WorldWideScience

Sample records for intracellular actin-based transport

  1. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallavicini, C; Levi, V; Bruno, L [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Desposito, M A, E-mail: lbruno@df.uba.a

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles ({phi}) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around {phi} = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  2. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Estes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo.

  3. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  4. Intracellular transport by active diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brangwynne, C. P.; Koenderink, G.H.; Mac Kintosh, F.C.; Weitz, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    All substances exhibit constant random motion at the microscopic scale. This is a direct consequence of thermal agitation, and leads to diffusion of molecules and small particles in a liquid. In addition to this nondirected motion, living cells also use active transport mechanisms, such as motor

  5. Intracellular transport: from physics to ... biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Aurélien; Cuvelier, Damien; Bassereau, Patricia; Goud, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    Considerable effort over the past three decades has allowed the identification of the protein families that control the cellular machinery responsible for intracellular transport within eukaryotic cells. These proteins are estimated to represent about 10-20% of the human "proteome." The complexity of intracellular transport makes useful the development of model membranes. We describe here experimental systems based on lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), which are attached to kinesin molecules. These systems give rise to thin membrane tubes and to complex tubular networks when incubated in vitro with microtubules and ATP. This type of assay, which mimics key events occurring during intracellular transport, allows physicists and biologists to understand how the unique mechanical properties of lipid membranes could be involved in the budding process, the sorting of cargo proteins and lipids, and the separation of the buds from a donor membrane.

  6. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. PMID:26488648

  7. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spatial Cell Biology : Dissecting and directing intracellular transport mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, M.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular compartmentalization and intracellular transport mechanisms are important to establish and maintain the spatial organisation of proteins and organelles needed to ensure proper cellular functioning. Especially in polarized cells like neurons, the proper distribution of proteins into the

  9. Intracellular transport of fat-soluble vitamins A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Nozomu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Vitamins are compounds that are essential for the normal growth, reproduction and functioning of the human body. Of the 13 known vitamins, vitamins A, D, E and K are lipophilic compounds and are therefore called fat-soluble vitamins. Because of their lipophilicity, fat-soluble vitamins are solubilized and transported by intracellular carrier proteins to exert their actions and to be metabolized properly. Vitamin A and its derivatives, collectively called retinoids, are solubilized by intracellular retinoid-binding proteins such as cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) and cellular retinal-binding protein (CRALBP). These proteins act as chaperones that regulate the metabolism, signaling and transport of retinoids. CRALBP-mediated intracellular retinoid transport is essential for vision in human. α-Tocopherol, the main form of vitamin E found in the body, is transported by α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) in hepatic cells. Defects of α-TTP cause vitamin E deficiency and neurological disorders in humans. Recently, it has been shown that the interaction of α-TTP with phosphoinositides plays a critical role in the intracellular transport of α-tocopherol and is associated with familial vitamin E deficiency. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms and biological significance of the intracellular transport of vitamins A and E. © 2014 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Immune regulation of Rab proteins expression and intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Gang; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2012-07-01

    Compartmentalization in cells of the immune system, the focus of this review, facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses essential for specialized immune functions. In this process of compartment maintenance, Rab proteins are central regulators of protein-mediated transport and fusion of intracellular structures. It is widely believed that the intracellular concentration of proteins that regulate intracellular transport, including Rab proteins, is constitutively mantained. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that transcriptional rates of Rab proteins can be modified. This process is especially evident during immune activation and argues that after activation, these cells require higher levels of Rab proteins. The aim of this review is to discuss evidence showing the increasing links between Rab protein expression and intracellular transport, particularly in monocytes and macrophages. We highlight here biological processes in which the expression of Rab GTPases is selectively regulated, leading to the activation of specific intracellular routes. Further, we focus on the immune regulation of intracellular transport after cytokine activation and microbial infection, with an emphasis in mycobacterial infection.

  11. Intracellular transport of cholesterol in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasaemle, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte was selected as a simple cell for the study of transbilayer movement of cholesterol. Cholesterol oxidase was used to measure the distribution of [ 3 H]cholesterol across the erythrocyte membrane. Cholesterol oxidase was also used to estimate the rate of transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to the plasma membrane of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts; the half-time of this process was 42 minutes. The rate of transport of LDL cholesterol to the plasma membrane was confirmed by a second procedure using amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was also used to estimate the rate of transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane of CHO cells. New methodology was developed including improvements of the previously published cholesterol oxidase assay for plasma membrane cholesterol. A new method for detecting transport of cholesterol to the plasma membrane in cultured cells was developed using amphotericin B. Preliminary studies investigated the use of fluorescent polyenes, pimaricin and etruscomycin, as probes for plasma membrane cholesterol in transport studies. Finally, a modification of a previously published cell staining protocol yielded a simple, quantitative assay for cell growth

  12. LIPID SYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND SECRETION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olga; Stein, Yechezkiel

    1967-01-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating albino mice injected intravenously with 9, 10-oleic acid-3H or 9, 10-palmitic acid-3H, it has been shown that the labeled fatty acids are incorporated into mammary gland glycerides. The labeled lipid in the mammary gland 1 min after injection was in esterified form (> 95%), and the radioautographic reaction was seen over the rough endoplasmic reticulum and over lipid droplets, both intracellular and intraluminal. At 10–60 min after injection, the silver grains were concentrated predominantly over lipid droplets. There was no concentration of radioactivity over the granules in the Golgi apparatus, at any time interval studied. These findings were interpreted to indicate that after esterification of the fatty acid into glycerides in the rough endoplasmic reticulum an in situ aggregation of lipid occurs, with acquisition of droplet form. The release of the lipid into the lumen proceeds directly and not through the Golgi apparatus, in contradistinction to the mode of secretion of casein in the mammary gland or of lipoprotein in the liver. The presence of strands of endoplasmic reticulum attached to intraluminal lipid droplets provides a structural counterpart to the milk microsomes described in ruminant milk. PMID:6033535

  13. Molecular approach to intracellular cargo transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ahmet

    2010-03-01

    Landmark discoveries in the study of cytoplasmic motors have been made through advances in single molecule biophysics and detailed mechanistic models exist for kinesin and dynein. However, the function of motors in physiological conditions has not been carefully tested. In cells, more than few dyneins can attach to the same cargo and interact with the opposite polarity motors of kinesin. To study the molecular crosstalk between the motors, we have used intraflagellar transport (IFT) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model system. Ultrahigh spatio-temporal tracking of single cargo movement showed that IFT particles move for long distances unidirectionally with 8 nm increments, agreeing with measured step sizes of kinesin and dynein. To measure how many motors transport each cargo, we have linked large polystyrene beads to internal IFT particles through a transmembrane protein. Force measurements indicated that, on average, 3-4 motors transport cargoes in each direction. The results showed that IFT motors are tightly coordinated and might be involved in recycling each other to the appropriate end of the flagellum.

  14. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  15. Modulating cancer cell survival by targeting intracellular cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Omer F; Gowda, Raghavendra; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2017-08-08

    Demand for cholesterol is high in certain cancers making them potentially sensitive to therapeutic strategies targeting cellular cholesterol homoeostasis. A potential approach involves disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport, which occurs in Niemann-Pick disease as a result of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency. Hence, a class of lysosomotropic compounds that were identified as functional ASM inhibitors (FIASMAs) might exhibit chemotherapeutic activity by disrupting cancer cell cholesterol homoeostasis. Here, the chemotherapeutic utility of ASM inhibition was investigated. The effect of FIASMAs on intracellular cholesterol levels, cholesterol homoeostasis, cellular endocytosis and signalling cascades were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of ASM inhibition was demonstrated using melanoma xenografts and a nanoparticle formulation was developed to overcome dose-limiting CNS-associated side effects of certain FIASMAs. Functional ASM inhibitors inhibited intracellular cholesterol transport leading to disruption of autophagic flux, cellular endocytosis and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Consequently, major oncogenic signalling cascades on which cancer cells were reliant for survival were inhibited. Two tested ASM inhibitors, perphenazine and fluphenazine that are also clinically used as antipsychotics, were effective in inhibiting xenografted tumour growth. Nanoliposomal encapsulation of the perphenazine enhanced its chemotherapeutic efficacy while decreasing CNS-associated side effects. This study suggests that disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting ASM could be utilised as a potential chemotherapeutic approach for treating cancer.

  16. Intracellular transport and compartmentation of phosphate in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaw, Wayne K; Garcia, L Rene

    2017-10-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is an essential macronutrient with structural and metabolic roles within every compartment of the plant cell. Intracellular Pi transporters direct Pi to each organelle and also control its exchange between subcellular compartments thereby providing the means to coordinate compartmented metabolic processes, including glycolysis, photosynthesis, and respiration. In this review we summarize recent advances in the identification and functional analysis of Pi transporters that localize to vacuoles, chloroplasts, non-photosynthetic plastids, mitochondria, and the Golgi apparatus. Electrical potentials across intracellular membranes and the pH of subcellular environments will also be highlighted as key factors influencing the energetics of Pi transport, and therefore pose limits for Pi compartmentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Ebbinghaus, M.; Santen, L.

    2015-09-01

    Cells are the elementary units of living organisms, which are able to carry out many vital functions. These functions rely on active processes on a microscopic scale. Therefore, they are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems, which are driven by continuous energy supply. The tasks that have to be performed in order to maintain the cell alive require transportation of various ingredients, some being small, others being large. Intracellular transport processes are able to induce concentration gradients and to carry objects to specific targets. These processes cannot be carried out only by diffusion, as cells may be crowded, and quite elongated on molecular scales. Therefore active transport has to be organized. The cytoskeleton, which is composed of three types of filaments (microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments), determines the shape of the cell, and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for a special kind of vehicles, namely the cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated. The interest for this type of question was enhanced when it was discovered that intracellular transport breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. Our review includes on the one hand an overview of biological facts, obtained from experiments, and on the other hand a presentation of some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We present some background knowledge on the original and variants of the TASEP (Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process), before turning to more application oriented models. After addressing microtubule based transport in general, with a focus on in vitro experiments, and on cooperative effects in the

  18. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and heme oxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number...

  19. Roles of rho GTPases in intracellular transport and cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiaojuan; Wang, Song; Huang, Yifan; Stamnes, Mark; Chen, Ji-Long

    2013-03-28

    Rho family GTPases belong to the Ras GTPase superfamily and transduce intracellular signals known to regulate a variety of cellular processes, including cell polarity, morphogenesis, migration, apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, viral transport and cellular transformation. The three best-characterized Rho family members are Cdc42, RhoA and Rac1. Cdc42 regulates endocytosis, the transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, post-Golgi transport and exocytosis. Cdc42 influences trafficking through interaction with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and the Arp2/3 complex, leading to changes in actin dynamics. Rac1 mediates endocytic and exocytic vesicle trafficking by interaction with its effectors, PI3kinase, synaptojanin 2, IQGAP1 and phospholipase D1. RhoA participates in the regulation of endocytosis through controlling its downstream target, Rho kinase. Interestingly, these GTPases play important roles at different stages of viral protein and genome transport in infected host cells. Importantly, dysregulation of Cdc42, Rac1 and RhoA leads to numerous disorders, including malignant transformation. In some cases, hyperactivation of Rho GTPases is required for cellular transformation. In this article, we review a number of findings related to Rho GTPase function in intracellular transport and cellular transformation.

  20. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number of transporters of heme and heme synthesis intermediates have been described. Here we review aspects of heme metabolism and discuss our current understanding of heme transporters, with emphasis on the function of the cell-surface heme exporter, FLVCR. Knockdown of Flvcr in mice leads to both defective erythropoiesis and disturbed systemic iron homeostasis, underscoring the critical role of heme transporters in mammalian physiology. PMID:21238504

  1. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    -induced cell surface DAT redistribution may result in long-lasting changes in DA homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which AMPH induces trafficking is not clear. Because AMPH is a substrate, we do not know whether extracellular AMPH stimulates trafficking through its interaction with DAT and subsequent...... alteration in DAT function, thereby triggering intracellular signaling or whether AMPH must be transported and then act intracellularly. In agreement with our previous studies, extracellular AMPH caused cytosolic redistribution of the wild-type human DAT (WT-hDAT). However, AMPH did not induce cytosolic...... redistribution in an uptake-impaired hDAT (Y335A-hDAT) that still binds AMPH. The divalent cation zinc (Zn(2+)) inhibits WT-hDAT activity, but it restores Y335A-hDAT uptake. Coadministration of Zn(2+) and AMPH consistently reduced WT-hDAT trafficking but stimulated cytosolic redistribution of Y335A...

  2. An active matter analysis of intracellular Active Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Tens of thousands of fluorescence-based trajectories at nm resolution have been analyzed, regarding active transport along microtubules in living cells. The following picture emerges. Directed motion to pre-determined locations is certainly an attractive idea, but cannot be pre-programmed as to do so would sacrifice adaptability. The polarity of microtubules is inadequate to identify these directions in cells, and no other mechanism is currently known. We conclude that molecular motors carry cargo through disordered intracellular microtubule networks in a statistical way, with loud cellular ``noise'' both in directionality and speed. Programmed random walks describe how local 1D active transport traverses crowded cellular space efficiently, rapidly, minimizing the energy waste that would result from redundant activity. The mechanism of statistical regulation is not yet understood, however.

  3. Crystallographic study of FABP5 as an intracellular endocannabinoid transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, Benoît; Wang, Tao [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sun, Jing; Wang, Liqun; Kaczocha, Martin [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Ojima, Iwao [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 1794-3400 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Deutsch, Dale, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Li, Huilin, E-mail: dale.deutsch@stonybrook.edu [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5213 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    FABP5 was recently found to intracellularly transport endocannabinoid signaling lipids. The structures of FABP5 complexed with two endocannabinoids and an inhibitor were solved. Human FABP5 was found to dimerize via a domain-swapping mechanism. This work will help in the development of inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels. In addition to binding intracellular fatty acids, fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) have recently been reported to also transport the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid derivatives that function as neurotransmitters and mediate a diverse set of physiological and psychological processes. To understand how the endocannabinoids bind to FABPs, the crystal structures of FABP5 in complex with AEA, 2-AG and the inhibitor BMS-309403 were determined. These ligands are shown to interact primarily with the substrate-binding pocket via hydrophobic interactions as well as a common hydrogen bond to the Tyr131 residue. This work advances our understanding of FABP5–endocannabinoid interactions and may be useful for future efforts in the development of small-molecule inhibitors to raise endocannabinoid levels.

  4. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  5. Analysis of Intracellular Transport by Teams of Molecular Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaban, Shreyas; Talukdar, Saurav; Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    Intracellular transport of cargoes, such as organelles, are enabled by nano-scale bio-mechanical agents called 'motor proteins', which attach to the cargo and transport it to their destination by 'walking' over filaments. The motors carry cargoes against load forces that are less than their characteristic 'stalling force'. Often transport is mediated by teams of motors, possibly of the same or different types. We develop a semi-analytical method to analyze the emergent transport properties of motor ensembles, by investigating the relative arrangements of motors while carrying a cargo. Study reveals that the relative configurations approach a unique steady state distribution, enforcing the robustness of the motor-cargo assembly. As the load on the cargo increases, motors tend to cluster together. Under high loads, akin to sudden obstacles, motors assume configurations that favor immediate cargo translocation when the load eventually subsides. Furthermore, participation by motors with varying stall forces reveals surprising results. Results indicate that a minority of motors with altered stall forces can determine average run-length and velocity of the cargo. Such mutations are related to neurological disorders, providing a potential insight into the onset of neuro-degeneration.

  6. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    applications. Further development could potentially enable selective capture of intracellular antigens, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, or disruption of the transport systems and consequently the infection and pathogenesis cycle of biothreat agents.

  7. Intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles in macrophages: intracellular uptake, exocytosis, and intercellular transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LQ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Li Qun Jiang,1 Ting Yu Wang,1 Thomas J Webster,2 Hua-Jian Duan,1 Jing Ying Qiu,1 Zi Ming Zhao,1 Xiao Xing Yin,1,* Chun Li Zheng3,* 1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Biodegradable nanomaterials have been widely used in numerous medical fields. To further improve such efforts, this study focused on the intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles (CsNPs in macrophages, a primary cell of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS. Such interactions with the MPS determine the nanoparticle retention time in the body and consequently play a significant role in their own clinical safety. In this study, various dye-labeled CsNPs (about 250 nm were prepared, and a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 was selected as a model macrophage. The results showed two mechanisms of macrophage incorporation of CsNPs, ie, a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway (the primary and phagocytosis. Following internalization, the particles partly dissociated in the cells, indicating cellular digestion of the nanoparticles. It was proved that, after intracellular uptake, a large proportion of CsNPs were exocytosed within 24 h; this excretion induced a decrease in fluorescence intensity in cells by 69%, with the remaining particles possessing difficulty being cleared. Exocytosis could be inhibited by both wortmannin and vacuolin-1, indicating that CsNP uptake was mediated by lysosomal and multivesicular body pathways, and after exocytosis, the reuptake of CsNPs by neighboring cells was verified by further experiments. This study, thus, elucidated the fate of CsNPs in macrophages as well as identified cellular disposition

  8. Intracellular transport of pancreatic zymogens during caerulein supramaximal stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, I.; Hashmimoto, S.; Saluja, A.; Steer, M.L.; Meldolesi, J.

    1987-01-01

    Rats infused with a dose of the secretagogue caerulein that is in excess of that which stimulates a maximal rate of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion develop acute edematous pancreatitis. The authors have previously noted that infusion of this dose of caerulein induces the appearance of large heterogeneous vacuoles in acinar cell, blockage of exocytosis, and intracellular accumulation of digestive zymogens. The current studies were performed to further elucidate these phenomena at the electron microscopic level of resolution and employed the techniques of pulse labeling, radioautography, and immunolocalization. Rats were infused with caerulein for 1 h, given a pulse of [ 3 H]phenylalanine, and killed at selected times during the subsequent 5- to 180-min postpulse period during which caerulein infusion was continued. Transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi cisternae was not altered by supramaximal stimulation, but transport through post-Golgi elements was altered. In particular, the maturation of condensing vacuoles into zymogen granules was found to be impaired. Thus these studies indicate that the large heterogeneous vacuoles that appear during supramaximal secretagogue stimulation and that contain admixed digestive zymogens and lysosomal hydrolases arise by at least two mechanisms, impaired condensing vacuole maturation and crinophagy

  9. Bifunctional effects of O-methylated flavones from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi on melanocytes: Inhibition of melanin production and intracellular melanosome transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Kudo

    Full Text Available The growing interest in skin lightening has recently renewed attention on the esthetic applications of Chinese herbal medicine. Although Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is used for antipyretic and antiinflammatory purposes, its whitening effect remains unclear. This study reports three major findings: (1 S. baicalensis has a potent inhibitory effect on melanogenesis; (2 wogonin and its glycoside are the active components of S. baicalensis; and (3 O-methylated flavones from S. baicalensis, such as wogonin, inhibit intracellular melanosome transport. Using a melanin quantification assay, we showed that S. baicalensis potently inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. Componential analyses revealed that the main components of S. baicalensis are baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A. Among these five flavones, wogonin and wogonoside consistently inhibited melanogenesis in both B16F10 melanoma cells and primary melanocytes. Wogonin exhibited the strongest inhibition of melanin production and markedly lightened the color of skin equivalents. We identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase-related proteins as potential targets of wogonin- and wogonoside-induced melanogenesis suppression. In culture, we found that the melanosomes in wogonin-treated B16F10 cells were localized to the perinuclear region. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that wogonin significantly reduced in melanophilin protein, which is required for actin-based melanosome transport. Other actin-based melanosome transport-related molecules, i.e., Rab27A and myosin Va, were not affected by wogonin. Cotreatment with MG132 blocked the wogonin-induced decrease in melanophilin, suggesting that wogonin promotes the proteolytic degradation of melanophilin via the calpain/proteasomal pathway. We determined that the structural specificities of the mono-O-methyl group in the flavone A-ring and the aglycone form were responsible for reducing melanosome

  10. Regulation of the Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System by Intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; HELLINGWERF, KJ; KONINGS, WN

    Various methods of manipulation of the intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis result in a unique relationship between the rate of glutamate and glutamine transport and the cytoplasmic pH. The initial rate of glutamate uptake by S. lactis cells increases more than 30-fold when the intracellular pH

  11. Live-cell imaging of new polyene sterols for improved analysis of intracellular cholesterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modzel, M.; Solanko, K. A.; Szomek, M.

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of intracellular cholesterol transport by fluorescence microscopy requires suitable fluorescent analogues of cholesterol. Most existing cholesterol analogues contain lipophilic dyes which can compromise the sterol properties in membranes. An alternative strategy is to introduce additiona...

  12. Intracellular boron accumulation in CHO-K1 cells using amino acid transport control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eisuke; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Shikano, Naoto; Ogura, Masato; Nakai, Kei; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Uemae, Yoji; Takada, Tomoya; Isobe, Tomonori; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    BPA used in BNCT has a similar structure to some essential amino acids and is transported into tumor cells by amino acid transport systems. Previous study groups have tried various techniques of loading BPA to increase intracellular boron concentration. CHO-K1 cells demonstrate system L (LAT1) activity and are suitable for specifying the transport system of a neutral amino acid. In this study, we examined the intracellular accumulation of boron in CHO-K1 cells by amino acid transport control, which involves co-loading with L-type amino acid esters. Intracellular boron accumulation in CHO-K1 cells showed the greatest increased upon co-loading 1.0 mM BPA, with 1.0 mM L-Tyr-O-Et and incubating for 60 min. This increase is caused by activation of a system L amino acid exchanger between BPA and L-Tyr. The amino acid esters are metabolized to amino acids by intracellular hydrolytic enzymes that increase the concentrations of intracellular amino acids and stimulate exchange transportation. We expect that this amino acid transport control will be useful for enhancing intracellular boron accumulation. - Highlights: • We examined optimal L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) loading in CHO-K1 cells. • Optimal BPA loading parameters were 1.0 mM and incubation for 60 min. • Intracellular boron accumulation increased upon co-loading BPA with L-Tyr-O-Et. • Optimal L-Tyr-O-Et loading parameters were 1.0 mM and incubation for 60 min. • Co-loading BPA with L-Tyr-O-Et can increase intracellular boron accumulation

  13. Immobilization of Caenorhabditis elegans to Analyze Intracellular Transport in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Shinsuke

    2017-10-18

    Axonal transport and intraflagellar transport (IFT) are essential for axon and cilia morphogenesis and function. Kinesin superfamily proteins and dynein are molecular motors that regulate anterograde and retrograde transport, respectively. These motors use microtubule networks as rails. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a powerful model organism to study axonal transport and IFT in vivo. Here, I describe a protocol to observe axonal transport and IFT in living C. elegans. Transported cargo can be visualized by tagging cargo proteins using fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). C. elegans is transparent and GFP-tagged cargo proteins can be expressed in specific cells under cell-specific promoters. Living worms can be fixed by microbeads on 10% agarose gel without killing or anesthetizing the worms. Under these conditions, cargo movement can be directly observed in the axons and cilia of living C. elegans without dissection. This method can be applied to the observation of any cargo molecule in any cells by modifying the target proteins and/or the cells they are expressed in. Most basic proteins such as molecular motors and adaptor proteins that are involved in axonal transport and IFT are conserved in C. elegans. Compared to other model organisms, mutants can be obtained and maintained more easily in C. elegans. Combining this method with various C. elegans mutants can clarify the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport and IFT.

  14. ATPase and GTPase Tangos Drive Intracellular Protein Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shu-Ou

    2016-12-01

    The GTPase superfamily of proteins provides molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The 'GTPase switch' paradigm, in which external regulatory factors control the switch of a GTPase between 'on' and 'off' states, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. However, recent work unveiled a class of nucleotide hydrolases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead, they use nucleotide-dependent dimerization cycles to regulate key cellular processes. In this review article, recent studies of dimeric GTPases and ATPases involved in intracellular protein targeting are summarized. It is suggested that these proteins can use the conformational plasticity at their dimer interface to generate multiple points of regulation, thereby providing the driving force and spatiotemporal coordination of complex cellular pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane.

  16. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future

  17. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  18. Intracellular transport of recombinant coronavirus spike proteins: implications for virus assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vennema, H.; Heijnen, L.; Zijderveld, A.; Spaan, W.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Coronavirus spike protein genes were expressed in vitro by using the recombinant vaccinia virus expression system. Recombinant spike proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced cell fusion in a host-cell-dependent fashion. The intracellular transport of recombinant spike proteins was

  19. Organelles involved in the intracellular transport of newly synthesized aminopeptidase N and their acidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E M; Sjöström, H

    1989-01-01

    vesicles are exocytotic and that the low pH in the acid compartments is of no importance for intracellular transport and correct sorting of aminopeptidase N. Furthermore, our results show that the majority of the aminopeptidase N in the lysosomal/endosomal-like compartments is newly synthesized....

  20. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, S; Pozzi, D; De Sanctis, S Candeloro; Caracciolo, G; Digman, M A; Gratton, E

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP–DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol–DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ≈ 0.003 μm 2 s −1 ). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ≈ 0.03 μm 2 s −1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes. (paper)

  1. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, S.; Pozzi, D.; Candeloro De Sanctis, S.; Digman, M. A.; Gratton, E.; Caracciolo, G.

    2013-03-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP-DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol-DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ≈ 0.003 μm2 s-1). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ≈ 0.03 μm2 s-1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanohorns decorated with semiconductor quantum dots to evaluate intracellular transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kristen A.; Inglefield, David L.; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry C.; Long, Timothy E.; Rylander, Christopher G.; Rylander, M. Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) have great potential to enhance thermal and chemotherapeutic drug efficiencies for cancer therapies. Despite their diverse capabilities, minimal research has been conducted so far to study nanoparticle intracellular transport, which is an important step in designing efficient therapies. SWNHs, like many other carbon nanomaterials, do not have inherent fluorescence properties making intracellular transport information difficult to obtain. The goals of this project were to (1) develop a simple reaction scheme to decorate the exohedral surface of SWNHs with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) and improve conjugate stability, and (2) evaluate SWNH-QD conjugate cellular uptake kinetics and localization in various cancer cell lines of differing origins and morphologies. In this study, SWNHs were conjugated to CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs using a unique approach to carbodiimide chemistry. Transmission electron microscopy and electron dispersive spectroscopy verified the conjugation of SWNHs and QDs. Cellular uptake kinetics and efficiency were characterized in three malignant cell lines: U-87 MG (glioblastoma), MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer), and AY-27 (bladder transitional cell carcinoma) using flow cytometry. Cellular distribution was verified by confocal microscopy, and cytotoxicity was also evaluated using an alamarBlue assay. Results indicate that cellular uptake kinetics and efficiency are highly dependent on cell type, highlighting the significance of studying nanoparticle transport at the cellular level. Nanoparticle intracellular transport investigations may provide information to optimize treatment parameters (e.g., SWNH concentration, treatment time, etc.) depending on tumor etiology.

  3. Real-time visualization of clustering and intracellular transport of gold nanoparticles by correlative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengmeng; Li, Qian; Liang, Le; Li, Jiang; Wang, Kun; Li, Jiajun; Lv, Min; Chen, Nan; Song, Haiyun; Lee, Joon; Shi, Jiye; Wang, Lihua; Lal, Ratnesh; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-05-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the endocytosis and intracellular trafficking of nanoparticles is essential for designing smart theranostic carriers. Physico-chemical properties, including size, clustering and surface chemistry of nanoparticles regulate their cellular uptake and transport. Significantly, even single nanoparticles could cluster intracellularly, yet their clustering state and subsequent trafficking are not well understood. Here, we used DNA-decorated gold (fPlas-gold) nanoparticles as a dually emissive fluorescent and plasmonic probe to examine their clustering states and intracellular transport. Evidence from correlative fluorescence and plasmonic imaging shows that endocytosis of fPlas-gold follows multiple pathways. In the early stages of endocytosis, fPlas-gold nanoparticles appear mostly as single particles and they cluster during the vesicular transport and maturation. The speed of encapsulated fPlas-gold transport was critically dependent on the size of clusters but not on the types of organelle such as endosomes and lysosomes. Our results provide key strategies for engineering theranostic nanocarriers for efficient health management.

  4. Transport phenomena in intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2018-02-01

    The role of non-Gaussian noises on transport characteristic of Ca2+ in intracellular calcium oscillation system driven by non-Gaussian noises is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The statistical properties of velocity of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca2+ concentration are simulated. The results exhibit, as parameter p(which is used to control the degree of the departure from the non-Gaussian noise and Gaussian noise.)increases, calcium in cytosol shows positive, zero, and negative transport, but in calcium store always hold positive value. As non-Gaussian noises increase, calcium in cytosol appears negative and zero transport, and in calcium store appears positive transport. As correlation time of non-Gaussian noises varies, calcium in both cytosol and calcium store occur negative, zero, and positive transport.

  5. Involvement of intracellular transport in TREK-1c current run-up in 293T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andharia, Naaz; Joseph, Ancy; Hayashi, Mikio; Okada, Masayoshi; Matsuda, Hiroko

    2017-05-04

    The TREK-1 channel, the TWIK-1-related potassium (K + ) channel, is a member of a family of 2-pore-domain K + (K2P) channels, through which background or leak K + currents occur. An interesting feature of the TREK-1 channel is the run-up of current: i.e. the current through TREK-1 channels spontaneously increases within several minutes of the formation of the whole-cell configuration. To investigate whether intracellular transport is involved in the run-up, we established 293T cell lines stably expressing the TREK-1c channel (K2P2.1) and examined the effects of inhibitors of membrane protein transport, N-methylmaleimide (NEM), brefeldin-A, and an endocytosis inhibitor, pitstop2, on the run-up. The results showing that NEM and brefeldin-A inhibited and pitstop2 facilitated the run-up suggest the involvement of intracellular protein transport. Correspondingly, in cells stably expressing the mCherry-TREK-1 fusion protein, NEM decreased and pitstop2 increased the cell surface localization of the fusion protein. Furthermore, the run-up was inhibited by the intracellular application of a peptide of the C-terminal fragment TREK335-360, corresponding to the interaction site with microtubule-associated protein 2 (Mtap2). This peptide also inhibited the co-immunoprecipitation of Mtap2 with anti-mCherry antibody. The extracellular application of an ezrin inhibitor (NSC668394) also suppressed the run-up and surface localization of the fusion protein. The co-application of these inhibitors abolished the TREK-1c current, suggesting that the additive effects of ezrin and Mtap2 enhance the surface expression of TREK-1c channels and the run-up. These findings clearly showed the involvement of intracellular transport in TREK-1c current run-up and its mechanism.

  6. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørnar Sporsheim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system.

  7. Cellular effects of fluorodeoxyglucose: Global changes in the lipidome and alteration in intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Klokk, Tove Irene; Lintonen, Tuulia; Simolin, Helena; Ekroos, Kim; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-11-29

    2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), labeled with 18F radioisotope, is the most common imaging agent used for positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology. However, little is known about the cellular effects of FDG. Another glucose analogue, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), has been shown to affect many cellular functions, including intracellular transport and lipid metabolism, and has been found to improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutic agents in vivo. Thus, in the present study, we have investigated cellular effects of FDG with the focus on changes in cellular lipids and intracellular transport. By quantifying more than 200 lipids from 17 different lipid classes in HEp-2 cells and by analyzing glycosphingolipids from MCF-7, HT-29 and HBMEC cells, we have discovered that FDG treatment inhibits glucosylceramide synthesis and thus reduces cellular levels of glycosphingolipids. In addition, in HEp-2 cells the levels and/or species composition of other lipid classes, namely diacylglycerols, phosphatidic acids and phosphatidylinositols, were found to change upon treatment with FDG. Furthermore, we show here that FDG inhibits retrograde Shiga toxin transport and is much more efficient in protecting cells against the toxin than 2DG. In summary, our data reveal novel effects of FDG on cellular transport and glycosphingolipid metabolism, which suggest a potential clinical application of FDG as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Kinesin-2: a family of heterotrimeric and homodimeric motors with diverse intracellular transport functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-2 was first purified as a heterotrimeric, anterograde, microtubule-based motor consisting of two distinct kinesin-related subunits and a novel associated protein (KAP) that is currently best known for its role in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis. Subsequent work, however, has revealed diversity in the oligomeric state of different kinesin-2 motors owing to the combinatorial heterodimerization of its subunits and the coexistence of both heterotrimeric and homodimeric kinesin-2 motors in some cells. Although the functional significance of the homo- versus heteromeric organization of kinesin-2 motor subunits and the role of KAP remain uncertain, functional studies suggest that cooperation between different types of kinesin-2 motors or between kinesin-2 and a member of a different motor family can generate diverse patterns of anterograde intracellular transport. Moreover, despite being restricted to ciliated eukaryotes, kinesin-2 motors are now known to drive diverse transport events outside cilia. Here, I review the organization, assembly, phylogeny, biological functions, and motility mechanism of this diverse family of intracellular transport motors.

  9. An intracellular traffic jam: Fc receptor-mediated transport of immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Devin B; Björkman, Pamela J

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques along with more powerful in vitro and in vivo models of receptor-mediated ligand transport are facilitating advances in our understanding of how cells efficiently direct receptors and their cargo to target destinations within the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. Specifically, light and 3D electron microscopy studies examining the trafficking behavior of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a transport receptor for immunoglobulin G (IgG), have given us new insights into the dynamic interplay between the structural components of the cytosolic trafficking machinery, its protein regulators, and the receptors it directs to various locations within the cell. These studies build upon previous biochemical characterizations of FcRn transport and are allowing us to begin formulation of a more complete model for the intracellular trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes.

  10. Competition of energy between active transport and vesicle fusion at the origin of intracellular gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelcé, Pierre

    2018-02-07

    It has been reported that the ionic patterns of hyphal growth can be explained by a weakening of the active transport at the tip at the expense of other biosynthesis processes, from which results energy transport from the proximal cells to the apical ones (Potapova et al. 1988). We present here a theory to support this hypothesis, whose extent is much more general than the initial frame where it has been formulated. It can be summarized in two basics mechanisms, one coupling active transport of the plasma membrane, electric potential and vesicle fusion, the other coupling the Ca 2+ -ATPase of the endoplasmic reticulum and vesicle fusion. For some values of parameters introduced in the theory, the uniform state of the cell becomes unstable, at the origin of intracellular gradient fields. Theoretical ionic patterns are spontaneously produced, which can be satisfactorily compared to several observed in and around tip-growing cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Navigating the plant cell: intracellular transport logistics in the green kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geitmann, Anja; Nebenführ, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular transport in plant cells occurs on microtubular and actin arrays. Cytoplasmic streaming, the rapid motion of plant cell organelles, is mostly driven by an actin-myosin mechanism, whereas specialized functions, such as the transport of large cargo or the assembly of a new cell wall during cell division, are performed by the microtubules. Different modes of transport are used, fast and slow, to either haul cargo over long distances or ascertain high-precision targeting, respectively. Various forms of the actin-specific motor protein myosin XI exist in plant cells and might be involved in different cellular functions. © 2015 Geitmann and Nebenführ. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Intracellular Transport of Cargo in a Sub-diffusive Environment over an Explicit Cytoskeletal Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelfeyt, Bryan; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Intracellular transport occurs in nearly all eukaryotic cells, where materials such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids travel to target locations through phases of passive, diffusion-based transport and active, motor-driven transport along filaments that make up the cell's cytoskeleton.We develop a computational model of the process with explicit cytoskeletal filament networks. In the active transport phase, cargo moves in straight lines along these filaments that are spread throughout the cell. To model the passive transport phase of cargo in the cytoplasm, where anomalous sub-diffusion is thought to take place, we implement a continuous-time random walk. We use this approach to provide a stepping stone to a predictive model where we can determine transport properties over a cytoskeletal network provided by experimental images of real filaments. We illustrate our approach by modeling the transport of insulin out of the cell and determining the impact of network geometry, anomalous sub-diffusion and motor number on the first-passage time distributions for insulin granules reaching their target destinations on the membrane.

  13. Identification of intracellular residues in the dopamine transporter critical for regulation of transporter conformation and cocaine binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, Claus Juul; Grånäs, Charlotta; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2004-01-01

    Recently we showed evidence that mutation of Tyr-335 to Ala (Y335A) in the human dopamine transporter (hDAT) alters the conformational equilibrium of the transport cycle. Here, by substituting, one at a time, 16 different bulky or charged intracellular residues, we identify three residues, Lys-264......, this inactivation was protected by dopamine and enhanced by cocaine. These data are consistent with a Zn(2+)-dependent partial reversal of a constitutively altered conformational equilibrium in the mutant transporters. They also suggest that the conformational equilibrium produced by the mutations resembles...... that of the NET more than that of the DAT. Moreover, the data provide evidence that the cocaine-bound state of both DAT mutants and of the NET is structurally distinct from the cocaine-bound state of the DAT....

  14. The GARP Complex Is Involved in Intracellular Cholesterol Transport via Targeting NPC2 to Lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jian; Zhang, Ying-Yu; Luo, Jie; Wang, Ju-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Xia; Miao, Hong-Hua; Shi, Xiong-Jie; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2017-06-27

    Proper intracellular cholesterol trafficking is critical for cellular function. Two lysosome-resident proteins, NPC1 and NPC2, mediate the egress of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes. However, other proteins involved in this process remain largely unknown. Through amphotericin B-based selection, we isolated two cholesterol transport-defective cell lines. Subsequent whole-transcriptome-sequencing analysis revealed two cell lines bearing the same mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 53 (Vps53) gene. Depletion of VPS53 or other subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex impaired NPC2 sorting to lysosomes and caused cholesterol accumulation. GARP deficiency blocked the retrieval of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) to the trans-Golgi network. Further, Vps54 mutant mice displayed reduced cellular NPC2 protein levels and increased cholesterol accumulation, underscoring the physiological role of the GARP complex in cholesterol transport. We conclude that the GARP complex contributes to intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting NPC2 to lysosomes in a CI-MPR-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of intracellular regions in the human serotonin transporter for phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    /dephosphorylation during transporter regulation by multiple pathways. In particular, activation and/or inhibition of kinases including PKC, PKG, p38MAPK, and CaMKII modulate SERT function and trafficking. The molecular mechanisms by which kinase activity is linked to SERT regulation are poorly understood, including...... the identity of specific phosphorylated residues. To elucidate SERT phosphorylation sites, we have generated peptides corresponding to the entire intracellular region of human SERT and performed in vitro phosphorylation assays with a panel of kinases suggested to be involved in SERT regulation or for which...

  16. Intracellular sucrose communicates metabolic demand to sucrose transporters in developing pea cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchan; Chan, Katie; Wang, Trevor L; Hedley, Cliff L; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2009-01-01

    Mechanistic inter-relationships in sinks between sucrose compartmentation/metabolism and phloem unloading/translocation are poorly understood. Developing grain legume seeds provide tractable experimental systems to explore this question. Metabolic demand by cotyledons is communicated to phloem unloading and ultimately import by sucrose withdrawal from the seed apoplasmic space via a turgor-homeostat mechanism. What is unknown is how metabolic demand is communicated to cotyledon sucrose transporters responsible for withdrawing sucrose from the apoplasmic space. This question was explored here using a pea rugosus mutant (rrRbRb) compromised in starch biosynthesis compared with its wild-type counterpart (RRRbRb). Sucrose influx into cotyledons was found to account for 90% of developmental variations in their absolute growth and hence starch biosynthetic rates. Furthermore, rr and RR cotyledons shared identical response surfaces, indicating that control of transporter activity was likely to be similar for both lines. In this context, sucrose influx was correlated positively with expression of a sucrose/H(+) symporter (PsSUT1) and negatively with two sucrose facilitators (PsSUF1 and PsSUF4). Sucrose influx exhibited a negative curvilinear relationship with cotyledon concentrations of sucrose and hexoses. In contrast, the impact of intracellular sugars on transporter expression was transporter dependent, with expression of PsSUT1 inhibited, PsSUF1 unaffected, and PsSUF4 enhanced by sugars. Sugar supply to, and sugar concentrations of, RR cotyledons were manipulated using in vitro pod and cotyledon culture. Collectively the results obtained showed that intracellular sucrose was the physiologically active sugar signal that communicated metabolic demand to sucrose influx and this transport function was primarily determined by PsSUT1 regulated at the transcriptional level.

  17. Following Intracellular Cholesterol Transport by Linear and Non-Linear Optical Microscopy of Intrinsically Fluorescent Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wustner, D.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of intracellular cholesterol transport is important for understanding the molecular basis of several metabolic and neuronal diseases, like atheroclerosis or lysosomal storage disorders. Progress in this field depends crucially on the development of new technical approaches to follow...... the cellular movement of this essential lipid molecule. In this article, a survey of the various methods being used for analysis of sterol trafficking is given. Various classical biochemical methods are presented and their suitability for analysis of sterol trafficking is assessed. Special emphasis...... analysis like pixel-wise bleach rate fitting and multiphoton image correlation spectroscopy are introduced. Several applications of the new technology including observation of vectorial sterol trafficking in polarized human hepatoma cells for investigation of reverse cholesterol transport are presented....

  18. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and intracellular pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The in situ assembly states of the glucose transport carrier protein in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular (microsomal) storage pool of rat adipocytes were assessed by studying radiation-induced inactivation of the D-glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding activities. High energy radiation inactivated the glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding of each of these membrane preparations by reducing the total number of the binding sites without affecting the dissociation constant. The reduction in total number of binding sites was analyzed as a function of radiation dose based on target theory, from which a radiation-sensitive mass (target size) was calculated. When the plasma membranes of insulin-treated adipocytes were used, a target size of approximately 58,000 daltons was obtained. For adipocyte microsomal membranes, we obtained target sizes of approximately 112,000 and 109,000 daltons prior to and after insulin treatment, respectively. In the case of microsomal membranes, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses, which may be interpreted as indicating the presence of a radiation-sensitive inhibitor. These results suggest that the adipocyte glucose transporter occurs as a monomer in the plasma membrane while existing in the intracellular reserve pool either as a homodimer or as a stoichiometric complex with a protein of an approximately equal size

  19. Luminal uptake and intracellular transport of insulin in renal proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellfritzsch, M.; Christensen, E.I.; Sonne, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is generally accepted that proteins taken up from the renal tubular fluid are transported into lysosomes in proximal tubule cells. Recently, however, it has been postulated that insulin in isolated perfused rat kidneys did not accumulate in lysosomes but to a certain degree in the Golgi region. The present study was undertaken to investigate the intracellular handling of biologically unaltered insulin in rat renal proximal tubule cells. Rats were prepared for in vivo micropuncture and either a colloidal gold insulin complex or insulin monoiodinated in the A-14 position ( 125 I-insulin) was microinfused into proximal tubules. After 5, 10, 25 or 60 min the tubules were fixed by microinfusion of glutaraldehyde and processed for electron microscopy or electron microscope autoradiography. A qualitative analysis of tubules infused with colloidal gold insulin or 125 I-insulin showed that insulin was taken up by endocytosis and transported to lysosomes, and a quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the 125 I-insulin microinfused tubules showed that the grain density after five min was significantly increased for endocytic vacuoles and for lysosomes. After 60 min the grain density was still significant over lysosomes. The accumulation of grains was non-significant over all other areas analyzed at any time. This study shows that insulin is taken up from the luminal side of the proximal tubule by endocytosis and transported to the lysosomes. There was no significant transport to the Golgi region

  20. Cytoplasmic electric fields and electroosmosis: possible solution for the paradoxes of the intracellular transport of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor P Andreev

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to show that electroosmotic flow might play an important role in the intracellular transport of biomolecules. The paper presents two mathematical models describing the role of electroosmosis in the transport of the negatively charged messenger proteins to the negatively charged nucleus and in the recovery of the fluorescence after photobleaching. The parameters of the models were derived from the extensive review of the literature data. Computer simulations were performed within the COMSOL 4.2a software environment. The first model demonstrated that the presence of electroosmosis might intensify the flux of messenger proteins to the nucleus and allow the efficient transport of the negatively charged phosphorylated messenger proteins against the electrostatic repulsion of the negatively charged nucleus. The second model revealed that the presence of the electroosmotic flow made the time of fluorescence recovery dependent on the position of the bleaching spot relative to cellular membrane. The magnitude of the electroosmotic flow effect was shown to be quite substantial, i.e. increasing the flux of the messengers onto the nucleus up to 4-fold relative to pure diffusion and resulting in the up to 3-fold change in the values of fluorescence recovery time, and therefore the apparent diffusion coefficient determined from the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Based on the results of the modeling and on the universal nature of the electroosmotic flow, the potential wider implications of electroosmotic flow in the intracellular and extracellular biological processes are discussed. Both models are available for download at ModelDB.

  1. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of long-term research of the morpho-functional characteristics of the cells of the stomach, small intestine and gallbladder the mechanism and function of membrane vesicles in the implementation of the main functions of these organs sets out in this article: the secretion of hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and the fluid at a concentration of bile epitheliocytes of gallbladder. Proofs of the intracellular formation of hydrochloric acid in tubulovesicles of the parietal cells and turnover of its secretory membranes in the process of secretory cycle, that has ensured the re-use and explained the extraordinary life of these unique cells are presented. The credible mechanism of HCl output oppression by H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity blockers has set out on this basis. The article provides detailed endocytosis mechanism of the ions and nutrients absorption by enterocytes. The mechanism of participation of the apical contractile complex of brush border of epithelial cells in the initiation of endocytosis and cytoplasmic microtubules in transport of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm was analyzed. Based on our research and numerous of the world scientific proceedings the conclusion was done about the existence of two energy dependent types of transport in the absorptive epithelium of the digestive--transmembrane (ionic and nutritive) homeostatic type which is realized by the ATP-system of the basal plasmalemma, and vesicular (endocytosis) type which is impltmented by apical contractile complex of brush border and cytoplasmic microtubules. Both types of transport are interrelated and are under constant cellular control. This observation is relevant to the majority of cells, including those involved in the secretion of various substances: hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, enzymes by main cells of the gastric glands and exocrinocytes of the pancreas, hormone by endocrine cells of the APUD system and, finally

  2. An intracellular interaction network regulates conformational transitions in the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kniazeff, Julie; Shi, Lei; Løland, Claus Juul

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS)(1) mediate sodium-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft and are targets for many psychoactive drugs. The crystal structure of the prokaryotic NSS protein, LeuT, was recently solved at high resolution; however, the mechanistic...... details of regulation of the permeation pathway in this class of proteins remain unknown. Here we combine computational modeling and experimental probing in the dopamine transporter (DAT) to demonstrate the functional importance of a conserved intracellular interaction network. Our data suggest...... that a salt bridge between Arg-60 in the N terminus close to the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment (TM) 1 and Asp-436 at the cytoplasmic end of TM8 is stabilized by a cation-pi interaction between Arg-60 and Tyr-335 at the cytoplasmic end of TM6. Computational probing illustrates how the interactions...

  3. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  4. Paraquat Resistant1, a Golgi-localized putative transporter protein, is involved in intracellular transport of paraquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-05-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops.

  5. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E. (SBU)

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  6. Dysregulation of intracellular calcium transporters in animal models of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Edgecomb, Jessica; LaBarge, Kara; Colucci, Wilson S

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) develops as the result of myocardial calcium (Ca) dysregulation. Here we reviewed all published studies that quantified the dysfunction of intracellular Ca transporters and the myofilaments in animal models of SIC. Cardiomyocytes isolated from septic animals showed, invariably, a decreased twitch amplitude, which is frequently caused by a decrease in the amplitude of cellular Ca transients (ΔCai) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load (CaSR). Underlying these deficits, the L-type Ca channel is downregulated, through mechanisms that may involve adrenomedullin-mediated redox signaling. The SR Ca pump is also inhibited, through oxidative modifications (sulfonylation) of one reactive thiol group (on Cys) and/or modulation of phospholamban. Diastolic Ca leak of ryanodine receptors is frequently increased. In contrast, Na/Ca exchange inhibition may play a partially compensatory role by increasing CaSR and ΔCai. The action potential is usually shortened. Myofilaments show a bidirectional regulation, with decreased Ca sensitivity in milder forms of disease (due to troponin I hyperphosphorylation) and an increase (redox mediated) in more severe forms. Most deficits occurred similarly in two different disease models, induced by either intraperitoneal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide or cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, substantial cumulative evidence implicates various Ca transporters and the myofilaments in SIC pathology. What is less clear, however, are the identity and interplay of the signaling pathways that are responsible for Ca transporters dysfunction. With few exceptions, all studies we found used solely male animals. Identifying sex differences in Ca dysregulation in SIC becomes, therefore, another priority.

  7. Dysregulation of intracellular calcium transporters in animal models of sepsis induced cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A.; Edgecomb, Jessica; LaBarge, Kara; Colucci, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) develops as the result of myocardial calcium (Ca2+) dysregulation. Here we reviewed all published studies that quantified the dysfunction of intracellular Ca2+ transporters and the myofilaments in animal models of SIC. Cardiomyocytes isolated from septic animals showed, invariably, a decreased twitch amplitude, which is frequently caused by a decrease in the amplitude of cellular Ca2+ transients (ΔCai) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ load (CaSR). Underlying these deficits, the L-type Ca2+ channel is downregulated, through mechanisms that may involve adrenomedullin-mediated redox signaling. SR Ca2+ pump (SERCA) is also inhibited, through oxidative modifications (sulphonylation) of one reactive thiol group (on Cys674), and/or modulation of phospholamban. Diastolic Ca2+ leak of ryanodine receptors is frequently increased. In contrast, Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition may play a partially compensatory role by increasing CaSR and ΔCai. The action potential is usually shortened. Myofilaments show a bidirectional regulation, with decreased Ca2+ sensitivity in milder forms of disease (due to troponin I hyperphosphorylation) and a (redox mediated) increase in more severe forms. Most deficits occurred similarly in two different disease models, induced by either intraperitoneal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In conclusion, substantial cumulative evidence implicates various Ca2+ transporters and the myofilaments in SIC pathology. What is less clear, however, is the identity and interplay of the signaling pathways that are responsible for Ca2+ transporters dysfunction. With few exceptions, all studies we found used solely male animals. Identifying sex differences in Ca2+ dysregulation in SIC becomes, therefore, another priority. PMID:25186837

  8. Chapter 4: Multitasking by exploitation of intracellular transport functions the many faces of FcRn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2009-01-01

    The MHC Class I-related receptor, FcRn, transports antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class within and across a diverse array of different cell types. Through this transport, FcRn serves multiple roles throughout adult life that extend well beyond its earlier defined function of transcytosing IgGs from mother to offspring. These roles include the maintenance of IgG levels and the delivery of antigen in the form of immune complexes to degradative compartments within cells. Recent studies have led to significant advances in knowledge of the intracellular trafficking of FcRn and (engineered) IgGs at both the molecular and cellular levels. The engineering of FcRn-IgG (or Fc) interactions to generate antibodies of increased longevity represents an area of active interest, particularly in the light of the expanding use of antibodies in therapy. The strict pH dependence of FcRn-IgG interactions, with binding at pH 6 that becomes essentially undetectable as near neutral pH is approached, is essential for efficient transport. The requirement for retention of low affinity at near neutral pH increases the complexity of engineering antibodies for increased half-life. Conversely, engineered IgGs that have gained significant binding for FcRn at this pH can be potent inhibitors of FcRn that lower endogenous IgG levels and have multiple potential uses as therapeutics. In addition, molecular studies of FcRn-IgG interactions indicate that mice have limitations as preclinical models for FcRn function, primarily due to cross-species differences in FcRn-binding specificity.

  9. Multitasking by Exploitation of Intracellular Transport Functions: The Many Faces of FcRn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2015-01-01

    The MHC Class I-related receptor, FcRn, transports antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class within and across a diverse array of different cell types. Through this transport, FcRn serves multiple roles throughout adult life that extend well beyond its earlier defined function of transcytosing IgGs from mother to offspring. These roles include the maintenance of IgG levels and the delivery of antigen in the form of immune complexes to degradative compartments within cells. Recent studies have led to significant advances in knowledge of the intracellular trafficking of FcRn and (engineered) IgGs at both the molecular and cellular levels. The engineering of FcRn–IgG (or Fc) interactions to generate antibodies of increased longevity represents an area of active interest, particularly in the light of the expanding use of antibodies in therapy. The strict pH dependence of FcRn–IgG interactions, with binding at pH 6 that becomes essentially undetectable as near neutral pH is approached, is essential for efficient transport. The requirement for retention of low affinity at near neutral pH increases the complexity of engineering antibodies for increased half-life. Conversely, engineered IgGs that have gained significant binding for FcRn at this pH can be potent inhibitors of FcRn that lower endogenous IgG levels and have multiple potential uses as therapeutics. In addition, molecular studies of FcRn–IgG interactions indicate that mice have limitations as preclinical models for FcRn function, primarily due to cross-species differences in FcRn-binding specificity. PMID:19755184

  10. In silico reconstitution of actin-based symmetry breaking and motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dayel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells assemble viscoelastic networks of crosslinked actin filaments to control their shape, mechanical properties, and motility. One important class of actin network is nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex and drives both membrane protrusion at the leading edge of motile cells and intracellular motility of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. These networks can be reconstituted in vitro from purified components to drive the motility of spherical micron-sized beads. An Elastic Gel model has been successful in explaining how these networks break symmetry, but how they produce directed motile force has been less clear. We have combined numerical simulations with in vitro experiments to reconstitute the behavior of these motile actin networks in silico using an Accumulative Particle-Spring (APS model that builds on the Elastic Gel model, and demonstrates simple intuitive mechanisms for both symmetry breaking and sustained motility. The APS model explains observed transitions between smooth and pulsatile motion as well as subtle variations in network architecture caused by differences in geometry and conditions. Our findings also explain sideways symmetry breaking and motility of elongated beads, and show that elastic recoil, though important for symmetry breaking and pulsatile motion, is not necessary for smooth directional motility. The APS model demonstrates how a small number of viscoelastic network parameters and construction rules suffice to recapture the complex behavior of motile actin networks. The fact that the model not only mirrors our in vitro observations, but also makes novel predictions that we confirm by experiment, suggests that the model captures much of the essence of actin-based motility in this system.

  11. Plasma membrane-located purine nucleotide transport proteins are key components for host exploitation by microsporidian intracellular parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of most animal groups including humans, but despite their significant economic and medical importance there are major gaps in our understanding of how they exploit infected host cells. We have investigated the evolution, cellular locations and substrate specificities of a family of nucleotide transport (NTT proteins from Trachipleistophora hominis, a microsporidian isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient. Transport proteins are critical to microsporidian success because they compensate for the dramatic loss of metabolic pathways that is a hallmark of the group. Our data demonstrate that the use of plasma membrane-located nucleotide transport proteins (NTT is a key strategy adopted by microsporidians to exploit host cells. Acquisition of an ancestral transporter gene at the base of the microsporidian radiation was followed by lineage-specific events of gene duplication, which in the case of T. hominis has generated four paralogous NTT transporters. All four T. hominis NTT proteins are located predominantly to the plasma membrane of replicating intracellular cells where they can mediate transport at the host-parasite interface. In contrast to published data for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, we found no evidence for the location for any of the T. hominis NTT transporters to its minimal mitochondria (mitosomes, consistent with lineage-specific differences in transporter and mitosome evolution. All of the T. hominis NTTs transported radiolabelled purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, GTP and GDP when expressed in Escherichia coli, but did not transport radiolabelled pyrimidine nucleotides. Genome analysis suggests that imported purine nucleotides could be used by T. hominis to make all of the critical purine-based building-blocks for DNA and RNA biosynthesis during parasite intracellular replication, as well as providing essential energy for parasite cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

  12. Intracellular Transport Routes for MHC I and Their Relevance for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Babdor, Joel; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Guermonprez, Pierre; Saveanu, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation, in which exogenous antigens are presented via MHC I complexes, is involved both in the generation of anti-infectious and anti-tumoral cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. While cross-presentation was described almost four decades ago and while it is now established that some dendritic cell (DC) subsets are better than others in processing and cross-presenting internalized antigens, the involved molecular mechanisms remain only partially understood. Some of the least explored molecular mechanisms in cross-presentation concern the origin of cross-presenting MHC I molecules and the cellular compartments where antigenic peptide loading occurs. This review focuses on MHC I molecules and their intracellular trafficking. We discuss the source of cross-presenting MHC I in DCs as well as the role of the endocytic pathway in their recycling from the cell surface. Next, we describe the importance of the TAP peptide transporter for delivering peptides to MHC I during cross-presentation. Finally, we highlight the impact of innate immunity mechanisms on specific antigen cross-presentation mechanisms in which TLR activation modulates MHC I trafficking and TAP localization. PMID:26191062

  13. Energetics of copper trafficking between the Atx1 metallochaperone and the intracellular copper transporter, Ccc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, D L; O'Halloran, T V

    2000-06-23

    The Atx1 metallochaperone protein is a cytoplasmic Cu(I) receptor that functions in intracellular copper trafficking pathways in plants, microbes, and humans. A key physiological partner of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Atx1 is Ccc2, a cation transporting P-type ATPase located in secretory vesicles. Here, we show that Atx1 donates its metal ion cargo to the first N-terminal Atx1-like domain of Ccc2 in a direct and reversible manner. The thermodynamic gradient for metal transfer is shallow (K(exchange) = 1.4 +/- 0.2), establishing that vectorial delivery of copper by Atx1 is not based on a higher copper affinity of the target domain. Instead, Atx1 allows rapid metal transfer to its partner. This equilibrium is unaffected by a 50-fold excess of the Cu(I) competitor, glutathione, indicating that Atx1 also protects Cu(I) from nonspecific reactions. Mechanistically, we propose that a low activation barrier for transfer between partners results from complementary electrostatic forces that ultimately orient the metal-binding loops of Atx1 and Ccc2 for formation of copper-bridged intermediates. These thermodynamic and kinetic considerations suggest that copper trafficking proteins overcome the extraordinary copper chelation capacity of the eukaryotic cytoplasm by catalyzing the rate of copper transfer between physiological partners. In this sense, metallochaperones work like enzymes, carefully tailoring energetic barriers along specific reaction pathways but not others.

  14. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-01

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (cryopreservation for practical applications.

  15. Membrane depolarization regulates intracellular RANKL transport in non-excitable osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notomi, Takuya; Kuno, Miyuki; Hiyama, Akiko; Ezura, Yoichi; Honma, Masashi; Ishizuka, Toru; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Yawo, Hiromu; Noda, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3) are important factors in Ca(2+) homeostasis, and promote osteoclastogenesis by modulating receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression. However, their contribution to RANKL intracellular transport (RANKLiT), including the trigger for RANKL lysosomal vesicle (RANKL-lv) fusion to the cell membrane, is unclear. In neurons, depolarization of membrane potential increases the intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)]i) and promotes neurotransmitter release via fusion of the synaptic vesicles to the cell membrane. To determine whether membrane depolarization also regulates cellular processes such as RANKLiT in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts (OBs), we generated a light-sensitive OB cell line and developed a system for altering their membrane potential via delivery of a blue light stimulus. In the membrane fraction of RANKL-overexpressing OBs, PTH and VD3 increased the membrane-bound RANKL (mbRANKL) level at 10 min after application without affecting the mRNA expression level, and depolarized the cell membrane while transiently increasing [Ca(2+)]i. In our novel OB line stably expressing the channelrhodopsin-wide receiver, blue light-induced depolarization increased the mbRANKL level, which was reversed by treatment of blockers for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. In co-cultures of osteoclast precursor-like RAW264.7 cells and light-sensitive OBs overexpressing RANKL, light stimulation induced an increase in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and promoted osteoclast differentiation. These results indicate that depolarization of the cell membrane is a trigger for RANKL-lv fusion to the membrane and that membrane potential contributes to the function of OBs. In addition, the non-genomic action of VD3-induced RANKL-lv fusion included the membrane-bound VD3 receptor (1,25D3-MARRS receptor). Elucidating the mechanism of RANKLiT regulation

  16. Intracellular Requirements for Passive Proton Transport through the Na+,K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kevin S; Meyer, Dylan J; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2016-12-06

    The Na + ,K + -ATPase (NKA or Na/K pump) hydrolyzes one ATP to exchange three intracellular Na+ (Na + i ) for two extracellular K+ (K + o ) across the plasma membrane by cycling through a set of reversible transitions between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated conformations, alternately opening ion-binding sites externally (E2) or internally (E1). With subsaturating [Na + ] o and [K + ] o , the phosphorylated E2P conformation passively imports protons generating an inward current (I H ), which may be exacerbated in NKA-subunit mutations associated with human disease. To elucidate the mechanisms of I H , we studied the effects of intracellular ligands (transported ions, nucleotides, and beryllium fluoride) on I H and, for comparison, on transient currents measured at normal Na + o (Q Na ). Utilizing inside-out patches from Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing NKA, we observed that 1) in the presence of Na + i , I H and Q Na were both activated by ATP, but not ADP; 2) the [Na + ] i dependence of I H in saturating ATP showed K 0.5,Na  = 1.8 ± 0.2 mM and the [ATP] dependence at saturating [Na + ] i yielded K 0.5,ATP  = 48 ± 11 μM (in comparison, Na + i -dependent Q Na yields K 0.5,Na  = 0.8 ± 0.2 mM and K 0.5,ATP  = 0.43 ± 0.03 μM; 3) ATP activated I H in the presence of K + i (∼15% of the I H observed in Na + i ) only when Mg 2+ i was also present; and 4) beryllium fluoride induced maximal I H  even in the absence of nucleotide. These data indicate that I H occurs when NKA is in an externally open E2P state with nucleotide bound, a conformation that can be reached through forward Na/K pump phosphorylation of E1, with Na + i and ATP, or by backward binding of K + i to E1, which drives the pump to the occluded E2(2K), where free P i (at the micromolar levels found in millimolar ATP solutions) promotes external release of occluded K + by backdoor NKA phosphorylation. Maximal I H through beryllium-fluorinated NKA indicates that this complex mimics ATP

  17. Photoactivatable Drug-Caged Fluorophore Conjugate Allows Direct Quantification of Intracellular Drug Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Rainer H.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We report here a method that utilizes photoactivatable drug-caged fluorophore conjugate to quantify intracellular drug trafficking processes at single cell resolution. Photoactivation is performed in labeled cellular compartments to visualize intracellular drug exchange at physiologic conditions, without the need for washing, facilitating its translation to in vivo cancer models. PMID:24135896

  18. Intracellular loop 5 is important for the transport mechanism and molecular pharmacology of the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Saida; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) belongs to a family of transport proteins called the neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. The specialized members of this family transport different neurotransmitters across the cell membrane, thereby regulating signaling between neurons. Most of these transporters...

  19. Tritium Suicide Selection Identifies Proteins Involved in the Uptake and Intracellular Transport of Sterols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, David P.; Georgiev, Alexander; Menon, Anant K.

    2009-01-01

    Sterol transport between the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) occurs by a nonvesicular mechanism that is poorly understood. To identify proteins required for this process, we isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in sterol transport. We used Upc2-1 cells that have the ability to take up sterols under aerobic conditions and exploited the observation that intracellular accumulation of exogenously supplied [3H]cholesterol in the form of [3H]cholesteryl ester requires an intact PM-ER sterol transport pathway. Upc2-1 cells were mutagenized using a transposon library, incubated with [3H]cholesterol, and subjected to tritium suicide selection to isolate mutants with a decreased ability to accumulate [3H]cholesterol. Many of the mutants had defects in the expression and trafficking of Aus1 and Pdr11, PM-localized ABC transporters that are required for sterol uptake. Through characterization of one of the mutants, a new role was uncovered for the transcription factor Mot3 in controlling expression of Aus1 and Pdr11. A number of mutants had transposon insertions in the uncharacterized Ydr051c gene, which we now refer to as DET1 (decreased ergosterol transport). These mutants expressed Aus1 and Pdr11 normally but were severely defective in the ability to accumulate exogenously supplied cholesterol. The transport of newly synthesized sterols from the ER to the PM was also defective in det1Δ cells. These data indicate that the cytoplasmic protein encoded by DET1 is involved in intracellular sterol transport. PMID:19060182

  20. Intracellular transport of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol is defective in Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscum, L.; Ruggiero, R.M.; Faust, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is characterized by substantial intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol. The accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in NPC fibroblasts cultured with low density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to result from the inability of LDL to stimulate cholesterol esterification in addition to impaired LDL-mediated downregulation of LDL receptor activity and cellular cholesterol synthesis. Although a defect in cholesterol transport in NPC cells has been inferred from previous studies, no experiments have been reported that measure the intracellular movement of LDL-cholesterol specifically. We have used four approaches to assess intracellular cholesterol transport in normal and NPC cells and have determined the following: (a) mevinolin-inhibited NPC cells are defective in using LDL-cholesterol for growth. However, exogenously added mevalonate restores cell growth equally in normal and NPC cells; (b) the transport of LDL-derived [3H]cholesterol to the plasma membrane is slower in NPC cells, while the rate of appearance of [3H]acetate-derived, endogenously synthesized [3H]cholesterol at the plasma membrane is the same for normal and NPC cells; (c) in NPC cells, LDL-derived [3H]cholesterol accumulates in lysosomes to higher levels than normal, resulting in defective movement to other cell membranes; and (d) incubation of cells with LDL causes an increase in cholesterol content of NPC lysosomes that is threefold greater than that observed in normal lysosomes. Our results indicate that a cholesterol transport defect exists in NPC that is specific for LDL-derived cholesterol

  1. Traffic jam: a compendium of human diseases that affect intracellular transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridor, M; Hannan, L A

    2000-11-01

    As sequencing of the human genome nears completion, the genes that cause many human diseases are being identified and functionally described. This has revealed that many human diseases are due to defects of intracellular trafficking. This 'Toolbox' catalogs and briefly describes these diseases.

  2. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Low temperature arrests both processing and intracellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, Gert Helge; Cowell, G M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of culture at 20 degrees C on biosynthesis of microvillar enzymes was studied in pig small intestinal mucosal explants. At this temperature, aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) and sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10) both accumulated intracellularly, predominantly in their transient, high m...

  3. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Low temperature arrests both processing and intracellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, Gert Helge; Cowell, G M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of culture at 20 degrees C on biosynthesis of microvillar enzymes was studied in pig small intestinal mucosal explants. At this temperature, aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) and sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10) both accumulated intracellularly, predominantly in their transient, high...

  4. Label-free, ultrahigh-speed, 3D observation of bidirectional and correlated intracellular cargo transport by coherent brightfield microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fan; Zhuo, Guan-Yu; Chou, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Hao; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2017-05-18

    The investigation of intracellular transport at the molecular scale requires measurements at high spatial and temporal resolutions. We demonstrate the label-free, direct imaging and tracking of native cell vesicles in live cells at an ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolution. Using coherent brightfield (COBRI) microscopy, we monitor individual cell vesicles traveling inside the cell with nanometer spatial precision in 3D at 30 000 frames per second. The stepwise directional motion of the vesicle on the cytoskeletal track is clearly resolved. We also observe the repeated switching of the transport direction of the vesicle in a continuous trajectory. Our high-resolution measurement unveils the transient pausing and subtle bidirectional motion of the vesicle, taking place over tens of nanometers in tens of milliseconds. By tracking multiple particles simultaneously, we found strong correlations between the motions of two neighboring vesicles. Our label-free ultrahigh-speed optical imaging provides the opportunity to visualize intracellular cargo transport at the nanoscale in the microsecond timescale with minimal perturbation.

  5. ERK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase temporally coordinate different modes of actin-based motility during embryonic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Siwei; Soto, Ximena; Woolner, Sarah; Amaya, Enrique

    2013-11-01

    Embryonic wound healing provides a perfect example of efficient recovery of tissue integrity and homeostasis, which is vital for survival. Tissue movement in embryonic wound healing requires two functionally distinct actin structures: a contractile actomyosin cable and actin protrusions at the leading edge. Here, we report that the discrete formation and function of these two structures is achieved by the temporal segregation of two intracellular upstream signals and distinct downstream targets. The sequential activation of ERK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling divides Xenopus embryonic wound healing into two phases. In the first phase, activated ERK suppresses PI3K activity, and is responsible for the activation of Rho and myosin-2, which drives actomyosin cable formation and constriction. The second phase is dominated by restored PI3K signalling, which enhances Rac and Cdc42 activity, leading to the formation of actin protrusions that drive migration and zippering. These findings reveal a new mechanism for coordinating different modes of actin-based motility in a complex tissue setting, namely embryonic wound healing.

  6. How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Simil...... specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.......Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions....... Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways...

  7. Autoradiographic and cytochemical studies on the intracellular transport of secreted proteins in the lacrimal ducts (glandula extraorbitalis) of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Azini was isolated from the glandula lacrimalis of the rat. Its vitality was proven by oxygen use measurements. In autoradiographic studies isolated Azini was marked with L-(4,5- 3 H)-leucine and fixed at various times thereafter. The light microscopic autoradiography showed a time dependent distribution of the silver grains whose association with membrane-enclosed compartments made the electron microscopic autoradiography possible. This distribution allows an analysis of the kinetics of the intracellular transport of secreted proteins. Because of its limited spatial resolution the autoradiographic research methods were combined with the cytochemical presentation of the peroxidase, a secreted protein, of the lacrimal duct. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Involvement of detergent-insoluble complexes in the intracellular transport of intestinal brush border enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1995-01-01

    was apparent after only 1 h of labeling, where aminopeptidase N, sucrase-isomaltase, and alkaline phosphatase together comprised 25-30% of the total labeled, detergent-insoluble proteins, showing that sorting of newly made brush border membrane proteins into the glycolipid "rafts" does take place...... intracellularly. I therefore propose that, in the enterocyte, the brush border enzymes are targeted directly from the trans-Golgi network toward the apical cell surface....

  9. Amoxicillin haptenates intracellular proteins that can be transported in exosomes to target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, F J; González-Morena, J M; Vida, Y; Pérez-Inestrosa, E; Blanca, M; Torres, M J; Pérez-Sala, D

    2017-03-01

    Allergic reactions to β-lactams are among the most frequent causes of drug allergy and constitute an important clinical problem. Drug covalent binding to endogenous proteins (haptenation) is thought to be required for activation of the immune system. Nevertheless, neither the nature nor the role of the drug protein targets involved in this process is fully understood. Here, we aim to identify novel intracellular targets for haptenation by amoxicillin (AX) and their cellular fate. We have treated B lymphocytes with either AX or a biotinylated analog (AX-B). The identification of protein targets for haptenation by AX has been approached by mass spectrometry and immunoaffinity techniques. In addition, intercellular communication mediated by the delivery of vesicles loaded with AX-B-protein adducts has been explored by microscopy techniques. We have observed a complex pattern of AX-haptenated proteins. Several novel targets for haptenation by AX in B lymphocytes have been identified. AX-haptenated proteins were detected in cell lysates and extracellularly, either as soluble proteins or in lymphocyte-derived extracellular vesicles. Interestingly, exosomes from AX-B-treated cells showed a positive biotin signal in electron microscopy. Moreover, they were internalized by endothelial cells, thus supporting their involvement in intercellular transfer of haptenated proteins. These results represent the first identification of AX-mediated haptenation of intracellular proteins. Moreover, they show that exosomes can constitute a novel vehicle for haptenated proteins, and raise the hypothesis that they could provide antigens for activation of the immune system during the allergic response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Coarse-graining intermittent intracellular transport: Two- and three-dimensional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Sean D.; Tuft, Marie; Brooks, Heather A.

    2015-10-01

    Viruses and other cellular cargo that lack locomotion must rely on diffusion and cellular transport systems to navigate through a biological cell. Indeed, advances in single particle tracking have revealed that viral motion alternates between (a) diffusion in the cytoplasm and (b) active transport along microtubules. This intermittency makes quantitative analysis of trajectories difficult. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to construct mathematical methods to approximate intermittent dynamics by effective stochastic differential equations. The coarse-graining method that we develop is more accurate than existing techniques and applicable to a wide range of intermittent transport models. In particular, we apply our method to two- and three-dimensional cell geometries (disk, sphere, and cylinder) and demonstrate its accuracy. In addition to these specific applications, we also explain our method in full generality for use on future intermittent models.

  11. Intracellular ascorbic acid inhibits transport of glucose by neurons, but not by astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maite A; Pozo, Miguel; Cortés, Christian; García, María de Los Angeles; Concha, Ilona I; Nualart, Francisco

    2007-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that glutamatergic activity induces ascorbic acid (AA) depletion in astrocytes. Additionally, different data indicate that AA may inhibit glucose accumulation in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. Thus, our hypothesis postulates that AA released from the astrocytes during glutamatergic synaptic activity may inhibit glucose uptake by neurons. We observed that cultured neurons express the sodium-vitamin C cotransporter 2 and the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 3, however, in hippocampal brain slices GLUT3 was the main transporter detected. Functional activity of GLUTs was confirmed by means of kinetic analysis using 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Therefore, we showed that AA, once accumulated inside the cell, inhibits glucose transport in both cortical and hippocampal neurons in culture. Additionally, we showed that astrocytes are not affected by AA. Using hippocampal slices, we observed that upon blockade of monocarboxylate utilization by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and after glucose deprivation, glucose could rescue neuronal response to electrical stimulation only if AA uptake is prevented. Finally, using a transwell system of separated neuronal and astrocytic cultures, we observed that glutamate can reduce glucose transport in neurons only in presence of AA-loaded astrocytes, suggesting the essential role of astrocyte-released AA in this effect.

  12. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C; Dalzell, Danielle R; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2  nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2  kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  13. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C.; Dalzell, Danielle R.; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (2 nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  14. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    and thereby improving the efficacy of the treatment. By implementing what is known as a DNA nuclear targeting sequence (DTS) strategy, we found that we could utilize the SCLC cells own transportation system thereby manipulating the cancer cells to bring our therapeutic plasmids from the cytoplasm......Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately...... has to be able to repeated systemic delivery of gene therapy to cancer cells in a both safe and efficient way. Non-viral delivery vectors fulfill many of these requirements except the latter. It is currently very difficult to systemically transport sufficient amounts of therapeutic DNA, by a non...

  15. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological differenti......The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...

  16. Actin-based motility of Listeria: Right-handed helical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes recruit cellular machinery to move in and between cells. Understanding the mechanism of motility, including force and torque generation and the resultant displacements, holds keys to numerous applications in medicine and biosensing. In this work, a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation is presented to illustrate that a biomechanical model of actin-based motility of a rigid surface through persistently attached filaments propelled by affinity-modulated molecular motors can produce a right-handed helical trajectory consistent with experimental observations. The implications of the mechanism to bacterial motility are discussed.

  17. Following Intracellular Cholesterol Transport by Linear and Non-Linear Optical Microscopy of Intrinsically Fluorescent Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wustner, D.

    2012-01-01

    analysis like pixel-wise bleach rate fitting and multiphoton image correlation spectroscopy are introduced. Several applications of the new technology including observation of vectorial sterol trafficking in polarized human hepatoma cells for investigation of reverse cholesterol transport are presented....... the cellular movement of this essential lipid molecule. In this article, a survey of the various methods being used for analysis of sterol trafficking is given. Various classical biochemical methods are presented and their suitability for analysis of sterol trafficking is assessed. Special emphasis...

  18. Contribution of host intracellular transport machineries to intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Agbeci

    Full Text Available The contribution of different host cell transport systems in the intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV was investigated. To discriminate between primary infections and secondary infections associated with the virus intercellular movement, a gene cassette expressing GFP-HDEL was inserted adjacent to a TuMV infectious cassette expressing 6K₂:mCherry, both within the T-DNA borders of the binary vector pCambia. In this system, both gene cassettes were delivered to the same cell by a single binary vector and primary infection foci emitted green and red fluorescence while secondarily infected cells emitted only red fluorescence. Intercellular movement was measured at 72 hours post infiltration and was estimated to proceed at an average rate of one cell being infected every three hours over an observation period of 17 hours. To determine if the secretory pathway were important for TuMV intercellular movement, chemical and protein inhibitors that blocked both early and late secretory pathways were used. Treatment with Brefeldin A or Concanamycin A or expression of ARF1 or RAB-E1d dominant negative mutants, all of which inhibit pre- or post-Golgi transport, reduced intercellular movement by the virus. These treatments, however, did not inhibit virus replication in primary infected cells. Pharmacological interference assays using Tyrphostin A23 or Wortmannin showed that endocytosis was not important for TuMV intercellular movement. Lack of co-localization by endocytosed FM4-64 and Ara7 (AtRabF2b with TuMV-induced 6K₂-tagged vesicles further supported this conclusion. Microfilament depolymerizing drugs and silencing expression of myosin XI-2 gene, but not myosin VIII genes, also inhibited TuMV intercellular movement. Expression of dominant negative myosin mutants confirmed the role played by myosin XI-2 as well as by myosin XI-K in TuMV intercellular movement. Using this dual gene cassette expression system and transport inhibitors

  19. Optimization of Intracellular Transportation of Gene Therapeutic DNA in Small Cell Lung Cancer (Ph.d.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease characterized as being very aggressive and metastasizing at a rapid pace. The malevolent pace of SCLC cell migration results in almost three out of four SCLC patients having disseminated SCLC at the time of diagnosis. Unfortunately...... has to be able to repeated systemic delivery of gene therapy to cancer cells in a both safe and efficient way. Non-viral delivery vectors fulfill many of these requirements except the latter. It is currently very difficult to systemically transport sufficient amounts of therapeutic DNA, by a non......-viral delivery system, to the nuclei of the SCLC cells. As a result, the gene therapy expression obtained is too low to have any clinical relevance. We have at the Department of Radiation Biology developed a transcriptionally targeting suicide gene therapy system which is built on a double stranded DNA plasmid...

  20. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    an intracellular and a plasma membrane localization of the receptors. In all experiments cultures treated with THIP alone served as controls. The inhibitors of protein synthesis totally abolished the ability of THIP to induce low-affinity GABA receptors. In contrast, the inhibitors of intracellular transport......The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...... as well as the protease inhibitor did not affect this parameter. However, studies of effects of GABA on transmitter release from monensin-treated cultures showed that transmitter release could not be inhibited by GABA in these cells in spite of the presence of low-affinity GABA receptors in the membrane...

  1. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. © 2016 Shekhar and Carlier. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. PARAQUAT RESISTANT1, a Golgi-Localized Putative Transporter Protein, Is Involved in Intracellular Transport of Paraquat1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops. PMID:23471133

  3. Role of ATP-binding cassette and solute carrier transporters in erlotinib CNS penetration and intracellular accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeliegy, Mohamed A; Carcaboso, Angel M; Tagen, Michael; Bai, Feng; Stewart, Clinton F

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of drug transporters in central nervous system (CNS) penetration and cellular accumulation of erlotinib and its metabolite, OSI-420. After oral erlotinib administration to wild-type and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-knockout mice (Mdr1a/b(-/-), Abcg2(-/-), Mdr1a/b(-/-)Abcg2(-/-), and Abcc4(-/-)), plasma was collected and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) was sampled using intracerebral microdialysis. A pharmacokinetic model was fit to erlotinib and OSI-420 concentration-time data, and brain penetration (P(Brain)) was estimated by the ratio of ECF-to-unbound plasma area under concentration-time curves. Intracellular accumulation of erlotinib was assessed in cells overexpressing human ABC transporters or SLC22A solute carriers. P(Brain) in wild-type mice was 0.27 ± 0.11 and 0.07 ± 0.02 (mean ± SD) for erlotinib and OSI-420, respectively. Erlotinib and OSI-420 P(Brain) in Abcg2(-/-) and Mdr1a/b(-/-)Abcg2(-/-) mice were significantly higher than in wild-type mice. Mdr1a/b(-/-) mice showed similar brain ECF penetration as wild-type mice (0.49 ± 0.37 and 0.04 ± 0.02 for erlotinib and OSI-420, respectively). In vitro, erlotinib and OSI-420 accumulation was significantly lower in cells overexpressing breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) than in control cells. Only OSI-420, not erlotinib, showed lower accumulation in cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) than in control cells. The P-gp/BCRP inhibitor elacridar increased erlotinib and OSI-420 accumulation in BCRP-overexpressing cells. Erlotinib uptake was higher in OAT3- and OCT2-transfected cells than in empty vector control cells. Abcg2 is the main efflux transporter preventing erlotinib and OSI-420 penetration in mouse brain. Erlotinib and OSI-420 are substrates for SLC22A family members OAT3 and OCT2. Our findings provide a mechanistic basis for erlotinib CNS penetration, cellular uptake, and efflux mechanisms. ©2010 AACR.

  4. System-wide organization of actin cytoskeleton determines organelle transport in hypocotyl plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jacqueline; Ivakov, Alexander; Somssich, Marc; Persson, Staffan; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is an essential intracellular filamentous structure that underpins cellular transport and cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. However, the system-level properties of actin-based cellular trafficking remain tenuous, largely due to the inability to quantify key features of the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we developed an automated image-based, network-driven framework to accurately segment and quantify actin cytoskeletal structures and Golgi transport. We show that the actin cytoskeleton in both growing and elongated hypocotyl cells has structural properties facilitating efficient transport. Our findings suggest that the erratic movement of Golgi is a stable cellular phenomenon that might optimize distribution efficiency of cell material. Moreover, we demonstrate that Golgi transport in hypocotyl cells can be accurately predicted from the actin network topology alone. Thus, our framework provides quantitative evidence for system-wide coordination of cellular transport in plant cells and can be readily applied to investigate cytoskeletal organization and transport in other organisms. PMID:28655850

  5. RickA expression is not sufficient to promote actin-based motility of Rickettsia raoultii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premanand Balraj

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsia raoultii is a novel Rickettsia species recently isolated from Dermacentor ticks and classified within the spotted fever group (SFG. The inability of R. raoultii to spread within L929 cells suggests that this bacterium is unable to polymerize host cell actin, a property exhibited by all SFG rickettsiae except R. peacocki. This result led us to investigate if RickA, the protein thought to generate actin nucleation, was expressed within this rickettsia species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Amplification and sequencing of R. raoultii rickA showed that this gene encoded a putative 565 amino acid protein highly homologous to those found in other rickettsiae. Using immunofluorescence assays, we determined that the motility pattern (i.e. microcolonies or cell-to-cell spreading of R. raoultii was different depending on the host cell line in which the bacteria replicated. In contrast, under the same experimental conditions, R. conorii shares the same phenotype both in L929 and in Vero cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of infected cells showed that non-motile bacteria were free in the cytosol instead of enclosed in a vacuole. Moreover, western-blot analysis demonstrated that the defect of R. raoultii actin-based motility within L929 cells was not related to lower expression of RickA. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results, together with previously published data about R. typhi, strongly suggest that another factor, apart from RickA, may be involved with be responsible for actin-based motility in bacteria from the Rickettsia genus.

  6. The B7-1 cytoplasmic tail enhances intracellular transport and mammalian cell surface display of chimeric proteins in the absence of a linear ER export motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Lin

    Full Text Available Membrane-tethered proteins (mammalian surface display are increasingly being used for novel therapeutic and biotechnology applications. Maximizing surface expression of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells is important for these applications. We show that the cytoplasmic domain from the B7-1 antigen, a commonly used element for mammalian surface display, can enhance the intracellular transport and surface display of chimeric proteins in a Sar1 and Rab1 dependent fashion. However, mutational, alanine scanning and deletion analysis demonstrate the absence of linear ER export motifs in the B7 cytoplasmic domain. Rather, efficient intracellular transport correlated with the presence of predicted secondary structure in the cytoplasmic tail. Examination of the cytoplasmic domains of 984 human and 782 mouse type I transmembrane proteins revealed that many previously identified ER export motifs are rarely found in the cytoplasmic tail of type I transmembrane proteins. Our results suggest that efficient intracellular transport of B7 chimeric proteins is associated with the structure rather than to the presence of a linear ER export motif in the cytoplasmic tail, and indicate that short (less than ~ 10-20 amino acids and unstructured cytoplasmic tails should be avoided to express high levels of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells.

  7. Structure and Function of an Actin-Based Filter in the Proximal Axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuzhan Balasanyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The essential organization of microtubules within neurons has been described; however, less is known about how neuronal actin is arranged and the functional implications of its arrangement. Here, we describe, in live cells, an actin-based structure in the proximal axon that selectively prevents some proteins from entering the axon while allowing the passage of others. Concentrated patches of actin in proximal axons are present shortly after axonal specification in rat and zebrafish neurons imaged live, and they mark positions where anterogradely traveling vesicles carrying dendritic proteins halt and reverse. Patches colocalize with the ARP2/3 complex, and when ARP2/3-mediated nucleation is blocked, a dendritic protein mislocalizes to the axon. Patches are highly dynamic, with few persisting longer than 30 min. In neurons in culture and in vivo, actin appears to form a contiguous, semipermeable barrier, despite its apparently sparse distribution, preventing axonal localization of constitutively active myosin Va but not myosin VI. : Balasanyan et al. find dynamic patches of actin in proximal axons of live neurons, mature and newly differentiated, in culture and in vivo. Patches contribute to a filter that sequesters some proteins within the somatodendritic domain while allowing others to pass into the axon, leading to polarized localization of proteins.

  8. Titin-Actin Interaction: PEVK-Actin-Based Viscosity in a Large Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles S. Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin exhibits an interaction between its PEVK segment and the actin filament resulting in viscosity, a speed dependent resistive force, which significantly influences diastolic filling in mice. While diastolic disease is clinically pervasive, humans express a more compliant titin (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.5–1.0 than mice (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.2. To examine PEVK-actin based viscosity in compliant titin-tissues, we used pig cardiac tissue that expresses titin isoforms similar to that in humans. Stretch-hold experiments were performed at speeds from 0.1 to 10 lengths/s from slack sarcomere lengths (SL to SL of 2.15 μm. Viscosity was calculated from the slope of stress-relaxation vs stretch speed. Recombinant PEVK was added to compete off native interactions and this found to reduce the slope by 35%, suggesting that PEVK-actin interactions are a strong contributor of viscosity. Frequency sweeps were performed at frequencies of 0.1–400 Hz and recombinant protein reduced viscous moduli by 40% at 2.15 μm and by 50% at 2.25 μm, suggesting a SL-dependent nature of viscosity that might prevent SL ``overshoot’’ at long diastolic SLs. This study is the first to show that viscosity is present at physiologic speeds in the pig and supports the physiologic relevance of PEVK-actin interactions in humans in both health and disease.

  9. Functional characterization of the protein C A267T mutation: evidence for impaired secretion due to defective intracellular transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeldhorn Lena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated protein C (PC is a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation by inactivating coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. PC deficiency is an autosomally inherited disorder associated with a high risk of recurrent venous thrombosis. The aim of the study was to explore the mechanisms responsible for severe PC deficiency in a patient with the protein C A267T mutation by in-vitro expression studies. Results Huh7 and CHO-K1 cells were transiently transfected with expression vectors containing wild-type (WT PC and mutated PC (A267T PC cDNAs. PC mRNA levels were assessed by qRT-PCR and the PC protein levels were measured by ELISA. The mRNA levels of WT PC and A267T PC were similar, while the intracellular protein level of A267T PC was moderately decreased compared to WT PC. The secretion of A267T PC into the medium was severely impaired. No differences in molecular weights were observed between WT and A267T PC before and after treatment with endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Proteasomal and lysosomal degradations were examined using lactacystin and bafilomycin, respectively, and revealed that A267T PC was slightly more susceptible for proteasomal degradation than WT PC. Intracellular co-localization analysis indicated that A267T PC was mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, whereas WT PC was observed in both ER and Golgi. Conclusions In contrast to what has been reported for other PC mutants, intracellular degradation of A267T PC was not the main/dominant mechanism underlying the reduced intracellular and secretion levels of PC. Our results indicate that the A267T mutation most likely caused misfolding of PC, which might lead to increased retention of the mutated PC in ER.

  10. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y requires glycosylation for efficient intracellular transport, but not for vacuolar sorting, in vivo stability, or activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Stevens, T H; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1991-01-01

    the formation of asparagine-linked glycosylation, had a similar effect on the transport of CPY at 23 degrees C. However, the absence of N-linked carbohydrate in general had the more dramatic result of blocking the transport of CPY altogether at an increased temperature (37 degrees C). The unglycosylated mutant...

  11. The unrelated surface proteins ActA of Listeria monocytogenes and IcsA of Shigella flexneri are sufficient to confer actin-based motility on Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocks, C; Marchand, J B; Gouin, E; d'Hauteville, H; Sansonetti, P J; Carlier, M F; Cossart, P

    1995-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri are two unrelated facultative intracellular pathogens which spread from cell to cell by using a similar mode of intracellular movement based on continuous actin assembly at one pole of the bacterium. This process requires the asymmetrical expression of the ActA surface protein in L. monocytogenes and the IcsA (VirG) surface protein in S. flexneri. ActA and IcsA share no sequence homology. To assess the role of the two proteins in the generation of actin-based movement, we expressed them in the genetic context of two non-actin polymerizing, non-pathogenic bacterial species, Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli. In the absence of any additional bacterial pathogenicity determinants, both proteins induced actin assembly and propulsion of the bacteria in cytoplasmic extracts from Xenopus eggs, as visualized by the formation of characteristic actin comet tails. E. coli expressing IcsA moved about two times faster than Listeria and displayed longer actin tails. However, actin dynamics (actin filament distribution and filament half-lives) were similar in IcsA- and ActA-induced actin tails suggesting that by using unrelated surface molecules, L. monocytogenes and S. flexneri move intracellularly by interacting with the same host cytoskeleton components or by interfering with the same host cell signal transduction pathway.

  12. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y requires glycosylation for efficient intracellular transport, but not for vacuolar sorting, in vivo stability, or activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Stevens, T H; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1991-01-01

    Functions of the carbohydrate side chains of the yeast vacuolar enzyme carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) were investigated by removal, through site-directed mutagenesis, of the sequences which act as signals for N-linked glycosylation. The mutant forms of the enzyme were analysed with respect to activity...... the formation of asparagine-linked glycosylation, had a similar effect on the transport of CPY at 23 degrees C. However, the absence of N-linked carbohydrate in general had the more dramatic result of blocking the transport of CPY altogether at an increased temperature (37 degrees C). The unglycosylated mutant...

  13. Intracellular Na+ concentration influences short-term plasticity of glutamate transporter-mediated currents in neocortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unichenko, Petr; Myakhar, Olga; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2012-04-01

    Fast synaptic transmission requires a rapid clearance of the released neurotransmitter from the extracellular space. Glial glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) strongly contribute to glutamate removal. In this work, we investigated the paired-pulse plasticity of synaptically activated, glutamate transporter-mediated currents (STCs) in cortical layer 2/3 astrocytes. STCs were elicited by local electrical stimulation in layer 4 in the presence of ionotropic glutamate (AMPA and NMDA), GABAA, and GABAB receptor antagonists. In experiments with low [Na(+)]i (5 mM) intrapipette solution, STCs elicited by paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at short (astrocytic [Na(+)]i, reduced the mean STC amplitude, decreased PPF at short ISIs, and slowed STC kinetics. All GABA-induced changes were blocked by NO-711 and SNAP-5114, GABA transporter (GATs) antagonists. In experiments with the low intrapipette solution, GAT blockade under control conditions decreased PPF at short ISIs both at room and at near physiological temperatures. Dialysis of single astrocyte with low [Na(+)]i solution increased the amplitude and reduced PPR of evoked field potentials recorded in the vicinity of the astrocyte. We conclude that (1) endogenous GABA via GATs may influence EAAT functioning and (2) astrocytic [Na(+)]i modulates the short-term plasticity of STCs and in turn the efficacy of glutamate removal. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. AGT1, Encoding an α-Glucoside Transporter Involved in Uptake and Intracellular Accumulation of Trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Plourde-Owobi, Lucile; Durner, Sophie; Parrou, Jean-Luc; Wieczorke, Roman; Goma, Gerard; François, Jean

    1999-01-01

    The trehalose content in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be significantly manipulated by including trehalose at an appropriate level in the growth medium. Its uptake is largely dependent on the expression of AGT1, which encodes an α-glucoside transporter. The trehalose found in a tps1 mutant of trehalose synthase may therefore largely reflect its uptake from the enriched medium that was employed.

  15. Myosin-V opposes microtubule-based cargo transport and drives directional motility on cortical actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitein, Lukas C; van Bergeijk, Petra; Lipka, Joanna; Keijzer, Nanda; Wulf, Phebe S; Katrukha, Eugene A; Akhmanova, Anna; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2013-05-06

    Intracellular transport is driven by motor proteins that either use microtubules or actin filaments as their tracks, but the interplay between these transport pathways is poorly understood. Whereas many microtubule-based motors are known to drive long-range transport, several actin-based motors have been proposed to function predominantly in cargo tethering. How these opposing activities are integrated on cargoes that contain both types of motors is unknown. Here we use inducible intracellular transport assays to show that acute recruitment of myosin-V to kinesin-propelled cargo reduces their motility near the cell periphery and enhances their localization at the actin-rich cell cortex. Myosin-V arrests rapid microtubule-based transport without the need for regulated auto- or other inhibition of kinesin motors. In addition, myosin-V, despite being an ineffective long-range transporter, can drive slow, medium-range (1-5 μm), point-to-point transport in cortical cell regions. Altogether, these data support a model in which myosin-V establishes local cortical delivery of kinesin-bound cargos through a combination of tethering and active transport. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions of Oryza sativa OsCONTINUOUS VASCULAR RING-LIKE 1 (OsCOLE1) and OsCOLE1-INTERACTING PROTEIN reveal a novel intracellular auxin transport mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Lan; Luo, Yanzhong; Xu, Miaoyun; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the transport mechanism of intracellular auxin. Here, we report two vacuole-localized proteins, Oryza sativa OsCONTINUOUS VASCULAR RING-LIKE 1 (OsCOLE1) and OsCOLE1-INTERACTING PROTEIN (OsCLIP), that regulate intracellular auxin transport and homoeostasis. Overexpression of OsCOLE1 markedly increased the internode length and auxin content of the stem base, whereas these parameters were decreased in RNA interference (RNAi) plants. OsCOLE1 was localized on the tonoplast and preferentially expressed in mature tissues. We further identified its interacting protein OsCLIP, which was co-localized on the tonoplast. Protein-protein binding assays demonstrated that the N-terminus of OsCOLE1 directly interacted with OsCLIP in yeast cells and the rice protoplast. Furthermore, (3) H-indole-3-acetic acid ((3) H-IAA) transport assays revealed that OsCLIP transported IAA into yeast cells, which was promoted by OsCOLE1. The results indicate that OsCOLE1 affects rice development by regulating intracellular auxin transport through interaction with OsCLIP, which provides a new insight into the regulatory mechanism of intracellular transport of auxin and the roles of vacuoles in plant development. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Contribution to the ultrastructural study of silk-excretion cells and autoradiographic analysis of intracellular fibroin transport in Bombyx mori L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couble, Pierre.

    1974-01-01

    It is much easier to study the mechanisms involved in the synthesis and exportation of extracellular proteins in the biological material chosen is highly differentiated. The silk-excretion gland of the silkworm is ideal in this respect because during the larva period, especially at the end of the 5th and last stage, the cells at the rear (excreting tube) synthesize and export massive quantities of a single protein: fibroin. These phenomena were explored by a cytological study carried out mainly by electron microscopy and autoradiography. The results obtained are given. They relate first of all to the morphological development of the secretion tube cells from the end of the 4th larva stage to the spinning of the cocoon, and contribute new information on the cell changes during the 4th slough and the end of the 5th age. They also concern intracellular fibroin transport which is proved to take place through the Golgi apparatus, and finally the possible role of the microtubules and microfilaments in fibroin transport and secretion. On this last point the results so far constitute only, a preliminary approach which justifie no final conclusions; they merely suggest that the microfilaments of the apical region are involved in the secretion process [fr

  18. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters intracellular pH and ion transport in the outer mantle epithelium of the bivalve Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marco G; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2014-09-01

    Bivalve molluscs, due to their sedentary mode of life and filter-feeding behavior, are very susceptible to pollutant bioaccumulation and used as sentinel organisms in the assessment of environment pollution. Herein we aimed to determine the in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a widely used herbicide, in Anodonta cygnea shell growth mechanisms. For that, we evaluated the effect of 2,4-D (100 μM) exposure on the transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc), potential (Vt) and conductance (Gt), as well as on OME ion transport systems and intracellular pH (pHi). In vivo exposure to 2,4-D caused an increase of 50% on the Isc generated by OME and ex vivo addition of that compound to the apical side of OME also induced an Isc increase. Furthermore, 2,4-D was able to cause a pHi increase in isolated cells of OME. Noteworthy, when 2,4-D was added following the exposure to specific inhibitors of several membrane transporters identified as responsible for pHi maintenance in these cells, no significant effect was observed on pHi except when the V-type ATPase inhibitor was used, indicating an overlap with the effect of 2,4-D. Thus, we concluded that 2,4-D is able of enhancing the activity of the V-ATPases present on the OME of A. cygnea and that this effect seems to be due to a direct stimulation of those H(+) transporters present on the apical portion of the membrane of OME cells, which are vital for shell maintenance and growth. This study allows us to better understand the molecular mechanisms behind 2,4-D toxicity and its deleterious effect in aquatic ecosystems, with particular emphasis on those involved in shell formation of bivalves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of irradiation on the intracellular transportation of the parotid gland acinar cells in the mouse. Localization of monosaccharides studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Hajime (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of radiation on the ability to ingest monosaccharides and intracellular transportation in the parotid gland in mice. The submandibular regions, including the parotid gland, was exposed to 10 Gy of X-rays. Three days after irradiation, the localization of reducing silver grains in organelles was determined, using electron microscopic autoradiography with H-3 labeled galactosamine, glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. In the non-irradiated group, the proportion of reducing silver grains in the acinar cells began to increase 15 min after administration of monosaccharides, reached a peak at 180 min, and thereafter decreased. Similar findings were observed in the irradiated group, although the values were lower than the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the endoplasmic reticulum reached a peak at 15 min in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, and gradually decreased until 120 min. Thereafter, it became almost constant and low, but the proportion in the irradiated group was slightly higher than in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the Golgi apparatus was maximum at 60 min in the non-irradiated group, and gradually decreased until 360 min. A similar tendency was seen in the irradiated group, although its variation was not so marked as in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the condensing vacuoles was maximum at 120 min, and thereafter, it decreased; the decrease was only slight in the irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in secretory granules increased with time in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, although this was only slight in the irradiated group, and reached a peak at 360 min. Transportation of monosaccharides in an acinar cell was found to be delayed by irradiation. (N.K.).

  20. Effect of irradiation for intracellular transport on mouse parotid gland; Study of electron microscopic autoradiography with [sup 3]H-leucine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondou, Nobuyoshi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Using light and electron microscopic autoradiographies by means of [sup 3]H-leucine, the influence of X-radiation, 10 Gy upon the submandibular region including parotid gland of a mouse was examined. The number of reduced silver grain per unit area of acinar cell was compared, and the rate of reduced silver grain localized in the intracellular organelle involved in the synthesis and transport of protein was observed. In the non-radiation (NR) group, reduced silver grain in the acinar cell of parotid gland showed the maximum value 30 minutes after [sup 3]H-leucine administration and thereafter decreased with time. Even the 3 and 14 post-radiation (PR) day-groups showed the maximum values at 30 minutes, but to a lesser extent than the NR groups, and subsequent time-course was noted a little. Reduced silver grain localized in the rough surfaced reticulum showed the highest rate at 15 minutes for the NR, 3 and 14 PR groups, and thereafter decreased abruptly. In comparing the rate of reduced silver grain localized in Golgi apparatus, the NR group showed the highest rate at 60 minutes and gradually decreased thereafter. The 3 PR group showed the highest rate at 60 minutes and similar tendency up to 120 minutes. The 14 PR group showed almost the similar tendency to the NR group. Reduced silver particles localized peri- and intra-secretory granules showed higher rate at 60 minutes for the NR group. In the 3 PR group, peri- and intra-secretory granules showed almost the same rate at 180 minutes, with a time lag for the transition of [sup 3]H-leucine to the secretory granules. In the 3 and 14 PR groups, similar order of rate was noted at 60 minutes between peri- and intra-secretory granules, with a transition time approximating to that of the NR group. Subsequent discharge, however, showed a delay tendency. Pathohistological examination revealed strong morphological changes of intracellular organelle in the 3 PR group and less remarkable changes in the 14 PR group. (author).

  1. Histochemical evidence for the differential surface labeling, uptake, and intracellular transport of a colloidal gold-labeled insulin complex by normal human blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, G.A.; Wolken, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    A colloidal gold-labeled insulin-bovine serum albumin (GIA) reagent has been developed for the ultrastructural visualization of insulin binding sites on the cell surface and for tracing the pathway of intracellular insulin translocation. When applied to normal human blood cells, it was demonstrated by both visual inspection and quantitative analysis that the extent of surface labeling, as well as the rate and degree of internalization of the insulin complex, was directly related to cell type. Further, the pathway of insulin (GIA) transport via round vesicles and by tubulo-vesicles and saccules and its subsequent fate in the hemic cells was also related to cell variety. Monocytes followed by neutrophils bound the greatest amount of labeled insulin. The majority of lymphocytes bound and internalized little GIA, however, between 5-10% of the lymphocytes were found to bind considerable quantities of GIA. Erythrocytes rarely bound the labeled insulin complex, while platelets were noted to sequester large quantities of the GIA within their extracellular canalicular system. GIA uptake by the various types of leukocytic cells appeared to occur primarily by micropinocytosis and by the direct opening of cytoplasmic tubulo-vesicles and saccules onto the cell surface in regions directly underlying surface-bound GIA. Control procedures, viz., competitive inhibition of GIA labeling using an excess of unlabeled insulin in the incubation medium, preincubation of the GIA reagent with an antibody directed toward porcine insulin, and the incorporation of 125I-insulin into the GIA reagent, indicated the specificity and selectivity of the GIA histochemical procedure for the localization of insulin binding sites

  2. Comparisons of anti-human immunodeficiency virus activities, cellular transport, and plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetics of 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X B; Zhu, Q Y; Vidal, P M; Watanabe, K A; Polsky, B; Armstrong, D; Ostrander, M; Lang, S A; Muchmore, E; Chou, T C

    1992-01-01

    3'-Fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (FLT), a candidate anti-AIDS compound in clinical trials, showed anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) potency (50% effective concentration, 0.0052 microM) slightly better than or equal to that of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) in MT4 cells and was threefold more potent in H9 cells. There was no FLT resistance demonstrable in the AZT-resistant HIV-1 strains. Both FLT and AZT showed low cytotoxicity for MT4 cells, with selectivity indices (efficacy/toxicity ratio) of greater than 47,000 and greater than 33,000, respectively. Cellular permeation of FLT and thymidine (dThd) was greater than that of AZT, and FLT and dThd permeated the cell membranes by a carrier-mediated mechanism as well as by simple diffusion, as indicated by the existence of nitrobenzylthioinosine-5'-monophosphate-sensitive and -insensitive components. By contrast, transport of AZT into cells was by simple diffusion. The intracellular level of the triphosphate of FLT (FLTTP) in MT4 cells was two- to threefold higher than that of AZT (AZTTP) after exposure to 1.8 microM each compound for 12 h. The elimination kinetics of FLTTP and AZTTP in HIV-1-infected MT4 cells in fresh medium showed biphasic patterns, with initial half-lives of 1.03 and 1.09 h, respectively. In phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, the FLTTP level was increased 59-fold compared with that in unstimulated cells at 12 h, was four- to sixfold higher than the level of AZTTP in stimulated cells at 12 h, and remained four- to fivefold higher during a 4-h elimination period in fresh medium and twofold higher at the end of a 12-h elimination period. Two- to eightfold more [3H]AZT than [3H]FLT was incorporated into the host cell DNA, and both [3H]AZT and [3H]FLT remained persistently incorporated for over 24 h. The incorporated [3H]AZT and [3H]FLT were alkali labile, whereas incorporated [3H]dThd was alkali stable. Pharmacokinetics of FLT in plasma of monkeys after

  3. The multidrug transporter MATE1 sequesters OCs within an intracellular compartment that has no influence on OC secretion in renal proximal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Guerrero, L J; Evans, K K; Dantzler, W H; Wright, S H

    2016-01-01

    Secretion of organic cations (OCs) across renal proximal tubules (RPTs) involves basolateral OC transporter (OCT)2-mediated uptake from the blood followed by apical multidrug and toxin extruder (MATE)1/2-mediated efflux into the tubule filtrate. Whereas OCT2 supports electrogenic OC uniport, MATE is an OC/H(+) exchanger. As assessed by epifluorescence microscopy, cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that stably expressed human MATE1 accumulated the fluorescent OC N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][l,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium (NBD-MTMA) in the cytoplasm and in a smaller, punctate compartment; accumulation in human OCT2-expressing cells was largely restricted to the cytoplasm. A second intracellular compartment was also evident in the multicompartmental kinetics of efflux of the prototypic OC [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP) from MATE1-expressing CHO cells. Punctate accumulation of NBD-MTMA was markedly reduced by coexposure of MATE1-expressing cells with 5 μM bafilomycin (BAF), an inhibitor of V-type H(+)-ATPase, and accumulation of [(3)H]MPP and [(3)H]NBD-MTMA was reduced by >30% by coexposure with 5 μM BAF. BAF had no effect on the initial rate of MATE1-mediated uptake of NBD-MTMA, suggesting that the influence of BAF was a secondary effect involving inhibition of V-type H(+)-ATPase. The accumulation of [(3)H]MPP by isolated single nonperfused rabbit RPTs was also reduced >30% by coexposure to 5 μM BAF, suggesting that the native expression in RPTs of MATE protein within endosomes can increase steady-state OC accumulation. However, the rate of [(3)H]MPP secretion by isolated single perfused rabbit RPTs was not affected by 5 μM BAF, suggesting that vesicles loaded with OCs(+) are not likely to recycle into the apical plasma membrane at a rate sufficient to provide a parallel pathway for OC secretion. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Bioelectric patterning during oogenesis: stage-specific distribution of membrane potentials, intracellular pH and ion-transport mechanisms in Drosophila ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Julia; Bohrmann, Johannes

    2015-01-16

    Bioelectric phenomena have been found to exert influence on various developmental and regenerative processes. Little is known about their possible functions and the cellular mechanisms by which they might act during Drosophila oogenesis. In developing follicles, characteristic extracellular current patterns and membrane-potential changes in oocyte and nurse cells have been observed that partly depend on the exchange of protons, potassium ions and sodium ions. These bioelectric properties have been supposed to be related to various processes during oogenesis, e. g. pH-regulation, osmoregulation, cell communication, cell migration, cell proliferation, cell death, vitellogenesis and follicle growth. Analysing in detail the spatial distribution and activity of the relevant ion-transport mechanisms is expected to elucidate the roles that bioelectric phenomena play during oogenesis. To obtain an overview of bioelectric patterning along the longitudinal and transversal axes of the developing follicle, the spatial distributions of membrane potentials (Vmem), intracellular pH (pHi) and various membrane-channel proteins were studied systematically using fluorescent indicators, fluorescent inhibitors and antisera. During mid-vitellogenic stages 9 to 10B, characteristic, stage-specific Vmem-patterns in the follicle-cell epithelium as well as anteroposterior pHi-gradients in follicle cells and nurse cells were observed. Corresponding distribution patterns of proton pumps (V-ATPases), voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+)-channels, amiloride-sensitive Na(+)-channels and Na(+),H(+)-exchangers (NHE) and gap-junction proteins (innexin 3) were detected. In particular, six morphologically distinguishable follicle-cell types are characterized on the bioelectric level by differences concerning Vmem and pHi as well as specific compositions of ion channels and carriers. Striking similarities between Vmem-patterns and activity patterns of voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels were found, suggesting

  5. Spatiotemporal Control of Lipid Conversion, Actin-Based Mechanical Forces, and Curvature Sensors during Clathrin/AP-1-Coated Vesicle Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Anitei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clathrin/adaptor protein-1-coated carriers connect the secretory and the endocytic pathways. Carrier biogenesis relies on distinct protein networks changing membrane shape at the trans-Golgi network, each regulating coat assembly, F-actin-based mechanical forces, or the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers. How these different hubs are spatiotemporally coordinated remains largely unknown. Using in vitro reconstitution systems, quantitative proteomics, and lipidomics, as well as in vivo cell-based assays, we characterize the protein networks controlling membrane lipid composition, membrane shape, and carrier scission. These include PIP5K1A and phospholipase C-beta 3 controlling the conversion of PI[4]P into diacylglycerol. PIP5K1A binding to RAC1 provides a link to F-actin-based mechanical forces needed to tubulate membranes. Tubular membranes then recruit the BAR-domain-containing arfaptin-1/2 guiding carrier scission. These findings provide a framework for synchronizing the chemical/biophysical properties of lipid bilayers, F-actin-based mechanical forces, and the activity of proteins sensing membrane shape during clathrin/adaptor protein-1-coated carrier biogenesis.

  6. Aqueous extract of tamarind seeds selectively increases glucose transporter-2, glucose transporter-4, and islets' intracellular calcium levels and stimulates β-cell proliferation resulting in improved glucose homeostasis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Sushant Shivdas; Srinivasan, B P

    2012-08-01

    Tamarindus indica Linn. has been in use for a long time in Asian food and traditional medicine for different diseases including diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been fully understood. In view of the multidimensional activity of tamarind seeds due to their having high levels of polyphenols and flavonoids, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of aqueous tamarind seed extract (TSE) might increase glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP) 1c messenger RNA (mRNA) in the liver. Daily oral administration of TSE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (90 mg/kg intraperitoneally) type 2 diabetic male Wistar rats at different doses (120 and 240 mg/kg body weight) for 4 weeks showed positive correlation with intracellular calcium and insulin release in isolated islets of Langerhans. Tamarind seed extract supplementation significantly improved the GLUT-2 protein and SREBP-1c mRNA expression in the liver and GLUT-4 protein and mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. The elevated levels of serum nitric oxide (NO), glycosylated hemoglobin level (hemoglobin (A1c)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) decreased after TSE administration. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that TSE abrogated STZ-induced apoptosis and increased β-cell neogenesis, indicating its effect on islets and β-cell mass. In conclusion, it was found that the antidiabetic effect of TSE on STZ-induced diabetes resulted from complex mechanisms of β-cell neogenesis, calcium handling, GLUT-2, GLUT-4, and SREBP-1c. These findings show the scope for formulating a new herbal drug for diabetes therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  8. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy

  9. Intracellular acidification reduces l-arginine transport via system y+L but not via system y+/CATs and nitric oxide synthase activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Marco A; Morales, Jorge; Cornejo, Marcelo; Blanco, Elias H; Mancilla-Sierpe, Edgardo; Toledo, Fernando; Beltrán, Ana R; Sobrevia, Luis

    2018-04-01

    l-Arginine is taken up via the cationic amino acid transporters (system y + /CATs) and system y + L in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). l-Arginine is the substrate for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) which is activated by intracellular alkalization, but nothing is known regarding modulation of system y + /CATs and system y + L activity, and eNOS activity by the pHi in HUVECs. We studied whether an acidic pHi modulates l-arginine transport and eNOS activity in HUVECs. Cells loaded with a pH-sensitive probe were subjected to 0.1-20 mmol/L NH 4 Cl pulse assay to generate pHi 7.13-6.55. Before pHi started to recover, l-arginine transport (0-20 or 0-1000 μmol/L, 10 s, 37 °C) in the absence or presence of 200 μmol/L N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) (system y + /CATs inhibitor) or 2 mmol/L l-leucine (systemy + L substrate) was measured. Protein abundance for eNOS and serine 1177 or threonine 495 phosphorylated eNOS was determined. The results show that intracellular acidification reduced system y + L but not system y + /CATs mediated l-arginine maximal transport capacity due to reduced maximal velocity. Acidic pHi reduced NO synthesis and eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation. Thus, system y + L activity is downregulated by an acidic pHi, a phenomenon that may result in reduced NO synthesis in HUVECs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biliary excretion of cadmium in rat. III. Effects of chelating agents and change in intracellular thiol content on billiary transport and tissue distribution of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    The effects of changes in sulfur-containing intracellular ligands on biliary excretion of cadmium were studied in rats. Injection of zinc or copper salts 24 h before intravenous injection of /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ (1 mg/kg Cd) decreased biliary excretion of Cd. Pretreatment with cysteine (25 mg/kg) had a similar effect. Depletion of intracellular thiol by injection of diethylmaleate had little effect. The effect of chelating agents on the pharmacokinetics of Cd depended on time of administration of the agents after exposure to Cd. When chelating agents were administered 1/2 h after Cd injection (before the synthesis of metallothionein), the thiol-containing agents (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol (BAL), DL-penicillamine, N-acetylpenicillamine, and dithioerythritol increased the biliary excretion of Cd, while the carboxyl-containing ones (EDTA and nitrilotriacetate) increased the urinary excretion of Cd. BAL was the most effective chelating agent, but there was also an increase in the renal concentration of Cd. However, when these chelating agents were administered 24 h after Cd injection (after the synthesis of metallothionein), only BAL increased the biliary excretion of Cd. Renal and hepatic Cd concentrations decreased concurrently after BAL treatment.

  11. Analyzing the in vivo status of exogenously applied auxins: a HPLC-based method to characterize the intracellularly localized auxin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sibu; Skůpa, Petr; Dobrev, Petre I; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous application of biologically important molecules for plant growth promotion and/or regulation is very common both in plant research and horticulture. Plant hormones such as auxins and cytokinins are classes of compounds which are often applied exogenously. Nevertheless, plants possess a well-established machinery to regulate the active pool of exogenously applied compounds by converting them to metabolites and conjugates. Consequently, it is often very useful to know the in vivo status of applied compounds to connect them with some of the regulatory events in plant developmental processes. The in vivo status of applied compounds can be measured by incubating plants with radiolabeled compounds, followed by extraction, purification, and HPLC metabolic profiling of plant extracts. Recently we have used this method to characterize the intracellularly localized PIN protein, PIN5. Here we explain the method in detail, with a focus on general application.

  12. Intracellular Transport of Vaccinia Virus in HeLa Cells Requires WASH-VPEF/FAM21-Retromer Complexes and Recycling Molecules Rab11 and Rab22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Jye-Chian; Chu, Li-Wei; Lo, Yung-Tsun; Lee, Sue-Ping; Chen, Tzu-Jung; Huang, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia virus, the prototype of the Orthopoxvirus genus in the family Poxviridae, infects a wide range of cell lines and animals. Vaccinia mature virus particles of the WR strain reportedly enter HeLa cells through fluid-phase endocytosis. However, the intracellular trafficking process of the vaccinia mature virus between cellular uptake and membrane fusion remains unknown. We used live imaging of single virus particles with a combination of various cellular vesicle markers, to track fluorescent vaccinia mature virus particle movement in cells. Furthermore, we performed functional interference assays to perturb distinct vesicle trafficking processes in order to delineate the specific route undertaken by vaccinia mature virus prior to membrane fusion and virus core uncoating in cells. Our results showed that vaccinia virus traffics to early endosomes, where recycling endosome markers Rab11 and Rab22 are recruited to participate in subsequent virus trafficking prior to virus core uncoating in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identified WASH-VPEF/FAM21-retromer complexes that mediate endosome fission and sorting of virus-containing vesicles prior to virus core uncoating in the cytoplasm. IMPORTANCE Vaccinia mature virions of the WR strain enter HeLa cells through fluid phase endocytosis. We previously demonstrated that virus-containing vesicles are internalized into phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate positive macropinosomes, which are then fused with Rab5-positive early endosomes. However, the subsequent process of sorting the virion-containing vesicles prior to membrane fusion remains unclear. We dissected the intracellular trafficking pathway of vaccinia mature virions in cells up to virus core uncoating in cytoplasm. We show that vaccinia mature virions first travel to early endosomes. Subsequent trafficking events require the important endosome-tethered protein VPEF/FAM21, which recruits WASH and retromer protein complexes to the endosome. There, the complex

  13. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  14. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auricelio A Macedo

    Full Text Available Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi. In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment.

  15. Physical interaction and functional coupling between ACDP4 and the intracellular ion chaperone COX11, an implication of the role of ACDP4 in essential metal ion transport and homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jianguo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Divalent metal ions such as copper, manganese, and cobalt are essential for cell development, differentiation, function and survival. These essential metal ions are delivered into intracellular domains as cofactors for enzymes involved in neuropeptide and neurotransmitter synthesis, superoxide metabolism, and other biological functions in a target specific fashion. Altering the homeostasis of these essential metal ions is known to connect to a number of human diseases including Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and pain. It remains unclear how these essential metal ions are delivered to intracellular targets in mammalian cells. Here we report that rat spinal cord dorsal horn neurons express ACDP4, a member of Ancient Conserved Domain Protein family. By screening a pretransformed human fetal brain cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified that ACDP4 specifically interacts with COX11, an intracellular metal ion chaperone. Ectopic expression of ACDP4 in HEK293 cells resulted in enhanced toxicity to metal ions including copper, manganese, and cobalt. The metal ion toxicity became more pronounced when ACDP4 and COX11 were co-expressed ectopically in HEK293 cells, suggesting a functional coupling between them. Our results indicate a role of ACDP4 in metal ion homeostasis and toxicity. This is the first report revealing a functional aspect of this ancient conserved domain protein family. We propose that ACDP is a family of transporter protein or chaperone proteins for delivering essential metal ions in different mammalian tissues. The expression of ACDP4 on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons may have implications in sensory neuron functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5 proteins is essential for intracellular transport of the proglutelin from the Golgi apparatus to the protein storage vacuole in rice endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masako; Wen, Liuying; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Okita, Thomas W; Washida, Haruhiko; Sugino, Aya; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Sunada, Mariko; Ueda, Takashi; Kumamaru, Toshihiro

    2013-06-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) glutelins are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum as a precursor, which are then transported via the Golgi to protein storage vacuoles (PSVs), where they are proteolytically processed into acidic and basic subunits. The glutelin precursor mutant6 (glup6) accumulates abnormally large amounts of proglutelin. Map-base cloning studies showed that glup6 was a loss-of-function mutant of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), which activates Rab GTPase, a key regulator of membrane trafficking. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the transport of proglutelins and α-globulins to PSV was disrupted in glup6 endosperm. Secreted granules of glutelin and α-globulin were readily observed in young glup6 endosperm, followed by the formation of large dilated paramural bodies (PMBs) containing both proteins as the endosperm matures. The PMBs also contained membrane biomarkers for the Golgi and prevacuolar compartment as well as the cell wall component, β-glucan. Direct evidence was gathered showing that GLUP6/GEF activated in vitro GLUP4/Rab5 as well as several Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Rab5 isoforms to the GTP-bound form. Therefore, loss-of-function mutations in GEF or Rab5 disrupt the normal transport of proglutelin from the Golgi to PSVs, resulting in the initial extracellular secretion of these proteins followed, in turn, by the formation of PMBs. Overall, our results indicate that GLUP6/GEF is the activator of Rab5 GTPase and that the cycling of GTP- and GDP-bound forms of this regulatory protein is essential for the intracellular transport of proglutelin and α-globulin from the Golgi to PSVs and in the maintenance of the general structural organization of the endomembrane system in rice seeds.

  17. Altered Na+ transport after an intracellular alpha-subunit deletion reveals strict external sequential release of Na+ from the Na/K pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaragatupalli, Siddhartha; Olivera, J Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2009-09-08

    The Na/K pump actively exports 3 Na(+) in exchange for 2 K(+) across the plasmalemma of animal cells. As in other P-type ATPases, pump function is more effective when the relative affinity for transported ions is altered as the ion binding sites alternate between opposite sides of the membrane. Deletion of the five C-terminal residues from the alpha-subunit diminishes internal Na(+) (Na(i)(+)) affinity approximately 25-fold [Morth et al. (2007) Nature 450:1043-1049]. Because external Na(+) (Na(o)(+)) binding is voltage-dependent, we studied the reactions involving this process by using two-electrode and inside-out patch voltage clamp in normal and truncated (DeltaKESYY) Xenopus-alpha1 pumps expressed in oocytes. We observed that DeltaKESYY (i) decreased both Na(o)(+) and Na(i)(+) apparent affinities in the absence of K(o)(+), and (ii) did not affect apparent Na(o)(+) affinity at high K(o)(+). These results support a model of strict sequential external release of Na(+) ions, where the Na(+)-exclusive site releases Na(+) before the sites shared with K(+) and the DeltaKESYY deletion only reduces Na(o)(+) affinity at the shared sites. Moreover, at nonsaturating K(o)(+), DeltaKESYY induced an inward flow of Na(+) through Na/K pumps at negative potentials. Guanidinium(+) can also permeate truncated pumps, whereas N-methyl-D-glucamine cannot. Because guanidinium(o)(+) can also traverse normal Na/K pumps in the absence of both Na(o)(+) and K(o)(+) and can also inhibit Na/K pump currents in a Na(+)-like voltage-dependent manner, we conclude that the normal pathway transited by the first externally released Na(+) is large enough to accommodate guanidinium(+).

  18. Optogenetic control of PIP3: PIP3 is sufficient to induce the actin-based active part of growth cones and is regulated via endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Kakumoto

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3 is highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and plays multiple roles in individual cells. However, the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3 in developing neurons remain unclear because of a lack of techniques for manipulating PIP3 spatiotemporally. We addressed this issue by combining optogenetic control and observation of endogenous PIP3 signaling. Endogenous PIP3 was abundant in actin-rich structures such as growth cones and "waves", and PIP3-rich plasma membranes moved actively within growth cones. To study the role of PIP3 in developing neurons, we developed a PI3K photoswitch that can induce production of PIP3 at specific locations upon blue light exposure. We succeeded in producing PIP3 locally in mouse hippocampal neurons. Local PIP3 elevation at neurite tips did not induce neurite elongation, but it was sufficient to induce the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Interestingly, ectopic PIP3 elevation alone activated membranes to form actin-based structures whose behavior was similar to that of growth-cone-like "waves". We also found that endocytosis regulates effective PIP3 concentration at plasma membranes. These results revealed the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3, providing fundamental information about PIP3 signaling in neurons.

  19. Intracellular transport of ions in mineralizing tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.L.

    This study resulted in the development of a new model for bone cell physiology and has provided the means for studying the mechanism and site of action of bone affecting hormones and vitamin metabolites and has provided new information on mechanisms of mineralization and mineralization defects

  20. An experimental and computational study of the effect of ActA polarity on the speed of Listeria monocytogenes actin-based motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne M Rafelski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic bacterium that moves within infected cells and spreads directly between cells by harnessing the cell's dendritic actin machinery. This motility is dependent on expression of a single bacterial surface protein, ActA, a constitutively active Arp2,3 activator, and has been widely studied as a biochemical and biophysical model system for actin-based motility. Dendritic actin network dynamics are important for cell processes including eukaryotic cell motility, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Here we experimentally altered the degree of ActA polarity on a population of bacteria and made use of an ActA-RFP fusion to determine the relationship between ActA distribution and speed of bacterial motion. We found a positive linear relationship for both ActA intensity and polarity with speed. We explored the underlying mechanisms of this dependence with two distinctly different quantitative models: a detailed agent-based model in which each actin filament and branched network is explicitly simulated, and a three-state continuum model that describes a simplified relationship between bacterial speed and barbed-end actin populations. In silico bacterial motility required a cooperative restraining mechanism to reconstitute our observed speed-polarity relationship, suggesting that kinetic friction between actin filaments and the bacterial surface, a restraining force previously neglected in motility models, is important in determining the effect of ActA polarity on bacterial motility. The continuum model was less restrictive, requiring only a filament number-dependent restraining mechanism to reproduce our experimental observations. However, seemingly rational assumptions in the continuum model, e.g. an average propulsive force per filament, were invalidated by further analysis with the agent-based model. We found that the average contribution to motility from side-interacting filaments was actually a function of the Act

  1. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  3. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, Douglas; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  4. Intracellular calcium homeostasis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal carrier of biological information: it controls cell life from its origin at fertilization to its end in the process of programmed cell death. Ca(2+) is a conventional diffusible second messenger released inside cells by the interaction of first messengers with plasma membrane receptors. However, it can also penetrate directly into cells to deliver information without the intermediation of first or second messengers. Even more distinctively, Ca(2+) can act as a first messenger, by interacting with a plasma membrane receptor to set in motion intracellular signaling pathways that involve Ca(2+) itself. Perhaps the most distinctive property of the Ca(2+) signal is its ambivalence: while essential to the correct functioning of cells, Ca(2+) becomes an agent that mediates cell distress, or even (toxic) cell death, if its concentration and movements inside cells are not carefully tuned. Ca(2+) is controlled by reversible complexation to specific proteins, which could be pure Ca(2+) buffers, or which, in addition to buffering Ca(2+), also decode its signal to pass it on to targets. The most important actors in the buffering of cell Ca(2+) are proteins that transport it across the plasma membrane and the membrane of the organelles: some have high Ca(2+) affinity and low transport capacity (e.g., Ca(2+) pumps), others have opposite properties (e.g., the Ca(2+) uptake system of mitochondria). Between the initial event of fertilization, and the terminal event of programmed cell death, the Ca(2+) signal regulates the most important activities of the cell, from the expression of genes, to heart and muscle contraction and other motility processes, to diverse metabolic pathways involved in the generation of cell fuels.

  5. Detection of Cytosolic Shigella flexneri via a C-Terminal Triple-Arginine Motif of GBP1 Inhibits Actin-Based Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S. Piro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamin-like guanylate binding proteins (GBPs are gamma interferon (IFN-γ-inducible host defense proteins that can associate with cytosol-invading bacterial pathogens. Mouse GBPs promote the lytic destruction of targeted bacteria in the host cell cytosol, but the antimicrobial function of human GBPs and the mechanism by which these proteins associate with cytosolic bacteria are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that human GBP1 is unique among the seven human GBP paralogs in its ability to associate with at least two cytosolic Gram-negative bacteria, Burkholderia thailandensis and Shigella flexneri. Rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS mutants of S. flexneri colocalize with GBP1 less frequently than wild-type S. flexneri does, suggesting that host recognition of O antigen promotes GBP1 targeting to Gram-negative bacteria. The targeting of GBP1 to cytosolic bacteria, via a unique triple-arginine motif present in its C terminus, promotes the corecruitment of four additional GBP paralogs (GBP2, GBP3, GBP4, and GBP6. GBP1-decorated Shigella organisms replicate but fail to form actin tails, leading to their intracellular aggregation. Consequentially, the wild type but not the triple-arginine GBP1 mutant restricts S. flexneri cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, human-adapted S. flexneri, through the action of one its secreted effectors, IpaH9.8, is more resistant to GBP1 targeting than the non-human-adapted bacillus B. thailandensis. These studies reveal that human GBP1 uniquely functions as an intracellular “glue trap,” inhibiting the cytosolic movement of normally actin-propelled Gram-negative bacteria. In response to this powerful human defense program, S. flexneri has evolved an effective counterdefense to restrict GBP1 recruitment.

  6. The intracellular pharmacokinetics of terminally capped peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Witsenburg, J.J.; Glauner, H.B.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Ferro, E.S.; Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Brock, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    With significant progress in delivery technologies, peptides and peptidomimetics are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutics also for intracellular applications. However, analyses of the intracellular behavior of peptides are a challenge; therefore, knowledge on the intracellular

  7. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  8. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  9. The Acyl-CoA synthetases encoded within FAA1 and FAA4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as components of the fatty acid transport system linking import, activation, and intracellular Utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Black, P N; Zhao, X D

    2001-01-01

    CoA levels were defined following incubation of wild type and mutant cells with limiting concentrations of exogenous oleate. These studies demonstrated oleoyl CoA levels were reduced to less than 10% wild-type levels in faa1 Delta and faa1 Delta faa4 Delta strains. Defects in metabolic utilization...... and intracellular trafficking were also found in the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase-deficient strains. The faa1 Delta faa4 Delta strain had a marked reduction in endogenous acyl-CoA pools, suggesting these enzymes play a role in maintenance of endogenous acyl-CoA pools, metabolism and trafficking. In addition...

  10. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3 buff...

  11. Dihydroceramide biology - Structure-specific metabolism and intracellular localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; NikolovaKarakashian, M; Klappe, K; Alexander, C; Merrill, AH

    1997-01-01

    This study utilized fluorescent analogs to characterize the intracellular transport and metabolism of dihydroceramide (DN-Cer), an intermediate in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, When 6-[N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl) amino]hexanoyl-DH-Cer (C-6-NBD-DH-Cer) was incubated with HT29, NRK, BHK,

  12. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca 2+ on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery

  13. Multimotor transport in constitutive exocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afonso Serra Marques, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is an essential cellular process that controls numerous cellular functions by promoting correct sorting, transport and delivery of different cargos in the cell. The microtubule system and associated molecular motors, dynein and kinesins, are

  14. Plant Transporter Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) play a critical role for numerous biological processes, by controlling the movements of ions and molecules in and out of cells. In plants, transporters thus function as gatekeepers between the plant and its surrounding environment and between organs......, tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. Since plants are highly compartmentalized organisms with complex transportation infrastructures, they consequently have many transporters. However, the vast majority of predicted transporters have not yet been experimentally verified to have transport...... activity. This project contains a review of the implemented methods, which have led to plant transporter identification, and present our progress on creating a high-throughput functional genomics transporter identification platform....

  15. Conditions With High Intracellular Glucose Inhibit Sensing Through Glucose Sensor Snf3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Wu, B.Q.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2010-01-01

    as for amino acids. An alternating-access model of the function of transporter-like sensors has been previously suggested based on amino acid sensing, where intracellular ligand inhibits binding of extracellular ligand. Here we studied the effect of intracellular glucose on sensing of extracellular glucose...... through the transporter-like sensor Snf3 in yeast. Sensing through Snf3 was determined by measuring degradation of Mth1 protein. High intracellular glucose concentrations were achieved by using yeast strains lacking monohexose transporters which were grown on maltose. The apparent affinity...... of extracellular glucose to Snf3 was measured for cells grown in non-fermentative medium or on maltose. The apparent affinity for glucose was lowest when the intracellular glucose concentration was high. The results conform to an alternating-access model for transporter-like sensors. J. Cell. Biochem. 110: 920...

  16. Intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, S; Chevalier, J; Cremieux, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin in mycobacteria, two methods were used with Mycobacterium smegmatis. A radiometric method (K. V. Cundy, C. E. Fasching, K. E. Willard, and L. R. Peterson, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:491-497, 1991) was used without great modification, but the fluorometric method (P. G. S. Mortimer and L. J. V. Piddock, J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 28:639-653, 1991) was changed considerably. Indeed, adsorption of the quinolone to the bacterial surface was characterized by measuring the level of accumulation of 0 degree C. Taking into account the adsorption, the pH of the washing buffer was increased from 7.0 to 9.0 to improve the desorption of norfloxacin from the cell surface. Both the fluorometric method, with the technical improvement, and the radiometric method could be used to estimate the intracellular accumulation of norfloxacin, which resulted from the difference between the whole uptake measured at 37 degrees C and the adsorption measured at 0 degrees C. A total of 35 ng of norfloxacin per mg of cells (dry weight) penetrated into the M. smegmatis cell, and the steady state was achieved in 5 min. Use of inhibitors of the proton motive force revealed that transport of norfloxacin was energy independent. Thus, the same mechanisms of quinolone accumulation that occur in eubacteria seem to occur in mycobacteria, at least in M. smegmatis. PMID:8585727

  17. Control of the initiation and termination of kinesin-1-driven transport by myosin-Ic and nonmuscle tropomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Holzbaur, Erika L F; Ostap, E Michael

    2015-02-16

    Intracellular transport is largely driven by processive microtubule- and actin-based molecular motors. Nonprocessive motors have also been localized to trafficking cargos, but their roles are not well understood. Myosin-Ic (Myo1c), a nonprocessive actin motor, functions in a variety of exocytic events, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet clear. To investigate the interplay between myosin-I and the canonical long-distance transport motor kinesin-1, we attached both motor types to lipid membrane-coated bead cargo, using an attachment strategy that allows motors to actively reorganize within the membrane in response to the local cytoskeletal environment. We compared the motility of kinesin-1-driven cargos in the absence and presence of Myo1c at engineered actin/microtubule intersections. We found that Myo1c significantly increases the frequency of kinesin-1-driven microtubule-based runs that begin at actin/microtubule intersections. Myo1c also regulates the termination of processive runs. Beads with both motors bound have a significantly higher probability of pausing at actin/microtubule intersections, remaining tethered for an average of 20 s, with some pauses lasting longer than 200 s. The actin-binding protein nonmuscle tropomyosin (Tm) provides spatially specific regulation of interactions between myosin motors and actin filaments in vivo; in the crossed-filament in vitro assay, we found that Tm2-actin abolishes Myo1c-specific effects on both run initiation and run termination. Together, these observations suggest Myo1c is important for the selective initiation and termination of kinesin-1-driven runs along microtubules at specific actin filament populations within the cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Consequences of Molecular-Scale Non-Equilibrium Activity on the Dynamics and Mechanics of Self-Assembled Actin-Based Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall Mccall, Patrick

    Living cells are hierarchically self-organized forms of active soft matter: molecules on the nanometer scale form functional structures and organelles on the micron scale, which then compose cells on the scale of 10s of microns. While the biological functions of intracellular organelles are defined by the composition and properties of the structures themselves, how those bulk properties emerge from the properties and interactions of individual molecules remains poorly understood. Actin, a globular protein which self-assembles into dynamic semi-flexible polymers, is the basic structural material of cells and the major component of many functional organelles. In this thesis, I have used purified actin as a model system to explore the interplay between molecular-scale dynamics and organelle-scale functionality, with particular focus on the role of molecular-scale non-equilibrium activity. One of the most canonical forms of molecular-scale non-equilibrium activity is that of mechanoenzymes, also called motor proteins. These proteins utilized the free energy liberated by hydrolysis of ATP to perform mechanical work, thereby introducing non-equilibrium "active" stresses on the molecular scale. Combining experiments with mathematical modeling, we demonstrate in this thesis that non-equilibrium motor activity is sufficient to drive self-organization and pattern formation of the multimeric actin-binding motor protein Myosin II on 1D reconstituted actomyosin bundles. Like myosin, actin is itself an ATPase. However, nono-equilibrium ATP hydrolysis on actin is known to regulate the stability and assembly kinetics of actin filaments rather than generate active stresses per se. At the level of single actin filaments, the inhomogeneous nucleotide composition generated along the filament length by hydrolysis directs binding of regulatory proteins like cofilin, which mediate filament disassembly and thereby accelerate actin filament turnover. The concequences of this non

  20. Superdiffusion dominates intracellular particle motion in the supercrowded cytoplasm of pathogenic Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverey, Julia F.; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Bao, Han; Leippe, Matthias; Metzler, Ralf; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Acanthamoebae are free-living protists and human pathogens, whose cellular functions and pathogenicity strongly depend on the transport of intracellular vesicles and granules through the cytosol. Using high-speed live cell imaging in combination with single-particle tracking analysis, we show here that the motion of endogenous intracellular particles in the size range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers in Acanthamoeba castellanii is strongly superdiffusive and influenced by cell locomotion, cytoskeletal elements, and myosin II. We demonstrate that cell locomotion significantly contributes to intracellular particle motion, but is clearly not the only origin of superdiffusivity. By analyzing the contribution of microtubules, actin, and myosin II motors we show that myosin II is a major driving force of intracellular motion in A. castellanii. The cytoplasm of A. castellanii is supercrowded with intracellular vesicles and granules, such that significant intracellular motion can only be achieved by actively driven motion, while purely thermally driven diffusion is negligible.

  1. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  2. Intracellular ion channels and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eLeanza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K+ channels (Ca2+-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K+ channel-3 (TASK-3, Ca2+ uniporter MCU, Mg2+-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 receptor, the ER-located Ca2+ depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1, a component of the store-operated Ca2+ channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment.

  3. Analysis of Select Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Proteins for Restriction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1): HSV-1 gM Protein Potently Restricts HIV-1 by Preventing Intracellular Transport and Processing of Env gp160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpitiya Arachchige, Sachith; Henke, Wyatt; Pramanik, Ankita; Kalamvoki, Maria; Stephens, Edward B

    2018-01-15

    Virus-encoded proteins that impair or shut down specific host cell functions during replication can be used as probes to identify potential proteins/pathways used in the replication of viruses from other families. We screened nine proteins from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for the ability to enhance or restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We show that several HSV-1 proteins (glycoprotein M [gM], US3, and UL24) potently restricted the replication of HIV-1. Unlike UL24 and US3, which reduced viral protein synthesis, we observed that gM restriction of HIV-1 occurred through interference with the processing and transport of gp160, resulting in a significantly reduced level of mature gp120/gp41 released from cells. Finally, we show that an HSV-1 gM mutant lacking the majority of the C-terminal domain (HA-gM[Δ345-473]) restricted neither gp160 processing nor the release of infectious virus. These studies identify proteins from heterologous viruses that can restrict viruses through novel pathways. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infection of humans results in AIDS, characterized by the loss of CD4 + T cells and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Both HIV-1 and HSV-1 can infect astrocytes and microglia of the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the identification of HSV-1 proteins that directly restrict HIV-1 or interfere with pathways required for HIV-1 replication could lead to novel antiretroviral strategies. The results of this study show that select viral proteins from HSV-1 can potently restrict HIV-1. Further, our results indicate that the gM protein of HSV-1 restricts HIV-1 through a novel pathway by interfering with the processing of gp160 and its incorporation into virus maturing from the cell. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Intracellular trafficking mechanism of cationic phospholipids including cationic liposomes in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, K; Sakai-Kato, K; Goda, Y

    2014-07-01

    The development of gene delivery methods is essential for the achievement of effective gene therapy. Elucidation of the intracellular transfer mechanism for cationic carriers is in progress, but there are few reports regarding the intracellular trafficking processes of the cationic phospholipids taken up into cells. In the present work, the trafficking processes of a cationic phospholipid (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, DOTAP) were investigated from intracellular uptake to extracellular efflux using cationic liposomes in vitro. Following intracellular transport of liposomes via endocytosis, DOTAP was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Moreover, the proteins involved in DOTAP intracellular trafficking and extracellular efflux were identified. In addition, helper lipids of cationic liposomes were found to partially affect this intracellulartrafficking. These findings might provide valuable information for designing cationic carriers and avoiding unexpected toxic side effects derived from cationic liposomal components.

  5. MR imaging of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janick, P.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Asakura, T.

    1989-01-01

    MR imaging was performed on varying concentrations of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin as well as varying proportions of deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in vitro at 1.5T with use of standard spin-echo and gradient-refocused spin sequences. This study indicates that susceptibility-induced T2 shortening occurs over a broad range of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin concentrations (maximal at hematocrits between 20% and 45%), reflecting diffusional effects at the cellular level. T2* gradient-echo imaging enhances the observed hypointensity in images of intracellular deoxyhemoglobin. The characteristic MR appearance of acute hemotomas can be modeled by the behavior of intracellular and extracellular deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin

  6. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a Km of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a Km of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose.

  7. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  8. Intracellular Polyamines Enhance Astrocytic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Jan; Inyushin, Mikhail; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V.; Rivera, Yomarie; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y.; Nichols, Colin G.; Eaton, Misty J.; Skatchkov, Serguei N.

    2013-01-01

    Spermine (SPM) and spermidine (SPD), endogenous polyamines (PA) with the ability to modulate various ion channels and receptors in the brain, exert neuroprotective, antidepressant, antioxidant and other effects in vivo such as increasing longevity. These PA are preferably accumulated in astrocytes, and we hypothesized that SPM increases glial intercellular communication by interacting with glial gap junctions. Results obtained in situ, using Lucifer yellow propagation in the astrocytic syncitium of 21–25 day old rat CA1 hippocampal slices, showed reduced coupling when astrocytes were dialyzed with standard intracellular solutions (ICS) without SPM. However, there was a robust increase in the spreading of Lucifer yellow via gap junctions to neighboring astrocytes when the cells were patched with ICS containing 1 mM SPM; a physiological concentration in glia. Lucifer yellow propagation was inhibited by gap junction blockers. Our findings show that the glial syncitium propagates SPM via gap junctions and further suggest a new role of polyamines in the regulation of the astroglial network in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23076119

  9. A Phytochrome-Derived Photoswitch for Intracellular Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369490959; Nijenhuis, Wilco; Hoogstraaten, Rein I; Willems, Jelmer; Kapitein, Lukas C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298806630

    2017-01-01

    Cells depend on the proper positioning of their organelles, suggesting that active manipulation of organelle positions can be used to explore spatial cell biology and to restore cellular defects caused by organelle misplacement. Recently, blue-light dependent recruitment of specific motors to

  10. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species......-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly....... Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59...

  11. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism.

  12. Investigating Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Simon R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    for signal transduction. One of the major mechanisms for GPCR regulation involves their endocytic trafficking, which serves to internalize the receptors from the plasma membrane and thereby attenuate G protein-dependent signaling. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that GPCRs can signal...... independently of G proteins, as well as from intracellular compartments including endosomes. It is in this context that receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking have attracted renewed interest within the GPCR field. In this chapter, we will review the current understanding and methodologies...... that have been used to investigate internalization and intracellular signaling of GPCRs, with a particular focus on emerging real-time techniques. These recent developments have improved our understanding of the complexities of GPCR internalization and intracellular signaling and suggest that the broader...

  13. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  14. LDL Receptors as Gateways for Intracellular Porphyrin Uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novick, S.; Laster, B.; Quastel, M.

    2004-01-01

    Boronated compounds are currently being studied for possible use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). We found that one of these agents, BOPP (tetrakis-carborane-carboxylate, esters of 2,4-bis (a,b- dihydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX), could also be labeled with indium (In-BOPP) and, therefore, could also be used potentially to transport high Z atoms into tumor cell DNA for AET (Auger Electron Therapy). In order to assess the uptake of these agents into cells, the role of the LDL receptor in the intracellular accumulation of BOPP and In-BOPP was investigated. Pre-incubation of V-79 Chinese hamster cells in medium containing delipidized fetal bovine serum (FBS) markedly increased the subsequent uptake of intracellular boron transported by both BOPP and In-BOPP when compared with cells that had been pre-incubated with medium containing 10% normal FBS (lipidized). The increased uptake was characterized by elevated levels of receptor, and greater affinity was shown for both BOPP and In-BOPP, although less marked with the latter. Positive cooperativity was demonstrated by sigmoid saturation curves, Scatchard analysis and Hill plots. Increasing the amount of LDL in the incubation medium had a relatively small effect on the total accumulation of either indium or boron atoms inside the cell. Furthermore, chemical acetylation of LDL did not decrease the intracellular uptake of either boron or indium transported by BOPP or In-BOPP. It is thus concluded that BOPP and In-BOPP preferentially enter the cells directly by way of the LDL receptor and that only a small fraction of these molecules are transported into the cells indirectly using serum LDLs as their carriers. These data suggest a novel way of bringing greater amounts of boron and indium (and perhaps other agents) into tissues. Porphyrins can be used to transport different agents into tumor cells because they are tumor affinic molecules. Tumors express a higher number of LDL receptors than do most normal tissues

  15. Modulation of host central carbon metabolism and in situ glucose uptake by intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Lentini, Gaelle; Dumoulin, Peter C; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2017-11-01

    Obligate intracellular pathogens satisfy their nutrient requirements by coupling to host metabolic processes, often modulating these pathways to facilitate access to key metabolites. Such metabolic dependencies represent potential targets for pathogen control, but remain largely uncharacterized for the intracellular protozoan parasite and causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Perturbations in host central carbon and energy metabolism have been reported in mammalian T. cruzi infection, with no information regarding the impact of host metabolic changes on the intracellular amastigote life stage. Here, we performed cell-based studies to elucidate the interplay between infection with intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes and host cellular energy metabolism. T. cruzi infection of non-phagocytic cells was characterized by increased glucose uptake into infected cells and increased mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis. While intracellular amastigote growth was unaffected by decreased host respiratory capacity, restriction of extracellular glucose impaired amastigote proliferation and sensitized parasites to further growth inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose. These observations led us to consider whether intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes utilize glucose directly as a substrate to fuel metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, isolated T. cruzi amastigotes transport extracellular glucose with kinetics similar to trypomastigotes, with subsequent metabolism as demonstrated in 13C-glucose labeling and substrate utilization assays. Metabolic labeling of T. cruzi-infected cells further demonstrated the ability of intracellular parasites to access host hexose pools in situ. These findings are consistent with a model in which intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes capitalize on the host metabolic response to parasite infection, including the increase in glucose uptake, to fuel their own metabolism and replication in the host cytosol. Our findings enrich

  16. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations.

  17. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations >60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2–3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations. PMID:27847498

  18. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease and intracellular traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Cecilia; Bakke, Oddmund; Progida, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of genes whose primary function is the regulation of membrane traffic are increasingly being identified as the underlying causes of various important human disorders. Intriguingly, mutations in ubiquitously expressed membrane traffic genes often lead to cell type- or organ-specific disorders. This is particularly true for neuronal diseases, identifying the nervous system as the most sensitive tissue to alterations of membrane traffic. Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the most common inherited peripheral neuropathies. It is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), which comprises a group of disorders specifically affecting peripheral nerves. This peripheral neuropathy, highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, is characterized by a slowly progressive degeneration of the muscle of the foot, lower leg, hand and forearm, accompanied by sensory loss in the toes, fingers and limbs. More than 30 genes have been identified as targets of mutations that cause CMT neuropathy. A number of these genes encode proteins directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of intracellular traffic. Indeed, the list of genes linked to CMT disease includes genes important for vesicle formation, phosphoinositide metabolism, lysosomal degradation, mitochondrial fission and fusion, and also genes encoding endosomal and cytoskeletal proteins. This review focuses on the link between intracellular transport and CMT disease, highlighting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the different forms of this peripheral neuropathy and discussing the pathophysiological impact of membrane transport genetic defects as well as possible future ways to counteract these defects. PMID:22465036

  19. Collective motor dynamics in membrane transport in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaklee, Paige Marie

    2009-01-01

    Key cellular processes such as cell division, internal cellular organization, membrane compartmentalization and intracellular transport rely on motor proteins. Motor proteins, ATP-based mechanoenzymes, actively transport cargo throughout the cell by walking on cytoskeletal filaments. Motors have

  20. Micro- and nanotechnologies for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lee, Chun-Sing; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-11-01

    The majority of drugs and biomolecules need to be delivered into cells to be effective. However, the cell membranes, a biological barrier, strictly resist drugs or biomolecules entering cells, resulting in significantly reduced intracellular delivery efficiency. To overcome this barrier, a variety of intracellular delivery approaches including chemical and physical ways have been developed in recent years. In this review, the focus is on summarizing the nanomaterial routes involved in making use of a collection of receptors for the targeted delivery of drugs and biomolecules and the physical ways of applying micro- and nanotechnologies for high-throughput intracellular delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Fluorescent nanothermometers for intracellular thermal sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Rosal, Blanca Del; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Maestro, Laura Martínez; Haro-González, Patricia; Solé, José García

    2014-05-01

    The importance of high-resolution intracellular thermal sensing and imaging in the field of modern biomedicine has boosted the development of novel nanosized fluorescent systems (fluorescent nanothermometers) as the next generation of probes for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. This thermal mapping requires fluorescent nanothermometers with good biocompatibility and high thermal sensitivity in order to obtain submicrometric and subdegree spatial and thermal resolutions, respectively. This review describes the different nanosized systems used up to now for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. We also include the later advances in molecular systems based on fluorescent proteins for thermal mapping. A critical overview of the state of the art and the future perspective is also included.

  2. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. © 2015 The Authors

  3. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  4. Role of intracellular infections in premature childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurabishvili, S; Mamamtavrishvili, I; Apridonidze, K; Shanidze, L

    2005-09-01

    Vaginal Smear taken by sterile Folkman spoon from 15 women with premature birth was studied. The study was performed by the direct immune fluorescence method with the luminescence microscope. We aimed to study the effect of intracellular infections: ureaplasma urealitikum, mycoplasma hominis, Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus of I and II type and cytomegalovirus. Intracellular infections were detected in at about 82% of cases, which included mono infections with cytomegalovirus and in 9 cases in the form of bi-component associations. The obtained results may be interesting from the etiologic point of view of premature births in Georgian population.

  5. Horizontal Transmission of Intracellular Insect Symbionts via Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Chrostek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence is accumulating that endosymbionts of phytophagous insects may transmit horizontally via plants. Intracellular symbionts known for manipulating insect reproduction and altering fitness (Rickettsia, Cardinium, Wolbachia, and bacterial parasite of the leafhopper Euscelidius variegatus have been found to travel from infected insects into plants. Other insects, either of the same or different species can acquire the symbiont from the plant through feeding, and in some cases transfer it to their progeny. These reports prompt many questions regarding how intracellular insect symbionts are delivered to plants and how they affect them. Are symbionts passively transported along the insect-plant-insect path, or do they actively participate in the process? How widespread are these interactions? How does symbiont presence influence the plant? And what conditions are required for the new infection to establish in an insect? From an ecological, evolutionary, and applied perspective, this mode of horizontal transmission could have profound implications if occurring frequently enough or if new stable symbiont infections are established. Transmission of symbionts through plants likely represents an underappreciated means of infection, both in terms of symbiont epidemiology and the movement of symbionts to new host species.

  6. Horizontal Transmission of Intracellular Insect Symbionts via Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrostek, Ewa; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Hurst, Gregory D D; Hughes, Grant L

    2017-01-01

    Experimental evidence is accumulating that endosymbionts of phytophagous insects may transmit horizontally via plants. Intracellular symbionts known for manipulating insect reproduction and altering fitness ( Rickettsia, Cardinium, Wolbachia , and bacterial parasite of the leafhopper Euscelidius variegatus ) have been found to travel from infected insects into plants. Other insects, either of the same or different species can acquire the symbiont from the plant through feeding, and in some cases transfer it to their progeny. These reports prompt many questions regarding how intracellular insect symbionts are delivered to plants and how they affect them. Are symbionts passively transported along the insect-plant-insect path, or do they actively participate in the process? How widespread are these interactions? How does symbiont presence influence the plant? And what conditions are required for the new infection to establish in an insect? From an ecological, evolutionary, and applied perspective, this mode of horizontal transmission could have profound implications if occurring frequently enough or if new stable symbiont infections are established. Transmission of symbionts through plants likely represents an underappreciated means of infection, both in terms of symbiont epidemiology and the movement of symbionts to new host species.

  7. Hepatitis C virus intracellular host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefhebber, Johanna Maaike Pieternella

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects about 170 million people worldwide causing a major healthcare problem. The virus lifecycle is greatly dependent on the host-cell for effective replication. In this thesis, the intracellular interactions of the non-structural HCV proteins with the host-cell were

  8. Enhanced production of intracellular dextran dextrinase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhanced production of intracellular dextran dextrinase from Gluconobacter oxydans using statistical experimental methods. ... the Plackett-Burman screening. A four-factor five-level central composite design (CCD) was chosen to explain the combined effects of the four medium constituents. The optimum medium consisted ...

  9. Biological synthesis and characterization of intracellular gold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... nontoxic, safe, biocompatible and environmentally acceptable. In the present study, Aspergillus fumigatus was used for the intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Stable nanoparticles were produced when an aqueous solution of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) was reduced by A. fumigatus biomass as the reducing agent ...

  10. Efficient intracellular delivery of native proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Astolfo, Diego S; Pagliero, Romina J; Pras, Anita; Karthaus, Wouter R; Clevers, Hans; Prasad, Vikram; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Rehmann, Holger; Geijsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein function is used to intervene in cellular processes but is often done indirectly by means of introducing DNA or mRNA encoding the effector protein. Thus far, direct intracellular delivery of proteins has remained challenging. We developed a method termed iTOP, for induced

  11. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... [Ganguli P, Chowdhury S, Bhowmick R and Sarkar RR 2015 Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: A ... cells and tissues by studying different signalling pathways, such as Hedgehog ...... Murray JD 2003 On the mechanochemical theory of biological.

  12. Optimizing Nanoelectrode Arrays for Scalable Intracellular Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2018-03-20

    Electrode technology for electrophysiology has a long history of innovation, with some decisive steps including the development of the voltage-clamp measurement technique by Hodgkin and Huxley in the 1940s and the invention of the patch clamp electrode by Neher and Sakmann in the 1970s. The high-precision intracellular recording enabled by the patch clamp electrode has since been a gold standard in studying the fundamental cellular processes underlying the electrical activities of neurons and other excitable cells. One logical next step would then be to parallelize these intracellular electrodes, since simultaneous intracellular recording from a large number of cells will benefit the study of complex neuronal networks and will increase the throughput of electrophysiological screening from basic neurobiology laboratories to the pharmaceutical industry. Patch clamp electrodes, however, are not built for parallelization; as for now, only ∼10 patch measurements in parallel are possible. It has long been envisioned that nanoscale electrodes may help meet this challenge. First, nanoscale electrodes were shown to enable intracellular access. Second, because their size scale is within the normal reach of the standard top-down fabrication, the nanoelectrodes can be scaled into a large array for parallelization. Third, such a nanoelectrode array can be monolithically integrated with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics to facilitate the large array operation and the recording of the signals from a massive number of cells. These are some of the central ideas that have motivated the research activity into nanoelectrode electrophysiology, and these past years have seen fruitful developments. This Account aims to synthesize these findings so as to provide a useful reference. Summing up from the recent studies, we will first elucidate the morphology and associated electrical properties of the interface between a nanoelectrode and a cellular membrane

  13. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  14. Intracellular pH in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Hug, M; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of H+ and HCO3- transport in a HCO3- secreting epithelium, pancreatic ducts, we have measured the intracellular pH (pHi) in this tissue using the pH sensitive probe BCECF. We found that exposures of ducts to solutions containing acetate/acetic acid or NH4+/NH3...... buffers (20 mmol/l) led to pHi changes in accordance with entry of lipid-soluble forms of the buffers, followed by back-regulation of pHi by duct cells. In another type of experiment, changes in extracellular pH of solutions containing HEPES or HCO3-/CO2 buffers led to significant changes in pHi that did....... Under some conditions, these exchangers can be invoked to regulate cell pH....

  15. Heme requirement and intracellular trafficking in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, F.A.; Sant'Anna, C.; Lemos, D.; Laranja, G.A.T.; Coelho, M.G.P.; Reis Salles, I.; Michel, A.; Oliveira, P.L.; Cunha-e-Silva, N.; Salmon, D.; Paes, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Epimastigotes multiplies in the insect midgut by taking up nutrients present in the blood meal including heme bound to hemoglobin of red blood cell. During blood meal digestion by vector proteases in the posterior midgut, hemoglobin is clipped off into amino acids, peptides, and free heme. In this paper, we compared the heme and hemoglobin uptake kinetics and followed their intracellular trafficking. Addition of heme to culture medium increased epimastigote proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while medium supplemented with hemoglobin enhanced growth after 3-day lag phase. Medium supplemented with globin-derived peptides stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-independent way. Using Palladium mesoporphyrin IX (Pd-mP) as a fluorescent heme-analog, we observed that heme internalization proceeded much faster than that observed by hemoglobin-rhodamine. Binding experiments showed that parasites accumulated the Pd-mP into the posterior region of the cell whereas hemoglobin-rhodamine stained the anterior region. Finally, using different specific inhibitors of ABC transporters we conclude that a P-glycoprotein homologue transporter is probably involved in heme transport through the plasma membrane

  16. NMR monitoring of intracellular sodium in dog and rabbit kidney tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, Y.; Vinay, P.; Boulanger, M.

    1987-01-01

    23 Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to monitor intra- and extracellular sodium in suspensions of dog cortical tubules, rabbit cortical tubules, and dog thick ascending limbs. The NMR visibility of the intracellular sodium was determined by comparing the NMR and flame photometry results and by redistributing the sodium ions between the intra- and extracellular compartments using the ionophore nystatin (influx) or sodium substitution for choline in the extracellular fluid (efflux). The intracellular sodium visibility was ∼30% for the total sodium and 58% for the transportable sodium. Addition of sodium to sodium-depleted homogenates of dog renal cortex also showed a loss of visibility. The values of the relaxation times T 1 and T 2 were determined but could not be correlated with the visibility measurements. The intracellular sodium concentration in dog cortical tubules incubated in optimal biochemical conditions was estimated at 51 mM was dependent on the extracellular sodium concentration

  17. Intracellular Ca2+ Regulation in Calcium Sensitive Phenotype of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERMANSYAH

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular cytosolic Ca2+ concentration accumulation plays an essential information in Saccharomyces cerevisiae i.e. to explain cellular mechanism of Ca2+ sensitive phenotype. Disruption both S. cerevisiae PPase PTP2 and MSG5 genes showed an inhibited growth in the presence of Ca2+. On the other hand, by using Luminocounter with apoaequorin system, a method based upon luminescent photoprotein aequorin, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was accumulated as a consequence of calcium sensitive phenotype of S. cerevisiae. This fact indicated that PPase ptp2Δ and msg5Δ were involved in intracellular Ca2+ transport in addition their already known pathways i.e Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase cell wall integrity pathway, high osmolarity glycerol (HOG pathway, and pheromone response FUS3 pathway.

  18. Autophagy Evasion and Endoplasmic Reticulum Subversion: The Yin and Yang of Legionella Intracellular Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Racquel Kim; Roy, Craig R

    2016-09-08

    The gram-negative bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila creates a novel organelle inside of eukaryotic host cells that supports intracellular replication. The L. pneumophila-containing vacuole evades fusion with lysosomes and interacts intimately with the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although the natural hosts for L. pneumophila are free-living protozoa that reside in freshwater environments, the mechanisms that enable this pathogen to replicate intracellularly also function when mammalian macrophages phagocytose aerosolized bacteria, and infection of humans by L. pneumophila can result in a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. A bacterial type IVB secretion system called Dot/Icm is essential for intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. The Dot/Icm apparatus delivers over 300 different bacterial proteins into host cells during infection. These bacterial proteins have biochemical activities that target evolutionarily conserved host factors that control membrane transport processes, which results in the formation of the ER-derived vacuole that supports L. pneumophila replication. This review highlights research discoveries that have defined interactions between vacuoles containing L. pneumophila and the host ER. These studies reveal how L. pneumophila creates a vacuole that supports intracellular replication by subverting host proteins that control biogenesis and fusion of early secretory vesicles that exit the ER and host proteins that regulate the shape and dynamics of the ER. In addition to recruiting ER-derived membranes for biogenesis of the vacuole in which L. pneumophila replicates, these studies have revealed that this pathogen has a remarkable ability to interfere with the host's cellular process of autophagy, which is an ancient cell autonomous defense pathway that utilizes ER-derived membranes to target intracellular pathogens for destruction. Thus, this intracellular pathogen has evolved multiple mechanisms to control membrane

  19. Intracellular Proton-Transfer Mutants in a CLC Cl-/H+ Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H.; Miller, C

    2009-01-01

    CLC-ec1, a bacterial homologue of the CLC family's transporter subclass, catalyzes transmembrane exchange of Cl- and H+. Mutational analysis based on the known structure reveals several key residues required for coupling H+ to the stoichiometric countermovement of Cl-. E148 (Gluex) transfers protons between extracellular water and the protein interior, and E203 (Gluin) is thought to function analogously on the intracellular face of the protein. Mutation of either residue eliminates H+ transport while preserving Cl- transport. We tested the role of Gluin by examining structural and functional properties of mutants at this position. Certain dissociable side chains (E, D, H, K, R, but not C and Y) retain H+/Cl- exchanger activity to varying degrees, while other mutations (V, I, or C) abolish H+ coupling and severely inhibit Cl- flux. Transporters substituted with other nonprotonatable side chains (Q, S, and A) show highly impaired H+ transport with substantial Cl- transport. Influence on H+ transport of side chain length and acidity was assessed using a single-cysteine mutant to introduce non-natural side chains. Crystal structures of both coupled (E203H) and uncoupled (E203V) mutants are similar to wild type. The results support the idea that Gluin is the internal proton-transfer residue that delivers protons from intracellular solution to the protein interior, where they couple to Cl- movements to bring about Cl-/H+ exchange.

  20. Reduction of intracellular glutathione content and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roos-Verheij, W.S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular glutathione (GSH) content of HeLa, CHO and V79 cells was reduced by incubating the cells in growth medium containing buthionine sulphoximine or diethyl maleate (DEM). Clonogenicity, single-strand DNA breaks (ssb) and double-strand DNA breaks (dsb) were used as criteria for radiation-induced damage after X- or γ-irradiation. In survival experiments, DEM gave a slightly larger sensitization although it gave a smaller reduction of the intracellular GSH. In general, sensitization was larger for dsb than for ssb, also the reduction of the o.e.r. was generally larger for dsb than for ssb. This may be due to the higher dose rate in case of dsb experiments resulting in a higher rate of radiochemical oxygen consumption. In general, no effect was found on post-irradiation repair of ssb and dsb. (author)

  1. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  2. Reduction of intracellular glutathione content and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roos-Verheij, W.S.D.

    1986-05-01

    The intracellular glutathione (GSH) content in HeLa, CHO and V79 cells was reduced by incubating the cells in growth medium containing buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or diethyl maleate (DEM). Clonogenicity, single strand DNA breaks (ssb) and double strand DNA breaks (dsb) were used as criteria for radiation induced damage after X- or γ irradiation. In survival experiments DEM gave a slightly larger sensitization although it gave a smaller reduction of the intracellular GSH. In general, sensitization was larger for dsb than for ssb, also the reduction of the OER was generally larger for dsb than for ssb. This may be due to the higher dose rate in case of dsb experiments resulting in a higher rate of radiochemical oxygen consumption. In general, no effect was found on post-irradiation repair of ssb and dsb. (Auth.)

  3. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular delivery of such proteins, including human tumor suppressors (such as p53) (Brown et al., 2009) and exogenous tumor-killing proteins...vivo systems. Nature materials 11, 1038-1043. Chorny, M., Hood, E., Levy, R.J., and Muzykantov, V.R. (2010). Endothelial delivery of antioxidant ...for the ntracellular delivery of such proteins, including human umor suppressors [7] and exogenous tumor-killing proteins 8—10]), is attractive as a

  4. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  5. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  6. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-03-15

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB-PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities.

  7. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Intracellular processing of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Skovbjerg, H; Norén, Ove

    1984-01-01

    The biosynthesis of pig small intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.23-62) was studied by labelling of organ cultured mucosal explants with [35S]methionine. The earliest detactable form of the enzyme was an intracellular, membrane-bound polypeptide of Mr 225 000, sensitive to endo H...... 000 polypeptide is of the same size as the mature lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and was the only form expressed in the microvillar membrane. Together, these data are indicative of an intracellular proteolytic cleavage during transport. The presence of leupeptin during labelling prevented the appearance...... of the Mr 160 000 form but not that of the Mr 245 000 polypeptide, suggesting that the proteolytic cleavage takes place after trimming and complex glycosylation. The proteolytic cleavage was not essential for the transport since the precursor was expressed in the microvillar membrane in the presence...

  8. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  9. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of 86 Rb and 22 Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular [Ca] (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca]i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: [Ca]i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular [Ca] to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in [Ca]i, suggesting that the source of the increase in [Ca]i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases [Ca]i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation

  10. Intracellular Hyper-Acidification Potentiated by Hydrogen Sulfide Mediates Invasive and Therapy Resistant Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Wei Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Slow and continuous release of H2S by GYY4137 has previously been demonstrated to kill cancer cells by increasing glycolysis and impairing anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. This action is specific for cancer cells. The resulting lactate overproduction and defective pH homeostasis bring about intracellular acidification-induced cancer cell death. The present study investigated the potency of H2S released by GYY4137 against invasive and radio- as well as chemo-resistant cancers, known to be glycolytically active. We characterized and utilized cancer cell line pairs of various organ origins, based on their aggressive behaviors, and assessed their response to GYY4137. We compared glycolytic activity, via lactate production, and intracellular pH of each cancer cell line pair after exposure to H2S. Invasive and therapy resistant cancers, collectively termed aggressive cancers, are receptive to H2S-mediated cytotoxicity, albeit at a higher concentration of GYY4137 donor. While lactate production was enhanced, intracellular pH of aggressive cancers was only modestly decreased. Inherently, the magnitude of intracellular pH decrease is a key determinant for cancer cell sensitivity to H2S. We demonstrated the utility of coupling GYY4137 with either simvastatin, known to inhibit monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4, or metformin, to further boost glycolysis, in bringing about cell death for aggressive cancers. Simvastatin inhibiting lactate extrusion thence contained excess lactate induced by GYY4137 within intracellular compartment. In contrast, the combined exposure to both GYY4137 and metformin overwhelms cancer cells with lactate over-production exceeding its expulsion rate. Together, GYY4137 and simvastatin or metformin synergize to induce intracellular hyper-acidification-mediated cancer cell death.

  11. Intracellular bacteria: the origin of dinoflagellate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E S

    1990-01-01

    Dinoflagellate blooms of the same species have been registered either as toxic or nontoxic and, in the latter case, toxicity may be of different types. A hypothesis has been formulated according to which the bacteria having in some way taken part in the toxin formation are either inside the dinoflagellate cell or in the nutritive liquid. The presence of intracellular bacteria in those microorganisms has been studied mainly in material from cultures, a few from the sea, and several strains were isolated from different species. Experiments with crossed inoculations have shown that the bacterial strain from Gonyaulax tamarensis caused the cells of some other species to become toxic. From nontoxic clonal cultures of Prorocentrum balticum, Glenodinium foliaceum, and Gyrodinium instriatum, after inoculation of that bacterial strain, cultures were obtained whose cell extracts showed the same kind of toxicity as G. tamarensis. No toxic action could be found in the extracts of the bacterial cells form the assayed strains. The interference of intracellular bacteria in the metabolism of dinoflagellates must be the main cause of their toxicity.

  12. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Walters, Jamie D; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2012-11-02

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Intracellular signaling mechanisms in thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Terán, Paul; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Suárez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Luna-Ceballos, Rosa Isela; Erazo Valle-Solís, Aura

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, the papillary variant accounts for 80-90% of all diagnosed cases. In the development of papillary thyroid cancer, BRAF and RAS genes are mainly affected, resulting in a modification of the system of intracellular signaling proteins known as «protein kinase mitogen-activated» (MAPK) which consist of «modules» of internal signaling proteins (Receptor/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) from the cell membrane to the nucleus. In thyroid cancer, these signanling proteins regulate diverse cellular processes such as differentiation, growth, development and apoptosis. MAPK play an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer as they are used as molecular biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and as possible therapeutic molecular targets. Mutations in BRAF gene have been correlated with poor response to treatment with traditional chemotherapy and as an indicator of poor prognosis. To review the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular signaling of BRAF and RAS genes in thyroid cancer. Molecular therapy research is in progress for this type of cancer as new molecules have been developed in order to inhibit any of the components of the signaling pathway (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK; with special emphasis on the (RET/PTC)/Ras/Raf section, which is a major effector of ERK pathway. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  15. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  16. The first intracellular loop of GLUT4 contains a retention motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talantikite, Maya; Berenguer, Marion; Gonzalez, Teresa; Alessi, Marie Christine; Poggi, Marjorie; Peiretti, Franck; Govers, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Glucose transporter GLUT4 (also known as SLC2A4) plays a major role in glucose homeostasis and is efficiently retained intracellularly in adipocytes and myocytes. To simplify the analysis of its retention, here, various intracellular GLUT4 domains were fused individually to reporter molecules. Of the four short cytoplasmic loops of GLUT4, only the first nine-residue-long loop conferred intracellular retention of truncated forms of the transferrin receptor and CD4 in adipocytes. In contrast, the same loop of GLUT1 was without effect. The reporter molecules to which the first loop of GLUT4 was fused localized, unlike GLUT4, to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), possibly explaining why these molecules did not respond to insulin. The retention induced by the GLUT4 loop was specific to adipocytes as it did not induce retention in preadipocytes. Of the SQWLGRKRA sequence that constitutes this loop, mutation of either the tryptophan or lysine residue abrogated reporter retention. Mutation of these residues individually into alanine residues in the full-length GLUT4 molecule resulted in a decreased retention for GLUT4-W105A. We conclude that the first intracellular loop of GLUT4 contains the retention motif WLGRK, in which W105 plays a prominent role. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Trade-Offs of Escherichia coli Adaptation to an Intracellular Lifestyle in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Azevedo

    Full Text Available The bacterium Escherichia coli exhibits remarkable genomic and phenotypic variation, with some pathogenic strains having evolved to survive and even replicate in the harsh intra-macrophage environment. The rate and effects of mutations that can cause pathoadaptation are key determinants of the pace at which E. coli can colonize such niches and become pathogenic. We used experimental evolution to determine the speed and evolutionary paths undertaken by a commensal strain of E. coli when adapting to intracellular life. We estimated the acquisition of pathoadaptive mutations at a rate of 10-6 per genome per generation, resulting in the fixation of more virulent strains in less than a hundred generations. Whole genome sequencing of independently evolved clones showed that the main targets of intracellular adaptation involved loss of function mutations in genes implicated in the assembly of the lipopolysaccharide core, iron metabolism and di- and tri-peptide transport, namely rfaI, fhuA and tppB, respectively. We found a substantial amount of antagonistic pleiotropy in evolved populations, as well as metabolic trade-offs, commonly found in intracellular bacteria with reduced genome sizes. Overall, the low levels of clonal interference detected indicate that the first steps of the transition of a commensal E. coli into intracellular pathogens are dominated by a few pathoadaptive mutations with very strong effects.

  18. A new type of intracellular retention signal identified in a pestivirus structural glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrack, Sandra; Aberle, Daniel; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S; Meyers, Gregor

    2012-08-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins into intracellular organelles is crucial for cell function. Viruses exploit intracellular transport and retention systems to concentrate envelope proteins at the site of virus budding. In pestiviruses, a group of important pathogens of pigs and ruminants closely related to human hepatitis C virus, the E(rns) protein translated from the viral RNA is secreted from the infected cells and found in the serum of infected animals. Secretion of the protein is regarded as crucial for its function as a viral virulence factor associated with its RNase activity. However, ∼95% of the E(rns) molecules are retained within the infected cell. Fusion of different E(rns) fragments to the C terminus of CD72 allowed identification of a retention signal within the C-terminal 65 aa of the viral protein. This C-terminal sequence represents its membrane anchor and folds into an amphipathic helix binding in-plane to the membrane surface. Residues L183, I190, and L208 are important for intracellular location of E(rns). Presentation of the retention signal on the cytoplasmic instead of the luminal face of the ER membrane in CD8α fusion proteins still led to retention. Thus, E(rns) contains in its C-terminal amphipathic helix an intracellular retention signal that is active on both faces of the membrane.

  19. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  20. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  1. Intracellular Na⁺ and cardiac metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Johannes; Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2013-08-01

    In heart failure, alterations of excitation-contraction underlie contractile dysfunction. One important defect is an elevation of the intracellular Na(+) concentration in cardiac myocytes ([Na(+)]i), which has an important impact on cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis. While elevated [Na(+)]i is thought to compensate for decreased Ca(2+) load of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), it yet negatively affects energy supply-and-demand matching and can even induce mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying these pathophysiological changes. The chain of events may constitute a vicious cycle of ion dysregulation, oxidative stress and energetic deficit, resembling characteristic cellular deficits that are considered key hallmarks of the failing heart. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  3. Nanobodies: Chemical Functionalization Strategies and Intracellular Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Schneider, Anselm F. L.; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Nanobodies can be seen as next‐generation tools for the recognition and modulation of antigens that are inaccessible to conventional antibodies. Due to their compact structure and high stability, nanobodies see frequent usage in basic research, and their chemical functionalization opens the way towards promising diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this Review, central aspects of nanobody functionalization are presented, together with selected applications. While early conjugation strategies relied on the random modification of natural amino acids, more recent studies have focused on the site‐specific attachment of functional moieties. Such techniques include chemoenzymatic approaches, expressed protein ligation, and amber suppression in combination with bioorthogonal modification strategies. Recent applications range from sophisticated imaging and mass spectrometry to the delivery of nanobodies into living cells for the visualization and manipulation of intracellular antigens. PMID:28913971

  4. Intracellular metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activates signaling cascades distinct from cell surface counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; Kumar, Vikas; O'Malley, Karen L

    2009-12-18

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to transmit extracellular signals to the cytoplasm from their position on the cell surface. Some receptors, including the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), are also highly expressed on intracellular membranes where they serve unknown functions. Here, we show that activation of cell surface versus intracellular mGluR5 results in unique Ca(2+) signatures leading to unique cellular responses. Specifically, activation of either cell surface or intracellular mGluR5 leads to JNK, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, whereas activation of only intracellular mGluR5 leads to ERK1/2 and Elk-1 phosphorylation. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, the present findings support a role for CaMK kinase in mediating mGluR5-dependent cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, whereas CaMKII is upstream of intracellular mGluR5-mediated Elk-1 phosphorylation. Consistent with models showing Elk-1 regulating cascades of gene expression, the known Elk-1 targets c-fos and egr1 were up-regulated following intracellular mGluR5 activation, whereas a representative non-Elk-1 target, c-jun, was not. These findings emphasize that glutamate not only serves as a neurotransmitter for cell surface receptors but, when transported into the cell, can also activate intracellular receptors such as mGluR5. Glutamate activation of intracellular mGluR5 serves an important role in the regulation of nuclear Ca(2+), transcriptional activation, and gene expression necessary for physiological processes such as synaptic plasticity.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Intracellular and Membrane Proteins From Voriconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Il; Kim, Hwa Su; Choi, Chi Won; Yoo, Jung Sik; Yu, Jae Yon; Lee, Yeong Seon

    2013-12-01

    The proteomic analysis of voriconazole resistant Candida glabrata strain has not yet been investigated. In this study, differentially expressed proteins of intracellular and membrane fraction from voriconazole-susceptible, susceptible dose-dependent (S-DD), resistant C. glabrata strains were compared with each other and several proteins were identified. The proteins of intracellular and membrane were isolated by disrupting cells with glass bead and centrifugation from voriconazole susceptible, S-DD, and resistant C. glabrata strains. The abundance of expressed proteins was compared using two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and proteins showing continuous twofold or more increase or reduction of expression in resistant strains compared to susceptible and S-DD strain were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry method. Of 34 intracellular proteins, 15 proteins showed expression increase or reduction (twofold or more). The identified proteins included regulation, energy production, carbohydrate transport, amino acid transport, and various metabolism related proteins. The increase of expression of heat shock protein 70 was found. Among membrane proteins, 12, 31 proteins showed expression increase or decrease in the order of susceptible, S-DD, and resistant strains. This expression included carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid synthesis, and response to stress-related proteins. In membrane fractions, the change of expression of 10 heat shock proteins was observed, and 9 heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) showed the reduction of expression. The expression of Hsp70 protein in membrane fraction is related to voriconazole resistant C. glabrata strains.

  6. Characterization of Intracellular Streaming and Traction Forces in Migrating Physarum Plasmodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shun; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Guy, Robert D.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2012-11-01

    Physarum plasmodium is a model organism for cell migration that exhibits fast intracellular streaming. Motile amoeboid physarum plasmodia were obtained from dish cultures of Physarum Polycephalum, a slime mold that inhabits shady cool moist areas in the wild, such as decaying vegetable material. The migrating amoebae were obtained by cutting successively smaller pieces from the growing tips of the cultured parent mold, and their size ranged 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Single amoebae were seeded and let adhere on flexible polyacrilamide gels that were functionalized with collagen, contained 0.2-micron fluorescent beads, and were embedded in an aqueous medium. Soon after adhering to the gel, the amoeabe began crawling at about 1mm/hr. Joint time-lapse sequences of intracellular streaming and gel deformation were acquired respectively in the bright and fluorescent fields of a confocal microscope at 20X magnification. These images were analyzed using particle-tracking algorithms, and the traction stresses applied by the amoebae on the surface were computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the gel using the measured bead displacements as boundary conditions. These measurements provide, for the first time, a joint characterization of intracellular mass transport and the forces driving this transport in motile amoeboid cells.

  7. Effect of serum proteins on polystyrene nanoparticle uptake and intracellular trafficking in endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Guaccio, Angela; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.

    2011-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as small dimensions, surface charge and surface functionalization, control their capability to interact with cells and, in particular, with sub-cellular components. This interaction can be also influenced by the adsorption of molecules present in biological fluids, like blood, on NP surface. Here, we analysed the effect of serum proteins on 49 and 100 nm red fluorescent polystyrene NP uptake in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells, as a model for vascular transport. To this aim, NP uptake kinetic, endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking were studied by monitoring NPs inside cells through confocal microscopy and multiple particle tracking (MPT). We demonstrated that NPs are rapidly internalized by cells in serum-free (SF) medium, according to a saturation kinetic. Conversely, in 10% foetal bovine serum-enriched (SE) medium, NP uptake rate results drastically reduced. Moreover, NP internalization depends on an active endocytic mechanism that does not involve clathrin- and caveolae-mediated vesicular transport, in both SE and SF media. Furthermore, MPT data indicate that NP intracellular trafficking is unaffected by protein presence. Indeed, approximately 50–60% of internalized NPs is characterized by a sub-diffusive behaviour, whereas the remaining fraction shows an active motion. These findings demonstrate that the unspecific protein adsorption on NP surface can affect cellular uptake in terms of internalization kinetics, but it is not effective in controlling active and cellular-mediated uptake mechanisms of NPs and their intracellular routes.

  8. The Role of Autophagy in Intracellular Pathogen Nutrient Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eSteele

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Following entry into host cells intracellular pathogens must simultaneously evade innate host defense mechanisms and acquire energy and anabolic substrates from the nutrient-limited intracellular environment. Most of the potential intracellular nutrient sources are stored within complex macromolecules that are not immediately accessible by intracellular pathogens. To obtain nutrients for proliferation, intracellular pathogens must compete with the host cell for newly-imported simple nutrients or degrade host nutrient storage structures into their constituent components (fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. It is becoming increasingly evident that intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide variety of strategies to accomplish this task. One recurrent microbial strategy is to exploit host degradative processes that break down host macromolecules into simple nutrients that the microbe can use. Herein we focus on how a subset of bacterial, viral and eukaryotic pathogens leverage the host process of autophagy to acquire nutrients that support their growth within infected cells

  9. Transport of protons and lactate in cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Cour, Morten la; Ming Lui, Ge

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange......Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange...

  10. Metabolic data and retention functions for the intracellular alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report is a collection and discussion of the information needed for interpretation of bioassay results for the important radioelement cesium (Cs), as well as a comparison of the physiological behavior of Cs with that of potassium (K) and rubidium (Rb). This report is intended not only as an investigation of the metabolism of the intracellular alkali metals by humans, but also as a case study of the limitations inherent in applying ICRP 30 retention models in bioassay programs. In particular, the relationship between the mathematical components of the ICRP 30 retention model for Cs and actual physiological or anatomical entities is examined, and ways are suggested for modifying the ICRP 30 models for Cs, Rb, and K to yield better accuracy and to better account for biological variability among humans. Although the physiological behaviors of both Rb and Cs resemble that of K, quantitative differences arise because of differences in transport of K, Rb, and Cs by cell membranes. The resemblance is close enough, however, that total body K can be used as an index of whole-body retention times of Rb and Cs, and of compartmental fractions of Cs. The Cs half-time based on total body K appears to be within a factor of 1.5 for all adults. Total body K may be determined by whole-body gamma-ray counting techniques and hence is a reasonable index to use in many bioassay programs

  11. Strategies of Intracellular Pathogens for Obtaining Iron from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidia Leon-Sicairos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are destroyed by the host tissues through processes that usually involve phagocytosis and lysosomal disruption. However, some organisms, called intracellular pathogens, are capable of avoiding destruction by growing inside macrophages or other cells. During infection with intracellular pathogenic microorganisms, the element iron is required by both the host cell and the pathogen that inhabits the host cell. This minireview focuses on how intracellular pathogens use multiple strategies to obtain nutritional iron from the intracellular environment in order to use this element for replication. Additionally, the implications of these mechanisms for iron acquisition in the pathogen-host relationship are discussed.

  12. Intracellular and in vivo oxygen sensing using phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Seiji; Yoshihara, Toshitada

    2016-08-01

    Molecular oxygen plays an indispensable role as a terminal electron acceptor in the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Acute or chronic oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) in organisms results in various diseases, and the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanism of hypoxia-related diseases and various cellular responses to hypoxia is an urgent issue. Optical oxygen imaging methods using phosphorescent probes have opened up techniques for noninvasive imaging of the intracellular and tissue oxygen status, and oxygen-sensitive probes play a key role in the development of this approach. We expect that phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes can serve as new oxygen-sensing probes for intracellular and intravascular oxygen imaging in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Asp3Gly polymorphism affects fatty acid-binding protein 3 intracellular stability and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusudo, Tatsuya; Hashida, Yasuhiko; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hitoshi

    2015-08-19

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABP) play a crucial role in intracellular fatty acid transportation and metabolism. In this study, we investigate the effects of the FABP3 Asp3Gly (D3G) polymorphism on protein structure and function. Although the mutation did not alter protein secondary structure or the ability to bind 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid and palmitate, the intracellular stability of the D3G mutant was significantly decreased. Immunocytochemical analysis reveals that the mutation alters FABP3 subcellular localization. Our results suggest that the D3G polymorphism may impact energy metabolism and physiological functions. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inositol transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sabine

    2015-04-28

    The cyclic polyol myo-inositol is a key molecule in many different metabolic pathways among all organisms; in addition, it is fundamental for osmotic balance in the mammalian brain. This review sums up inositol transporters from eukaryotic organisms, elucidating their vital role in regulating the intracellular distribution and uptake of inositol. They can be divided into two groups according to their transport mechanisms: (1) sodium ion coupled inositol transporters that belong to the Solute Carrier Families 5 and 6-like Superfamily and, (2) proton coupled inositol symporters that are members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily. Intriguingly members of both families offer promising targets for medical treatment of a variety of diseases. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Trafficking of Sendai virus nucleocapsids is mediated by intracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raychel Chambers

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxoviruses are assembled at the plasma membrane budding sites after synthesis of all the structural components in the cytoplasm. Although viral ribonuclocapsid (vRNP is an essential component of infectious virions, the process of vRNP translocation to assembly sites is poorly understood.To analyze real-time trafficking of vRNPs in live infected cells, we created a recombinant Sendai virus (SeV, rSeVLeGFP, which expresses L protein fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. The rSeVLeGFP showed similar growth kinetics compared to wt SeV, and newly synthesized LeGFP could be detected as early as 8 h postinfection. The majority of LeGFP co-localized with other components of vRNPs, NP and P proteins, suggesting the fluorescent signals of LeGFP represent the locations of vRNPs. Analysis of LeGFP movement using time-lapse digital video microscopy revealed directional and saltatory movement of LeGFP along microtubules. Treatment of the cells with nocodazole restricted vRNP movement and reduced progeny virion production without affecting viral protein synthesis, suggesting the role of microtubules in vRNP trafficking and virus assembly. Further study with an electron microscope showed close association of vRNPs with intracellular vesicles present in infected cells. In addition, the vRNPs co-localized with Rab11a protein, which is known to regulate the recycling endocytosis pathway and Golgi-to-plasma membrane trafficking. Simultaneous movement between LeGFP and Rab11a was also observed in infected cells, which constitutively express mRFP-tagged Rab11a. Involvement of recycling endosomes in vRNP translocation was also suggested by the fact that vRNPs move concomitantly with recycling transferrin labeled with Alexa 594.Collectively, our results strongly suggest a previously unrecognized involvement of the intracellular vesicular trafficking pathway in vRNP translocation and provide new insights into the transport of viral structural

  16. [Role of defective intracellular proteolysis in human degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezelof, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Although intracellular protein synthesis has been studied extensively, protein degradation and disposal, know as proteolysis, has been relatively neglected. Modern studies which led two Nobel prizes (de Duve in 1950 and Herschko, Rose and Ciechanover in 1980) established that proteolysis is ensured by two separate but complementary mechanisms: lysosomes responsible for auto and heterophagy and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). The UPS involves ubiquitin, a small molecule consisting of 76 amino acids found in all eukaryotic cells that ensures the identification of the protein to be degraded and its transport to the proteasome, an intracellular complex with enzymes which degrade unneeded or damaged proteins. The proteasome, acting as a composting agent, ensures the enzymatic dissociation of the protein. In this degradation process, as infinite screw, ubiquitin, peptides and amino acids are released and made available for a new cycle. Knowledge of the UPS and its related disorders is continually expanding. Concurrent with lysosomes which work in acidic environment, it is currently known that the UPS provides 80% to 90% of the proteolysis of the short-life proteins and ensures, as chaperon-molecules, the right conformation and hence the correct function of the proteins. The proteolytic activity generates abnormal residues (tau protein, amyloid and related proteins) and various soluble and insoluble wastes. Some are precipitated as inclusion-bodies or aggregosomes, identified years ago by pathologists. These aggregosomes affect almost exclusively long-lived cells (nervous and muscular, macophages). Pigment deposits, such as lipofuscines made by the peroxydation of cell membranes, are the most abundant. Due to their diverse chemical composition, they cannot be empoyed for a scientific classification. Failures of these systems are numerous. They vary not according to the chemical nature of the abnormal protein and wastes but the life span of the targeted cells and

  17. A sensor for intracellular ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans-Oldehinkel, Esther; Mahmood, Nik A.B.N.; Poolman, Bert

    2006-01-01

    Cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domains are found in >4,000 proteins in species from all kingdoms of life, yet their functions are largely unknown. Tandem CBS domains are associated with membrane transport proteins, most notably members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily; voltage-gated

  18. Intracellular Shuttle: The Lactate Aerobic Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Santos de Oliveira Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactate is a highly dynamic metabolite that can be used as a fuel by several cells of the human body, particularly during physical exercise. Traditionally, it has been believed that the first step of lactate oxidation occurs in cytosol; however, this idea was recently challenged. A new hypothesis has been presented based on the fact that lactate-to-pyruvate conversion cannot occur in cytosol, because the LDH enzyme characteristics and cytosolic environment do not allow the reaction in this way. Instead, the Intracellular Lactate Shuttle hypothesis states that lactate first enters in mitochondria and only then is metabolized. In several tissues of the human body this idea is well accepted but is quite resistant in skeletal muscle. In this paper, we will present not only the studies which are protagonists in this discussion, but the potential mechanism by which this oxidation occurs and also a link between lactate and mitochondrial proliferation. This new perspective brings some implications and comes to change our understanding of the interaction between the energy systems, because the product of one serves as a substrate for the other.

  19. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  20. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  1. Intracellular recording from a spider vibration receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Ewald; Burger, Anna-M; Barth, Friedrich G

    2006-05-01

    The present study introduces a new preparation of a spider vibration receptor that allows intracellular recording of responses to natural mechanical or electrical stimulation of the associated mechanoreceptor cells. The spider vibration receptor is a lyriform slit sense organ made up of 21 cuticular slits located on the distal end of the metatarsus of each walking leg. The organ is stimulated when the tarsus receives substrate vibrations, which it transmits to the organ's cuticular structures, reducing the displacement to about one tenth due to geometrical reasons. Current clamp recording was used to record action potentials generated by electrical or mechanical stimuli. Square pulse stimulation identified two groups of sensory cells, the first being single-spike cells which generated only one or two action potentials and the second being multi-spike cells which produced bursts of action potentials. When the more natural mechanical sinusoidal stimulation was applied, differences in adaptation rate between the two cell types remained. In agreement with prior extracellular recordings, both cell types showed a decrease in the threshold tarsus deflection with increasing stimulus frequency. Off-responses to mechanical stimuli have also been seen in the metatarsal organ for the first time.

  2. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  3. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  4. Pico gauges for minimally invasive intracellular hydrostatic pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pressure has a multitude of functions in cells surrounded by a cell wall or similar matrix in all kingdoms of life. The functions include cell growth, nastic movements, and penetration of tissue by parasites. The precise measurement of intracellular pressure in the majority of cells...

  5. Intracellular angiotensin II inhibits heterologous receptor stimulated Ca2+ entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Brailoiu, E; Henning, RH; Deelman, LE; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies show that angiotensin II (AngII) can act from within the cell, possibly via intracellular receptors pharmacologically different from typical plasma membrane AngII receptors. The role of this intracellular AngII (AngII(i)) is unclear. Besides direct effects of AngII(i) on cellular

  6. Development of bacterial cell-based system for intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of bacterial cell-based system for intracellular antioxidant activity screening assay using green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter. ... Both strains demonstrated that quercetin and α- tocopherol exhibited the most potent and significant antioxidant activity with more than 60% reduction of intracellular superoxide ...

  7. Analysis of Intracellular Metabolites from Microorganisms: Quenching and Extraction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinu, Farhana R; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Aggio, Raphael

    2017-10-23

    Sample preparation is one of the most important steps in metabolome analysis. The challenges of determining microbial metabolome have been well discussed within the research community and many improvements have already been achieved in last decade. The analysis of intracellular metabolites is particularly challenging. Environmental perturbations may considerably affect microbial metabolism, which results in intracellular metabolites being rapidly degraded or metabolized by enzymatic reactions. Therefore, quenching or the complete stop of cell metabolism is a pre-requisite for accurate intracellular metabolite analysis. After quenching, metabolites need to be extracted from the intracellular compartment. The choice of the most suitable metabolite extraction method/s is another crucial step. The literature indicates that specific classes of metabolites are better extracted by different extraction protocols. In this review, we discuss the technical aspects and advancements of quenching and extraction of intracellular metabolite analysis from microbial cells.

  8. Harmonization of the intracellular cytokine staining assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welters, Marij J P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Letsch, Anne; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-07-01

    Active immunotherapy for cancer is an accepted treatment modality aiming to reinforce the T-cell response to cancer. T-cell reactivity is measured by various assays and used to guide the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. However, data obtained across different institutions may vary substantially making comparative conclusions difficult. The Cancer Immunotherapy Immunoguiding Program organizes proficiency panels to identify key parameters influencing the outcome of commonly used T-cell assays followed by harmonization. Our successes with IFNγ-ELISPOT and peptide HLA multimer analysis have led to the current study on intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). We report the results of three successive panels evaluating this assay. At the beginning, 3 out of 9 participants (33 %) were able to detect >6 out of 8 known virus-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. This increased to 50 % of the laboratories in the second phase. The reported percentages of cytokine-producing T cells by the different laboratories were highly variable with coefficients of variation well over 60 %. Variability could partially be explained by protocol-related differences in background cytokine production leading to sub-optimal signal-to-noise ratios. The large number of protocol variables prohibited identification of prime guidelines to harmonize the assays. In addition, the gating strategy used to identify reactive T cells had a major impact on assay outcome. Subsequent harmonization of the gating strategy considerably reduced the variability within the group of participants. In conclusion, we propose that first basic guidelines should be applied for gating in ICS experiments before harmonizing assay protocol variables.

  9. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  10. Functional conservation study of polarity protein Crumbs intracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi-ping; Cao, Hao-wei; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Dan-dan; Huang, Juan

    2017-01-20

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) plays key roles in the establishing and maintaining cell apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells by determining the apical plasma membrane identity. Although its intracellular domain contains only 37 amino acids, it is absolutely essential for its function. In Drosophila, mutations in this intracellular domain result in severe defects in epithelial polarity and abnormal embryonic development. The intracellular domain of Crb shows high homology across species from Drosophila to Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. However, the intracellular domains of the two Crb proteins in C. elegans are rather divergent from those of Drosophila and mammals, raising the question on whether the function of the intracellular domain of the Crb protein is conserved in C. elegans. Using genomic engineering approach, we replaced the intracellular domain of the Drosophila Crb with that of C. elegans Crb2 (CeCrb2), which has extremely low homology with those from the Crb proteins of Drosophila and mammals. Surprisingly, substituting the intracellular domain of Drosophila Crb with that of CeCrb2 did not cause any abnormalities in development of the Drosophila embryo, in terms of expression and localization of Crb and other polarity proteins and apical-basal polarity in embryonic epithelial cells. Our results support the notion that despite their extensive sequence variations, all functionally critical amino acid residues and motifs of the intercellular domain of Crb proteins are fully conserved between Drosophila and C. elegans.

  11. Mapping intracellular diffusion distribution using single quantum dot tracking: compartmentalized diffusion defined by endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Liu, Yu-Ru; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Wang, Wei-Chi; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-01-14

    The crowded intracellular environment influences the diffusion-mediated cellular processes, such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. The hindered diffusion of macromolecules in heterogeneous cytoplasm has been studied over years, but the detailed diffusion distribution and its origin still remain unclear. Here, we introduce a novel method to map rapidly the diffusion distribution in single cells based on single-particle tracking (SPT) of quantum dots (QDs). The diffusion map reveals the heterogeneous intracellular environment and, more importantly, an unreported compartmentalization of QD diffusions in cytoplasm. Simultaneous observations of QD motion and green fluorescent protein-tagged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dynamics provide direct evidence that the compartmentalization results from micron-scale domains defined by ER tubules, and ER cisternae form perinuclear areas that restrict QDs to enter. The same phenomenon was observed using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans, further confirming the compartmentalized diffusion. These results shed new light on the diffusive movements of macromolecules in the cell, and the mapping of intracellular diffusion distribution may be used to develop strategies for nanoparticle-based drug deliveries and therapeutics.

  12. Gold-carbon dots for the intracellular imaging of cancer-derived exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoyue; Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yizhi; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2018-04-01

    As a novel fluorescent nanomaterial, gold-carbon quantum dots (GCDs) possess high biocompatibility and can be easily synthesized by a microwave-assisted method. Owing to their small sizes and unique optical properties, GCDs can be applied to imaging of biological targets, such as cells, exosomes and other organelles. In this study, GCDs were used for fluorescence imaging of exosomes. Tumor-specific antibodies are attached to the GCDs, forming exosome specific nanoprobes. The nanoprobes can label exosomes via immuno-reactions and thus facilitate fluorescent imaging of exosomes. When incubated with live cells, exosomes labeled with the nanoprobes can be taken up by the cells. The intracellular experiments confirmed that the majority of exosomes were endocytosed by cells and transported to lysosomes. The manner by which exosomes were taken up and the intracellular distribution of exosomes are unaffected by the GCDs. The experimental results successfully demonstrated that the presented nanoprobe can be used to study the intrinsic intracellular behavior of tumor derived exosomes. We believe that the GCDs based nanoprobe holds a great promise in the study of exosome related cellular events, such as cancer metastasis.

  13. Alternative oxidase impacts ganoderic acid biosynthesis by regulating intracellular ROS levels in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Deng-Ke; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Ze-Hua; Zhang, Guang; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tian-Jun; Wang, Sheng-Li; Ren, Ang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2017-10-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX), which forms a branch of the mitochondrial respiratory electron transport pathway, functions to sustain electron flux and alleviate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In this article, a homologous AOX gene was identified in Ganoderma lucidum. The coding sequence of the AOX gene in G. lucidum contains 1038 nucleotides and encodes a protein of 39.48 kDa. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to study the function of AOX in G. lucidum, and two silenced strains (AOXi6 and AOXi21) were obtained, showing significant decreases of approximately 60 and 50 %, respectively, in alternative pathway respiratory efficiency compared to WT. The content of ganoderic acid (GA) in the mutant strains AOXi6 and AOXi21 showed significant increases of approximately 42 and 44 %, respectively, compared to WT. Elevated contents of intermediate metabolites in GA biosynthesis and elevated transcription levels of corresponding genes were also observed in the mutant strains AOXi6 and AOXi21. In addition, the intracellular ROS content in strains AOXi6 and AOXi21 was significantly increased, by approximately 1.75- and 1.93-fold, respectively, compared with WT. Furthermore, adding N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, significantly depressed the intracellular ROS content and GA accumulation in AOX-silenced strains. These results indicate that AOX affects GA biosynthesis by regulating intracellular ROS levels. Our research revealed the important role of AOX in the secondary metabolism of G. lucidum.

  14. Intracellular localisation of proteins to specific cellular areas by nanocapsule mediated delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huabin; Chen, Ligang; Sun, Xianchao; Fu, Ailing

    2017-09-01

    Nanocapsules are promising carriers with great potential for intracellular protein transport. Although many studies have intended to improve cell uptake efficacy, there is an increasing interest in understanding of subcellular distribution of cargoes inside cells, which is essential for purposeful delivery of biomolecules into specific sites within cells. Herein, we interrogate the intracellular localisation of exogenous proteins, including fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and green fluorescent protein (GFP), mediated by specially designed nanocapsules. The results show that the designed nanocapsules can deliver the two types of fluorescent proteins into different cellular destinations (cytosol, nucleus or the whole cell), depending on the composition of nanocapsules. Meanwhile, several impact factors that influence the distribution of proteins in cells have also been investigated, and the results suggest that the localisation of capsule-mediated proteins in cells is strongly affected by the surface properties of nanocapsules, the types of stabilisers and proteins, and environmental temperatures. The rational control of intracellular localised delivery of exogenous proteins as we demonstrated in this study might open new avenues to obtain desired magnitude of drug effects for modulating cell activity.

  15. Intracellular Retention of ABL Kinase Inhibitors Determines Commitment to Apoptosis in CML Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadosz, Marek; Schnöder, Tina; Heidel, Florian; Schemionek, Mirle; Melo, Junia V.; Kindler, Thomas; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Koschmieder, Steffen; Fischer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Clinical development of imatinib in CML established continuous target inhibition as a paradigm for successful tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. However, recent reports suggested that transient potent target inhibition of BCR-ABL by high-dose TKI (HD-TKI) pulse-exposure is sufficient to irreversibly commit cells to apoptosis. Here, we report a novel mechanism of prolonged intracellular TKI activity upon HD-TKI pulse-exposure (imatinib, dasatinib) in BCR-ABL-positive cells. Comprehensive mechanistic exploration revealed dramatic intracellular accumulation of TKIs which closely correlated with induction of apoptosis. Cells were rescued from apoptosis upon HD-TKI pulse either by repetitive drug wash-out or by overexpression of ABC-family drug transporters. Inhibition of ABCB1 restored sensitivity to HD-TKI pulse-exposure. Thus, our data provide evidence that intracellular drug retention crucially determines biological activity of imatinib and dasatinib. These studies may refine our current thinking on critical requirements of TKI dose and duration of target inhibition for biological activity of TKIs. PMID:22815843

  16. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. (paper)

  17. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are critical for the pulse behavior of the actin network, including the autocatalytic assembly of F-actin, the negative feedback of F-actin on Las17, and the autocatalytic self-assembly of Las17. These feedback mechanisms are also studied by a simple ordinary differential equation (ODE) model. Finally, we develop a partial differential equation (PDE) model that is more realistic than the ODE model and more computationally efficient than the stochastic model. We use the PDE model to explore the rich spectrum of behaviors of the actin network beyond pulses, such as oscillations and permanent patches. The predictions of the PDE model are of high interest for suggesting future experiments that can test the model.

  18. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the "molecular clutch" description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  19. New perspective in the assessment of total intracellular magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Sargenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is essential for biological processes, but its cellular homeostasis has not been thoroughly elucidated, mainly because of the inadequacy of the available techniques to map intracellular Mg distribution. Recently, particular interest has been raised by a new family of fluorescent probes, diaza-18-crown-hydroxyquinoline (DCHQ, that shows remarkably high affinity and specificity for Mg, thus permitting the detection of the total intracellular Mg. The data obtained by fluori- metric and cytofluorimetric assays performed with DCHQ5 are in good agreement with atomic absorption spectroscopy, confirming that DCHQ5 probe allows both qualitative and quantitative determination of total intracellular Mg.

  20. Feedback Regulation of Intracellular Hydrostatic Pressure in Surface Cells of the Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; White, Thomas W; Delamere, Nicholas A; Mathias, Richard T

    2015-11-03

    In wild-type lenses from various species, an intracellular hydrostatic pressure gradient goes from ∼340 mmHg in central fiber cells to 0 mmHg in surface cells. This gradient drives a center-to-surface flow of intracellular fluid. In lenses in which gap-junction coupling is increased, the central pressure is lower, whereas if gap-junction coupling is reduced, the central pressure is higher but surface pressure is always zero. Recently, we found that surface cell pressure was elevated in PTEN null lenses. This suggested disruption of a feedback control system that normally maintained zero surface cell pressure. Our purpose in this study was to investigate and characterize this feedback control system. We measured intracellular hydrostatic pressures in mouse lenses using a microelectrode/manometer-based system. We found that all feedback went through transport by the Na/K ATPase, which adjusted surface cell osmolarity such that pressure was maintained at zero. We traced the regulation of Na/K ATPase activity back to either TRPV4, which sensed positive pressure and stimulated activity, or TRPV1, which sensed negative pressure and inhibited activity. The inhibitory effect of TRPV1 on Na/K pumps was shown to signal through activation of the PI3K/AKT axis. The stimulatory effect of TRPV4 was shown in previous studies to go through a different signal transduction path. Thus, there is a local two-legged feedback control system for pressure in lens surface cells. The surface pressure provides a pedestal on which the pressure gradient sits, so surface pressure determines the absolute value of pressure at each radial location. We speculate that the absolute value of intracellular pressure may set the radial gradient in the refractive index, which is essential for visual acuity. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of polyamine transporters in plants: paraquat transport provides crucial clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Miki; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2014-05-01

    Polyamine (PA) transport as well as PA biosynthesis, degradation and conjugation plays a vital role in the regulation of intracellular PA levels, which are essential for cell growth. Generally, PA uptake activity is elevated in rapidly proliferating cells. Previous studies showed that PA uptake in plant cells occurred via energy-dependent, protein-mediated transport systems. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that paraquat (PQ), one of the most widely used herbicides, is transported by the PA transport system in diverse organisms including plants. The PA/PQ transport interactions are proposed to be due to specific structural similarities between PA and PQ. The understanding of PA transport mechanisms has progressed in parallel with that of PQ transport, but the molecular identity of the plant PA/PQ transporter has remained an enigma. Recently, independent studies identified the L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) family transmembrane proteins as transporters of both PA and PQ. Arabidopsis LAT family proteins showed different subcellular localization properties, which suggested that these transporters were involved in intracellular PA trafficking and PA uptake across the plasma membrane. The identification of plant PA transporters is an important step in understanding the mechanism of PA homeostasis in plant cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of PA transport systems that are linked to the understanding of PQ translocation.

  2. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  3. Intracellular Renin Disrupts Chemical Communication between Heart Cells. Pathophysiological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, Walmor C

    2014-01-01

    HighlightsIntracellular renin disrupts chemical communication in the heartAngiotensinogen enhances the effect of reninIntracellular enalaprilat reduces significantly the effect of reninIntracellular renin increases the inward calcium currentHarmful versus beneficial effect during myocardial infarction The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; (1) under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell to cell through gap junctions; (2) the intracellular dialysis of renin (100 nM) disrupts chemical communication - an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100 nM); (3) enalaprilat (10(-9) M) administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; (4) aliskiren (10(-8) M) inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication; (5) the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II) was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; (6) the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed; (7) the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  4. Western Analysis of Intracellular Interleukin-8 in Human Mononuclear Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Miskolci, Veronika; Hodgson, Louis; Cox, Dianne; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Most cytokines are stored in the cytoplasm until their release into the extracellular environment; however, some cytokines have been reported to localize in the nucleus. Traditional whole cell extract preparation does not provide information about the intracellular localization of cytokines. Here, we describe how to prepare cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts that can be analyzed by immunoblotting. While in this chapter we use this method to analyze intracellular localization of interleukin-8 (I...

  5. Acquisition of an animal gene by microsporidian intracellular parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Selman, Mohammed; Pombert, Jean-François; Solter, Leellen; Farinelli, Laurent; Weiss, Louis M.; Keeling, Patrick; Corradi, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Parasites have adapted to their specialised way of life by a number of means, including the acquisition of genes by horizontal gene transfer. These newly acquired genes seem to come from a variety of sources, but seldom from the host, even in the most intimate associations between obligate intracellular parasite and host [1]. Microsporidian intracellular parasites have acquired a handful of genes, mostly from bacteria, that help them take energy from their hosts or protect them from the envir...

  6. Ultrafine particles cause cytoskeletal dysfunctions in macrophages: role of intracellular calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown David M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution is reported to cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. Since most of these particles are derived form combustion processes, the primary composition product is carbon with a very small diameter (ultrafine, less than 100 nm in diameter. Besides the induction of reactive oxygen species and inflammation, ultrafine particles (UFP can cause intracellular calcium transients and suppression of defense mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, such as impaired migration or phagocytosis. Methods In this study the role of intracellular calcium transients caused by UFP was studied on cytoskeleton related functions in J774A.1 macrophages. Different types of fine and ultrafine carbon black particles (CB and ufCB, respectively, such as elemental carbon (EC90, commercial carbon (Printex 90, diesel particulate matter (DEP and urban dust (UD, were investigated. Phagosome transport mechanisms and mechanical cytoskeletal integrity were studied by cytomagnetometry and cell viability was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Macrophages were exposed in vitro with 100 and 320 μg UFP/ml/million cells for 4 hours in serum free medium. Calcium antagonists Verapamil, BAPTA-AM and W-7 were used to block calcium channels in the membrane, to chelate intracellular calcium or to inhibit the calmodulin signaling pathways, respectively. Results Impaired phagosome transport and increased cytoskeletal stiffness occurred at EC90 and P90 concentrations of 100 μg/ml/million cells and above, but not with DEP or UD. Verapamil and W-7, but not BAPTA-AM inhibited the cytoskeletal dysfunctions caused by EC90 or P90. Additionally the presence of 5% serum or 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA suppressed the cytoskeletal dysfunctions. Cell viability showed similar results, where co-culture of ufCB together with Verapamil, W-7, FCS or BSA produced less cell dead compared to the particles only.

  7. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); James, John; Prescott, Alan [Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Haga, Ismar R. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Beard, Philippa M., E-mail: pip.beard@roslin.ed.ac.uk [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  8. Manipulation of intracellular auxin in a single cell by light with esterase-resistant caged auxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Naoyuki; Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-09-04

    Auxin, a plant hormone, is polar transported from its site of production. This auxin polar transport system establishes an auxin gradient in plant tissue that is necessary for proper plant development. Therefore, the spatial effect of the auxin gradient on plant development is highly important for the understanding of plant auxin responses. Herein we report the design, syntheses and biological properties of esterase-resistant caged auxins. The conventional caging group, 2-nitrobenzyl ester, was found to be enzymatically hydrolyzed in plant cells and released original auxin without photolysis. The esterase-resistant caging group, (2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)(2-nitrobenzyl) ester, (DMPNB) was designed to improve the stability of caged auxins. Three auxins, indole 3-acetic acid, naphthalene 1-acetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid were caged with the DMPNB caging group. DMPNB-caged auxins were inactive within a plant cell until photolysis, but they release auxins with photoirradiation to activate auxin-responsive gene expression. We demonstrated spatial and temporal control of intracellular auxin levels with photoirradiation by using this caged auxin system and were able to photocontrol the physiological auxin response in Arabidopsis plants. Additionally, the photoirradiation of DMPNB-caged auxin within a single cell can manipulate the intracellular auxin level and triggers auxin response.

  9. Vitamin E and Phosphoinositides Regulate the Intracellular Localization of the Hepatic α-Tocopherol Transfer Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Stacey; Ghelfi, Mikel; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Parker, Robert; Qian, Jinghui; Carlin, Cathleen; Manor, Danny

    2016-08-12

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) is an essential nutrient for all vertebrates. From the eight naturally occurring members of the vitamin E family, α-tocopherol is the most biologically active species and is selectively retained in tissues. The hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (TTP) preferentially selects dietary α-tocopherol and facilitates its transport through the hepatocyte and its secretion to the circulation. In doing so, TTP regulates body-wide levels of α-tocopherol. The mechanisms by which TTP facilitates α-tocopherol trafficking in hepatocytes are poorly understood. We found that the intracellular localization of TTP in hepatocytes is dynamic and responds to the presence of α-tocopherol. In the absence of the vitamin, TTP is localized to perinuclear vesicles that harbor CD71, transferrin, and Rab8, markers of the recycling endosomes. Upon treatment with α-tocopherol, TTP- and α-tocopherol-containing vesicles translocate to the plasma membrane, prior to secretion of the vitamin to the exterior of the cells. The change in TTP localization is specific to α-tocopherol and is time- and dose-dependent. The aberrant intracellular localization patterns of lipid binding-defective TTP mutants highlight the importance of protein-lipid interaction in the transport of α-tocopherol. These findings provide the basis for a proposed mechanistic model that describes TTP-facilitated trafficking of α-tocopherol through hepatocytes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Role of Passive Diffusion, Transporters, and Membrane Trafficking-Mediated Processes in Cellular Drug Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocucci, E; Kim, J Y; Bai, Y; Pabla, N

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular drug accumulation is thought to be dictated by two major processes, passive diffusion through the lipid membrane or membrane transporters. The relative role played by these distinct processes remains actively debated. Moreover, the role of membrane-trafficking in drug transport remains underappreciated and unexplored. Here we discuss the distinct processes involved in cellular drug distribution and propose that better experimental models are required to elucidate the differential contributions of various processes in intracellular drug accumulation. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  11. Auxin transport inhibitors impair vesicle motility and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in diverse eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Grigoriev, Ilya; Fischer, Rainer; Tominaga, Motoki; Robinson, David G; Hasek, Jirí; Paciorek, Tomasz; Petrásek, Jan; Seifertová, Daniela; Tejos, Ricardo; Meisel, Lee A; Zazímalová, Eva; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ueda, Takashi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Akhmanova, Anna; Brock, Roland; Spang, Anne; Friml, Jirí

    2008-03-18

    Many aspects of plant development, including patterning and tropisms, are largely dependent on the asymmetric distribution of the plant signaling molecule auxin. Auxin transport inhibitors (ATIs), which interfere with directional auxin transport, have been essential tools in formulating this concept. However, despite the use of ATIs in plant research for many decades, the mechanism of ATI action has remained largely elusive. Using real-time live-cell microscopy, we show here that prominent ATIs such as 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and 2-(1-pyrenoyl) benzoic acid (PBA) inhibit vesicle trafficking in plant, yeast, and mammalian cells. Effects on micropinocytosis, rab5-labeled endosomal motility at the periphery of HeLa cells and on fibroblast mobility indicate that ATIs influence actin cytoskeleton. Visualization of actin cytoskeleton dynamics in plants, yeast, and mammalian cells show that ATIs stabilize actin. Conversely, stabilizing actin by chemical or genetic means interferes with endocytosis, vesicle motility, auxin transport, and plant development, including auxin transport-dependent processes. Our results show that a class of ATIs act as actin stabilizers and advocate that actin-dependent trafficking of auxin transport components participates in the mechanism of auxin transport. These studies also provide an example of how the common eukaryotic process of actin-based vesicle motility can fulfill a plant-specific physiological role.

  12. Defining Lipid Transport Pathways in Animal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Richard E.; Sleight, Richard G.

    1985-09-01

    A new technique for studying the metabolism and intracellular transport of lipid molecules in living cells based on the use of fluorescent lipid analogs is described. The cellular processing of various intermediates (phosphatidic acid and ceramide) and end products (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) in lipid biosynthesis is reviewed and a working model for compartmentalization during lipid biosynthesis is presented.

  13. Activation of 5-[125I]iodonaphthyl-1-azide via excitation of fluorescent (N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)) lipid analogs in living cells. A potential tool for identification of compartment-specific proteins and proteins involved in intracellular transport and metabolism of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, A.G.; Pagano, R.E.; Raviv, Y.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a new technique for analysis of proteins located near fluorescent lipid analogs in intact living cells using the membrane-permeant, photoactivatable probe, 5-[ 125 I]iodonaphthyl-1-azide ([ 125 I]INA). [ 125 I] INA can be activated directly with UV light or indirectly through excitation of adjacent fluorophores (photosensitizers) with visible light to modify nearby proteins covalently with 125 I. In this report we demonstrate that fluorescent phospholipids and sphingolipids containing N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-6-aminocaproic acid serve as appropriate photosensitizers for [ 125 I]INA. Using Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts, we optimized the labeling conditions with respect to lipid concentration and time of irradiation and then examined the profiles of cellular proteins that were labeled when fluorescent analogs of ceramide, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidic acid were used as photosensitizers in living cells. The use of different fluorescent lipids, which label different subcellular compartments of cells as determined by fluorescence microscopy, derivatized different sets of cellular proteins with 125 I. The labeled proteins were subsets of the total set of proteins available for derivatization as determined by direct activation of [ 125 I]INA. Most proteins labeled by this procedure were pelleted by centrifugation of cell lysates at high speed (260,000 x g), but several soluble proteins were also labeled under these conditions. The implications of using this technique for identification of compartment-specific proteins and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport are discussed

  14. Overcoming the membrane barrier: Recruitment of γ-glutamyl transferase for intracellular release of metabolic cargo from peptide vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzl, Tilmann; Sroka, Magdalena; Srivastava, Puneet; Herdewijn, Piet; Marlière, Philippe; Panke, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Semipermeable membranes of cells frequently pose an obstacle in metabolic engineering by limiting uptake of substrates, intermediates, or xenobiotics. Previous attempts to overcome this barrier relied on the promiscuous nature of peptide transport systems, but often suffered from low versatility or chemical instability. Here, we present an alternative strategy to transport cargo molecules across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli based on chemical synthesis of a stable cargo-peptide vector construct, transport through the peptide import system, and efficient intracellular release of the cargo by the promiscuous enzyme γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT). Retaining the otherwise periplasmic GGT in the cytoplasm was critical for the functionality of the system, as was fine-tuning its expression in order to minimize toxic effects associated to cytoplasmic GGT expression. Given the established protocols of peptide synthesis and the flexibility of peptide transport and GGT, the system is expected to be suitable for a broad range of cargoes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Analysis of intracellular expressed proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal Neelja

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is the most threatening infectious disease globally. Although progress has been made to reduce global incidence of TB, emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR TB threatens to undermine these advances. To combat the disease, novel intervention strategies effective against drug resistant and sensitive subpopulations of M. tuberculosis are urgently required as adducts in the present treatment regimen. Using THP-1 cells we have analyzed and compared the global protein expression profile of broth-cultured and intraphagosomally grown drug resistant and sensitive M.tuberculosis clinical isolates. Results On comparing the two dimensional (2-DE gels, many proteins were found to be upregulated/expressed during intracellular state which were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS. Four proteins (adenosylhomocysteinase, aspartate carbomyltransferase, putatitive thiosulfate sulfurtransferase and universal stress protein were present in both intracellular MDR and sensitive isolates and three of these belonged to intermediary metabolism and respiration category. Two proteins (alanine dehydrogenase and adenosine kinase of intracellular MDR isolate and two (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and ATP synthase epsilon chain of intracellular sensitive isolate belonged to intermediary metabolism and respiration category. One protein (Peroxidase/Catalase of intracellular MDR and three (HSPX, 14 kDa antigen and 10 kDa chaperonin of sensitive isolate belonged to virulence, detoxification and adaptation category. ESAT-6 of intracellular MDR belonged to cell wall and cell processes category. Two proteins (Antigen 85-C and Antigen 85-A of intracellular sensitive isolate were involved in lipid metabolism while probable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A was involved in information pathways. Four (Rv0635, Rv1827, Rv0036c and Rv2032 of intracellular MDR and two proteins (Rv2896c and Rv2558c of

  16. Intracellular renin disrupts chemical communication between heart cells. Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; 1 under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell-to-cell through gap junctions; 2 the intracellular dialysis of renin (100nM disrupts chemical communication-an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100nM; 3 enalaprilat (10-9M administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; 4 aliskiren (10-8M inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication;5 the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; 6 the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed;7 the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis, causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  17. Surveillance for Intracellular Antibody by Cytosolic Fc Receptor TRIM21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. McEwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TRIM21 has emerged as an atypical Fc receptor that is broadly conserved and widely expressed in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Viruses that traffic surface-bound antibodies into the cell during infection recruit TRIM21 via a high affinity interaction between Fc and TRIM21 PRYSPRY domain. Following binding of intracellular antibody, TRIM21 acts as both antiviral effector and sensor for innate immune signalling. These activities serve to reduce viral replication by orders of magnitude in vitro and contribute to host survival during in vivo infection. Neutralization occurs rapidly after detection and requires the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The microbial targets of this arm of intracellular immunity are still being identified: TRIM21 activity has been reported following infection by several non-enveloped viruses and intracellular bacteria. These findings extend the sphere of influence of antibodies to the intracellular domain and have broad implications for immunity. TRIM21 has been implicated in the chronic auto-immune condition systemic lupus erythematosus and is itself an auto-antigen in Sjögren’s syndrome. This review summarises our current understanding of TRIM21’s role as a cytosolic Fc receptor and briefly discusses pathological circumstances where intracellular antibodies have been described, or are hypothesized to occur, and may benefit from further investigations of the role of TRIM21.

  18. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  19. Endocannabinoid transport revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolussi, Simon; Gertsch, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are arachidonic acid-derived endogenous lipids that activate the endocannabinoid system which plays a major role in health and disease. The primary endocannabinoids are anandamide (AEA, N-arachidonoylethanolamine) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. While their biosynthesis and metabolism have been studied in detail, it remains unclear how endocannabinoids are transported across the cell membrane. In this review, we critically discuss the different models of endocannabinoid trafficking, focusing on AEA cellular uptake which is best studied. The evolution of the current knowledge obtained with different AEA transport inhibitors is reviewed and the confusions caused by the lack of their specificity discussed. A comparative summary of the most important AEA uptake inhibitors and the studies involving their use is provided. Based on a comprehensive literature analysis, we propose a model of facilitated AEA membrane transport followed by intracellular shuttling and sequestration. We conclude that novel and more specific probes will be essential to identify the missing targets involved in endocannabinoid membrane transport. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  1. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Zhang, Ellisa W.; Dudley, Anne G.; Dixon, Beverly R. E. A.; Guckes, Kirsten R.; Breland, Erin J.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Casella, Daniel P.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Clayton, Douglass B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. PMID:27795353

  2. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed.

  3. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K.; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies. PMID:25460730

  4. An Investigation of the Stoichiometry of Na+ Cotransport with Dopamine in Rat and Human Dopamine Transporters Expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schumacher, Paul

    2001-01-01

    The neuronal membrane transporter for dopamine (DAT) is a member of the Na+ and Cl dependent family of transporters and concentrates dopamine intracellularly up to 106 fold over extracellular levels...

  5. Cadmium Induces Transcription Independently of Intracellular Calcium Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvermoes, Brooke E.; Bird, Gary S.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to cadmium is associated with human pathologies and altered gene expression. The molecular mechanisms by which cadmium affects transcription remain unclear. It has been proposed that cadmium activates transcription by altering intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and disrupting calcium-mediated intracellular signaling processes. This hypothesis is based on several studies that may be technically problematic; including the use of BAPTA chelators, BAPTA-based fluorescent sensors, and cytotoxic concentrations of metal. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present report, the effects of cadmium on [Ca2+]i under non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic conditions was monitored using the protein-based calcium sensor yellow cameleon (YC3.60), which was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. In HEK293 constitutively expressing YC3.60, this calcium sensor was found to be insensitive to cadmium. Exposing HEK293::YC3.60 cells to non-cytotoxic cadmium concentrations was sufficient to induce transcription of cadmium-responsive genes but did not affect [Ca2+]i mobilization or increase steady-state mRNA levels of calcium-responsive genes. In contrast, exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of cadmium significantly reduced intracellular calcium stores and altered calcium-responsive gene expression. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that at low levels, cadmium induces transcription independently of intracellular calcium mobilization. The results also support a model whereby cytotoxic levels of cadmium activate calcium-responsive transcription as a general response to metal-induced intracellular damage and not via a specific mechanism. Thus, the modulation of intracellular calcium may not be a primary mechanism by which cadmium regulates transcription. PMID:21694771

  6. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  7. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  8. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A. Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  9. Astroglial expression of the P-glycoprotein is controlled by intracellular CNTF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillet Catherine

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-glycoprotein (P-gp, an ATP binding cassette transmembrane transporter, is expressed by astrocytes in the adult brain, and is positively modulated during astrogliosis. In a search for factors involved in this modulation, P-gp overexpression was studied in long-term in vitro astroglial cultures. Results Surprisingly, most factors that are known to induce astroglial activation in astroglial cultures failed to increase P-gp expression. The only effective proteins were IFNγ and those belonging to the IL-6 family of cytokines (IL-6, LIF, CT-1 and CNTF. As well as P-gp expression, the IL-6 type cytokines - but not IFNγ - stimulated the expression of endogenous CNTF in astrocytes. In order to see whether an increased intracellular level of CNTF was necessary for induction of P-gp overexpression by IL-6 type cytokines, by the same cytokines analysis was carried out on astrocytes obtained from CNTF knockout mice. In these conditions, IFNγ produced increased P-gp expression, but no overexpression of P-gp was observed with either IL-6, LIF or CT-1, pointing to a role of CNTF in the intracellular signalling pathway leading to P-gp overexpression. In agreement with this suggestion, application of exogenous CNTF -which is internalised with its receptor - produced an overexpression of P-gp in CNTF-deficient astrocytes. Conclusions These results reveal two different pathways regulating P-gp expression and activity in reactive astrocytes, one of which depends upon the intracellular concentration of CNTF. This regulation of P-gp may be one of the long searched for physiological roles of CNTF.

  10. Modulation of intracellular calcium waves and triggered activities by mitochondrial ca flux in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghang Zhao

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that mitochondria may play important roles in the Ca(2+ homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. However, it is still unclear if mitochondrial Ca(2+ flux can regulate the generation of Ca(2+ waves (CaWs and triggered activities in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, intracellular/cytosolic Ca(2+ (Cai (2+ was imaged in Fluo-4-AM loaded mouse ventricular myocytes. Spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ release and CaWs were induced in the presence of high (4 mM external Ca(2+ (Cao (2+. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP reversibly raised basal Cai (2+ levels even after depletion of SR Ca(2+ in the absence of Cao (2+ , suggesting Ca(2+ release from mitochondria. FCCP at 0.01 - 0.1 µM partially depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m and increased the frequency and amplitude of CaWs in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous recording of cell membrane potentials showed the augmentation of delayed afterdepolarization amplitudes and frequencies, and induction of triggered action potentials. The effect of FCCP on CaWs was mimicked by antimycin A (an electron transport chain inhibitor disrupting Δψ m or Ru360 (a mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter inhibitor, but not by oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor or iodoacetic acid (a glycolytic inhibitor, excluding the contribution of intracellular ATP levels. The effects of FCCP on CaWs were counteracted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporine A, or the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter activator kaempferol. Our results suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+ release and uptake exquisitely control the local Ca(2+ level in the micro-domain near SR ryanodine receptors and play an important role in regulation of intracellular CaWs and arrhythmogenesis.

  11. Mitochondrial hyperoxidation signals residual intracellular dysfunction after global ischemia in rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M; Feng, Z C; Raffin, C N; Harrison, M; Sick, T J

    1995-07-01

    Reperfusion after global ischemia (10-60 min in duration) in rat neocortex most commonly provoked transient hyperoxidation of mitochondrial electron carriers, tissue hyperoxygenation, and CBF hyperemia. These responses were normally accompanied by recovery of K+ homeostasis and EEG spike activity. Goals of this research were to understand putative relationships among these postreperfusion events with special emphasis on determining whether mitochondrial hyperoxidation results from intracellular changes that may modulate residual damage. The amplitude of postischemic mitochondrial hyperoxidation (PIMHo) did not increase when CBF increased above an apparent threshold during reperfusion, and tissue hyperoxygenation was not required for PIMHo to occur or to continue. These findings suggest that PIMHo is not merely a response to increased CBF and tissue hyperoxygenation; rather, PIMHo is modulated, at least in part, by residual intracellular derangements that limit mitochondrial electron transport. This suggestion was supported by observations that NAD became hyperoxidized after reoxygenation in anoxic hippocampal slices. Also, PIMHo occurred and subsequently resolved in many animals, but K+o never was cleared fully to baseline and/or EEG spike activity never was evident. One suggestion is that PIMHo signals or initiates residual intracellular derangements that in turn impair electrical and metabolic recovery of cerebral neurons after ischemia; an alternative suggestion is that PIMHo and tissue hyperoxygenation are not the sole factors modulating the immediate restoration of electrical activity after ischemia. Present data also support the following: Decreased oxygen consumption, despite adequate oxygen delivery, likely contributes to tissue hyperoxygenation after ischemia; and mitochondrial hyperoxidation is modulated by a limitation in the supply of electrons to the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  12. The calcium feedback loop and T cell activation: how cytoskeleton networks control intracellular calcium flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noah; Reicher, Barak; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2014-02-01

    During T cell activation, the engagement of a T cell with an antigen-presenting cell (APC) results in rapid cytoskeletal rearrangements and a dramatic increase of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration, downstream to T cell antigen receptor (TCR) ligation. These events facilitate the organization of an immunological synapse (IS), which supports the redistribution of receptors, signaling molecules and organelles towards the T cell-APC interface to induce downstream signaling events, ultimately supporting T cell effector functions. Thus, Ca(2+) signaling and cytoskeleton rearrangements are essential for T cell activation and T cell-dependent immune response. Rapid release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, e.g. the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggers the opening of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, residing in the plasma membrane. These channels facilitate a sustained influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane in a process termed store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Because CRAC channels are themselves inhibited by Ca(2+) ions, additional factors are suggested to enable the sustained Ca(2+) influx required for T cell function. Among these factors, we focus here on the contribution of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. The TCR-mediated increase in intracellular Ca(2+) evokes a rapid cytoskeleton-dependent polarization, which involves actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) reorientation. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+) flux and cytoskeletal rearrangements, and further describe the way by which the cytoskeletal networks feedback to Ca(2+) signaling by controlling the spatial and temporal distribution of Ca(2+) sources and sinks, modulating TCR-dependent Ca(2+) signals, which are required for an appropriate T cell response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters

  13. Binding thermodynamics of a glutamate transporter homologue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicolas; Oh, SeCheol; Boudker, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyze concentrative uptake of the neurotransmitter into glial cells and neurons. Their transport cycle involves binding and release of the substrate on the extra- and intracellular sides of the plasma membranes, and translocation of the substrate-binding site across the lipid bilayers. The energy of the ionic gradients, mainly sodium, fuels the cycle. Here, we used a cross-linking approach to trap a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii in key conformational states with substrate-binding site facing either the extracellular or intracellular sides of the membrane to study their binding thermodynamics. We show that the chemical potential of sodium ions in solution is exclusively coupled to substrate binding and release, and not to substrate translocation. Despite the structural symmetry, the binding mechanisms are distinct on the opposite sides of the membrane and more complex than the current models suggest. PMID:23563139

  14. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function...... in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular...... gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity...

  15. Perturbation of intracellular acyl-CoA metabolism induces the unfolded protein response pathway and autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    autophagy mainly is a response to the stress of nutrient limitation. In the present study, we demonstrate that perturbation of fatty acid synthesis and transport either through inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FAS) or by depleting cells for the acyl-CoA binding protein, Acb1p, leads to induction of Hac1p....... This and the facts that Acb1p-depleted cells are hypersensitive to the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin and accumulate the transcription factor Msn2p in  the nucleus, indicate that perturbation of intracellular acyl-CoA metabolism leads to  a starvation response that upregulate autophagy, which involves both Ras......Eukaryotic cells have developed several strategies to respond and adapt to changes in their intracellular and extracellular environment. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway is activated following accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas...

  16. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...... sector’s significant contribution to global challenges such as climate change, it is often said that sustainable development cannot be achieved without sustainable transportation....

  17. Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, S.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins mediating intra- and intercellular transport of lipids and lipid-modified proteins In this thesis, I studied the intra- and intercellular transport of lipidic molecules, in particular glycosphingolipids and lipid-modified proteins. The first part focuses on the intracellular transport of

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons storage by Fusarium solani in intracellular lipid vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, Anthony [Laboratoire de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, 17 avenue Bleriot, BP 699, 62228 Calais Cedex (France); Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa [Laboratoire de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, 17 avenue Bleriot, BP 699, 62228 Calais Cedex (France)]. E-mail: lounes@univ-littoral.fr; Newsam, Ray [Department of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Robinson, Gary [Department of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Durand, Roger [Laboratoire de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, 17 avenue Bleriot, BP 699, 62228 Calais Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    Accumulation and elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in the fungus Fusarium solani. When the fungus was grown on a synthetic medium containing benzo[a]pyrene, hyphae of F. solani contained numerous lipid vesicles which could be stained by the lipid-specific dyes: Sudan III and Rhodamine B. The fluorescence produced by Rhodamine B and PAH benzo[a]pyrene were at the same locations in the fungal hyphae, indicating that F. solani stored PAH in pre-existing lipid vesicles. A passive temperature-independent process is involved in the benzo[a]pyrene uptake and storage. Sodium azide, a cytochrome c oxidation inhibitor, and the two cytoskeleton inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin did not prevent the transport and accumulation of PAH in lipid vesicles of F. solani hyphae. F. solani degraded a large range of PAHs at different rates. PAH intracellular storage in lipid vesicles was not necessarily accompanied by degradation and was common to numerous other fungi. - Fungi can store PAHs intracellularly in lipid vesicles independently of their PAH degradation abilities.

  19. Soluble Moringa oleifera leaf extract reduces intracellular cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Tatip, Supinda; Kosasih, Sattawat; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera leaves are a well-known source of antioxidants and traditionally used for medicinal applications. In the present study, the protective action of soluble M. oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) against cadmium toxicity was investigated in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that this extract exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress induced by cadmium and H2O2 through the reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, not only the co-exposure of soluble MOLE with cadmium but also pretreatment of this extract prior to cadmium exposure significantly reduced the cadmium uptake through an inhibition of Fet4p, a low-affinity iron(II) transporter. In addition, the supplementation of soluble MOLE significantly reduced intracellular iron accumulation in a Fet4p-independent manner. Our findings suggest the potential use of soluble extract from M. oleifera leaves as a dietary supplement for protection against cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons storage by Fusarium solani in intracellular lipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdin, Anthony; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Newsam, Ray; Robinson, Gary; Durand, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Accumulation and elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in the fungus Fusarium solani. When the fungus was grown on a synthetic medium containing benzo[a]pyrene, hyphae of F. solani contained numerous lipid vesicles which could be stained by the lipid-specific dyes: Sudan III and Rhodamine B. The fluorescence produced by Rhodamine B and PAH benzo[a]pyrene were at the same locations in the fungal hyphae, indicating that F. solani stored PAH in pre-existing lipid vesicles. A passive temperature-independent process is involved in the benzo[a]pyrene uptake and storage. Sodium azide, a cytochrome c oxidation inhibitor, and the two cytoskeleton inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin did not prevent the transport and accumulation of PAH in lipid vesicles of F. solani hyphae. F. solani degraded a large range of PAHs at different rates. PAH intracellular storage in lipid vesicles was not necessarily accompanied by degradation and was common to numerous other fungi. - Fungi can store PAHs intracellularly in lipid vesicles independently of their PAH degradation abilities

  1. Brucella Intracellular Life Relies on the Transmembrane Protein CD98 Heavy Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keriel, Anne; Botella, Eric; Estrach, Soline; Bragagnolo, Gabriel; Vergunst, Annette C; Feral, Chloe C; O'Callaghan, David

    2015-06-01

    Brucella are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to escape host defenses and create a niche in which they can multiply. Although the importance of Brucella T4SS is clear, little is known about its interactions with host cell structures. In this study, we identified the eukaryotic protein CD98hc as a partner for Brucella T4SS subunit VirB2. This transmembrane glycoprotein is involved in amino acid transport, modulation of integrin signaling, and cell-to-cell fusion. Knockdown of CD98hc expression in HeLa cells demonstrated that it is essential for Brucella infection. Using knockout dermal fibroblasts, we confirmed its role for Brucella but found that it is not required for Salmonella infection. CD98hc transiently accumulates around the bacteria during the early phases of infection and is required for both optimal bacterial uptake and intracellular multiplication of Brucella. These results provide new insights into the complex interplay between Brucella and its host. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  3. Intracellular Methamphetamine Prevents the Dopamine-induced Enhancement of Neuronal Firing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kaustuv; Sambo, Danielle; Richardson, Ben D.; Lin, Landon M.; Butler, Brittany; Villarroel, Laura; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2014-01-01

    The dysregulation of the dopaminergic system is implicated in multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson disease and drug addiction. The primary target of psychostimulants such as amphetamine and methamphetamine is the dopamine transporter (DAT), the major regulator of extracellular dopamine levels in the brain. However, the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of methamphetamine and amphetamine administration are unique from one another, thereby suggesting these two compounds impact dopaminergic neurotransmission differentially. We further examined the unique mechanisms by which amphetamine and methamphetamine regulate DAT function and dopamine neurotransmission; in the present study we examined the impact of extracellular and intracellular amphetamine and methamphetamine on the spontaneous firing of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons and isolated DAT-mediated current. In dopaminergic neurons the spontaneous firing rate was enhanced by extracellular application of amphetamine > dopamine > methamphetamine and was DAT-dependent. Amphetamine > methamphetamine similarly enhanced DAT-mediated inward current, which was sensitive to isosmotic substitution of Na+ or Cl− ion. Although isosmotic substitution of extracellular Na+ ions blocked amphetamine and methamphetamine-induced DAT-mediated inward current similarly, the removal of extracellular Cl− ions preferentially blocked amphetamine-induced inward current. The intracellular application of methamphetamine, but not amphetamine, prevented the dopamine-induced increase in the spontaneous firing of dopaminergic neurons and the corresponding DAT-mediated inward current. The results reveal a new mechanism for methamphetamine-induced dysregulation of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:24962577

  4. The Intracellular Destiny of the Protein Corona: A Study on its Cellular Internalization and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Filippo; Garry, David; Monopoli, Marco P; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2016-11-22

    It has been well established that the early stages of nanoparticle-cell interactions are governed, at least in part, by the layer of proteins and other biomolecules adsorbed and slowly exchanged with the surrounding biological media (biomolecular corona). Subsequent to membrane interactions, nanoparticles are typically internalized into the cell and trafficked along defined pathways such as, in many cases, the endolysosomal pathway. Indeed, if the original corona is partially retained on the nanoparticle surface, the biomolecules in this layer may play an important role in determining subsequent cellular processing. In this work, using a combination of organelle separation and fluorescence labeling of the initial extracellular corona, we clarify its intracellular evolution as nanoparticles travel within the cell. We show that specific proteins present in the original protein corona are retained on the nanoparticles until they accumulate in lysosomes, and, once there, they are degraded. We also report on how different bare surfaces (amino and carboxyl modified) affect the details of this evolution. One overarching discovery is that the same serum proteins can exhibit different intracellular processing when carried inside cells by nanoparticles, as components of their corona, compared to what is observed when they are transported freely from the extracellular medium.

  5. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juenemann, Katrin; Wiemhoefer, Anne; Reits, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyQ repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion

  7. Facilitating Intracellular Drug Delivery by Ultrasound-Activated Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, BHA

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to investigate the combination of ultrasound and microbubbles (USMB) for intracellular delivery of (model) drugs in vitro. We have focused on clinically approved drugs, i.e. cisplatin, and microbubbles, i.e. SonoVue™, to facilitate clinical translation. In addition, model

  8. FLIPR assays of intracellular calcium in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes sensitive to changes in intracellular calcium have become increasingly popular in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug discovery for several reasons. First of all, the assays using the dyes are easy to perform and are of low cost compared to other assays. Second, most non...

  9. Chitosan conjugation enables intracellular bacteria susceptible to aminoglycoside antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibo; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Sun, Feifei; Sun, Yuelin; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-11-01

    Most chronic infections are difficult to eradicate because bacteria capable of surviving in host-infected cells may be protected from the killing actions of antibiotics, leading to therapy failures and disease relapses. Here we demonstrated that covalent-coupling chitosan to streptomycin significantly improved intracellular bactericidal capacity towards multiple organisms within phagocytic or nonphagocytic cells. Structure-activity relationship investigations indicated that antibiotic contents, molecular size and positive charges of the conjugate were the key to retain this intracellular bactericidal activity. Mechanistic insight demonstrated the conjugate was capable to target and eliminate endocytic or endosomal escaped bacteria through facilitating the direct contact between the antibiotic and intracellular organism. In vivo acute infection models indicated that compared to equal dose of the antibiotic, chitosan-streptomycin (C-S) conjugate and especially the human serum album binding chitosan-streptomycin conjugate (HCS) complex formed by human serum album and C-S conjugate greatly decreased the bacteria burden in the spleen and liver in both wild type and immuno-suppressive mice. Furthermore, the HCS complex remarkably reduced mortality of infected TLR2 deficient mice, mimicking immune-compromised persons who were more susceptible to bacterial infections. These findings might open up a new avenue to combat intracellular bacterial infection by aminoglycosides antibiotics at a lower effective dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Intracellular localization of Na + /H + antiporter from Malus zumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we examined the intracellular localization of the product of Na+/H+ antiporter gene (MzNHX1) cloned from Malus zumi. Analysis using yeast cells expressing a fusion protein of MzNHX1 and green fluorescent protein confirmed the localization of MzNHX1 on the tonoplast.

  11. Bioinspired Nanocarriers Designed to Enhance Intracellular Delivery of Biotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    therapeutic and vaccine development. Keywords - gene therapy, vaccine, bioinspired, biotherapeutic I. INTRODUCTION The efficacy of many protein and DNA...DNA, RNA and proteins . While these therapeutics have tremendous potential, effectively formulating and delivering them has also been a widely...intracellular trafficking that is inspired by biological polymers, i.e. proteins , that are involved in controlling vesicular trafficking pathways. For

  12. Comparing mannose binding lectin genetic diversity in intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-05

    Sep 5, 2007 ... binding lectin of Escherichia coli (Kawasaki et al., 1989) and Salmonella (Ihara et al., 1991). However some reports could not find any effect of mannose binding lectin on complement activation upon extracellular infec- tion of Staphylococcus aureus (Cunion et al., 2001). In intracellular infections, there is ...

  13. Association between VDAC1 mRNA expression and intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One way in which xenobiotics induce apoptotic cell death is to alter the selective permeability of the intracellular voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) in the mitochondrial membrane. In this study, we explored the association between VDAC1 mRNA expression and mitochondrial function during hexavalent chromium ...

  14. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  15. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTRACELLULAR IONS TO Kv CHANNEL VOLTAGE SENSOR DYNAMICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eGoodchild

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensing domains of Kv channels control ionic conductance through coupling of the movement of charged residues in the S4 segment to conformational changes at the cytoplasmic region of the pore domain, that allow K+ ions to flow. Conformational transitions within the voltage sensing domain caused by changes in the applied voltage across the membrane field are coupled to the conducting pore region and the gating of ionic conductance. However, several other factors not directly linked to the voltage dependent movement of charged residues within the voltage sensor impact the dynamics of the voltage sensor, such as inactivation, ionic conductance, intracellular ion identity and block of the channel by intracellular ligands. The effect of intracellular ions on voltage sensor dynamics is of importance in the interpretation of gating current measurements and the physiology of pore/voltage sensor coupling. There is a significant amount of variability in the reported kinetics of voltage sensor deactivation kinetics of Kv channels attributed to different mechanisms such as open state stabilization, immobilization and relaxation processes of the voltage sensor. Here we separate these factors and focus on the causal role that intracellular ions can play in allosterically modulating the dynamics of Kv voltage sensor deactivation kinetics. These considerations are of critical importance in understanding the molecular determinants of the complete channel gating cycle from activation to deactivation.

  16. Galectin-3 guides intracellular trafficking of some human serotransferrin glycoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Carl Michael; Bengtson, Per; Cucak, Helena

    2013-01-01

    these transferrin glycoforms differently after preloading with exogenously added galectin-3. In all, this study provides the first evidence of a functional role for transferrin glycans, in intracellular trafficking after uptake. Moreover, the galectin-3 bound glycoform increased in cancer, suggesting...

  17. Cytoplasmic tail of coronavirus spike protein has intracellular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-18

    Apr 18, 2017 ... if the histidine residue is protonated. Lontok et al., in their chimeric S protein studies used C terminal 11 amino acids of SARS-S protein attached to the plasma membrane re- porter protein VSV-G to show KXHXX motif is an intra- cellular localization signal for SARS, and the intracellular distribution closely ...

  18. Biomineralization Patterns of Intracellular Carbonatogenesis in Cyanobacteria: Molecular Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of intracellular carbonatogenesis in several cyanobacteria species has challenged the traditional view that this process was extracellular and not controlled. However, a detailed analysis of the size distribution, chemical composition and 3-D-arrangement of carbonates in these cyanobacteria is lacking. Here, we characterized these features in Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora C7 and Candidatus Synechococcus calcipolaris G9 by conventional transmission electron microscopy, tomography, ultramicrotomy, and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM. Both Ca. G. lithophora C7 and Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 formed numerous polyphosphate granules adjacent or engulfing Ca-carbonate inclusions when grown in phosphate-rich solutions. Ca-carbonates were scattered within Ca. G. lithophora C7 cells under these conditions, but sometimes arranged in one or several chains. In contrast, Ca-carbonates formed at cell septa in Ca. S. calcipolaris G9 and were segregated equally between daughter cells after cell division, arranging as distorted disks at cell poles. The size distribution of carbonates evolved from a positively to a negatively skewed distribution as particles grew. Conventional ultramicrotomy did not preserve Ca-carbonates explaining partly why intracellular calcification has been overlooked in the past. All these new observations allow discussing with unprecedented insight some nucleation and growth processes occurring in intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria with a particular emphasis on the possible involvement of intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton.

  19. Deciphering the Intracellular Fate of Propionibacterium acnes in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Natalie; Mak, Tim N.; Shinohara, Debika Biswal; Sfanos, Karen S.; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes various niches of the human body, particularly the sebaceous follicles of the skin. Over the last years a role of this common skin bacterium as an opportunistic pathogen has been explored. Persistence of P. acnes in host tissue has been associated with chronic inflammation and disease development, for example, in prostate pathologies. This study investigated the intracellular fate of P. acnes in macrophages after phagocytosis. In a mouse model of P. acnes-induced chronic prostatic inflammation, the bacterium could be detected in prostate-infiltrating macrophages at 2 weeks postinfection. Further studies performed in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 revealed intracellular survival and persistence of P. acnes but no intracellular replication or escape from the host cell. Confocal analyses of phagosome acidification and maturation were performed. Acidification of P. acnes-containing phagosomes was observed at 6 h postinfection but then lost again, indicative of cytosolic escape of P. acnes or intraphagosomal pH neutralization. No colocalization with the lysosomal markers LAMP1 and cathepsin D was observed, implying that the P. acnes-containing phagosome does not fuse with lysosomes. Our findings give first insights into the intracellular fate of P. acnes; its persistency is likely to be important for the development of P. acnes-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23862148

  20. Cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptides - prospectives for targeting intracellular infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper S; Franzyk, Henrik; Sayers, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    . TPk showed the highest antibacterial activity. SA-3 exhibited selective disruption of liposomes mimicking Gram-positive and Gram-negative membranes. CONCLUSION: PK-12-KKP is an unlikely candidate for targeting intracellular bacteria, as the eukaryotic cell-penetrating ability is poor. SA-3, affected...

  1. Purification of an Intracellular Fibrinolytic Protease from Ganoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Method: The intracellular fibrinolytic protease produced by Ganoderma lucidum VK12 was isolated from the mycelia grown in MCDBF broth ... The inhibitory effect of different metal ions and commercial protease inhibitors on enzyme activity was studied. ... sodium hydroxide and 2.9 %w/v sodium carbonate in glass-distilled ...

  2. Cytoplasmic tail of coronavirus spike protein has intracellular

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intracellular trafficking and localization studies of spike protein from SARS and OC43 showed that SARS spikeprotein is localized in the ER or ERGIC compartment and OC43 spike protein is predominantly localized in thelysosome. Differential localization can be explained by signal sequence. The sequence alignment ...

  3. Microsporidia are natural intracellular parasites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-12-09

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes.

  4. Glycine Transporter Dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette; Dutertre, Sébastien; Hastrup, Hanne; Jha, Alok; Gether, Ulrik; Sitte, Harald H.; Betz, Heinrich; Eulenburg, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Different Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma membrane based on hydrodynamic and native gel electrophoretic studies. Here, we used cysteine substitution and oxidative cross-linking to show that of GlyT1 and GlyT2 also form dimeric complexes within the plasma membrane. GlyT oligomerization at the cell surface was confirmed for both GlyT1 and GlyT2 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization that was retained intracellulary. Based on these results and GlyT structures modeled by using the crystal structure of the bacterial homolog LeuTAa, as a template, residues located within the extracellular loop 3 and at the beginning of transmembrane domain 6 are proposed to contribute to the dimerization interface of GlyTs. PMID:18252709

  5. Metal ion transport in eukaryotic microorganisms: insights from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, D J

    2000-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, copper, manganese, and zinc are essential nutrients for all eukaryotic microorganisms. Therefore, these organisms possess efficient uptake mechanisms to obtain these nutrients from their extracellular environment. Metal ions must also be transported into intracellular organelles where they function as catalytic and structural cofactors for compartmentalized enzymes. Thus, intracellular transport mechanisms are also present. When present in high levels, metal ions can also be toxic, so their uptake and intracellular transport is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to limit metal ion overaccumulation and facilitate storage and sequestration. Remarkable molecular insight into these processes has come from recent studies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism, which is the primary subject of this chapter, serves as a useful paradigm to understand metal ion metabolism in other eukaryotic microbes.

  6. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, Heven

    2008-01-01

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular (Ca2+) during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  7. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  8. ABC transporters affect the detection of intracellular oxidants by fluorescent probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, J.; Kubala, Lukáš; Kotasová, H.; Gudernová, I.; Šrámková, Z.; Pekarová, Michaela; Sarkadi, B.; Pachernik, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 7 (2011), s. 779-787 ISSN 1071-5762 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Fluorescence * redox status * mitochondria Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.878, year: 2011

  9. Cytosolic calcium homeostasis in fungi: Roles of plasma membrane transport and intracellular sequestration of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.J.; Vogg, G.; Sanders, D.

    1990-01-01

    Cytosolic free calcium ([Ca 2+ ] c ) has been measured in the mycelial fungus Neurospora crassa with Ca 2+ - selective microelectrodes. The mean value of [Ca 2+ ] c is 92 ± 15 nM and it is insensitive to external pH values between 5.8 and 8.4. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential enables the electrochemical potential difference for Ca 2+ across the plasma membrane to be estimated as about -60 kJmol -1 - a value that cannot be sustained either by a simple Ca 2+ - ATPase, or, in alkaline conditions, by straightforward H + /Ca 2+ exchange with a stoichiometric ratio of + /Ca 2+ . The authors propose that the most likely alternative mechanism of Ca 2+ efflux is ATP-driven H + /Ca 2+ exchange, with a stoichiometric ratio of at least 2 H + /Ca 2+ . The increase in [Ca 2+ ] c in the presence of CN - at pH 8.4 is compared with 45 Ca 2+ influx under the same conditions. The proportion of entering Ca 2+ remaining free in the cytosol is only 8 x 10 -5 , and since the concentration of available chelation sites on Ca 2+ binding proteins is unlikely to exceed 100 μM, a major role for the fungal vacuole in short-term Ca 2+ homeostasis is indicated. This notion is supported by the observation that cytosolic Ca 2+ homeostasis is disrupted by a protonophore, which rapidly abolishes the driving force for Ca 2+ uptake into fungal vacuoles

  10. Immunomicroscopic localization of aminopeptidase N in the pig enterocyte. Implications for the route of intracellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Sjöström, H; Norén, Ove

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular localization of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) in the pig enterocyte was investigated by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunogold staining). By indirect immunofluorescence on either frozen or paraffin-embedded sections, a very intense staining in the microvilla...

  11. Sodium transport and intracellular sodium activity in cultured human nasal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Boucher, Richard C.

    1991-01-01

    Human airway epithelia are predominantly Na(+)-absorbing epithelia. To investigate the mechanisms for Na+ absorption across airway epithelia, the driving forces and paths for Na+ translocation across each membrane wereexamined with double-barreled Na(+)-selective microelectrodes in cultured human...

  12. Synthesis and live-cell imaging of fluorescent sterols for analysis of intracellular cholesterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modzel, Maciej; Lund, Frederik W.; Wüstner, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis relies on precise control of the sterol content of organelle membranes. Obtaining insight into cholesterol trafficking pathways and kinetics by live-cell imaging relies on two conditions. First, one needs to develop suitable analogs that resemble cholesterol...

  13. Involvement of detergent-insoluble complexes in the intracellular transport of intestinal brush border enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1995-01-01

    A number of transmembrane digestive enzymes of the porcine small intestinal brush border membrane were found to be partially Triton X-100-insoluble at 0 degree C and colocalized in gradient centrifugation experiments with the GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase in low-density, detergent-insoluble c......A number of transmembrane digestive enzymes of the porcine small intestinal brush border membrane were found to be partially Triton X-100-insoluble at 0 degree C and colocalized in gradient centrifugation experiments with the GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase in low-density, detergent......-insoluble complexes commonly known as glycolipid "rafts". Thus, aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), aminopeptidase A (EC 3.4.11.7), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5), and sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10) were 34-48% detergent-insoluble. Maltase-glucoamylase (EC 3.2.1.20) was markedly less detergent-insoluble (20......%), and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.23-62) was essentially fully soluble in detergent. In radioactively labeled, mucosal explants, the newly synthesized brush border enzymes began to associate with detergent-insoluble complexes while still in their transient, high mannose-glycosylated form...

  14. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  15. A Miniature Graphene-based Biosensor for Intracellular Glucose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Kamran ul; Asif, Muhammad H.; Hassan, Muhammad Umair; Sandberg, Mats O.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Fagerholm, Siri; Strålfors, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report on a small and simple graphene-based potentiometric sensor for the measurement of intracellular glucose concentration. A fine borosilicate glass capillary coated with graphene and subsequently immobilized with glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme is inserted into the intracellular environment of a single human cell. The functional groups on the edge plane of graphene assist the attachment with the free amine terminals of GOD enzyme, resulting in a better immobilization. The sensor exhibits a glucose-dependent electrochemical potential against an Ag/AgCl reference microelectrode which is linear across the whole concentration range of interest (10 – 1000 μM). Glucose concentration in human fat cell measured by our graphene-based sensor is in good agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  16. Enzyme encapsulated hollow silica nanospheres for intracellular biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Peng; Hung, Yann; Chang, Jen-Hsuan; Lin, Chen-Han; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2014-05-14

    Hollow silica nanospheres (HSN) with low densities, large interior spaces and permeable silica shells are suitable for loading enzymes in the cavity to carry out intracellular biocatalysis. The porous shell can protect the encapsulated enzymes against proteolysis and attenuate immunological response. We developed a microemulsion-templating method for confining horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the cavity of HSN. This simple one-pot enzyme encapsulation method allows entrapping of the enzyme, which retains high catalytic activity. Compared with HRP supported on solid silica spheres, HRP@HSN with thin porous silica shells displayed better enzyme activity. The small HRP@HSN (∼50 nm in diameter), giving satisfactory catalytic activity, can act as an intracellular catalyst for the oxidation of the prodrug indole-3-acetic acid to produce toxic free radicals for killing cancer cells. We envision this kind of hollow nanosystem could encapsulate multiple enzymes or other synergistic drugs and function as therapeutic nanoreactors.

  17. Siderocalin inhibits the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Erin E; Srikanth, Chittur V; Sandgren, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    that siderocalin expression is upregulated following M.tb infection of mouse macrophage cell lines and primary murine alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, siderocalin added exogenously as a recombinant protein or overexpressed in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line inhibited the intracellular growth of the pathogen......Siderocalin is a secreted protein that binds to siderophores to prevent bacterial iron acquisition. While it has been shown to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) in extracellular cultures, its effect on this pathogen within macrophages is not clear. Here, we show....... A variant form of siderocalin, which is expressed only in the macrophage cytosol, inhibited intracellular M.tb growth as effectively as the normal, secreted form, an observation that provides mechanistic insight into how siderocalin might influence iron acquisition by the bacteria in the phagosome. Our...

  18. Multimodal transport and dispersion of organelles in narrow tubular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Saurabh S.; Koslover, Elena F.

    2018-04-01

    Intracellular components explore the cytoplasm via active motor-driven transport in conjunction with passive diffusion. We model the motion of organelles in narrow tubular cells using analytical techniques and numerical simulations to study the efficiency of different transport modes in achieving various cellular objectives. Our model describes length and time scales over which each transport mode dominates organelle motion, along with various metrics to quantify exploration of intracellular space. For organelles that search for a specific target, we obtain the average capture time for given transport parameters and show that diffusion and active motion contribute to target capture in the biologically relevant regime. Because many organelles have been found to tether to microtubules when not engaged in active motion, we study the interplay between immobilization due to tethering and increased probability of active transport. We derive parameter-dependent conditions under which tethering enhances long-range transport and improves the target capture time. These results shed light on the optimization of intracellular transport machinery and provide experimentally testable predictions for the effects of transport regulation mechanisms such as tethering.

  19. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  20. Evaluation of two novel methods for assessing intracellular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Kombrabail, M; Vijayalakshmi, K; Krishnamoorthy, G; White, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The ability to resolve the spatio-temporal complexity of intracellular O 2 distribution is the ‘Holy Grail’ of cellular physiology. In an effort to obtain a non-invasive approach of mapping intracellular O 2 tensions, two methods of phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy were examined in the current study. These were picosecond time-resolved epiphosphorescence microscopy (single 0.5 µm focused spot) and two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy with pinhole shifting. Both methods utilized nanoparticle-embedded Ru complex (45 nm diameter) as the phosphorescent probe, excited using pulsed outputs of Ti–sapphire Tsunami lasers (710–1050 nm). The former method used a 1 ps pulse width excitation beam with vertical polarization via a dichroic mirror (610 nm, XF43) and a 20× objective (NA 0.55, Nikon). Transmitted luminescence (1–2 × 10 4 counts s −1 ) was collected and time-correlated single photon counted decay times measured. Alternatively, an unmodified Zeiss LSM510 Confocal NLO microscope with 40× objective (NA 1.3) used successively shifted pinhole positions to collect image data from the lagging trail of the raster scan. Images obtained from two-photon excitation of a yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and a flagellate fish parasite (Spironucleus vortens), electroporated with Ru complex, indicated the intracellular location and magnitude of O 2 gradients, thus confirming the feasibility of optical mapping under different external O 2 concentrations. Both methods gave similar lifetimes for Ru complex phosphorescence under aerobic and anaerobic gas phases. Estimation of O 2 tensions within individual fibroblasts (human dermal fibroblast (HDF)) and mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells was possible using epiphosphorescence microscopy. MCF-7 cells showed lower intracellular O 2 concentrations than HDF cells, possibly due to higher metabolic rates in the former. Future work should involve construction of higher resolution 3D maps of Ru coordinate

  1. Evaluation of two novel methods for assessing intracellular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Catrin F.; Kombrabail, M.; Vijayalakshmi, K.; White, Nick; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Lloyd, David

    2012-08-01

    The ability to resolve the spatio-temporal complexity of intracellular O2 distribution is the ‘Holy Grail’ of cellular physiology. In an effort to obtain a non-invasive approach of mapping intracellular O2 tensions, two methods of phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy were examined in the current study. These were picosecond time-resolved epiphosphorescence microscopy (single 0.5 µm focused spot) and two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy with pinhole shifting. Both methods utilized nanoparticle-embedded Ru complex (45 nm diameter) as the phosphorescent probe, excited using pulsed outputs of Ti-sapphire Tsunami lasers (710-1050 nm). The former method used a 1 ps pulse width excitation beam with vertical polarization via a dichroic mirror (610 nm, XF43) and a 20× objective (NA 0.55, Nikon). Transmitted luminescence (1-2 × 104 counts s-1) was collected and time-correlated single photon counted decay times measured. Alternatively, an unmodified Zeiss LSM510 Confocal NLO microscope with 40× objective (NA 1.3) used successively shifted pinhole positions to collect image data from the lagging trail of the raster scan. Images obtained from two-photon excitation of a yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and a flagellate fish parasite (Spironucleus vortens), electroporated with Ru complex, indicated the intracellular location and magnitude of O2 gradients, thus confirming the feasibility of optical mapping under different external O2 concentrations. Both methods gave similar lifetimes for Ru complex phosphorescence under aerobic and anaerobic gas phases. Estimation of O2 tensions within individual fibroblasts (human dermal fibroblast (HDF)) and mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells was possible using epiphosphorescence microscopy. MCF-7 cells showed lower intracellular O2 concentrations than HDF cells, possibly due to higher metabolic rates in the former. Future work should involve construction of higher resolution 3D maps of Ru coordinate complex lifetime

  2. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...resolution. However, viral RNA tends to cluster in specific subcellular sites (e.g. viral replication factories). Thus while true single-molecule...assays [4]. Detection of viral RNA allows for in depth interrogation of the subcellular sites of viral replication and such experiments will help further

  3. NAD+-Glycohydrolase Promotes Intracellular Survival of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A global increase in invasive infections due to group A Streptococcus (S. pyogenes or GAS has been observed since the 1980s, associated with emergence of a clonal group of strains of the M1T1 serotype. Among other virulence attributes, the M1T1 clone secretes NAD+-glycohydrolase (NADase. When GAS binds to epithelial cells in vitro, NADase is translocated into the cytosol in a process mediated by streptolysin O (SLO, and expression of these two toxins is associated with enhanced GAS intracellular survival. Because SLO is required for NADase translocation, it has been difficult to distinguish pathogenic effects of NADase from those of SLO. To resolve the effects of the two proteins, we made use of anthrax toxin as an alternative means to deliver NADase to host cells, independently of SLO. We developed a novel method for purification of enzymatically active NADase fused to an amino-terminal fragment of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LFn-NADase that exploits the avid, reversible binding of NADase to its endogenous inhibitor. LFn-NADase was translocated across a synthetic lipid bilayer in vitro in the presence of anthrax toxin protective antigen in a pH-dependent manner. Exposure of human oropharyngeal keratinocytes to LFn-NADase in the presence of protective antigen resulted in cytosolic delivery of NADase activity, inhibition of protein synthesis, and cell death, whereas a similar construct of an enzymatically inactive point mutant had no effect. Anthrax toxin-mediated delivery of NADase in an amount comparable to that observed during in vitro infection with live GAS rescued the defective intracellular survival of NADase-deficient GAS and increased the survival of SLO-deficient GAS. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that delivery of LFn-NADase prevented intracellular trafficking of NADase-deficient GAS to lysosomes. We conclude that NADase mediates cytotoxicity and promotes intracellular survival of GAS in host cells.

  4. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet?visible (UV?vis) absorption spectra...

  5. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  6. Forced resurgence and targeting of intracellular uropathogenic Escherichia coli reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Blango

    Full Text Available Intracellular quiescent reservoirs of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, which can seed the bladder mucosa during the acute phase of a urinary tract infection (UTI, are protected from antibiotic treatments and are extremely difficult to eliminate. These reservoirs are a potential source for recurrent UTIs that affect millions annually. Here, using murine infection models and the bladder cell exfoliant chitosan, we demonstrate that intracellular UPEC populations shift within the stratified layers of the urothelium during the course of a UTI. Following invasion of the terminally differentiated superficial layer of epithelial cells that line the bladder lumen, UPEC can multiply and disseminate, eventually establishing reservoirs within underlying immature host cells. If given access, UPEC can invade the superficial and immature bladder cells equally well. As infected immature host cells differentiate and migrate towards the apical surface of the bladder, UPEC can reinitiate growth and discharge into the bladder lumen. By inducing the exfoliation of the superficial layers of the urothelium, chitosan stimulates rapid regenerative processes and the reactivation and efflux of quiescent intracellular UPEC reservoirs. When combined with antibiotics, chitosan treatment significantly reduces bacterial loads within the bladder and may therefore be of therapeutic value to individuals with chronic, recurrent UTIs.

  7. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L; Zhang, Ellisa W; Dudley, Anne G; Dixon, Beverly R E A; Guckes, Kirsten R; Breland, Erin J; Floyd, Kyle A; Casella, Daniel P; Algood, Holly M Scott; Clayton, Douglass B; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Correlation between intracellular accumulation of peptidoglycan precursors and streptomycin formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimi, Osamu; Kawashima, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Masanori; Nomi, Ryosaku

    1984-01-01

    When the mycelium of Streptomyces HUT 6037 was suspended in 0.5% NaCl solution containing 14 C-glucosamine, peptidoglycan precursors accumulated in the cells. While UDP-N-acetylglucosamine accumulated in the largest amount among the precursors, extracellularly added and intracellularly accumulated UDP-N-acetylglucosamine were not used to synthesize streptomycin and were probably used for peptidoglycan formation. On the other hand, correlation was recognized between accumulation of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) and streptomycin formation. Addition of an inhibitor of peptidoglycan synthesis such as enduracidin, vancomycin or cycloserine to a mycelium-suspended culture changed the ratio of accumulated peptidoglycan precursors. When streptomycin formation was stimulated by addition of enduracidin or vancomycin, intracellular GlcN-6P remarkably increased and then decreased rapidly. On the contrary, when cycloserine was added to the culture, no increase of GlcN-6P was observed and streptomycin formation was not stimulated. These results suggest that an increase in the intracellular concentration of GlcN-6P is required for activation or induction of the system for utilizing GlcN-6P for streptomycin formation. (author)

  9. Mechanisms of Borrelia burgdorferi internalization and intracellular innate immune signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja ePetnicki-Ocwieja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is a long-term infection whose most severe pathology is characterized by inflammatory arthritis of the lower bearing joints, carditis and neuropathy. The inflammatory cascades are initiated through the early recognition of invading Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes by cells of the innate immune response, such as neutrophils and macrophage. B. burgdorferi does not have an intracellular niche and thus much research has focused on immune pathways activated by pathogen recognition molecules at the cell surface, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs. However, in recent years, studies have shown that internalization of the bacterium by host cells is an important component of the defense machinery in response to B. burgdorferi. Upon internalization, B. burgdorferi is trafficked through an endo/lysosomal pathway resulting in the activation of a number of intracellular pathogen recognition receptors including TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs. Here we will review the innate immune molecules that participate in both cell surface and intracellular immune activation by B. burgdorferi.

  10. New intracellular activities of matrix metalloproteinases shine in the moonlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Parker G; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher M

    2017-11-01

    Adaption of a single protein to perform multiple independent functions facilitates functional plasticity of the proteome allowing a limited number of protein-coding genes to perform a multitude of cellular processes. Multifunctionality is achievable by post-translational modifications and by modulating subcellular localization. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), classically viewed as degraders of the extracellular matrix (ECM) responsible for matrix protein turnover, are more recently recognized as regulators of a range of extracellular bioactive molecules including chemokines, cytokines, and their binders. However, growing evidence has convincingly identified select MMPs in intracellular compartments with unexpected physiological and pathological roles. Intracellular MMPs have both proteolytic and non-proteolytic functions, including signal transduction and transcription factor activity thereby challenging their traditional designation as extracellular proteases. This review highlights current knowledge of subcellular location and activity of these "moonlighting" MMPs. Intracellular roles herald a new era of MMP research, rejuvenating interest in targeting these proteases in therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Confocal microscopy for intracellular co-localization of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy is the best method to visualize intracellular co-localization of proteins in intact cells. Because of the point scan/pinhole detection system, light contribution from the neighborhood of the scanning spot in the specimen can be eliminated, allowing high Z-axis resolution. Fluorescence detection by sensitive photomultiplier tubes allows the usage of filters with a narrow bandpath, resulting in minimal cross-talk (overlap) between two spectra. This is particularly important in demonstrating co-localization of proteins with multicolor labeling. Here, the methods outlining the detection of transiently expressed tagged proteins and the detection of endogenous proteins are described. Ideally, the intracellular co-localization of two endogenous proteins should be demonstrated. However, when antibodies raised against the protein of interest are unavailable for immunofluorescence or the available cell lines do not express the protein of interest sufficiently enough for immunofluorescence, an alternative method is to transfect cells with expression plasmids that encode tagged proteins and stain the cells with anti-tag antibodies. However, it should be noted that the tagging of proteins of interest or their overexpression could potentially alter the intracellular localization or the function of the target protein.

  12. A first step toward liposome-mediated intracellular bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieth, Anita; Verseux, Cyprien; Barnert, Sabine; Süss, Regine; Römer, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria presents a severe challenge to medicine and public health. While bacteriophage therapy is a promising alternative to traditional antibiotics, the general inability of bacteriophages to penetrate eukaryotic cells limits their use against resistant bacteria, causing intracellular diseases like tuberculosis. Bacterial vectors show some promise in carrying therapeutic bacteriophages into cells, but also bring a number of risks like an overload of bacterial antigens or the acquisition of virulence genes from the pathogen. As a first step in the development of a non-bacterial vector for bacteriophage delivery into pathogen-infected cells, we attempted to encapsulate bacteriophages into liposomes. Here we report effective encapsulation of the model bacteriophage λeyfp and the mycobacteriophage TM4 into giant liposomes. Furthermore, we show that liposome-associated bacteriophages are taken up into eukaryotic cells more efficiently than free bacteriophages. These are important milestones in the development of an intracellular bacteriophage therapy that might be useful in the fight against multi-drug-resistant intracellular pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  13. Potent Antibacterial Nanoparticles against Biofilm and Intracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibo; Tang, Jiangjiang; Liu, Qianjin; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-01-01

    The chronic infections related to biofilm and intracellular bacteria are always hard to be cured because of their inherent resistance to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Herein we develop a facile approach to overcome the above conundrum through phosphatidylcholine-decorated Au nanoparticles loaded with gentamicin (GPA NPs). The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra which demonstrated that GPA NPs with a diameter of approximately 180 nm were uniform. The loading manner and release behaviors were also investigated. The generated GPA NPs maintained their antibiotic activities against planktonic bacteria, but more effective to damage established biofilms and inhibited biofilm formation of pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, GPA NPs were observed to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 cells and readily engulfed by the macrophages, which facilitated the killing of intracellular bacteria in infected macrophages. These results suggested GPA NPs might be a promising antibacterial agent for effective treatment of chronic infections due to microbial biofilm and intracellular bacteria.

  14. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  15. Intracellular Hg(0) Oxidation in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Schaefer, Jeffra K; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Yee, Nathan

    2016-10-03

    The disposal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) wastes in mining and manufacturing areas has caused serious soil and groundwater contamination issues. Under anoxic conditions, certain anaerobic bacteria can oxidize dissolved elemental mercury and convert the oxidized Hg to neurotoxic methylmercury. In this study, we conducted experiments with the Hg-methylating bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 to elucidate the role of cellular thiols in anaerobic Hg(0) oxidation. The concentrations of cell-surface and intracellular thiols were measured, and specific fractions of D. desulfuricans ND132 were examined for Hg(0) oxidation activity and analyzed with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that intracellular thiol concentrations are approximately six times higher than those of the cell wall. Cells reacted with a thiol-blocking reagent were severely impaired in Hg(0) oxidation activity. Spheroplasts lacking cell walls rapidly oxidized Hg(0) to Hg(II), while cell wall fragments exhibited low reactivity toward Hg(0). EXAFS analysis of spheroplast samples revealed that multiple different forms of Hg-thiols are produced by the Hg(0) oxidation reaction and that the local coordination environment of the oxidized Hg changes with reaction time. The results of this study indicate that Hg(0) oxidation in D. desulfuricans ND132 is an intracellular process that occurs by reaction with thiol-containing molecules.

  16. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Schaefer

    Full Text Available One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ, which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Role of acylCoA binding protein in acylCoA transport, metabolism and cell signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, J; Jensen, M V; Hansen, J K

    1999-01-01

    Long chain acylCoA esters (LCAs) act both as substrates and intermediates in intermediary metabolism and as regulators in various intracellular functions. AcylCoA binding protein (ACBP) binds LCAs with high affinity and is believed to play an important role in intracellular acylCoA transport...

  18. Intracellular Na+, K+ and Cl- activities in Acheta domesticus Malpighian tubules and the response to a diuretic kinin neuropeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, Geoffrey M

    2012-08-15

    The mechanism of primary urine production and the activity of a diuretic kinin, Achdo-KII, were investigated in malpighian tubules of Acheta domesticus by measuring intracellular Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) activities, basolateral membrane voltage (V(b)), fluid secretion and transepithelial ion transport. Calculated electrochemical gradients for K(+) and Cl(-) across the basolateral membrane show they are actively transported into principal cells, and basolateral Ba(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels do not contribute to net transepithelial K(+) transport and fluid secretion. A basolateral Cl(-) conductance was revealed after the blockade of K(+) channels with Ba(2+), and a current carried by the passive outward movement of Cl(-) accounts for the hyperpolarization of V(b) in response to Ba(2+). Ion uptake via Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransport, driven by the inwardly directed Na(+) electrochemical gradient, is thermodynamically feasible, and is consistent with the actions of bumetanide, which reduces fluid secretion and both Na(+) and K(+) transport. The Na(+) gradient is maintained by its extrusion across the apical membrane and by a basolateral ouabain-sensitive Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Achdo-KII has no significant effect on the intracellular ion activities or V(b). Electrochemical gradients across the apical membrane were estimated from previously published values for the levels of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) in the secreted fluid. The electrochemical gradient for Cl(-) favours passive movement into the lumen, but falls towards zero after stimulation by Achdo-KII. This coincides with a twofold increase in Cl(-) transport, which is attributed to the opening of an apical Cl(-) conductance, which depolarises the apical membrane voltage.

  19. Intracellular angiotensin II elicits Ca2+ increases in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Brailoiu, E; Kok, JW; Henning, RH; De Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies show that angiotensin II can act within the cell, possibly via intracellular receptors pharmacologically different from typical plasma membrane angiotensin II receptors. The signal transduction of intracellular angiotensin LI is unclear. Therefore. we investigated the effects of

  20. Real-time visualization of intracellular hydrodynamics in single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potma, Eric O.; Boeij, Wim P. de; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular water concentrations in single living cells were visualized by nonlinear coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In combination with isotopic exchange measurements, CARS microscopy allowed the real-time observation of transient intracellular hydrodynamics at a high

  1. Intracellular diffusion restrictions in isolated cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkedal Rikke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction of intracellular diffusion of adenine nucleotides has been studied intensively on adult rat cardiomyocytes. However, their cause and role in vivo is still uncertain. Intracellular membrane structures have been suggested to play a role. We therefore chose to study cardiomyocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, which are thinner and have fewer intracellular membrane structures than adult rat cardiomyocytes. Previous studies suggest that trout permeabilized cardiac fibers also have diffusion restrictions. However, results from fibers may be affected by incomplete separation of the cells. This is avoided when studying permeabilized, isolated cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to verify the existence of diffusion restrictions in trout cardiomyocytes by comparing ADP-kinetics of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers, permeabilized cardiomyocytes and isolated mitochondria from rainbow trout heart. Experiments were performed at 10, 15 and 20°C in the absence and presence of creatine. Results Trout cardiomyocytes hypercontracted in the solutions used for mammalian cardiomyocytes. We developed a new solution in which they retained their shape and showed stable steady state respiration rates throughout an experiment. The apparent ADP-affinity of permeabilized cardiomyocytes was different from that of fibers. It was higher, independent of temperature and not increased by creatine. However, it was still about ten times lower than in isolated mitochondria. Conclusions The differences between fibers and cardiomyocytes suggest that results from trout heart fibers were affected by incomplete separation of the cells. However, the lower ADP-affinity of cardiomyocytes compared to isolated mitochondria indicate that intracellular diffusion restrictions are still present in trout cardiomyocytes despite their lower density of intracellular membrane structures. The lack of a creatine effect indicates that

  2. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  3. Probenecid and N-Acetylcysteine Prevent Loss of Intracellular Glutathione and Inhibit Neuronal Death after Mechanical Stretch Injury In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lina; Empey, Philip E; Ji, Jing; Chao, Honglu; Kochanek, Patrick M; Bayır, Hülya; Clark, Robert S B

    2016-10-15

    Probenecid and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can preserve intracellular levels of the vital antioxidant glutathione (GSH) via two distinct biochemical pathways. Probenecid inhibits transporter-mediated GSH efflux and NAC serves as a cysteine donor for GSH synthesis. We hypothesized that probenecid and NAC alone would maintain intracellular GSH concentrations and inhibit neuronal death after traumatic stretch injury, and that the drugs in combination would produce additive effects. Sex-segregated rat primary cortical neurons were treated with probenecid (100 μM) and NAC (50 μM), alone and in combination (Pro-NAC), then subjected to mechanical stretch (10s -1 strain rate, 50% membrane deformation). At 24 h, both probenecid and NAC inhibited trauma-induced intracellular GSH depletion, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and propidium iodide (PI) uptake in both XY- and XX-neurons. Combined Pro-NAC treatment was superior to probenecid or NAC alone in maintenance of intracellular GSH and neuronal death assessed by PI uptake. Interestingly, caspase 3 activity 24 h after mechanical trauma was more prominent in XX-neurons, and treatment effects (probenecid, NAC, and Pro-NAC) were observed in XX- but not XY-neurons; however, XY-neurons were ultimately more vulnerable to mechanical stretch-induced injury than their XX counterparts, as was evidenced by more neuronal death detected by LDH release and PI uptake. In addition, after stretch injury in HT22 hippocampal cells, both NAC and probenecid were highly effective at reducing oxidative stress detected by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. These in vitro data support further testing of this drug combination in models of traumatic neuronal injury in vivo.

  4. Optical and electron microscopy study of laser-based intracellular molecule delivery using peptide-conjugated photodispersible gold nanoparticle agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawinkel, Judith; Richter, Undine; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Westermann, Martin; Gamrad, Lisa; Rehbock, Christoph; Barcikowski, Stephan; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2016-01-08

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can act as carriers for therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genetic constructs for medical applications. The triggered release of the molecule into the cytoplasm can be crucial to its effective delivery. Hence, we implemented and characterized laser interaction with defined gold nanoparticle agglomerates conjugated to CPPs which enables efficient endosomal rupture and intracellular release of molecules transported. Gold nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in liquid were conjugated with CPPs forming agglomerates and the intracellular release of molecules was triggered via pulsed laser irradiation (γ = 532 nm, τ pulse = 1 ns). The CPPs enhance the uptake of the agglomerates along with the cargo which can be co-incubated with the agglomerates. The interaction of incident laser light with gold nanoparticle agglomerates leads to heat deposition and field enhancement in the vicinity of the particles. This highly precise effect deagglomerates the nanoparticles and disrupts the enclosing endosomal membrane. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed this rupture for radiant exposures of 25 mJ/cm2 and above. Successful intracellular release was shown using the fluorescent dye calcein. For a radiant exposure of 35 mJ/cm2 we found calcein delivery in 81 % of the treated cells while maintaining a high percentage of cell viability. Furthermore, cell proliferation and metabolic activity were not reduced 72 h after the treatment. CPPs trigger the uptake of the gold nanoparticle agglomerates via endocytosis and co-resident molecules in the endosomes are released by applying laser irradiation, preventing their intraendosomal degradation. Due to the highly localized effect, the cell membrane integrity is not affected. Therefore, this technique can be an efficient tool for spatially and temporally confined intracellular release. The utilization of specifically designed photodispersible gold nanoparticle agglomerates (65 nm

  5. DMPD: NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18585455 NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Shaw...tml) (.csml) Show NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. PubmedID 18585455 Ti...tle NOD-like receptors (NLRs): bona fide intracellular microbial sensors. Authors

  6. DMPD: Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18573338 Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. Curr Opin Im...munol. 2008 Aug;20(4):383-8. Epub 2008 Jun 23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Intracellular DNA sensors ...in immunity. PubmedID 18573338 Title Intracellular DNA sensors in immunity. Authors Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. P

  7. Similar Intracellular Peptide Profile of TAP1/beta 2 Microglobulin Double-Knockout Mice and C57BL/6 Wild-Type Mice as Revealed by Peptidomic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Leandro Mantovani de [UNIFESP; Berti, Denise A.; Russo, Lilian C.; Coelho, Veronica; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Oliveira, Vitor [UNIFESP; Ferro, Emer Suavinho [UNIFESP

    2010-01-01

    Cells produce and use peptides in distinctive ways. in the present report, using isotope labeling plus semi-quantitative mass spectrometry, we evaluated the intracellular peptide profile of TAP1/beta 2m(-/-) (transporter associated with antigen-processing 1/beta 2 microglobulin) double-knockout mice and compared it with that of C57BL/6 wild-type animals. Overall, 92 distinctive peptides were identified, and most were shown to have a similar concentration in both mouse strains. However, some p...

  8. Plasmalemmal V-H+-ATPases regulate intracellular pH in human lung microvascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sennoune, Souad R.; Maiti, Debasish; Martinez, Gloria M.; Bakunts, Karina; Wesson, Donald E.; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The lung endothelium layer is exposed to continuous CO 2 transit which exposes the endothelium to a substantial acid load that could be detrimental to cell function. The Na + /H + exchanger and HCO 3 - -dependent H + -transporting mechanisms regulate intracellular pH (pH cyt ) in most cells. Cells that cope with high acid loads might require additional primary energy-dependent mechanisms. V-H + -ATPases localized at the plasma membranes (pmV-ATPases) have emerged as a novel pH regulatory system. We hypothesized that human lung microvascular endothelial (HLMVE) cells use pmV-ATPases, in addition to Na + /H + exchanger and HCO 3 - -based H + -transporting mechanisms, to maintain pH cyt homeostasis. Immunocytochemical studies revealed V-H + -ATPase at the plasma membrane, in addition to the predicted distribution in vacuolar compartments. Acid-loaded HLMVE cells exhibited proton fluxes in the absence of Na + and HCO 3 - that were similar to those observed in the presence of either Na + , or Na + and HCO 3 - . The Na + - and HCO 3 - -independent pH cyt recovery was inhibited by bafilomycin A 1 , a V-H + -ATPase inhibitor. These studies show a Na + - and HCO 3 - -independent pH cyt regulatory mechanism in HLMVE cells that is mediated by pmV-ATPases

  9. The intracellular fate of an amphipathic pH-responsive polymer: Key characteristics towards drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, S A; Orellana-Tavra, C; Chen, A; Slater, N K H

    2016-12-01

    Biopolymers have become important drug delivery systems for therapeutic molecules by enhancing their accessibility and efficacy intracellularly. However, the transport of these drugs across the cell membrane and their release into the cytosol remain a challenge. The trafficking of poly (l-lysine iso-phthalamide) grafted with phenylalanine (PP-50) was investigated using an osteosarcoma cell line (SAOS-2). Colocalisation of this amphipathic biopolymer with endocytosis tracers, such as transferrin and lactosylceramide, suggested that PP-50 is partially internalised by both clathrin and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Macropinocytosis was also investigated, but a smaller correlation was found between this mechanism and PP-50 transport. A significant decrease in polymer-mediated calcein uptake was found when cells were pre-incubated with endocytosis inhibitors, suggesting also the use of a combination of mechanisms for cell internalisation. In addition, PP-50 colocalisation with endosome and lysosome pathway markers showed that the polymer was able to escape the endolysosomal compartment before maturation. This is a critical characteristic of a biopolymer towards use as drug delivery systems and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intracellular Redox Compartmentation and ROS-Related Communication in Regulation and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed enormous progress in understanding redox signaling related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. The consensus view is that such signaling is intrinsic to many developmental processes and responses to the environment. ROS-related redox signaling is tightly wedded to compartmentation. Because membranes function as barriers, highly redox-active powerhouses such as chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria may elicit specific signaling responses. However, transporter functions allow membranes also to act as bridges between compartments, and so regulated capacity to transmit redox changes across membranes influences the outcome of triggers produced at different locations. As well as ROS and other oxidizing species, antioxidants are key players that determine the extent of ROS accumulation at different sites and that may themselves act as signal transmitters. Like ROS, antioxidants can be transported across membranes. In addition, the intracellular distribution of antioxidative enzymes may be modulated to regulate or facilitate redox signaling appropriate to the conditions. Finally, there is substantial plasticity in organellar shape, with extensions such as stromules, peroxules, and matrixules playing potentially crucial roles in organelle-organelle communication. We provide an overview of the advances in subcellular compartmentation, identifying the gaps in our knowledge and discussing future developments in the area. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2...

  12. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... This analysis starts with a review of ocean transportation demand and supply including projections of ship capacity demand and world shipbuilding capacity under various economic and political assumptions...

  13. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenhut Michael

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalites in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  14. Deoxycytidine transport and metabolism in choroid plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, R.; Huntoon, S.

    1983-05-01

    In vitro, the transport into and release of (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine from the isolated choroid plexus, the anatomical locus of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, were studied separately. By use of the ability of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) to inhibit deoxycytidine efflux from choroid plexus, the transport of 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine into choroid plexus at 37 degrees C was measured. Deoxycytidine was transported into choroid plexus against a concentration gradient by a saturable process that depended on intracellular energy production, but not intracellular binding or metabolism. The Michaelis-Menten constant (KT) for the active transport of deoxycytidine into choroid plexus was 15 microM. The active transport system for deoxycytidine was inhibited by naturally occurring nucleosides and deoxynucleosides, but not by 1 mM probenecid and 2-deoxyribose or 100 microM cytosine and cytosine arabinoside. With less than 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine in the medium, the choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine against a concentration gradient. However, approximately 50% of the (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine was phosphorylated to (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine nucleotides at a low extracellular (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine concentration (6 nM) in 15-min incubations. This accumulation process depended, in part, on saturable intracellular phosphorylation. These studies provide further evidence that the choroid plexus contains an active nucleoside transport system of low specificity for deoxynucleosides and ribonucleosides, and a separate, saturable efflux system for deoxynucleosides which is very sensitive to inhibition by NBTI.

  15. The product of the ABC half-transporter gene ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) is expressed in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocchi, E; Khodjakov, A; Volk, E L

    2000-01-01

    The products of the ABC gene family can be generally classified as either full-transporters of half-transporters. Full-transporters are expressed in the plasma membrane, whereas half-transporters are usually found in intracellular membranes. Recently, an ABC half-transporter, the ABCG2 gene product...... by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. This protein is highly overexpressed in several drug-resistant cell lines and localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane, instead of to intracellular membranes as seen with all other known half-transporters. Therefore, BCRP/MXR is unique among the ABC half...

  16. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-07

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  17. Anion transport and GABA signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Huebner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas activation of GABAA receptors by GABA usually results in a hyperpolarizing influx of chloride into the neuron, the reversed chloride driving force in the immature nervous system results in a depolarizing efflux of chloride. This GABAergic depolarization is deemed to be important for the maturation of the neuronal network. The concept of a developmental GABA switch has mainly been derived from in vitro experiments and reliable in vivo evidence is still missing. As GABAA receptors are permeable for both chloride and bicarbonate, the net effect of GABA also critically depends on the distribution of bicarbonate. Whereas chloride can either mediate depolarizing or hyperpolarizing currents, bicarbonate invariably mediates a depolarizing current under physiological conditions. Intracellular bicarbonate is quickly replenished by cytosolic carbonic anhydrases. Intracellular bicarbonate levels also depend on different bicarbonate transporters expressed by neurons. The expression of these proteins is not only developmentally regulated but also differs between cell types and even subcellular regions. In this review we will summarize current knowledge about the role of some of these transporters for brain development and brain function.

  18. ERK1/2 mediates sperm acrosome reaction through elevation of intracellular calcium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaldety, Yael; Breitbart, Haim

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilization capacity after residing in the female reproductive tract for a few hours in a process called capacitation. Only capacitated sperm can bind the zona pellucida (ZP) of the egg and undergo the acrosome reaction, a process that allows penetration and fertilization. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) mediates signalling in many cell types, however its role in sperm function is largely unknown. Here we show that ERK1/2 is highly phosphorylated/activated after a short incubation of mouse sperm under capacitation conditions and that this phosphorylation is reduced after longer incubation. Further phosphorylation was observed upon addition of crude extract of egg ZP or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The mitogen-activated ERK-kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 abolished ERK1/2 phosphorylation, in vitro fertilization rate and the acrosome reaction induced by ZP or EGF but not by the Ca2+-ionophore A23187. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 along the capacitation process diminished almost completely the sperm's ability to go through the acrosome reaction, while inhibition at the end of capacitation attenuated the acrosome reaction rate by only 45%. The fact that the acrosome reaction, induced by the Ca2+ -ionophore A23187, was not inhibited by U0126 suggests that ERK1/2 mediates the acrosome reaction by activating Ca2+ transport into the cell. Direct determination of intracellular [Ca2+] revealed that Ca2+ influx induced by EGF or ZP was completely blocked by U0126. Thus, it has been established that the increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation/activation in response to ZP or by activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by EGF, is a key event for intracellular Ca2+ elevation and the subsequent occurrence of the acrosome reaction.

  19. Intracellular localization of adeno-associated viral proteins expressed in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Ramírez, Lilí E; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2011-01-01

    Production of vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAVv) in insect cells represents a feasible option for large-scale applications. However, transducing particles yields obtained in this system are low compared with total capsid yields, suggesting the presence of genome encapsidation bottlenecks. Three components are required for AAVv production: viral capsid proteins (VP), the recombinant AAV genome, and Rep proteins for AAV genome replication and encapsidation. Little is known about the interaction between the three components in insect cells, which have intracellular conditions different to those in mammalian cells. In this work, the localization of AAV proteins in insect cells was assessed for the first time with the purpose of finding potential limiting factors. Unassembled VP were located either in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Their transport into the nucleus was dependent on protein concentration. Empty capsids were located in defined subnuclear compartments. Rep proteins expressed individually were efficiently translocated into the nucleus. Their intranuclear distribution was not uniform and differed from VP distribution. While Rep52 distribution and expression levels were not affected by AAV genomes or VP, Rep78 distribution and stability changed during coexpression. Expression of all AAV components modified capsid intranuclear distribution, and assembled VP were found in vesicles located in the nuclear periphery. Such vesicles were related to baculovirus infection, highlighting its role in AAVv production in insect cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that the intracellular distribution of AAV proteins allows their interaction and does not limit vector production in insect cells. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  20. Caveolin-2 associates with intracellular chlamydial inclusions independently of caveolin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norkin Leonard C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid raft domains form in plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells by the tight packing of glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Caveolae are invaginated structures that form in lipid raft domains when the protein caveolin-1 is expressed. The Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that replicate entirely within inclusions that develop from the phagocytic vacuoles in which they enter. We recently found that host cell caveolin-1 is associated with the intracellular vacuoles and inclusions of some chlamydial strains and species, and that entry of those strains depends on intact lipid raft domains. Caveolin-2 is another member of the caveolin family of proteins that is present in caveolae, but of unknown function. Methods We utilized a caveolin-1 negative/caveolin-2 positive FRT cell line and laser confocal immunofluorescence techniques to visualize the colocalization of caveolin-2 with the chlamydial inclusions. Results We show here that in infected HeLa cells, caveolin-2, as well as caveolin-1, colocalizes with inclusions of C. pneumoniae (Cp, C. caviae (GPIC, and C. trachomatis serovars E, F and K. In addition, caveolin-2 also associates with C. trachomatis serovars A, B and C, although caveolin-1 did not colocalize with these organisms. Moreover, caveolin-2 appears to be specifically, or indirectly, associated with the pathogens at the inclusion membranes. Using caveolin-1 deficient FRT cells, we show that although caveolin-2 normally is not transported out of the Golgi in the absence of caveolin-1, it nevertheless colocalizes with chlamydial inclusions in these cells. However, our results also show that caveolin-2 did not colocalize with UV-irradiated Chlamydia in FRT cells, suggesting that in these caveolin-1 negative cells, pathogen viability and very likely pathogen gene expression are necessary for the acquisition of caveolin-2 from the Golgi. Conclusion Caveolin-2 associates with the chlamydial

  1. Xenoestrogens alter estrogen receptor (ER α intracellular levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio La Rosa

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2-dependent estrogen receptor (ER α intracellular concentration is a well recognized critical step in the pleiotropic effects elicited by E2 in several target tissues. Beside E2, a class of synthetic and plant-derived chemicals collectively named endocrine disruptors (EDs or xenoestrogens bind to and modify both nuclear and extra-nuclear ERα activities. However, at the present no information is available on the ability of EDs to hamper ERα intracellular concentration. Here, the effects of bisphenol A (BPA and naringenin (Nar, prototypes of synthetic and plant-derived ERα ligands, have been evaluated on ERα levels in MCF-7 cells. Both EDs mimic E2 in triggering ERα Ser118 phosphorylation and gene transcription. However, only E2 or BPA induce an increase of cell proliferation; whereas 24 hrs after Nar stimulation a dose-dependent decrease in cell number is reported. E2 or BPA treatment reduces ERα protein and mRNA levels after 24 hrs. Contrarily, Nar stimulation does not alter ERα content but reduces ERα mRNA levels like other ligands. Co-stimulation experiments indicate that 48 hrs of Nar treatment prevents the E2-induced ERα degradation and hijacks the physiological ability of E2:ERα complex to regulate gene transcription. Mechanistically, Nar induces ERα protein accumulation by preventing proteasomal receptor degradation via persistent activation of p38/MAPK pathway. As a whole these data demonstrate that ERα intracellular concentration is an important target through which EDs hamper the hormonal milieu of E2 target cells driving cells to different outcomes or mimicking E2 even in the absence of the hormone.

  2. Xenoestrogens alter estrogen receptor (ER) α intracellular levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Pellegrini, Marco; Totta, Pierangela; Acconcia, Filippo; Marino, Maria

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2)-dependent estrogen receptor (ER) α intracellular concentration is a well recognized critical step in the pleiotropic effects elicited by E2 in several target tissues. Beside E2, a class of synthetic and plant-derived chemicals collectively named endocrine disruptors (EDs) or xenoestrogens bind to and modify both nuclear and extra-nuclear ERα activities. However, at the present no information is available on the ability of EDs to hamper ERα intracellular concentration. Here, the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) and naringenin (Nar), prototypes of synthetic and plant-derived ERα ligands, have been evaluated on ERα levels in MCF-7 cells. Both EDs mimic E2 in triggering ERα Ser118 phosphorylation and gene transcription. However, only E2 or BPA induce an increase of cell proliferation; whereas 24 hrs after Nar stimulation a dose-dependent decrease in cell number is reported. E2 or BPA treatment reduces ERα protein and mRNA levels after 24 hrs. Contrarily, Nar stimulation does not alter ERα content but reduces ERα mRNA levels like other ligands. Co-stimulation experiments indicate that 48 hrs of Nar treatment prevents the E2-induced ERα degradation and hijacks the physiological ability of E2:ERα complex to regulate gene transcription. Mechanistically, Nar induces ERα protein accumulation by preventing proteasomal receptor degradation via persistent activation of p38/MAPK pathway. As a whole these data demonstrate that ERα intracellular concentration is an important target through which EDs hamper the hormonal milieu of E2 target cells driving cells to different outcomes or mimicking E2 even in the absence of the hormone.

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility and intracellular localization of Diplorickettsia massiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Geetha; Barry, Abdoulaye O; Ghigo, Eric; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2012-02-01

    Diplorickettsia massiliensis is an obligate intracellular bacterium from the Coxiellaceae family recently isolated from Ixodes ricinus ticks. The inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents were assessed by two different methods, immunofluorescence and Gimenez staining assay. Different markers (EEA1, Lamp-1, Cathepsin D, and LysoTracker Red DND99) were used to reveal the nature of the vacuole containing the bacterium. Ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and rifampin had MIC values of 2 lg mL(-1). We found that 4 lg mL(-1) of Doxycycline inhibited the growth of D. massiliensis strain. Surprisingly, D. massiliensis was resistant to chloramphenicol up to the concentration of 64 lg mL(-1). We found that penicillin G, ammonium chloride, gentamycin, omeprazole, bafilomycin A1, and chloroquine were not active against D. massiliensis. Studies performed with markers EEA1, Lamp-1, Cathepsin D, and LysoTracker Red DND99 showed that D. massiliensis is localized within an acidic compartment that is not an early phagosome, but a late phagosome or a phagolysosome. Gimenez staining stays a good method that will work with a very low number of bacteria and can be used to determine the MICs of new therapeutic antibiotics precisely. The resistance profile of D. massiliensis was found to be quite unusual for intracellular Gram-negative bacterium with marked resistance to chloramphenicol. Despite of localization in acidic compartment, pH-neutralizing agents do not significantly inhibit intracellular growth of bacterium. The results of these studies prove that antibiotic resistance does not depend on pH of vacuole. This pH-related mechanism seems not to play a contributing role in the overall resistance of D. massiliensis.

  4. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  5. Transmembrane protein OSTA-1 shapes sensory cilia morphology via regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier-Mason, Anique; Wojtyniak, Martin; Bowie, Rachel V; Nechipurenko, Inna V; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2013-04-01

    The structure and function of primary cilia are critically dependent on intracellular trafficking pathways that transport ciliary membrane and protein components. The mechanisms by which these trafficking pathways are regulated are not fully characterized. Here we identify the transmembrane protein OSTA-1 as a new regulator of the trafficking pathways that shape the morphology and protein composition of sensory cilia in C. elegans. osta-1 encodes an organic solute transporter alpha-like protein, mammalian homologs of which have been implicated in membrane trafficking and solute transport, although a role in regulating cilia structure has not previously been demonstrated. We show that mutations in osta-1 result in altered ciliary membrane volume, branch length and complexity, as well as defects in localization of a subset of ciliary transmembrane proteins in different sensory cilia types. OSTA-1 is associated with transport vesicles, localizes to a ciliary compartment shown to house trafficking proteins, and regulates both retrograde and anterograde flux of the endosome-associated RAB-5 small GTPase. Genetic epistasis experiments with sensory signaling, exocytic and endocytic proteins further implicate OSTA-1 as a crucial regulator of ciliary architecture via regulation of cilia-destined trafficking. Our findings suggest that regulation of transport pathways in a cell type-specific manner contributes to diversity in sensory cilia structure and might allow dynamic remodeling of ciliary architecture via multiple inputs.

  6. Subcellular site and nature of intracellular cadmium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying heavy metal accumulation, toxicity, and tolerance in higher plants are poorly understood. Since subcellular processes are undoubtedly involved in all these phenomena, it is of interest to study the extent, subcellular site and nature of intracellularly accumulated cadmium in higher plants. Whole plants supplied 109 CdCl 2 or 112 CdSO 4 accumulated Cd into roots and aerial tissues. Preparation of protoplasts from aerial tissues followed by subcellular fractionation of the protoplasts to obtain intact vacuoles, chloroplasts and cytosol revealed the presence of Cd in the cytosol but not in vacuoles or chloroplasts. No evidence was obtained for the production of volatile Cd complexes in tobacco

  7. Intracellular Fluid Mechanics: Coupling Cytoplasmic Flow with Active Cytoskeletal Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilner, Alex; Manhart, Angelika

    2018-01-01

    The cell is a mechanical machine, and continuum mechanics of the fluid cytoplasm and the viscoelastic deforming cytoskeleton play key roles in cell physiology. We review mathematical models of intracellular fluid mechanics, from cytoplasmic fluid flows, to the flow of a viscous active cytoskeletal gel, to models of two-phase poroviscous flows, to poroelastic models. We discuss application of these models to cell biological phenomena, such as organelle positioning, blebbing, and cell motility. We also discuss challenges of understanding fluid mechanics on the cellular scale.

  8. Bullous pemphigoid antigen localization suggests an intracellular association with hemidesmosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westgate, G E; Weaver, A C; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    immunoelectron microscopy using both peroxidase and colloidal gold labeling techniques with patients' sera or IgG, revealed that BPA is associated with hemidesmosomes--putative adhesion structures at the BMZ, based on their similarity in ultrastructure to desmosomes. More specifically BPA was immunolocalized...... to the cytoplasmic face of hemidesmosomes and was not observed extracellularly in the basement membrane. In stratifying and nonstratifying cultures of rat keratinocytes, BPA is expressed intracellularly and not in the cell-derived matrix, unlike other known basement membrane components. These cells also synthesize...

  9. Tatp-mediated intracellular delivery of pharmaceutical nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchilin, V P

    2007-08-01

    CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides), including Tatp (transactivator of transcription peptide), have been successfully used for intracellular delivery of a wide variety of cargoes including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers such as liposomes, micelles and nanoparticles. Here, we will consider the major results obtained in this area with emphasis on Tatp-mediated delivery of liposomes and various transfection vectors. We will also address the development of 'smart' stimuli-sensitive nanocarriers, where the cell-penetrating function can only be activated when the nanocarrier is inside the biological target, thus minimizing the interaction with non-target cells.

  10. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Thornell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4, Na-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2, electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2, and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE, as well as a borate transporter (BTR1. These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO3– either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO3– transporter contributes to a cell’s ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s (e.g., Na+ or Cl–. In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both classical and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family.

  11. ABC transporter genes and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-01-01

    Alterations of pancreatic β-cell cholesterol content may contribute to β-cell dysfunction. Two important determinants of intracellular cholesterol content are the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters A1 (ABCA1) and -G1 (ABCG1). Whether genetic variation in ABCA1 and ABCG1 predicts risk of type 2...... diabetes in the general population is unknown....

  12. Effect of transport in distribution of radioions and radiolabeled metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: route of administration; carrier effects and complexed or ionic tracers; membrane permeability, extracellular and intracellular concentrations; enzyme and hormonal stimulation or depression and the metabolic state; neoplasia and transport; and carrier for radiopharmaceutical binding to membrane or protein sites. Some radioisotopes considered are /sup 99m/Tc, 65 Zn, 62 Zn, 14 C and 111 In

  13. Raman spectroscopy for intracellular monitoring of carotenoid in Blakeslea trispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Emmanouil H; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria; Christofilos, Dimitrios; Arvanitidis, Ioannis; Kourouklis, Gerasimos

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, we explore the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy for intracellular monitoring of carotenoid in filamentous fungi Blakeslea trispora. Although carotenoid production from this fungus has been extensively studied through various chromatographic methods and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, no intracellular monitoring has been demonstrated until now. The intensity of the Raman spectrum, and more conveniently that of the strongest nu(1) carotenoid band at approximately 1,519 cm(-1), exhibits a good linear correlation with the carotenoid content of the sample as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Our results suggest that Raman spectroscopy can serve as an alternative method for the study and quantification of carotenoid in batch-mated submerged cultivations of B. trispora and similar organisms. Although not as accurate as HPLC, it allows a rapid sampling and analysis, avoiding the prolonged and tedious classical isolation procedures required for carotenoid determination by HPLC and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  14. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  15. Bacteriomimetic invasin-functionalized nanocarriers for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouta, Hagar Ibrahim; Menina, Sara; Kochut, Annika; Gordon, Sarah; Geyer, Rebecca; Dersch, Petra; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-28

    Intracellular bacteria invade mammalian cells to establish an infectious niche. The current work models adhesion and subsequent internalization strategy of pathogenic bacteria into mammalian cells to design a bacteriomimetic bioinvasive delivery system. We report on the surface functionalization of liposomes with a C-terminal fragment of invasin (InvA497), an invasion factor in the outer membrane of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. InvA497-functionalized liposomes adhere to mammalian epithelial HEp-2 cell line at different infection stages with a significantly higher efficiency than liposomes functionalized with bovine serum albumin. Covalent attachment of InvA497 results in higher cellular adhesion than liposomes with physically adsorbed InvA497 with non-specific surface protein alignment. Uptake studies in HEp-2 cells indicate active internalization of InvA497-functionalized liposomes via β1-integrin receptor-mediated uptake mechanism mimicking the natural invasion strategy of Y. pseudotuberculosis. Uptake studies in Caco-2 cells at different polarization states demonstrate specific targeting of the InvA497-functionalized liposomes to less polarized cells reflecting the status of inflamed cells. Moreover, when loaded with the anti-infective agent gentamicin and applied to HEp-2 cells infected with Y. pseudotuberculosis, InvA497-functionalized liposomes are able to significantly reduce the infection load relative to non-functionalized drug-loaded liposomes. This indicates a promising application of such a bacteriomimetic system for drug delivery to intracellular compartments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin

    2007-01-01

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 ± 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors

  17. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  18. Eps15: a multifunctional adaptor protein regulating intracellular trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bergen en Henegouwen Paul MP

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over expression of receptor tyrosine kinases is responsible for the development of a wide variety of malignancies. Termination of growth factor signaling is primarily determined by the down regulation of active growth factor/receptor complexes. In recent years, considerable insight has been gained in the endocytosis and degradation of growth factor receptors. A crucial player in this process is the EGFR Protein tyrosine kinase Substrate #15, or Eps15. This protein functions as a scaffolding adaptor protein and is involved both in secretion and endocytosis. Eps15 has been shown to bind to AP-1 and AP-2 complexes, to bind to inositol lipids and to several other proteins involved in the regulation of intracellular trafficking. In addition, Eps15 has been detected in the nucleus of mammalian cells. Activation of growth factor receptors induces tyrosine phosphorylation and mono-ubiquitination of Eps15. The role of these post translational modifications of Eps15 is still a mystery. It is proposed that Eps15 and its family members Eps15R and Eps15b are involved in the regulation of membrane morphology, which is required for intracellular vesicle formation and trafficking.

  19. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqin Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications.

  20. Imaging the intracellular degradation of biodegradable polymer nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Barthel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of smart drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles has become of great interest. Drug-loaded nanoparticles can be introduced into the cell interior via endocytotic processes followed by the slow release of the drug due to degradation of the nanoparticle. In this work, poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA was chosen as the biodegradable polymer. Although common degradation of PLLA has been studied in various biological environments, intracellular degradation processes have been examined only to a very limited extent. PLLA nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 120 nm were decorated with magnetite nanocrystals and introduced into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. The release of the magnetite particles from the surface of the PLLA nanoparticles during the intracellular residence was monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM over a period of 14 days. It was demonstrated by the release of the magnetite nanocrystals from the PLLA surface that the PLLA nanoparticles do in fact undergo degradation within the cell. Furthermore, even after 14 days of residence, the PLLA nanoparticles were found in the MSCs. Additionally, the ultrastructural TEM examinations yield insight into the long term intercellular fate of these nanoparticles. From the statistical analysis of ultrastructural details (e.g., number of detached magnetite crystals, and the number of nanoparticles in one endosome, we demonstrate the importance of TEM studies for such applications in addition to fluorescence studies (flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  1. Human β-Cell Proliferation and Intracellular Signaling: Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mehboob A.; García-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C.; Bhushan, Anil; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This is the third in a series of Perspectives on intracellular signaling pathways coupled to proliferation in pancreatic β-cells. We contrast the large knowledge base in rodent β-cells with the more limited human database. With the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes and the recognition that type 2 diabetes is also due in part to a deficiency of functioning β-cells, there is great urgency to identify therapeutic approaches to expand human β-cell numbers. Therapeutic approaches might include stem cell differentiation, transdifferentiation, or expansion of cadaver islets or residual endogenous β-cells. In these Perspectives, we focus on β-cell proliferation. Past Perspectives reviewed fundamental cell cycle regulation and its upstream regulation by insulin/IGF signaling via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, glucose, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and liver kinase B1, protein kinase Cζ, calcium-calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells, epidermal growth factor/platelet-derived growth factor family members, Wnt/β-catenin, leptin, and estrogen and progesterone. Here, we emphasize Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription, Ras/Raf/extracellular signal–related kinase, cadherins and integrins, G-protein–coupled receptors, and transforming growth factor β signaling. We hope these three Perspectives will serve to introduce these pathways to new researchers and will encourage additional investigators to focus on understanding how to harness key intracellular signaling pathways for therapeutic human β-cell regeneration for diabetes. PMID:25999530

  2. Inflammatory intracellular pathways activated by electronegative LDL in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Montserrat; Sanchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Ordoñez-Llanos, Jordi; Benitez, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Electronegative LDL (LDL(-)) is a plasma LDL subfraction that induces cytokine release in monocytes through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. However, the intracellular pathways induced by LDL(-) downstream TLR4 activation are unknown. We aimed to identify the pathways activated by LDL(-) leading to cytokine release in monocytes. We determined LDL(-)-induced activation of several intracellular kinases in protein extracts from monocytes using a multikinase ELISA array. LDL(-) induced higher p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation than native LDL. This was corroborated by a specific cell-based assay and it was dependent on TLR4 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3k)/Akt pathway. P38 MAPK activation was involved in cytokine release promoted by LDL(-). A specific ELISA showed that LDL(-) activated cAMP response-element binding (CREB) in a p38 MAPK dependent manner. P38 MAPK was also involved in the nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1) activation by LDL(-). We found that NF-kB, AP-1 and CREB inhibitors decreased LDL(-)-induced cytokine release, mainly on MCP1, IL6 and IL10 release, respectively. LDL(-) promotes p38 MAPK phosphorylation through TLR4 and PI3k/Akt pathways. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK is involved in NF-kB, AP-1 and CREB activation, leading to LDL(-)-induced cytokine release in monocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling nanoparticle uptake and intracellular distribution using stochastic process algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobay, M. P. D., E-mail: maria.pamela.david@physik.uni-muenchen.de; Alberola, A. Piera; Mendoza, E. R.; Raedler, J. O., E-mail: joachim.raedler@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Faculty of Physics, Center for NanoScience (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Computational modeling is increasingly important to help understand the interaction and movement of nanoparticles (NPs) within living cells, and to come to terms with the wealth of data that microscopy imaging yields. A quantitative description of the spatio-temporal distribution of NPs inside cells; however, it is challenging due to the complexity of multiple compartments such as endosomes and nuclei, which themselves are dynamic and can undergo fusion and fission and exchange their content. Here, we show that stochastic pi calculus, a widely-used process algebra, is well suited for mapping surface and intracellular NP interactions and distributions. In stochastic pi calculus, each NP is represented as a process, which can adopt various states such as bound or aggregated, as well as be passed between processes representing location, as a function of predefined stochastic channels. We created a pi calculus model of gold NP uptake and intracellular movement and compared the evolution of surface-bound, cytosolic, endosomal, and nuclear NP densities with electron microscopy data. We demonstrate that the computational approach can be extended to include specific molecular binding and potential interaction with signaling cascades as characteristic for NP-cell interactions in a wide range of applications such as nanotoxicity, viral infection, and drug delivery.

  4. Modeling nanoparticle uptake and intracellular distribution using stochastic process algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobay, M. P. D.; Alberola, A. Piera; Mendoza, E. R.; Rädler, J. O.

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly important to help understand the interaction and movement of nanoparticles (NPs) within living cells, and to come to terms with the wealth of data that microscopy imaging yields. A quantitative description of the spatio-temporal distribution of NPs inside cells; however, it is challenging due to the complexity of multiple compartments such as endosomes and nuclei, which themselves are dynamic and can undergo fusion and fission and exchange their content. Here, we show that stochastic pi calculus, a widely-used process algebra, is well suited for mapping surface and intracellular NP interactions and distributions. In stochastic pi calculus, each NP is represented as a process, which can adopt various states such as bound or aggregated, as well as be passed between processes representing location, as a function of predefined stochastic channels. We created a pi calculus model of gold NP uptake and intracellular movement and compared the evolution of surface-bound, cytosolic, endosomal, and nuclear NP densities with electron microscopy data. We demonstrate that the computational approach can be extended to include specific molecular binding and potential interaction with signaling cascades as characteristic for NP-cell interactions in a wide range of applications such as nanotoxicity, viral infection, and drug delivery.

  5. Modeling nanoparticle uptake and intracellular distribution using stochastic process algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobay, M. P. D.; Alberola, A. Piera; Mendoza, E. R.; Rädler, J. O.

    2012-03-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly important to help understand the interaction and movement of nanoparticles (NPs) within living cells, and to come to terms with the wealth of data that microscopy imaging yields. A quantitative description of the spatio-temporal distribution of NPs inside cells; however, it is challenging due to the complexity of multiple compartments such as endosomes and nuclei, which themselves are dynamic and can undergo fusion and fission and exchange their content. Here, we show that stochastic pi calculus, a widely-used process algebra, is well suited for mapping surface and intracellular NP interactions and distributions. In stochastic pi calculus, each NP is represented as a process, which can adopt various states such as bound or aggregated, as well as be passed between processes representing location, as a function of predefined stochastic channels. We created a pi calculus model of gold NP uptake and intracellular movement and compared the evolution of surface-bound, cytosolic, endosomal, and nuclear NP densities with electron microscopy data. We demonstrate that the computational approach can be extended to include specific molecular binding and potential interaction with signaling cascades as characteristic for NP-cell interactions in a wide range of applications such as nanotoxicity, viral infection, and drug delivery.

  6. CIRRHOSIS INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN RENAL TISSUE THROUGH INTRACELLULAR OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Cristina Simões da SILVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Renal failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the renal oxidative stress, cell damage and impaired cell function in animal model of cirrhosis. Methods Secondary biliary cirrhosis was induced in rats by ligation of the common bile duct. We measured TBARS, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in kidney as markers of oxidative stress, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Relative cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay. Annexin V-PE was used with a vital dye, 7-AAD, to distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells and comet assay was used for determined DNA integrity in single cells. Results In bile duct ligation animals there was significant increase in the kidney lipoperoxidation and an increase of the level of intracellular ROS. There was too an increase in the activity of all antioxidant enzymes evaluated in the kidney. The percentage viability was above 90% in the control group and in bile duct ligation was 64.66% and the dominant cell death type was apoptosis. DNA damage was observed in the bile duct ligation. There was a decreased in the mitochondrial membrane potential from 71.40% ± 6.35% to 34.48% ± 11.40% in bile duct ligation. Conclusions These results indicate that intracellular increase of ROS cause damage in the DNA and apoptosis getting worse the renal function in cirrhosis.

  7. Dynamic intracellular localization of Dazl protein during Xenopus germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Haru; Orii, Hidefumi

    2015-08-01

    Xenopus dazl encoding an RNA-binding protein has been identified as a component of the germ plasm and is involved in the migration and differentiation of the primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we investigated the intracellular localization of Dazl in germline cells throughout the lifetime of Xenopus. In early embryogenesis, Dazl was detected initially in the germ plasm and then translocated to a perinuclear region. Then, it was detected within the nucleus in PGCs. Dazl was observed only in the cytoplasm in PGCs when sex differentiation began in the gonads. Dazl was distributed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of the primary oogonium and spermatogonium, but only in the cytoplasm of the secondary oogonium and spermatogonium. In spermatocytes, Dazl was distributed throughout cytoplasm and localized at the spindles and cytoplasm during meiosis. Then, it was detected as speckles in the nucleus in the round spermatid. The dynamic intracellular localization suggests that Dazl is a multifunctional protein regulating RNA metabolism required for Xenopus germline development.

  8. Optochemokine Tandem for Light-Control of Intracellular Ca2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Feldbauer

    Full Text Available An optochemokine tandem was developed to control the release of calcium from endosomes into the cytosol by light and to analyze the internalization kinetics of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs by electrophysiology. A previously constructed rhodopsin tandem was re-engineered to combine the light-gated Ca2+-permeable cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2(L132C, CatCh, with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in a functional tandem protein tCXCR4/CatCh. The GPCR was used as a shuttle protein to displace CatCh from the plasma membrane into intracellular areas. As shown by patch-clamp measurements and confocal laser scanning microscopy, heterologously expressed tCXCR4/CatCh was internalized via the endocytic SDF1/CXCR4 signaling pathway. The kinetics of internalization could be followed electrophysiologically via the amplitude of the CatCh signal. The light-induced release of Ca2+ by tandem endosomes into the cytosol via CatCh was visualized using the Ca2+-sensitive dyes rhod2 and rhod2-AM showing an increase of intracellular Ca2+ in response to light.

  9. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  10. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  11. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  12. Interplay between toxin transport and flotillin localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pust, Sascha; Dyve, Anne Berit; Torgersen, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    The flotillin proteins are localized in lipid domains at the plasma membrane as well as in intracellular compartments. In the present study, we examined the importance of flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 for the uptake and transport of the bacterial Shiga toxin (Stx) and the plant toxin ricin and we...... for flotillin-1 or -2. However, the Golgi-dependent sulfation of both toxins was significantly reduced in flotillin knockdown cells. Interestingly, when the transport of ricin to the ER was investigated, we obtained an increased mannosylation of ricin in flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 knockdown cells. The toxicity...... of both toxins was twofold increased in flotillin-depleted cells. Since BFA (Brefeldin A) inhibits the toxicity even in flotillin knockdown cells, the retrograde toxin transport is apparently still Golgi-dependent. Thus, flotillin proteins regulate and facilitate the retrograde transport of Stx and ricin....

  13. Animal Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ludrovcová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The research is aimed to the animal transports issue, from two points of view – first is the animal cruelty and second is the policy and economic consideration. The goal is to acquaint the readers with the transports risks and its cruelty and evaluation of the economic, political aspects for he involved countries. The study is oriented on more points of view, what is rare in works with a similar theme. Method: This paper examines many issues and examinations from different authors and subsequently summarized the findings with authors own knowledge to one expanded unit. Results: Results proves, that livestock transports have negative impact on animal´s health, environment. Number of transported animals is rising every year. Society: Research familiarize the society with the animal transports, cruelty against animals during them, and influence of transports on some countries, their economy, policy. People get better informed and can form their own opinion on this topic. They may start acting, undertaking some steps to improve the present situation, what could help a lot to animals and environment. Limitations / further research: Future research could show progress and improvement of transports, quality of food supply and economics.

  14. Structure of a Eurkaryotic CLC Transporter Defines an Intermediate State in the Transport Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Feng; E Campbell; Y Hsiung; R MacKinnon

    2011-12-31

    CLC proteins transport chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions across cell membranes to control the electrical potential of muscle cells, transfer electrolytes across epithelia, and control the pH and electrolyte composition of intracellular organelles. Some members of this protein family are Cl{sup -} ion channels, whereas others are secondary active transporters that exchange Cl{sup -} ions and protons (H{sup +}) with a 2:1 stoichiometry. We have determined the structure of a eukaryotic CLC transporter at 3.5 angstrom resolution. Cytoplasmic cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains are strategically positioned to regulate the ion-transport pathway, and many disease-causing mutations in human CLCs reside on the CBS-transmembrane interface. Comparison with prokaryotic CLC shows that a gating glutamate residue changes conformation and suggests a basis for 2:1 Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} exchange and a simple mechanistic connection between CLC channels and transporters.

  15. Structure of a Eukaryotic CLC Transporter Defines an Intermediate State in the Transport Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Liang; Campbell, Ernest B.; Hsiung, Yichun; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-01-01

    CLC proteins transport chloride (Cl - ) ions across cell membranes to control the electrical potential of muscle cells, transfer electrolytes across epithelia, and control the pH and electrolyte composition of intracellular organelles. Some members of this protein family are Cl - ion channels, whereas others are secondary active transporters that exchange Cl - ions and protons (H + ) with a 2:1 stoichiometry. We have determined the structure of a eukaryotic CLC transporter at 3.5 angstrom resolution. Cytoplasmic cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains are strategically positioned to regulate the ion-transport pathway, and many disease-causing mutations in human CLCs reside on the CBS-transmembrane interface. Comparison with prokaryotic CLC shows that a gating glutamate residue changes conformation and suggests a basis for 2:1 Cl - /H + exchange and a simple mechanistic connection between CLC channels and transporters.

  16. Structure of a eukaryotic CLC transporter defines an intermediate state in the transport cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liang; Campbell, Ernest B.; Hsiung, Yichun; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2011-01-01

    CLC proteins transport Cl− ions across cell membranes to control the electrical potential of muscle cells, transfer electrolytes across epithelia, and control the pH and electrolyte composition of intracellular organelles. Some members of this protein family are Cl− ion channels, while others are secondary active transporters that exchange Cl− ions and H+ with a 2:1 stoichiometry. We have determined the structure of a eukaryotic CLC transporter at 3.5 Å resolution. Cytoplasmic CBS domains are strategically positioned to regulate the ion transport pathway, and many disease-causing mutations in human CLCs reside on the CBS-transmembrane interface. Comparison with prokaryotic CLC shows that a gating glutamate changes conformation and suggests a basis for 2:1 Cl−/H+ exchange and a simple mechanistic connection between CLC channels and transporters. PMID:20929736

  17. Intracellular levels of glutamate in swollen astrocytes are preserved via neurotransmitter reuptake and de novo synthesis: implications for hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Alexandra L; Mongin, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    Hyponatremia and several other CNS pathologies are associated with substantial astrocytic swelling. To counteract cell swelling, astrocytes lose intracellular osmolytes, including l-glutamate and taurine, through volume-regulated anion channel. In vitro, when swollen by exposure to hypo-osmotic medium, astrocytes lose endogenous taurine faster, paradoxically, than l-glutamate or l-aspartate. Here, we explored the mechanisms responsible for differences between the rates of osmolyte release in primary rat astrocyte cultures. In radiotracer assays, hypo-osmotic efflux of preloaded [(14) C]taurine was indistinguishable from d-[(3) H]aspartate and only 30-40% faster than l-[(3) H]glutamate. However, when we used HPLC to measure the endogenous intracellular amino acid content, hypo-osmotic loss of taurine was approximately fivefold greater than l-glutamate, and no loss of l-aspartate was detected. The dramatic difference between loss of endogenous taurine and glutamate was eliminated after inhibition of both glutamate reuptake [with 300 μM dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA)] and glutamate synthesis by aminotransferases [with 1 mM aminooxyacetic acid (AOA)]. Treatment with TBOA+AOA made reductions in the intracellular taurine and l-glutamate levels approximately equal. Taken together, these data suggest that swollen astrocytes actively conserve intracellular glutamate via reuptake and de novo synthesis. Our findings likely also explain why in animal models of acute hyponatremia, extracellular levels of taurine are dramatically elevated with minimal impact on extracellular l-glutamate. We identified mechanisms that allow astrocytes to conserve intracellular l-glutamate (Glu) upon exposure to hypo-osmotic environment. Cell swelling activates volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) and triggers loss of Glu, taurine (Tau), and other cytosolic amino acids. Glu is conserved via reuptake by Na(+) -dependent transporters and de novo synthesis in the reactions of

  18. The conserved dileucine- and tyrosine-based motifs in MLV and MPMV envelope glycoproteins are both important to regulate a common Env intracellular trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Vergès Sandra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrovirus particles emerge from the assembly of two structural protein components, Gag that is translated as a soluble protein in the cytoplasm of the host cells, and Env, a type I transmembrane protein. Because both components are translated in different intracellular compartments, elucidating the mechanisms of retrovirus assembly thus requires the study of their intracellular trafficking. Results We used a CD25 (Tac chimera-based approach to study the trafficking of Moloney murine leukemia virus and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus Env proteins. We found that the cytoplasmic tails (CTs of both Env conserved two major signals that control a complex intracellular trafficking. A dileucine-based motif controls the sorting of the chimeras from the trans-Golgi network (TGN toward endosomal compartments. Env proteins then follow a retrograde transport to the TGN due to the action of a tyrosine-based motif. Mutation of either motif induces the mis-localization of the chimeric proteins and both motifs are found to mediate interactions of the viral CTs with clathrin adaptors. Conclusion This data reveals the unexpected complexity of the intracellular trafficking of retrovirus Env proteins that cycle between the TGN and endosomes. Given that Gag proteins hijack endosomal host proteins, our work suggests that the endosomal pathway may be used by retroviruses to ensure proper encountering of viral structural Gag and Env proteins in cells, an essential step of virus assembly.

  19. Aspergillus myosin-V supports polarized growth in the absence of microtubule-based transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, both microtubules and actin filaments are important for polarized growth at the hyphal tip. Less clear is how different microtubule-based and actin-based motors work together to support this growth. Here we examined the role of myosin-V (MYOV in hyphal growth. MYOV-depleted cells form elongated hyphae, but the rate of hyphal elongation is significantly reduced. In addition, although wild type cells without microtubules still undergo polarized growth, microtubule disassembly abolishes polarized growth in MYOV-depleted cells. Thus, MYOV is essential for polarized growth in the absence of microtubules. Moreover, while a triple kinesin null mutant lacking kinesin-1 (KINA and two kinesin-3s (UNCA and UNCB undergoes hyphal elongation and forms a colony, depleting MYOV in this triple mutant results in lethality due to a severe defect in polarized growth. These results argue that MYOV, through its ability to transport secretory cargo, can support a significant amount of polarized hyphal tip growth in the absence of any microtubule-based transport. Finally, our genetic analyses also indicate that KINA (kinesin-1 rather than UNCA (kinesin-3 is the major kinesin motor that supports polarized growth in the absence of MYOV.

  20. Tumour Cell Labelling by Magnetic Nanoparticles with Determination of Intracellular Iron Content and Spatial Distribution of the Intracellular Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cuschieri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically labelled cells are used for in vivo cell tracking by MRI, used for the clinical translation of cell-base therapies. Studies involving magnetic labelled cells may include separation of labelled cells, targeted delivery and controlled release of drugs, contrast enhanced MRI and magnetic hyperthermia for the in situ ablation of tumours. Dextran-coated super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO ferumoxides are used clinically as an MR contrast agents primarily for hepatic imaging. The material is also widely used for in vitro cell labelling, as are other SPIO-based particles. Our results on the uptake by human cancer cell lines of ferumoxides indicate that electroporation in the presence of protamine sulphate (PS results in rapid high uptake of SPIO nanoparticles (SPIONs by parenchymal tumour cells without significant impairment of cell viability. Quantitative determination of cellular iron uptake performed by colorimetric assay is in agreement with data from the literature. These results on intracellular iron content together with the intracellular distribution of SPIONs by magnetic force microscopy (MFM following in vitro uptake by parenchymal tumour cells confirm the potential of this technique for clinical tumour cell detection and destruction.

  1. Intracellular Trafficking Modulation by Ginsenoside Rg3 Inhibits Brucella abortus Uptake and Intracellular Survival within RAW 264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-03-28

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, has various pharmacological and biological activities; however, its effects against Brucella infection are still unclear. Herein, the inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against intracellular parasitic Brucella infection were evaluated through bacterial infection, adherence assays, and LAMP-1 colocalization, as well as immunoblotting and FACS for detecting MAPK signaling proteins and F-actin polymerization, respectively. The internalization, intracellular growth, and adherence of Brucella abortus in Rg3-treated RAW 264.7 cells were significantly decreased compared with the Rg3-untreated control. Furthermore, an apparent reduction of F-actin content and intensity of F-actin fluorescence in Rg3-treated cells was observed compared with B. abortus -infected cells without treatment by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. In addition, treating cells with Rg3 decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling proteins such as ERK 1/2 and p38 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, the colocalization of B. abortus -containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was markedly increased in Rg3-treated cells. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits B. abortus infection in mammalian cells and can be used as an alternative approach in the treatment of brucellosis.

  2. Functional and molecular characterization of transmembrane intracellular pH regulators in human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Huang, Shu-Fu; Chao, Shih-Chi; Chang, Chung-Yi; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Li, Chung-Hsing; Loh, Shih-Hurng

    2018-06-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular pH (pH i ) plays vital roles in many cell functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and metastasis. Thus far, Na + -H + exchanger (NHE), Na + -HCO 3 - co-transporter (NBC), Cl - /HCO 3 - exchanger (AE) and Cl - /OH - exchanger (CHE) have been identified to co-regulate pH i homeostasis. However, functional and biological pH i -regulators in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have yet to be identified. Microspectrofluorimetry technique with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye, BCECF, was used to detect pH i changes. NH 4 Cl and Na + -acetate pre-pulse were used to induce intracellular acidosis and alkalosis, respectively. Isoforms of pH i -regulators were detected by Western blot technique. The resting pH i was no significant difference between that in HEPES-buffered (nominal HCO 3 - -free) solution or CO 2 /HCO 3 -buffered system (7.42 and 7.46, respectively). The pH i recovery following the induced-intracellular acidosis was blocked completely by removing [Na + ] o , while only slowed (-63%) by adding HOE694 (a NHE1 specific inhibitor) in HEPES-buffered solution. The pH i recovery was inhibited entirely by removing [Na + ] o , while adding HOE 694 pulse DIDS (an anion-transporter inhibitor) only slowed (-55%) the acid extrusion. Both in HEPES-buffered and CO 2 /HCO 3 -buffered system solution, the pH i recovery after induced-intracellular alkalosis was entirely blocked by removing [Cl - ] o . Western blot analysis showed the isoforms of pH i regulators, including NHE1/2, NBCe1/n1, AE1/2/3/4 and CHE in the hDPSCs. We demonstrate for the first time that resting pH i is significantly higher than 7.2 and meditates functionally by two Na + -dependent acid extruders (NHE and NBC), two Cl - -dependent acid loaders (CHE and AE) and one Na + -independent acid extruder(s) in hDPSCs. These findings provide novel insight for basic and clinical treatment of dentistry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transport Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  4. Nicaragua - Transportation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation examines impacts of the Transportation Project in three ways. First, we calculate economic rates of return associated with reduced user costs for each...

  5. Ocean transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frankel, Ernst G; Marcus, Henry S

    1973-01-01

    .... In ocean transportation economics we present investment and operating costs as well as the results of a study of financing of shipping. Similarly, a discussion of government aid to shipping is presented.

  6. Intracellular targets of RGDS peptide in melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capogrossi Maurizio C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RGD-motif acts as a specific integrins-ligand and regulates a variety of cell-functions via extracellular action affecting cell-adhesion properties. However, increasing evidence identifies additional RGDS-functions at intracellular level. Previous reports show RGDS-internalization in endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and lymphocytes, indicating intracellular targets such as caspase-8 and caspase-9, and suggest RGDS specific activity at cytoplasmic level. Given the role RGDS-peptides play in controlling proliferation and apoptosis in several cell types, investigating intracellular targets of RGDS in melanoma cells may un-reveal novel molecular targets and key pathways, potentially useful for a more effective approach to melanoma treatment. Results In the present study we show for the first time that RGDS-peptide is internalized in melanoma cells in a time-dependent way and exerts strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects independently from its extracellular anti-adhesive action. RGES control-peptide did not show biological effects, as expected; nevertheless it is internalized, although with slower kinetics. Survivin, a known cell-cycle and survival-regulator is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in cell lysates and overlay assays with the purified proteins showed that RGDS interacts with survivin, as well as with procaspase-3, -8 and -9. RGDS-peptide binding to survivin was found to be specific, at high affinity (Kd 27.5 μM and located at the survivin C-terminus. RGDS-survivin interaction appeared to play a key role, since RGDS lost its anti-mitogenic effect in survivin-deprived cells with a specific siRNA. Conclusions RGDS inhibits melanoma growth with an adhesion-independent mechanism; it is internalized in melanoma cells and specifically interacts with survivin. The present data may indicate a novel role of RGDS-containing peptides physiologically released from the extracellular

  7. Mechanism of H. pylori intracellular entry: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eLiu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of H. pylori reside on gastric epithelial cell surfaces and in the overlying mucus, but a small fraction of H. pylori enter host epithelial and immune cells. To explore the role of the nudA invasin in host cell entry, a ΔnudA deletion derivative of strain J99 was constructed and transformants were verified by PCR and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. AGS cells were inoculated with either wild type (WT strain J99 or its ΔnudA mutant to determine the fraction of bacteria that were bound to the cells and inside these cells using the gentamicin protection assay. We observed no significant difference between either the density of H. pylori bound to AGS cell membranes or the density of intracellular H. pylori. To further explore this finding, separate chambers of each culture were fixed in glutaraldehyde for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and immunogold TEM. This addition to the classical gentamicin assay demonstrated that there were significantly more intracellular, and fewer membrane-bound, H. pylori in WT-infected AGS cells than in ΔnudA allele infected cells. Thus, the sum of intracellular and membrane-bound H. pylori was similar in the two groups. Since no other similar TEM study has been performed, it is at present unknown whether our observations can be reproduced by others Taken together however, our observations suggest that the classical gentamicin protection assay is not sufficiently sensitive to analyze H. pylori cell entry and that the addition of TEM to the test demonstrate that nudA plays a role in H. pylori entry into AGS cells in vitro. In addition, deletion of the invasin gene appears to limit H. pylori to the AGS cell surface, where it may be partly protected against gentamicin. In contrast, this specific environment may render H. pylori more vulnerable to host defense and therapeutic intervention, and less prone to trigger normal immune, carcinogenic, and other developmental response pathways.

  8. Transport service

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Cerruti / FI

    2006-01-01

    A large number of pallet-crates (panières grillagées), which are used for transporting equipment and for removals, have been dispatched to various locations around the CERN site. We kindly request all users who may have such crates in their possession and no longer need them to make the necessary arrangements (EDH request to the Transport Group) to return them to Building 133, as we currently have no more in stock. Claude CERRUTI / FI-PI

  9. RF transport

    CERN Document Server

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems.

  10. Public transport

    OpenAIRE

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Public transport plays an essential role in enabling people from low income and other disadvantaged groups to access employment and services. It also contributes to the development of social networks and social capital, by helping people to visit friends and relatives and take part in community and other social activities. Public policy makers have begun to recognise that adequate public transport provision can play an important role in reducing social exclusion. [Taken from introductory para...

  11. Development of nanosensors for studying intracellular phosphate levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Hong

    Abstract Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential macronutrient that plays a central role in metabolism and signal transduction in plants. Uptake, compartmentation and transport are important players of cellular Pi homeostasis; however, methods to determine the cellular phosphate concentration...

  12. Intracellular mediators of potassium-induced aldosterone secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.; Chiou, S.; Davis, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular messengers of potassium in eliciting aldosterone secretion in calf adrenal glomerulosa cells since there were unresolved issues relating to the role of phosphoinositides, cAMP and protein kinases. We observed no evidence of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) in 3 H-inositol labeled alf adrenal cells or increase of cAMP in response to potassium. Addition of calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine after stimulating adrenal glomerulosa cells with potassium, markedly inhibited aldosterone secretion. A calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) produced greater reduction of aldosterone secretion than an inhibitor of protein kinase C (H-7). These results suggest that a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration through voltage-dependent calcium channel and calmodulin are the critical determinants of aldosterone secretion stimulated by potassium

  13. Subcellular site and nature of intracellular cadmium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying heavy metal accumulation, toxicity and tolerance in higher plants are poorly understood. Since subcellular processes are undoubtedly involved in all these phenomena, it is of interest to study the extent of, subcellular site of and nature of intracellularly accumulated cadmium in higher plants. Whole plants supplied 109 CdCl 2 or 112 CdSO 4 accumulated Cd into roots and aerial tissues. Preparation of protoplasts from aerial tissue followed by subcellular fractionation of the protoplasts to obtain intact vacuoles, chloroplasts and cytosol revealed the presence of Cd in the cytosol but not in vacuoles or chloroplasts. Particulate materials containing other cell components were also labeled. Of the 109 Cd supplied to plants, 2 to 10% was recovered in both cytosol preparations and in particulate materials. Cytosol contained proteinaceous--Cd complexes, free metal and low molecular weight Cd complexes. Labeling of protoplasts gave similar results. No evidence was obtained for the production of volatile Cd complexes in tobacco

  14. Improved Fourier-based characterization of intracellular fractal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylas, Joanna; Quinn, Kyle P.; Hunter, Martin; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A novel Fourier-based image analysis method for measuring fractal features is presented which can significantly reduce artifacts due to non-fractal edge effects. The technique is broadly applicable to the quantitative characterization of internal morphology (texture) of image features with well-defined borders. In this study, we explore the capacity of this method for quantitative assessment of intracellular fractal morphology of mitochondrial networks in images of normal and diseased (precancerous) epithelial tissues. Using a combination of simulated fractal images and endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, our method is shown to more accurately characterize the exponent of the high-frequency power spectral density (PSD) of these images in the presence of artifacts that arise due to cellular and nuclear borders. PMID:23188308

  15. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent......During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  16. Gravity and the cell: Intracellular structures and Stokes sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P.

    1977-01-01

    Plant and certain animal embryos appear to be responsive to the gravity vector during early stages of development. The convection of particle sedimentation as the basis for the sensing of gravity is investigated using the cells of wheat seedlings, amphibian embryos, and mammals. Exploration of the mammalian cell for sedimenting particles reveals that their existence is unlikely, especially in the presence of a network of microtubules and microfilaments considered to be responsible for intracellular organization. Destruction of these structures renders the cell susceptible to accelerations several times g. Large dense particles, such as chromosomes, nucleoli, and cytoplasmic organelles are acted upon by forces much larger than that due to gravity, and their positions in the cell appear to be insensitive to gravity.

  17. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  18. Intracellular Signaling Mediators in the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thiriet, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The volumes in this authoritative series present a multidisciplinary approach to modeling and simulation of flows in the cardiovascular and ventilatory systems, especially multiscale modeling and coupled simulations. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems are tightly coupled, as their primary function is to supply oxygen to and remove carbon dioxide from the body's cells. Because physiological conduits have deformable and reactive walls, macroscopic flow behavior and prediction must be coupled to phenomenological models of nano- and microscopic events in a corrector scheme of regulated mechanisms when the vessel lumen caliber varies markedly. Therefore, investigation of flows of blood and air in physiological conduits requires an understanding of the biology, chemistry, and physics of these systems together with the mathematical tools to describe their functioning. Volume 4 is devoted to major sets of intracellular mediators that transmit signals upon stimulation of cell-surface receptors.  Activation of...

  19. The intracellular cholesterol landscape: dynamic integrator of the immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol has typically been considered an exogenous, disease-related factor in immunity; however, recent literature suggests that a paradigm shift is in order. Sterols are now recognized to ligate several immune receptors. Altered flux through the mevalonic acid synthesis pathway also appears to be a required event in the antiviral interferon response of macrophages and in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of T cells. In this review, evidence is discussed that suggests an intrinsic, ‘professional’ role for sterols and oxysterols in macrophage and T cell immunity. Host defense may have been the original selection pressure behind the development of mechanisms for intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Functional coupling between sterol metabolism and immunity has fundamental implications for health and disease. PMID:27692616

  20. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...... might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of p......H(i), the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1, is essential for cell migration and accumulates at the cell front. Here, we test the hypothesis that the uneven distribution of NHE1 activity creates a pH(i) gradient in migrating cells. Using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, pH(i) was measured in five cell lines (MV...

  1. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-05-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (A549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment.

  2. Cotranscriptionally folded RNA nanostructures pave the way to intracellular nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Chao, Jie; Shi, Jiye; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-01-02

    A very attractive goal in nanotechnology is to manufacture smart nanodevices that integrate multiple biological/biomedical functions and autonomously function in vivo in a predefined and well-controlled manner. For decades, researchers have been developing many different ways toward this target, using bottom-up assembly of types of nanomaterials or top-down fabrication of devices with nanometer-scale precision. However, the practical application of these nanodevices remains challenging. One possible barrier lies in the spatiotemporal separation between fabrication and use, which poses a great challenge for the non-invasive delivery of fully functional nanodevice into live cells. Indeed, cells themselves are highly complex natural machines with membrane barriers and finely regulated pathways for intracellular delivery. However, there is plenty of evidence that nanomaterials or nanodevices are easily aggregated or trapped inside of the cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus: Live-in and let die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eFraunholz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus uses a plethora of virulence factors to accomodate a diversity of niches in its human host. Aside from the classical manifestations of S. aureus-induced diseases, the pathogen also invades and survives within mammalian host cells. The survival strategies of the pathogen are as diverse as strains or host cell types used. S. aureus is able to replicate in the phagosome or freely in the cytoplasm of its host cells. It escapes the phagosome of professional and non-professional phagocytes, subverts autophagy, induces cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and pyronecrosis, and even can induce anti-apoptotic programs in phagocytes. The focus of this review is to present a guide to recent research outlining the variety of intracellular fates of S. aureus.

  4. Intracellular regulation of TNF activity in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Vucic, Domagoj

    2018-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα, TNF) is a key mediator and regulator of mammalian immune responses in healthy organisms and in diseased conditions. TNF governs development of the immune system, cell survival signaling pathways, proliferation and regulates metabolic processes. Whereas TNF-induced NF-κB and MAP pro-survival kinase activities constitute its major biochemical functions, TNF can also stimulate cell death in certain pathological situations. TNF-induced signal transduction pathways are tightly regulated through ubiquitination and phosphorylation of molecules partaking in all TNF-dependent membrane-associated and intracellular protein signaling complexes. Deregulated TNF signaling in individuals carrying naturally occurring genetic mutations in proteins that mediate TNF signaling, or in corresponding genetically modified animal models, results in severe pathologies. In this review we will describe the current knowledge of TNF signaling and its relevance for human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1987-01-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate [ 14 C]ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular [ 14 C]ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular [ 14 C]ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of [ 14 C]ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of [ 14 C]ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis

  6. Liposome-based Formulation for Intracellular Delivery of Functional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Chatin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular delivery of biologically active protein represents an important emerging strategy for both fundamental and therapeutic applications. Here, we optimized in vitro delivery of two functional proteins, the β-galactosidase (β-gal enzyme and the anti-cytokeratin8 (K8 antibody, using liposome-based formulation. The guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipid bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC (bis (guanidinium-tren-cholesterol combined to the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE (dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine was shown to efficiently deliver the β-gal intracellularly without compromising its activity. The lipid/protein molar ratio, protein amount, and culture medium were demonstrated to be key parameters affecting delivery efficiency. The protein itself is an essential factor requiring selection of the appropriate cationic lipid as illustrated by low K8 binding activity of the anti-K8 antibody using guanidinium-based liposome. Optimization of various lipids led to the identification of the aminoglycoside lipid dioleyl succinyl paromomycin (DOSP associated with the imidazole-based helper lipid MM27 as a potent delivery system for K8 antibody, achieving delivery in 67% of HeLa cells. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy showed that the structure of supramolecular assemblies BGTC:DOPE/β-gal and DOSP:MM27/K8 were different depending on liposome types and lipid/protein molar ratio. Finally, we observed that K8 treatment with DOSP:MM27/K8 rescues the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent chloride efflux in F508del-CFTR expressing cells, providing a new tool for the study of channelopathies.

  7. Squalestatin alters the intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic prion peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxic peptides derived from the protease-resistant core of the prion protein are used to model the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The current study characterised the ingestion, internalization and intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic peptide containing amino acids 105–132 of the murine prion protein (MoPrP105-132 in neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons. Results Fluorescence microscopy and cell fractionation techniques showed that MoPrP105-132 co-localised with lipid raft markers (cholera toxin and caveolin-1 and trafficked intracellularly within lipid rafts. This trafficking followed a non-classical endosomal pathway delivering peptide to the Golgi and ER, avoiding classical endosomal trafficking via early endosomes to lysosomes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis demonstrated close interactions of MoPrP105-132 with cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1, enzymes implicated in the neurotoxicity of prions. Treatment with squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol levels and caused the redistribution of MoPrP105-132 out of lipid rafts. In squalestatin-treated cells, MoPrP105-132 was rerouted away from the Golgi/ER into degradative lysosomes. Squalestatin treatment also reduced the association between MoPrP105-132 and cPLA2/COX-1. Conclusion As the observed shift in peptide trafficking was accompanied by increased cell survival these studies suggest that the neurotoxicity of this PrP peptide is dependent on trafficking to specific organelles where it activates specific signal transduction pathways.

  8. Axotomy depletes intracellular calcium stores in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Marcel; Gemes, Geza; Weyker, Paul D; Cruikshank, James M; Kawano, Takashi; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2009-08-01

    The cellular mechanisms of neuropathic pain are inadequately understood. Previous investigations have revealed disrupted Ca signaling in primary sensory neurons after injury. The authors examined the effect of injury on intracellular Ca stores of the endoplasmic reticulum, which critically regulate the Ca signal and neuronal function. Intracellular Ca levels were measured with Fura-2 or mag-Fura-2 microfluorometry in axotomized fifth lumbar (L5) dorsal root ganglion neurons and adjacent L4 neurons isolated from hyperalgesic rats after L5 spinal nerve ligation, compared to neurons from control animals. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca stores released by the ryanodine-receptor agonist caffeine decreased by 46% in axotomized small neurons. This effect persisted in Ca-free bath solution, which removes the contribution of store-operated membrane Ca channels, and after blockade of the mitochondrial, sarco-endoplasmic Ca-ATPase and the plasma membrane Ca ATPase pathways. Ca released by the sarco-endoplasmic Ca-ATPase blocker thapsigargin and by the Ca-ionophore ionomycin was also diminished by 25% and 41%, respectively. In contrast to control neurons, Ca stores in axotomized neurons were not expanded by neuronal activation by K depolarization, and the proportionate rate of refilling by sarco-endoplasmic Ca-ATPase was normal. Luminal Ca concentration was also reduced by 38% in axotomized neurons in permeabilized neurons. The adjacent neurons of the L4 dorsal root ganglia showed modest and inconsistent changes after L5 spinal nerve ligation. Painful nerve injury leads to diminished releasable endoplasmic reticulum Ca stores and a reduced luminal Ca concentration. Depletion of Ca stores may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  9. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Savannah; Takeda, Kazuyo; Stark, Felicity; Meierovics, Anda I.; Yabe, Idalia; Cowley, Siobhan C.

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells). Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates. PMID:26379269

  10. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah Maggio

    Full Text Available The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells. Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates.

  11. Mechanisms of Defense against Intracellular Pathogens Mediated by Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Barry R; Modlin, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The key question our work has sought to address has been, "What are the necessary and sufficient conditions that engender protection from intracellular pathogens in the human host?" The origins of this work derive from a long-standing interest in the mechanisms of protection against two such paradigmatic intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, that have brilliantly adapted to the human host. It was obvious that these pathogens, which cause chronic diseases and persist in macrophages, must have acquired subtle strategies to resist host microbicidal mechanisms, yet since the vast majority of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis do not develop disease, there must be some potent human antimicrobial mechanisms. What follows is not a comprehensive review of the vast literature on the role of human macrophages in protection against infectious disease, but a summary of the research in our two laboratories with collaborators that we hope has contributed to some understanding of mechanisms of resistance and pathogenesis. While mouse models revealed some necessary conditions for protection, e.g., innate immunity, Th1 cells and their cytokines, and major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cells, here we emphasize multiple antimicrobial mechanisms that exist in human macrophages that differ from those of most experimental animals. Prominent here is the vitamin D-dependent antimicrobial pathway common to human macrophages activated by innate and acquired immune responses, mediated by antimicrobial peptides, e.g., cathelicidin, through an interleukin-15- and interleukin-32-dependent common pathway that is necessary for macrophage killing of M. tuberculosis in vitro.

  12. Vector-free intracellular delivery by reversible permeabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley O'Dea

    Full Text Available Despite advances in intracellular delivery technologies, efficient methods are still required that are vector-free, can address a wide range of cargo types and can be applied to cells that are difficult to transfect whilst maintaining cell viability. We have developed a novel vector-free method that uses reversible permeabilization to achieve rapid intracellular delivery of cargos with varying composition, properties and size. A permeabilizing delivery solution was developed that contains a low level of ethanol as the permeabilizing agent. Reversal of cell permeabilization is achieved by temporally and volumetrically controlling the contact of the target cells with this solution. Cells are seeded in conventional multi-well plates. Following removal of the supernatant, the cargo is mixed with the delivery solution and applied directly to the cells using an atomizer. After a short incubation period, permeabilization is halted by incubating the cells in a phosphate buffer saline solution that dilutes the ethanol and is non-toxic to the permeabilized cells. Normal culture medium is then added. The procedure lasts less than 5 min. With this method, proteins, mRNA, plasmid DNA and other molecules have been delivered to a variety of cell types, including primary cells, with low toxicity and cargo functionality has been confirmed in proof-of-principle studies. Co-delivery of different cargo types has also been demonstrated. Importantly, delivery occurs by diffusion directly into the cytoplasm in an endocytic-independent manner. Unlike some other vector-free methods, adherent cells are addressed in situ without the need for detachment from their substratum. The method has also been adapted to address suspension cells. This delivery method is gentle yet highly reproducible, compatible with high throughput and automated cell-based assays and has the potential to enable a broad range of research, drug discovery and clinical applications.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular ions in perfused from heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnstein, D.; Fossel, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    Intracellular sodium, potassium, and lithium were observed in a perfused frog heart by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A perfusate buffer containing the shift reagent, dysprosium tripolyphosphate, was used in combination with mathematical filtering or presaturation of the extracellular resonance to separate the intra- and extracellular sodium NMR signals. Addition of 10 μM ouabain to the perfusate, perfusion with a zero potassium, low-calcium buffer, and replacement of 66% of the perfusate sodium with lithium resulted in changes in the intracellular sodium levels. An increase of 45% in the intracellular sodium was observed when changing the pacing rate from 0 to 60 beats/min (with proportional changes for intermediate pacing rates). The ratio of intracellular potassium to sodium concentration was determined to be 2.3 by NMR, indicating that a substantial amount of the intracellular potassium is undetectable with these NMR method. In addition, intracellular lithium was observed during perfusion with a lithium-containing perfusate

  14. Data for automated, high-throughput microscopy analysis of intracellular bacterial colonies using spot detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies is useful in strategies directed against bacterial attachment, subsequent cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. An automated, high-throughput microscopy-method was established to quantify the number and size of intracellular bacterial...... of cell nuclei were automatically quantified using a spot detection-tool. The spot detection-output was exported to Excel, where data analysis was performed. In this article, micrographs and spot detection data are made available to facilitate implementation of the method....

  15. Intracellular Delivery of Molecular Cargo Using Cell-Penetrating Peptides and the Combination Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs can cross cellular membranes in a non-toxic fashion, improving the intracellular delivery of various molecular cargos such as nanoparticles, small molecules and plasmid DNA. Because CPPs provide a safe, efficient, and non-invasive mode of transport for various cargos into cells, they have been developed as vectors for the delivery of genetic and biologic products in recent years. Most common CPPs are positively charged peptides. While delivering negatively charged molecules (e.g., nucleic acids to target cells, the internalization efficiency of CPPs is reduced and inhibited because the cationic charges on the CPPs are neutralized through the covering of CPPs by cargos on the structure. Even under these circumstances, the CPPs can still be non-covalently complexed with the negatively charged molecules. To address this issue, combination strategies of CPPs with other typical carriers provide a promising and novel delivery system. This review summarizes the latest research work in using CPPs combined with molecular cargos including liposomes, polymers, cationic peptides, nanoparticles, adeno-associated virus (AAV and calcium for the delivery of genetic products, especially for small interfering RNA (siRNA. This combination strategy remedies the reduced internalization efficiency caused by neutralization.

  16. Canine adenovirus type 2 vector generation via I-Sce1-mediated intracellular genome release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Ibanes

    Full Text Available When canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2, or also commonly referred to as CAV-2 vectors are injected into the brain parenchyma they preferentially transduce neurons, are capable of efficient axonal transport to afferent regions, and allow transgene expression for at last >1 yr. Yet, translating these data into a user-friendly vector platform has been limited because CAV-2 vector generation is challenging. Generation of E1-deleted adenovirus vectors often requires transfection of linear DNA fragments of >30 kb containing the vector genome into an E1-transcomplementing cell line. In contrast to human adenovirus type 5 vector generation, CAV-2 vector generation is less efficient due, in part, to a reduced ability to initiate replication and poor transfectibility of canine cells with large, linear DNA fragments. To improve CAV-2 vector generation, we generated an E1-transcomplementing cell line expressing the estrogen receptor (ER fused to I-SceI, a yeast meganuclease, and plasmids containing the I-SceI recognition sites flanking the CAV-2 vector genome. Using transfection of supercoiled plasmid and intracellular genome release via 4-OH-tamoxifen-induced nuclear translocation of I-SceI, we improved CAV-2 vector titers 1,000 fold, and in turn increased the efficacy of CAV-2 vector generation.

  17. Analytic derivation of bacterial growth laws from a simple model of intracellular chemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Parth Pratim; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Experiments have found that the growth rate and certain other macroscopic properties of bacterial cells in steady-state cultures depend upon the medium in a surprisingly simple manner; these dependencies are referred to as 'growth laws'. Here we construct a dynamical model of interacting intracellular populations to understand some of the growth laws. The model has only three population variables: an amino acid pool, a pool of enzymes that transport an external nutrient and produce the amino acids, and ribosomes that catalyze their own and the enzymes' production from the amino acids. We assume that the cell allocates its resources between the enzyme sector and the ribosomal sector to maximize its growth rate. We show that the empirical growth laws follow from this assumption and derive analytic expressions for the phenomenological parameters in terms of the more basic model parameters. Interestingly, the maximization of the growth rate of the cell as a whole implies that the cell allocates resources to the enzyme and ribosomal sectors in inverse proportion to their respective 'efficiencies'. The work introduces a mathematical scheme in which the cellular growth rate can be explicitly determined and shows that two large parameters, the number of amino acid residues per enzyme and per ribosome, are useful for making approximations.

  18. Systematic Identification of Intracellular-Translocated Candidate Effectors in Edwardsiella piscicida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingzhi Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens inject effectors directly into host cells to target a variety of host cellular processes and promote bacterial dissemination and survival. Identifying the bacterial effectors and elucidating their functions are central to understanding the molecular pathogenesis of these pathogens. Edwardsiella piscicida is a pathogen with a wide host range, and very few of its effectors have been identified to date. Here, based on the genes significantly regulated by macrophage infection, we identified 25 intracellular translocation-positive candidate effectors, including all five previously reported effectors, namely EseG, EseJ, EseH, EseK, and EvpP. A subsequent secretion analysis revealed diverse secretion patterns for the 25 effector candidates, suggesting that multiple transport pathways were involved in the internalization of these candidate effectors. Further, we identified two novel type VI secretion system (T6SS putative effectors and three outer membrane vesicles (OMV-dependent putative effectors among the candidate effectors described above, and further analyzed their contribution to bacterial virulence in a zebrafish model. This work demonstrates an effective approach for screening bacterial effectors and expands the effectors repertoire in E. piscicida.

  19. Changes in transcript related to osmosis and intracellular ion homeostasis in Paulownia tomentosa under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang eFan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Paulownia tomentosa is an important economic and greening tree species that is cultivated widely, including salt environment. Our previous studies indicated its autotetraploid induced by colchicine showed better stress tolerance, but the underlying molecular mechanism related to ploidy and salt stress is still unclear. To investigate this issue, physiological measurements and transcriptome profiling of diploid and autotetraploid plants untreated and treated with NaCl were performed. Through the comparisons among four accessions, for one thing, we found different physiological changes between diploid and autotetraploid P. tomentosa; for another, and we detected many differentially expressed unigenes involved in salt stress response. These differentially expressed unigenes were assigned to several metabolic pathways, including plant hormone signal transduction, RNA transporter, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and plant-pathogen interaction, which constructed the complex regulatory network to maintain osmotic and intracellular ion homeostasis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the expression patterns of 20 unigenes. The results establish the foundation for the genetic basis of salt tolerance in P. tomentosa, which in turn accelerates Paulownia breeding and expands available arable land.

  20. Particles on the move: intracellular trafficking and asymmetric mitotic partitioning of nanoporous polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Lai, Zon W; Goode, Robert J A; Cui, Jiwei; Bacic, Tess; Kamphuis, Marloes M J; Nice, Edouard C; Caruso, Frank

    2013-06-25

    Nanoporous polymer particles (NPPs) prepared by mesoporous silica templating show promise as a new class of versatile drug/gene delivery vehicles owning to their high payload capacity, functionality, and responsiveness. Understanding the cellular dynamics of such particles, including uptake, intracellular trafficking, and distribution, is an important requirement for their development as therapeutic carriers. Herein, we examine the spatiotemporal map of the cellular processing of submicrometer-sized disulfide-bonded poly(methacrylic acid) (PMASH) NPPs in HeLa cells using both flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The data show that the PMASH NPPs are transported from the early endosomes to the lysosomes within a few minutes. Upon cell division, the lysosome-enclosed PMASH NPPs are distributed asymmetrically between two daughter cells. Statistical analysis of cells during cytokinesis suggests that partitioning of particles is biased with an average segregation deviation of 60%. Further, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis reveals that 127 out of 3059 identified spots are differentially regulated upon exposure to the PMASH NPPs. Pathway analysis of the proteomics data suggests that ubiquitylation, a reversible modification of cellular proteins with ubiquitin, plays a central role in overall cellular responses to the particles. These results provide important insights into the cellular dynamics and heterogeneity of NPPs, as well as the mechanisms that regulate the motility of these particles within cells, all of which have important implications for drug susceptibility characteristics in cancer cells using particle-based carriers.

  1. PIST regulates the intracellular trafficking and plasma membrane expression of Cadherin 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshima Kazuo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The atypical cadherin protein cadherin 23 (CDH23 is crucial for proper function of retinal photoreceptors and inner ear hair cells. As we obtain more and more information about the specific roles of cadherin 23 in photoreceptors and hair cells, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the transport of this protein to the plasma membrane are largely unknown. Results PIST, a Golgi-associated, PDZ domain-containing protein, interacted with cadherin 23 via the PDZ domain of PIST and the C-terminal PDZ domain-binding interface (PBI of cadherin 23. By binding to cadherin 23, PIST retained cadherin 23 in the trans-Golgi network of cultured cells. The retention was released when either of the two known cadherin 23-binding proteins MAGI-1 and harmonin was co-expressed. Similar to MAGI-1 and harmonin, PIST was detected in mouse inner ear sensory hair cells. Conclusions PIST binds cadherin 23 via its PDZ domain and retains cadherin 23 in trans-Golgi network. MAGI-1 and harmonin can compete with PIST for binding cadherin 23 and release cadherin 23 from PIST's retention. Our finding suggests that PIST, MAGI-1 and harmonin collaborate in intracellular trafficking of cadherin 23 and regulate the plasma membrane expression of cadherin 23.

  2. A new way of producing pediocin in Pediococcus acidilactici through intracellular stimulation by internalized inulin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whee-Soo; Lee, Jun-Yeong; Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Hong, Liang; Lee, Sang-Mok; Cui, Lian-Hua; Lee, Ki-June; Kim, GiRak; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2018-04-12

    One of the most challenging aspects of probiotics as a replacement for antibiotics is to enhance their antimicrobial activity against pathogens. Given that prebiotics stimulate the growth and/or activity of probiotics, we developed phthalyl inulin nanoparticles (PINs) as prebiotics and observed their effects on the cellular and antimicrobial activities of Pediococcus acidilactici (PA). First, we assessed the internalization of PINs into PA. The internalization of PINs was largely regulated by glucose transporters in PA, and the process was energy-dependent. Once internalized, PINs induced PA to produce substantial amounts of antimicrobial peptide (pediocin), which is effective against both Gram-positive (Salmonella Gallinarum) and Gram-negative (Listeria monocytogenes) pathogens. When treated with small-sized PINs, PA witnessed a nine-fold increase in antimicrobial activity. The rise in pediocin activity in PA treated with PINs was accompanied by enhanced expression of stress response genes (groEL, groES, dnaK) and pediocin biosynthesis genes (pedA, pedD). Although the mechanism is not clear, it appears that the internalization of PINs by PA causes mild stress to activate the PA defense system, leading to increased production of pediocin. Overall, we identified a prebiotic in nanoparticle form for intracellular stimulation of probiotics, demonstrating a new avenue for the biological production of antimicrobial peptides.

  3. Identification of Conserved ABC Importers Necessary for Intracellular Survival of Legionella pneumophila in Multiple Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Lama

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is established that the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila becomes significantly augmented for infection of macrophages after intracellular growth in amoebae when compared to like-strains cultivated in laboratory media. Based on this observation, we reasoned that the most critical virulence determinants of L.p. are expressed by responding to stimuli generated by the protozoan host specifically; a process we term “protozoan-priming.” We sought to identify L.p. virulence factors that were required for replication in amoebae in order to highlight the genes necessary for production of the most infectious form of the bacterium. Using a transposon mutagenesis screen, we successfully identified 12 insertions that produced bacteria severely attenuated for growth in amoebae, while retaining a functional Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system. Seven of these insertion mutants were found dispensable for growth in macrophages, revealing attractive therapeutic targets that reside upstream of the pathogen-human interface. Two candidates identified, lpg0730 and lpg0122 were required for survival and replication in amoebae and macrophage host cells. Both genes are conserved among numerous important human pathogenic bacteria that can persist or replicate in amoebae. Each gene encodes a component of an ATP binding cassette (ABC transport complex of unknown function. We demonstrate the lpg0730 ortholog in Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida to be essential for colonization of both protozoan and mammalian host cells, highlighting conserved survival mechanisms employed by bacteria that utilize protozoa as an environmental reservoir for replication.

  4. Vitamin E Phosphate Nucleoside Prodrugs: A Platform for Intracellular Delivery of Monophosphorylated Nucleosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Daifuku

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E phosphate (VEP nucleoside prodrugs are designed to bypass two mechanisms of tumor resistance to therapeutic nucleosides: nucleoside transport and kinase downregulation. Certain isoforms of vitamin E (VE have shown activity against solid and hematologic tumors and result in chemosensitization. Because gemcitabine is one of the most common chemotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer, it was used to demonstrate the constructs utility. Four different VE isoforms were conjugated with gemcitabine at the 5′ position. Two of these were δ-tocopherol-monophosphate (MP gemcitabine (NUC050 and δ-tocotrienol-MP gemcitabine (NUC052. NUC050 was shown to be able to deliver gemcitabine-MP intracellularly by a nucleoside transport independent mechanism. Its half-life administered IV in mice was 3.9 h. In a mouse xenograft model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC NCI-H460, NUC050 at a dose of 40 mg/kg IV qwk × 4 resulted in significant inhibition to tumor growth on days 11–31 (p < 0.05 compared to saline control (SC. Median survival was 33 days (NUC050 vs. 25.5 days (SC ((hazard ratio HR = 0.24, p = 0.017. Further, NUC050 significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to historic data with gemcitabine at 135 mg/kg IV q5d × 3 on days 14–41 (p < 0.05. NUC052 was administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg IV qwk × 2 followed by 50 mg/kg qwk × 2. NUC052 resulted in inhibition to tumor growth on days 14–27 (p < 0.05 and median survival was 34 days (HR = 0.27, p = 0.033. NUC050 and NUC052 have been shown to be safe and effective in a mouse xenograft of NSCLC.

  5. The genome of the obligate intracellular parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: new insights into microsporidian genome dynamics and reductive evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinz

    Full Text Available The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome

  6. Sodium coupled bicarbonate influx regulates intracellular and apical pH in cultured rat caput epididymal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Li, Sheng; Huang, Jie-Hong; Yang, Deng-Liang; Zhang, Geng; Chen, Si-Liang; Ruan, Ye-Chun; Ye, Ke-Nan; Cheng, Christopher H K; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2011-01-01

    The epithelium lining the epididymis provides an optimal acidic fluid microenvironment in the epididymal tract that enable spermatozoa to complete the maturation process. The present study aims to investigate the functional role of Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter in the pH regulation in rat epididymis. Immunofluorescence staining of pan cytokeratin in the primary culture of rat caput epididymal epithelium showed that the system was a suitable model for investigating the function of epididymal epithelium. Intracellular and apical pH were measured using the fluorescent pH sensitive probe carboxy-seminaphthorhodafluor-4F acetoxymethyl ester (SNARF-4F) and sparklet pH electrode respectively to explore the functional role of rat epididymal epithelium. In the HEPES buffered Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution, the intracellular pH (pHi) recovery from NH(4)Cl induced acidification in the cultured caput epididymal epithelium was completely inhibited by amiloride, the inhibitor of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE). Immediately changing of the KH solution from HEPES buffered to HCO(3)(-) buffered would cause another pHi recovery. The pHi recovery in HCO(3)(-) buffered KH solution was inhibited by 4, 4diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid (DIDS), the inhibitor of HCO(3)(-) transporter or by removal of extracellular Na(+). The extracellular pH measurement showed that the apical pH would increase when adding DIDS to the apical side of epididymal epithelial monolayer, however adding DIDS to the basolateral side had no effect on apical pH. The present study shows that sodium coupled bicarbonate influx regulates intracellular and apical pH in cultured caput epididymal epithelium.

  7. Subversion of the cytoskeleton by intracellular bacteria: lessons from Listeria, Salmonella, and Vibrio

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Santos, Marcela; Orth, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Summary Entry into host cells and intracellular persistence by invasive bacteria are tightly coupled to the ability of the bacterium to disrupt the eukaryotic cytoskeletal machinery. Herein we review the main strategies used by three intracellular pathogens to harness key modulators of the cytoskeleton. Two of these bacteria, namely Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, exhibit quite distinct intracellular lifestyles, and therefore, provide a comprehensive panel for the understanding of the intricate bacteria-cytoskeleton interplay during infections. The emerging intracellular pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus is depicted as a developing model for the uncovering of novel mechanisms used to hijack the cytoskeleton. PMID:25440316

  8. Does the intracellular ionic concentration or the cell water content (cell volume) determine the activity of TonEBP in NIH3T3 cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Tina; Schou, Kenneth; Friis, Martin Barfred

    2008-01-01

    of the present investigation was to investigate whether cell shrinkage or high intracellular ionic concentration induced the activation of TonEBP. We designed a model system for isotonically shrinking cells over a prolonged period of time. Cells swelled in hypotonic medium and performed a regulatory volume......Cl(-) co-transporter, and Gadolinium inhibited shrinkage-activated Na(+) channels. Cells remained shrunken for at least 4 hours (isotonically shrunken cells). The activity of TonEBP was investigated with a Luciferase assay after isotonic shrinkage and after shrinkage in a high NaCl hypertonic medium....... We found that TonEBP was strongly activated after 4 and 16 hours in cells in high NaCl hypertonic medium but not after 4 or 16 hours in isotonically shrunken cells. Cells treated with high NaCl hypertonic medium for 4 hours had significantly higher intracellular concentrations of both K(+) and Na...

  9. Interfacility transports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Thomas H

    2002-02-01

    Financial pressures exerted by managed care organizations toward hospitals to improve efficiencies and to lower total healthcare costs continue to force physicians and administrators to reevaluate operations and practices. This shifting of risk exposure from insurers to providers has resulted in many mergers, acquisitions, and affiliations, so as to form integrated health systems that reduce repetition and duplication of services. Therefore, as these integrated systems develop, along with the emergence of tertiary care, regional referral, and specialty hospitals, the need for patient transfers between such facilities will expand. The decision to move patients between facilities is a multicomponent process comprising health, safety, financial, and legal concerns. Interfacility transportation of patients has been performed over the past 20 to 30 years. Whereas ground transport services were prominent in the 1970s, air medical programs using helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft have recently become widespread. Both hospital-based and private agencies have continued to develop programs for efficiently and expeditiously transporting critically ill or injured patients, many requiring complex life-support devices. The Practice Management Committee of the American College of Emergency Physicians recently updated the 1990 policy statement on interfacility transfers, and two position statements are available from the National Association of EMS Physicians on criteria for air medical transport and medical direction for interfacility transport services. This review provides an overview of transportation systems and services available and assists physicians in understanding the various modes and characteristics of systems available. Personnel configurations and capabilities, physiological limitations, inherent requirements for equipment and patient preparation, and legal issues involved with transferring patients are also outlined.

  10. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors modify intracellular pH transients and contractions of rat middle cerebral arteries during CO2/HCO3- fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jacob K; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2018-03-01

    The CO 2 /HCO 3 - buffer minimizes pH changes in response to acid-base loads, HCO 3 - provides substrate for Na + ,HCO 3 - -cotransporters and Cl - /HCO 3 - -exchangers, and H + and HCO 3 - modify vasomotor responses during acid-base disturbances. We show here that rat middle cerebral arteries express cytosolic, mitochondrial, extracellular, and secreted carbonic anhydrase isoforms that catalyze equilibration of the CO 2 /HCO 3 - buffer. Switching from CO 2 /HCO 3 - -free to CO 2 /HCO 3 - -containing extracellular solution results in initial intracellular acidification due to hydration of CO 2 followed by gradual alkalinization due to cellular HCO 3 - uptake. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition decelerates the initial acidification and attenuates the associated transient vasoconstriction without affecting intracellular pH or artery tone at steady-state. Na + ,HCO 3 - -cotransport and Na + /H + -exchange activity after NH 4 + -prepulse-induced intracellular acidification are unaffected by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. Extracellular surface pH transients induced by transmembrane NH 3 flux are evident under CO 2 /HCO 3 - -free conditions but absent when the buffer capacity and apparent H + mobility increase in the presence of CO 2 /HCO 3 - even after the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. We conclude that (a) intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity accentuates pH transients and vasoconstriction in response to acute elevations of pCO 2 , (b) CO 2 /HCO 3 - minimizes extracellular surface pH transients without requiring carbonic anhydrase activity, and (c) carbonic anhydrases are not rate limiting for acid-base transport across cell membranes during recovery from intracellular acidification.

  11. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bouret

    Full Text Available We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  12. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Médéric; Counillon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  13. Micro-environment and intracellular metabolism modulation of adipose tissue macrophage polarization in relation to chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Tu, Yixuan; Chen, Hainan; Jackson, Ampadu O; Patel, Vaibhav; Yin, Kai

    2018-02-23

    The accumulation and pro-inflammatory polarization of immune cells, mainly macrophages, in adipose tissue (AT) are considered crucial factors for obesity-induced chronic inflammatory diseases. In this review, we highlighted the role of adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) polarization on AT function in the obese state and the effect of the micro-environment and intracellular metabolism on the dynamic switch of ATMs into their pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes, which may have distinct influences on obesity-related chronic inflammatory diseases. Obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions, including those of glucose, fatty acid, cholesterol, and other nutrient substrates such as vitamin D and iron in AT, promote the pro-inflammatory polarization of ATMs and AT inflammation via regulating the interaction between ATMs and adipocytes and intracellular metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and reverse cholesterol transportation. Focusing on the regulation of ATM metabolism will provide a novel target for the treatment of obesity-related chronic inflammatory diseases, including insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Li; Li Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.

    2008-01-01

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by ∼ 68% and ∼ 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy

  15. The Potential Role of Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Proteins for Therapy of Erythroid Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefkothea C. Papadopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The erythroid related disorders (ERDs represent a large group of hematological diseases, which in most cases are attributed either to the deficiency or malfunction of biosynthetic enzymes or oxygen transport proteins. Current treatments for these disorders include histo-compatible erythrocyte transfusions or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. Gene therapy delivered via suitable viral vectors or genetically modified HSCs have been under way. Protein Transduction Domain (PTD technology has allowed the production and intracellular delivery of recombinant therapeutic proteins, bearing Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs, into a variety of mammalian cells. Remarkable progress in the field of protein transduction leads to the development of novel protein therapeutics (CPP-mediated PTs for the treatment of monogenetic and/or metabolic disorders. The “concept” developed in this paper is the intracellular protein delivery made possible via the PTD technology as a novel therapeutic intervention for treatment of ERDs. This can be achieved via four stages including: (i the production of genetically engineered human CPP-mediated PT of interest, since the corresponding native protein either is missing or is mutated in the erythroid progenitor cell (ErPCs or mature erythrocytes of patients; (ii isolation of target cells from the peripheral blood of the selected patients; (iii ex vivo transduction of cells with the CPP-mediated PT of interest; and (iv re-administration of the successfully transduced cells back into the same patients.

  16. Membrane-traversing mechanism of thyroid hormone transport by monocarboxylate transporter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protze, Jonas; Braun, Doreen; Hinz, Katrin Manuela; Bayer-Kusch, Dorothea; Schweizer, Ulrich; Krause, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) mediates thyroid hormone (TH) transport across the plasma membrane in many cell types. In order to better understand its mechanism, we have generated three new MCT8 homology models based on sugar transporters XylE in the intracellular opened (PDB ID: 4aj4) and the extracellular partly occluded (PDB ID: 4gby) conformations as well as FucP (PDB ID: 3o7q) and GLUT3 (PDB ID: 4zwc) in the fully extracellular opened conformation. T 3 -docking studies from both sides revealed interactions with His192, His415, Arg445 and Asp498 as previously identified. Selected mutations revealed further transport-sensitive positions mainly at the discontinuous transmembrane helices TMH7 and 10. Lys418 is potentially involved in neutralising the charge of the TH substrate because it can be replaced by charged, but not by uncharged, amino acids. The side chain of Thr503 was hypothesised to stabilise a helix break at TMH10 that undergoes a prominent local shift during the transport cycle. A T503V mutation accordingly affected transport. The aromatic Tyr419, the polar Ser313 and Ser314 as well as the charged Glu422 and Glu423 lining the transport channel have been studied. Based on related sugar transporters, we suggest an alternating access mechanism for MCT8 involving a series of amino acid positions previously and newly identified as critical for transport.

  17. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  18. Glycine transporter dimers: evidence for occurrence in the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholomäus, Ingo; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Nicke, Annette

    2008-01-01

    by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy. Endoglycosidase treatment and surface biotinylation further revealed that complex-glycosylated GlyTs form dimers located at the cell surface. Furthermore, substitution of tryptophan 469 of GlyT2 by an arginine generated a transporter deficient in dimerization......Different Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6a family have been shown to form dimers or oligomers in both intracellular compartments and at the cell surface. In contrast, the glycine transporters (GlyTs) GlyT1 and -2 have been reported to exist as monomers in the plasma...

  19. Optimal transport

    CERN Document Server

    Eckmann, B

    2008-01-01

    At the close of the 1980s, the independent contributions of Yann Brenier, Mike Cullen and John Mather launched a revolution in the venerable field of optimal transport founded by G Monge in the 18th century, which has made breathtaking forays into various other domains of mathematics ever since. The author presents a broad overview of this area.

  20. Transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  1. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2001/1199) of the 10. of december 2001 relative to the passing of safety rules concerning the maritime transport of spent fuels, plutonium and high-level radioactive wastes contained in packages. (O.M.)

  2. Transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The transport system comprises at least one road surface (2) and at least one vehicle (4) on wheels (6). The road surface (2) has a substantially bowl-shaped cross section and the vehicle (4) is designed so that the wheels (6) run directly on the road surface (2) while the road surface (2) acts as a

  3. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Matt S; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Palermo, Joseph J; Hibbing, Michael E; Dodson, Karen W; Hultgren, Scott J

    2016-04-12

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, impacting mostly women. Every year, millions of UTIs occur in the U.S. with most being caused by uropathogenic E. coli(UPEC). During a UTI, UPEC invade bladder cells and form an intracellular bacterial community

  4. Intracellular putrescine and spermidine deprivation induces increased uptake of the natural polyamines and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhonen-Hongisto, L; Seppänen, P; Jänne, J

    1980-01-01

    Inhibition of polyamine synthesis by alpha-difluoromethylornithine in cultured Ehrlich ascites-carcinoma cells rapidly enhanced the uptake of exogenous putrescine, spermidine and spermine from the culture medium. In tumour cells exposed to the drug for 2 days, the intracellular concentration of spermidine was decreased to less than 10% of that found in untreated cells. However, the strikingly stimulated transport system brought the concentration of spermidine to the control values in less than 2h after supplementation of the cells with micromolar concentrations of the polyamine. In the absence of polyamine deprivation, tumour cells did not accumulate extracellular polyamines to any appreciable extent. Ascites-tumour cells deprived of putrescine and spermidine likewise concentrated methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) [1,1'-[methylethanedylidine)dinitrilo]diguanidine] at a greatly enhanced rate. A previous "priming of tumour cells with difluoromethylornithine followed by an exposure of the cells to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) resulted in a marked and rapid anti-proliferative effect. PMID:6786285

  5. Peptidomimetics with beta-peptoid resudies as carriers for intracellular delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    Intracellular delivery using cell penetrating peptides is a promising approach for the transport of biomacromolecules and particulate carriers across cell membranes into cells to modify cellular functions. Synthetic peptides with novel backbone design were examined for their ability to form...... prepared by mixing and characterized with respect to size and surface charge. At ratios of peptide nitrogen to siRNA phosphate (N/P) of 1 and below, particles with narrow size distributions (poly dispersity indexes lower than 0.11) ranging from approximately 100 to 350 nm were formed, and they showed...... a negative zeta potential (-24 to -31 mV). At higher N/P ratios, larger aggregates with zeta potential close to neutral were formed. However, the complexes were not able to silence the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in HeLa-cells stably expressing EGFP, which was measured by flow...

  6. DNA uptake, intracellular trafficking and gene transfection after ultrasound exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Jing; Santangelo, Philip J; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound has been studied as a promising tool for intracellular gene delivery. In this work, we studied gene transfection of a human prostate cancer cell line exposed to megahertz pulsed ultrasound in the presence of contrast agent and assessed the efficiency of fluorescently labelled DNA delivery into cell nuclei, which is necessary for gene transfection. At the sonication conditions studied, ~30% of cells showed DNA uptake 30min after sonication, but that fraction decreased over time to ~10% of cells after 24h. Most cells containing DNA had DNA in their nuclei, but the amount varied significantly. Transfection efficiency peaked at ~10% at 8h post sonication. Among those cells containing DNA, ~30% of DNA was localized in the cell nuclei, ~30% was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes and the remainder was "free" in the cytoplasm 30min after sonication. At later times up to 24h, ~30% of DNA continued to be found in the nuclei and most or all of the rest of the DNA was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. These results demonstrate that ultrasound can deliver DNA into cell nuclei shortly after sonication and that the rest of the DNA can be cleared by autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structures of the TRIC trimeric intracellular cation channel orthologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, Go; Hiraizumi, Masahiro; Maturana, Andrés D; Kumazaki, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Liu, Keihong; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Iwata, So; Tsukada, Keisuke; Komori, Tomotaka; Uemura, Sotaro; Goto, Yuhei; Nakane, Takanori; Takemoto, Mizuki; Kato, Hideaki E; Yamashita, Keitaro; Wada, Miki; Ito, Koichi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hattori, Motoyuki; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for muscle contraction, cell growth, apoptosis, learning and memory. The trimeric intracellular cation (TRIC) channels were recently identified as cation channels balancing the SR and ER membrane potentials, and are implicated in Ca 2+ signaling and homeostasis. Here we present the crystal structures of prokaryotic TRIC channels in the closed state and structure-based functional analyses of prokaryotic and eukaryotic TRIC channels. Each trimer subunit consists of seven transmembrane (TM) helices with two inverted repeated regions. The electrophysiological, biochemical and biophysical analyses revealed that TRIC channels possess an ion-conducting pore within each subunit, and that the trimer formation contributes to the stability of the protein. The symmetrically related TM2 and TM5 helices are kinked at the conserved glycine clusters, and these kinks are important for the channel activity. Furthermore, the kinks of the TM2 and TM5 helices generate lateral fenestrations at each subunit interface. Unexpectedly, these lateral fenestrations are occupied with lipid molecules. This study provides the structural and functional framework for the molecular mechanism of this ion channel superfamily.

  8. Sigma-1 receptor: The novel intracellular target of neuropsychotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sigma-1 receptor ligands have been long expected to serve as drugs for treatment of human diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, depression, idiopathic pain, drug abuse, and cancer. Recent research exploring the molecular function of the sigma-1 receptor started unveiling underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic activity of those ligands. Via the molecular chaperone activity, the sigma-1 receptor regulates protein folding/degradation, ER/oxidative stress, and cell survival. The chaperone activity is activated or inhibited by synthetic sigma-1 receptor ligands in an agonist-antagonist manner. Sigma-1 receptors are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes that are physically associated with the mitochondria (MAM: mitochondria-associated ER membrane. In specific types of neurons (e.g., those at the spinal cord, sigma-1 receptors are also clustered at ER membranes that juxtapose postsynaptic plasma membranes. Recent studies indicate that sigma-1 receptors, partly in sake of its unique subcellular localization, regulate the mitochondria function that involves bioenergetics and free radical generation. The sigma-1 receptor may thus provide an intracellular drug target that enables controlling ER stress and free radical generation under pathological conditions.

  9. The Chlamydia psittaci genome: a comparative analysis of intracellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Anja; Schöfl, Gerhard; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

  10. Resveratrol Interferes with Fura-2 Intracellular Calcium Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Richard F; Leech, Colin A; Roe, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol found in some fruits and especially in grapes, has been reported to provide diverse health benefits. Resveratrol's mechanism of action is the subject of many investigations, and some studies using the ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2 suggest that it modulates cellular calcium responses. In the current study, contradictory cellular calcium responses to resveratrol applied at concentrations exceeding 10 μM were observed during in vitro imaging studies depending on the calcium indicator used, with Fura-2 indicating an increase in intracellular calcium while Fluo-4 and the calcium biosensor YC3.60 indicated no response. When cells loaded with Fura-2 were treated with 100 μM resveratrol, excitation at 340 nm resulted in a large intensity increase at 510 nm, but the expected concurrent decline with 380 nm excitation was not observed. Pre-treatment of cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM did not prevent a rise in the 340/380 ratio when resveratrol was present, but it did prevent an increase in 340/380 when ATP was applied, suggesting that the resveratrol response was an artifact. Cautious data interpretation is recommended from imaging experiments using Fura-2 concurrently with resveratrol in calcium imaging experiments.

  11. Metabolic host responses to infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eEisenreich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of bacterial pathogens with mammalian hosts leads to a variety of physiological responses of the interacting partners aimed at an adaptation to the new situation. These responses include multiple metabolic changes in the affected host cells which are most obvious when the pathogen replicates within host cells as in case of intracellular bacterial pathogens. While the pathogen tries to deprive nutrients from the host cell, the host cell in return takes various metabolic countermeasures against the nutrient theft. During this conflicting interaction, the pathogen triggers metabolic host cell responses by means of common cell envelope components and specific virulence-associated factors. These host reactions generally promote replication of the pathogen. There is growing evidence that pathogen-specific factors may interfere in different ways with the complex regulatory network that controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of mammalian cells. The host cell defence answers include general metabolic reactions, like the generation of oxygen- and/or nitrogen-reactive species, and more specific measures aimed to prevent access to essential nutrients for the respective pathogen. Accurate results on metabolic host cell responses are often hampered by the use of cancer cell lines that already exhibit various de-regulated reactions in the primary carbon metabolism. Hence, there is an urgent need for cellular models that more closely reflect the in vivo infection conditions. The exact knowledge of the metabolic host cell responses may provide new interesting concepts for antibacterial therapies.

  12. Viral evasion of intracellular DNA and RNA sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ying Kai; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    The co-evolution of viruses with their hosts has led to the emergence of viral pathogens that are adept at evading or actively suppressing host immunity. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are key components of antiviral immunity that detect conserved molecular features of viral pathogens and initiate signalling that results in the expression of antiviral genes. In this Review, we discuss the strategies that viruses use to escape immune surveillance by key intracellular sensors of viral RNA or DNA, with a focus on RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), cyclic GMP–AMP synthase (cGAS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ)-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Such viral strategies include the sequestration or modification of viral nucleic acids, interference with specific post-translational modifications of PRRs or their adaptor proteins, the degradation or cleavage of PRRs or their adaptors, and the sequestration or relocalization of PRRs. An understanding of viral immune-evasion mechanisms at the molecular level may guide the development of vaccines and antivirals. PMID:27174148

  13. Iron in intracellular infection: to provide or to deprive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eSilva-Gomes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their chemical versatility, transition metals were incorporated as cofactors for several basic metabolic pathways in living organisms. This same characteristic makes them potentially harmful, since they can be engaged in deleterious reactions like Fenton chemistry. As such, organisms have evolved highly specialized mechanisms to supply their own metal needs while keeping their toxic potential in check.This dual character comes into play in host-pathogen interactions, given that the host can either deprive the pathogen of these key nutrients or exploit them to induce toxicity towards the invading agent. Iron stands as the prototypic example of how a metal can be used to limit the growth of pathogens by nutrient deprivation, a mechanism widely studied in Mycobacterium infections. However, the host can also take advantage of iron-induced toxicity to control pathogen proliferation, as observed in infections caused by Leishmania. Whether we may harness either of the two pathways for therapeutical purposes is still ill-defined.In this review, we discuss how modulation of the host iron availability impacts the course of infections, focusing on those caused by two relevant intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium and Leishmania.

  14. In vivo oriented modeling with consideration of intracellular crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Noriko; Iba, Keisuke; Tabira, Akito; Okuhara, Takahiro; Kubojima, Takeshi; Hiraiwa, Takumi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Oka, Kotaro; Funahashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    In vivo reaction space is constrained by complex structures which are made of entwined cytoskeletons and organelles; this create the difference between in vivo and in vitro in respect of molecular mobility, and it may affect reaction processes. Our motivation is to reveal the background mechanisms of the properties of molecular behaviors in vivo by numerical approach. For this object, we reassembled a pseudo-intracellular environment in 3D lattice space, and executed Monte Carlo simulation. By changing the relative amount of non-reactive obstacles in the simulation space, we tested the effect of the level of crowdedness to the molecular mobility and reaction processes. Our results showed that molecules demonstrated anomalous diffusion correlating to the restriction level of the reaction space. Reaction processes also showed distinct characteristics, that is increase of reaction rate at the beginning of reactions, with the decrease of the reaction rate at later time frame of reactions. Our results suggested that the anomalous behaviors at singe molecule level in vivo could bring an essential difference to the reaction processes and the results.

  15. Multistimulative Nanogels with Enhanced Thermosensitivity for Intracellular Therapeutic Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Zhou, Bingjie; Zhan, Yuan; Wang, Yifeng; Zhang, Yuhong; Li, Yulin; He, Peixin

    2017-11-15

    The flexibility and hydrophilicity of nanogels suggest their potential for the creation of nanocarriers with good colloidal stability and stimulative ability. In the present study, biocompatible AGP and AGPA nanogels with triple-stimulative properties (thermosensitivity, pH sensitivity, and redox sensitivity) were prepared by incorporating poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) or poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(NIPAM-AA)) into alginate (AG) emulsion nanodrops, followed by fixation with a disulfide-containing molecule (cystamine dihydrochloride (Cys)). Compared to AG/PNIPAM(AGP) nanogels, AG/P(NIPAM-AA) (AGPA) nanogels exhibited more sensitive volumetric expansion by switching the temperature from 40 to 25 °C under physiological medium. This expansion occurs because P(NIPAM-AA) with -COOH groups can be fixed inside the nanogels via chemical bonding with Cys, whereas PNIPAM was encapsulated in the nanogels through simple physical interactions with the AG matrix. AGPA nanogels carrying an anticancer drug tend to easily enter cells upon heating, thereby exerting toxicity through a cold shock and reverse thermally induced release of an anticancer drug. Upon internalization inside cells, the nanogels use the reducible and acidic intracellular environments to effectively release the drug to the nucleus to impart anticancer activity. These results demonstrate that multifunctional nanogels may be used as a general platform for therapeutic delivery.

  16. The Chlamydia psittaci genome: a comparative analysis of intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Voigt

    Full Text Available Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis.A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins.This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions.

  17. Collective Dynamics of Intracellular Water in Living Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orecchini, A; Sebastiani, F; Paciaroni, A; Petrillo, C; Sacchetti, F; Jasnin, M; Francesco, A De; Zaccai, G; Moulin, M; Haertlein, M

    2012-01-01

    Water dynamics plays a fundamental role for the fulfillment of biological functions in living organisms. Decades of hydrated protein powder studies have revealed the peculiar dynamical properties of hydration water with respect to pure water, due to close coupling interactions with the macromolecule. In such a framework, we have studied coherent collective dynamics in protein and DNA hydration water. State-of-the-art neutron instrumentation has allowed us to observe the propagation of coherent density fluctuations within the hydration shell of the biomolecules. The corresponding dispersion curves resulted to be only slightly affected by the coupling with the macromolecules. Nevertheless, the effects of the interaction appeared as a marked increase of the mode damping factors, which suggested a destructuring of the water hydrogen-bond network. Such results were interpreted as the signature of a 'glassy' dynamical character of macromolecule hydration water, in agreement with indications from measurements of the density of vibrational states. Extending the investigations to living organisms at physiological conditions, we present here an in-vivo study of collective dynamics of intracellular water in Escherichia coli cells. The cells and water were fully deuterated to minimise the incoherent neutron scattering background. The water dynamics observed in the living cells is discussed in terms of the dynamics of pure bulk water and that of hydration water measured in powder samples.

  18. Collective Dynamics of Intracellular Water in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchini, A.; Sebastiani, F.; Jasnin, M.; Paciaroni, A.; De Francesco, A.; Petrillo, C.; Moulin, M.; Haertlein, M.; Zaccai, G.; Sacchetti, F.

    2012-02-01

    Water dynamics plays a fundamental role for the fulfillment of biological functions in living organisms. Decades of hydrated protein powder studies have revealed the peculiar dynamical properties of hydration water with respect to pure water, due to close coupling interactions with the macromolecule. In such a framework, we have studied coherent collective dynamics in protein and DNA hydration water. State-of-the-art neutron instrumentation has allowed us to observe the propagation of coherent density fluctuations within the hydration shell of the biomolecules. The corresponding dispersion curves resulted to be only slightly affected by the coupling with the macromolecules. Nevertheless, the effects of the interaction appeared as a marked increase of the mode damping factors, which suggested a destructuring of the water hydrogen-bond network. Such results were interpreted as the signature of a "glassy" dynamical character of macromolecule hydration water, in agreement with indications from measurements of the density of vibrational states. Extending the investigations to living organisms at physiological conditions, we present here an in-vivo study of collective dynamics of intracellular water in Escherichia coli cells. The cells and water were fully deuterated to minimise the incoherent neutron scattering background. The water dynamics observed in the living cells is discussed in terms of the dynamics of pure bulk water and that of hydration water measured in powder samples.

  19. Real-Time monitoring of intracellular wax ester metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Matti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wax esters are industrially relevant molecules exploited in several applications of oleochemistry and food industry. At the moment, the production processes mostly rely on chemical synthesis from rather expensive starting materials, and therefore solutions are sought from biotechnology. Bacterial wax esters are attractive alternatives, and especially the wax ester metabolism of Acinetobacter sp. has been extensively studied. However, the lack of suitable tools for rapid and simple monitoring of wax ester metabolism in vivo has partly restricted the screening and analyses of potential hosts and optimal conditions. Results Based on sensitive and specific detection of intracellular long-chain aldehydes, specific intermediates of wax ester synthesis, bacterial luciferase (LuxAB was exploited in studying the wax ester metabolism in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Luminescence was detected in the cultivation of the strain producing wax esters, and the changes in signal levels could be linked to corresponding cell growth and wax ester synthesis phases. Conclusions The monitoring system showed correlation between wax ester synthesis pattern and luminescent signal. The system shows potential for real-time screening purposes and studies on bacterial wax esters, revealing new aspects to dynamics and role of wax ester metabolism in bacteria.

  20. Comparison of the intracellular trafficking itinerary of ctla-4 orthologues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satdip Kaur

    Full Text Available CTLA-4 is an essential inhibitor of T cell immune responses. At steady state, most CTLA-4 resides in intracellular compartments due to constitutive internalisation mediated via a tyrosine based endocytic motif (YVKM within the cytoplasmic domain. This domain is highly conserved in mammals suggesting strong selective pressure. In contrast, the C-terminal domain varies considerably in non-mammals such as fish, xenopus and birds. We compared the ability of the C-terminus of these species to direct the trafficking of CTLA-4 with human CTLA-4. Using a chimeric approach, endocytosis was found to be conserved between human, xenopus and chicken CTLA-4 but was reduced substantially in trout CTLA-4, which lacks the conserved YXXM motif. Nevertheless, we identified an alternative YXXF motif in trout CTLA-4 that permitted limited endocytosis. Post-internalisation, CTLA-4 was either recycled or targeted for degradation. Human and chicken CTLA-4, which contain a YVKM motif, showed efficient recycling compared to xenopus CTLA-4 which contains a less efficient YEKM motif. Specific mutation of this motif in human CTLA-4 reduced receptor recycling. These findings suggest evolutionary development in the endocytic and recycling potential of CTLA-4, which may facilitate more refined functions of CTLA-4 within the mammalian immune system.