against T. gondii and the liver stages of Plasmodium has also been unraveled at the genetic and molecular level, leading to unexpected insights. Methodological advances in metabolomics and molecular biology have been instrumental to solving some fundamental puzzles of mitochondrial carbon metabolism in Apicomplexa. Also, for the first time, the generation of stably transfected Cryptosporidium parasites was achieved, which opens up a wide variety of experimental possibilities for this understudied, important apicomplexan pathogen. PMID:27347391

  11. Intracellular Events and Cell Fate in Filovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ryabchikova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Marburg and Ebola viruses cause a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans with high fatality rates. Early target cells of filoviruses are monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The infection spreads to the liver, spleen and later other organs by blood and lymph flow. A hallmark of filovirus infection is the depletion of non-infected lymphocytes; however, the molecular mechanisms leading to the observed bystander lymphocyte apoptosis are poorly understood. Also, there is limited knowledge about the fate of infected cells in filovirus disease. In this review we will explore what is known about the intracellular events leading to virus amplification and cell damage in filovirus infection. Furthermore, we will discuss how cellular dysfunction and cell death may correlate with disease pathogenesis.

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  13. Bonamia parasites: a rapidly changing perspective on a genus of important mollusc pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, M.Y.; Culloty, S.C.; Lynch, S.A.; Arzul, I.; Carnegie, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms of the genus Bonamia are intracellular protistan parasites of oysters. To date, 4 species have been described (B. ostreae, B. exitiosa, B. perspora and B. roughleyi), although the status of B. roughleyi is controversial. Introduction especially of B. ostreae and B. exitiosa to naïve host p

  14. Host mitochondrial association evolved in the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii via neofunctionalization of a gene duplicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other warm-blooded animals, the ability to associate with host mitochondria (HMA) is driven by a locally expanded gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. The importance of copy number in the e...

  15. Macrophages and lymphocytes differentially modulate the ability of RANTES to inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eleanore; Amella, Carol A; Pompucci, Lorena; Franchin, Giovanni; Sherry, Barbara; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2003-11-01

    The beta-chemokines MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES inhibit HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells by inhibiting interactions between the virus and CCR5 receptors. However, while beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes is well documented, conflicting results have been obtained using primary macrophages as the virus target. Here, we show that the beta-chemokine RANTES inhibits virus entry into both cellular targets of the virus, lymphocytes and macrophages. However, while virus entry is inhibited at the moment of infection in both cell types, the amount of virus progeny is lowered only in lymphocytes. In macrophages, early-entry restriction is lost during long-term cultivation, and the amount of virus produced by RANTES-treated macrophages is similar to the untreated cultures, suggesting an enhanced virus replication. We further show that at least two distinct cellular responses to RANTES treatment in primary lymphocytes and macrophages contribute to this phenomenon. In lymphocytes, exposure to RANTES significantly increases the pool of inhibitory beta-chemokines through intracellular signals that result in increased production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, thereby amplifying the antiviral effects of RANTES. In macrophages this amplification step does not occur. In fact, RANTES added to the macrophages is efficiently cleared from the culture, without inducing synthesis of beta-chemokines. Our results demonstrate dichotomous effects of RANTES on HIV-1 entry at the moment of infection, and on production and spread of virus progeny in primary macrophages. Since macrophages serve as a reservoir of HIV-1, this may contribute to the failure of endogenous chemokines to successfully eradicate the virus.

  16. Phagosomal Acidification Prevents Macrophage Inflammatory Cytokine Production to Malaria, and Dendritic Cells Are the Major Source at the Early Stages of Infection: IMPLICATION FOR MALARIA PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Gowda, D Channe

    2015-09-18

    Inflammatory cytokines produced at the early stages of malaria infection contribute to shaping protective immunity and pathophysiology. To gain mechanistic insight into these processes, it is important to understand the cellular origin of cytokines because both cytokine input and cytokine-producing cells play key roles. Here, we determined cytokine responses by monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) to purified Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei ANKA, and by spleen macrophages and DCs from Plasmodium yoelii 17NXL-infected and P. berghei ANKA-infected mice. The results demonstrate that monocytes and macrophages do not produce inflammatory cytokines to malaria parasites and that DCs are the primary source early in infection, and DC subsets differentially produce cytokines. Importantly, blocking of phagosomal acidification by inhibiting vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase enabled macrophages to elicit cytokine responses. Because cytokine responses to malaria parasites are mediated primarily through endosomal Toll-like receptors, our data indicate that the inability of macrophages to produce cytokines is due to the phagosomal acidification that disrupts endosomal ligand-receptor engagement. Macrophages efficiently produced cytokines to LPS upon simultaneously internalizing parasites and to heat-killed Escherichia coli, demonstrating that phagosomal acidification affects endosomal receptor-mediated, but not cell surface receptor-mediated, recognition of Toll-like receptor agonists. Enabling monocytes/macrophages to elicit immune responses to parasites by blocking endosomal acidification can be a novel strategy for the effective development of protective immunity to malaria. The results have important implications for enhancing the efficacy of a whole parasite-based malaria vaccine and for designing strategies for the development of protective immunity to pathogens that induce immune responses primarily through endosomal receptors.

  17. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  18. Polyoxygenated cholesterol ester hydroperoxide activates TLR4 and SYK dependent signaling in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis.

  19. Quantification of malaria parasite release from infected erythrocytes: inhibition by protein-free media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerberg Joshua

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular malaria parasites leave their host erythrocytes to infect neighbouring cells after each cycle of asexual replication. No method is currently available for the direct quantification of parasite release. Method and results To quantify parasite release process, human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum were injected into sealed chambers at optimal density, where they progressed through the end of the erythrocyte cycle. Each event of parasite release inside the chamber at the site of erythrocyte rupture leaves on the chamber wall a footprint, composed of 1 separated parasites, 2 a digestive vacuole with haemozoin, and 3 fragments of the ruptured membranes. These footprints are stable for hours, allowing precise identification using differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy. The relative rate of parasite release is defined as the percent of such footprints out of all schizonts injected and incubated into chamber at 37°C for two hours. The method is highly reproducible, easy to perform, and does not require expensive equipment. Additionally, this method allows one to analyse cell and release site morphology, which adds information about the release process and the quality of the culture. The method is used here to show that swelling of schizonts caused by protein-free media inhibits parasite release. Conclusion In this study, a novel method is described to count sites of parasite release by microscopy. Besides the direct estimation of parasite release from infected erythrocytes, this method provides a morphological evaluation of normal infected cells approaching the end of the plasmodial life cycle, or pathological forms accumulated as the result of experimental intervention in the parasite release process. One may now accurately estimate the relative parasite release rate at the time of cycle transition, without any obligatory coupling to parasite invasion.

  20. Characterization of Leptin Intracellular Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Walum

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is produced by adipose tissue, and its concentration in plasma is related to the amount of fat in the body. The leptin receptor (OBR is a member of the class I cytokine receptor family and several different isoforms, produced by alternative mRNA splicing are found in many tissues, including the hypothalamus. The two predominant isoforms includes a long form (OBRl with an intracellular domain of 303 amino acids and a shorter form (OBRs with an intracellular domain of 34 amino acids. Since OBRl is mainly expressed in the hypotalamus, it has been suggested to be the main signalling form. The peripheral production of leptin by adipocyte tissue and its effects as a signal of satiety in the central nervous system imply that leptin gains access to regions of the brain regulating in energy balance by crossing the blood-brain barrier. In an attempt to characterize the intracellular transport of leptin, we have followed binding internalization and degradation of leptin in HEK293 cells. We have also monitored the intracellular transport pathway of fluorescent conjugated leptin in HEK293 cells. Phenylarsine oxide, a general inhibitor of endocytosis, as well as incubation at mild hypertonic conditions, prevented the uptake of leptin, confirming a receptor-mediated internalization process. When internalized, 125I-leptin was rapidly accumulated inside the cells and reached a maximum after 10 min. After 70 minutes about 40-50% of total counts in each time point were found in the medium as TCA-soluble material. Leptin sorting, at the level of early endosomes, did not seem to involve recycling endosomes, since FITC-leptin was sorted from Cy3- transferrin containing compartments at 37°C. At 45 minutes of continuos internalization, FITC-leptin appeared mainly accumulated in late endocytic structures colocalizing with internalized rhodamine coupled epidermial growth factor (EGF and the lysosomal marker protein lamp-1. The transport of leptin was also shown

  1. Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates survive intracellularly without replication within acidic vacuoles of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Julie; Thyssen, Sandra; Valvano, Miguel A

    2004-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex can survive intracellularly in murine macrophages and in free-living Acanthamoeba. In this work, we show that the clinical isolates B. vietnamiensis strain CEP040 and B. cenocepacia H111 survived but did not replicate within vacuoles of A. polyphaga. B. cepacia-containing vacuoles accumulated the fluid phase marker Lysosensor Blue and displayed strong blue fluorescence, indicating that they had low pH. In contrast, the majority of intracellular bacteria within amoebae treated with the V-ATPse inhibitor bafilomycin A1 localized in vacuoles that did not fluoresce with Lysosensor Blue. Experiments using bacteria fluorescently labelled with chloromethylfluorescein diacetate demonstrated that intracellular bacteria remained viable for at least 24 h. In contrast, Escherichia coli did not survive within amoebae after 2 h post infection. Furthermore, intracellular B. vietnamiensis CEP040 retained green fluorescent protein within the bacterial cytoplasm, while this protein rapidly escaped from the cytosol of phagocytized heat-killed bacteria into the vacuolar lumen. Transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed that intracellular Burkholderia cells were structurally intact. In addition, both Legionella pneumophila- and B. vietnamiensis-containing vacuoles did not accumulate cationized ferritin, a compound that localizes within the lysosome. Thus, our observations support the notion that B. cepacia complex isolates can use amoebae as a reservoir in the environment by surviving without intracellular replication within an acidic vacuole that is distinct from the lysosomal compartment.

  2. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage traffic

  3. CD14-dependent monocyte isolation enhances phagocytosis of listeria monocytogenes by proinflammatory, GM-CSF-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Neu

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an important line of defence against invading pathogens. Human macrophages derived by different methods were tested for their suitability as models to investigate Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infection and compared to macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Human primary monocytes were isolated by either positive or negative immunomagnetic selection and differentiated in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF into pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophages, respectively. Regardless of the isolation method, GM-CSF-derived macrophages (GM-Mφ stained positive for CD206 and M-CSF-derived macrophages (M-Mφ for CD163. THP-1 cells did not express CD206 or CD163 following incubation with PMA, M- or GM-CSF alone or in combination. Upon infection with Lm, all primary macrophages showed good survival at high multiplicities of infection whereas viability of THP-1 was severely reduced even at lower bacterial numbers. M-Mφ generally showed high phagocytosis of Lm. Strikingly, phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ was markedly influenced by the method used for isolation of monocytes. GM-Mφ derived from negatively isolated monocytes showed low phagocytosis of Lm whereas GM-Mφ generated from positively selected monocytes displayed high phagocytosis of Lm. Moreover, incubation with CD14 antibody was sufficient to enhance phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ generated from negatively isolated monocytes. By contrast, non-sp