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Sample records for intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy

  1. Intracavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy Not Suitable for Ambient Level Radiocarbon Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro

    2015-01-01

    IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy as a radiocarbon detection technique was first reported by the Murnick group at Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, in 2008. This technique for radiocarbon detection was presented with tremendous potentials for applications in various fields of research.

  2. Intracavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy not suitable for ambient level radiocarbon detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro A J

    2015-09-01

    IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy as a radiocarbon detection technique was first reported by the Murnick group at Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, in 2008. This technique for radiocarbon detection was presented with tremendous potentials for applications in various fields of research. Significantly cheaper, this technique was portrayed as a possible complementary technique to the more expensive and complex accelerator mass spectrometry. Several groups around the world started developing this technique for various radiocarbon related applications. The IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup at the University of Groningen was constructed in 2012 in close collaboration with the Murnick group for exploring possible applications in the fields of radiocarbon dating and atmospheric monitoring. In this paper we describe a systematic evaluation of the IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup at Groningen for radiocarbon detection. Since the IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup was strictly planned for dating and atmospheric monitoring purposes, all the initial experiments were performed with CO2 samples containing contemporary levels and highly depleted levels of radiocarbon. Because of recurring failures in differentiating the two CO2 samples, with the radiocarbon concentration 3 orders of magnitude apart, CO2 samples containing elevated levels of radiocarbon were prepared in-house and experimented with. All results obtained thus far at Groningen are in sharp contrast to the results published by the Murnick group and rather support the results put forward by the Salehpour group at Uppsala University. From our extensive test work, we must conclude that the method is unsuited for ambient level radiocarbon measurements, and even highly enriched CO2 samples yield insignificant signal.

  3. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy: Is there any evidence of a radiocarbon signal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Anders; Salehpour, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the first report of an ultrasensitive method for ro-vibrational spectrometry of radiocarbon dioxide was published. The method, called intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy (ICOGS), claimed a sensitivity and limit-of-detection comparable to accelerator mass spectroscopy. ICOGS was claimed to utilize the isotope-dependent ro-vibrational absorption lines of carbon dioxide in the infrared spectrum. In order to facilitate unambiguous detection of radiocarbon, the sample was placed inside the cavity of a radiocarbon dioxide laser. This intracavity approach was claimed to increase the sensitivity by seven orders of magnitude compared with traditional optogalvanic methods. However, despite the methodical and thorough efforts of several research groups worldwide, these claims have not been possible to reproduce. Instead, we have previously reported serious deviations from the original results, where we found that ICOGS suffers from considerable problems with the stability and reproducibility of the optogalvanic signal, and that misinterpretations of these uncertainties likely are the explanation for the claimed sensitivity in the first reports. Having identified the stability and reproducibility of the detection as major concerns, we decided to improve the setup by with state-of-the-art plasma source technology. Deploying a custom-made stripline split-ring resonator optogalvanic detector, we have now investigated the applicability of ICOGS to radiocarbon detection even further. Measurements have been made with a wide range of parameters including different gas mixtures at various pressures and wavelengths. We have also conducted measurements with gas flowing through the sample cell to investigate the effect of plasma induced decomposition of the sample. Still, we have seen no indications of a significant radiocarbon signal in a concentration range between 0.29 Modern and 9.7 Modern, i.e., the range of interest to the radiocarbon community. Hence, our conclusions

  4. Optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianarosa, P.; Demers, Y.; Gagne, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced optogalvanic spectroscopy in a hollow cathode-produced plasma has been used to resolve the isotopic structure of some absorption lines in uranium. We have shown that the optogalvanic signal associated with any isotope can be related to the concentration of that isotope in a multi-isotopic sample. From the results we have obtained, optogalvanic spectroscopy of sputtered samples appears to be an interesting approach to the isotopic analysis of both natural and enriched uranium and could easily be applied to the analysis of other fissile elements, such as the plutonium isotopes

  5. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy. An analytical technique for 14C analysis with subattomole sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnick, Daniel E; Dogru, Ozgur; Ilkmen, Erhan

    2008-07-01

    We show a new ultrasensitive laser-based analytical technique, intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy, allowing extremely high sensitivity for detection of (14)C-labeled carbon dioxide. Capable of replacing large accelerator mass spectrometers, the technique quantifies attomoles of (14)C in submicrogram samples. Based on the specificity of narrow laser resonances coupled with the sensitivity provided by standing waves in an optical cavity and detection via impedance variations, limits of detection near 10(-15) (14)C/(12)C ratios are obtained. Using a 15-W (14)CO2 laser, a linear calibration with samples from 10(-15) to >1.5 x 10(-12) in (14)C/(12)C ratios, as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry, is demonstrated. Possible applications include microdosing studies in drug development, individualized subtherapeutic tests of drug metabolism, carbon dating and real time monitoring of atmospheric radiocarbon. The method can also be applied to detection of other trace entities.

  6. Rare earth optogalvanic spectroscopy: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destro, Marcelo G.; Neri, Jose W.; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Silveira, Carlos A.B.; Riva, Rudimar [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica]. E-mail: destro@ieav.cta.br; Victor, Alessandro R. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The IEAv has special interest in the studies of rare earth isotope applications in laser medium and integrated optics as well as aerospace research. We are starting to work with Ytterbium, Erbium, Dysprosium and Neodymium laser selective photoionization research. This paper describes the preliminary results of emission and optogalvanic spectroscopy obtained from a Neodymium hollow cathode lamps. Furthermore these results were used to setup our laser systems to work to leads a Nd isotopes selective laser photoionization. (author)

  7. Transverse mode analysis of optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy of canine hemangiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weina; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kisker, David W.; Lear, Kevin L.

    2010-02-01

    The label-free technique of optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy (OFIS) uses the optical transmission spectrum of a cell in a microfluidic optical resonator to distinguish cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Based on their distinctive characteristic transmission spectra, canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) cancer cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have been differentiated using the OFIS technique with high statistical significance (p<10- 6). 95% sensitivity and 98% specificity were achieved simultaneously. A cell lens model explains trends in the transverse mode pattern in the transmission spectra of HSA cells and allows extraction of cell focal length.

  8. Intracavity Faraday modulation spectroscopy (INFAMOS): A tool for radical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Michele; Pinto, Tomas H. P.; Wu, Xia; Ritchie, Grant A. D.

    2017-08-01

    We present the intra-cavity Faraday modulation spectroscopy technique, whereby optical feedback cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is coupled with Faraday modulation spectroscopy to greatly enhance the interaction path length of a laser beam with a paramagnetic sample in a magnetic field. We describe a first prototype based upon a cw quantum cascade laser targeting a selection of fundamental rovibrational R-branch transitions of nitric oxide (1890 cm-1), consisting of a linear cavity (finesse F =6300 ) and a water-cooled solenoid. We demonstrate a minimum detectable Verdet constant of Vmin=4.7 ×10-14 rad cm-1 G-1 H z-1/2 (at SNR = 1), corresponding to a single-pass rotation angle of 1.6 ×10-10 rad Hz-1/2 and a limit of detection of 0.21 ppbv Hz-1/2 NO.

  9. Local Electric Field Strength in a Hollow Cathode Determined by Stark Splitting of the 2S Level of Hydrogen Isotopes by Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.; Rosa, M. I. de la; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.; Gonzalo, A. B.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present Doppler-free two-photon optogalvanic spectroscopy as a tool to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic deuterium. The strong electric field strength present in the hollow cathode is determined for various discharge conditions which allows studying the corresponding variations of the cathode fall, and its changes with discharge operation time.

  10. Development of atomic spectroscopy technologies - Hyperfine structure of 2 period atoms using optogalvanic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Nam Ic [Hankuk University of foreign studies, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The source of anomalous broad linewidth of 3{sup 3}P{sub 1},{sub 2},{sub 3}-3{sup 3}D{sub 2},{sub 3},4(3s') transition was explained. The broad optogalvanic spectrum was consisted of two gaussian peaks of different linewidths, and they are separated by 250 MHz. The Narrow peak, which has linewidth of room temperature, is from oxygen atoms already separated, and the shifted broad peak, which has linewidth corresponding to a temperature of 9000 K, is from weakly bound molecular ions. Obtained hyperfine spectrum of fluorine atom at the expected frequency, was too weak to analyze hyperfine structure constants. Microwave discharge might be necessary for higher density of excited state. 16 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  11. Three-colour photoionization optogalvanic spectroscopy in U-Ne hollow cathode discharges: observation of even-parity autoionization states of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.K.; Seema, A.U.; Das, R.C.; Shah, M.L.; Dev, Vas; Suri, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-colour three-step photoionization spectroscopy of uranium has been performed in a U-Ne hollow cathode discharge tube by temporally resolving three-colour photoionization optogalvanic (PIOG) signal from the normal optogalvanic (OG) signal using three tunable pulsed dye lasers. U-Ne hollow cathode discharge tube has been used as a source of uranium atomic vapour and photoionization detector. Using this technique, photoionization spectra of uranium have been investigated systematically in the energy region 52150-52590 cm -1 , through three different excitation pathways, originating from its ground state, 0 cm -1 ( 5 L 0 6 ). By analyzing the three-colour photoionization spectra sixty new even-parity autoionization resonances of uranium have been identified and their probable total angular momentum (J) values have been assigned according to the J-momentum selection rule. (author)

  12. Intracavity absorption spectroscopy of formaldehyde from 6230 to 6420 cm(-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.; Levinsky, Howard B.; Mokhov, Anatoli V.

    We apply intracavity absorption spectroscopy for measurements of the absorption spectrum of formaldehyde, CH2O, from 6230 to 6420 cm(-1), of which only a small fraction (6351-6362 cm(-1)) has been recorded elsewhere. The measurements are performed in the cavity of a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser,

  13. Intracavity absorption spectroscopy of formaldehyde from 6230 to 6420 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.; Levinsky, Howard B.; Mokhov, Anatoli V.

    2017-05-01

    We apply intracavity absorption spectroscopy for measurements of the absorption spectrum of formaldehyde, CH2O, from 6230 to 6420 cm-1, of which only a small fraction (6351-6362 cm-1) has been recorded elsewhere. The measurements are performed in the cavity of a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser, with a sensitivity corresponding to the effective absorption path length of 45 m and a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm-1. The noise-equivalent detection limit of CH2O achieved with the strongest absorption line at 6252.64 cm-1 is estimated to be 5 ppm. High tolerance to broadband losses and the accessible time resolution of 50 µs make it possible to apply this detection system for time-resolved monitoring of CH2O together with other molecules in harsh combustion environments, e.g., in combustion engines.

  14. Optogalvanic detection of the Zeeman effect in a hollow-cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, E.; Gagne, J.

    1987-01-01

    Optogalvanic detection of complex Zeeman patterns in a hollow-cathode lamp is investigated. Uranium lines with J 1 = 6 and J 2 = 7 are resolved, with our best results obtained using intermodulate optogalvanic spectroscopy (but this scheme is applicable only to lines giving strong signals). This detection method has a 40-MHz resolution, so a magnetic field of 0.1 T is sufficient to resolve most patterns. Weak lines can be studied with modulated optogalvanic spectroscopy. However, the stronger field required in this case perturbs the discharge. Although they are impractical for the measurement of component relative intensities, these detection methods may find applications in the determination of Lande g factors

  15. A broadband Tm/Ho-doped fiber laser tunable from 1.8 to 2.09 µm for intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2018-04-01

    A broadband tunable Tm/Ho-doped fiber laser is developed for sensitive in situ measurements of intracavity absorption spectra in the spectral range of 4780-5560 cm-1. This spectral range includes an atmospheric transmission window enabling sensitive measurements of various species. The spectral bandwidth of laser emission varies from 20 to 60 cm-1 and is well suitable for multicomponent spectroscopy. The sensitivity achieved in cw operation corresponds to an effective absorption path length of L eff = 20 km, with a spectral noise of less than 1%. The spectroscopic system is applied for measurements of absorption spectra of H2O, NH3 and for simultaneous in situ detection of three isotopes of CO2 in human breath, which is important for medical diagnostics procedures.

  16. Single frequency intracavity SRO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Buchhave, Preben

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only given. A single resonance optical parametric oscillator (SRO) is inserted intracavity to a CW high power, single frequency, and ring Nd:YVO4 laser. We obtain a stable single frequency CW SRO with output at 1.7-1.9 μm (idler) and a resonating signal at 2.3-2.6 μm. The behavior...

  17. Development of a see-through hollow cathode discharge lamp for (Li/Ne) optogalvanic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V. K.; Kumar, P.; Sarangpani, K. K.; Dixit, S. K.; Nakhe, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    Development of a demountable and see-through hollow cathode (HC) discharge lamp suitable for optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy is described. The design of the HC lamp is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Lithium, investigated rarely by the OG method, is selected for cathode material as its isotopes are important for nuclear industry. The HC lamp is characterized electrically and optically for discharge oscillations free OG effect. Strong OG signals of lithium as well as neon (as buffer gas) are produced precisely upon copper vapor laser pumped tunable dye laser irradiation. The HC lamp is capable of generating a clean OG resonance spectrum in the available dye laser wavelength scanning range (627.5-676 nm) obtained with 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran dye. About 28 resonant OG lines are explicitly observed. Majority of them have been identified using j-l coupling scheme and assigned to the well-known neon transitions. One line that corresponds to wavelength near about 670.80 nm is assigned to lithium and resolved for its fine (2S1/2 → 2P1/2, 3/2) transitions. These OG transitions allow 0.33 cm-1 accuracy and can be used to supplement the OG transition data available from other sources to calibrate the wavelength of a scanning dye laser with precision at atomic levels.

  18. Optogalvanic monitoring of collisional transfer of laser excitation energy in a neon RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The optogalvanic signals produced by pulsed laser excitation of 1s5--2p8 and 1s5-2p9 (Paschen notation) transition by a ∼29 MHz radiofrequency (rf) discharge at ∼5 torr have been investigated. The optogalvanic signal produced by 1s5-2p9 excitations indicates that there is transfer of energy from the 2p9 state to some other state. The state to which this energy is transferred is believed to be mainly the 2p8 state because of the very small energy gap between the 2p9 and 2p8 states. To verify this transfer, the 1s5-2p8 transition was investigated. The similarity of the temporal profiles of the optogalvanic signals in both excitations confirms the collisional transfer of laser excitation energy from 2p9 to 2p8

  19. A simplified theoretical model for the laser-induced optogalvanic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirage, A.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified theoretical model for an estimate of the optogalvanic effect induced in an electric discharge by resonant laser radiation is presented. This theory is based on the solution of a two-level system rate equation, where the upper level of the stimulated transition is connected to the ground state (lower level) through radiative and collisional processes. The developed relations show that the magnitude and temporal evolution (in the case of pulsed excitation) of the optogalvanic signal depend on the electronic plasma density, electron temperature and on the density of light absorbing centers. (author) [pt

  20. Optical spectroscopy versus mass spectrometry: The race for fieldable isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshick, C.M.; Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Several techniques have been developed to provide on-site isotopic analyses, including decay-counting and mass spectrometry, as well as methods that rely on the accessibility of optical transitions for isotopic selectivity (e.g., laser-induced fluorescence and optogalvanic spectroscopy). The authors have been investigating both mass spectrometry and optogalvanic spectroscopy for several years. Although others have considered these techniques for isotopic analysis, the authors have focussed on the use of a dc glow discharge for atomization and ionization, and a demountable discharge cell for rapid sample exchange. The authors' goal is a fieldable instrument that provides useful uranium isotope ratio information

  1. Intracavity interferometry using synchronously pumped OPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadilová, Alena; Vyhlídal, David; Kubeček, Václav; Šulc, Jan; Navrátil, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The concept of system for intracavity interferometry based on the beat note detection in subharmonic synchronously intracavity pumped optical parametrical oscillator (OPO) is presented. The system consisted of SESAM-modelocked, picosecond, diode pumped Nd:YVO4 laser, operating at wavelength 1.06 μm and tunable linear intracavity pumped OPO based on MgO:PPLN crystal, widely tunable in 1.5 μm able to deliver two independent trains of picosecond pulses. The optical length of the OPO cavity was set to be exactly twice the pumping cavity length. In this configuration the OPO produces signal pulses with the same repetition frequency as the pump laser but the signal consists of two completely independent pulse trains. For purpose of pump probe measurements the setup signal with half repetition rate and scalable amplitude was derived from the OPO signal using RF signal divider, electropotical modulator and fiber amplifier. The impact of one pump beam on the sample is detected by one probing OPO train, the other OPO train is used as a reference. The beat note measured using the intracavity interferometer is proportional to phase modulation caused by the pump beam. The bandwidth of observed beat-note was less than 1 Hz (FWHM), it corresponds to a phase shift measurement error of less than 1.5 × 10-7 rad without any active stabilization. Such compact low-cost system could be used for ultra-sensitive phase-difference measurements (e.g. nonlinear refractive index measurement) for wide range of material especially in spectral range important for telecom applications.

  2. Efficient yellow beam generation by intracavity sum frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    :YVO4 crystal and its intracavity sum frequency generation by considering the influence of the thermal lensing effect on the performance of the laser. A KTP crystal cut for type-II phase matching was used for intracavity sum ...

  3. Dynamical regimes and intracavity propagation delay in external ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E JAYAPRASATH

    2017-10-31

    Oct 31, 2017 ... to increase as the external cavity feedback rate of TL is increased, while an increment in the injection rate between the two lasers resulted in a reduction of intracavity propagation delay. Keywords. Semiconductor lasers; chaos synchronization; intracavity propagation delay. PACS Nos 42.55.−f; 42.55.

  4. Efficient yellow beam generation by intracavity sum frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... We present our studies on dual wavelength operation using a single Nd:YVO4 crystal and its intracavity sum frequency generation by considering the influence of the thermal lensing effect on the performance of the laser. A KTP crystal cut for type-II phase matching was used for intracavity sum frequency ...

  5. Digital mode selection using an intracavity SLM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available an intracavity SLM L BURGER1,3, I LITVIN1 AND A. FORBES1,2,3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa 2School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000, South Africa 3Laser Research Institute... for a certain grey-level values of a uniform phase screen on the SLM (to simulate a flat mirror) at different grey levels, and that the output power level loops from 0 to 2? radians. We noted that the lasing band broadened with increasing pump power...

  6. Tuning quantum correlations with intracavity photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maria M. de; Gomila, Damia; Zambrini, Roberta [IFISC, Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems (CSIC-UIB), Campus UIB, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Garcia-March, Miguel Angel [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We show how to tune quantum noise in nonlinear systems by means of periodic spatial modulation. We prove that the introduction of an intracavity photonic crystal in a multimode optical parametric oscillator inhibits and enhances light quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, it leads to a significant noise reduction in field quadratures, robustness of squeezing in a wider angular range, and spatial entanglement. These results have potential benefits for quantum imaging, metrology, and quantum information applications and suggest a control mechanism of fluctuations by spatial modulation of interest also in other nonlinear systems.

  7. Lasers with intra-cavity phase elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulses, A. Alkan; Kurtz, Russell; Islas, Gabriel; Anisimov, Igor

    2018-02-01

    Conventional laser resonators yield multimodal output, especially at high powers and short cavity lengths. Since highorder modes exhibit large divergence, it is desirable to suppress them to improve laser quality. Traditionally, such modal discriminations can be achieved by simple apertures that provide absorptive loss for large diameter modes, while allowing the lower orders, such as the fundamental Gaussian, to pass through. However, modal discrimination may not be sufficient for short-cavity lasers, resulting in multimodal operation as well as power loss and overheating in the absorptive part of the aperture. In research to improve laser mode control with minimal energy loss, systematic experiments have been executed using phase-only elements. These were composed of an intra-cavity step function and a diffractive out-coupler made of a computer-generated hologram. The platform was a 15-cm long solid-state laser that employs a neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate crystal rod, producing 1064 nm multimodal laser output. The intra-cavity phase elements (PEs) were shown to be highly effective in obtaining beams with reduced M-squared values and increased output powers, yielding improved values of radiance. The utilization of more sophisticated diffractive elements is promising for more difficult laser systems.

  8. Subharmonic synchronously intracavity pumped picosecond optical parametric oscillator for intracavity phase interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadilová, Alena; Vyhlídal, David; Kubeček, Václav; Šulc, Jan

    2014-12-01

    The laser system suitable for precise intracavity phase interferometry is presented. The system is based on an intracavity pumped PPLN linear optical parametrical oscillator (OPO). For synchronous pumping of OPO a SESAM-mode-locked, picosecond, diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 linear oscillator, operating at 1.06 µm was used. The OPO cavity was set to be twice as long as the pumping Nd:YVO4 laser cavity. The pumping laser was set in such a manner that the parametric gain inside the PPLN overcame the OPO threshold only for one direction of pumping pulse propagation. This leads to the generation of two independent trains of pulses at the 1.5 µm spectral range. To verify the system performance, a LiNbO3 electro-optic phase modulator was placed inside the OPO. The RF-signal derived from the pumping pulse train, detected by a fast photodiode and divided by two, was applied on the modulator. A stable beat-note signal between the two OPO trains was successfully measured for the first time from such a compact, all-diode-pumped laser system. For RF-signal amplitude from 100 up to 700 mV beat-note frequency varied from 232 up to 1847 Hz which corresponded to detected phase-shift 36-250 µrad. The bandwidth of beat-note was less than 1 Hz (FWHM) resulting in phase-shift measurement error 1.5 × 10-7 rad.

  9. Numerical modelling of passively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shuanghong; Zhang Xingyu; Wang Qingpu; Zhang Jun; Wang Shumei; Liu Yuru; Zhang Xuehui

    2007-01-01

    Assuming intracavity photon densities to be of Gaussian spatial distributions, the space-dependent rate equations of passively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers are deduced for the first time for the pumping beams of Gaussian and top-head spatial distributions, respectively. The new rate equations are normalized and solved numerically to investigate the influences of the normalized initial population inversion density, normalized Raman gain coefficient, saturable absorber parameter, beam size ratio of pump to fundamental laser and loss ratio of the first Stokes to fundamental laser on the pulse parameters of the first Stokes. The results of the Gaussian and top-head pumpings show similar trends despite some discrepancies. The new theories and numerical results will help design passively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers of high performance

  10. Laser-optogalvanic studies of the 4p5 ns and nd autoionizing resonances in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, M A; Hanif, M; Aslam, M

    2008-01-01

    We report new measurements of the odd-parity autoionizing resonances in krypton using resonant two-photon excitation from the 4p 5 5s[3/2] 2 metastable level in a mild DC discharge and an optogalvanic detection technique. We have observed the 4p 5 ns [1/2] 0,1 , 4p 5 nd [3/2] 2 and 4p 5 nd [5/2] 2,3 autoionizing resonances excited from three intermediate levels 4p 5 5p' [1/2] 1 , 4p 5 5p' [3/2] 1 and 4p 5 5p' [3/2] 2 . The spectra are notable for the absence of the broad autoionizing 4p 5 nd [3/2] 1 series which dominates in the photo-absorption spectrum from the ground state. The prominent transitions follow ΔK = ΔJ = Δl selection rules of the JK-coupling scheme. We report nearly 100 new energy levels in krypton besides the quantum defects and the reduced widths Γ r Γ(ν) 3 of the nd' [3/2] 2 , nd' [5/2] 2 and nd' [5/2] 3 Rydberg states

  11. Penning type of ionizing energy transfer collisions in a Hg-Ar discharge detected by the optogalvanic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.; George, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the optogalvanic signals has been investigated in detail in a Hg-argon discharge by irradiating it with an excimer pumped dye laser. The signals at 4510.7, 4596 and 4628.4 A exhibited anomalous behavior. Analysis of the data revealed that the excited Ar and Hg atoms respectively in the 1P1 and 3P1 states participated in energy transfer collisions, causing atomic mercury to excite to an ionized energy state, while simultaneously the argon atom relaxes to its ground state.

  12. Optogalvanic measurement of isotope shifts of doubly ionized uranium (U III) made using natural-U samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyakis, K.N.; Gagne, J.

    1989-01-01

    An efficient method of identifying 235 U III (in natural-U samples), with the help of the optogalvanic effect in a hollow-cathode discharge, is presented. The use of this method enabled us to carry out the measurement of isotope shifts and the preliminary investigation of hyperfine structures of U III. The 238 U-- 235 U shifts for the 591.313-, 586.045-, and 610.497-nm U III lines are found to be 921(3), 417(6), and 392(12) mK, respectively

  13. Modelling a singly resonant, intracavity ring optical parametric oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Wei, Hou

    2003-01-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the dynamics of a single-frequency, unidirectional ring laser with an intracavity nonlinear singly resonant OPO-crystal in a coupled resonator. We find for a range of operating conditions good agreement between model results and measurements of the laser...

  14. Intra-cavity generation of superpositions of Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate experimentally the intra-cavity generation of a coherent superposition of Laguerre–Gaussian modes of zero radial order but opposite azimuthal order. The superposition is created with a simple intra-cavity stop...

  15. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  16. Jitter reduction by intracavity active phase modulation in a mode-locked semiconductor laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozharar, Sarper; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Quinlan, Franklyn; Delfyett, Peter J

    2009-03-01

    We experimentally verify the theory of Haus et al. [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 41 (2004)] on the effects of timing jitter using intracavity phase modulation on the pulse train of a mode-locked laser. The theory is based on the solution of the Heisenberg-Langevin equation in the presence of dispersion and intracavity phase modulation. Using active intracavity phase modulation, we have reduced the timing jitter on a 10.24 GHz mode-locked diode laser by 50% from 304 to 150 fs integrated from 1 Hz to the Nyquist frequency of 5.12 GHz.

  17. Investigation of intracavity phase interferometry applied to nano-metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xuan

    Intracavity phase interferometry is sensing technique developed at UNM, in which a physical quantity to be measured is put as integral part of a mode-locked laser. It relies on the fact that any intracavity phase shift of an intracavity pulse will result in a frequency change of the whole pulse train. The implementations of IPI requires the operation of a mode-locked laser in which two pulses circulate independently, i.e. with no phase coupling between them. IPI has been demonstrated with a variety of laser systems, to detect either non-reciprocal effects (such as rotation, magnetic field), or phase changes that can be made periodic at the repetition rate of the laser cavity. The purpose of this work is to study the feasibility of applying this technique to the measurement of non-periodic (i.e. slow) changes in optical path. The new concept to measure sub-nanometer displacement uses an optoelectronic modulator (EOM) inside the cavity. The operation of the mode-locked laser after insertion of such an element in its cavity is analyzed. Several laser systems have been tried for the implementation of IPI. Two of them are presented in this thesis. The first one is a Nd:YVO4 laser, mode-locked by a multiple quantum wells (MQW) saturable absorber. The presence of a solid state saturable absorber introduced a dead band in the beat note response of the system. A new coupling between group and phase velocity was discovered experimentally, and explained through simulation. This coupling affects negatively the operation of the system, since the repetition rate is no longer a reliable fixed quantity. The coupling could be eliminated by replacing the MQW with a dye jet absorber. A first demonstration of a slow optical path change (in the nm range) was made. The system that appeared at first the most promising is the intracavity optical parametric oscillator (OPO) synchronously pumped by a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire lasers. Bringing the unstable behavior of that laser under control

  18. Intracavity optical trapping with Ytterbium doped fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Rania; Kalantarifard, Fatemeh; Elahi, Parviz; Ilday, F. Omer; Volpe, Giovanni; Maragò, Onofrio M.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a novel approach for trapping micron-sized particles and living cells based on optical feedback. This approach can be implemented at low numerical aperture (NA=0.5, 20X) and long working distance. In this configuration, an optical tweezers is constructed inside a ring cavity fiber laser and the optical feedback in the ring cavity is controlled by the light scattered from a trapped particle. In particular, once the particle is trapped, the laser operation, optical feedback and intracavity power are affected by the particle motion. We demonstrate that using this configuration is possible to stably hold micron-sized particles and single living cells in the focal spot of the laser beam. The calibration of the optical forces is achieved by tracking the Brownian motion of a trapped particle or cell and analysing its position distribution.

  19. Intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network based on dense wavelength division multiplexing filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Ying; Duan, Liangcheng; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-10-06

    We report the system design and experimental verification of an intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network with hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) sensors and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) filters. Compared with fiber Bragg grating (FBG), it is easier for the DWDM to accomplish a stable output. We realize the concentration detection of three gas cells filled with acetylene. The sensitivity is up to 100 ppmV at 1536.71 nm. Voltage gradient is firstly used to optimize the intracavity sensor network enhancing the detection efficiency up to 6.5 times. To the best of our knowledge, DWDM is firstly used as a wavelength division multiplexing device to realize intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network. It make it possible to realize high capacity intracavity sensor network via multiplexed technique.

  20. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  1. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  2. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  3. Active mode control of solid state laser using an intra-cavity beam shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenguang; Zhou, Qiong; Yan, Baozhu; Jiang, Zongfu

    2015-05-01

    In high power solid state lasers, thermal lens effect always give rise to the multi-modes oscillation in the resonator. The beam quality will deteriorate with the increase of output power. In this paper, an intra-cavity beam shaper is introduced to actively compensate the thermal lens in the laser resonator. One round trip ABCD matrix of the resonator with an intra-cavity beam shaper and thermal lens is calculated. The design parameters with wide stable zone are concluded through the ABCD matrix. The mode size and stability diagram of the resonator are calculated under different focal length of the thermal lens. The relationship between the adjustment of the intra-cavity beam shaper and the mode size under different thermal lenses are concluded, and general method to actively control the modes contents by adjusting the intra-cavity beam shaper is introduced. The effectiveness and performance of active mode control with the intra-cavity beam shaper are verified by simulations of the output modes of resonators. It shows that the M2 factor is well maintained below 1.6 even the focal length of the thermal lens changes from 5m to 0.5m.

  4. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  5. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation

  6. All-optical noise reduction of fiber laser via intracavity SOA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Kang; Chen, Dijun; Pan, Zhengqing; Zhang, Xi; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2016-10-10

    We have designed a unique intracavity semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) structure to suppress the relative intensity noise (RIN) for a fiber DFB laser. By exploiting the gain saturation effect of the SOA, a maximum noise suppression of 30 dB around the relaxation oscillation frequency is achieved, and the whole resonance relaxation oscillation peak completely disappears. Moreover, via a specially designed intracavity SOA structure, the optical intensity inside the SOA will be in a balanced state via the oscillation in the laser cavity, and the frequency noise of the laser will not be degraded with the SOA.

  7. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... Full Length Research Paper. Determination of lactic acid bacteria in Kaşar cheese and identification by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. İlkay Turhan1* and Zübeyde Öner2. 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetic, School of Health Sciences, T.C.Istanbul Arel University, 34537 Buyukcekmece /.

  8. Implementation of intra-cavity beam shaping technique to enhance pump efficiency

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the author proposes an implementation of a new intra-cavity beam shaping technique to vary the intensity distribution of the fundamental mode in a resonator cavity while maintaining a constant intensity distribution at the output...

  9. Influence of high-order dispersion on kerr frequency combs and intracavity soliton dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Shaofei; Guo, Hairun; Bai, Xuekun

    2014-01-01

    The influence of high-order dispersion on both temporal and spectral characteristics of microresonator-based optical frequency combs are investigated. The moment method and intracavity dispersive wave generations are utilized to analyze comb dynamics. © 2014 Optical Society of America....

  10. Experimental Performance of a Single-Mode Ytterbium-doped Fiber Ring Laser with Intracavity Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a linearly polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with a single longitudinal mode output at 1064 run. A fiber-coupled intracavity phase modulator ensured mode-hop free operation and allowed fast frequency tuning. The fiber laser was locked with high stability to an iodine-stabilized laser, showing a frequency noise suppression of a factor approx 10 (exp 5) at 1 mHz

  11. Applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on several areas of intense topical interest related to applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials. The eleven chapters in the book cover the following areas of interest relating to applied spectroscopy and nanoscience: ·         Raman spectroscopic characterization, modeling and simulation studies of carbon nanotubes, ·         Characterization of plasma discharges using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy, ·         Fluorescence anisotropy in understanding protein conformational disorder and aggregation, ·         Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nanomedicine, ·         Calculation of Van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale, ·         Theory and simulation associated with adsorption of gases in nanomaterials, ·         Atom-precise metal nanoclusters, ·         Plasmonic properties of metallic nanostructures, two-dimensional materials, and their composites, ·         Applications of graphe...

  12. Construction and characterization of a hollow cathode tube for high sensibility laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morage, A.; Motta, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    A new hollow cathode tube argon-iron design was developed to be used in laser atomic spectroscopy experiments, were high sensibility is required. This tube was employed in order to allow laser absorption and optogalvanic signal measurements. The tube also included fused-quartz Brewster angle windows aligned with the optical axis in each ending of the tube. Therefore, in this configuration a minimum laser intensity losses through the windows can be attained for the appropriate light polarization. The optogalvanic signal detection was accomplished using a tunable dye laser resonant with the Ar, 3p 5 4p ( 3 S 1 )--> 3p 5 4d ( 3 D 1 0 ) transition, that corresponds to 591.2 nm in air. It was also possible to determine the gas temperature by measuring the Doppler line broadening and the results were compared to those obtained from a theoretical model for gas heat conduction. To measure the temperature of the cathode external surface a thermocouple was used inside the tube. The analysis of results showed that a high signal to noise ratio can be obtained with this tube configuration, that permits experimental investigation of electronic transitions presenting low light absorption cross sections. (author)

  13. Widely tunable terahertz source based on intra-cavity frequency mixing in quantum cascade laser arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Aiting; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Yifan; Kim, Jae Hyun; Belkin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mbelkin@ece.utexas.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Vijayraghavan, Karun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); ATX Photonics, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    We demonstrate a compact monolithic terahertz source continuously tunable from 1.9 THz to 3.9 THz with the maximum peak power output of 106 μW at 3.46 THz at room temperature. The source consists of an array of 10 electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers with intra-cavity terahertz difference-frequency generation. To increase fabrication yield and achieve high THz peak power output in our devices, a dual-section current pumping scheme is implemented using two electrically isolated grating sections to independently control gain for the two mid-IR pumps.

  14. All-solid-state continuous-wave doubly resonant all-intracavity sum-frequency mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, H M; Heine, F; Huber, G; Halldórsson, T

    1997-10-01

    A new resonator design for doubly resonant continuous-wave intracavity sum-frequency mixing is presented. We generated 212 mW of coherent radiation at 618 nm by mixing the radiation of a 1080-nm Nd(3+):YAlO(3) laser and a 1444-nm Nd(3+):YAG laser. Two different mixing resonator setups and several nonlinear-optical crystals were investigated. So far output is limited by unequal performance of the two fundamental lasers and coating problems of the nonlinear crystals.

  15. Time-Gating Processes in Intra-Cavity Mode-Locking Devices Like Saturable Absorbers and Kerr Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Photons are non-interacting entities. Light beams do not interfere by themselves. Light beams constituting different laser modes (frequencies) are not capable of re-arranging their energies from extended time-domain to ultra-short time-domain by themselves without the aid of light-matter interactions with suitable intra-cavity devices. In this paper we will discuss the time-gating properties of intra-cavity "mode-locking" devices that actually help generate a regular train of high energy wave packets.

  16. Scheme for improving laser stability via feedback control of intracavity nonlinear loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Pixian; Lu, Huadong; Su, Jing; Peng, Kunchi

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel and efficient scheme to enhance the stability of laser output via feedback control to a nonlinear loss deliberately introduced to the laser resonator. By means of the feedback control to the intracavity nonlinear loss of an all-solid-state continuous-wave single-frequency laser with high output power at 1064 nm, its intensity and frequency stabilities are significantly improved. A lithium triborate crystal is deliberately placed inside the laser resonator to be an element of the nonlinear loss, and the temperature of the crystal is feedback controlled by an electronic loop. The control signal is generated by distinguishing the deviation of the output power and used for manipulating the intracavity nonlinear loss to compensate the deviation of the laser power actively. With the feedback-control loop, the intensity and frequency fluctuations of the output laser at 1064 nm are reduced from ±0.59% and 21.82 MHz without the feedback to ±0.26% and 9.84 MHz, respectively.

  17. Multi-mode dynamics of optical oscillators based on intracavity nonlinear frequency down-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yuri A.

    2018-01-01

    The transient power characteristics of two optical oscillators—a difference frequency generator (ICDFG) and a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (ICSRO)—based on intracavity nonlinear optical frequency conversion, are described. The simulation has been performed via the rate-equation mathematical model, which features a multi-mode behavior of all optical fields. The reason for unattainability of single-mode emission in these devices without an additional frequency-selective element (e.g., a Fabry-Perot etalon) is clarified. It is shown that the dynamics of a short-wavelength emission (pump) results mainly from the nonlinear optical interaction, while that of the longer-wavelength optical fields (signal and idler) depends on selectivity of the etalon. With the suitable etalons inserted in their cavities, both devices are shown to operate dynamically single-mode under conventional experimental conditions. The nonlinear interaction makes the pump emission collapse to the single-mode operation very fast (it takes no more than a few tens of the photon lifetimes). To overcome the threshold of parametric generation, the intracavity pump power in the ICSRO has to exceed ˜ 100 W, while the ICDFG is essentially a "thresholdless" device.

  18. Double-confocal resonator for X-ray generation via intracavity Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    There has been a growing interest in developing compact X-ray sources through Thomson scattering of a laser beam by a relativistic electron beam. For higher X-ray flux it is desirable to have the scattering to occur inside an optical resonator where the laser power is higher. In this paper I propose a double-confocal resonator design optimized for head-on Thomson scattering inside an FEL oscillator and analyze its performance taking into account the diffraction and FEL gain. A double confocal resonator is equivalent to two confocal resonators in series. Such a resonator has several advantages: it couples electron beam through and X-ray out of the cavity with holes on cavity mirrors, thus allowing the system to be compact; it supports the FEL mode with minimal diffraction loss through the holes; it provides a laser focus in the forward direction for a better mode overlap with the electron beam; and it provides a focus at the same location in the backward direction for higher Thomson scattering efficiency; in addition, the mode size at the focal point and hence the Rayleigh range can be adjusted simply through intracavity apertures; furthermore, it gives a large mode size at the mirrors to reduce power loading. Simulations as well as analytical results will be presented. Also other configurations of intracavity Thomson scattering where the double-confocal resonator could be useful will be discussed.

  19. Spectral and lasing characteristics of 1% Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Osipov, V. V.; Vatnik, S. M.; Shitov, V. A.; Vedin, I. A.; Kurbatov, P. F.; Maksimov, R. N.; Luk'yashin, K. E.; Pavlyuk, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    High-transparency 1% Ho:YAG ceramics with the transmission coefficient of 82% in the IR range at the sample thickness of 1 mm are synthesised from a mixture of the Ho:Y2O3 and Al2O3 nanopowders obtained by the laser method. Results of investigations of spectral and lasing characteristics of 1 % Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping by radiation of a 5% Tm:KLuW disk element are presented. Based on spectral intensity analysis of generation in the 1.8 - 2.1 mm range and on cavity parameters, the estimated lasing slope efficiency for 1% Ho:YAG ceramics is about 40%.

  20. Deformable mirrors for intra-cavity use in high-power thin-disk lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehler, Stefan; Dietrich, Tom; Wittmüss, Philipp; Sawodny, Oliver; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Graf, Thomas

    2017-02-20

    We present deformable mirrors for the intra-cavity use in high-power thin-disk laser resonators. The refractive power of these mirrors is continuously adaptable from -0.7 m-1 to 0.3 m-1, corresponding to radii of curvature ranging between 2.86 m (convex) and 6.67 m (concave). The optimized shape of the mirror membrane enables a very low peak-to-valley deviation from a paraboloid deformation over a large area. With the optical performance of our mirrors being equal to that of standard HR mirrors, we were able to demonstrate the tuning of the beam quality of a thin-disk laser in a range of M2 = 3 to M2 = 1 during laser operation at output powers as high as 1.1 kW.

  1. Intracavity Laser Refractometry In Reflection: Development And Implementation In Biomedical Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The Intracavity Laser Refractometry in Reflection (ILRR) method is developed for precise investigation of the processes on an interface of different media in real time. This method is very attractive for the study of biological liquids. It is based on the control of two-mode phase-anisotropic laser spectrum. In the aggregate the values of the sensitivity, time of measuring, potential parameters of investigated media of ILRR method correspond to the best results in optical refractometry. The absolute value of refractive index correlates with the course of different diseases. It can serve the objective parameter for an estimation of a level of illness processes in organism and drug efficiency. In result of the investigation of the photoresponse of the blood to low-level laser irradiation both the slow thermal effect and fast biophysical effect were discovered. The refractive index behaviour in real time allows the photoacceptors and maximum therapeutic doses on organism, cellular, and molecular levels to be determined.

  2. High-average-power diode-end-pumped intracavity-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honea, E.C.; Ebbers, C.A.; Beach, R.J.; Speth, J.A.; Emanuel, M.S> ; Skidmore, J.A.; Payne, S.A.

    1998-02-12

    A compact diode-pumped ND:YAG laser was frequency-doubled to 0.532 {mu}m with an intracavity KTP or LBO crystal using a `V` cavity configuration. Two acousto-optic Q-switches were employed at repetition rates of 10-30 kHz. Dichroic fold and end mirrors were used to output two beams with up to 140 W of 0.532 {mu}m power using KTP and 116 W using LBO as the frequency doubling crystal. This corresponds to 66% of the maximum output power at 1.064 {mu}m obtained with an optimized output coupler reflectivity. The minimum output pulse duration varied with repetition rate from 90 to 130 ns. The multimode output beam had a smooth profile and a beam quality of M{sup 2} = 5 1.

  3. High-efficiency intracavity second-harmonic enhancement for a few-cycle laser pulse train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yi; Xu, Shixiang; Zeng, Xuanke; Zou, Da; Li, Jingzhen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an intracavity second-harmonic (SH) enhancement technology without the need of input impedance-matching for optimal coupling between the cavity and its input frequency comb. More than 10% SH energy conversion efficiency is available, thus the power of the SH frequency comb can be enhanced beyond 100 relative to single-pass SH generation. Compared with a conventional passive enhancing cavity, for the purpose of high power enhancement, our scheme can operate at much lower finesse and thus broader bandwidth so that it can support several-optical-cycle pulses more easily. If they have the same finesse, both methods perform with similar operating stability. The results show that our novel design is suitable for some applications which need a short wavelength, high intensity, and ultra-broad bandwidth pulse train. (paper)

  4. Plasma magnetic field measurement by intracavity absorption. Progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, G.O.

    1984-01-01

    Dye laser intracavity absorption (ICA) is being studied as a potential diagnostic for plasma or neutral beam systems. For magnetic field measurements it is necessary to make Zeeman effect measurements on the resonance transition of atomic lithium on a millisecond time scale. To do this it is necessary to sweep the dye laser in wavelength at a rapid rate so that the absorber can be sampled many times during the measurement. Our results indicate that the ICA signal becomes small at high sweep rates limiting the rate at which such sweeping may be carried out. It may be possible to avoid this limitation by chopping the pump laser. The studies of coupled cavity ICA are continuing, and are discussed in detail in an appendix. An ICA system using a dye cell has been designed, and supplementary experiments involving the observation of ICA in a ring dye laser are discussed

  5. Passive mode locking at harmonics of the free spectral range of the intracavity filter in a fiber ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Lu, Fuyun; Dong, Xinyong; Shum, Ping; Yang, Xiufeng; Zhou, Xiaoqun; Gong, Yandong; Lu, Chao

    2005-11-01

    We report the passive mode-locking at harmonics of the free spectral range (FSR) of the intracavity multi-channel filter in a fiber ring laser. The laser uses a sampled fiber Bragg grating (SFBG) with a free spectral range (FSR) of 0.8 nm, or 99 GHz at 1555 nm, and a length of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with low and flat dispersion. Stable picosecond soliton pulse trains with twofold to sevenfold enhancement in the repetition rate, relative to the FSR of the SFBG, have been achieved. The passive mode-locking mechanism that is at play in this laser relies on a dissipative four-wave mixing process and switching of repetition rate is realized simply by adjustment of the intracavity polarization controllers.

  6. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with III-nitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 mu m aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of similar to 550 mu W with a threshold current density of similar to 3.5 kA/cm(2), while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of similar to 80 mu W and threshold current densities of similar to 7 kA/cm

  7. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Shen, C.; Margalith, T.; Ng, T. K.; DenBaars, S. P.; Ooi, B. S.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with IIInitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 μm aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of ~550 μW with a threshold current density of ~3.5 kA/cm2, while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of ~80 μW and threshold current densities of ~7 kA/cm2.

  8. 21.2% wall-plug efficiency green laser based on an electrically pumped VECSEL through intracavity second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pu; Xu, Bing; van Leeuwen, Robert; Chen, Tong; Watkins, Laurence; Zhou, Delai; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Gao, Peng; Xu, Guoyang; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2015-03-01

    We have achieved a 21.2% wall-plug efficiency green laser at 532 nm based on an electrically pumped vertical externalcavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) through intracavity second harmonic generation. The continuous-wave green output power was 3.34 W. The VECSEL gain device is cooled by using a thermoelectric cooler, which can greatly benefit packaging. Both power and efficiency can be further scaled up by optimizing external-cavity design and improving the performance of VECSEL gain device.

  9. Intracavity coherent interaction of mode-locked pulse train with resonant medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Koji

    Resonant interactions of a mode-locked pulse train with intracavity samples, namely rubidium-87 (Rb-87) vapor and Fabry-Perot etalon, placed inside a laser cavity are studied in the light of developing ultra-sensitive laser sensors to measure a small magnetic field and a minute change of index of refraction of a sample material, respectively. A Rb-87 vapor provides an opportunity for a compact high-sensitivity atomic magnetometer due to its accessibility by the standard laser sources and to the large ensemble magnetization. By employing the ultra-sensitive interferometric technique utilizing the intracavity properties of a mode-locked laser, the performance of the Rb-87 magnetometer can be further improved. The fundamental properties of coherent interaction between a mode-locked pulse train and a Rb-87 vapor are studied in numerical calculations of 33 density matrix equations and the reduced wave equation, which are then examined in experiments. In particular, a coherent dark-state is created by the pulse train and is further enhanced by means of spectral shaping or polarization modulation of the excitation pulse train. Experiments performed inside a laser cavity show that the atomic coherence is still preserved due to the coherent nature of interaction between the Rb-87 vapor and the ultrashort pulses occurred within a short time scale compared to the atomic relaxation times, which results in nonlinear propagation of the pulses as well as an observation of the dark-line resonance inside the laser cavity. A Fabry-Perot etalon is a type of optical cavity and serves as a tuning element of the frequency of cw-lasers. By inserting a Fabry-Perot etalon inside a mode-locked laser, the cavity resonance modes are modied due to a coupling between the two cavities, which leads to unique temporal and spectral characteristics of the resultant pulse train and its frequency comb. Both the temporal and spectral properties of the pulse train are studied in detail in experiments as

  10. The effect of refractive index changes in an intracavity absorption on the laser output power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hawat, Sh.; Eskef, M.

    2007-10-01

    A model describing the intra-cavity absorption has been developed. The model allows for a reliable description of the attenuation of laser power as a function of the gas pressure inside the absorption cell, conducting both real and imaginary parts of the refractive index of the absorbing gas. The model relies on an adequate integration of the additional loss due to the absorption into the rate equations. After that the rate equations are solved under steady state conditions, which is quite reliable for a cw CO 2 laser. The oscillation, clearly observed in case of weak absorption, is described in the framework of an interference model considering the electric field inside the cavity as the interference result of successive phase correlated waves differing from each other in the number of passes made through the cavity. The phase shift is determined by the optical length of the cavity depending on the real part of the refractive index of the gas in the absorption cell. The model has been applied to analyze a large set of attenuation curves obtained in a previous work, in which intra-cavity absorption was measured for the three gases CFC-11, 12, 22 using a tunable cw CO 2 laser at 44 lines of the emission spectrum of the CO 2 molecule distributed on the branches P and R of the two bands at 9.6 μm and 10.6 μm. For mostly all examples, the value of the absorption cross section (imaginary part of the refractive index) has been determined by fitting the model to the experimental data. Furthermore, the value of the linear polarizability (real part of the refractive index) has been calculated from the oscillation period for all examples, in which the attenuation curve exhibits reliable oscillating behavior. The results are in fair agreement with the values of the absorption cross section published in the Hitran data base, as well as with the results obtained from independent absorption measurements performed outside the cavity (Author)

  11. How to tune quantum correlations with an intracavity photonic crystal in an optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-March, Miguel; de Castro, Maria; Gomila, Damia; Zambrini, Roberta

    2011-05-01

    We study the effect of periodic modulations on the quantum correlations of light in a nonlinear optical system, considering an intracavity photonic crystal in a type I optical parametric oscillator (OPO). We use a few modes linear approximation below threshold to obtain analytical expressions for the correlations comparing them with numerical results obtained from Langevin equations below (and also above) threshold. First, we find that the parametric threshold can be either raised or lowered through the amplitude of the photonic crystal, due to the interplay of two competing mechanism, i.e, inhibition of the signal spatial instability and the imprint of a spatial modulation on the pump favouring the instability process. Second, we find that, above threshold, the break of translational invariance provides a mechanism to reduce the quadrature quantum fluctuations leading to squeezing over a larger range of quadrature angles. Finally, inseparable and EPR entangled spatial beams are found in the presence of the PC. Funded by FISICOS (FIS2007-60327), CoQuSys (200450E566), MEC, Fulbright Commision, and FECYT.

  12. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  13. Radially polarized and passively Q-switched Yb-doped fiber laser based on intracavity birefringent mode discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuehuan; Wu, Yongxiao; Chen, Sanbin; Li, Jianlang

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a passive Q-switched ytterbium-doped fiber laser with radially polarized beam emission by using a c-cut YVO4 birefringent crystal as the intracavity polarization discriminator, and a Cr4+:YAG crystal as the saturable absorber and output coupler. The maximum averaged laser power reached 3.89 W with a high slope efficiency of 66.5%. The laser pulse had a peak power of 161 W, 160 ns duration, and 151 kHz repetition rate at the absorbed pump power of 6.48 W. Such a radially polarized pulse would facilitate numerous applications.

  14. Analysis of Some New Electronic Transitions Observed Using Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy (ils): Possible Identification of HCuN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jack C.; Grames, Ethan M.; O'Brien, Leah C.; O'Brien, James J.

    2017-06-01

    Four new electronic transitions with blue-degraded bandheads were observed in the orange-red region of the visible spectrum. The transitions were observed in the plasma discharge of a hollow copper cathode placed within the cavity of a tunable dye laser system, allowing molecular absorbance to be enhanced upon laser amplification. To produce the molecules, the surface of the copper cathode was soaked in a dilute ammonia solution prior to installation, and 1 torr of H_2 was used as the sputter gas in the dc plasma discharge. The bandheads were observed at 16,560 \\wn, 16,485 \\wn, 16,027 \\wn, and 15,960 \\wn. Using 1.5 torr of D_2 as the sputter gas resulted in a -3 \\wn shift in origin for the bands in the 16,000 \\wn region. Four rotational branches have been identified in each transition, and the transitions have been fit to independent ^{2}Σ - ^{2}Π transitions using PGOPHER, with spin-orbit splittings in the Hund's case (a) Π-states of -71.2 \\wn and -65.4 \\wn. The transitions have tentatively been assigned to HCuN. Results of this analysis will be presented.

  15. Detection of atomic oxygen in flames by absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheskis, S.; Kovalenko, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The absolute concentration of atomic oxygen in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen/air flame has been measured using Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy (ICLS) based on a dye laser pumped by an argon-ion laser. Absorptions at the highly forbidden transitions at 630.030 nm and 636.380 nm were observed at an equivalent optical length of up to 10 km. The relatively low intensity of the dye laser avoids photochemical interferences that are inherent to some other methods for detecting atomic oxygen. The detection sensitivity is about 6x10 14 atom/cm 3 and can be improved with better flame and laser stabilization. (orig.)

  16. Intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator driven by a KLM Nd:GGG laser with a single AO modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Yufei; Li, Tao; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Qiao, Wenchao

    2015-05-01

    An intracavity KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a Kerr lens mode-locking (KLM) Nd:GGG laser near 1062 nm with a single AO modulator was realized for the first time. The mode-locking pulses of the signal wave were obtained with a short duration of subnanosecond and a repetition rate of several kilohertz (kHz). Under a diode pump power of 8.25 W, a maximum output power of 104 mW at signal wavelength near 1569 nm was obtained at a repetition rate of 2 kHz. The highest pulse energy and peak power were estimated to be 80 μJ and 102 kW at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, respectively. The shortest pulse duration was measured to be 749 ps. By considering the Gaussian spatial distribution of the photon density and the Kerr-lens effect in the gain medium, a set of the coupled rate equations for QML intracavity optical parametric oscillator are given and the numerical simulations are basically fitted with the experimental results.

  17. Intracavity KTiOAsO4 optical parametric oscillator pumped by an actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, W. X.; Wang, Q. P.; Liu, Z. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wan, X. B.; Bai, F.; Shen, H. B.; Lv, G. P.; Jin, G. F.; Tao, X. T.; Sun, Y. X.

    2012-04-01

    A KTiOAsO4 (KTA) intracavity optical parametric oscillator (IOPO) is achieved within a diode end-pumped acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. With a 25-mm-long X-cut KTA crystal, efficient parametric conversions to signal (1535 nm) and idler (3467 nm) waves are realized. At an incident diode power of 14.9 W, the highest output power of 1.83 W including 1.37 W of signal and 0.46 W of idler radiations are obtained at a repetition rate of 40 kHz, corresponding to a total optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 12.3%. Rate equations model are used to simulate this system, and the theoretical results agree with the experimental ones.

  18. High power MWIR quantum cascade lasers and their use in intra-cavity THz room temperature generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troccoli, Mariano; Wang, Xiaojun; Fan, Jenyu; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Aiting; Jiang, Yifan; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Belkin, Mikhail A.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we review our results on high power quantum cascade lasers in the mid- and long-wave infrared regions of the spectrum (4-12um). The specifications and characteristics of state-of-the-art QC lasers fabricated by MOCVD technology are illustrated, along with their key application requirements and potential issues for future improvements. Single emitter QC lasers in the Watt-class range are presented and analyzed. In addition, we explore the use of high power QCLs for THz generation at room temperature by non-linear mixing of high power mid-infrared beams in a monolithic intra-cavity design. The THz radiation so obtained is widely tunable by electrical injection. Experimentally, we demonstrate ridge waveguide single mode devices electrically tunable between 3.44 and 4.02 THz.

  19. Efficient high-pulse-energy eye-safe laser generated by an intracavity Nd:YLF/KTP optical parametric oscillator: role of thermally induced polarization switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y J; Tang, C Y; Huang, Y P; Cho, C Y; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2012-01-01

    A high-pulse-energy eye-safe laser at 1552 nm is effectually generated by an intracavity Nd:YLF/KTP optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with the help of the thermally induced polarization switching. The polarization characteristics of the c-cut Nd:YLF laser at 1053 nm in the continuous-wave (CW) and Q-switched operation are comprehensively investigated. We experimentally verify the thermally induced birefringence can lead to a polarization switching between the mutually orthogonal components of the fundamental pulses. Consequently, an efficient intracavity nonlinear frequency conversion can be achieved in an optically isotropic laser crystal without any additional polarization control. With this finding, the pulse energy and peak power of the compact Nd:YLF/KTP eye-safe laser under an incident pump power of 12.7 W and a pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz are up to 306 μJ and 4 kW, respectively

  20. A Physico-Chemical Study of Some Areas of Fundamental Significance to Biophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Devendra; McGlynn, S. P.

    1999-04-01

    This report covers: Radiation Signatures; Electronic Structure of Steroids, Vitamins, and others; Laser Optogalvanic Effect; Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectroscopy, including Electron Scattering, Photochemistry, and Magnetic Circular Dichroism; and Ozone.

  1. Plasma diagnosis by dye laser intracavity absorption: Final report for period January 1, 1982-May 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, G.O.

    1986-05-01

    Dye laser intracavity absorption (ICA) has been studied as a potential diagnostic for plasma or neutral beam systems. For magnetic field measurements it is necessary to make Zeeman effect measurements on the resonance transition of atomic lithium on a millisecond time scale, or to make motional Stark Effect measurements on an injected fast atomic beam of hydrogen. To do this it may be necessary to sweep the dye laser in wavelength at a rapid rate so that the absorber can be sampled many times during the measurement. We have examined both of these possibilities during this contract. A rather detailed absorption spectrum of molecular hydrogen and deuterium arising in the 2c 3 Piu and other electronic states has been obtained and analyzed. This has provided new information on the types of molecular species that may be detected in a plasma by ICA, and may provide a basis for the application of ICA for the diagnosis of the edge plasma in a tokamak or in the end regions of a mirror machine

  2. Electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  3. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Xiong; Jinlu Shan; Jia Liu; Kewei Zhao; Shu Chen; Wenjing Xu; Qian Zhou; Mei Yang; Xin Lei

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point ...

  4. Intracavity KTP-based OPO pumped by a dual-loss modulated, simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GGG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Yufei; Li, Dechun; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2014-11-03

    An intracavity KTiOPO(4) (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:Gd(3)Ga(5)O(12) (Nd:GGG) laser with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and a Cr(4+):YAG saturable absorber is presented. A minimum mode-locking pulse duration underneath the Q-switched envelope was evaluated to be about 290 ps. A maximum QML output power of 82 mW at the signal wavelength of 1570 nm was achieved, corresponding to a maximum mode-locked pulse energy of about 5.12 μJ. The M(2) values were measured to be about 1.3 and 1.5 for tangential and sagittal directions using knife-edge technique.

  5. Quasi-continuous-wave 589-nm radiation based on intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:GGG/BaWO4 Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Men, Shaojie; Rao, Han; Xia, Jinbao; Zhang, Sasa; Zhang, Huaijin

    2016-07-01

    Quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) 589-nm radiation was realized based on a frequency-doubled crystalline Raman laser. The fundamental wave with macro-micro-pulse trains was generated from an acousto-optically Q-switched QCW diode side-pumped Nd:GGG laser. Intracavity Raman conversion was accomplished by a BaWO4 crystal and the second harmonic generation was finished by a KTP crystal. Under a pumping power of 126.0 W with a macro-pulse frequency of 300 Hz and duration of 300 μs, the maximum 589 nm output power of 4.2 W was obtained at a micro-pulse frequency of 33.3 kHz. The micro-pulse width was 13.6 ns.

  6. Comparison of Small-Scale Actively and Passively Q-Switched Eye-Safe Intracavity Optical Parametric Oscillators at 1.57 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jie-Guang; Pan Yu-Zhai; Qu Shi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    The first experimental comparison between the actively and passively Q-switched intracavity optical parametric oscillators (IOPOs) at 1.57 μm driven by a small-scale diode-pumped Nd:YVO 4 laser are thoroughly presented. It is found that the performances of the two types of IOPOs are complementary. The actively Q-switched IOPO features a shorter pulse duration, a higher peak power, and a superior power and pulse stability. However, in terms of compactness, operation threshold and conversion efficiency, passively Q-switched IOPOs are more attractive. It is further indicated that the passively Q-switched IOPO at 1.57μm is a promising and cost-effective eye-safe laser source, especially at the low and moderate output levels. In addition, instructional improvement measures for the two types of IOPOs are also summarized. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  7. 303 nm continuous wave ultraviolet laser generated by intracavity frequency-doubling of diode-pumped Pr3+:LiYF4 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Chaomin; Zhu, Kun; Ping, Yunxia; Song, Pei; Sun, Xiaohui; Wang, Fuxin; Yao, Yi

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate an efficient and compact ultraviolet laser at 303 nm generated by intracavity frequency doubling of a continuous wave (CW) laser diode-pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser at 607 nm. A cesium lithium borate (CLBO) crystal, cut for critical type I phase matching at room temperature, is used for second-harmonic generation (SHG) of the fundamental laser. By using an InGaN laser diode array emitting at 444.3 nm with a maximum incident power of 10 W, as high as 68 mW of CW output power at 303 nm is achieved. The output power stability in 4 h is better than 2.85%. To the best of our knowledge, this is high efficient UV laser generated by frequency doubling of an InGaN laser diode array pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  9. Idler-resonant intracavity KTA-based OPO pumped by a dual-loss modulated-Q-switched-laser with AOM and Cr4+:YAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Junpeng; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2017-06-01

    An idler-resonant KTiOAsO4 (KTA)-based intracavity optical parametric oscillator (IOPO) pumped by a dual-loss-modulated Q-switched laser with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber (Cr4+:YAG-SA) has been presented. By utilizing a type-II non-critically phase-matched KTA crystal, signal wave at 1535 nm and idler wave at 3467 nm have been generated. Under an incident pump power of 18.3 W, maximum output powers of 615 mW for signal wave and 228 mW for idler wave were obtained at an AOM modulation rate of 10 kHz, corresponding to a whole optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 4.6%. The shortest pulse widths of signal and idler wave were measured to be 898 ps and 2.9 ns, corresponding to the highest peak powers of 68.4 and 7.9 kW, respectively. In comparison with IOPO pumped by a singly Q-switched laser with an AOM, the IOPO pumped by a doubly Q-switched laser (DIOPO) with an AOM and a Cr4+:YAG-SA can generate signal wave and idler wave with shorter pulse width and higher peak power. By considering the spatial Gaussian distribution of intracavity photon density, a set of coupled rate equations for the idler-resonant DIOPO were built for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results.

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  11. Modern spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollas, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The latest edition of this highly acclaimed title introduces the reader to a wide range of spectroscopies, and includes both the background theory and applications to structure determination and chemical analysis.  It covers rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy, as well as EXAFs and the theory of lasers and laser spectroscopy. A  revised and updated edition of a successful, clearly written book Includes the latest developments in modern laser techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy and femtosecond lasers Provides numerous worked examples, calculations and questions at the end of chapters.

  12. Electronic spectroscopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is

  13. Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  14. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, J.; Brun, T.O.; Dianoux, A.J.; Howard, J.; Rush, J.J.; White, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  15. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  16. A physico-chemical study of some areas of fundamental significance to biophysics: Annual report, 1988--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Density Effects on High-n Rydbergs of Methyl Iodide; Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Biologically Active Molecules; Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy; Luminescence Studies; and Photoionization Studies

  17. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  18. Hadron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binon, F.; Frere, J.M.; Peigneux, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    HADRON 89 is the third of a series of biennial conferences on hadron spectroscopy which are now replacing the former separate meson and baryon spectroscopy conferences. The first one, HADRON 85, was held at the University of Maryland. The second one, HADRON 87, has taken place at KEK in Tsukuba in Japan. This conference is divided into 7 sessions bearing on: - session 1 Light mesons and exotics (19 conferences) - session 2 Light mesons and exotics-theory-phonomenology (15 conferences) - session 3 Theoretical problems (14 conferences) - session 4 New detectors factories (9 conferences) - session 5 Baryons (7 conferences) - session 6 Heavy flavor spectroscopy (7 conferences) - session 7 Concluding hadron 89 (3 conferences)

  19. Spectroscopy of C-H stretching overtones in dimethylacetylene, dimethylcadmium, and dimethylmercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares I., C.; Yamasaki, N.L.S.; Weitz, E. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1989-06-15

    The overtone spectra of a number of C-H stretching vibrations of dimethylacetylene, dimethylcadmium, and dimethylmercury were obtained by using intracavity dye laser photoacoustic spectroscopy. Transitions corresponding to the {Delta}{nu} = 5, 6, and 7 overtones of the C-H stretch are assigned by using the local-mode model. In addition, a number of local-mode-normal-mode combination bands have been identified. Local-mode harmonic frequencies ({omega}{sub e}) and anharmonicities ({omega}{sub e}x{sub e}) are obtained from Birge-Sponer plots. The line widths of the pure local-mode transitions are analyzed in terms of possible resonances with local-mode-normal-mode combination bands. Line widths in this series of compounds are compared to line widths in the M(CH{sub 3}){sub 4} and M(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} series.

  20. Electronic spectroscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is directly chemical since the outer shell electrons of the TMI are probed and provide information about the oxidation state and coordination environment of TMI on surfaces. Furthermore, the DRS technique ca...

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  2. Simultaneous intracavity optical parametric oscillation and stimulated Raman scattering pumped by a doubly passively Q-switched Nd:GGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Jia; Li, Yufei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Dechun; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2014-12-01

    By using a doubly passively Q-switched Nd:Gd3Ga5O12(Nd:GGG) laser with Cr4+:YAG and GaAs as saturable absorbers as pump laser, simultaneous intracavity optical parametric oscillation and stimulated Raman scattering based on a single X-cut KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal have been realized. Under an incident diode pump power of 10.5 W, the output powers at the signal wave near 1,569 nm and the first Stokes emission near 1,094 nm were 218 and 72 mW, corresponding to the optical-to-optical conversion efficiencies of 2.08 and 0.69 %, respectively. The measured shortest pulse duration at the signal wave near 1,569 nm was 580 ps, generating a pulse peak power of 43.7 kW, while the minimum pulse duration at the first Stokes emission near 1,094 nm was 1.61 ns. By adjusting the tilt angle of the KTP crystal, up to the third Stokes scattering was also obtained.

  3. Dual-wavelength passively Q-switched ytterbium-doped fiber laser using Fe3O4-nanoparticle saturable absorber and intracavity polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hayali, S. K. M.; Al-Janabi, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated the operation of a dual-wavelength passively Q-switched ytterbium-doped fiber laser by using a saturable absorber (SA) based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a magnetic fluid. The SA was fabricated by depositing magnetic fluid at the end of an optical fiber ferrule. By performing adjustments to the pump power and polarization controller state in the cavity, a stable dual-wavelength lasing operation was generated without intracavity spectral filters or modulation elements. The Q-switched laser output was achieved at a pump threshold of 80 mW with a maximum output pulse energy of 38.8 nJ, a repetition rate of 73.4 kHz and a minimum pulse width of 3.4 µs. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a dual-wavelength passively Q-switched fiber laser using Fe3O4 nanoparticles as the SA in the 1.0 µm operation region.

  4. 2.1-watts intracavity-frequency-doubled all-solid-state light source at 671 nm for laser cooling of lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, U; Bergschneider, A; Sievers, F; Kretzschmar, N; Salomon, C; Chevy, F

    2013-04-08

    We present an all-solid-state laser source emitting up to 2.1 W of single-frequency light at 671 nm developed for laser cooling of lithium atoms. It is based on a diode-pumped, neodymium-doped orthovanadate (Nd:YVO(4)) ring laser operating at 1342 nm. Optimization of the thermal management in the gain medium results in a maximum multi-frequency output power of 2.5 W at the fundamental wavelength. We develop a simple theory for the efficient implementation of intracavity second harmonic generation, and its application to our system allows us to obtain nonlinear conversion efficiencies of up to 88%. Single-mode operation and tuning is established by adding an etalon to the resonator. The second-harmonic wavelength can be tuned over 0.5 nm, and mode-hop-free scanning over more than 6 GHz is demonstrated, corresponding to around ten times the laser cavity free spectral range. The output frequency can be locked with respect to the lithium D-line transitions for atomic physics applications. Furthermore, we observe parametric Kerr-lens mode-locking when detuning the phase-matching temperature sufficiently far from the optimum value.

  5. Improvement of stability and efficiency in diode-pumped passively Q-switched intracavity optical parametric oscillator with a monolithic cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J Y; Zhuang, W Z; Huang, Y P; Huang, Y J; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2012-01-01

    We improve the performance of intracavity optical parametric oscillator (IOPO) pumped by a diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 /Cr 4+ :YAG laser. The IOPO cavity is formed independently by a monolithic KTP crystal that the mirrors are directly deposited on top of the nonlinear crystal. We study the performances of this IOPO cavity with different reflectivity of the output coupler at 1.5 μm (R s ) of 80 and 50%. The average power of 1.5 μm is up to 3.3 W at the maximum pump power of 16.8 W for both cases. The diode-to-signal conversion efficiency is up to 20%, which is the highest one for IOPOs to our best knowledge. At the maximum pump power, the pulse energies are 41 μJ with the pulse width of 3 ns at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 80 kHz for R s = 80% and 51 μJ with the pulse width of 1.2 ns at a PRR of 65 kHz for R s = 50%, respectively. The pulse amplitude fluctuations in standard deviation are 2.6% for R s = 80% and 4% for R s = 50%, respectively

  6. Reconfiguration of the multiwavelength operation of optical fiber ring lasers by the modifiable intra-cavity induced losses of an in-fiber tip probe modal Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salceda-Delgado, G.; Martinez-Rios, A.; Sierra-Hernandez, J. M.; Rodríguez-Carreón, V. C.; Toral-Acosta, D.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.; Álvarez-Tamayo, R. I.; Castillo-Guzman, A. A.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2018-03-01

    A straightforward and versatile method for switching from single to different multiwavelength laser emission in ring cavity fiber lasers is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The method is based on using the changeable interference pattern from an optical fiber modal Michelson interferometer as a wavelength selective filter into the ring cavity laser. The interferometer is constructed using a bi-conical tapered fiber and a single-mode fiber segment, with these being spliced together to form an optical fiber tip probe. When the length of the single-mode fiber piece is modified, the phase difference between the interfering modes of the interferometer causes a change in the interferometer free spectral range. As a consequence, the laser intra-cavity losses lead to gain competition, which allows us to adjust the number of simultaneously generated laser lines. A multiwavelength reconfiguration of the laser from one up to a maximum of eight emission lines was obtained, with a maximum SNR of around 47 dBm.

  7. Emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    This 16th article in the series of biennial reviews of emission spectroscopy surveys with emphasis the emission spectrochemical literature appearing in referred publications during 1976 and 1977. Books and general reviews of emission spectroscopy and closely related subjects are considered in the first section, whereas specific reviews and texts are included in each of the five tropical sections. Spectral descriptions and classifications are examined in the second section. An abbreviated instrumentation section follows, and standards, samples, calibrations, and calculations are evaluated in the fourth section. The emphasis on excitation sources reflects the size of section five. In the sixth section, important applications are explored

  8. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  9. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    causes relaxation processes with characteristic contributions to the frequency-dependent complex dielectric constant. These dipolar relaxations were initially described by Debye (Polare Molekeln 1929). They are the basis of impedance spectroscopy (K’Owino and Sadik Electroanalysis 17(23):2101–2113, 2005...

  10. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanli; Shan, Jinlu; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Kewei; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2017-01-17

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point was defined on the mucosa surface, with a total dose of 55-62 Gy-eq/4 f (13-16 Gy-eq/f/wk). All the patients completed the radiotherapy in accordance with our protocol. The rectal lesions regressed completely, and the acute rectal toxicity was mild (≤G2). The 4-year local control, overall survival, disease-free survival, and late complication (≥G2) rates were 96.9%, 90.6%, 87.5% and 15.6%, respectively. No severe late complication (≥G3) occurred. The mean follow-up was 56.1 ± 16.0 months. At the end of last follow-up, 29 patients remained alive. The mean survival time was 82.1 ± 2.7 months. Cf-252 neutron ICBT administered as the sole treatment (without surgery) for patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma is effective with acceptable late complications. Our study and method offers a definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma patients.

  11. Combination of external beam radiotherapy and Californium (Cf)-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy is more effective in control of cervical squamous cell carcinoma than that of cervical adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanli; Liu, Jia; Chen, Shu; Zhou, Qian; Xu, Wenjing; Tang, Chen; Chen, Yonghong; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and Californium (Cf)-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) on cervical squamous versus adenocarcinoma. A total of 106 patients with stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer were accrued between January 2005 and May 2011 and divided into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC) as a pair with 53 patients in each group according to tumor size, stage, age, and hemoglobin level using matched-pair design. The whole pelvic EBRT was performed with 2 Gy/fraction, 4 fractions/week. The total dose was 48-54 Gy (the center of whole pelvic field was blocked by 4 cm in width after 20-36 Gy). Cf-252 neutron ICBT was delivered with 11 and 12 Gy-eq/f with the total dose at point A of 44 and 48 Gy-eq for SCC and AC patients, respectively. The mean follow-up time was 43 months. The 5-year LC, OS, DFS, LAC rates, and mean survival time were 66.0, 56.6, 52.8.0, 17.0%, and 76.4 ± 6.2 months, respectively, for AC patients, whereas they were 81.1, 69.8, 67.9, 11.3%, and 93.3 ± 4.3 months, respectively, for SCC patients. Furthermore, the early treatment toxicity was mild in both groups, the late treatment complications were mainly radiation-induced proctitis and cystitis, and there were no grade 3 or higher complications. Although the combination of Cf-252 neutron ICBT and EBRT was effective in both histology types of cervical cancer, a more aggressive strategy is needed to control cervical AC.

  12. Flexoelectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J F

    2013-08-21

    Flexoelectricity is an increasingly popular subject because it can be extremely large in thin films and permits switching of devices in nonpolar (non-piezoelectric) crystals via application of inhomogeneous stresses. However, recent work has been limited to macroscopic measurement of voltage or strain. Here, we discuss the vibrational spectroscopy of flexoelectricity as a recommended new tool for thin-film characterization, with special emphasis upon incommensurate crystals.

  13. Flexoelectric spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J F

    2013-01-01

    Flexoelectricity is an increasingly popular subject because it can be extremely large in thin films and permits switching of devices in nonpolar (non-piezoelectric) crystals via application of inhomogeneous stresses. However, recent work has been limited to macroscopic measurement of voltage or strain. Here, we discuss the vibrational spectroscopy of flexoelectricity as a recommended new tool for thin-film characterization, with special emphasis upon incommensurate crystals. (viewpoint)

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, A.

    1982-01-01

    In this work examples of the various aspects of photoelectron spectroscopy are given. The investigation was started with the development of an angle-resolved spectrometer so that the first chapters deal with angle-resolved ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. To indicate the possibilities and pitfalls of the technique, in chapter II the theory is briefly reviewed. In chapter III the instrument is described. The system is based on the cylindrical mirror deflection analyzer, which is modified and improved for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. In combination with a position sensitive detector, a spectrometer is developed with which simultaneously several angle-resolved spectra can be recorded. In chapter IV, the results are reported of angle-integrated UPS experiments on dilute alloys. Using the improved energy resolution of the instrument the author was able to study the impurity states more accurately and shows that the photoemission technique has become an important tool in the study of impurities and the interactions involved. XPS and Auger results obtained from dilute alloys are presented in chapter V. It is shown that these systems are especially suited for the study of correlation effects and can provide interesting problems related to the satellite structure and the interaction of the impurity with the host. In chapter VI, the valence bands of ternary alloys are studied with UPS and compared to recent band structure calculation. The core level shifts are analyzed in a simple, thermodynamic scheme. (Auth.)

  15. A physico-chemical study of some areas of fundamental significance to biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.; Kumar, D.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Radiation signatures; photoelectron spectroscopy of biologically active molecules; laser optogalvanic effect; magnetic circular dichroism; photochemistry of halogenated molecules; and density effects on high-n rydbergs

  16. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Infrared and Near-Infrared Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Sidsel Dahl

    and 1,4-diaminobutane). Experimentally, the hydrogen bonds have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared and near-infrared regions. The focus is primarily on spectra recorded in the near-infrared regions, which in these studies are dominated by O-H and N-H stretching overtones....... Overtone spectra have been recorded with intracavity laser photoacoustic laser spectroscopy and conventional long path absorption spectroscopy. Theoretically, a combination of electronic structure calculations and local mode models have been employed to guide the assignment of bands in the vibrational......,4-diaminobutane, no sign of intramolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds were identified in the overtone spectra. However, theoretical analyzes indicate that intramolecular N-H···N hydrogen bonds are present in all three diamines if two hydrogen atoms on one of the methylene groups are substituted with triuoromethyl...

  17. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  18. Evaluating the Feasibility of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging of the Uterine Cervix With an Intracavity Array: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltovich, Helen; Homyk, Andrew D.; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The uterine cervix softens, shortens, and dilates throughout pregnancy in response to progressive disorganization of its layered collagen microstructure. This process is an essential part of normal pregnancy, but premature changes are associated with preterm birth. Clinically, there are no reliable noninvasive methods to objectively measure cervical softening or assess cervical microstructure. The goal of these preliminary studies was to evaluate the feasibility of using an intracavity ultrasound array to generate acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) excitations in the uterine cervix through simulation, and to optimize the acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation for shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) of the tissue stiffness. The cervix is a unique soft tissue target for SWEI because it has significantly greater acoustic attenuation (α = 1.3 to 2.0 dB·cm−1·MHz−1) than other soft tissues, and the pathology being studied tends to lead to an increase in tissue compliance, with healthy cervix being relatively stiff compared with other soft tissues (E ≈ 25 kPa). Additionally, the cervix can only be accessed in vivo using a transvaginal or catheter-based array, which places additional constraints on the excitation focal characteristics that can be used during SWEI. Finite element method (FEM) models of SWEI show that larger-aperture, catheter-based arrays can utilize excitation frequencies up to 7 MHz to generate adequate focal gain up to focal depths 10 to 15 mm deep, with higher frequencies suffering from excessive amounts of near-field acoustic attenuation. Using full-aperture excitations can yield ~40% increases in ARFI-induced displacements, but also restricts the depth of field of the excitation to ~0.5 mm, compared with 2 to 6 mm, which limits the range that can be used for shear wave characterization of the tissue. The center-frequency content of the shear wave particle velocity profiles ranges from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz, depending on the focal

  19. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Spectra of hadrons show various and complex structures due to the strong coupling constants of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) constituting its fundamental theory. For their understandings, two parameters, i.e., (1) the quark mass and (2) their excitation energies are playing important roles. In low energies, for example, rather simple structures similar to the positronium appear in the heavy quarks such as charms and bottoms. It has been, however, strongly suggested by the recent experiments that the molecular resonant state shows up when the threshold to decay to mesons is exceeded. On the other hand, chiral symmetry and its breaking play important roles in the dynamics of light quarks. Strange quarks are in between and show special behaviors. In the present lecture, the fundamental concept of the hadron spectroscopy based on the QCD is expounded to illustrate the present understandings and problems of the hadron spectroscopy. Sections are composed of 1. Introduction, 2. Fundamental Concepts (hadrons, quarks and QCD), 3. Quark models and exotic hadrons, 4. Lattice QCD and QCD sum rules. For sections 1 to 3, only outline of the concepts is described because of the limited space. Exotic hadrons, many quark pictures of light hadrons and number of quarks in hadrons are described briefly. (S. Funahashi)

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemcik, T.

    1984-01-01

    The emission and absorption of photons taking place without changes in the frequency spectrum of the crystal lattice are known as the Moessbauer effect. It takes place in the low energy levels of heavy nuclei in solid lattices at low temperatures. On the basis of the hyperfine structure of Moessbauer spectra the notions are explained of isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic splitting. The principle and function are explained of Moessbauer spectrometers and the methods of graphical processing of spectra, also the use of the least square fit. Moessbauer spectroscopy is nondestructive, highly sensitive and selective and makes structural resolution possible. It is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Examples are given of the use of this method for mineralogical and crystallo-chemical analysis of lunar minerals and rocks, for analysis of corrosion products of iron and for phase analysis of alloys. (M.D.)

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in photoelectron spectroscopy at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: the orientation of CO on Pt(III) and Ni(III) surfaces from angle-resolved photoemission; photoemission from CO on Pt(III) in the range 40 eV less than or equal to dirac constant ω less than or equal to 150 eV; photoemission studies of electron states at clean surfaces using synchrotron radiation; angle and energy dependent photoemission studies of plasmon loss structure in Al and In; d-orbital directed photoemission from copper; interpretation of angle-resolved x-ray photoemission from valence bands; atomic cross-section effects in soft x-ray photoemission from Ag, Au, and Pt valence bands; x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of transition metal difluorides; x-ray photoemission investigation of the density of states of B'-NiAl; the electronic structure of SrTiO 3 and some simple related oxides; fluorescence lifetime measurements of np 5 (n+1)S' states in krypton and xenon; Zeeman beats in the resonance fluorescence of the 3P 1 , states in krypton and xenon; lifetime measurements of rare-gas dimers; configuration interaction effects in the atomic photoelectron spectra of Ba, Sm, Eu, and Yb; glow discharge lamps as electron sources for electron impact excitation; electron impact excitation of electron correlation states in Ca, Sr, and Ba; photoelectron spectroscopy of atomic and molecular bismuth; relativistic effects in the uv photoelectron spectra of group VI diatomic molecules; and relative gas-phase acidities and basicities from a proton potential model

  2. SIMP spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e + e − colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  3. SIMP spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, Yonit [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kuflik, Eric [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Center for Japanese Studies, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e{sup +}e{sup −} colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  4. Amateur spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, M. V.

    1998-06-01

    (The 1997 Presidential Address to the British Astronomical Association.) Auguste Comte is remembered for an unfortunate remark. In 1825 he said the chemical composition of stars would never be revealed. Within a decade or so the heart of the atom was being explored in remote stars through the science of spectroscopy. In simplistic terms one can regard the atom as a miniature solar system, but with the novel option that electrons (representing planets) having the ability to 'jump' from one orbit to another. In 'falling' to a lower orbit a photon of light of precise wavelength is released to travel outwards. When the electron 'jumps' to a higher orbit a photon of light is absorbed. This is taking place on a vast scale which we observe as lines in the spectrum - their position and prominence relates to the particular atomic element, temperature and pressure within the stellar atmosphere. It is beyond the scope of this Address to discuss the various processes that affect spectra, or to provide a mathematical explanation which can be found elsewhere. In any case the lack of a deep understanding does not preclude enjoyable or useful observations. Methods and results from amateurs conducting such observations are discussed in this paper.

  5. Planetary spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, U.

    1988-01-01

    The main goal of the research is charge coupled device (CCD) spectroscopic and imaging studies of the solar system in support of spacecraft investigations. Studies include the physical behavior of comets, the atmosphere of the gaseous planets, and the solid surfaces of satellites and asteroids. The major observing program consisted of approximately 50 nights of photometry of Comet Halley in order to resolve the controversy over this comet's rotation period. This data is presently being analyzed. Additional observing projects included the spectroscopic occultation of Charon by Pluto, reflection spectroscopy of Mercury, and a spectrum of the satellite Oberon. Mercury data does not corroborate the Fe(++) absorption feature reported by McCord and Clark at 8800 A but instead potentially shows a weaker feature at longer wavelengths. This position is in much closer accord with expectations for Mercury since a band center near 8800 A implies too little Fe(++) on Mercury, especially if band shifts with temperature are considered. The Pluto project proved that the deep methane absorptions visible in their combined specta are due soley to Pluto with Charon showing a flat and featureless spectrum. It appears that if Charon ever contained a substantial methane component, the satellite's low surface gravity could not hold it and the methane evaporated and escaped

  6. Analysis of the absorption spectra of gas emission of patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by laser optoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukreeva, Ekaterina B.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Kistenev, Yurii V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Tuzikov, Sergei A.; Yumov, Evgenii L.

    2013-02-01

    It is important to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer in the early stages of the disease. The method of laser opto-acoustic gas analysis, in this case, can act as a promising tool for diagnostics. The material for this study were the gas emission samples collected from patients and healthy volunteers - samples of exhaled air, swabs from teeth and cheeks. A set of material was formed three groups: healthy volunteers, patients with COPD, lung cancer patients. The resulting samples were analyzed by means of laser opto-acoustic gas analyzers: with intracavity location detector (ILPA-1), with extracavity location detector (LGA-2). Presentation of the results in an easy to visual form was performed using the method of elastic maps, based on the principal component analysis. The results of analysis show potentialities of usage of laser optoacoustic spectroscopy application to assess the status of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  7. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, tunable cw sources, and Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy. Discusses saturation spectroscopy; continuous wave saturation spectroscopy in the ultraviolet; and two-photon spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen 1S-2S. Focuses on Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of gaseous samples. Explains that in saturation spectroscopy, a monochromatic laser beam ''labels'' a group of atoms within a narrow range of axial velocities through excitation or optical pumping, and a Doppler-free spectrum of these selected atoms is observed with a second, counterpropagating beam. Notes that in two-photon spectroscopy it is possible to record Doppler-free spectra without any need for velocity selection by excitation with two counterpropagating laser beams whose first order Doppler shifts cancel

  8. Progress in K spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1977-07-01

    The progress in the field of K* spectroscopy is reviewed within the framework of the simple harmonic oscillator quark model, and contrasted with the recent progress made in the charmonium spectroscopy

  9. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  10. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  11. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  12. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  13. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  14. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  15. Spectroscopy of Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    first task was to select and purchase a Visible/Near- infrared spectrophotometer suitable for non-contacting spectroscopy of biological tissues...FiLE COPY AD 0 NContract No: DAMD17-88-C-8125 N Title: Spectroscopy of Burn Wounds I Principal Investigator: Martin A. Afromowitz, Ph.D. PI Address...Include Security Classification) SPECTROSCOPY OF BURN WOUNDS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Martin A. Afromowitz, Ph.D., and James B. Callis, Ph.D. 13a. TYPE OF

  16. Advances in DUV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mogensen, Claus Tilsted

    The would-be advantages of deep UV (DUV) spectroscopy are well known, but the potential applications have so far not been fully realized due to technological limitations and, perhaps, lack of bright ideas. However, new components and new knowledge about DUV spectra and spectroscopic methods...... combined with increasing needs for solutions to practical problems in environmental protection, medicine and pollution monitoring promise a new era in DUV spectroscopy. Here we shall review the basis for DUV spectroscopy, both DUV fluorescence and DUV Raman spectroscopy, and describe recent advances...

  17. Heterodyned holographic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, NG

    In holographic spectroscopy an image of an interference pattern is projected onto a detector and transformed back to the input spectrum. The general characteristics are similar to those of Fourier transform spectroscopy, but the spectrum is obtained without scanning. In the heterodyned arrangement

  18. Hadron spectroscopy: Workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comyn, M.

    1993-01-01

    The hadron spectroscopy sessions of the Working Group on Hadron and Nuclear Spectroscopy are summarized. The present status of the field is discussed, along with the main priorities and open questions for the future. The required characteristics of optimum future facilities are outlined

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  20. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  1. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Matulková, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2010), s. 408-420 ISSN 1230-3402 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FTIR spectroscopy * absorption spectroscopy * laser diodes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2010

  2. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  3. Homogeneity spoil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Boesch, C.; Martin, E.; Grutter, R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the problems of in vivo MR spectroscopy of P-31 is spectra localization. Surface coil spectroscopy, which is the method of choice for clinical applications, suffers from the high-intensity signal from subcutaneous muscle tissue, which masks the spectrum of interest from deeper structures. In order to suppress this signal while maintaining the simplicity of surface coil spectroscopy, the authors introduced a small sheet of ferromagnetically dotted plastic between the surface coil and the body. This sheet destroys locally the field homogeneity and therefore all signal from structures around the coil. The very high reproducibility of the simple experimental procedure allows long-term studies important for monitoring tumor therapy

  4. Measurements of extinction by aerosol particles in the near-infrared using continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Daniel; King, Simon J; Kim, Jin; Reid, Jonathan P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2011-02-10

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a fiber-coupled continuous wave distributed feedback laser at a wavelength of 1520 nm has been used to measure extinction of light by samples of nearly monodisperse aerosol particles analysis of the sample extinction that is based on the Poisson statistics of the number of particles within the intracavity laser beam: variances of measured extinction are used to derive values of the scattering cross section for size-selected aerosol particles, without need for knowledge of the particle number density or sample length. Experimental parameters that influence the performance of the CRD system and the application and limitations of the statistical model are examined in detail. Determinations are reported of the scattering cross sections for polystyrene spheres (PSSs), sodium chloride, and ammonium sulfate, and, for particles greater than 500 nm in diameter, are shown to be in agreement with the corresponding values calculated using Mie theory or Discrete Dipole Approximation methods. For smaller particles, the experimentally derived values of the scattering cross section are larger than the theoretical predictions, and transmission of a small fraction of larger particles into the cavity is argued to be responsible for this discrepancy. The effects of cubic structure on the determination of optical extinction efficiencies of sodium chloride aerosol particles are examined. Values are reported for the real components of the refractive indices at 1520 nm of PSS, sodium chloride, and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles.

  5. IR Spectroscopy. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzler, H.; Gremlich, H.U.

    2002-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: absorption and molecular design, spectrometers, sample preparation, qualitative spectral interpretation and assertions, near-infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy, reference spectra and expert systems

  6. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ARTICLE. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Biological Applications. B G Hegde. Recently, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectros- copy has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules such as proteins, protein aggregates ... research interests are.

  7. Foundations of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stenholm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    A simple presentation of the theoretical foundations of steady-state laser spectroscopy, this text helps students to apply theory to calculations with a systematic series of examples and exercises. 1984 edition.

  8. Charmonium spectroscopy, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The state of charmonium spectroscopy is reviewed. All analyses proceed from a spin-dependent, non-relativistic Schroedinger equation. Many of the possible branching ratios for charm like states are investigated. 17 refs

  9. Dual THz comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    Optical frequency combs are innovative tools for broadband spectroscopy because a series of comb modes can serve as frequency markers that are traceable to a microwave frequency standard. However, a mode distribution that is too discrete limits the spectral sampling interval to the mode frequency spacing even though individual mode linewidth is sufficiently narrow. Here, using a combination of a spectral interleaving and dual-comb spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, we achieved a spectral sampling interval equal to the mode linewidth rather than the mode spacing. The spectrally interleaved THz comb was realized by sweeping the laser repetition frequency and interleaving additional frequency marks. In low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved an improved spectral sampling density of 2.5 MHz and enhanced spectral accuracy of 8.39 × 10-7 in the THz region. The proposed method is a powerful tool for simultaneously achieving high resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage in THz spectroscopy.

  10. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  11. Methods of laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Y.; Ben-Reuven, A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the one-atom maser and cavity quantum electrodynamics; Rydberg atoms and radiation; investigation of nonthermal population distributions with femtosecond optical pulses; intra- and intermolecular energy transfer of large molecules in solution after picosecond excitation; new techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses; spectral linewidth of semiconductor lasers; the hydrogen atom in a new light; laser frequency division and stabilization; modified optical Bloch equations for solids; CARS spectroscopy of transient species; off resonant laser induced ring emission; UV laser ionization spectroscopy and ion photochemistry; laser spectroscopy of proton-transfer in microsolvent clusters; recent advances in intramolecular electronic energy transfer; and photoionization and dissociation of the H 2 molecule near the ionization threshold

  12. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  13. Spectroscopy stepping stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, M.R.; Sturman, B.T.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the elemental composition of samples has long been a basic task of analytical science. Some very powerful and convenient approaches are based on the wavelength-specific absorption or emission of light by gas-phase atoms. Techniques briefly described as examples of analytical atomic spectrometry include atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma emission and mass spectroscopy and laser induced breakdown spectrometry

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopy. Tutorial book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Langouche, Guido

    2013-01-01

    First textbook on Moessbauer Spectroscopy covering the complete field. Offers a concise introduction to all aspects of Moessbauer spectroscopy by the leading experts in the field. Tutorials on Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Since the discovery of the Moessbauer Effect many excellent books have been published for researchers and for doctoral and master level students. However, there appears to be no textbook available for final year bachelor students, nor for people working in industry who have received only basic courses in classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, chemistry and materials science. The challenge of this book is to give an introduction to Moessbauer Spectroscopy for this level. The ultimate goal of this book is to give this audience not only a scientific introduction to the technique, but also to demonstrate in an attractive way the power of Moessbauer Spectroscopy in many fields of science, in order to create interest among the readers in joining the community of Moessbauer spectroscopists. This is particularly important at times where in many Moessbauer laboratories succession is at stake.

  15. Plasmon enhanced spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Ricardo F

    2013-04-21

    Surface enhanced spectroscopy encompasses a broad field of linear and nonlinear optical techniques that arose with the discovery of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. SERS enabled ultrasensitive and single molecule detection with molecular fingerprint specificity, opening the door for a large variety of chemical sensing applications. Basically, from the beginning it was realized that the necessary condition for SERS to be observed was the presence of a metallic nanostructure, and with this condition, the optical enhancement found a home in the field of plasmonics. Although plasmonic practitioners claim that SERS is "the most spectacular application of plasmonics", perhaps it is more appropriate to say that the spectacular development of plasmonics is due to SERS. Here is a brief recollection from surface enhanced spectroscopy to plasmon enhanced spectroscopy.

  16. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitler, Axel; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    "This book presents the current state of knowledge in the field of terahertz spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive source of information for beginners and experienced researchers alike whose interests lie in this area. The book aims to explain the fundamental physics that underpins terahertz  technology and to describe its key applications. Highlights of scientific research in the field of terahertz science are also outlined in some chapters, providing an overview as well as giving an insight into future directions for research.  Over the past decade terahertz spectroscopy has developed into one of the most rapidly growing areas of its kind, gaining an important impact across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Due to substantial advances in femtosecond laser technology, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has established itself as the dominant spectroscopic technique for experimental scientists interested in measurements at this frequency range. In solids and liquids THz radiation is in reso...

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  18. Dye lasers in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Luther, J.; Steudel, A.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of dye lasers which are relevant to atomic spectroscopy are discussed. Several experiments made possible by tunable dye lasers are discussed. Applications of high spectral density dye lasers are covered in areas such as absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photoionization and photodetachment, and two- and multi-photon processes. Applications which take advantage of the narrow bandwidth of tunable dye lasers are discussed, including saturation spectroscopy, fluorescence line narrowing, classic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, nonoptical detection of optical resonances, heterodyne spectroscopy, and nonlinear coherent resonant phenomena. (26 figures, 180 references) (U.S.)

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Astronomical Spectroscopy -24 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in Mendeleev's Periodic Table when the latter was formulated in. 1869. Cesium was discovered ten years earlier, in 1859; it is the first element discovered by spectroscopy. Kirchhoff and Bunsen continued their search; another new element was discovered in. 1860. It was named rubidium, and it filled up another slot in the.

  1. Outlook for baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    The review of baryon spectroscopy includes a number of new generation experiments with greatly improved statistics which have emerged and are enhancing experimental knowledge of baryon resonances. The future research directions are pointed out, and some problems and deficiencies which can be resolved with contemporary techniques are mentioned

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  3. Charmonium spectroscopy - A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to a renewed interest in the precision spectroscopy of charmonium. These are the successful exploitation of proton-antiproton annihilation in the /× = 2 9-4.0. GeV range at Fermilab (FNAL experiments E760, E835), and the BEs spectrometer program at BEPC, the electron positron collider at Beijing. Both these experiments.

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Charmonium spectroscopy - A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A review is presented of the latest developments in the spectroscopy of char- monium. Keywords. Charmonium ... More than half the decays measured have errors larger than 30%. The bound states,. ' (21Л0) and .... at sLAC claimed to have found it, but no other past experiment succeeded in confirming it. E760 and E835 ...

  6. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    essential to understand their structure. Membrane-bound proteins are generally not amenable to crystallization and often their sizes are so large that conventional techniques such as X-ray crystal- lography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will have limited applications in deciphering their structure. In.

  7. Spectroscopy of new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, G.

    1977-08-01

    A review of the spectroscopy of the ''psions'' with hidden charm or charm quantum number ch = o is followed by a discussion of charmed mesons and baryons. The anomalous C-μ events and the heavy lepton hypothesis are briefly considered

  8. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  9. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  10. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  11. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  13. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  14. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  15. Mid-infrared upconversion spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Andersen, H. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is emerging as an attractive alternative to near-infrared or visible spectroscopy. MIR spectroscopy offers a unique possibility to probe the fundamental absorption bands of a large number of gases as well as the vibrational spectra of complex molecules. In this paper...

  16. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Testera, G; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Nesteruk, K P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  17. Gaussian mode selection with intracavity diffractive optics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available of internal aperture. However, the power loss discrimination between the low order modes is often poor, and the small beam waist results in poor power extraction. Conversely, if an unstable configuration is employed, the mode volume is large and mode... discrimination good, but this is at the expense of high intrinsic loss for the oscillating modes, making such cavities suitable only for lasers with high gain. A major advance to overcome such problems was the introduction of so–called graded–phase mirrors [1...

  18. Intra-cavity vortex beam generation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available in Fig. 3. For a Gaussian pump beam (Fig. 4(a)) we achieved a Gaussian output (Fig. 4(b)) and for a ring shaped pump beam (Fig. 4(c)) we achieved a LG01 (Fig. 4(d)) eigenmode of pure modal quality. The idea of pump shaping is employed to a plano... plano-concave laser cavity with a ring shaped pump intensity profile. The beam shaping element could be removed to revert back to the Gaussian pump scenario. Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8130 813009-4 Downloaded from SPIE Digital Library on 30 Sep 2011...

  19. Thermal birefringence-compensated linear intracavity frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... The output mirror M3 was a plano-convex mirror with high reflection coating at the fundamental wavelength (R>99.7%) and high transmission coating (T >95%) at the. SHG wavelength to couple out the green beam. The pump head was placed between the two mirrors M1 and M2 and the LBO crystal was ...

  20. Thermal birefringence-compensated linear intracavity frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... green conversion efficiency was measured to be ∼12.7%. On further increasing of pump power, the output power starts to roll off as the cavity becomes unstable due to strong thermal effects. At the maximum output power, the green pulse duration (FWHM) was measured to be ∼73 ns. A typical green pulse ...

  1. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  2. Hadron spectroscopy with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS accelerator. In the past two years hadron spectroscopy was brought into focus. A huge amount of data was taken, using hadronic beams at a momentum of 190 GeV$/c$ impinging on hydrogen, lead, nickel and tungsten targets. The primary goal for the hadron programme is the study of resonance production by diractive scattering, central production and photon exchange. To bring clarity in the intriguing question about the existence of exotic states, such as glueballs and hybrids, the analysis of several channels have been started. We present here a selective overview of the current status.

  3. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, J.V.

    1991-12-01

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  5. Basic Principles of Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy deals with the production, measurement, and interpretation of spectra arising from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are many different spectroscopic methods available for solving a wide range of analytical problems. The methods differ with respect to the species to be analyzed (such as molecular or atomic spectroscopy), the type of radiation-matter interaction to be monitored (such as absorption, emission, or diffraction), and the region of the electromagnetic spectrum used in the analysis. Spectroscopic methods are very informative and widely used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Spectroscopic methods based on the absorption or emission of radiation in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), infrared (IR), and radio (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR) frequency ranges are most commonly encountered in traditional food analysis laboratories. Each of these methods is distinct in that it monitors different types of molecular or atomic transitions. The basis of these transitions is explained in the following sections.

  6. Hadron spectroscopy in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Palano, Antimo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed. In particular the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the $J/\\psi p$ system, the possible existence of four-quark states decaying to $J/\\psi \\phi$ and the confirmation of resonant nature of the $Z_c(4430)^−$ mesonic state are discussed. In the sector of charmed baryons, the observation of five new $\\Omega_c$ states, the observation of the $\\Xi^+_{cc}$ and the study of charmed baryons decaying to $D^0 p$ are presented.

  7. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  8. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  9. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy in astronomy has increased dramatically in the past ten years. The broad design considerations are discussed in terms of wavelength coverage and resolution. Three rough resolution ranges, lambda/Delta lambda of approximately 100, 1000 and 10,000, are identified in which various types of astronomical problems can be studied. Numerous existing systems are briefly discussed and references are given to more complete descriptions.

  11. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sroubek, Z.; Zavadil, J.; Kubec, F.

    1977-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy is one of the modern methods suitable for the analysis of thin films and solid state surfaces. The method is capable of providing the compositional information with a depth resolution below 0.1 μm and a sensitivity of the order of 10 -3 ppm for some impurities. The review article contains a description of the method, a list of typical applications and a short account of relevant theories. (author)

  12. Total Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of determining the distribution of beta decay strength (B(GT)) as a function of excitation energy in the daughter nucleus is discussed. Total Absorption Spectroscopy is shown to provide a way of determining the B(GT) precisely. A brief history of such measurements and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique, is followed by examples of two recent studies using the technique. (authors)

  13. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  14. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Role of vibrational spectroscopy in solving problems related to astrobiology will be discussed. Vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for identifying molecules. Theoretical approach used in this work is based on direct computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities from electronic structure codes. One of the applications of this computational technique is possible identification of biological building blocks (amino acids, small peptides, DNA bases) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Identifying small biological molecules in the ISM is very important from the point of view of origin of life. Hybrid (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) theoretical techniques will be discussed that may allow to obtain accurate vibrational spectra of biomolecular building blocks and to create a database of spectroscopic signatures that can assist observations of these molecules in space. Another application of the direct computational spectroscopy technique is to help to design and analyze experimental observations of ice surfaces of one of the Jupiter's moons, Europa, that possibly contains hydrated salts. The presence of hydrated salts on the surface can be an indication of a subsurface ocean and the possible existence of life forms inhabiting such an ocean.

  15. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  16. Layman friendly spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentic, Stipo; Sessions, Sharon

    Affordable consumer grade spectroscopes (e.g. SCiO, Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE) are becoming more available to the general public. We introduce the concepts of spectroscopy to the public and K12 students and motivate them to delve deeper into spectroscopy in a dramatic participatory presentation and play. We use diffraction gratings, lasers, and light sources of different spectral properties to provide a direct experience of spectroscopy techniques. Finally, we invite the audience to build their own spectroscope--utilizing the APS SpectraSnapp cell phone application--and study light sources surrounding them in everyday life. We recontextualize the stigma that science is hard (e.g. ``Math, Science Popular Until Students Realize They're Hard,'' The Wall Street Journal) by presenting the material in such a way that it demonstrates the scientific method, and aiming to make failure an impersonal scientific tool--rather than a measure of one's ability, which is often a reason for shying away from science. We will present lessons we have learned in doing our outreach to audiences of different ages. This work is funded by the APS Outreach Grant ``Captain, we have matter matters!'' We thank New Mexico Tech Physics Department and Physics Club for help and technical equipment.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy on actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boge, M.

    1988-01-01

    The wide spatial extend of the 5f electrons leads a broad spectrum of chemical and physical properties, in particular magnetic, in compounds of light actinides. Their behaviour goes from the localized magnetism of lanthanides to the itinerant magnetism often found in transition metals compounds. One parameter which strongly influences the magnetic character is the actinide-actinide distance. Moessbauer spectroscopy of the 59.5 KeV resonance in 237 Np allows a detailed study of local magnetic properties of the Np ion. Some results are presented on compounds of different crystallographic structure, showing the large variety of magnetic properties

  18. MR spectroscopy in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, T.; Gerigk, L.; Giesel, F.; Schuster, L.; Essig, M.

    2010-01-01

    With an increasingly aging population we are faced with the problem of an increasing number of dementia patients. In addition to clinical, neuropsychological and laboratory procedures, MRI plays an important role in the early diagnosis of dementia. In addition to various morphological changes functional changes can also help in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia. Overall the diagnosis of dementia can be improved by using parameters from MR spectroscopy. This article focuses on MR spectroscopic changes in the physiological aging process as well as on changes in mild cognitive impairment a precursor of Alzheimer's dementia, in Alzheimer's dementia, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. (orig.) [de

  19. Fourier transforms in spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2000-01-01

    This modern approach to the subject is clearly and logically structured, and gives readers an understanding of the essence of Fourier transforms and their applications. All important aspects are included with respect to their use with optical spectroscopic data. Based on popular lectures, the authors provide the mathematical fundamentals and numerical applications which are essential in practical use. The main part of the book is dedicated to applications of FT in signal processing and spectroscopy, with IR and NIR, NMR and mass spectrometry dealt with both from a theoretical and practical poi

  20. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  1. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr +3 :LaF 3 verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the 3 H 4 , 3 H 6 , and 3 P 0 levels of the praseodymium ions

  2. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Meson and baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanius, K.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the essential results are given of the hadron spectroscopy which have been obtained in the last two years. The progress in meson spectroscopy originates in high statistics and in the extensive use of partial wave analysis. The resonances established fill the major meson multiplets. The rotational excitation (α)=0 multiplet is complete. With regard to the gaps in the 1 ++ and 1 +- nonets of the α=1 multiplet there are some good condidates, like Q 2 (1400) and D(1285). Concerning the α=2 and 3 multiplets, there are only very few established states. The reactions that should be studied in searching for the missing states are exclusive channels with multiparticle final state. Both the new evidence about meson resonances and the non-evidence for exotic states, which cannot be represented as a bound q anti q pair, show that the general pattern of meson states is in agreement with the naive nonrelativistic quark model. The summary of SU(6)xO(3) multiplets, as far as it belongs to the distribution of the observed resonances among the different multiplets, can be changed in future. Only the [56.0 + ] can be considered as well established concerning the distribution of the states. As far as it belongs to the [56.1 - ], [70.2 + ] and the second [56.2 + ], additional confirmations are necessary

  4. Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The field of High resolution Spectroscopy has been considerably extended and even redefined in some areas. Combining the knowledge of spectroscopy laser technology chemical computation and experiments Handbook of High resolution Spectroscopy provides a comprehensive survey of the whole field as it presents itself today with emphasis on the recent developments. This essential handbook for advanced research students graduate students and researchers takes a systematic approach through the rang...

  5. Molecular studies by electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansteen, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experience gained in experimental nuclear physics has played a large role in the development of electron spectroscopy as a powerful tool for studying chemical systems. The use of ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) for the mapping of molecular properties connected with inner as well as outer electron shells is reviewed, mainly from a phenomological point of view. Molecular Auger electron spectroscopy is described as a means of gaining information on details in molecular structure, simultaneously being extensively applied for surface studies. Future highly promising research areas for molecular electron spectroscopy are suggested to be (e,2e) processes as well as continued exploitation of synchrotron radiation from high energy nuclear devices. (Auth.)

  6. Mass Spectroscopy/Mass Spectroscopy Method for Quantitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine naproxen levels in human plasma using a new liquid chromatography-Mass spectroscopy/Mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) method that involves a simple and single step extraction procedure using low-cost reagents. Method: A novel liquid chromatography.tandem mass spectrometry method for the ...

  7. Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Ken M

    2011-01-01

    Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs is a complete guide for amateur astronomers who are looking for a new challenge beyond astrophotography. The book provides a brief overview of the history and development of the spectroscope, then a short introduction to the theory of stellar spectra, including details on the necessary reference spectra required for instrument testing and spectral comparison. The various types of spectroscopes available to the amateur are then described. Later sections cover all aspects of setting up and using various types of commercially available and home-built spectroscopes, starting with basic transmission gratings and going through more complex models, all the way to the sophisticated Littrow design. The final part of the text is about practical spectroscope design and construction. This book uniquely brings together a collection of observing, analyzing, and processing hints and tips that will allow the amateur to build skills in preparing scientifically acceptable spectra data. It...

  8. Scanning image correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-05-01

    Molecular interactions are at the origin of life. How molecules get at different locations in the cell and how they locate their partners is a major and partially unresolved question in biology that is paramount to signaling. Spatio-temporal correlations of fluctuating fluorescently tagged molecules reveal how they move, interact, and bind in the different cellular compartments. Methods based on fluctuations represent a remarkable technical advancement in biological imaging. Here we discuss image analysis methods based on spatial and temporal correlation of fluctuations, raster image correlation spectroscopy, number and brightness, and spatial cross-correlations that give us information about how individual molecules move in cells and interact with partners at the single molecule level. These methods can be implemented with a standard laser scanning microscope and produce a cellular level spatio-temporal map of molecular interactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Electromagnetic induction spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, I. J.; Keiswetter, Dean A.

    1998-09-01

    An object, made partly or wholly of metals, has a distinct combination of electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability, and geometrical shape and size. When the object is exposed to a low-frequency electromagnetic field, it produces a secondary magnetic field. By measuring the secondary field in a broadband spectrum, we obtain a distinct spectral signature that may uniquely identify the object. Based on the response spectrum, we attempt to 'fingerprint' the object. This is the basic concept of Electromagnetic Induction Spectroscopy (EMIS). EMIS technology may be particularly useful for detecting buried landmines and unexploded ordnance. By fully characterizing and identifying an object without excavation. We should be able to reduce significantly the number of false targets. EMIS should be fully applicable to many other problems where target identification and recognition (without intrusive search) are important. For instance, an advanced EMIS device at an airport security gate may be able to recognize a particular weapon by its maker and type.

  10. NMR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, A.G.; Fedin, Eh.I.

    1986-01-01

    Physical foundations are given and the most important areas of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) application in physics, chemistry, biology are described. A detailed review of the investigations conducted and the NMR applications in different science and technology fields is presented. The method basic experimental variants, including such new ones as high resolution in a solid body; rare isotope resonance; two-dimensional and multi-quantum fourier-spectroscopy; large molecule NMR; NMR tomography and NMR intrascopy etc. are considered. The instruments are briefly described. NMR is characterized as one of the most important investigation methods of the material composition, its molecular and crystal structure, visualization of the living organism and nonmetallic object inner structure

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue ischaemia can be a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional oxygenation monitoring modalities measure systemic oxygenation, but regional tissue oxygenation is not monitored. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive monitor for measuring regional oxygen saturation which provides real-time information. There has been increased interest in the clinical application of NIRS following numerous studies that show improved outcome in various clinical situations especially cardiac surgery. Its use has shown improved neurological outcome and decreased postoperative stay in cardiac surgery. Its usefulness has been investigated in various high risk surgeries such as carotid endarterectomy, thoracic surgeries, paediatric population and has shown promising results. There is however, limited data supporting its role in neurosurgical population. We strongly feel, it might play a key role in future. It has significant advantages over other neuromonitoring modalities, but more technological advances are needed before it can be used more widely into clinical practice.

  12. Transit spectroscopy with GTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osorio M.R. Zapatero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to different ground-based surveys and space missions, nowadays we have a fairly large sample of discovered extra-solar planets to study and, without a doubt, this number will increase in the future. One of the most succesful techniques that allows us to prove the physical properties and atmospheric composition of these exoplanets is transmission spectroscopy. The level of precision that is require to measure these effects provides a technical challenge that is solved by using big telescopes and stable instruments to reach low noise levels. In this article, we will discuss the use of the 10m class telescope GTC to observed planetary transits in spectroscopic mode and some of the results that we are currently obtaining.

  13. Heavy meson spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarty, S.

    1989-08-01

    In this article we give a review of certain aspects of the present understanding of spectroscopy of heavy mesons and constituent quark masses in the light of non-relativistic potential model approach motivated by quantum chromodynamics. We find that the one gluon exchange at short distance and colour-confining interaction at large distance which is pure scalar (or scalar-vector admixture with dominant scalar interaction) under the Lorentz transformation, can explain only partially the present data on 1P states of cc-bar and bb-bar states. The S-wave data, that are available at present, however can be understood with both scalar confinement or scalar-vector admixture with scalar-dominant interaction. (author). 44 refs, 13 tabs

  14. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  15. Superconductivity for mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Masataka

    2007-01-01

    Time-of-Flight Mass Spectroscopy (TOF-MS) with super-conducting detectors has two advantages over MS with conventional ion detectors. First, it is coverage for a very wide range of molecule weight over 1,000,000. Secondly, kinetic energies of accelerated molecules can be measured at impact events one by one. These unique features enable an ultimate detection efficiency of 100% for intact ions and a fragmentation analysis that is critical for top-down proteomics. Superconducting MS is expected to play a role in, for example, the detection of antigen-antibody complexes, which are important for medical diagnosis. In this paper, how superconductivity contributes to MS is described. (author)

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  17. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In Raman spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of photons from an atom or molecule in chemical entities is utilized to analyze the composition of solids, liquids and gases. However, the low cross-section limits its applications. The introduction of sur- face-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in 1974 has attracted a lot of attention ...

  18. Ultrabroadband spectroscopy for security applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Sunniva; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrabroadband spectroscopy is a promising novel approach to overcome two major hurdles which have so far limited the application of THz spectroscopy for security applications: the increased bandwidth enables to record several characteristic spectroscopic features and the technique allows...... evaluation of the technique for defense and civil security applications....

  19. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  20. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  1. Industrial applications of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, J. G.; Walder, F.; Petty, C.; Kemeny, G.

    1993-03-01

    In the last two decades, Raman spectroscopy has matured as an important method for the study of molecules and complex molecular systems. This is evident from the number of fine texts and the many review articles which have been published describing theory and applications of Raman spectroscopy over a very broad range of subjects (1-10). Raman spectroscopy is the essential partner to infrared spectroscopy for a complete vibrational analysis of a molecule in structure determinations. From the understanding developed on small molecules, theory was extended to interpret the spectra of larger systems such as polymers, biological molecules, and ordered condensed phases. The contribution of Raman spectroscopy to these areas has been significant. It was the development of commercial lasers in the 1960s which spurred the renewed interest in the Raman technique. But applications were still limited for highly fluorescing or intensely colored systems. In 1986, a breakthrough paper by Hirschfeld and Chase (11) described the use of near-infrared laser excitation and a commercial interferometer-based FT-IR spectrometer to record FT-Raman spectra. Significant advantages included the inherent multiplex, throughput and data processing features of the FT interferometers and the use of a ND:YAG laser (1.064 μm) which dramatically decreased problems with sample fluorescence and decomposition. A deluge of papers describing applications of FT-Raman spectroscopy can be found in the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, Spectrochimica Acta (special issues 40A ad 47A), and Applied Spectroscopy since then.

  2. Partial symmetries in nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    The notions of exact, dynamical and partial symmetries are discussed in relation to nuclear spectroscopy. Explicit forms of Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. An analysis of the resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions demonstrates the relevance of such partial symmetry to the spectroscopy of axially deformed nuclei. (Author)

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attekum, P.M.T.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  4. Operando fuel cell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Ian Michael

    The active state of a catalyst only exists during catalysis (1) provided the motivation for developing operando spectroscopic techniques. A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was designed to interface with commercially available instruments for acquisition of infrared spectra of the catalytic surface of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) during normal operation. This technique has provided insight of the complex processes occurring at the electrode surface. Nafion, the solid electrolyte used in most modern-day polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), serves many purposes in fuel cell operation. However, there is little known of the interface between Nafion and the electrode surface. Previous studies of complex Stark tuning curves of carbon monoxide on the surface of a platinum electrode were attributed the co-adsorption of bisulfite ions originating from the 0.5M H2SO4 electrolyte used in the study(2). Similar tuning curves obtained on a fuel cell MEA despite the absence of supplemental electrolytes suggest the adsorption of Nafion onto platinum (3). The correlation of spectra obtained using attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) and polarization modulated IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to a theoretical spectrum generated using density functional theory (DFT) lead to development of a model of Nafion and platinum interaction which identified participation of the SO3- and CF3 groups in Nafion adsorption. The use of ethanol as a fuel stream in proton exchange membrane fuel cells provides a promising alternative to methanol. Relative to methanol, ethanol has a greater energy density, lower toxicity and can be made from the fermentation of biomass(4). Operando IR spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation pathway of ethanol and Stark tuning behavior of carbon monoxide on Pt, Ru, and PtRu electrodes. Potential dependent products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and carbon monoxide are identified as well as previously

  5. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13 C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system

  6. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  7. Hadron Spectroscopy in COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) aimed at studying the structure and spectrum of hadrons. In the naive Constituent Quark Model (CQM) mesons are bound states of quarks and antiquarks. QCD, however, predict the existence of hadrons beyond the CQM with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). One main goal of COMPASS is to search for these states. Particularly interesting are so called spin-exotic mesons which have J^{PC} quantum numbers forbidden for ordinary q\\bar{q} states. Its large acceptance, high resolution, and high-rate capability make the COMPASS experiment an excellent device to study the spectrum of light-quark mesons in diffractive and central production reactions up to masses of about 2.5 GeV. COMPASS is able to measure final states with charged as well as neutral particles, so that resonances can be studied ...

  8. Meson spectroscopy with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Nerling, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The COMPASS fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS is dedicated to the study of hadron structure and dynamics. In the physics programme using hadron beams, the focus is on the detection of new states, in particular the search for $J^{PC}$ exotic states and glueballs. After a short pilot run in 2004 (190 GeV/c negative pion beam, lead target), we started our hadron spectroscopy programme in 2008 by collecting an unprecedented statistics with a negative hadron beam (190 GeV/c) on a liquid hydrogen target. A similar amount of data with positive hadron beam (190 GeV/c) has been taken in 2009, as well as some additional data with negative beam on nuclear targets. The spectrometer features a large angular acceptance and high momentum resolution and also good coverage by electromagnetic calorimetry, crucial for the detection of final states involving $\\pi^0$ or $\\eta$. A first important result is the observation of a significant $J^{PC}$ spin exotic signal consistent with the disputed $\\pi_1(1600)$ in the pilot run dat...

  9. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2016-11-29

    The goal of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is to study the structure and dynamics of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer used by the experiment has large acceptance and covers a wide kinematic range for charged as well as neutral particles and can therefore measure a wide range of reactions. The spectroscopy of light mesons is performed with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The light-meson spectrum is measured in different final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions with squared four-momentum transfer $t$ to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently world's largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to observe new states. Among these is a new axial-vector signal, the $a_1(1420)$, with unusual properties. Novel analysis techniques have been...

  10. Taurid Compex reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birlan, M.; Popescu, M.; Nedelcu, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Taurid complex is a massive stream of material in the inner part of the Solar System. Its name is related to the Taurid meteor shower. This complex is characterized by a cluster of objects having low-inclination (i < 12°), large-eccentricity (0.64--0.85) orbits with semimajor axes spanning the range 1.8--2.6 au. The largest body of the Taurid Complex is the comet P/Encke, and this complex contains more than 20 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). There is an important lack of information concerning the physical parameters of the Taurid complex. The observational campaign for observing NEAs of the Taurid complex was started in 2011 in order to provide valuable spectroscopic data for characterizing the surfaces of the complex members. The paper presents near-infrared spectroscopy using IRTF/SpeX obtained remotely from Paris Observatory and Bucharest Observatory for the following asteroids: (2201) Oljato, (4183) Cuno, (4486) Mithra, (5243) Heracles, (6063) Jason, and (269690) 1996 RG_3. We will present a detailed analysis of these spectra which allows their association with several minerals and laboratory spectra of meteorites.

  11. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-01-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. (I) Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states. (II) Open flavor states (a) the D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; (b) Charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note the authors emphasize that there are many missing (undiscovered) states in both categories - states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to the authors would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular status. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner B decay remains to be seen. The authors suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undetermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  12. Heavy quark spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    New experimental and theoretical developments in heavy quark spectroscopy are reviewed. From studies of J/psi decays, the eta' is found to have some ''glue'' or other inert component, while the iota (a glueball candidate) probably contains some quarks as well. The xi(2.2) persists in new Mark III data, but is not seen by the DM2 collaboration. The production of charmonium states by anti pp reactions is reviewed. First evidence for a P- wave charmed meson, D(2420), has been presented by the ARGUS group. Radiative UPSILON decay studies fail to confirm the zeta(8.3) and begin to place useful limits on Higgs bosons. First results from an experiment at Fermilab on low-background hadronic production of UPSILON states are shown. Accurate measurements of chi/sub b/(1P) masses by the ARGUS collaboration are noted, and interpreted as favoring scalar quark confinement. Studies of t and other heavy quarks will probe the q anti q interaction below 0.05 fm, are likely to be strongly affected by t anti t-Z interference, and can provide varied information on Higgs bosons. 144 refs., 21 figs

  13. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopy in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Held, P.; Teucher, R.; Schlichting, F.; Foh, J.; Kankeleit, E.

    1995-01-01

    Nearly 40 years after the discovery of the Moessbauer effect for the first time a Moessbauer spectrometer will leave our planet to explore in situ the surface of another solar system body: the red planet Mars [1]. We are currently developing a miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer (MIMOS) which is part of the scientific payload of the Russian Mars96 mission, to be launched within the next 2-4 years [2,3]. To fulfill the requirements for a space mission to the planet Mars, all parts of the spectrometer had to be extremely miniaturized and ruggedized to withstand the space flight and Mars environmental conditions. The relevant parts (e.g. drive, detector system, electronics etc.) will be described in more detail and its characteristics compared to standard systems. Because of this new development there now is a growing interest to include a Moessbauer (MB) instrument in future space missions to other solar system bodies as for instance Venus, the terrestrial Moon, and a comet nucleus. Because of extremely different environmental conditions (e.g. nearly zero gravity on the surface of a comet nucleus, high pressure and temperature on the surface of Venus, etc.) different instrument designs and concepts are required for different missions. We will present some ideas for various types of missions, as well as the motivation for using Moessbauer spectroscopy in these cases. (orig.)

  15. Broadband transmission EPR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred R Hagen

    Full Text Available EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9-10 GHz range. Most (biomolecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin - nuclear spin interactions and electron spin - electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8-2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed.

  16. Recon Spectroscopy with TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, David W.; TRES Team

    2018-01-01

    The Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) on the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins has been a workhorse for reconnaissance spectroscopy of transiting-planet candidates identified by a variety of ground- and space-based photometric surveys, including Vulcan, TrES, HATNet, KELT, QES, Kepler, and K2. In support of NASA missions, quick-look classifications of effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, line broadening due to rotation, and absolute radial velocity have been uploaded to ExoFOP at NExScI on a timely schedule. More careful results derived using the Stellar Parameter Classification (SPC) tool can be provided in support of publications. For example, SPC results for effective temperature and metallicity have been used extensively to help constrain asteroseismic analyses of Kepler and K2 targets. TRES has also been used effectively for orbital solutions, Rossiter-McLaughlin observations, and Doppler tomography of large planets orbiting brighter. We look forward to continuing this work on TESS Objects of Interest.

  17. Self-Powered Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    UV   spectroscopy  using   visible  light  detectors,  we   developed...physical  structures.  In  many  ways,   absorption  and   transmission   spectroscopy  are  fundamentally  connected  to  the... spectroscopy  in  the   UV   and  infrared  regimes  –  although  outside  the  bandwidth  of  the  human

  18. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Condensed matter physics; high-c superconductivity; electronic properties; photoemission spectroscopy; angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy; cuprates; films; strain; pulsed laser deposition.

  19. Admittance spectroscopy or deep level transient spectroscopy: A contrasting juxtaposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Joachim; Venter, Andre

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of defects in semiconductors remains of primary importance. In this paper the effectiveness of two of the most commonly used semiconductor defect spectroscopy techniques, viz. deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and admittance spectroscopy (AS) are reviewed. The analysis of defects present in commercially available SiC diodes shows that admittance spectroscopy allows the identification of deep traps with reduced measurement effort compared to deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Besides the N-donor, well-studied intrinsic defects were detected in these diodes. Determination of their activation energy and defect density, using the two techniques, confirm that the sensitivity of AS is comparable to that of DLTS while, due to its well defined peak shape, the spectroscopic resolution is superior. Additionally, admittance spectroscopy can analyze faster emission processes which make the study of shallow defects more practical and even that of shallow dopant levels, possible. A comparative summary for the relevant spectroscopic features of the two capacitance methods are presented.

  20. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The publication in electronic form has been set up as proceedings of the conference dealing with applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in material science. Twenty-three abstracts and twenty-two presentations are included.

  1. Spectroscopy: Mapping spins in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy is used to map the properties of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride, with the help of the nitrogen-vacancy colour centres engineered in a diamond layer placed under the 2D material.

  2. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  3. Dual Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsch, T. W.; Picqué, N.

    2010-06-01

    The advent of laser frequency combs a decade ago has already revolutionized optical frequency metrology and precision spectroscopy. Extensions of laser combs from the THz region to the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray frequencies are now under exploration. Such laser combs have become enabling tools for a growing tree of applications, from optical atomic clocks to attosecond science. Recently, the millions of precisely controlled laser comb lines that can be produced with a train of ultrashort laser pulses have been harnessed for highly multiplexed molecular spectroscopy. Fourier multi-heterodyne spectroscopy, dual comb spectroscopy, or asynchronous optical sampling spectroscopy with frequency combs are emerging as powerful new spectroscopic tools. Even the first proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated a very exciting potential for ultra-rapid and ultra-sensitive recording of complex molecular spectra. Compared to conventional Fourier transform spectroscopy, recording times could be shortened from seconds to microseconds, with intriguing prospects for spectroscopy of short lived transient species. Longer recording times allow high resolution spectroscopy of molecules with extreme precision, since the absolute frequency of each laser comb line can be known with the accuracy of an atomic clock. The spectral structure of sharp lines of a laser comb can be very useful even in the recording of broadband spectra without sharp features, as they are e.g. encountered for molecular gases or in the liquid phase. A second frequency comb of different line spacing permits the generation of a comb of radio frequency beat notes, which effectively map the optical spectrum into the radio frequency regime, so that it can be recorded with a single fast photodetector, followed by digital signal analysis. In the time domain, a pulse train of a mode-locked femtosecond laser excites some molecular medium at regular time intervals. A second pulse train of different repetition

  4. ESR spectroscopy and electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy can map out the electron distribution in a molecule, in much the same way as proton NMR spectroscopy can map out the proton distribution, and it provides some of the most direct evidence for the principal concepts underlying the electronic theory of organic structure and mechanism. This is illustrated for phenomena of conjugation, hyper-conjugation, substituent effects in annulenes, Hueckel theory, ring strain, the Mills-Nixon effect, and ion pairing. (author)

  5. Semiconductor optoelectronic infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingworth, A.R.

    2001-08-01

    We use spectroscopy to study infrared optoelectronic inter and intraband semiconductor carrier dynamics. The overall aim of this thesis was to study both III-V and Pb chalcogenide material systems in order to show their future potential use in infrared emitters. The effects of bandstructure engineering have been studied in the output characteristics of mid-IR III-V laser diodes to show which processes (defects, radiative, Auger and phonon) dominate and whether non-radiative processes can be suppressed. A new three-beam pump probe experiment was used to investigate interband recombination directly in passive materials. Experiments on PbSe and theory for non-parabolic near-mirror bands and non-degenerate statistics were in good agreement. Comparisons with HgCdTe showed a reduction in the Auger coefficient of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the PbSe. Using Landau confinement to model spatial confinement in quantum dots (QDs) 'phonon bottlenecking' was studied. The results obtained from pump probe and cyclotron resonance saturation measurements showed a clear suppression in the cooling of carriers when Landau level separation was not resonant with LO phonon energy. When a bulk laser diode was placed in a magnetic field to produce a quasi quantum wire device the resulting enhanced differential gain and reduced Auger recombination lowered I th by 30%. This result showed many peaks in the light output which occurred when the LO phonon energy was a multiple of the Landau level separation. This showed for the first time evidence of the phonon bottleneck in a working laser device. A new technique called time resolved optically detected cyclotron resonance, was used as a precursor to finding the carrier dynamics within a spatially confined quantum dot. By moving to the case of a spatial QD using an optically detected intraband resonance it was possible to measure the energy separation interband levels and conduction and valence sublevels within the dot simultaneously. Furthermore

  6. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  7. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  8. Photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.L.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is an epoch making event for photoemission spectroscopy that the light sources of continuous wavelength from vacuum ultra-violet to X-ray region have become available by the advent of synchrotron radiation. Specifically the progress after stable intense light has become obtainable from storage rings is very significant. One of the features of these synchrotron radiation is its extreme polarization of radiating pattern. Though the elementary processes of photoemission out of solids are the basic themes, phenomenalistic 3-stage model is usually applied to the analysis of experiments. In this model, the process of photoemission is considered by dividing into three stages, namely the generation of photoelectrons due to optical transition between electron status -- the transportation of photoelectrons to solid surfaces -- breaking away from the surfaces. The spectrometers, the energy analyzers of photoelectrons, and sample-preparing room used for photoemission spectroscopy are described. Next, energy distribution curves are explained. At the end, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, CFS (constant final energy spectroscopy) and CIS (constant initial energy spectroscopy), Auger yield and interatomic Auger yield, the determination of surface structure by normal emission CIS, and surface EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) are described. As seen above, the application specifically to surface physics is promising in the future. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  10. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  11. Laser Spectroscopy : XII International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Allegrini, Maria; Sasso, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    This text includes all the recent advances in the field of laser spectroscopy. Major results span from the control of matter by electromagnetic fields (trapping and coding) to high precision measurements on simple atomic systems and to quantum optics with single atoms. It includes a report of the Bose-Einstein condensation achieved by laser-cooling of rubidium atoms. Achievements in the technology of tunable sources, in particular of miniaturized solid state devices, are also reported. Most recent advances in molecular spectroscopy are illustrated with emphasis on "cooled" spectra, clusters and high accuracy frequency references. Topics such as atomic interferometry and microcavity quantum optics are also covered.

  12. Quantum Spectroscopy of Plasmonic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Kalashnikov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We use frequency-entangled photons, generated via spontaneous parametric down conversion, to measure the broadband spectral response of an array of gold nanoparticles exhibiting Fano-type plasmon resonance. Refractive-index sensing of a liquid is performed by measuring the shift of the array resonance. This method is robust in excessively noisy conditions compared with conventional broadband transmission spectroscopy. Detection of a refractive-index change is demonstrated with a noise level 70 times higher than the signal, which is shown to be inaccessible with the conventional transmission spectroscopy. Use of low-photon fluxes makes this method suitable for measurements of photosensitive biosamples and chemical substances.

  13. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  14. Industrial Applications of Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, Frank J.

    2002-01-01

    The historical development of the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in industrial applications is briefly outlined. The power of the technique for the study of commercially important materials and its capacity to make contributions as a research tool, in quality control, and for in-service evaluation are reviewed. The disadvantages of the technique in the industrial setting are considered. The power of Moessbauer spectroscopy when used to approach specific industrial problems is illustrated by its use in monitoring the nature of corrosion resistant coated steel for automobile manufacture and the in situ characterization of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

  15. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  16. Optical Spectroscopy of Single Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Trägårdh, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes optical spectroscopy on III-V semiconductor nanowires. The nanowires were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). Photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy are used as tools to investigate issues such as the size of the band gap, the effects of surface states, and the charge carrier transport in core-shell nanowires. The band gap of InAs1-xPx nanowires with wurtzite crystal structure is measured as a function of ...

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  18. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  19. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO2 and NO3) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH2]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  20. Laboratory infrared spectroscopy of PAHs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Joblin, C.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that polyaromatic molecules are the carriers of the infrared interstellar emission bands has spurred the laboratory spectroscopy of this class of molecules. Here we will give an overview of the infrared spectroscopic methods that have been applied over the past two decades to

  1. More seminars on muonium spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.F.J.

    1984-12-01

    The paper concerns topics which illustrate the use of muonium spectroscopy in four major areas. The experimental method -muon spin rotation (muSR) is employed in the four topics, which include: muSR studies in magnetism, muons in metals and metal hydrides, muonium in semiconductors and muSR studies in chemistry. (U.K.)

  2. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  3. High spin spectroscopy of Pr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-07-31

    Jul 31, 2001 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 57, No. 1. — journal of. July 2001 physics pp. 175–179. High spin spectroscopy of. 139. Pr. S CHANDA. ½. , SARMISHTHA BHATTACHARYYA. ¾. , TUMPA BHATTACHARJEE .... which is configured under LINUX platform. Around 90 x10 two and higher fold events were ...

  4. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    near-ultraviolet range of electromagnetic spectra. The shift in energy in Raman effect gives information about the ... Raman spectroscopy is commonly used in chemistry, since vibrational information is very specific for the ... in polarizability is compatible with preservation of the center of symmetry. Thus, in a centrosymmetric ...

  5. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    derstanding of the chemical kinetics and molecular dynamics of the excited molecule. This special issue contains eighteen articles dealing with many dif- ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy ...

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy of implanted sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niesen, L.

    1983-01-01

    A review is given of the field of Moessbauer spectroscopy of ion-implanted sources. After an introduction to the various aspects of the ion-implantation method, the following topics are treated: final site selection of implanted impurities; trapping of defects at implanted ions; on-line implantation; implantation in metals, semiconductors and insulators. (Auth.)

  7. High resolution X ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartiromo, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a detailed discussion of the physical processes which are responsible for the emission spectra of H-like and He-like ion of high Z impurities in low density plasmas. The application of high resolution X-ray spectroscopy to the diagnostic of tokamak plasmas is also discussed and examples of the results obtained are presented

  8. Astronomical Spectroscopy A Short History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Astronomical Spectroscopy A Short History. J C Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 24-29. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/05/0024-0029 ...

  9. Rotational tunnelling spectroscopy with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Prager, M.

    1993-04-01

    Neutron tunnelling spectroscopy has been a very fruitful field for almost two decades and is still expanding into new areas, both experimentally and theoretically. The development of the topic is reviewed from the theoretical point of view, highlighting new approaches, and selected examples of more recent experimental work are presented. A brief discussion of instrument performance and experimental requirements is given. (author)

  10. Astronomical Spectroscopy A Short History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Astronomical Spectroscopy A Short History. J C Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 24-29. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/05/0024-0029 ...

  11. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  12. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given. (DWL)

  13. A dual-loss-modulated intra-cavity frequency-doubled Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4/KTP green laser with a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber and an acousto-optic modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Cheng, Kang; Han, Chao; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    By using both a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) and an acousto-optic (AO) modulator, a dual-loss-modulated intra-cavity frequency-doubled Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:Lu 0.15 Y 0.85 VO 4 /KTP (KTiOPO 4 ) green laser was demonstrated for the first time. The QML green laser characteristics such as the pulse width and single-pulse energy have been measured for different modulation frequencies of the AO modulator (f p ). In particular, in comparison with the solely passively QML green laser with an SWCNT-SA, the dual-loss-modulated QML green laser can generate a more stable pulse train, a shorter pulse width of the Q-switched envelope, a greater pulse energy and a higher average peak power. For the dual-loss-modulated QML green laser, at a pump power of 7.9 W and a repetition rate of 10 kHz, the pulse width and the pulse energy of the Q-switch envelope and the average peak power of the QML green laser are 50 ns, 20.34 µJ and 15.5 kW, respectively, corresponding to a pulse width compression of 77%, a pulse energy improvement factor of six times and a QML peak power increase factor of 16 times when compared with those for the solely passively QML green laser. The experimental results show that the dual-loss modulation is an efficient method for the generation of a stable QML green laser with an SWCNT-SA

  14. Photoemission Electron Spectroscopy IV: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. D.; Nagatomi, T. (Translator); Mizutani, G. (Translator); Endo, K. (Translation Supervisor)

    2010-01-01

    The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful experimental tool to probe themomentum-resolved electronic structure, i.e., the electronic band dispersion ε(k), of solids and their surfaces. ARPES is also an ideal tool to address the question concerning the electron correlation effect on quasiparticle excitations in the low-dimensional (one- or two-dimensional) correlated electron systems. In this issue, we briefly introduce representative studies of ARPES and their fruitf...

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF 2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  17. Design and development of a spectroscopy amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Khalaf, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectroscopy amplifier is an integral part of my detection system used for the measurement and spectroscopy of nuclear radiations. Its performance determination the contribution of the electronics to the energy resolution of the system. A spectroscopy amplifier has been designed and developed using locally available components. The design and description of this unit is discussed in this article. (author)

  18. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One such nonlinear process, namely, the third order nonlinear spectroscopy has become a popular tool to study molecular structure. Thus, the spectroscopy based on the third order optical nonlinearity called stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) is a tool to extract the structural and dynamical information about a molecular ...

  19. Positron Spectroscopy of Hydrothermally Grown Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS Edward C. Schneider...United States Government. AFIT-ENP-14-M-33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES THESIS...33 POSITRON SPECTROSCOPY OF HYDROTHERMALLY GROWN ACTINIDE OXIDES Edward C. Schneider, BS Captain, USAF Approved

  20. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  2. Light hadron spectroscopy at BESIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Besiii Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    J / ψ (ψ 3686) decay is an ideal place to study light hadron spectroscopy. BESIII has collected the largest J / ψ , ψ (3686) samples in the world, including 1.31 billion J / ψ events and 0.5 billion ψ (3686) events. In this paper, latest experimental results at BESIII about the p p ‾ mass threshold enhancement and X (1835) are presented, which help us to understood the nature of the states around 1.8 GeV. Results of a model independent partial wave analysis of J / ψ → γπ0π0 and a partial wave analysis of J / ψ → γϕϕ are also presented, which may contribute to the search for possible scalar, pseudoscalar or tensor glueballs. More experimental results about light hadron spectroscopy at BESIII are expected.

  3. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  4. Spectroscopy, scattering, and KK molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The author presents a pedagogical description of a new theoretical technique, based on the multichannel Schroedinger equation, for simultaneously applying the quark model to both meson spectroscopy and meson-meson scattering. This is an extension of an earlier analysis which led to the prediction that the f{sub o}(975) and a{sub o}(980) scalar mesons are K{bar K} molecular states.

  5. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  6. Developments in inverse photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheils, W.; Leckey, R.C.G.; Riley, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    In the 1950's and 1960's, Photoemission Spectroscopy (PES) established itself as the major technique for the study of the occupied electronic energy levels of solids. During this period the field divided into two branches: X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) for photon energies greater than ∼l000eV, and Ultra-violet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS) for photon energies below ∼100eV. By the 1970's XPS and UPS had become mature techniques. Like XPS, BIS (at x-ray energies) does not have the momentum-resolving ability of UPS that has contributed much to the understanding of the occupied band structures of solids. BIS moved into a new energy regime in 1977 when Dose employed a Geiger-Mueller tube to obtain density of unoccupied states data from a tantalum sample at a photon energy of ∼9.7eV. At similar energies, the technique has since become known as Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPS), in acknowledgment of its complementary relationship to UPS and to distinguish it from the higher energy BIS. Drawing on decades of UPS expertise, IPS has quickly moved into areas of interest where UPS has been applied; metals, semiconductors, layer compounds, adsorbates, ferromagnets, and superconductors. At La Trobe University an IPS facility has been constructed. This presentation reports on developments in the experimental and analytical techniques of IPS that have been made there. The results of a study of the unoccupied bulk and surface bands of GaAs are presented

  7. High spin spectroscopy of Pr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001-07-31

    Jul 31, 2001 ... High spin states; nuclear structure; gamma-ray spectroscopy;. ½¿. Pr energy levels. PACS Nos 21.10.-k; 23.20.-g; 27.60.+j; 29.30.Kv. 1. Introduction. The transitional nuclei in the A. ½ ¼ region with N between 77 and 81 are interesting as it offer good scope to look for possible shape changes, similar to ...

  8. Decoherence Spectroscopy for Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Trubko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence due to photon scattering in an atom interferometer was studied as a function of laser frequency near an atomic resonance. The resulting decoherence (contrast-loss spectra will be used to calibrate measurements of tune-out wavelengths that are made with the same apparatus. To support this goal, a theoretical model of decoherence spectroscopy is presented here along with experimental tests of this model.

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hüfner, Stefan

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy presents an up-to-date introduction to the field by treating comprehensively the electronic structures of atoms, molecules, solids and surfaces Brief descriptions are given of inverse photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission and photoelectron diffraction Experimental aspects are considered throughout the book, and the results are carefully interpreted by theory A wealth of measured data is presented in the form of tables for easy use by experimentalists

  10. Compressive spectroscopy by spectral modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    We review two compressive spectroscopy techniques based on modulation in the spectral domain that we have recently proposed. Both techniques achieve a compression ratio of approximately 10:1, however each with a different sensing mechanism. The first technique uses a liquid crystal cell as a tunable filter to modulate the spectral signal, and the second technique uses a Fabry-Perot etalon as a resonator. We overview the specific properties of each of the techniques.

  11. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation

  12. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  13. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  14. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Laser excitation spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solarz, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Laser excitation spectroscopy, recently applied to uranium enrichment research at LLL, has produced a wealth of new and vitally needed information about the uranium atom and its excited states. Among the data amassed were a large number of cross sections, almost a hundred radiative lifetimes, and many level assignments. Rydberg states, never before observed in uranium or any of the actinides, have been measured and cataloged. This work puts a firm experimental base under laser isotope separation, and permits a choice of the laser frequencies most appropriate for practical uranium enrichment

  16. Atomic spectroscopy with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tino, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Some applications of semiconductor diode lasers in atomic spectroscopy are discussed by describing different experiments performed with lasers emitting in the visible and in the near-infrared region. I illustrate the results obtained in the investigation of near-infrared transitions of atomic oxygen and of the visible intercombination line of strontium. I also describe how two offset-frequency-locked diode lasers can be used to excite velocity selective Raman transitions in Cs. I discuss the spectral resolution, the accuracy of frequency measurements, and the detection sensitivity achievable with diode lasers. (orig.)

  17. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  18. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  19. Supraconductor magnet for optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.; Buhler, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superconductive magnet system for optic spectroscopy has been built. It includes an elaborate support structure, a LN2/LHe cryostat with its supplies and controls and a superconductive magnet of the split pole type equipped with a superconductive switch. A vertically introduced sample in the LHe bath, on request subcooled down to 2.2K is observed through two optical passages. Magnet characteristics are as follows : - clear bore 35mm - clear split 20mm - central field 6.33 Teslas - homogeneity over 10mm D.S.V.: 1% [fr

  20. General Remarks about mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzababayev, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    More than forty years have passed since the discovery of Mossbauer effect; one of the most brilliant findings in modern physics. This effect proved itself to be the powerful tool in almost all disciplines of the natural sciences and technology. Its unique feature is that it gives the possibility to get the results which cannot be obtained by any other physical methods. Mossbauer effect has been used as a key to unlock some basic physical, chemical and biological phenomena, as a guide for finding the new ways of solving applied scientific and technical problems of electronics, metallurgy, civil engineering, and even fine arts and archaeology. Very few scientific techniques can claim entry into as many countries as Mossbauer spectroscopy. Due to its wide application in an education and research processes the community of Mossbauer spectroscopists extends to almost 100 different countries. Laboratory equipment necessary for conducting gamma resonance spectroscopy, do not require large investments, premises, personnel. The spectrometer is rather small in size and could be installed on the ordinary laboratory table. That is why Mossbauer effect is widely used at numerous Universities all over the world as an universal instrument for tuition and research

  1. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  2. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styczen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The contributions given hereafter to this Annual Report cover a broad activity of the Department in 1999 both in the pure nuclear spectroscopy and in the applied spectroscopy investigations. That activity is then assembled in the two main groups: the nuclear structure studies with the application of the multidetector systems such as GASP, GAMMASPHERE, EUROBALL and the RFD - as its ancillary device, and investigations of condensed matter properties with the use of nuclear methods. In addition, non-nuclear methods such as the atomic force microscopy provided several new encouraging results. The nice data obtained are due to the great skill and hard work of all members of the staff, and a vast cooperation both with international and national institutes and institutions. When anticipated for calling the attractive results of the past year, I would rather admit that all data given here pretend to be those. To meet with, I refer directly to the short presentations given in the next pages. (author)

  3. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  4. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  5. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  6. Modern luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gaft, Michael; Panczer, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence Spectroscopy of Minerals and Materials presents an overview of the general concepts in luminescence spectroscopy as well as experimental methods and their interpretation. Special emphasis is laid on the fluorescence lifetime and the determination of time-resolved spectra. This method enables the exposure of new luminescence in minerals previously hidden by more intensive centers. Specialists in the fields of solid state physics, chemistry and spectroscopy will find a wealth of new information in this unique book.

  7. Doppler-free Fourier transform spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Samuel A; Hipke, Arthur; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    Sub-Doppler broadband multi-heterodyne spectroscopy is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using two laser frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies, we have recorded Doppler-free two-photon dual-comb spectra of atomic rubidium resonances of a width of 6 MHz, while simultaneously interrogating a spectral span of 10 THz. The atomic transitions are uniquely identified via the intensity modulation of the observed fluorescence radiation. To the best of our knowledge, these results represent the first demonstration of Doppler-free Fourier transform spectroscopy and extend the range of applications of broadband spectroscopy towards precision nonlinear spectroscopy.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  9. HOMES - Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HOMES (Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy) is a space telescope that employs a double dispersion architecture, using a holographic optical element...

  10. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy in turbid media using fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, Arjen; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Robinson, Dominic J.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new technique, fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy (FDPS), that enables the quantitative investigation of fluorophores in turbid media. FDPS measurements are made with the same probe geometry as differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) measurements. Phantom

  11. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy of plasmonic fractals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, A; Matsui, T; Zhu, W; Nahata, A; Vardeny, Z V

    2009-03-20

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to study the transmission properties of metallic films perforated with aperture arrays having deterministic or stochastic fractal morphologies ("plasmonic fractals"), and compare them with random aperture arrays. All of the measured plasmonic fractals show transmission resonances and antiresonances at frequencies that correspond to prominent features in their structure factors in k space. However, in sharp contrast to periodic aperture arrays, the resonant transmission enhancement decreases with increasing array size. This property is explained using a density-density correlation function, and is utilized for determining the underlying fractal dimensionality, D(fractals relative to the transmission of the corresponding random aperture arrays is obtained, and is shown to be universal.

  13. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.E.

    1977-10-01

    The use of modulation spectroscopy to study the electronic properties of solids has been very productive. The construction of a wide range Wavelength Modulation Spectrometer to study the optical properties of solids is described in detail. Extensions of the working range of the spectrometer into the vacuum ultraviolet are discussed. Measurements of the reflectivity and derivative reflectivity spectra of the lead chalcogenides, the chalcopyrite ZnGeP/sub 2/, the layer compounds GaSe and GaS and their alloys, the ferroelectric SbSI, layer compounds SnS/sub 2/ and SnSe/sub 2/, and HfS/sub 2/ were made. The results of these measurements are presented along with their interpretation in terms of band structure calculations.

  14. The COMPASS Hadron Spectroscopy Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, A

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS for the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a large acceptance and high momentum resolution spectrometer including particle identification and calorimetry and is therefore ideal to access a broad range of different final states. Following the promising observation of a spin-exotic resonance during an earlier pilot run, COMPASS focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the years 2008 and 2009. A data set, world leading in terms of statistics and resolution, has been collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on either liquid hydrogen or nuclear targets. Spin-exotic meson and glueball candidates formed in both diffractive dissociation and central production are presently studied. Since the beam composition includes protons, the excited baryon spectrum is also accessible. Furthermore, Primakoff reactions have the potential to determine radiative widths of the resonances and to probe chiral pe...

  15. High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buckin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HR-US is an analytical technique for direct and non-destructive monitoring of molecular and micro-structural transformations in liquids and semi-solid materials. It is based on precision measurements of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in analysed samples. The application areas of HR-US in research, product development, and quality and process control include analysis of conformational transitions of polymers, ligand binding, molecular self-assembly and aggregation, crystallisation, gelation, characterisation of phase transitions and phase diagrams, and monitoring of chemical and biochemical reactions. The technique does not require optical markers or optical transparency. The HR-US measurements can be performed in small sample volumes (down to droplet size, over broad temperature range, at ambient and elevated pressures, and in various measuring regimes such as automatic temperature ramps, titrations and measurements in flow.

  16. Programmable spectroscopy enabled by DLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Bjarke; Rasmussen, Michael; Herholdt-Rasmussen, Nicolai; Jespersen, Ole

    2015-03-01

    Ibsen Photonics has since 2012 worked to deploy Texas Instruments DLP® technology to high efficiency, fused silica transmission grating based spectrometers and programmable light sources. The use of Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs) in spectroscopy, allows for replacement of diode array detectors by single pixel detectors, and for the design of a new generation of programmable light sources, where you can control the relative power, exposure time and resolution independently for each wavelength in your spectrum. We present the special challenges presented by DMD's in relation to stray light and optical throughput, and we comment on the possibility for instrument manufacturers to generate new, dynamic measurement schemes and algorithms for increased speed, higher accuracy, and greater sample protection. We compare DMD based spectrometer designs with competing, diode array based designs, and provide suggestions for target applications of the technology.

  17. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  18. Spectroscopy after the new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    Conventional spectroscopy is reexamined in a search for puzzles and paradoxes which have arisen in attempting to describe the properties of the known particles. These may offer clues to the missing elements necessary for the description of the new particles. The minimum number of elementary building blocks, charm and color, the colored quark model for saturation, spin splittings in the meson spectrum, three kinds of quarks, the Melosh transformation and the Jackson frame, beyond the single-quark transition--the Zweig rule mystery, new particles and old symmetries, the f--A2 interference, and tests of the Zweig rule by rho--ω and f--A2--f' interference are considered

  19. Visible and UV emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monier-Garbet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Visible and ultra-violet emission spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic technique extensively used in contemporary fusion experiments. Theoretical plasma models are required to derive the relevant physical parameters. These models are reviewed in the first part of this paper. They allow spectral line intensities and radiative power losses to be calculated from the knowledge of the detailed atomic physics processes occurring in the plasma. In tokamak plasma experiments, impurity contamination and transport are important concerns. Basic spectroscopic methods used in their understanding are described. They include the determination of impurity concentrations either by line emission modelling (through the use of an impurity transport code), or by direct charge-exchange recombination measurement. They also include the evaluation of neutral particle fluxes at the plasma periphery. Finally, the experimental techniques used in the derivation of impurity transport coefficients are reported

  20. Photon correlation spectroscopy in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovati, L.

    2011-05-01

    On the basis of the theory of light scattering, photon correlation spectroscopy has been used for more than three decades to study ocular tissues. From first in-vitro experiments to study cataractogenesis, this approach has been extended to characterize semi-quantitatively in-vivo all the ocular tissues from cornea to retina and choroids. In order to acquire high quality measurement data from the experiments, serious attention has to be paid to the detector and processing system performance. Detector noise, sensitivity, dead time and afterpulsing lead to a direct or indirect corruption of the acquired correlation function whereas counting range and resolution should be optimized to take into account the wide variability of the ocular tissue optical characteristics.

  1. MR spectroscopy in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) offers unique possibilities for non-invasive evaluation of biochemistry in vivo. During recent years there has been a growing body of evidence from clinical research studies on human beings using 31P and 1H MRS. The results indicate that it is possible to evaluate phosphorous...... for non-invasive follow-up of treatment. Taken together, the evidence obtained so far certainly shows some trends for clinical applications of MRS. Methods are now available for the clinical research necessary for establishing routine clinical MRS examinations....... energy metabolism, loss of neurones, and lactate production in a large number of brain diseases. Furthermore, 31P and 1H MRS may be particularly clinically useful in evaluation of various disorders in skeletal muscle. In the heart 31P MRS seems at the moment the most suitable for evaluation of global...

  2. Moessbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, U.

    1994-01-01

    The short pulse nature of synchrotron radiation makes it possible to perform Moessbauer spectroscopy in the time domain, i.e. instead of measuring the transmitted intensity time integrated as a function of source/absorber velocity, the intensity of the scattered radiation is measured time differential. The resulting time spectrum is essentially source independent and complications in the data analysis which are related to the radioactive source are completely removed. Furthermore, the large brightness and well defined polarization of the synchrotron radiation can, e.g., speed up the data collection and facilitate studies of polarization phenomena. To illustrate these new spectroscopic possibilities, measurements of the temperature dependence and polarization dependence of forward scattering from alpha - sup 5 sup 7 Fe nuclei are presented and discussed 26 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  3. Spectroscopy of family gauge bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Koide

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spectroscopy of family gauge bosons is investigated based on a U(3 family gauge boson model proposed by Sumino. In his model, the family gauge bosons are in mass eigenstates in a diagonal basis of the charged lepton mass matrix. Therefore, the family numbers are defined by (e1,e2,e3=(e,μ,τ, while the assignment for quark sector are free. For possible family-number assignments (q1,q2,q3, under a constraint from K0–K¯0 mixing, we investigate possibilities of new physics, e.g. production of the lightest family gauge boson at the LHC, μ−N→e−N, rare K and B decays, and so on.

  4. A Century of Galaxy Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    1995-10-01

    The first successful spectrum of a galaxy, M31, was obtained in 1898 and published in a two-page paper in the young Astrophysical Journal (Scheiner 1899). Thus the first century of galaxy spectroscopy and the first century of the Astrophysical Journal are almost coincident; I celebrate both in this paper. I describe the very early history of the determination of internal kinematics in spiral galaxies, often by quoting the astronomers' own published words. By mid-century, observations with improved optical and radio telescopes offered evidence that much of the matter in a galaxy is dark. As the century ends, research interests have enlarged to include study of spheroidal and disk galaxies with complex nuclear (and other) kinematics. These complicated velocity patterns are understood as the result of interactions, acquisitions, and mergers, and offer clear evidence of the important role of gravitational effects in galaxy evolution.

  5. Materials characterization by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascente, P.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Low energy electrons are suitable for investigating surfaces due to their low mean free path in solids, which correspond to a few atomic layers (0.5 to 3.0 nm), and could be used in one of the following ways: incident electrons cause the emission of backscattered and secondary electrons and the electrons are excited by irradiated photons. The first case includes the emission of Auger electrons, while photoemission corresponds to the second case. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the most used surface analysis techniques since it is able to identify not only the surface constituents but also their chemical states. XPS can be employed in several areas of science and engineering, but in this report it will be presented only few examples of its use in the characterization of metallic materials, with an emphasis on thin films of noble and transition metals. (author)

  6. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  7. MR spectroscopy in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    for non-invasive follow-up of treatment. Taken together, the evidence obtained so far certainly shows some trends for clinical applications of MRS. Methods are now available for the clinical research necessary for establishing routine clinical MRS examinations.......MR spectroscopy (MRS) offers unique possibilities for non-invasive evaluation of biochemistry in vivo. During recent years there has been a growing body of evidence from clinical research studies on human beings using 31P and 1H MRS. The results indicate that it is possible to evaluate phosphorous...... energy metabolism, loss of neurones, and lactate production in a large number of brain diseases. Furthermore, 31P and 1H MRS may be particularly clinically useful in evaluation of various disorders in skeletal muscle. In the heart 31P MRS seems at the moment the most suitable for evaluation of global...

  8. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  9. a near ambient pressure UV photoelectron spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Kumar Ghosalya

    2018-03-02

    Mar 2, 2018 ... VB photoelectron spectroscopy with low energy photons is an important tool to access mostly sur- face specific electronic changes. Indeed, near ambient pressure (NAP) ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. (NAP-UPS) is fully relevant to explore silver-oxygen interaction, since Ag 4d and O 2p orbitals ...

  10. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modulation spectroscopy; saturation absorption spectroscopy; Zeeman splitting. PACS Nos 42.62.Fi; 32.60.+i; 33.55. ... easily circumvent the usual problem of laser intensity fluctuation and offer en suite phase-sensitive detection of the ..... Faraday effect can contribute to the signal profile. It has been established that optical.

  11. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering

  12. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungen, Ch. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  13. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.

    2013-01-01

    in a transmission spectrum and it is very sensitive to the constituent materials as well as both lateral and vertical dimensions of the structures. This makes LSPR spectroscopy interesting for a number of applications including nanometrology. Like scatterometry, LSPR spectroscopy requires test structures...

  14. Biochemical applications of FT-IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, A.M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of (FT-)IR spectroscopy in general biochemical research. In chapter 3, IR spectroscopy is used in the quantitation of residual detergent after reconstitution of an integral membrane protein in a pre-defined lipid matrix. This chapter discusses the choice of the

  15. Consistent spectroscopy for a extended gauge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Neto, G. de.

    1990-11-01

    The consistent spectroscopy was obtained with a Lagrangian constructed with vector fields with a U(1) group extended symmetry. As consistent spectroscopy is understood the determination of quantum physical properties described by the model in an manner independent from the possible parametrizations adopted in their description. (L.C.J.A.)

  16. Baryonic spectroscopy and its immediate future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The quark model is reviewed briefly for baryons and the various versions of SU(6) symmetry which were proposed and used in connection with baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. A series of basic questions are reviewed which experimental work in this field should aim to settle, as a minimal program. One also heralds the beginning of a new baryon spectroscopy associated with psi physics

  17. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    solution makes NMR more suitable for studying the dynamic behavior of macromolecules. The first high resolution protein structure by NMR spectroscopy was carried out in mid-1980s [3]. Before the beginning of this millennium, NMR spectroscopy was limited to solving 3D struc- tures of proteins with molecular masses less ...

  18. Applications of core level spectroscopy to adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2002-01-01

    In the following review different applications of core-level spectroscopy to atomic and molecular adsorbates will be shown. Core-holes are created through core-level ionization and X-ray absorption processes and the core-hole decays by radiant and non-radiant processes. This forms the basis for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy. We will demonstrate how we can use the different methods to obtain information about the chemical state, local geometric structure, nature of chemical bonding and dynamics in electron transfer processes. The adsorption of N 2 and CO on Ni(100) will be used as prototype systems for chemisorption while N 2 on graphite and Ar on Pt for physisorption

  19. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Saliva Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Jopi J W; Raittila, Jussi; Rieppo, Lassi; Lappalainen, Reijo; Kullaa, Arja M; Myllymaa, Sami

    2016-09-01

    Saliva provides a valuable tool for assessing oral and systemic diseases, but concentrations of salivary components are very small, calling the need for precise analysis methods. In this work, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using transmission and photoacoustic (PA) modes were compared for quantitative analysis of saliva. The performance of these techniques was compared with a calibration series. The linearity of spectrum output was verified by using albumin-thiocyanate (SCN(-)) solution at different SCN(-) concentrations. Saliva samples used as a comparison were obtained from healthy subjects. Saliva droplets of 15 µL were applied on the silicon sample substrate, 6 drops for each specimen, and dried at 37 ℃ overnight. The measurements were carried out using an FT-IR spectrometer in conjunction with an accessory unit for PA measurements. The findings with both transmission and PA modes mirror each other. The major bands presented were 1500-1750 cm(-1) for proteins and 1050-1200 cm(-1) for carbohydrates. In addition, the distinct spectral band at 2050 cm(-1) derives from SCN(-) anions, which is converted by salivary peroxidases to hypothiocyanate (OSCN(-)). The correlation between the spectroscopic data with SCN(-) concentration (r > 0.990 for transmission and r = 0.967 for PA mode) was found to be significant (P < 0.01), thus promising to be utilized in future applications. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Active beam spectroscopy for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Hellermann, M.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R.; Hawkes, N.C.; Mullane, M.O.; Zastrow, K.D.; Krasilnikov, A.; Tugarinov, S.; Lotte, P.; Malaquias, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2003-01-01

    The latest status of 'Active Beam' related spectroscopy aspects as part of the ITER diagnostic scenario is presented. A key issue of the proposed scheme is based on the concept that in order to achieve the ultimate goal of global data consistency, all particles involved, that is, intrinsic and seeded impurity ions as well as helium ash ions and bulk plasma ions and also the plasma background data (e.g. magnetic and electric fields, electron density and temperature profiles) need to be addressed. A further sensible step in this direction is the decision of exploiting both a dedicated low-energy, low-power diagnostic beam (DNB, 2.2 MW 100 keV/amu) as well as the high-power, high-energy heating beams (HNB, 17 MW 500 keV/amu) for maximum diagnostic information. The authors report some new aspects referring to the use of DNB for motional Stark effect (MSE) where the main idea is to treat both beams (HNB and DNB) as potential diagnostic tools with complementary roles. The equatorial ports for the DNB promise excellent spatial resolution, however, the angles are less favourable for a polarimetric MSE exploitation. HNB can be used as probe beam for diagnosing slowing-down fusion alpha with a birth energy of 3,5 MeV

  1. Anelastic spectroscopy in superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque Gimenez, J.M. de; Grandini, C.R.; Santos, D.L. dos; Cunha, A.G. da

    2005-01-01

    Since the discovery of the high Tc superconductors, several works have been made about the different properties of these materials. Anelastic spectroscopy experiments are sensitive tools to the study of defects in solids and phase transitions. By this technique, we can distinguish the different types of atomic jumps that happen to different temperatures. The intensity of the peaks in the anelastic spectrum and the ''step'' in the torsional modulus are related with the concentration of the relaxing entities, and the position of the peaks is determined by its mobility. In this paper, the study on Bi and Sm based superconducting oxides was made by anelastic relaxation measurements using a torsion pendulum. The samples were submitted to successive thermal treatments in high vacuum, in the temperature range between 100 K and 650 K, heating rate about 1 K/min. For Bi based superconducting oxides the results shown two peaks, that were associated to interstitial oxygen mobility and to orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition. For Sm based superconducting oxides the results shown a relaxation peak that was attributed to the jumps of the oxygen atoms in the inter-chains O1 and O5 of the lattice. (orig.)

  2. Anelastic spectroscopy in superconducting oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque Gimenez, J.M. de [USP, Inst. de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); UNESP, Dept. de Fisica, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Grandini, C.R.; Santos, D.L. dos [UNESP, Dept. de Fisica, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Cunha, A.G. da [UFES, Dept. de Fisica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery of the high Tc superconductors, several works have been made about the different properties of these materials. Anelastic spectroscopy experiments are sensitive tools to the study of defects in solids and phase transitions. By this technique, we can distinguish the different types of atomic jumps that happen to different temperatures. The intensity of the peaks in the anelastic spectrum and the ''step'' in the torsional modulus are related with the concentration of the relaxing entities, and the position of the peaks is determined by its mobility. In this paper, the study on Bi and Sm based superconducting oxides was made by anelastic relaxation measurements using a torsion pendulum. The samples were submitted to successive thermal treatments in high vacuum, in the temperature range between 100 K and 650 K, heating rate about 1 K/min. For Bi based superconducting oxides the results shown two peaks, that were associated to interstitial oxygen mobility and to orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition. For Sm based superconducting oxides the results shown a relaxation peak that was attributed to the jumps of the oxygen atoms in the inter-chains O1 and O5 of the lattice. (orig.)

  3. Fourier Spectroscopy: A Bayesian Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schmuck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of standard analysis techniques applied in the field of Fourier spectroscopy treat fundamental aspects insufficiently. For example, the spectra to be inferred are influenced by the noise contribution to the interferometric data, by nonprobed spatial domains which are linked to Fourier coefficients above a certain order, by the spectral limits which are in general not given by the Nyquist assumptions, and by additional parameters of the problem at hand like the zero-path difference. To consider these fundamentals, a probabilistic approach based on Bayes’ theorem is introduced which exploits multivariate normal distributions. For the example application, we model the spectra by the Gaussian process of a Brownian bridge stated by a prior covariance. The spectra themselves are represented by a number of parameters which map linearly to the data domain. The posterior for these linear parameters is analytically obtained, and the marginalisation over these parameters is trivial. This allows the straightforward investigation of the posterior for the involved nonlinear parameters, like the zero-path difference location and the spectral limits, and hyperparameters, like the scaling of the Gaussian process. With respect to the linear problem, this can be interpreted as an implementation of Ockham’s razor principle.

  4. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  5. Artificial Intelligence in planetary spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2017-10-01

    The field of exoplanetary spectroscopy is as fast moving as it is new. Analysing currently available observations of exoplanetary atmospheres often invoke large and correlated parameter spaces that can be difficult to map or constrain. This is true for both: the data analysis of observations as well as the theoretical modelling of their atmospheres.Issues of low signal-to-noise data and large, non-linear parameter spaces are nothing new and commonly found in many fields of engineering and the physical sciences. Recent years have seen vast improvements in statistical data analysis and machine learning that have revolutionised fields as diverse as telecommunication, pattern recognition, medical physics and cosmology.In many aspects, data mining and non-linearity challenges encountered in other data intensive fields are directly transferable to the field of extrasolar planets. In this conference, I will discuss how deep neural networks can be designed to facilitate solving said issues both in exoplanet atmospheres as well as for atmospheres in our own solar system. I will present a deep belief network, RobERt (Robotic Exoplanet Recognition), able to learn to recognise exoplanetary spectra and provide artificial intelligences to state-of-the-art atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Furthermore, I will present a new deep convolutional network that is able to map planetary surface compositions using hyper-spectral imaging and demonstrate its uses on Cassini-VIMS data of Saturn.

  6. Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Editor); Moos, Warren; VanSteenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The 'Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy' conference was inspired by the accomplishments of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission. The FUSE mission was launched in June 1999 and spent over eight years exploring the far-ultraviolet universe, gathering over 64 million seconds of high-resolution spectral data on nearly 3000 astronomical targets. The goal of this conference was not only to celebrate the accomplishments of FUSE, but to look toward the future and understand the major scientific drivers for the ultraviolet capabilities of the next generation fo space observatories. Invited speakers presented discussions based on measurements made by FUSE and other ultraviolet instruments, assessed their connection with measurements made with other techniques and, where appropriate, discussed the implications of low-z measurements for high-z phenomena. In addition to the oral presentations, many participants presented poster papers. The breadth of these presentation made it clear that much good science is still in progress with FUSE data and that these result will continue to have relevance in many scientific areas.

  7. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  8. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  9. Raman spectroscopy of skin neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moryatov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Kaganov, O. I.; Orlov, A. E.; Zaharov, V. P.; Batrachenko, I. A.; Artemiev, D. N.; Blinov, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    Skin melanoma is spread inhomogeneously worldwide, particularly in Samara region there are high figures of skin neoplasms sick rate as well—18.6%. Research goal: to develop a new method of early non-invasive differential diagnostics of skin neoplasms. Registration of Raman spectrum was implemented in the distance of 3-4 mm, the spectrum registration from pathologically changed zone was subsequently conducted, then from healthy skin zone. The test time for 1 patient was no longer than 3-5 min. In a range of experiments ex vivo there were the following results: melanoma—24, basal cell cancer—25, squamosus cell sarcinoma—7, nevus pigmentosis—9, other malignant neoplasms—6; in vivo: melanoma—9, basal cell cancer—8, nevus pigmentosis—2, other benign neoplasms—2. The first results of the research dedicated to studying permissive opportunities of Raman spectroscopy, with successive two-phase analysis of received parameters display high efficiency of method of differential diagnostic for skin melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, pigment and benign skin neoplasms. Safety and rapidity of the research reveal a high potential of the technique.

  10. Molecular spectroscopy of interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshalovich, D.A.; Khersonskij, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in the investigation into molecules of interstellar medium by molecular-spectroscopic methods are discussed generally. Ion-molecule reactions play a significant part in the formation of multiatom molecules in the interstellar medium as well as reactions proceeding on the surface of interstellar dust. More than 50 types of molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium at present. In a wide range of wave lengths over 500 spectral lines belonging to various molecules and molecular fragments have been recorded. Interstellar molecules permit to investigate interstellar gas from all the sides. They are a suitable indicator of the isotope composition of interstellar gas. Radio observations of interstellar molecules make it possible to effectively investigate kinematics and space structure both separate gas-dust complexes and total gas distribution in Galaxy. It is noted that achievements of molecular spectroscopy of the interstellar medium radically change representations of the chemical composition of interstellar gas, of isotope abundance and organic substance in the Universe

  11. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed

  12. Spectroscopy Division: progress report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.; Marathe, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarises the work done by members of the Spectroscopy Division both within BARC as well as in scientific institutions elsewhere during the calendar year 1990. Main areas of research activity include atomic spectroscopy for hyperfine structure and isotope shift determination, theoretical and experimental studies of diatomic molecules, infrared and Raman spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules, design and fabrication of beam line optics for INDUS-I synchrotron radiation source, beam foil spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy of various atomic and molecular systems. Major experimental facilities that have been utilised include a fourier transform spectrometer, an excimer laser pumped dye-laser and a continous wave argon-ion laser. The report also includes the spectroscopic analytical service rendered for various DAE units and describes briefly some new analytical facilities like laser enhanced ionization in flames and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy using pulsed lasers which are being set up. The above activites were reported by members of the Spectroscopy Division via invited lectures, papers presented in various national and international conferences and publication in scientific journals. Details of these are given at the end of the report. (author). figs., tabs

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Search for Extraterrestrial Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, T. E.; Sony, K. S.

    2008-11-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is one of the vital tools in astrobiology. In this paper we have studied the role of IR spectroscopy in the detection of plant and animal life elsewhere in our galaxy. Using relevant astrophysical data of nearby extrasolar planets we have calculated the detection limits of IR spectra of life related chemical compounds from these objects. The probability of detection of methane and plant pigments is found to relatively higher near M type stars compared to G type stars. A list of Jupiter size extrasolar planets discovered around G type stars which are potential objects for possible detection of plant life through IR reflection spectroscopy is also prepared.

  14. Near edge x-ray spectroscopy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    We propose to develop a quantitative theory of x-ray spectroscopies in the near edge region, within about 100 eV of threshold. These spectroscopies include XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), photoelectron diffraction (PD), and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS), all of which are important tools for structural studies using synchrotron radiation x-ray sources. Of primary importance in these studies are many-body effects, such as the photoelectron self-energy, and inelastic losses. A better understanding of these quantities is needed to obtain theories without adjustable parameters. We propose both analytical and numerical calculations, the latter based on our x-ray spectroscopy codes FEFF

  15. Handbook of Applied Solid State Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vij, D. R

    2006-01-01

    Solid-State spectroscopy is a burgeoning field with applications in many branches of science, including physics, chemistry, biosciences, surface science, and materials science. Handbook of Applied Solid-State Spectroscopy brings together in one volume information about various spectroscopic techniques that is currently scattered in the literature of these disciplines. This concise yet comprehensive volume covers theory and applications of a broad range of spectroscopies, including NMR, NQR, EPR/ESR, ENDOR, scanning tunneling, acoustic resonance, FTIR, auger electron emission, x-ray photoelectron emission, luminescence, and optical polarization, and more. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals and current methods and procedures, together with the latest applications and developments in the field.

  16. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...... of the hole in this manner. In a second example, a hole is created in an inner shell by the first pulse, and the second probe pulse couples an even more tightly bound state to that hole. The hole decays in this example by Auger electron emission, and the absorption spectroscopy follows the decay of the hole...

  17. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  18. Pinning an Ion with an Intracavity Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Rasmus Bogh; Leroux, Ian Daniel; Marciante, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    We report one-dimensional pinning of a single ion by an optical lattice. A standing-wave cavity produces the lattice potential along the rf-field-free axis of a linear Paul trap. The ion’s localization is detected by measuring its fluorescence when excited by standing-wave fields with the same...

  19. Dynamical regimes and intracavity propagation delay in external ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E JAYAPRASATH

    2017-10-31

    Oct 31, 2017 ... linewidth enhancement factor α = 3.8, the external cavity round- trip time τext = 10 ns, carrier lifetime τn = 2 ns, photon lifetime τp = 2 ps. The lasers are operated at wave- length λ = 830 nm, and hence detuning between the laser is zero ( ω = 0), τin = 8 ps is the internal cavity round-trip time. r2 = 0.58 is the ...

  20. Intra-cavity generation of high order LGpl modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the generation of symmetrical high order Laguerre Gaussian modes. These high order Laguerre-Gaussian beams are generated by forcing the laser using an annular binary Diffractive Optical Element whose geometry is in connection...

  1. Piezoelectric deformable mirror for intra-cavity laser adaptive optics.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available degree of freedom Fig. 5. Quadrilateral axisymmetric element with rotational degrees of freedom. The variational formulation of these elements employs the skew-symmetric part of the stress tensor as a Lagrange multiplier to enforce the continuum... mechanics definition of rotations in terms of displacement gradient. The stress tensor is therefore not a priori assumed to be symmetric. The finite element implementation starts with an eight-node ‘base element’ in the local coordinate system. The four...

  2. Intracavity generation of longitudinal dependant Bessel like beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available distribution (“double-face” effect). The significant difference between the near-field and the far-field intensity pattern can be considered a disadvantage of such beams, in contrast to Gaussian beams which preserve their profile while propagating in free... not been a detailed investigation of the transverse structure in the near and far field of longitudinal dependent BLBs [LDBLB], nor the possibility of managing the axial intensity of such BLBs through parameter choice of the implementation method...

  3. Linearly polarized intracavity passive Q-switched Yb-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... ratio of active core area to inner cladding area, the pump light absorption is improved and smaller fibre length becomes possible. There are reports on the passive Q-switching in. Yb-doped LMA fibre lasers by using Cr4+:YAG crystal as a saturable absorber. Huang et al have reported maximum average ...

  4. Efficient yellow beam generation by intracavity sum frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... The output at the fibre tip was collimated and focussed using two plano-convex lenses of focal length 25 mm (L1) and 50 mm (L2) with a magnification of two. Both the lenses were coated for antireflection at 808 nm for the transmission of pump power more than 95%. In diode end-pumped laser, the choice ...

  5. Efficient yellow beam generation by intracavity sum frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Author Affiliations. A J Singh1 P K Gupta1 S K Sharma1 P K Mukhopadhyay1 K S Bindra1 S M Oak1. Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India ...

  6. Dynamical regimes and intracavity propagation delay in external ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A diode laser subjected to an optical feedback, also called an external cavity diode laser, acts as the transmitter laser (TL). A solitary diode laser acts as the receiver laser (RL). The optical output of the TL is coupled to the RL and laser operating parameters are optimized to achieve synchronization in their output intensities.

  7. Linearly polarized intracavity passive Q-switched Yb-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    YAG crystal as a saturable absorber. An average output power of 9.4 W with pulse duration of 64 ns and pulse repetition rate of 57.4 kHz with a slope efficiency of 52% was achieved. Measured polarization extinction ratio (PER) ...

  8. Linearly polarized intracavity passive Q-switched Yb-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... Q-switched fibre lasers with high peak power have attracted a lot of attention due to many applications in the fields of industrial processing and medical treatments. For special applications of nonlinear frequency shifting like frequency doubling and optical paramet- ric oscillation, linearly polarized ...

  9. Intracavity mode competition between classes of flat–top beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available beam as the oscillating mode. Single–mode oscillation would typically be Gaussian in profile, while multimode oscillation might deliver a beam with an averaged flat–like profile in the near field, but would diverge very quickly due to the higher order...

  10. News from Online: More Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-09-01

    rising from a cup of hot coffee. Next is an applet with atoms in a parabolic magnetic trap at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/applets/bec.html. The height of the magnetic trap can be changed in order to allow for escape of the most energetic atoms, resulting in cooling so that the Bose-Einstein Condensate is formed. Physics 2000 demands robust computing power. Check the system requirements on the introductory screen before venturing too far into this site. Martin V. Goldman, from the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the Director of Physics 2000, which received support from the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the National Science Foundation. David Rea is the Technical Director, and many others help make this excellent site possible. Mark your calendars: October 31 through December 3, 1999! Bookmark this site-- http://www.ched-ccce.org/confchem/1999/d/index.html --and sign up. The Winter 1999 CONFCHEM Online Conference will focus on Developments in Spectroscopy and Innovative Strategies for Teaching Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Curriculum. Scott Van Bramer of Widener University is the conference chair. Experts will present six papers, each to be followed by online discussions. CONFCHEM Online Conferences are sponsored by the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education's Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE). Several Online Conferences are held each year--all are well worth your time. World Wide Web Addresses EMSpectrum Explorer http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/EMSpectrum/emspectrum.html Light and Energy http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/index.html Emission Spectrum Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/emission/index.html Absorption Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/absorption/index.html Removing Color with a Single Filter from Colored Light http://mc2.cchem

  11. Noise and detection in ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montelatici, V.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring techniques suitable for ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy are analyzed and source of noise identified. The choice of optical detector is for photoelectrical devices. It is shown that the shot noise of phototubes is the most important noise source

  12. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  13. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopy for cocrystal screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allesø, Morten; Velaga, Sitaram; Alhalaweh, Amjad

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for solid-state analysis, providing fast, noninvasive measurements. The use of NIR spectroscopy for polymorph screening and the associated advantages have recently been demonstrated. The objective of this work was to evaluate...... retained in a physical mixture with the guest molecule, while liquid-assisted cogrinding did not induce any changes in the crystal lattice. The good chemical peak selectivity of Raman spectroscopy allowed a straightforward interpretation of sample data by analyzing peak positions and comparing to those...... of pure references. In addition, Raman spectroscopy provided additional information on the crystal structure of the IND-SAC cocrystal. The broad spectral line shapes of NIR spectra make visual interpretation of the spectra difficult, and consequently, multivariate modeling by principal component analysis...

  15. Laser spectroscopy on neutron rich sodium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, G; Jacquinot, P; Juncar, P; Klapisch, Robert; Liberman, S; Pinard, J; Thibault, C; Vialle, J L

    1976-01-01

    The authors describe results with single-mode dye lasers in high- resolution atomic line spectroscopy. Optical pumping and magnetic resonance detection of Na D-lines provide values of static nuclear groundstate properties.

  16. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University MRI department. Subject: Seventy four consecutive patients.

  17. Solid-State Spectroscopy An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmany, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods have opened up a new horizon in our knowledge of solid-state materials. Numerous techniques using electromagnetic radiation or charged and neutral particles have been invented and worked out to a high level in order to provide more detailed information on the solids. The text presented here is an updated description of such methods as they were originally presented in the first edition. It covers linear response of solids to electromagnetic radiation in a frequency range extending from megahertz or gigahertz as used in spin resonance spectroscopy, to infrared spectroscopy and various forms of spectroscopy in the visible and near visible spectral range. It extends to spectroscopy in the UV and x-ray spectral range and eventually several spectroscopic methods are addressed in the frequency range of g radiation. Likewise linear response to irradiation with particles such as electrons, positrons, muons, neutrons, and atoms is discussed. Instrumental and technical background is provided as we...

  18. Review of Ge detectors for gamma spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Alexiev, D; Mo, L; Smith, M L; Rosenfeld, A H

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of the use of germanium detectors for gamma spectroscopy. The advantages, principles of operation, and fabrication processes of semiconductor radiation detectors are described. Copyright (2002) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  19. Resonant metallic nanostructures for enhanced terahertz spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.

    2015-11-12

    We present our recent studies on terahertz resonant dipole nanoantennas. Exploiting the localization and enhancement capabilities of these devices, we introduce an effective method to perform terahertz spectroscopy on an extremely small number of nano-objects.

  20. Solar neutrino spectroscopy (before and after superkamiokande)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1996-11-01

    Results of solar neutrino spectroscopy based on data from four experiments are presented. Perspectives related to forthcoming experiments are discussed. Implications of the results for neutrino properties are considered. (author). 54 refs, 2 tabs

  1. Moessbauer Spectroscopy study of Quimsachata Volcano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, A.G.B.

    1988-01-01

    It has been studied volcanic lava from Quimsachata Volcano in Pem. Moessbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electronic and optical microscopy allowed the identification of different mineralogical phases. (A.C.AS.) [pt

  2. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  3. Report of the Nuclear Spectroscopy Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerry, T.B.; Wylie, W.; Hugo

    1978-01-01

    This is a report of the group working with Nuclear Spectroscopy. They made a general discussion involving personnel, research interests (present and future) and suggestions, on general. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  4. Spectroscopy and optical diagnostics for gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Ronald K; Goldenstein, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to the science that governs the interaction of light and matter (in the gas phase). It provides readers with the basic knowledge to exploit the light-matter interaction to develop quantitative tools for gas analysis (i.e. optical diagnostics) and understand and interpret the results of spectroscopic measurements. The authors pair the basics of gas‐phase spectroscopy with coverage of key optical diagnostic techniques utilized by practicing engineers and scientists to measure fundamental flow‐field properties. The text is organized to cover three sub‐topics of gas‐phase spectroscopy: (1) spectral line positions, (2) spectral line strengths, and (3) spectral lineshapes by way of absorption, emission, and scattering interactions. The latter part of the book describes optical measurement techniques and equipment. Key subspecialties include laser induced fluorescence, tunable laser absorption spectroscopy, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. It is ideal for students an...

  5. EPR Spectroscopy in Environmental Lichen-Indication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, P. V.; Nguyet, Le Thi Bich; Zhuravleva, S. E.; Trukhan, E. M.

    2017-09-01

    The paramagnetic properties of lichens were investigated using EPR spectroscopy and Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr. as a case study. It was found that the concentration of paramagnetic centers in lichen thalli increased as the air-pollution level increased. Possible formation mechanisms of the paramagnetic centers in lichens were discussed. The efficiency of using EPR spectroscopy to study lichens as environmental quality indicators was demonstrated.

  6. Electron capture and energy-gain spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taulbjerg, K.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of translation energy spectroscopy as a tool to determine individual reaction cross sections in atomic collisions is analyzed with special emphasis on the electron capture process in highly charged ion collisions. A condition is derived to separate between higher collision energies where translation energy spectroscopy is problem free and lower energies where strong overlap of individual spectra features prohibits an analysis of the total translation energy spectrum by means of a simple deconvolution procedure. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  8. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  9. Bidimensional spectroscopy of interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzichristou, E. T.

    We have undertaken a program of studying the central few kpc regions of interacting/merger candidates, that were specifically chosen to have a range of nuclear activity, IR properties and strength of interaction. Here we present data obtained using the integral field spectrograph ARGUS, on the CFHT for few of these objects. Unlike slit spectroscopy, these data provide a direct two-dimensional picture of the wavelength-dependant emission and absorption line properties of these galaxies. The main conclusions are: (1) Mkn 789 is a recent merger product, undergoing a strong burst of star formation, while the older stellar component did not have yet the time to relax. It has no compact nuclear structure and its strong star formation powers a large scale outflow ("superwind"), which gives characteristic multiple profiles. Mkn 463 on the other hand, appears at an intermediate merging stage where at least one of its two visible nuclei had time to become activated, showing a Seyfert-like spectrum. The distinct kinematic feature here is a strongly blueshifted component that is interpreted in terms of bowshocks driven by a radio jet into the ambient gas. (2) UGC 3995 is the brightest member of a pair of interacting spirals, has a low-ionization, Seyfert-like spectrum. The velocity field is smooth, characteristic of a retrogradely rotating disk, but we find rotation of the kinematic axis with wavelength, that correspond to isophotal distortions and an obvious line profile substructure. It seems that this is a distinct kinematic feature in Seyfert-like nuclei independently of their interaction stage, indicating radial gas motions that might be related to the activation of the central engine. (3) Both mergers (Mkn 463, Mkn 789) have higher IR activity, as expressed by the LFIR excess and "warm" far-IR colours, among the objects in our sample. This seems to be independent of the nature of the central engine. On the other hand, the 25 microns characteristic excess emission of

  10. Near infrared spectroscopy and exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, Caroline

    2002-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method for the continuous monitoring of changes in tissue oxygenation and blood volume during aerobic exercise. During incremental exercise in adult subjects there was a positive correlation between lactate threshold (measured by blood sampling) and changes in the rate of muscle deoxygenation (measured by NIRS). However, the 7% failure rate for the NIRS test mitigated against the general use of this method. NIRS did not provide a valid method for LT determination in an adolescent population. NIRS was then used to examine whether haemodynamic changes could be a contributing factor to the mechanism underlying the cross-transfer effect. During a one-legged incremental aerobic exercise test the muscle was more deoxygenated in the exercising leg than in the non-exercising leg, consistent with oxygen consumption outstripping blood flow to the exercising limb. However, muscle blood volume increased equally in both legs. This suggests that blood flow may be raised to similar levels in both the legs; although local factors may signal an increase in blood volume, this effect is expressed in both legs. Muscle blood flow and changes in muscle blood volume were then measured directly by NIRS during an incremental one-arm aerobic exercise test. There was no significant difference in either blood volume or blood flow in the two arms at the end of the test. In the non-exercising arm changes in blood flow and blood volume were measured throughout the protocol. At higher exercise intensities, blood volume continued to rise as muscle blood flow plateaued, indicating that blood volume changes become independent of changes in blood flow. Finally, the effect of different training regimes on changes in muscle blood volume was examined. Subjects were assigned to a training group; two-arm training, one-arm training or a control group. Training did not affect blood volume changes during two-arm exercise. However, during one

  11. Near infrared spectroscopy and exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, Caroline

    2002-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method for the continuous monitoring of changes in tissue oxygenation and blood volume during aerobic exercise. During incremental exercise in adult subjects there was a positive correlation between lactate threshold (measured by blood sampling) and changes in the rate of muscle deoxygenation (measured by NIRS). However, the 7% failure rate for the NIRS test mitigated against the general use of this method. NIRS did not provide a valid method for LT determination in an adolescent population. NIRS was then used to examine whether haemodynamic changes could be a contributing factor to the mechanism underlying the cross-transfer effect. During a one-legged incremental aerobic exercise test the muscle was more deoxygenated in the exercising leg than in the non-exercising leg, consistent with oxygen consumption outstripping blood flow to the exercising limb. However, muscle blood volume increased equally in both legs. This suggests that blood flow may be raised to similar levels in both the legs; although local factors may signal an increase in blood volume, this effect is expressed in both legs. Muscle blood flow and changes in muscle blood volume were then measured directly by NIRS during an incremental one-arm aerobic exercise test. There was no significant difference in either blood volume or blood flow in the two arms at the end of the test. In the non-exercising arm changes in blood flow and blood volume were measured throughout the protocol. At higher exercise intensities, blood volume continued to rise as muscle blood flow plateaued, indicating that blood volume changes become independent of changes in blood flow. Finally, the effect of different training regimes on changes in muscle blood volume was examined. Subjects were assigned to a training group; two-arm training, one-arm training or a control group. Training did not affect blood volume changes during two-arm exercise. However, during one

  12. Early prediction of skin viability using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2014-08-01

    Accurate and early prediction of skin flap viability is vitally important in reconstructive surgery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first pilot study to evaluate the simultaneous use of both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy on a reverse MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model in the early prediction of skin viability. A total of 62 flap measurement sites from 11 Sprague-Dawley rats were monitored for 72 hours. Both statistical analysis using measured spectra and quantification of physiologically relevant tissue parameters using empirical methods were performed. The statistical analysis results suggest that either visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy or autofluorescence spectroscopy alone can predict the skin viability accurately; however, autofluorescence spectroscopy is more sensitive to tissue changes in the first 2 hours after induction of ischemia. The pilot study shows that it is feasible to predict flap failures in the first 2 hours when using autofluorescence spectroscopy alone; moreover, it is possible to predict flap failures even in the first 15 minutes with high accuracy when using diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy simultaneously. Meanwhile, several physiologically relevant parameters including hemoglobin oxygenation, total hemoglobin concentration, and redox ratio indicators estimated from diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectra show distinctively different trends over time for nonviable and viable skin. These findings will be helpful to clinicians for making a precise judgment on flap viability. Furthermore, the authors' results highlight the advantage of using autofluorescence spectroscopy in the early prediction of skin flap viability relative to diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

  13. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics

  14. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  15. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading causes of death next to heart diseases, Half of all cancer cases occur in developing countries. The conventional histopathology is usually the most trustable gold standard for pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. However, the applicability of this method is more or less restricted because of the requirement of removing human tissues and the difficulty of real time diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in 'optical biopsy' system using tissue spectroscopy to establish the pathological changes. Among optical based methods, Raman spectroscopy is a unique vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of probing biomolecular structures and conformation of tissues, and has excelled in the early detection of pre-cancer and cancer in the number of organs with high diagnostic specificity. Raman spectroscopy offers certain distinct advantages over than other optical diagnostic techniques such as high spatial resolution, use of less harmful NIR radiation, less or no sample preparation, no influence of water bands which facilitates in vivo/in situ measurements. This makes Raman spectroscopy also very useful for biomedical applications. Several research groups have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in biomedical applications. The background and principle of these techniques will be discussed with some examples and discussions on how Raman spectroscopy can act as a promising technique for rapid in vivo diagnosis and detection of various cancers at the molecular level. (author)

  16. Nuclear spectroscopy using the neutron capture reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidy, T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental methods using neutron spectroscopy as a means to study the nucleus structure are described. Since reactions of neutron capture (n, γ) are non-selective, they permit to study the nature of excitation (monoparticle and collective) of nuclear levels, the nature of vibrational excitations, to check the connection between shell model and liquid drop model etc. In many cases (n, γ) reactions are the only way to check the forecast of nuclear models. Advantages of (n, γ) spectroscopy, possessing a high precision of measurement and high sensitivity, are underlined. Using neutron spectroscopy on facilities with a high density of neutron flux the structures of energy levels of a large group of nuclei are studied. In different laboratories complete schemes of energy levels of nuclei are obtained, a great number of new levels are found, the evergy level densities are determined, multipolarities of γ-transitions, spins, level parities are considered. StrUctures of rotational bands of heavy deformed nuclei are studied. The study of the structure of high-spin states is possible only using the methods of (n, γ) spectroscopy Investigation results of the nuclei 24 Na, 114 Cd, 154 Eu, 155 Cd, 155 Sm, 233 Th are considered as examples. The most interesting aspects of the investigations using neutron spectroscopy are discUssed

  17. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  18. Practical guide to surface science and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2001-01-01

    Practical Guide to Surface Science and Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to surface science as well as describes the basic analytical techniques that researchers use to understand what occurs at the surfaces of materials and at their interfaces. These techniques include auger electron spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of electrons and ions, low energy electron diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, and interfacial segregation. Understanding the behavior of materials at their surfaces is essential for materials scientists and engineers as they design and fabricate microelectronics and semiconductor devices. The book gives over 100 examples, discussion questions and problems with varying levels of difficulty. Included with this book is a CD-ROM, which not only contains the same information, but also provides many elements of animation and interaction that are not easily emulated on paper. In diverse subject matters ranging from the operation of ion pumps, computer-...

  19. Impedance Spectroscopy of Dielectrics and Electronic Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Pissis, Polycarpos; Macdonald, J. Ross

    2013-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is used for the characterization of materials, such as electroceramics, solid and liquid electrochemical cells, dielectrics and also fully integrated devices, such as fuel cells. It consists of measuring the electrical impedance - or a closely related property, such as admi......Impedance spectroscopy is used for the characterization of materials, such as electroceramics, solid and liquid electrochemical cells, dielectrics and also fully integrated devices, such as fuel cells. It consists of measuring the electrical impedance - or a closely related property......, and procedures for the correction of measurement errors. The applications of impedance spectroscopy are illustrated with examples from electroceramics and polymer-based dielectric systems. The way in which the technique is applied to the two classes of materials is compared with reference to the different models...

  20. FTIR spectroscopy applications in forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, C.; Maynard, P.; Dawson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, and especially Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is a well-established technique in analytical chemistry and finds widespread application in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Infrared spectra depend on the nature of the functional groups present in the analyte, and are generally complex with numerous maxima and minima. These features are useful for comparison purposes and, in most cases, the infrared spectrum of an organic compound is considered as a unique functional print of this compound (i e the infrared spectrum constitutes the chemical signature or fingerprint of an organic compound). Many inorganic substances may also be uniquely identified using infrared spectroscopy. Until recently, infrared spectroscopy was of only limited utility in forensic science, despite its high selectivity. This is because infrared spectroscopy suffered from a lack of sensitivity in its early forms. However, with the advance of modern technology this is no longer the case. The widespread use of microscope attachments, along with numerous new sampling accessories, has overcome most of the previous limitations. For example, with an infrared microscope, it is possible to focus the infrared beam, and therefore select relevant areas of the sample as small as 10 x 10 μm and achieve a measurement in situ. Such a configuration enables the rapid generation of high-resolution spectra from samples of 10 ng. Typical forensic applications include the analysis of single textile fibres, minute paint chips or smears, drugs, laser printer and photocopy toners, polymers and miscellaneous unknown substances. Here we will broadly review the most common applications of infrared spectroscopy in forensic science

  1. Classical ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaneck, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of polymers was well established by Clark and coworkers in the 1970s, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of polymer films, was developed later. Previous to the 1970s, the first attempts to use ultraviolet light on polymer films took the form of appearance potential (valence band edge) measurements. Only some years later could the full valence band region of thin polymer films, including insulating polymers, semiconducting polymers and electrically conducting polymers. The development of what might be termed 'classical ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy' of polymer films may be loosely based upon a variety of issues, including adapting thin polymer film technology to ultra high vacuum studies, the widespread use of helium resonance lamps for studies of solid surfaces, the combined advent of practical and sufficient theoretical-computational methods. The advent of, and the use of, easily available synchrotron radiation for multi-photon spectroscopies, nominally in the area of the near UV, is not included in the term 'classical'. At the same time, electrically conducting polymers were discovered, leading to applications of the corresponding semiconducting polymers, which added technologically driven emphasis to this development of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy for polymer materials. This paper traces a limited number of highlights in the evolution of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of polymers, from the 1970s through to 2008. Also, since this issue is dedicated to Prof. Kazuhiko Seki, who has been a friend and competitor for over two decades, the author relies on some of Prof. Seki's earlier research, unpublished, on who-did-what-first. Prof. Seki's own contributions to the field, however, are discussed in other articles in this issue.

  2. A Brief History of Spectroscopy on EBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-28

    In the autumn of 1986, the first electron beam ion trap, EBIT, was put into service as a light source for the spectroscopy of highly charged ions. On the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of EBIT, we review its early uses for spectroscopy, from the first measurements of x rays from L-shell xenon ions in 1986 to its conversion to SuperEBIT in 1992 and rebirth as EBIT-I in 2001. Together with their sibling, EBIT-II, these machines have been used at Livermore to perform a multitude of seminal studies of the physics of highly charged ions.

  3. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D; Forsberg, U; Golubev, P; Sarmiento, L G; Yakushev, A; Andersson, L-L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Heßberger, F P; Herzberg, R-D; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Schädel, M; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2013-09-13

    A high-resolution α, x-ray, and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z=115. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z>112. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  4. X-Ray photoelectron Spectroscopy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Du, Yingge

    2017-01-03

    With capability for obtaining quantitative elemental composition, chemical and electronic state, and overlayer thickness information from the top ~10 nm of a sample surface, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) or Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) is a versatile and widely used technique for analyzing surfaces. The technique is applied to a host of materials, from insulators to conductors in virtually every scientific field and sub-discipline. More recently, XPS has been extended under in-situ and operando conditions. Following a brief introduction to XPS principles and instrument components, this article exemplifies widely ranging XPS applications in material and life sciences.

  5. Trap-assisted decay spectroscopy with ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalska, M; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Beck, D.; Blank, B.; Blaum, K.; Böhm, Ch.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Fraile, L.M.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Kreim, S.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Rubio, B.; Schweikhard, L.; Stanja, J.; Zuber, K.

    Penning traps are excellent high-precision mass spectrometers for radionuclides. The high-resolving power used for cleaning isobaric and even isomeric contaminants can be exploited to improve decay-spectroscopy studies by delivering purified samples. An apparatus allowing trap-assisted decay spectroscopy has been coupled to the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. The results from studies with stable and radioactive ions show that the setup can be used to perform decay studies on purified short-lived nuclides and to assist mass measurements.

  6. Principles of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Principles of Laser Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics is an essential textbook for graduate students studying the interaction of optical fields with atoms. It also serves as an ideal reference text for researchers working in the fields of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics. The book provides a rigorous introduction to the prototypical problems of radiation fields interacting with two- and three-level atomic systems. It examines the interaction of radiation with both atomic vapors and condensed matter systems, the density matrix and the Bloch vector, and applications involving linear absorptio

  7. Spectroscopy the key to the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Keith

    2007-01-01

    This is the first non-technical book on spectroscopy written specifically for practical amateur astronomers. It includes all the science necessary for a qualitative understanding of stellar spectra, but avoids a mathematical treatment which would alienate many of its intended readers. Any amateur astronomer who carries out observational spectroscopy and who wants a non-technical account of the physical processes which determine the intensity and profile morphology of lines in stellar spectra will find this is the only book written specially for them. It is an ideal companion to existing books

  8. Explosive detection using infrared laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, J.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Lambrecht, A.

    2009-01-01

    Stand-off and extractive explosive detection methods for short distances are investigated using mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. A quantum cascade laser (QCL) system for TATP-detection by open path absorption spectroscopy in the gas phase was developed. In laboratory measurements a detection limit of 5 ppm*m was achieved. For explosives with lower vapor pressure an extractive hollow fiber based measurement system was investigated. By thermal desorption gaseous TATP or TNT is introduced into a heated fiber. The small sample volume and a fast gas exchange rate enable fast detection. TNT and TATP detection levels below 100 ng are feasible even in samples with a realistic contaminant background.

  9. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  10. Scikit-spectra: Explorative Spectroscopy in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hughes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scikit-spectra is an intuitive framework for explorative spectroscopy in Python. Scikit-spectra leverages the Pandas library for powerful data processing to provide datastructures and an API designed for spectroscopy. Utilizing the new IPython Notebook widget system, scikit-spectra is headed towards a GUI when you want it, API when you need it approach to spectral analysis. As an application, analysis is presented of the surface-plasmon resonance shift in a solution of gold nanoparticles induced by proteins binding to the gold’s surface. Please refer to the scikit-spectra website for full documentation and support: http://hugadams.github.io/scikit-spectra/

  11. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  12. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  13. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  14. Overlapping β decay and resonance neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Fogelberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    By carrying out a detailed study of 87 Kr levels, we have shown that delayed neutron spectroscopy can be a viable method for studying individual levels and that a broad resonance-like structure is present in the β-strength distribution. 12 refs., 1 fig

  15. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  16. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed; and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  17. Laboratory system for alpha particle spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.R.; Chiu, N.W.

    1987-03-01

    An automated alpha particle spectroscopy system has beeen designed and fabricated. It consists of two major components, the automatic sample changer and the controller/data acquisition unit. It is capable of unattended analysis of ten samples for up to 65,000 seconds per sample

  18. Monitoring of whey quality with NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey; Lomborg, Carina

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for monitoring of liquid whey quality parameters during protein production process has been tested. The parameters included total solids, lactose, protein and fat content. The samples for the experiment were taken from real industrial...

  19. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  20. High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared techniques. Electrical properties were studied using a.c. impedance spectroscopy technique in the temperature range of 50–650 °C and frequency range of 10 Hz–13 MHz. The complex impedance plots at temperature ≥ 300 °C show ...

  1. Pear quality characteristics by Vis / NIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Nicácia P; Fachinello, José C; Galarça, Simone P; Betemps, Débora L; Pasa, Mateus S; Schmitz, Juliano D

    2012-09-01

    Recently, non-destructive techniques such as the Vis / NIR spectroscopy have been used to evaluate the characteristics of maturation and quality of pears. The study aims to validate the readings by the Vis / NIR spectroscopy as a non-destructive way to assess the qualitative characteristics of pear cultivars 'Williams', 'Packams' and 'Carrick', produced according to Brazilian conditions. The experiment was conducted at the Pelotas Federal University, UFPel, in Pelotas / RS, and the instrument used to measure the fruit quality in a non-destructive way was the NIR- Case spectrophotometer (SACMI, Imola, Italy). To determine pears' soluble solids (SS) and pulp firmness (PF), it was established calibration equations for each variety studied, done from the evaluations obtained by a non-destructive method (NIR-Case) and a destructive method. Further on, it was tested the performance of these readings by linear regressions. The results were significant for the soluble solids parameter obtained by the Vis / NIR spectroscopy; however, it did not achieve satisfactory results for the pear pulp firmness of these cultivars. It is concluded that the Vis / NIR spectroscopy, using linear regression, allows providing reliable estimates of pears' quality levels, especially for soluble solids.

  2. Overview. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy. Section 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styczen, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The 1994 year activity in the Nuclear Spectroscopy Department was like in previous years spread over large variety of subjects concerned with the in-beam nuclear spectroscopy and many nucleon transfer reactions, properties of high excited nuclear states, and the applied nuclear spectroscopy. The studies in the first two groups were mostly carried out in a vast international collaboration which enabled us to carry out experiments on highly sophisticated experimental facilities abroad like EUROGAM, GASP, HECTOR or OSIRIS, and others. Some preparations for `home` experiments have been carried out on the very much looked forward and recently obtained heavy ion beam from the cyclotron at the Warsaw University. The applied nuclear spectroscopy works, on the other hand, were based on using our own installations: an elaborated set-up for perturbed angular correlations, the RBS and PIXE set-ups at the Van de Graaff accelerator, the implanter, an atomic force microscope and several others. Much of the effort manifests itself in several valuable results which are summarized in the following pages. It is to be underlined that those results, as well as some new instrumentation developments were possible due to additional support via special grants and the promotion of the international cooperation by the State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author).

  3. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabelac, M.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, P.; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report double-resonant IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy of neutral gramicidin peptides in the gas phase. The IR spectra of gramicidin A and C, recorded in both the 1000 cm(-1) to 1800 cm(-1) and the 2700 to 3750 cm(-1) region, allow structural analysis. By studying this broad IR range, various local

  4. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, M.J.; Bell, J.F.; Cruikshank, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites. 100 refs

  5. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabeláč, Martin; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, Pavel; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2011), s. 1816-1821 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : density functional calculations * gramicidin * IR spectroscopy * protein folding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.412, year: 2011

  6. Monitoring of batch processes using spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurden, S. P.; Westerhuis, J. A.; Smilde, A. K.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new techniques for the understanding, monitoring and the control of batch processes. Spectroscopy is now becoming established as a means of obtaining real-time, high-quality chemical information at frequent time intervals and across a wide range of industrial

  7. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopy and supramolecular structures of two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    2007-05-16

    May 16, 2007 ... Indian Academy of Sciences. 243. #. Dedicated to Prof. Dr. Werner Weisweiler on the occasion of his 69th birthday. *For correspondence. Synthesis, spectroscopy and supramolecular structures of two magnesium 4-nitrobenzoate complexes. #. BIKSHANDARKOIL R SRINIVASAN,. 1,. * JYOTI V SAWANT,.

  9. Battery impedance spectroscopy using bidirectional grid connected ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shimul Kumar Dam

    Impedance spectroscopy; grid connection; battery converter; state of charge; health monitoring. 1. Introduction. Batteries play an important role as energy storage devices for renewable energy sources, electric vehicle and many other applications. A battery bank is interfaced to load through a power converter, which controls ...

  10. Improving transition voltage spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Chen, Jingzhe; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) is a promising spectroscopic tool for molecular junctions. The principles in TVS is to find the minimum on a Fowler-Nordheim plot where ln(I/V2) is plotted against 1/V and relate the voltage at the minimum Vmin to the closest molecular level. Importantly, Vmin...

  11. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  12. High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared techniques. Electrical properties were studied using a.c. impedance spectroscopy technique in the temperature range of 50–650 °C and frequency range of 10 Hz–13 MHz. The complex impedance plots at temperature ≥ 300 °C show ...

  13. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for sepia melanin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbonyiryivuze, A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available range of electromagnetic radiation, antibiotic, thermoregulation. Melanins are found all over the body from the skin and blood to the nervous system but the role of melanin in all these system is unclear. FTIR spectroscopy technique is usually one...

  14. Monitoring Industrial Food Processes Using Spectroscopy & Chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Kjær; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade rapid spectroscopic measurements have revolutionized quality control in practically all areas of primary food and feed production. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR & NIT) has been implemented for monitoring the quality of millions of samples of cereals, milk and meat with unprec...

  15. A New Spin on Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Chris [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The electronic spin degree of freedom is of general fundamental importance to all matter. Understanding its complex roles and behavior in the solid state, particularly in highly correlated and magnetic materials, has grown increasingly desirable as technology demands advanced devices and materials based on ever stricter comprehension and control of the electron spin. However, direct and efficient spin dependent probes of electronic structure are currently lacking. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has become one of the most successful experimental tools for elucidating solid state electronic structures, bolstered by-continual breakthroughs in efficient instrumentation. In contrast, spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has lagged behind due to a lack of similar instrumental advances. The power of photoemission spectroscopy and the pertinence of electronic spin in the current research climate combine to make breakthroughs in Spin and Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (SARPES) a high priority . This thesis details the development of a unique instrument for efficient SARPES and represents a radical departure from conventional methods. A custom designed spin polarimeter based on low energy exchange scattering is developed, with projected efficiency gains of two orders of magnitude over current state-of-the-art polarimeters. For energy analysis, the popular hemispherical analyzer is eschewed for a custom Time-of-Flight (TOF) analyzer offering an additional order of magnitude gain in efficiency. The combined instrument signifies the breakthrough needed to perform the high resolution SARPES experiments necessary for untangling the complex spin-dependent electronic structures central to today's condensed matter physics.

  16. The dawn of X‐ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a few episodes from the early days of X‐ray spectroscopy. It relies on contemporary publications, especially those by Barkla, Moseley, Siegbahn, and Compton. The paper addresses the subject from the vantage point of physics and should be of interest to the X‐ray spectroscopist...

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy with neutrons: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stewart F.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Daemen, Luke

    2018-02-01

    In this short review, we will briefly summarise the differences between INS spectroscopy and conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopies. We will illustrate these with the current state-of-the art, using C70 as an example. The main focus of the article will be on the key advances in INS spectroscopy over the last ten years or so, that are driving new areas of research. The developments fall into three broad categories: (i) new sources, (ii) new and/or upgraded instrumentation and (iii) novel uses for existing instruments. For (i) we summarise the new neutron sources that are now, or will be, operating. For (ii) we show the capabilities of new or upgraded instruments. These offer unprecedented levels of sensitivity: sub-millimole quantities of hydrogen can be measured and millimole quantities of low cross section materials. Recent work on hexahalo metallates and adsorbed CO2 is used to demonstrate what is now feasible. For (iii), instruments that were designed for studies of magnetism, are now being used for molecular spectroscopy, especially for catalysts. This is illustrated with work on CuH and methanol synthesis catalysts.

  18. Arbitrary-Region Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Jelle; Dekens, Tomas; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Lamb, Don C

    2016-10-18

    Combining imaging with correlation spectroscopy, as in raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), makes it possible to extract molecular translational diffusion constants and absolute concentrations, and determine intermolecular interactions from single-channel or multicolor confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) images. Region-specific RICS analysis remains very challenging because correlations are always calculated in a square region-of-interest (ROI). In this study, we describe a generalized image correlation spectroscopy algorithm that accepts arbitrarily shaped ROIs. We show that an image series can be cleaned up before arbitrary-region RICS (ARICS) analysis. We demonstrate the power of ARICS by simultaneously measuring molecular mobility in the cell membrane and the cytosol. Mobility near dynamic subcellular structures can be investigated with ARICS by generating a dynamic ROI. Finally, we derive diffusion and concentration pseudo-maps using the ARICS method. ARICS is a powerful expansion of image correlation spectroscopy with the potential of becoming the new standard for extracting biophysical parameters from confocal fluorescence images. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 16th International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this conference is to review the status, progress and future plans of the field of hadron spectroscopy, and relate these to understanding hadron dynamics. This series of biennial conferences began in 1985 at College Park, Maryland, USA, with the 15th conference held in Nara, Japan in November 2013. Hadron 2015 will be organized by Jefferson Lab.

  20. High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate, BaSnO3. SHAIL UPADHYAY. Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India. MS received 29 May 2012; revised 14 July 2012. Abstract. Polycrystalline powder of BaSnO3 was prepared at 1300 ◦C using a ...

  1. Gamma and Xray spectroscopy at high performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The author determines that for many interesting problems in gamma and Xray spectroscopy it is necessary to use crystal diffractometers. The basic features of such instruments are discussed and the special performance of crystal spectrometers is demonstrated by means of typical examples of various applications

  2. Small animal cardiovascular MR imaging and spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakermans, Adrianus J.; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Moonen, Rik P. M.; Motaal, Abdallah G.; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Vandoorne, Katrien; Nicolay, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    The use of MR imaging and spectroscopy for studying cardiovascular disease processes in small animals has increased tremendously over the past decade. This is the result of the remarkable advances in MR technologies and the increased availability of genetically modified mice. MR techniques provide a

  3. Time-dependent Autler-Townes spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Qamar, S; Zubairy, M S

    2003-01-01

    Autler-Townes spontaneous emission spectroscopy is revisited for a time-dependent case. We report the results of spontaneous emission spectra for nonstationary scattered light signals using the definition of the time-dependent physical spectrum. This is a rare example of problems where time-dependent spectra can be calculated exactly.

  4. Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy of Biopolymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis Marcott; Michael Lo; Kevin Kjoller; Craig Prater; Roshan Shetty; Joseph Jakes; Isao Noda

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been combined in a single instrument capable of producing 100 nm spatial resolution IR spectra and images. This new capability enables the spectroscopic characterization of biomaterial domains at levels not previously possible. A tunable IR laser source generating pulses on the order of 10 ns was used...

  5. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-31

    Oct 31, 2014 ... A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understanding heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multiquark hadrons the ...

  6. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understand- ing heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure. (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multi- quark hadrons the hadron ...

  7. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (< 30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain.

  8. Spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is a well-known fact that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has emerged as one of the best analytical techniques for multi-elemental compositional analysis of samples. We report assembling and optimization of LIBS set up using high resolution and broad-range echelle spectrograph coupled to an intensified ...

  9. Structural, optical spectroscopy, optical conductivity and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fe and W co-substituted BaTiO3 perovskite ceramics, compositional formula BaTi 0.5 (Fe 0.33 W 0.17 )O 3 , were synthesized by the standard solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronmicroscopy and spectroscopy ellipsometry. The prepared sample remains as double phases with the ...

  10. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in water | Boudjemai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sparks were generated in water by the focused beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser Na and Cu aqueous solutions exhibited fluorescence signal on the decaying edge of plasma emission at their respective characteristic resonance lines. Potential of the laser plasma spectroscopy for in-situ pollution monitoring in natural ...

  11. Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Advanced Placement Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigna, James

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is a new addition to the Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry curriculum. This article explains the rationale for its inclusion, an overview of how the PES instrument records data, how the data can be analyzed, and how to include PES data in the course. Sample assessment items and analysis are included, as well as…

  12. Novel concepts for terahertz waveguide spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In the recent years there has been a tremendous interest in various waveguides for the THz range. A waveguide offers strong confinement of the field as well as low-loss propagation over significant distances, properties which are important for sensitive spectroscopy. The confinement of the field ...

  13. Intense Terahertz Sources for 2D Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov

    This Ph.D. thesis covers the development of terahertz (THz) spectroscopy systems for investigating nonlinear vibrational responses in organic biomolecules such as sucrose. First, an add-on module for the DFT-based ab initio software CASTEP is developed to include a THz pulse as an external field...

  14. Parallel reconstruction in accelerated multivoxel MR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, V. O.; Klomp, D. W. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298206382; Laterra, J.; Barker, P. B.

    PurposeTo develop the simultaneous acquisition of multiple voxels in localized MR spectroscopy (MRS) using sensitivity encoding, allowing reduced total scan time compared to conventional sequential single voxel (SV) acquisition methods. MethodsDual volume localization was used to simultaneously

  15. Spectroscopy on Polymer-Fullerene Photovoltaic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyakonov, V.; Riedel, I.; Godovsky, D.; Parisi, J.; Ceuster, J. De; Goovaerts, E.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the electrical transport properties of ITO/conjugated polymer-fullerene/Al photovoltaic cells and the role of defect states with current-voltage studies, admittance spectroscopy, and electron spin resonance technique. In the temperature range 293-40K, the characteristic step in the

  16. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus

    2017-04-18

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  17. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  18. Surface Fluctuation Scattering using Grating Heterodyne Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, R. V.; Sirohi, R. S.; Mann, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Heterodyne photon spectroscopy is used for the study of the viscoelastic properties of the liquid interface by studying light scattered from thermally generated surface fluctuations. A theory of a heterodyne apparatus based on a grating is presented, and the heterodyne condition is given in terms...

  19. Analyzing Engineered Nanoparticles using Photothermal Infrared Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko

    fabricated, and Gambles solution with dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles showed lowered potential as expected. Despite the potential of this concept instability and lack of reproducibility continued to be an unneglectable issue. The concept of utilizing string resonators for photothermal spectroscopy was...

  20. The spectroscopy of the new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, K.

    1977-01-01

    Theories and models of heavy quark-antiquark systems are reviewed. The principal topics are: i) the spectroscopy of the psi-family both above and below charm threshold; ii) production of charmed mesons in e + e - annihilation; and iii) the consequences of interpreting UPSILON and UPSILON' as bound states of a new quark-antiquark system. (orig.) [de

  1. XAFS Spectroscopy : Fundamental Principles and Data Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Mojet, B.L.; Dorssen, G.E. van; Ramaker, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The physical principles of XAFS spectroscopy are given at a sufficiently basic level to enable scientists working in the field of catalysis to critically evaluate articles dealing with XAFS studies on catalytic materials. The described data-analysis methods provide the basic tools for studying the

  2. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted. Keywords. Heavy flavour; spectroscopy; potential models; exotics. PACS Nos 12.40.Yx; 14.40.Pq; 14.40.Rt; 12.39.Pn. 1. Introduction. In recent years, the investigation of hadrons containing heavy ...

  3. Prospects for in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, E.B.; Manoharan, R.; Koo, T.-W.; Shafer, K.E.; Motz, J.T.; Fitzmaurice, M.; Kramer, J.R.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a potentially important clinical tool for real-time diagnosis of disease and in situ evaluation of living tissue. The purpose of this article is to review the biological and physical basis of Raman spectroscopy of tissue, to assess the current status of the field and to explore future directions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy and the molecular level information it provides are explained. An overview of the evolution of Raman spectroscopic techniques in biology and medicine, from early investigations using visible laser excitation to present-day technology based on near-infrared laser excitation and charge-coupled device array detection, is presented. State-of-the-art Raman spectrometer systems for research laboratory and clinical settings are described. Modern methods of multivariate spectral analysis for extracting diagnostic, chemical and morphological information are reviewed. Several in-depth applications are presented to illustrate the methods of collecting, processing and analysing data, as well as the range of medical applications under study. Finally, the issues to be addressed in implementing Raman spectroscopy in various clinical applications, as well as some long-term directions for future study, are discussed. (author)

  4. LASER-INDUCED BREAKDOWN SPECTROSCOPY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique, which can be used to perform ... environmental pollution by Cr results mainly from mining and smelting activities [2]. The ... mapping of large areas, for example soils around mines, for potential heavy metal pollutants. To the best of our ...

  5. Spectroscopy of thin nanodiamond layers and membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kravets, Roman; Remeš, Zdeněk; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Bryknar, Z.; Nesládek, M.; Potměšil, Jiří; Poruba, Aleš; Vaněček, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 352, - (2006), s. 1344-1347 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Raman scattering * chemical vapor deposition * optical spectroscopy * defects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2006

  6. Complete system for portable gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuess, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The report described a system built around the Computing Gamma Spectrometer (PSA) LEA 74-008. The software primarily supports high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy using either a high-purity intrinsic germanium detector (HPGe) or a lithium-drifted germanium detector [Ge(Li)

  7. Comparison of photoacoustic spectroscopy, conventional absorption spectroscopy, and potentiometry as probes of lanthanide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, R.A.; Palmer, C.E.A.; Baisden, P.A.; Russo, R.E.; Silva, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors measured the stability constants of praseodymium acetate and oxydiacetate complexes by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy, conventional UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, and pH titration. For the spectroscopic studies, changes in the free Pr absorption peaks at 468 and 481 nm were monitored at varying ligand concentrations. The total Pr concentration was 1 x 10 -4 M in solutions used for the photoacoustic studies and 0.02 M for conventional spectroscopy. For the pH titrations, we used solutions whose Pr concentrations varied from 5 x 10 -3 to 5 x 10 -2 M, with total ligand-to-metal ratios ranging from 1 to 10. A comparison of the results obtained by the three techniques demonstrates that photoacoustic spectroscopy can give the same information about metal-ligand speciation as more conventional methods. It is particularly suited to those situations where the other techniques are insensitive because of limited metal concentrations

  8. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  9. Energy analyzer for Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy backscattering ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, S.S.; Gorelik, V.A.; Gutenko, V.T.; Protopopov, O.D.; Trubitsin, A.A.; Shuvalova, Z.A.; Yakushev, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Energy analyzer for electron Auger spectroscopy and low-energy backscattering ion spectroscopy is described. Analyzer presents one-cascade variant of cylindrical mirror with second-order focusing. Energy relative resolution is continuously adjusted within 0.2-1.2% limits. Signal/noise relation by Cu Auger-line at 1 muA current of exciting beam changes upper limit of range 150-450

  10. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of crystalline and aqueous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Møller, Uffe; Eichhorn, Finn

    2007-01-01

    We use ab-initio density-functional perturbation theory together with THz spectroscopy for precise prediction and assignment of vibrational modes in molecular crystals. We show that THz spectroscopy is useful for analysis of liquids and food products....

  11. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... be signicantly reduced. Besides time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurement, optical transmission, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy experiments on black silicon are presented....

  12. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3- dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]- dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems.

  13. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  14. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-01

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy during peripheral vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Schroeder, T V; Vogt, K C

    1997-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy was performed perioperatively on the dorsum of the foot in 14 patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass surgery using a prosthesis or the greater saphenous vein. Dual-wavelength continuous light spectroscopy was used to assess changes in tissue saturation before, during...... that near-infrared spectroscopy is appropriate for perioperative monitoring during vascular grafting....

  16. SPECTROSCOPY OF PUTATIVE BROWN DWARFS IN TAURUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Mamajek, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Quanz and coworkers have reported the discovery of the coolest known member of the Taurus star-forming complex (L2 ± 0.5), and Barrado and coworkers have identified a possible protostellar binary brown dwarf in the same region. We have performed infrared spectroscopy on the former and the brighter component of the latter to verify their substellar nature. The resulting spectra do not exhibit the strong steam absorption bands that are expected for cool objects, demonstrating that they are not young brown dwarfs. The optical magnitudes and colors for these sources are also indicative of background stars rather than members of Taurus. Although the fainter component of the candidate protostellar binary lacks spectroscopy, we conclude that it is a galaxy rather than a substellar member of Taurus based on its colors and the constraints on its proper motion.

  17. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan

    are located in the visible range, e.g. for petroleum product analysis. Deep Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy applied to this research field was claimed to be able to solve the problem. Chapter 5 is devoted to gasoline analysis by the use of the DUV Raman spectroscopy. Firstly, some sampling difficulties...... (absorption, condensation) are described. We have found a way to solve the problems, and our solution, using a special designed gas gap cell to obtain measurements of extraordinary high quality, are presented. The DUV Raman spectra of gasoline were excited by three different wavelengths, 257.3, 244.0 and 229...... spectra of the gasoline samples. It is virtually unimportant what the rest of the sample consisted of. The most intense characteristic band is located at 1381 cm-1. The Raman spectra of home-made artificial gasoline mixtures - with gradually increasing Naphthalene contents - can be used to determine...

  18. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kasem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, known also as laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS, is a well-known spectrochemical elemental analysis technique. The field of LIBS has been rapidly matured as a consequence of growing interest in real-time analysis across a broad spectrum of applied sciences and recent development of commercial LIBS analytical systems. In this brief review, we introduce the contributions of the research groups in the African continent in the field of the fundamentals and applications of LIBS. As it will be shown, the fast development of LIBS in Africa during the last decade was mainly due to the broad environmental, industrial, archaeological, and biomedical applications of this technique.

  19. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  20. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  1. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Systems for Tissue Oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Dahl

    We present exible silicon device platforms, which combine polyimide with polydimethylsiloxane in order to add flexibility and biocompatibility to the silicon devices. The device platforms are intended as tissue oximeters, using near infrared spectroscopy, but could potentially also be used...... for other medical applications. The tissue oximeters are realised by incorporation of pn-diodes into the silicon in order to form arrays of infrared detectors. These arrays can then be used for spatially resolved spectroscopy measurements, with the targeted end user being prematurely born infant children....... Monte Carlo simulations have been performed on a model of a neonatal head and they show only weak changing signals as function of changes in cerebral oxygenation. A mechanical and electrical analysis of the device platforms, both by analytical expressions and numerical simulation, indicated...

  2. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  3. Disease recognition by infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Steiner, Gerald; Beleites, Claudia; Salzer, Reiner

    2009-02-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are emerging biophotonic tools to recognize various diseases. The current review gives an overview of the experimental techniques, data-classification algorithms and applications to assess soft tissues, hard tissues and body fluids. The methodology section presents the principles to combine vibrational spectroscopy with microscopy, lateral information and fiber-optic probes. A crucial step is the classification of spectral data by a variety of algorithms. We discuss unsupervised algorithms such as cluster analysis or principal component analysis and supervised algorithms such as linear discriminant analysis, soft independent modeling of class analogies, artificial neural networks support vector machines, Bayesian classification, partial least-squares regression and ensemble methods. The selected topics include tumors of epithelial tissue, brain tumors, prion diseases, bone diseases, atherosclerosis, kidney stones and gallstones, skin tumors, diabetes and osteoarthritis. ((c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  4. Reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy of aluminum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiříček, Petr; Bartoš, Igor; Zemek, Josef; Werner, W. S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 604, 11-12 (2010), s. 1006-1009 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0601; GA MŠk MEB060809 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Al(111) * polycrystalline Al * electron energy loss spectroscopy * photoelectron diffraction * PHD * REELS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.010, year: 2010

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, S.; Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures, mimicked...... by periodic arrays of half-cylinders (up to 120 nm in radius), we find no enhancement factors exceeding 10 orders of magnitude (10(10)). (C) 2012 Optical Society of America...

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures, mimicked...... by periodic arrays of half-cylinders (up to 120 nm in radius), we find no enhancement factors exceeding 10 orders of magnitude (1010)....

  7. Heavy flavour production and spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258787

    2012-01-01

    At the Moriond QCD conference LHCb has presented results on heavy flavour production and spectroscopy. Here the latest results are discussed, which include the first observation and measurement of the branching fraction of the hadronic decay $B^+_e \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$, the mass measurement of the excited B mesons and the mass measurement of the $\\Xi_b$ and $\\Omega_b$ baryons.

  8. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of transient species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw, D.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    Transient species are studied in the isolation of the gas phase using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). A description of the equipment used and a discussion of some theoretical topics, which play a role in the interpretation of PE spectra, are given. Koopmans' theorem, Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) calculations and the sum rule are discussed. A versatile ultraviolet PE spectrometer, designed specifically for this purpose, has been built and the construction and performance of this instrument are described. (Auth.)

  9. Genetic algorithm simulation for line shape spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ping; Pan Chuanhong; Cui Zhengying; Ding Xuantong; Wang Quanming

    2005-01-01

    Line shape spectroscopy is a valuable tool both for diagnostic, and for understanding the basic atomic processes in the boundary region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The D α line profiles are modeled with genetic algorithm. The modeling profiles are in good agreement with the line profiles obtained in experiment. The results of this analysis suggest that there are one population of hydrogen and three populations of deuterium with different temperatures and population ratios. (authors)

  10. Polarization Effects in Attosecond Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    following the field instead. We show that polarization effects may lead to an apparent temporal shift that needs to be properly accounted for in the analysis. The effect may be isolated and studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from oriented polar molecules. We also show that polarization...... effects will lead to an apparent temporal shift of 50 as between photoelectrons from a 2p and 1s state in atomic hydrogen....

  11. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  12. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800,000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1–1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine haemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm−1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  13. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1-1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm-1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  14. Proximity Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy/Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Here a new microscopic method is proposed to image and characterize very thin samples like few-layer materials, organic molecules, and nanostructures with nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution using electron beams of energies lower than 20 eV. The microscopic technique achieves high resolution through the proximity (or near-field) effect, as in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), while it also allows detection of transmitted electrons for imaging and spectroscopy, as in scanning transmission...

  15. Spectroscopy by frequency entangled photon pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2003-01-01

    Quantum spectroscopy was performed using the frequency-entangled broadband photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. An absorptive sample was placed in front of the idler photon detector, and the frequency of signal photons was resolved by a diffraction grating. The absorption spectrum of the sample was measured by counting the coincidences, and the result is in agreement with the one measured by a conventional spectrophotometer with a classical light source.

  16. Heavy baryon spectroscopy with relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarce, A.; Garcilazo, H.; Vijande, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparative Faddeev study of heavy baryon spectroscopy with nonrelativistic and relativistic kinematics. We show results for different standard hyperfine interactions with both kinematics in an attempt to learn about the light quark dynamics. We highlight the properties of particular states accessible in nowadays laboratories that would help in discriminating between different dynamical models. The advance in the knowledge of light quark dynamics is a key tool for the understanding of the existence of exotic hadrons.

  17. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  18. Monitoring of phenol photodegradation by ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, B.; Gonzalez, C.; Thomas, O.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been developed as an emerging technology for hazardous organic treatment in industrial wastewater. In this paper, the contribution of ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy to follow phenol photodegradation was studied in a laboratory photochemical reactor equipped with a low pressure mercury lamp. It has been observed that a multicomponent approach is efficient for the evolution estimation of the initial product or intermediate compounds formed during the photodegradation.

  19. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, K.; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, F.; Holá, Miroslava; Mahelová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2014), s. 23924-23935 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * Candida parapsilosis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  20. Laser spectroscopy monitoring of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyothi Lakshmi, R.; Ullas, G.; Kartha, V.B.; Alexander, Mohan

    2000-01-01

    Surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy are the major treatment modalities for many forms of cancer at present. Monitoring of the therapy, follow up studies on regression of the disease and detection of recurrence are very essential for successful treatment. Any technique which will be of assistance for these purposes will thus be of great help. This paper presents some of our results of Raman and Pulsed Laser fluorescence spectroscopy studies on tissues, body fluids and bone, in oral cancer subjects after radiation therapy