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Sample records for intracavitary brachytherapy dose

  1. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

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    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  2. Medium-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

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    Tanaka, Eiichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of medium-dose-rate (MDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICRT) for cervical cancer. Between May 1991 and March 2001, 80 patients with cervical cancer were treated with external radiotherapy combined with MDR-ICRT. Two patients were excluded from this study. The median age of patients was 61 years (range: 30-87 years). Seventy-five patients had pathologically proved squamous cell carcinoma, and 3 had adenocarcinoma. The patients were staged by Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) classification as follows: Stage IA (2), Stage IB (4), Stage IIA (5), Stage IIB (22), Stage IIIA (1), Stage IIIB (32), Stage IVA (5), Stage IVB (7). Median follow-up for survivor was 68 months (range: 12-131 months). The radiation therapy was based on a combination of ICRT and external pelvic irradiation. Patients with stages II, III and IVA were treated with whole-pelvic irradiation with respective total doses of 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Doses of 40, 30, 20, and 20 Gy parametrial irradiation were added with central shield pelvic irradiation for stages IB, II, III and IVA lesions respectively. For MDR-ICRT, from May 1991 to December 1995, point A dose were 40 Gy/4 fractions for stages I and II, 38 Gy/4 fractions for stage III, and 28.5 Gy/3 fractions for stage IVA. And from January 1996 to March 2001, point A dose of 36 Gy/4 fractions for stages I and II, 34 Gy/4 fractions for stage III, and 25.5 Gy/3 fractions for stage IVA. The median dose rate at point A was 1.7 Gy/hour (range: 1.3-2.2 Gy/hour). The 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 100%, 76%, 51% and 40% for stages I, II, III and IVA respectively. All patients with stage IVB died from the tumor with a median survival time of 12 months. The 5-year pelvic control rates were 100%, 88%, 69% and 40% for stages I, II, III and IVA respectively. Major late complications occurred in 2 patients (3%). One patient developed vesico- and recto-vaginal fistulae, and died of pelvic infection

  3. Impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy and evaluation of OAR doses

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    Thaper, Deepak; Shukla, Arvind; Rathore, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in CT based intracavitary brachytherapy planning and evaluation of its effect on organ at risk (OAR) like bladder, rectum and sigmoid and target volume High risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV)

  4. Local vaginal anesthesia during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

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    Chen, H.-C.; Wan Leung, Stephen; Wang, C.-J.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, S.-J.; Yang, C.-W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of local vaginal lidocaine application for pain relief during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy for patients with cervical cancer, and to investigate sequential changes in serum levels of lidocaine during the procedures. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was designed to examine the analgesic effect, physical response, and side effects of local anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. Forty patients were enrolled. All patients received 10-15 MV X-rays to the pelvis with a total dose of 45-59.4 Gy 5-6 weeks before undergoing HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. All patients underwent first intracavitary brachytherapy under general anesthesia. These patients were randomly allocated to receive one of two different treatment protocols as follows: (1) treatment session - control session - treatment session - control session; or (2) control session - treatment session- control session - treatment session. In the treatment sessions, topical anesthesia was administered using 4 ml of 10% lidocaine solution sprayed liberally on the cervix and vagina during intracavitary brachytherapy. In the control sessions, a placebo was administered in the same manner during brachytherapy. The Hensche's applicators for brachytherapy were inserted into the cervix and vagina 5 min after lidocaine application. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess pain and discomfort during brachytherapy. Blood pressure and heart rates were measured to evaluate the physiological response. Another prospective study was then performed to investigate the sequential changes of serum lidocaine levels during the anesthetic procedure. Eleven additional patients with similar disease state and demographic characteristics were enrolled and blood samples were obtained before, and 5, 15, 30, and 45 min after the initiation of lidocaine application. Results: The mean VAS values recorded during the treatment sessions and control

  5. A quality indicator to evaluate high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix

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    Morales, Francisco Contreras; Soboll, Daniel Scheidegger

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this report is to prevent a simple quality indicator (QI) that can be promptly used to evaluate the high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cancer of the cervix, and if necessary, to correct applicators' geometry before starting the treatment. We selected 51 HDR intracavitary applications of brachytherapy of patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with 60 mm uterine tandem and small Fletcher colpostat, according to the Manchester method (dose prescription on point A). A QI was defined as the ratio between the volume of 100% isodose curve of the study insertion and the volume of the 100% isodose curve of an insertion considered to be ideal. The data obtained were distributed in three groups: the group with tandem placement slippage (67,5%), a group with colpostat placement slippage (21,9%), and a third group, considered normal (10,6%). Each group showed particular characteristics (p < 0.0001). QI can be the best auxiliary method to establish the error tolerance (%) allowed for HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. (author)

  6. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

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    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  7. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kohno, Mari; Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae; Nagata, Yasushi; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women’s Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  8. Dosimetric comparison of different dose prescription systems with CT based intracavitary brachytherapy and manual back projection technique to reconstruct the applicator

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    Oinam, A.S.; Dubey, S.; Kehwar, T.S.; Rout, Sanjaya K.; Patel, F.D.; Sharma, S.C.; Goyal, D.R.; Narayan, P.

    2002-01-01

    Intracavitary brachytherapy is one of the well-established techniques for the treatment of carcinoma of cervix. The prediction of late effect of normal tissue like rectum and bladder needs the defining of the volume of the bladder and rectum in situ. In the normal planning of intracavitary and interstitial implants, simulated radiograph films are used to reconstruct the applicator geometry and dose points to represent the dose to critical organs. CT based brachytherapy can define such volume instead of defining dose points, which represent the dose to these critical organs

  9. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

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    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Abe, Madoka; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  10. A study on the variation of bladder and rectal doses with respiration in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer

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    Singh Karuna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In cervical intracavitary brachytherapy, it is mandatory to evaluate if the doses to bladder and rectum are within tolerance limits. In this study, an effort has been made to evaluate the effect of respiration on the doses to bladder and rectum in patients undergoing brachytherapy.Material and methods: Fifteen patients with cervix cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation followed by intracavitary brachytherapy were included in this study. At the time of brachytherapy, all patients underwent 4D computed tomography (CT imaging. Five out of fifteen patients were scanned with empty bladder while the rest had full bladder during sectional imaging. Four sets of pelvic CT image datasets with applicators in place were acquired at equal interval in a complete respiratory cycle. Treatment plans were generated for all the CT datasets on a PlatoTM Sunrise planning system. A dose of 7 Gy was prescribed to Point A. Doses to ICRU (Report No.38 bladder (IBRP and rectal (IRRP reference points were calculated in all the CT datasets.Results: The mean of maximum dose to IBRP at four different respiratory phases for full and empty bladder were 53.38 ± 19.20%, 55.75 ± 16.71%, 56.13 ± 17.70%, 57.50 ± 17.48% and 60.93 ± 15.18%, 60.29 ± 16.28%, 60.86 ± 15.90%, 60.82 ± 15.42% of the prescribed dose respectively. Similarly, maximum dose to IRRP for full and empty bladder were 55.50 ± 18.66%, 57.38 ± 14.81%, 58.00 ± 14.97%, 58.38 ± 17.28% and 71.96 ± 6.90%, 71.58 ± 7.52%, 68.92 ± 6.21%, 71.45 ± 7.16% respectively.Conclusions: Our study shows that respiration affects the dose distribution to the bladder and rectum in intracavitary brachytherapy of cervix cancer. It is advisable to reduce the critical organ dose to account for the dose variation introduced by respiratory motion.

  11. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

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    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  12. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy in the management of cervical and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia

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    Ogino, Ichiro; Kitamura, Tatsuo; Okajima, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Sho

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICR) in patients with grade 3 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN-3) and grade 3 vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN-3). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis in 20 patients with CIN-3 (n = 14) or VAIN-3 (n = 6), average age 61.9 years, managed with HDR-ICR at Kanagawa Cancer Center. Two patients with CIN-3 with microinvasive foci and 11 other patients with CIN-3 were treated with HDR-ICR for cervical lesions. Six patients with CIN-3 after hysterectomy received HDR-ICR for recurrent or residual VAIN-3 lesions. One patient received radiation therapy for both CIN-3 and VAIN-3 lesions. All these patients but one were postmenopausal. Results: Seventeen patients were treated with HDR-ICR alone, and three with combined external radiation therapy. The dose was calculated at Point A located 2 cm superior to the external os and 2 cm lateral to the axis of the intrauterine tube for intact uterus. For lesions of the vaginal stump, the dose was calculated at a point 1 cm superior to the vaginal apex or 1 cm beyond vaginal mucosa. In the 14 patients treated for CIN-3 lesions, the mean total dose of HDR-ICR was 26.1 Gy (range 20-30). Six patients received HDR-ICR for VAIN-3 lesions with mean dose of 23.3 Gy (range 15-30). At follow-up (mean 90.5 months; range 13-153), 14 patients were alive and 6 had died owing to nonmalignant intercurrent disease. No patient developed recurrent disease. Rectal bleeding occurred in three patients, but this symptom subsided spontaneously. Moderate and severe vaginal reactions were noted in two patients, in whom the treatment had included the entire vagina. Conclusions: HDR-ICR can be employed as the primary management strategy for postmenopausal women with CIN-3. In intraepithelial neoplasia involving the vaginal wall after hysterectomy, HDR-ICR should be considered as an alternative to total vaginectomy

  13. Positional variation of applicators during low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a prospective study

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    Arul Ponni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to know the effect of variation in position of applicators to the dose received by the tumor volume, critical organs such as rectum and bladder and the correlation of variation on the clinical outcome.Material and methods: 36 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer, undergoing intracavitary brachythe - rapy (ICBT from October 2005 to December 2006 were the subjects of the study. Two pairs of orthogonal X-ray films were taken: one prior to loading of sources and the other after removal of sources. These patients were followed up as per the RTOG criteria.Results: The median duration of insertion was 25 hours with a median follow up period of 6.7 months. The translational variation of the applicator position for all patients was 3 mm and 1 mm (2 SD, respectively, in the patient’s lateral and antero-posterior direction. The rotational variation was 3 and 4 degrees (2 SD in the patient’s transverse and sagittal planes. Detailed analysis of source movement showed following changes in median dose: point A: 14%, point B: 2%, point P: 1%, Rectum 1: 3.5%, Rectum 2: 4% and Bladder: 9.1%. The incidence of rectal toxicity was 6/36(16.7% and that of bladder was 1/36 (2.8%. When the variables were grouped to evaluate the relationship, our study showed statistically significant relationship between: R2 and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.002, point A and rectal toxicity (Pearson: 0.792, lateral displacement/anteroposterior displacement and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.012/0.003, beta angle and R2 (p value: 0.002.Conclusions: The geometric relationships between the ICBT applicators and the critical structures vary during the course of low dose rate brachytherapy. Source movement does result in significant dose alterations in terms of increased rate of complications, but its impact on cure rates needs to be studied in the future.

  14. Retrospective Dosimetric Comparison of Low-Dose-Rate and Pulsed-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy Using a Tandem and Mini-Ovoids

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    Mourtada, Firas; Gifford, Kent A.; Berner, Paula A.; Horton, John L.; Price, Michael J.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution of Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy to that of Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy around mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. Ten patient treatment plans were selected from our clinical database, all of which used mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. A commercial treatment planning system using AAPM TG43 formalism was used to calculate the dose in water for both the 137 Cs and 192 Ir sources. For equivalent system loadings, we compared the dose distributions in relevant clinical planes, points A and B, and to the ICRU bladder and rectal reference points. The mean PDR doses to points A and B were 3% ± 1% and 6% ± 1% higher than the LDR doses, respectively. For the rectum point, the PDR dose was 4% ± 3% lower than the LDR dose, mainly because of the 192 Ir PDR source anisotropy. For the bladder point, the PDR dose was 1% ± 4% higher than the LDR dose. We conclude that the PDR and LDR dose distributions are equivalent for intracavitary brachytherapy with a tandem and mini-ovoids. These findings will aid in the transfer from the current practice of LDR intracavitary brachytherapy to PDR for the treatment of gynecologic cancers

  15. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

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    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  16. A real-time in vivo dosimetric verification method for high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

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    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Cao Xinping; Huang Shaomin; Lerch, Michael; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: A real-time in vivo dosimetric verification method using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters has been developed for patient dosimetry in high-dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: The necessary calibration and correction factors for MOSFET measurements in {sup 192}Iridium source were determined in a water phantom. With the detector placed inside a custom-made nasopharyngeal applicator, the actual dose delivered to the tumor was measured in vivo and compared to the calculated values using a commercial brachytherapy planning system. Results: Five MOSFETs were independently calibrated with the HDR source, yielding calibration factors of 0.48 {+-} 0.007 cGy/mV. The maximum sensitivity variation was no more than 7% in the clinically relevant distance range of 1-5 cm from the source. A total of 70 in vivo measurements in 11 NPC patients demonstrated good agreement with the treatment planning. The mean differences between the planned and the actually delivered dose within a single treatment fraction were -0.1%{+-} 3.8% and -0.1%{+-} 3.7%, respectively, for right and left side assessments. The maximum dose deviation was less than 8.5%. Conclusions: In vivo measurement using the real-time MOSFET dosimetry system is possible to evaluate the actual dose to the tumor received by the patient during a treatment fraction and thus can offer another line of security to detect and prevent large errors.

  17. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

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    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  18. A comparative study of Manchester system and ABS system in intracavitary brachytherapy dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Uma Maheswari, P.; Meenakshi, P.S.; Mallika, A.; Gandhimathi, S.

    2008-01-01

    The success of brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of cervix depends on the delivery of high radiation dose to the tumour in the cervix, sparing the critical organs rectum and bladder. Ideally, the dose should be prescribed to the individual patient's target volume. But almost all the institutions follow the dose prescription at a point instead of target volume, since tumour localization is not possible in radiograph. There are different systems of dose specifications for Ca. cervix treatment: -Manchester system and American Brachytherapy Society system. In Manchester system, Point A and Point B were defined. Point A was defined to be 2 cm superior to the external cervical os (or cervical end of the tandem) and 2 cm lateral to the cervical canal, which represents the location where the uterine vessels cross the ureter. Point B was defined 3 cm lateral to point A, which represents the lymph nodes. The American Board of Brachytherapy (ABs) recommends prescribing the dose to the new point called point H and pelvic wall points. Point H is based on the mid-dwell position of the vaginal ovoids. Finding Point H begins with drawing a line connecting the mid-dwell positions of the ovoids. From the intersection of this line with the tandem, move superiorly along the tandem 2 cm plus the radius of the ovoids, and then 2 cm perpendicular to the tandem in the lateral direction. In selectron LDR machine, instead of the mid-dwell position, the center of the ovoid source is taken. The pelvic wall points are located at the intersection of a horizontal tangent to superior aspect of the acetabulum on the AP radiograph

  19. The effect of combined external beam and high-dose intracavitary brachytherapy on dysphagia and survival in patients with advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorozu, Atsunori; Dokiya, Takushi; Ogita, Mikio; Kutsuki, Shoji

    1996-01-01

    During an 11-year period, a group of 130 patients with esophageal cancer of stages 2 to 4 were treated with external beam irradiation (40 to 60 Gy) followed by boost dose of 10 to 20 Gy of high-dose intracavitary brachytherapy. The overall 2-year survival rate was 15.4%. The significant prognostic factors were tumor size, response to external beam irradiation, pretreatment dysphagia score, and presence of distant metastases. The palliative effect was excellent; the dysphagia scores of 122 of 130 patients (93.8%) improved. The significant palliative factors were response to external beam irradiation and pretreatment dysphagia score. Tracheoesophageal fistulas developed after treatment in 13 of 130 patients (10%); 3 of the fistulas were probably related to radiotherapy. We conclude that intracavitary brachytherapy is useful in the treatment of cases of advanced cancer which show a good response to external beam irradiation and may be curative in patients with mild dysphagia. (author)

  20. Prediction of late rectal complication following high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy in cancer of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Eun; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2003-01-01

    Although high-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy (HDR ICR) has been used in the treatment of cervical cancer, the potential for increased risk of late complication, most commonly in the rectum, is a major concern. We have previously reported on 136 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy between 1995 and 1999. The purpose of this study is to upgrade the previous data and confirm the correlation between late rectal complication and rectal dose in cervix cancer patients treated with HDR ICR. A retrospective analysis was performed for 222 patients with cervix cancer who were treated for curative intent with extemal beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR ICR from July 1995 to December 2001. The median dose of EBRT was 50.4 (30.6-56.4) Gy with a daily fraction size 1.8 Gy. A total of six fractions of HDR ICR were given twice weekly with fraction size of 4 (3-5.5) Gy to A point by Iridium-192 source. The rectal dose was calculated at the rectal reference point using the barium contrast criteria in vivo measurement of the rectal dose was performed with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during HDR ICR. The median follow-up period was 39 months, ranging from 6 to 90 months. Twenty-one patients (9.5%) experienced late rectal bleeding, from 3 to 44 months (median, 13 months) after the completion of RT. The calculated rectal doses were not different between the patients with rectal bleeding and those without, but the measured rectal doses were higher in the complicated patients. The differences of the measured ICR rectal fractional dose, ICR total rectal dose, and total rectal biologically equivalent dose (BED) were statistically significant. When the measured ICR total rectal dose was beyond 16 Gy, when the ratio of the measured rectal dose to A point dose was beyond 70%, or when the measured rectal BED was over 110 GY 3 , a high possibility of late rectal complication was found. Late rectal complication was closely correlated with measured rectal dose by in vivo dosimetry using

  1. Impact of delineation uncertainties on dose to organs at risk in CT-guided intracavitary brachytherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duane, Frances K

    2014-08-07

    This study quantifies the inter- and intraobserver variations in contouring the organs at risk (OARs) in CT-guided brachytherapy (BT) for the treatment of cervical carcinoma. The dosimetric consequences are reported in accordance with the current Gynecological Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie\\/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology guidelines.

  2. Intracavitary radiation treatment planning and dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.L.; Masterson, M.E.; Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Intracavitary radiation therapy with encapsulated radionuclide sources has generally involved, since the advent of afterloading techniques, inserting the sources in tubing previously positioned within a body cavity near the region to be treated. Because of the constraints on source locations relative to the target region, the functions of treatment planning and dose evaluation, usually clearly separable in interstitial brachytherapy, tend to merge in intracavitary therapy. Dose evaluation is typically performed for multiple source-strength configurations in the process of planning and thus may be regarded as complete when a particular configuration has been selected. The input data for each dose evaluation, of course, must include reliable dose distribution information for the source-applicator combinations used. Ultimately, the goal is to discover the source-strength configuration that results in the closest possible approach to the dose distribution desired

  3. Determination of the dose around an ovoid for treatments in intracavitary brachytherapy Hdr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera M, T.; Velasco V, R. A. E.; Serrano F, A. K.; Azorin N, J.

    2010-09-01

    On this work the results of the dosimetric measurements are presented around an ovoid of 2 cm diameter. The measurements were carried out using a water mannequin, an ovoid, a radiation gamma source of 192 Ir and thermoluminescent dosemeters. The dosimetry was realized in the direction of the rectum and bladder. To know the effect of the shielding of the devices type Manchester in the dose, the thermoluminescent dosemeters were irradiated to a radiation gamma source of 192 Ir contained in the Gamma med Plus equipment. The planning was realized normalizing the calculation to 2.5 cm from the applicator center on the transverse plane (2.5, 0, 0). The results show that the dose distribution for an ovoid without shielding is more uniform in the transversal plane to the source axis. The results were compared with the calculated results by means of the planning system BrachyVision. While the absorbed dose distribution around an ovoid with shielding is completely anisotropic. This anisotropic is due to the shielding. (Author)

  4. High-dose-rate-intracavitary brachytherapy applications and the difference in the bladder and rectum doses: A study from rural centre of Maharashatra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To report the difference in the bladder and rectum doses with different applications by the radiotherapists in the same patient of the carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by multiple fractions of high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT. Materials and Methods : Between January 2003 to December 2004, a total of 60 cases of the carcinoma uterine cervix were selected randomly for the retrospective analyses. All 60 cases were grouped in six groups according to the treating radiotherapist who did the HDR-ICBT application. Three radiotherapists were considered for this study, named A, B and C. Ten cases for each radiotherapist in whom all three applications were done by the same radiotherapist. And 10 cases for each radiotherapist with shared applications in the same patient (A+B, A+C and B+C. The bladder and rectal doses were calculated in reference to point "A" dose and were limited to 80% of prescribed point "A" dose, as per ICRU-38 recommendations. Received dose grouped in three groups- less then 80% (< 80%, 80-100% and above 100% (>100%. A total of 180 applications for 60 patients were calculated for the above analyses. Results : There is a lot of difference in the bladder and rectal doses with the application by the different radiotherapists, even in the same patient with multiple fractions of HDR-ICBT. Applications by ′A′ radiotherapist were within the limits in the self as well as in the shared groups more number of times, by ′B′ radiotherapist was more times exceeding the limit and by ′C′ radiotherapist doses were in between the A and B. Discussion and Conclusion : For the rectal and bladder doses most important factors are patient′s age, disease stage, duration between EBRT and HDR-ICRT and patient anatomy, but these differences can be minimized to some extent by careful application, proper packing and proper fixation.

  5. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Sharon M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn

    2012-01-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6–1 and 8–1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10–1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3–1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura

  6. Intracavitary mould brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Edward; Blumenfeld, Israel; Cederbaum, Martin; Kuten, Abraham

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To integrate brachytherapy in the combined modality management of malignant tumors of the maxilla, as a means of increasing the radiotherapy dose to the tumor bed while avoiding high doses to the orbital contents. Materials and methods: Following a partial or total maxillectomy, a duplication of the interim surgical obturator was created using a wash of vinyl polysiloxane. This mould was used as a carrier for afterloading nylon catheters through which 192-Iridium seed-ribbons were inserted. Following brachytherapy, selected patients also received external beam irradiation. Results and discussion: After a median follow-up of 36 months, 9 out of 11 patients are alive and disease-free; 1 developed a local recurrence and another relapsed at another site in the oral cavity. Transient grade 1 - 2 mucositis at the implant site was observed in all patients. The review of computer isodose distributions showed that the average dose received by the homolateral eyeball was 10% (range 9,2 - 10.0) of the prescribed surface dose to the surgical cavity. Conclusions: Brachytherapy can be integrated in the management of patients with malignant tumors of the maxilla in the form of a custom-made intracavitary mould carrying 192-Iridium sources. We found this technique particularly useful in cases with close or positive surgical margins

  7. Patient-related factors determining geometry of intracavitary applicators and pelvic dose distribution during cervical cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Kobierska, Anna; Jassem, Jacek; Badzio, Andrezej

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the influence of the size of cervical cancer brachytherapy applicators (ovoids and uterine tandems) on pelvic dose distribution and to analyze the impact of various patient-and disease-related factors on applicators' geometry and on dose distribution in particular applications. Methods and Materials: The subject of this study were 356 cervical cancer patients treated with Selectron LDR as a part of their radical radiotherapy. Analyzed factors included patient age, weight, number of vaginal deliveries, and disease stage. Results: The use of larger vaginal applicators resulted in lower bladder and rectum doses and in higher point B doses (all p < 0.0001); longer uterine tandems produced lower rectum doses and higher point B doses (both p < 0.0001). Increasing patient age and disease stage resulted in a decreased frequency of use of large ovoids (both p < 0.0001) and of long tandems (age: p = 0.0069, stage: p = 0.004). As a result, higher doses to bladder (age: p < 0.0001, stage: p = 0.017) and rectum (age: p = 0.037, stage: p = 0.011) were observed. Increasing age also resulted in lower point B doses (p < 0.0001). Increasing patient weight correlated with less frequent use of long tandems (p = 0.0015) and with higher bladder doses (p = 0.04). Higher number of vaginal deliveries was related to the increase in the use of long tandems (p = 0.002); in patients who had had at least one vaginal delivery, point B doses were significantly higher (p = 0.0059). In multivariate analysis ovoid size and uterine tandem length were dependent on patient age (respectively: p < 0.001 and p = 0.001), disease stage (respectively: p = 0.003 and p = 0.008) and on the number of vaginal deliveries (respectively: p = 0.07 and p 0.008). Doses to critical organs and to points B were dependent on patient age (respectively: p < 0.001, p = 0.011, and p < 0.001) and on disease stage (respectively: p < 0.001, p = 0.004, and p = 0

  8. Uncertainties in Assesment of the Vaginal Dose for Intracavitary Brachytherapy of Cervical Cancer using a Tandem-ring Applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Daniel; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Petra; Georg, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The vagina has not been widely recognized as organ at risk in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. No widely accepted dose parameters are available. This study analyzes the uncertainties in dose reporting for the vaginal wall using tandem-ring applicators. Methods and Materials: Organ wall contours were delineated on axial magnetic resonance (MR) slices to perform dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Different DVH parameters were used in a feasibility study based on 40 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment plans of different cervical cancer patients. Dose to the most irradiated, 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 , and at defined points on the ring surface and at 5-mm tissue depth were reported. Treatment-planning systems allow different methods of dose point definition. Film dosimetry was used to verify the maximum dose at the surface of the ring applicator in an experimental setup. Results: Dose reporting for the vagina is extremely sensitive to geometrical uncertainties with variations of 25% for 1 mm shifts. Accurate delineation of the vaginal wall is limited by the finite pixel size of MRI and available treatment-planning systems. No significant correlation was found between dose-point and dose-volume parameters. The DVH parameters were often related to noncontiguous volumes and were not able to detect very different situations of spatial dose distributions inside the vaginal wall. Deviations between measured and calculated doses were up to 21%. Conclusions: Reporting either point dose values or DVH parameters for the vaginal wall is based on high inaccuracies because of contouring and geometric positioning. Therefore, the use of prospective dose constraints for individual treatment plans is not to be recommended at present. However, for large patient groups treated within one protocol correlation with vaginal morbidity can be evaluated

  9. Intracavitary brachytherapy significantly enhances local control of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: the existence of a dose-tumor-control relationship above conventional tumoricidal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Peter Man Lung; Leung, Sing Fai; Lee, Wai Yee; Zee, Benny

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of intracavitary brachytherapy (ICT) in early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: All T1 and T2 (nasal infiltration) NPC treated with a curative intent from 1984 to 1996 were analyzed (n = 509). One hundred sixty-three patients were given ICT after radical external radiotherapy (ERT) (Group A). They were compared with 346 patients treated by ERT alone (Group B). The ERT delivered the tumoricidal dose (uncorrected BED-10 ≥75 Gy) to the primary tumor and did not differ between the two groups in technique or dosage. The ICT delivered a dose of 18-24 Gy in 3 fractions over 15 days to a point 1 cm perpendicular to the midpoint of the plane of the sources. ICT was used to treat local persistence diagnosed at 4-6 weeks after ERT (n = 101) or as an adjuvant for the complete responders to ERT (n = 62). Results: The two groups did not differ in patients' age or sex, rate of distant metastasis, rate of regional failure, overall survival, or the follow-up duration. However, Group A had significantly more T2 lesions and Group B had significantly more advanced N-stages. Local failure was significantly less (crude rates 6.75% vs. 13.0%; 5-year actuarial rates 5.40% vs. 10.3%) and the disease-specific mortality was significantly lower (crude rates 14.1 % vs. 21.7%; 5-year actuarial rates 11.9% vs. 16.4%) in Group A compared to Group B. Multivariate analysis showed that the ICT was the only significant prognostic factor predictive for fewer local failures (Cox regression p = 0.0328, risk ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.256-0.957). However, when ICT was excluded from the Cox regression model, the total physical dose or the total BED-10 uncorrected for tumor repopulation during the period of radiotherapy became significant in predicting ultimate local failure rate. The two groups were comparable in the incidence rates of each individual chronic radiation complication and the actuarial cumulative rate of

  10. Image-based dose planning of intracavitary brachytherapy: registration of serial-imaging studies using deformable anatomic templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Carlson, Blake; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Yin Pen; Grigsby, Perry W.; Nguyen, Kim; Dempsey, James F; Lerma, Fritz A.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Vannier, Michael W.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that high-dimensional voxel-to-voxel transformations, derived from continuum mechanics models of the underlying pelvic tissues, can be used to register computed tomography (CT) serial examinations into a single anatomic frame of reference for cumulative dose calculations. Methods and Materials: Three patients with locally advanced cervix cancer were treated with CT-compatible intracavitary (ICT) applicators. Each patient underwent five volumetric CT examinations: before initiating treatment, and immediately before and after the first and second ICT insertions, respectively. Each serial examination was rigidly registered to the patient's first ICT examination by aligning the bony anatomy. Detailed nonrigid alignment for organs (or targets) of interest was subsequently achieved by deforming the CT exams as a viscous-fluid, described by the Navier-Stokes equation, until the coincidence with the corresponding targets on CT image was maximized. In cases where ICT insertion induced very large and topologically complex rearrangements of pelvic organs, e.g., extreme uterine canal reorientation following tandem insertion, a viscous-fluid-landmark transformation was used to produce an initial registration. Results: For all three patients, reasonable registrations for organs (or targets) of interest were achieved. Fluid-landmark initialization was required in 4 of the 11 registrations. Relative to the best rigid bony landmark alignment, the viscous-fluid registration resulted in average soft-tissue displacements from 2.8 to 28.1 mm, and improved organ coincidence from the range of 5.2% to 72.2% to the range of 90.6% to 100%. Compared to the viscous-fluid transformation, global registration of bony anatomy mismatched 5% or more of the contoured organ volumes by 15-25 mm. Conclusion: Pelvic soft-tissue structures undergo large deformations and displacements during the external-beam and multiple-ICT course of radiation therapy for locally advanced cervix

  11. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  12. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  13. Impact of systematic errors on DVH parameters of different OAR and target volumes in Intracavitary Brachytherapy (ICBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourya, Ankur; Singh, Gaganpreet; Kumar, Vivek; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study is to analyze the impact of systematic errors on DVH parameters of different OAR and Target volumes in intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). To quantify the changes in dose-volume histogram parameters due to systematic errors in applicator reconstruction of brachytherapy planning, known errors in catheter reconstructions have to be introduced in applicator coordinate system

  14. Rectal doses during LDR and HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of gyneacological malignancies: comparison of direct measurement with that of calculated from radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Arun; Agarwal, D.P.

    2001-01-01

    In the present study rectal doses using CaSO 4 :Dy powder has been measured in 14 cases of cancer cervix treated by LDR brachytherapy and 20 cases of cancer cervix treated by HDR brachytherapy. The maximum rectal dose in LDR varied from 1073-1856 cGy for point A dose of 3000 cGy. The maximum rectal dose was found to be at 6-8 cm from the anal verge. The results of the calculation and actual measurements has been compared

  15. Evaluation of the response of concurrent high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy in management of early stage carcinoma cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, H S; Walke, Rahul V; Hirapara, Pushpendra H; Jakhar, Shankar Lal; Bardia, M R

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate local disease control and early complications of concomitant brachytherapy with external beam-radiotherapy in early stage carcinoma cervix. Fifty patients of early stage carcinoma cervix (FIGO-IB/IIA) were randomly divided into study group concomitant external beam irradiation (EBRT) and HDR-ICBT (intra-cavitary brachytherapy, xrt = 50 Gy/25 Fr, HDR 5.2 Gy*5 Fr) and the control group EBRT followed by HDR-ICBT (xrt = 50 Gy/25 Fr, HDR 7.5 Gy*3 Fr). Acute reactions and local disease response were compared between treatment and at 6-month follow up. Median overall treatment times were 38 and 61 days in the study and the control groups, respectively. Acute skin reactions and diarrhea were more in the study but manageable. At the completion of the study, there were 80 and 68 % complete responses, 16 and 20 % partial responses, 0 and 8 % stable diseases in the study group and the control group, respectively. Response was better in the study group but statistically insignificant. Larger number of patients and longer follow up are required to arrive at concrete conclusion.

  16. The dose distribution of low dose rate Cs-137 in intracavitary brachytherapy: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation, treatment planning calculation and polymer gel measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, M; Love, P A; Verhaegen, F; Nalder, C; Bidmead, A M; Leach, M; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the dose distribution delivered by low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques and polymer gel dosimetry. The results obtained were compared with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The 20 mm and the 30 mm diameter Selectron vaginal applicator set (Nucletron) were used for this study. A homogeneous and a heterogeneous-with an air cavity-polymer gel phantom was used to measure the dose distribution from these sources. The same geometrical set-up was used for the MC calculations. Beyond the applicator tip, differences in dose as large as 20% were found between the MC and TPS. This is attributed to the presence of stainless steel in the applicator and source set, which are not considered by the TPS calculations. Beyond the air cavity, differences in dose of around 5% were noted, due to the TPS assuming a homogeneous water medium. The polymer gel results were in good agreement with the MC calculations for all the cases investigated

  17. Cervical cancer: intracavitary dose specification and prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.; Gerbi, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Dose and volume specifications for reporting intracavitary therapy were analyzed according to criteria recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Ninety Fletcher-Suit radium applications were studied to examine the validity of the assumptions of the ICRU and the merit of their routine reporting. It was demonstrated that the reporting recommendations were inconsistent with clinical prescription systems and added little to dose specification. The distinction between dose specification and dose prescription was stressed

  18. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy for stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix in Japan. A multi-institutional study of Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 2006-2007 (Study of JASTRO 2006-2007)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Kenjo, Masahiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The current study was a retrospective questionnaire survey of stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy in Japan aimed to investigate the optimal dose on the basis of the biological effective dose and prognostic factors. Between 1990 and 2000, 61 patients with stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix underwent high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy in 19 major hospitals in Japan. This retrospective questionnaire survey was performed by mail including survey charts to be fulfilled by radiation oncologists in these 19 major hospital. Fifty had only adenocarcinoma components and 11 had adenosquamous cell carcinoma components. All patients were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy. Total biological effective dose (T-BED 10 ) was calculated from the sum of the biological effective doses of the external beam radiation therapy and the intracavitary brachytherapy. Thirty-two patients underwent chemotherapy. The 5-year overall survival rate of all patients was 20.2%. Stratified by total biological effective dose, the 5-year overall survival rate was 0% for T-BED 10 10 between 75 and 100 Gy and 0% for T-BED 10 >110 Gy (P=0.15). Stratified by histopathology, the 5-year overall survival rate was 22.1% for adenocarcinoma and 13.6% for adenosquamous cell carcinoma (P=0.43). Stratified by chemotherapy, the 5-year overall survival rate was 20.3% in patients who received chemotherapy and 20.4% in patients who did not receive chemotherapy (P=0.96). The 5-year overall survival rate of stage IIIb adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix in this retrospective questionnaire survey was 20.2%. The optimal T-BED 10 and evident prognostic factors were not clear from this questionnaire survey. (author)

  19. SU-F-T-35: Optimization of Bladder and Rectal Doses Using a Multi-Lumen Intracavitary Applicator for Gynecological Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laoui, S; Dietrich, S; Sehgal, V; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation dose delivery for endometrial cancer using HDR techniques is limited by dose to bladder and rectum. A dosimetric study was performed using Varian Capri vaginal brachytherapy applicator to determine the optimal channel configuration which minimizes dose to bladder and rectum, while providing good target coverage. Methods: A total of 17 patients, 63 plans clinically delivered, and 252 simulated plans using Varian BrachyVision planning system were generated to investigate optimal channel configuration which results in minimum dose to bladder and rectum while providing adequate target coverage. The Capri applicator consists of 13 lumens arranged in two concentric rings, one central lumen and six lumens per ring. Manual dose shaping is invariably required to lower the dose to critical organs. Three-dimensional plans were simulated for 4 channel arrangements, all 13 channels, channel 12 o’clock (close to bladder) and 6 o’clock (close to rectum) deactivated, central channel deactivated, and central channel in addition to 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock deactivated. A relationship between V100, the volume that receives the prescribed dose, and the amount of curie-seconds required to deliver it, was established. Results: Using all 13 channels results in maximum dose to bladder and rectum. Deactivating central channel in addition to 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock resulted in minimizing bladder and rectum doses but compromised target coverage. The relationship between V100, the volume that receives the prescribed dose, and the curie seconds was found to be linear. Conclusion: Deactivating channels 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock was shown to be the optimal configuration leading to minimum dose to bladder and rectum without compromising target coverage. The linear relationship between V100 and the curie- seconds can be used as a verification parameter.

  20. Accurate localization of intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from 3D CT imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma, F.A.; Williamson, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To present an accurate method to identify the positions and orientations of intracavitary (ICT) brachytherapy applicators imaged in 3D CT scans, in support of Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, enabling accurate dose modeling in the presence of applicator shielding and interapplicator attenuation. Materials and methods: The method consists of finding the transformation that maximizes the coincidence between the known 3D shapes of each applicator component (colpostats and tandem) with the volume defined by contours of the corresponding surface on each CT slice. We use this technique to localize Fletcher-Suit CT-compatible applicators for three cervix cancer patients using post-implant CT examinations (3 mm slice thickness and separation). Dose distributions in 1-to-1 registration with the underlying CT anatomy are derived from 3D Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations incorporating each applicator's internal geometry (source encapsulation, high-density shields, and applicator body) oriented in relation to the dose matrix according to the measured localization transformations. The precision and accuracy of our localization method are assessed using CT scans, in which the positions and orientations of dense rods and spheres (in a precision-machined phantom) were measured at various orientations relative to the gantry. Results: Using this method, we register 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations directly onto post insertion patient CT studies. Using CT studies of a precisely machined phantom, the absolute accuracy of the method was found to be ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.3 mm in the axial direction while its precision was ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.2 mm axially. Conclusion: We have developed a novel, and accurate technique to localize intracavitary brachytherapy applicators in 3D CT imaging studies, which supports 3D dose planning involving detailed 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations, modeling source positions, shielding and interapplicator shielding

  1. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Chao, Clifford; Erickson, Beth; Fowler, Jeffery; Gupta, Nilendu; Martinez, Alvaro; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  2. Patient-based dosimetric comparison of interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy in cases of cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Anil K.; Julka, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.; Rustogi, Ashish; Subramani, V.; Prabhakar, R.; Rath, G.K.; Semwal, Manoj K.; Thulkar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the form of High Dose Rate (HDR) intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) along with external beam radiotherapy(EBRT) is the main treatment in cancer cervix. Of late, some large centres have started practicing template based transperineal interstitial brachytherapy (TIB) for advanced/ bulky cancer cervix. Usually, TIB is given for patients with advanced disease/ distorted anatomy or recurrent disease for better lateral target coverage. CT/MRI/USG based planning has made volumetric dosimetry possible for the target and the organs at risk (OARs). This has resulted in better correlation between dose received and treatment outcome in terms of tumour control and late toxicities as against the point dosimetry system. It has been shown by many studies that ICRU based point dose reporting may not represent the actual doses received by the OARs. Though it is expected that TIB gives better target coverage and OAR sparing in advanced/ bulky cancer cervix cases as compared to ICRT, detailed patient studies on the subject have not been reported. We have carried out dosimetric comparison between ICRT and TIB for cancer cervix patients undergoing treatment at our centre in terms of treated volume and doses to OARs

  3. A newly developed MR simulation system for intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    We have developed a prototype system for a magnetic resonance (MR) simulation to accurately estimate radiation doses to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues during brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Six patients with cervical cancer underwent MR simulation prior to intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy using Co-60 sources. Tandem and ovoid applicators filled with tap-water were placed in the uterine cavity and vaginal fornix, then MR imaging examinations were performed. Frontal and lateral images of maximum intensity projection (MIP) of applicators generated from a data set of half-Fourier single shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) images were chosen for processing by the treatment planning computer system. Then, isodose curves on the coronal or sagittal plane of the tandem section were superimposed on corresponding T2-weighted images derived from a turbo spin-echo technique. Doses to the tumor, the posterior wall of the urinary bladder, the anterior wall of the rectum, and the urethra were read from isodose curves superimposed on the T2-weighted sagittal image. Phantom experiments were done to evaluate geometrical errors. The possible distortion of the lattice image on the phantom was small. This system promises to be useful in customizing the dose distribution corresponding to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues. (author)

  4. A newly developed MR simulation system for intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a prototype system for a magnetic resonance (MR) simulation to accurately estimate radiation doses to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues during brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Six patients with cervical cancer underwent MR simulation prior to intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy using Co-60 sources. Tandem and ovoid applicators filled with tap-water were placed in the uterine cavity and vaginal fornix, then MR imaging examinations were performed. Frontal and lateral images of maximum intensity projection (MIP) of applicators generated from a data set of half-Fourier single shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) images were chosen for processing by the treatment planning computer system. Then, isodose curves on the coronal or sagittal plane of the tandem section were superimposed on corresponding T2-weighted images derived from a turbo spin-echo technique. Doses to the tumor, the posterior wall of the urinary bladder, the anterior wall of the rectum, and the urethra were read from isodose curves superimposed on the T2-weighted sagittal image. Phantom experiments were done to evaluate geometrical errors. The possible distortion of the lattice image on the phantom was small. This system promises to be useful in customizing the dose distribution corresponding to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues. (author)

  5. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicat...... IC/IS brachytherapy improves the therapeutic ratio in LACC by enabling a tumour specific dose escalation resulting in significantly higher local control in large tumours without adding treatment related late morbidity.......Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC....../IS) applicators. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the impact on local control and late morbidity of application of combined IS/IC brachytherapy in a large multicentre population. Material/methods 610 patients with LACC from the retroEMBRACE study were included. Patients were divided into an IC group (N...

  6. Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toita, Takafumi, E-mail: b983255@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Radiology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBT of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were

  7. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC) in treatment of cervical carcinoma: 5-year results and implication of increased low-grade rectal complication on initiation of an HDR-IC fractionation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongjong; Wan Leung, Stephen; Chen Huichun; Sun Limin; Fang Fumin; Changchien Chanchao; Huang Engyen; Wu Jiaming; Chen Chuhnchih

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment results and rectal/bladder complications of cervical carcinoma radically treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC). The current policy of using three-fraction scheme was examined. Methods and Materials: Between November 1987 and August 1990, 173 patients with cervical carcinoma were treated with curative-intent radiation therapy. Whole pelvic irradiation was administered with 10-MV X ray. Dose to the central cervix was 40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions, following by pelvic wall boost 6-14 Gy in three to seven fractions with central shielding. 60 Co sources were used for HDR-IC, and 7.2 Gy was given to Point A for three applications, 1-2 weeks apart. Duration of follow-up was 5-7.8 years. Results: Twenty-eight patients (16%) developed central-regional recurrences. Overall 5-year actuarial pelvic control rate was 83%. By stage, 5-year actuarial pelvic control rates were 94%, 87%, and 72% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Thirty-one patients (18%) developed distant metastasis. Overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 58%. By stage, 5-year actuarial survival rates were 79%, 59%, and 41% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Sixty-six (38%) and 19 patients (11%) developed rectal and bladder complications, respectively. For rectal complication, the overall actuarial rate was 38% at 5 years. By grade, 5-year actuarial rectal complication rates were 24%, 15%, 4%, and 3% for Grades 1-4, respectively. Overall prevalence of rectal complications was 37% and 14% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. Prevalence of low-grade rectal complication (Grades 1 and 2) was dominant at 2 years (30%), but declined to 8% at 5 years. Prevalence of high-grade, severe rectal complication (Grades 3 and 4) remained steady at 2 and 5 years (7% and 6%, respectively). Five-year actuarial bladder complication was 9%. Five-year prevalence of bladder complication was 2%. Conclusion: Using a three

  8. [A new applicator with regulatable air bag designed for intracavitary brachytherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Wei, Guang-Yu; Tan, Yi-Chang; Huang, Ze-Li; Li, Shao-En; Lu, Zhi-Qian

    2004-10-01

    Nasopharynx applicator used in intracavitary brachytherapy plays an important role in the radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), its quality affects the efficiency of treatment. This study was to design a new applicator for clinical use. An inexpensive, reusable, and flexible latex nasopharynx applicator was designed. An air bag was placed at 15 mm from the foreside of the applicator, clung to the tube. The edge of air bag is tangent to the axis of tube. When the bag was full of air, the tube would hunch reversely,close to nasopharyngeal vault. After introduced into nasopharynx through middle nasal meatus, the applicator could be fixed in suitable position by its rotation, and air bag regulation, and confirmed its position by simulation. A total of 221 patients with NPC were treated with external beam radiation therapy in our hospital, and boosted HDR brachytherapy using this new applicator. The response rate was 92.6% in the primary tumor group (200/216), and 100% in the recurrent tumor group (5/5). Mucosal necrosis in the posterior or anterior wall of nasopharynx occurred in 5 patients, 8 patients experienced nasal congestion and nasal synechia. This new nasopharynx applicator is easy to operate, painless, and well dosage-distributed. Mucosal necrosis is likely due to higher fractional dose.

  9. Remote-controlled afterloading for intracavitary brachytherapy in gynecological carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotte, K.

    1983-01-01

    Classical radiotherapy is gradually being replaced by remote-controlled afterloading procedures in the intracavitary treatment of tumors found during gynecological examination. These new procedures practically eliminate the exposure of the clinic staff to radiation. The possibilities of this new method are discussed with regard to the physics and biology of radiation. Our own results with this new method are reported. (orig.)

  10. Determination of the dose around an ovoid for treatments in intracavitary brachytherapy Hdr; Determinacion de la dosis alrededor de un ovoide para tratamientos en braquiterapia intracavitaria HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Velasco V, R. A. E. [Hospital Central Militar, Periferico y Ejercito Nacional s/n, Lomas de Sotelo, 11200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Serrano F, A. K. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 5190, Col. Magdalena de las Salinas, 03220 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J., E-mail: trivera@ipn.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    On this work the results of the dosimetric measurements are presented around an ovoid of 2 cm diameter. The measurements were carried out using a water mannequin, an ovoid, a radiation gamma source of {sup 192}Ir and thermoluminescent dosemeters. The dosimetry was realized in the direction of the rectum and bladder. To know the effect of the shielding of the devices type Manchester in the dose, the thermoluminescent dosemeters were irradiated to a radiation gamma source of {sup 192}Ir contained in the Gamma med Plus equipment. The planning was realized normalizing the calculation to 2.5 cm from the applicator center on the transverse plane (2.5, 0, 0). The results show that the dose distribution for an ovoid without shielding is more uniform in the transversal plane to the source axis. The results were compared with the calculated results by means of the planning system BrachyVision. While the absorbed dose distribution around an ovoid with shielding is completely anisotropic. This anisotropic is due to the shielding. (Author)

  11. BRIT manual after loading brachytherapy kit for intracavitary: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Lalit M.; Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam K.; Shahi, Uday P.; Pradhan, Satyajit

    2007-01-01

    Brachytherapy continues to serve as an important and rapidly evolving tool in the management of cancer. Technological developments in the last two decades have dramatic impact on the safe practice of brachytherapy. A wide range of brachytherapy sources and equipment are available for new therapeutic possibilities. However, decision making with regard to new brachytherapy facilities are need based and depend on the patient load, socioeconomic status of the patients, and funds available with the institution. Remote afterloading equipments are fast replacing the Manual After Loading (MAL) systems. However, keeping in view the large number of patients, who can not afford expensive treatment, the utility of manual after loading system which is inexpensive, cannot be ignored

  12. High versus low dose rate intracavitary irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Chul; Loh, John J.K.; Kim, Gwi-Eon; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been used as a standard modality in the treatment of patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix and to compare them with the effects of LDR brachytherapy. From January 1971 to December 1992, 104 patients suffering from adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University. LDR brachytherapy was carried out on 34 patients and HDR brachytherapy on 70 patients. In the LDR group, eight patients were in stage IB, six in IIA, 12 in IIB, three in IIIA and five in IIIB. External radiation therapy was delivered with 10 MV X-rays, 2 Gy fraction per day, total dose of whole pelvis 36-52 Gy (median 46 Gy). LDR radium intracavitary irradiation was performed with a Henschke applicator, 37-59 Gy targeted at point A (median 43 Gy). In the HDR group, there were 16 patients in stage IB, six in IIA, 32 in IIB and 16 in IIIB. The total whole pelvis dose of external radiation was 40-50 Gy (median 44 Gy), daily 1.8-2.0 Gy. HDR Co-60 intracavitary irradiation was performed with a remotely controlled after-loading system (RALS), 30-48 Gy (median 39 Gy) targeted at point A, three times per week, 3 Gy per fraction. The 5-year overall survival rate in the LDR group was 72.9, 61.9 and 35.7% in stage I, II and III, respectively and the corresponding figures for HDR were 87.1, 58.3 and 43.8% (p 0.05). No prognostic factors were evident in the comparison between the two groups. There was no difference in terms of 5-year survival rate in the patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix between those treated with HDR and those treated with LDR brachytherapy. Even though late complication rates were higher in the HDR group, most of them were classified as grade I. This retrospective study suggests that HDR

  13. Reirradiation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with intracavitary mold brachytherapy: an effective means of local salvage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Stephen C.K.; Lam, W.-K.; Ng, M.-F.; Au, S.-K.; Mak, W.-T.; Lau, W.-H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of intracavitary mold brachytherapy in salvaging local failure of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: The outcomes of 118 consecutive NPC patients with local failure treated with mold brachytherapy between 1989 and 1996 were retrospectively reviewed. Eleven patients received additional external radiotherapy. Results: All molds were tailor-made, and the whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Pharyngeal recess dissection was routinely performed to allow direct contact of the radioactive source with the pharyngeal recess, a common site of local failure. Initially, the molds were preloaded with 192 Ir wires, but since 1992, the sources have been manually afterloaded; the mold has also been redesigned for better conformity, ease of insertion, and radiation safety. Using brachytherapy alone, 50-55 Gy was given for recurrence in 4-7 days; for persistence, 40 Gy was administered. The overall complete remission rate was 97%. The rates of 5-year local control, relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, overall survival, and major complication were 85%, 68.3%, 74.8%, 61.3%, and 46.9%, respectively. Major complications included nasopharyngeal necrosis with headache, necrosis of cervical vertebrae with atlantoaxial instability, temporal lobe necrosis, and palsy of the cranial nerves. The afterloaded mold was as effective as the preloaded version, but with fewer complications. Conclusions: Intracavitary mold brachytherapy was effective in salvaging NPC with early-stage local persistence or first recurrence

  14. Radiological safety problems in intracavitary brachytherapy using the manual afterloading in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lea, D.; Gonzales, E.; Gallardo, J.; Diaz, M.

    1996-01-01

    In three venezuelan public hospitals it was detected radioactive contamination for Cs-137 during inspection with the wipe test technique in areas where is applied intracavitary brachytherapy using manual afterloading. This caused a condition of great stress in the personal engaged the treatments. In each Cs-137 source in these hospitals was tested leakage. The source plastic holder was analysed. The authors were able to demonstrate: a) The radioactive contamination found in the treatment area had its origin in the Cs-137 capsule corrosion and b) The corrosion in the source capsule was produced by the radiolytic degradation of the PVC tube used as source-holder in the intracavitary treatments. (authors). 3 refs., 1 tab

  15. Stereotactic intracavitary brachytherapy with P-32 for cystic craniopharyngiomas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarouf, Mohammad; El Majdoub, Faycal; Fuetsch, Manuel; Hoevels, Mauritius; Lehrke, Ralph; Berthold, Frank; Voges, Juergen; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Although microsurgery remains the first-line treatment, gross total resection of cystic craniopharyngeomas (CP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and the addition of external irradiation to subtotal resection proves to achieve similar tumor control. However, concern regarding long-term morbidity associated with external irradiation in children still remains. With this retrospective analysis, the authors emphasize intracavitary brachytherapy using phosphorus-32 (P-32) as a treatment option for children with cystic CP. Between 1992 and 2009, 17 children (median age 15.4 years; range 7-18 years) with cystic CP underwent intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32. Eleven patients were treated for recurrent tumor cysts; 6 patients were treated primarily. MR imaging revealed solitary cysts in 7 patients; 10 patients had mixed solid-cystic lesions (median tumor volume 11.1 ml; range 0.5-78.9 ml). The median follow-up time was 61.9 months (range 16.9-196.6 months). Local cyst control could be achieved in 14 patients (82 %). Three patients showed progression of the treated cystic formation (in-field progression) after a median time of 8.3 months (range 5.3-10.3 months), which led to subsequent interventions. The development of new, defined cysts and progression of solid tumor parts (out-of-field progression) occurred in 5 patients and led to additional interventions in 4 cases. There was neither surgery-related permanent morbidity nor mortality in this study. The overall progression-free survival was 75, 63, and 52 % after 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32 represents a safe and effective treatment option for children harboring cystic CP, even as primary treatment. However, P-32 does not clearly affect growth of solid tumor parts or the development of new cystic formations. (orig.) [de

  16. HIGH-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY IN CARCINOMA CERVIX STAGE IIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya Maruthavanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced (IIB-IVA and early inoperable cases. The current standard of practice with curable intent is concurrent chemoradiation in which intracavitary brachytherapy is an integral component of radiotherapy. This study aims at assessing the efficacy of HDR ICBT (High-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy in terms local response, normal tissue reactions, and feasibility. METHODS AND MATERIALS A total of 20 patients of stage IIIB cancer of the uterine cervix were enrolled in the study and were planned to receive concurrent chemotherapy weekly along with EBRT (external beam radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 Fr. Suitability for ICBT was assessed at 40 Gy/20 Fr. 6/20 patients were suitable at 40 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 5.5 Gy to point A in 4 sessions (5.5 Gy/4 Fr. The remaining 14/20 patients completed 50 Gy and received HDR ICBT with a dose of 6 Gy to point A in 3 sessions (6 Gy/3 Fr. RESULTS A total of 66 intracavitary applications were done and only one application required dose modification due to high bladder dose, the pelvic control rate was 85% (17/20. 10% (2/20 had stable disease and 5% (1/20 had progressive disease at one year of follow up. When toxicity was considered only 15% developed grade I and grade II rectal complications. Patient compliance and acceptability was 100%. Patients were very comfortable with the short treatment time as compared with patients on LDR ICBT (low-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy treatment interviewed during the same period. CONCLUSION This study proves that HDR brachytherapy is efficacious and feasible in carcinoma of cervix stage IIIB. It also proves that good dose distribution can be achieved with HDR intracavitary facility by the use of dose optimization. The short treatment time in HDR ICBT makes it possible to maintain this optimised dose distribution throughout the treatment providing a gain in the therapeutic ratio and

  17. Clinical Use of the Utrecht Applicator for Combined Intracavitary/Interstitial Brachytherapy Treatment in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Moerland, Marinus A.; Roesink, Judith M.; Tersteeg, Robbert J.H.A.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate the benefit of the Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator for combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) approach, using magnetic resonance imaging—guided brachytherapy, over the intracavitary approach alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and to analyze the clinical use of needles. Methods and Materials: This study includes the first 20 patients treated with the new applicator. Brachytherapy consisted of two pulsed dose rate applications, and the second application was performed with the IC/IS approach. The number of needles, chosen guiding holes through the ovoids, and insertion depths were based on the dose distribution and dosimetric shortcomings of the first application (IC alone). We investigated the dosimetric gain by comparing the clinical interstitial optimized plan (IC/IS clinical ) with an additionally generated optimized plan without needle use (IC study ). Furthermore, we studied the relation of the inserted needles and their source loading patterns with the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Results: A total of 54 needles (range, 1–6 per application) were applied with an average depth of 25 mm. The chosen needle positions corresponded with the location of the HR-CTV extensions. The total and individual needle treatment times per application were on average 19% (range, 4–35%) and 7% (range, 2–14%) of the implant treatment time, respectively. The total (external-beam radiotherapy + brachytherapy) D90 HR-CTV for the IC study and the IC/IS clinical were on average 79.5 (SD 7.4) Gy α/β10 and 83.9 (SD 6.7) Gy α/β10 , respectively, with an average gain of 4.4 (SD 2.3) Gy α/β10 for the second application. Conclusions: Needle placement was feasible in all patients and resulted in a gain in dose and better coverage of HR-CTV. Defining the location of HR-CTV protrusions and analyzing the associated needles has given us deeper understanding of the possibilities in magnetic

  18. Method for dose calculation in intracavitary irradiation of endometrical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevrieva, I.F.; Ivashchenko, N.T.; Musapirova, N.A.; Fel'dman, S.Z.; Sajbekov, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method for dose calculation for the conditions of intracavitary gamma therapy of endometrial carcinoma using spherical and linear 60 Co sources was elaborated. Calculations of dose rates for different amount and orientation of spherical radiation sources and for different planes were made with the aid of BEhSM-4M computer. Dosimet were made with the aid of BEhSM-4M computer. Dosimetric study of dose fields was made using a phantom imitating the real conditions of irradiation. Discrepancies between experimental and calculated values are within the limits of the experiment accuracy

  19. Stereotactic intracavitary brachytherapy with P-32 for cystic craniopharyngiomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maarouf, Mohammad; El Majdoub, Faycal [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Center of Neurosurgery, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC), Cologne (Germany); Fuetsch, Manuel [University Hospital of Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Hoevels, Mauritius [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Lehrke, Ralph [St. Barbara-Klinik Hamm-Heessen, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Hamm (Germany); Berthold, Frank [University Hospital of Cologne, Department Pediatric Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Voges, Juergen [University Hospital of Magdeburg, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Magdeburg (Germany); Sturm, Volker [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); University Hospital of Wurzburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Although microsurgery remains the first-line treatment, gross total resection of cystic craniopharyngeomas (CP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and the addition of external irradiation to subtotal resection proves to achieve similar tumor control. However, concern regarding long-term morbidity associated with external irradiation in children still remains. With this retrospective analysis, the authors emphasize intracavitary brachytherapy using phosphorus-32 (P-32) as a treatment option for children with cystic CP. Between 1992 and 2009, 17 children (median age 15.4 years; range 7-18 years) with cystic CP underwent intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32. Eleven patients were treated for recurrent tumor cysts; 6 patients were treated primarily. MR imaging revealed solitary cysts in 7 patients; 10 patients had mixed solid-cystic lesions (median tumor volume 11.1 ml; range 0.5-78.9 ml). The median follow-up time was 61.9 months (range 16.9-196.6 months). Local cyst control could be achieved in 14 patients (82 %). Three patients showed progression of the treated cystic formation (in-field progression) after a median time of 8.3 months (range 5.3-10.3 months), which led to subsequent interventions. The development of new, defined cysts and progression of solid tumor parts (out-of-field progression) occurred in 5 patients and led to additional interventions in 4 cases. There was neither surgery-related permanent morbidity nor mortality in this study. The overall progression-free survival was 75, 63, and 52 % after 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Intracavitary brachytherapy using P-32 represents a safe and effective treatment option for children harboring cystic CP, even as primary treatment. However, P-32 does not clearly affect growth of solid tumor parts or the development of new cystic formations. (orig.) [German] Obwohl die Mikrochirurgie die Methode der Wahl darstellt, ist die komplette Resektion zystischer Kraniopharyngeome haeufig mit einer

  20. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  1. Problems of treatment planning of intracavitary brachytherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Akira; Yamamoto, Koji; Yoshioka, Shinji; Kawamura, Masashi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Fujii, Takashi; Ikezoe, Junpei

    1999-01-01

    In high dose rate intracavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer, the most acceptable dose point is at 5 mm deep from the mucosal surface currently. However, the balloon applicator has a tendency to distort due to irregularity of the tumor, especially advanced cancer. Therefore we studied the difference of the dose distribution when the definition of the mucosal surface was changed in five cases. We concluded that the difference of the distance between the source and the mucosal surface is significant, and the definition of the mucosal surface and mucosal surface dose should also be designated. (author)

  2. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume -- Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) -- Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  3. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part II: Low dose rate and pulsed dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A number of recent developments have revitalized brachytherapy including remote afterloading, implant optimization, increasing use of 3D imaging, and advances in dose specification and basic dosimetry. However, the core physical principles underlying the classical methods of dose calculation and arrangement of multiple sources remain unchanged. The purpose of this course is to review these principles and their applications to low dose-rate interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy. Emphasis will be placed upon the classical implant systems along with classical and modern methods of dose specification. The level of presentation is designed for radiation oncology residents and beginning clinical physicists. A. Basic Principles (1) Radium-substitute vs. low-energy sealed sources (2) Dose calculation principles (3) The mysteries of source strength specification revealed: mgRaEq, mCi and air-kerma strength B. Interstitial Brachytherapy (1) Target volume, implanted volume, dose specification in implants and implant optimization criteria (2) Classical implant systems: Manchester Quimby and Paris a) Application of the Manchester system to modern brachytherapy b) Comparison of classical systems (3) Permanent interstitial implants a) Photon energy and half life b) Dose specification and pre-operative planning (4) The alphabet soup of dose specification: MCD (mean central dose), minimum dose, MPD (matched peripheral dose), MPD' (minimum peripheral dose) and DVH (dose-volume histogram) quality indices C. Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix (1) Basic principles a) Manchester System: historical foundation of U.S. practice patterns b) Principles of applicator design (2) Dose specification and treatment prescription a) mg-hrs, reference points, ICRU Report 38 reference volume --Point A dose vs mg-hrs and IRAK (Integrated Reference Air Kerma) --Tissue volume treated vs mg-hrs and IRAK b) Practical methods of treatment specification and prescription

  4. Monte Carlo model for a prototype CT-compatible, anatomically adaptive, shielded intracavitary brachytherapy applicator for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Michael J.; Gifford, Kent A.; Horton, John L. Jr.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Gillin, Michael T.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas-Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas-Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas-Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1220 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas-Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Current, clinically applicable intracavitary brachytherapy applicators that utilize shielded ovoids contain a pair of tungsten-alloy shields which serve to reduce dose delivered to the rectum and bladder during source afterloading. After applicator insertion, these fixed shields are not necessarily positioned to provide optimal shielding of these critical structures due to variations in patient anatomies. The authors present a dosimetric evaluation of a novel prototype intracavitary brachytherapy ovoid [anatomically adaptive applicator (A{sup 3})], featuring a single shield whose position can be adjusted with two degrees of freedom: Rotation about and translation along the long axis of the ovoid. Methods: The dosimetry of the device for a HDR {sup 192}Ir was characterized using radiochromic film measurements for various shield orientations. A MCNPX Monte Carlo model was developed of the prototype ovoid and integrated with a previously validated model of a v2 mHDR {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron Co.). The model was validated for three distinct shield orientations using film measurements. Results: For the most complex case, 91% of the absolute simulated and measured dose points agreed within 2% or 2 mm and 96% agreed within 10% or 2 mm. Conclusions: Validation of the Monte Carlo model facilitates future investigations into any dosimetric advantages the use of the A{sup 3} may have over the current state of art with respect to optimization and customization of dose delivery as a function of patient anatomical geometries.

  5. Monte Carlo model for a prototype CT-compatible, anatomically adaptive, shielded intracavitary brachytherapy applicator for the treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Michael J.; Gifford, Kent A.; Horton, John L. Jr.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Gillin, Michael T.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Current, clinically applicable intracavitary brachytherapy applicators that utilize shielded ovoids contain a pair of tungsten-alloy shields which serve to reduce dose delivered to the rectum and bladder during source afterloading. After applicator insertion, these fixed shields are not necessarily positioned to provide optimal shielding of these critical structures due to variations in patient anatomies. The authors present a dosimetric evaluation of a novel prototype intracavitary brachytherapy ovoid [anatomically adaptive applicator (A 3 )], featuring a single shield whose position can be adjusted with two degrees of freedom: Rotation about and translation along the long axis of the ovoid. Methods: The dosimetry of the device for a HDR 192 Ir was characterized using radiochromic film measurements for various shield orientations. A MCNPX Monte Carlo model was developed of the prototype ovoid and integrated with a previously validated model of a v2 mHDR 192 Ir source (Nucletron Co.). The model was validated for three distinct shield orientations using film measurements. Results: For the most complex case, 91% of the absolute simulated and measured dose points agreed within 2% or 2 mm and 96% agreed within 10% or 2 mm. Conclusions: Validation of the Monte Carlo model facilitates future investigations into any dosimetric advantages the use of the A 3 may have over the current state of art with respect to optimization and customization of dose delivery as a function of patient anatomical geometries.

  6. Combined teletherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy boost for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouvaris, J.; Plataniotis, G.A.; Sandilos, P.; Dardoufas, C.; Damatopoulou, A.; Vlahos, L.; Papavasiliou, C.

    1996-01-01

    For the non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma, external beam radiation therapy (median dose 64 Gy) and a boost of intracavitary irradiation (ICRT) has been given. Caesium-137 pellets of 40 mCi were used at a dose rate of 3-3.5 Gy/h, 1 cm from the sources. The median dose was 8.5 Gy. Overall 5-year actuarial survival for the 48 studied patients was 60.4% and LRFS was 64%. The procedure was well tolerated by our patients

  7. High versus low dose-rate intracavitary irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Gwi Eon; Chung, Eun Ji; Suh, Chang Ok; Hong, Soon Won; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John Jk

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix is low. Traditionally, Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been used as a standard modality in the treatment for patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the effects of the High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix compared with the LDR. From January 1971 to December 1992, 106 patients of adenocarcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University with curative intent. LDR brachytherapy was carried out on 35 patients and 71 patients were treated with HDR brachytherapy. In LDR Group, 8 patients were in stage I, 18 in stage II and 9 in stage III. external radiation therapy was delivered with 10 MV X-ray, daily 2 Gy fractionation, total dose 40-46 Gy (median 48 Gy). And LDR Radium intracavitary irradiation was performed with Henschke applicator, 22-56 Gy to point A (median 43 Gy). In HDR Group, there were 16 patients in stage I, 38 in stage II and 17 in stage III. The total dose of external radiation was 40-61 Gy (median 45 Gy), daily 1.8-2.0 Gy. HDR Co-60 intracavitary irradiation was performed with RALS(Remote Afterloading System), 30-57 Gy (median 39 Gy) to point A, 3 times a week, 3 Gy per fraction. The 5-year overall survival rate in LDR Group was 72.9%, 61.9%, 45.0% in stage I, II, III, respectively and corresponding figures for HDR were 87.1%, 58.3%, 41.2%, respectively (p>0.05). There was no statistical difference in terms of the 5-year overall survival rate between HDR Group and LDR Group in adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. There was 11% of late complication rates in LDR Group and 27% in HDR Group. There were no prognostic factors compared HDR with LDR group. The incidence of the late complication rate in HDR Group stage II, III was higher than that in LDR Group (16.7% vs. 31.6% in stage II, 11.1% vs. 35.3% in stage III, p>0

  8. Loading pattern calculated by inverse optimization vs traditional dosimetry systems of intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamema, S.V.; Deshpande, D.D.; Kirisits, C.; Trnkova, P.; Poetter, R.; Mahantshetty, U.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the recent past, inverse planning algorithms were introduced for intracavitary brachytherapy planning (ICBT) for cervical cancer. The loading pattern of these algorithms in comparison with traditional systems may not be similar. The purpose of this study was to objectively compare the loading patterns of traditional systems with the inverse optimization. Based on the outcome of the comparison, an attempt was made to obtain a loading pattern that takes into account the experience made with the inverse optimization

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation of stepping source in afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy for GZP6 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toossi, M.T.B.; Abdollahi, M.; Ghorbani, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Stepping source in brachytherapy systems is used to treat a target lesion longer than the effective treatment length of the source. Dose calculation accuracy plays a vital role in the outcome of brachytherapy treatment. In this study, the stepping source (channel 6) of GZP6 brachytherapy unit was simulated by Monte Carlo simulation and matrix shift method. The stepping source of GZP6 was simulated by Monte Carlo MCNPX code. The Mesh tally (type I) was employed for absorbed dose calculation in a cylindrical water phantom. 5 x 108 photon histories were scored and a 0.2% statistical uncertainty was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations. Dose distributions were obtained by our matrix shift method for esophageal cancer tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm. Isodose curves produced by simulation and TPS were superimposed to estimate the differences. Results Comparison of Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions show that in longitudinal direction (source movement direction) Monte Carlo and TPS dose distributions are comparable. [n transverse direction, the dose differences of 7 and 5% were observed for esophageal tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm respectively. Conclusions Although, the results show that the maximum difference between Monte Carlo and TPS calculations is about 7%, but considering that the certified activity is given with ± I 0%, uncertainty, then an error of the order of 20% for Monte Carlo calculation would be reasonable. It can be suggested that accuracy of the dose distribution produced by TPS is acceptable for clinical applications. (author)

  10. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  11. Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer. II: Comparative Planning Study With Intracavitary and Intracavitary–Interstitial Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dae Yup [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Safigholi, Habib; Soliman, Abraam [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Scanderbeg, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Liu, Zhaowei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Owrangi, Amir [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, William Y., E-mail: william.song@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparative planning study evaluating the utility of the proposed direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator against standard applicators, in the setting of image guided adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A detailed conceptual article was published in 2014. The proposed DMBT tandem applicator has 6 peripheral grooves of 1.3-mm width, along a 5.4-mm-thick nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cm{sup 3}, capable of generating directional dose profiles. We performed a comparative planning study with 45 cervical cancer patients enrolled consecutively in the prospective observational EMBRACE study. In all patients, MRI-based planning was performed while utilizing various tandem-ring (27 patients) and tandem-ring-needles (18 patients) applicators, in accordance with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie–European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology recommendations. For unbiased comparisons, all cases were replanned with an in-house–developed inverse optimization code while enforcing a uniform set of constraints that are reflective of the clinical practice. All plans were normalized to the same high-risk clinical target volume D90 values achieved in the original clinical plans. Results: In general, if the standard tandem was replaced with the DMBT tandem while maintaining all other planning conditions the same, there was consistent improvement in the plan quality. For example, among the 18 tandem-ring-needles cases, the average D2cm{sup 3} reductions achieved were −2.48% ± 11.03%, −4.45% ± 5.24%, and −5.66% ± 6.43% for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. An opportunity may also exist in avoiding use of needles altogether for when the total number of needles required is small (approximately 2 to 3 needles or less), if DMBT tandem is used. Conclusions: Integrating the novel DMBT tandem onto both intracavitary and intracavitary

  12. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Alksne, John F.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  13. Novel use of the Contura for high dose rate cranial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J; Alksne, John F; Lawson, Joshua D; Murphy, Kevin T

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A method of quality audit for treatment planning system for intracavitary HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Vandana, S.; Philomina, A.; Kannan, S.; Rituraj, U.

    2007-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy is a multipurpose modality. Quality audit (QAu) is an independent examination and evaluation of quality assurance activities and results of an institution. Both clinical and physical aspects of patient treatments must be subjected to careful control and planning to achieve a high degree of accuracy in radiation therapy treatments. Comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes should be established to cover all steps from dose prescription to dose delivery. These programmes should include detailed internal checks performed by the radiotherapy centres and external audits made by independent bodies. A systematic and independent examination and evaluation to determine whether quality activities and results comply with planned arrangements and whether the arrangements are implemented effectively and are suitable to achieve objectives is called quality audit. One purpose of a quality audit (QAu) is to evaluate the need for improvement or corrective action

  15. A prospective study to assess the bladder distension effects on dosimetry in intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical cancer via computed tomography-assisted techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.-M.; Huang, H.-Y.; Huang, E.-Y.; Wang, C.-J.; Ko, S.-F.; Lin Hao; Song, J.-C.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is as important as external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the radical radiotherapy of uterine cervical cancer. The degree of urinary bladder distension during ICBT may affect the dose distribution in the bladder and rectum, to which an overdose may increase the chance of developing treatment-related complications. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess and quantify the impact of bladder distension on dosimetry in ICBT in patients with cervical cancer. Patients and methods: We recruited 20 patients with cervical cancer during a 12-month period. Inclusion criteria included pathological diagnosis of cervical cancer with IA to IIIB stages, and intact uterus. Patients were evaluated for brachytherapy after EBRT, and eligible individuals (cervical os could be identified clearly) were invited enter to this protocol to receive ICBT. In the first brachytherapy, bladder preparation (evacuation and distension by a Foley catheter) and CT scan were performed soon after the insertion of CT-compatible applicators. Then the bladder wall doses [median dose, maximum dose and dose-volume histograms (DVH)] were calculated via the PLATO computer planning system (Nucletron PLATO-RTS version 2.0). The individual data regarding doses and DVH were collected and compared. Bladder distension may shift the applicator position, and posterior displacement of the applicator system may increase the dose to the rectal wall, so this effect was also evaluated. Results: All the continuous variables of these 20 patients followed a normal distribution. By paired t-test and multiple linear regression analysis, we found that bladder distension statistically significantly decreased the median bladder wall dose with an average reduction of 48% of the dose of an empty bladder (P<0.001), and the maximum dose did not change; on the other hand, the bladder distension did not have any adverse effects on the rectal wall doses. Conclusions

  16. High dose rate intracavitary afterloading irradiation in malignant inoperable obturation of bile ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itami, J.; Saegusa, K.; Mamiya, T.; Miyoshi, T.; Arimizu, N.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Ohto, M.

    1986-02-01

    After decompression of the bile duct with PTCD, seven patients with carcinomas of the bile ducts were submitted to an intracavitary Ir-afterloading irradiation performed according to the high-dose-rate method with a Buchler device. Most of the patients were irradiated with 30 Gy in two fractions. Five patients were also exposed to percutaneous radiation with 40 to 50 Gy. Local control was achieved in six patients. One patient developed a locoregional recurrence which was possibly due to a so-called 'geographic miss'. In one patient a benign fibrotic stenosis of the bile duct was found at the site of most intensive irradiation. Intracavitary irradiation is very important in the treatment of malignant of bile ducts. However, there is an urgent need of research with regard to the combined method with percutaneous irradiation and to the optimum fractionation of intracavitary high dose rate irradiation.

  17. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  18. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  19. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cancer of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwahlen, Daniel; Jezioranski, John; Chan, Philip; Haider, Masoom A.; Cho, Young-Bin; Yeung, Ivan; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and benefits of optimized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy (BT) for cancer of the cervix. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB-IV cervical cancer had an MRI-compatible intrauterine BT applicator inserted after external beam radiotherapy. MRI scans were acquired, and the gross tumor volume at diagnosis and at BT, the high-risk (HR) and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and rectal, sigmoid, and bladder walls were delineated. Pulsed-dose-rate BT was planned and delivered in a conventional manner. Optimized MRI-based plans were developed and compared with the conventional plans. Results: The HR CTV and intermediate-risk CTV were adequately treated (the percentage of volume treated to ≥100% of the intended dose was >95%) in 70% and 85% of the patients with the conventional plans, respectively, and in 75% and 95% of the patients with the optimized plans, respectively. The minimal dose to the contiguous 2 cm 3 of the rectal, sigmoid, and bladder wall volume was 16 ± 6.2, 25 ± 8.7, and 31 ± 9.2 Gy, respectively. With MRI-guided BT optimization, it was possible to maintain coverage of the HR-CTV and reduce the dose to the normal tissues, especially in patients with small tumors at BT. In these patients, the HR percentage of volume treated to ≥100% of the intended dose approached 100% in all cases, and the minimal dose to the contiguous 2-cm 3 of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder was 12-32% less than with conventional BT planning. Conclusion: MRI-based BT for cervical cancer has the potential to optimize primary tumor dosimetry and reduce the dose to critical normal tissues, particularly in patients with small tumors.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of rectum and bladder using image-based CT planning and orthogonal radiographs with ICRU 38 recommendations in intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to compare CT-based dosimetry with International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU 38 bladder and rectum reference points in patients of carcinoma of uterine cervix treated with intracavitary brachytherapy (ICA. Twenty-two consecutive patients were evaluated. Orthogonal radiographs and CT images were acquired and transferred to PLATO planning system. Bladder and rectal reference points were identified according to ICRU 38 recommendations. Dosimetry was carried out based on Manchester system. Patient treatment was done using 192 Iridium high dose rate (HDR remote after-loading machine based on the conventional radiograph-based dosimetry. ICRU rectal and bladder point doses from the radiograph plans were compared with D 2 , dose received by 2 cm 3 of the organ receiving maximum dose from CT plan. V 2 , volume of organ receiving dose more than the ICRU reference point, was evaluated. The mean (±standard deviation volume of rectum and bladder was 60 (±28 cm 3 and 138 (±41 cm 3 respectively. The mean reference volume in radiograph and CT plan was 105 (±7 cm 3 and 107 (±7 cm 3 respectively. It was found that 6 (±4 cm3 of rectum and 16 (±10 cm 3 of bladder received dose more than the prescription dose. V2 of rectum and bladder was 7 (±1.7 cm 3 and 20.8 (±6 cm 3 respectively. Mean D 2 of rectum and bladder was found to be 1.11 (±0.2 and 1.56 (±0.6 times the mean ICRU reference points respectively. This dosimteric study suggests that comparison of orthogonal X-ray-based and CT-based HDR ICA planning is feasible. ICRU rectal point dose correlates well with maximum rectal dose, while ICRU bladder point underestimates the maximum bladder dose.

  2. Geometrical considerations in dose volume analysis in intracavitary treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, D.D.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Pradhan, A.S.; Viswanathan, P.S.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    The present work was aimed at to study the relationship between the volume enclosed by reference iodose surface and various geometrical parameters of the intracavitary applicator in treatment of carcinoma of cervix. Pearshape volume of the reference isodose derived from the Total Reference Air Kerma (TRAK) and the product of its dimensions, height H, width W and thickness T which is dependent on the applicator geometry, were estimated for 100 intracavitary applications treated by Selectron LDR machine. Orthogonal radiographs taken for each patient were used for measurement of actual geometric dimensions of the applicator and carrying out the dosimetry on TP-11 treatment planning system. The dimensions H, W and T of reference isodose surface (60 Gy) were also noted. Ratio of the product HWT and the pearshape volume was found mainly to be a function of colpostat separation and not of other geometrical parameters like maximum vertical and anterio-posterior dimension of the applicator. The ratio remained almost constant for a particular combination of uterine tandem and colpostat. Variation in the ratios were attributed to the non-standard geometry. The ratio of the volume of reference isodose surface to the product of its dimensions in the applicator depends upon the colpostat separation. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Comparison of 60Cobalt and 192Iridium sources in high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.; Baier, K.; Flentje, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: 60 Co sources with dimensions identical to those of 192 Ir have recently been made available in clinical brachytherapy. A longer half time reduces demands on logistics and quality assurance and perhaps costs. Material and Methods: Comparison of the physical properties of 60 Co and 192 Ir with regard to brachytherapy. Results: Required activities for the same air kerma rate are lower by a factor of 2.8 for 60 Co. Differential absorption in tissues of different densities can be neglected. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that integral dose due to radial dose fall off is higher for 192 Ir in comparison to 60 Co within the first 22 cm from the source (normalization at 1 cm). At larger distances this relationship is reversed. Conclusion: Clinical examples for intracavitary and interstitial applications however, show practically identical dose distributions in the treatment volume. (orig.)

  4. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  5. Intracavitary after loading techniques, advantages and disadvantages with high and low dose-rate methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstam, Rune

    1980-01-01

    Even though suggested as early as 1903, it is only when suitable sealed gamma sources became available, afterloading methods could be developed for interstitial as well as intracavitary work. Manual afterloading technique can be used only for low dose rate irradiation, while remote controlled afterloading technique can be used for both low and high dose-rate irradiation. Afterloading units used at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, are described, and experience of their use is narrated briefly. (M.G.B.)

  6. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  7. Variations of intracavitary applicator geometry during multiple HDR brachytherapy insertions in carcinoma cervix and its influence on reporting as per ICRU report 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Kumar, Shaleen; Das, Koilpillai Joseph Maria; Pandey, Chandra Mani; Halder, Shikha; Ayyagari, Sunder

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines the extent of variation in the applicator geometry during multiple high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) applications and its impact on reporting as per ICRU report 38. Materials and methods: Eighty orthogonal radiographs from 20 consecutive patients of carcinoma cervix (FIGO stages, IIA-IIIB) having four HDR ICBT applications of 6 Gy each at weekly intervals following teletherapy were evaluated. The applicator consisted of a flexible intrauterine tandem (IUT) independent of the ovoid assembly. The applicator geometry was evaluated in terms of: α angle, β angle, intrauterine length (IUTL), interovoid (IOV), os to right ovoid (ORT) and os to left ovoid (OLT) distances along with vertical (VDL) and anteroposterior displacements (ADL) of the os with respect to the ovoids. The Cartesian co-ordinates (X, Y, and Z) of the IUT tip, centre of both ovoids and os were also measured. Doses to right point A (ARD), left point A (ALD), along with a reference volume of 6 Gy for ICRU height (IRH), width (IRW), thickness (IRT) and volume (IRV) were estimated for each application. Results: Highly significant differences (P<0.001) between four insertions in any given patient across 20 patients for α angle, β angle, IUTL, IOV, ORT, VDL, co-ordinates of the IUT, ovoids and os were observed, except for ADL (P=0.041) and OLT (P=0.247). As a consequence, variations were observed in ARD (P=0.027), ALD (P=0.017); IRH, IRW, IRT and IRV (all P<0.001). Applicator factors which influenced the various dose specification parameters were: β angle and ORT for both ARD and ALD; UTLN, VDL and ORT for IRH; UTLN and IOV for IRW; UTLN for IRT and VDL for the 6 Gy IRV. Conclusions: A significant variation of the applicator geometry and its movement was observed in patients undergoing multiple HDR ICBT. This could have implications for reporting dose and volume specifications as required by ICRU report 38

  8. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  9. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi, Ramin; Siavashpour, Zahra; Aghamiri, Mahmoud Reza; Kirisits, Christian; Ghaderi, Reza

    2017-12-01

    Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs) deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in 'organs-applicators', while maintaining target dose at the original level. There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients' plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  10. Endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy as boost radiation for primary early T stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Bo Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT is usually applied as boost radiotherapy for superficial residual of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC after primary extern-beam radiptherapy (ERT. Here, we evaluated the outcome of endoscope-guided interstitial intensity-modulated brachytherapy (IMBT boost radiation for deep-seated residual NPC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two hundred and thirteen patients with residual NPC who were salvaged with brachytherapy boost radiation during 2005-2009 were analyzed retrospectively. Among these patients, 171 patients had superficial residual NPC (≤1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium were treated with ICBT boost radiation, and interstitial IMBT boost radiation was delivered to 42 patients with deep-seated residual NPC (>1 cm below the nasopharyngeal epithelium. We found that IMBT boost subgroup had a higher ratio of T2b (81.0% VS 34.5%, P<0.001 and stage II (90.5% VS 61.4%, P = 0.001 than that of ICBT boost subgroup. The dosage of external-beam radiotherapy in the nasopharyngeal (63.0±3.8 VS 62.6±4.3 Gray (Gy, P = 0.67 and regional lymph nodes (55.8±5.0 VS 57.5±5.7 Gy, P = 0.11 was comparable in both groups. For brachytherapy, IMBT subgroup had a lower boost radiation dosage than ICBT subgroup (11.0±2.9 VS 14.8±3.2 Gy, P<0.01. Though the IMBT group had deeper residual tumors and received lower boost radiation dosages, both subgroups had the similar 5-year actuarial overall survival rate (IMBT VS ICBT group: 96.8% VS 93.6%, P = 0.87, progression-free survival rate (92.4% VS 86.5%, P = 0.41 and distant metastasis-free survival rate (94.9% VS 92.7%, P = 0.64. Moreover, IMBT boost radiation subgroup had a similar local (97.4% VS 94.4%, P = 0.57 and regional (95.0% VS 97.2%, P = 0.34 control to ICBT subgroup. The acute and late toxicities rates were comparable between the both subgroups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IMBT boost radiation may be a promising therapeutic

  11. Dose calculation in brachytherapy with microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    The computer algorithms, that allow the calculation of brachytherapy doses and its graphic representation for implants, using programs developed for Pc microcomputers are presented. These algorithms allow to localized the sources in space, from their projection in radiographics images and trace isodose counter. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. MCNP modelling of vaginal and uterine applicators used in intracavitary brachytherapy and comparison with radiochromic film measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccolini, E.; Gerardy, I.; Ródenas, J.; van Dycke, M.; Gallardo, S.; Mostacci, D.

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that is minimally invasive, minimising radiation exposure to the surrounding healthy tissues. Microselectron© Nucletron devices with 192Ir source can be used for gynaecological brachytherapy, in patients with vaginal or uterine cancer. Measurements of isodose curves have been performed in a PMMA phantom and compared with Monte Carlo calculations and TPS (Plato software of Nucletron BPS 14.2) evaluation. The isodose measurements have been performed with radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT©). The dose matrix has been obtained after digitalisation and use of a dose calibration curve obtained with a 6 MV photon beam provided by a medical linear accelerator. A comparison between the calculated and the measured matrix has been performed. The calculated dose matrix is obtained with a simulation using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code (F4MESH tally).

  13. Dose Distribution of Rectum and Bladder in Intracavitary Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S. S.; Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The intrauterine irradiation is essential to achieve adequate tumor dose to central tumor mass of uterine malignancy in radiotherapy. The complications of pelvic organ are known to be directly related to radiation dose and physical parameters. The simulation radiogram and medical records of 206 patients, who were treated with intrauterine irradiation from Feb. 1983 to Oct. 1983, were critically analyzed. The physical parameters to include distances between lateral walls of vaginal fornices, longitudinal and lateral cervix to the central axis of ovoid were measured for low dose rate irradiation system and high dose rate remote control after loading system. The radiation doses and dose distributions within cervical area including interesting points and bladder, rectum, according to sources arrangement and location of applicator, were estimated with personal computer. Followings were summary of study results; 1. In distances between lateral walls of vaginal fornices, the low dose rate system showed as 4-7cm width and high dose rate system showed as 5-6cm. 2. In Horizontal angulation of tandem to body axis, the low dose rate system revealed mid position 64.6%, left deviation 19.2% and right deviation 16.2%. 3. In longitudinal angulation of tandem to body axis, the mid position was 11.8% and anterior angulation 88.2% in low dose rate system but in high dose rate system, anterior angulation was 98.5%. 4. Down ward displacement of ovoid below external os was only 3% in low dose rate system and 66.6% in high dose rate system. 5. In radiation source arrangement, the most activities of tandem and ovoid were 35 by 30 in low dose rate system but 50 by 40 in high dose rate system. 6. In low and high dose rate system, the total doses and TDF were 80, 70 Gy and 131, 123 including 40 Gy external irradiation. 7. The doses and TDF in interesting points Co, B, were 98, 47 Gy and 230, 73 in high dose rate system but in low dose rate system 125, 52 Gy and 262, 75 respectively. 8. Doses

  14. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in uterine cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Firuza D.; Rai, Bhavana; Mallick, Indranil; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is in wide use for curative treatment of cervical cancer. The American Brachytherapy Society has recommended that the individual fraction size be <7.5 Gy and the range of fractions should be four to eight; however, many fractionation schedules, varying from institution to institution, are in use. We use 9 Gy/fraction of HDR in two to five fractions in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We found that our results and toxicity were comparable to those reported in the literature and hereby present our experience with this fractionation schedule. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients with Stage I-III carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with HDR brachytherapy between 1996 and 2000. The total number of patients analyzed was 113. The median patient age was 53 years, and the histopathologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 93% of patients. The patients were subdivided into Groups 1 and 2. In Group 1, 18 patients with Stage Ib-IIb disease, tumor size <4 cm, and preserved cervical anatomy underwent simultaneous external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 40 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks with central shielding and HDR brachytherapy of 9 Gy/fraction, given weekly, and interdigitated with external beam radiotherapy. The 95 patients in Group 2, who had Stage IIb-IIIb disease underwent external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions within 4.5 weeks followed by two sessions of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of 9 Gy each given 1 week apart. The follow-up range was 3-7 years (median, 36.4 months). Late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rate was 74.5% and 62.0%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 100% for Stage I, 80% for Stage II, and 67.2% for Stage III patients. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 88.8% for

  15. Current situation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rogerio Matias Vidal da; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento, E-mail: rmv.fisica@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Pinezi, Juliana Castro Dourado [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias (PUC-Goias), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Macedo, Luiz Eduardo Andrade [Hospital Chama, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    To assess the current situation of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix in Brazil, regarding apparatuses, planning methods, prescription, fractionation schedule and evaluation of dose in organs at risk. Materials and methods: in the period between March/2012 and May/2013, a multiple choice questionnaire was developed and sent to 89 Brazilian hospitals which perform HDR brachytherapy. Results: sixty-one services answered the questionnaire. All regions of the country experienced a sharp increase in the number of HDR brachytherapy services in the period from 2001 to 2013. As regards planning, although a three-dimensional planning software was available in 91% of the centers, conventional radiography was mentioned by 92% of the respondents as their routine imaging method for such a purpose. Approximately 35% of respondents said that brachytherapy sessions are performed after teletherapy. The scheme of four 7 Gy intracavitary insertions was mentioned as the most frequently practiced. Conclusion: the authors observed that professionals have difficulty accessing adjuvant three-dimensional planning tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  16. Effect of bedside shielding on air-kerma rates around gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy patients containing 226Ra or 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, P.J.; Ramsey, M.J.; LaFontaine, R.L.; LePage, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom was implanted with 226Ra or 137Cs gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy sources. Air-kerma rate measurements were taken at 10-cm increments along a horizontal plane from the side of the bed at 50 cm, 87 cm, and 136 cm heights above the floor. Five portable lead shields were placed at the head, at the foot and along one side of the bed and readings were taken again at the corresponding heights above, below and behind the shields. The readings were normalized to 100-mg Ra equivalence, and air-kerma rate curves were drawn allowing for the comparison of 226Ra and 137Cs with and without lead shields. The data demonstrated that the air-kerma rates for 137Cs were reduced more than those for 226Ra with the use of the portable lead shields. There was four times the transmission with 226Ra than with 137Cs. The optimal placement was with the lateral bedside shields proximal to the head and foot closest to the bed, with the middle shield overlapping in back. The shields at the head and foot should extend out and overlap the bedside shields. The level of the sources should be positioned near the bottom of the shields. This information will provide the medical health physicist with an estimate of air-kerma rates for both 226Ra and 137Cs with and without shielding for evaluating personnel exposures as well as the effectiveness of current shielding in relation to radiation protection requirements in adjacent rooms or hallways

  17. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  18. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Kotaka, Kikuo; Itami, Jun

    1994-01-01

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  19. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  20. A method to combine three dimensional dose distributions for external beam and brachytherapy radiation treatments for gynecological neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, V.; Sahijdak, W.M.; Orton, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation treatment of gynecological neoplasms, such as cervical carcinoma, usually combines external radiation therapy with one or more intracavitary brachytherapy applications. Although the dose from external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy can be calculated and displayed in 3D individually, the dose distributions are not combined. At most, combined point doses are calculated for select points using various time-dose models. In this study, we present a methodology to combine external beam and brachytherapy treatments for gynecological neoplasms. Material and Methods: Three dimensional bio-effect treatment planning to obtain complication probability has been outlined. CT scans of the patient's pelvis with the gynecological applicator in place are used to outline normal tissue and tumor volumes. 3D external beam and brachytherapy treatment plans are developed separately and an external beam dose matrix and a brachytherapy dose matrix was calculated. The dose in each voxel was assumed to be homogeneous. The physical dose in each voxel of the dose matrix was then converted into extrapolated response dose (ERD) based on the linear quadratic model that accounts for the dose per fraction, number of fractions, dose rate, and complete or incomplete repair of sublethal damage (time between fractions). The net biological dose delivered was obtained by summing the ERD grids from external beam and brachytherapy since there was complete repair of sublethal damage between external beam and brachytherapy treatments. The normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability were obtained using the biological dose matrix based on the critical element model. Results: The outlined method of combining external beam and brachytherapy treatments was implemented on gynecological treatments using an applicator for brachytherapy treatments. Conclusion: Implementation of the biological dose calculation that combine different modalities is extremely useful

  1. Localizing intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J.; Todor, Dorin A.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of radio-opaque applicators of known but arbitrary shape from a small set of 2D x-ray projections in support of intraoperative brachytherapy planning. Methods: The generalized iterative forward projection matching (gIFPM) algorithm finds the six degree-of-freedom pose of an arbitrary rigid object by minimizing the sum-of-squared-intensity differences (SSQD) between the computed and experimentally acquired autosegmented projection of the objects. Starting with an initial estimate of the object's pose, gIFPM iteratively refines the pose parameters (3D position and three Euler angles) until the SSQD converges. The object, here specialized to a Fletcher-Weeks intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) applicator, is represented by a fine mesh of discrete points derived from complex combinatorial geometric models of the actual applicators. Three pairs of computed and measured projection images with known imaging geometry are used. Projection images of an intrauterine tandem and colpostats were acquired from an ACUITY cone-beam CT digital simulator. An image postprocessing step was performed to create blurred binary applicators only images. To quantify gIFPM accuracy, the reconstructed 3D pose of the applicator model was forward projected and overlaid with the measured images and empirically calculated the nearest-neighbor applicator positional difference for each image pair. Results: In the numerical simulations, the tandem and colpostats positions (x,y,z) and orientations (α,β,γ) were estimated with accuracies of 0.6 mm and 2 deg., respectively. For experimentally acquired images of actual applicators, the residual 2D registration error was less than 1.8 mm for each image pair, corresponding to about 1 mm positioning accuracy at isocenter, with a total computation time of less than 1.5 min on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: This work describes a novel, accurate, fast, and completely

  2. Localizing intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J.; Todor, Dorin A.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To present a novel method for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of radio-opaque applicators of known but arbitrary shape from a small set of 2D x-ray projections in support of intraoperative brachytherapy planning. Methods: The generalized iterative forward projection matching (gIFPM) algorithm finds the six degree-of-freedom pose of an arbitrary rigid object by minimizing the sum-of-squared-intensity differences (SSQD) between the computed and experimentally acquired autosegmented projection of the objects. Starting with an initial estimate of the object's pose, gIFPM iteratively refines the pose parameters (3D position and three Euler angles) until the SSQD converges. The object, here specialized to a Fletcher-Weeks intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) applicator, is represented by a fine mesh of discrete points derived from complex combinatorial geometric models of the actual applicators. Three pairs of computed and measured projection images with known imaging geometry are used. Projection images of an intrauterine tandem and colpostats were acquired from an ACUITY cone-beam CT digital simulator. An image postprocessing step was performed to create blurred binary applicators only images. To quantify gIFPM accuracy, the reconstructed 3D pose of the applicator model was forward projected and overlaid with the measured images and empirically calculated the nearest-neighbor applicator positional difference for each image pair. Results: In the numerical simulations, the tandem and colpostats positions (x,y,z) and orientations ({alpha},{beta},{gamma}) were estimated with accuracies of 0.6 mm and 2 deg., respectively. For experimentally acquired images of actual applicators, the residual 2D registration error was less than 1.8 mm for each image pair, corresponding to about 1 mm positioning accuracy at isocenter, with a total computation time of less than 1.5 min on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: This work describes a novel, accurate

  3. Localizing intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J; Todor, Dorin A; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2011-02-01

    To present a novel method for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of radio-opaque applicators of known but arbitrary shape from a small set of 2D x-ray projections in support of intraoperative brachytherapy planning. The generalized iterative forward projection matching (gIFPM) algorithm finds the six degree-of-freedom pose of an arbitrary rigid object by minimizing the sum-of-squared-intensity differences (SSQD) between the computed and experimentally acquired autosegmented projection of the objects. Starting with an initial estimate of the object's pose, gIFPM iteratively refines the pose parameters (3D position and three Euler angles) until the SSQD converges. The object, here specialized to a Fletcher-Weeks intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) applicator, is represented by a fine mesh of discrete points derived from complex combinatorial geometric models of the actual applicators. Three pairs of computed and measured projection images with known imaging geometry are used. Projection images of an intrauterine tandem and colpostats were acquired from an ACUITY cone-beam CT digital simulator. An image postprocessing step was performed to create blurred binary applicators only images. To quantify gIFPM accuracy, the reconstructed 3D pose of the applicator model was forward projected and overlaid with the measured images and empirically calculated the nearest-neighbor applicator positional difference for each image pair. In the numerical simulations, the tandem and colpostats positions (x,y,z) and orientations (alpha, beta, gamma) were estimated with accuracies of 0.6 mm and 2 degrees, respectively. For experimentally acquired images of actual applicators, the residual 2D registration error was less than 1.8 mm for each image pair, corresponding to about 1 mm positioning accuracy at isocenter, with a total computation time of less than 1.5 min on a 1 GHz processor. This work describes a novel, accurate, fast, and completely automatic method to

  4. Trans-abdominal ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlation for conformal intracavitary brachytherapy in carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Khanna, Nehal; Swamidas, Jamema; Engineer, Reena; Thakur, Meenakshi H.; Merchant, Nikhil H.; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Trans-abdominal ultrasonography (US) is capable of determining size, shape, thickness, and diameter of uterus, cervix and disease at cervix or parametria. To assess the potential value of US for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy, we compared US-findings relevant for brachytherapy to the corresponding findings obtained from MR imaging. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with biopsy proven cervical cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy with/without concomitant Cisplatin chemotherapy and suitable for brachytherapy were invited to participate in this study. US and MR were performed in a similar reproducible patient positioning after intracavitary application. US mid-sagittal and axial image at the level of external cervical os was acquired. Reference points D1 to D9 and distances were identified with respect to central tandem and flange, to delineate cervix, central disease, and external surface of the uterus. Results: Thirty-two applications using CT/MR compatible applicators were evaluable. The D1 and D3 reference distances which represent anterior surface had a strong correlation with R = 0.92 and 0.94 (p < 0.01). The D2 and D4 reference distances in contrast, which represent the posterior surface had a moderate (D2) and a strong (D4) correlation with R = 0.63 and 0.82 (p < 0.01). Of all, D2 reference distance showed the least correlation of MR and US. The D5 reference distance representing the fundal thickness from tandem tip had a correlation of 0.98. The reference distances for D6, D7, D8, and D9 had a correlation of 0.94, 0.82, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Conclusions: Our study evaluating the use of US, suggests a reasonably strong correlation with MR in delineating uterus, cervix, and central disease for 3D conformal intracavitary brachytherapy planning.

  5. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO); Programa de verificacion del calculo para un sistema de planificacion de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (PLATO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  6. SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenafi, M; McDonald, D; Peng, J; Mart, C; Koch, N; Cooper, L; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Improved patient imaging used for planning the treatment of cervical cancer with Tandem and Ovoid (T&O) Intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) now allows for 3D delineation of target volumes and organs-at-risk. However, historical data relies on the conventional point A-based planning technique. A comparative dosimetric study was performed by generating both target-based (TBP) and point-based (PBP) plans for ten clinical patients. Methods: Treatment plans created using Elekta Oncentra v. 4.3 for ten consecutive cervical cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with HDR using the Utrecht T&O applicator. Both CT and MRI imaging modalities were utilized to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs-at-risk (rectum, sigmoid, bladder, and small bowel). Point A (left and right), vaginal mucosa, and ICRU rectum and bladder points were defined on CT. Two plans were generated for each patient using two prescription methods (PBP and TBP). 7Gy was prescribed to each point A for each PBP plan and to the target D90% for each TBP plan. Target V90%, V100%, and V200% were evaluated. In addition, D0.1cc and D2cc were analyzed for each organ-at-risk. Differences were assessed for statistical significance (p<0.05) by use of Student’s t-test. Results: Target coverage was comparable for both planning methods, with each method providing adequate target coverage. TBP showed lower absolute dose to the target volume than PBP (D90% = 7.0Gy vs. 7.4Gy, p=0.028), (V200% = 10.9cc vs. 12.8cc, p=0.014), (ALeft = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.009), and (ARight = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.013). TBP also showed a statistically significant reduction in bladder, rectum, small bowel, and sigmoid doses compared to PBP. There was no statistically significant difference in vaginal mucosa or ICRU-defined rectum and bladder dose. Conclusion: Target based prescription resulted in substantially lower dose to delineated organs-at-risk compared to point based prescription, while

  7. Comparison of Dose When Prescribed to Point A and Point H for Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Ji Hyeong; Gim, Il Hwan; Hwang, Seon Boong; Kim, Woong; Im, Hyeong Seo; Gang, Jin Mook; Gim, Gi Hwan; Lee, Ah Ram [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seou (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare plans prescribed to point A with these prescribed to point H recommended by ABS (American Brachytherapy Society) in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. This study selected 103 patients who received HDR (High Dose Rate) brachytherapy using tandem and ovoids from March 2010 to January 2012. Point A, bladder point, and rectal point conform with Manchester System. Point H conforms with ABS recommendation. Also Sigmoid colon point, and vagina point were established arbitrarily. We examined distance between point A and point H. The percent dose at point A was calculated when 100% dose was prescribed to point H. Additionally, the percent dose at each reference points when dose is prescribed to point H and point A were calculated. The relative dose at point A was lower when point H was located inferior to point A. The relative doses at bladder, rectal, sigmoid colon, and vagina points were higher when point H was located superior to point A, and lower when point H was located inferior to point A. This study found out that as point H got located much superior to point A, the absorbed dose of surrounding normal organs became higher, and as point H got located much inferior to point A, the absorbed dose of surrounding normal organs became lower. This differences dose not seem to affect the treatment. However, we suggest this new point is worth being considered for the treatment of HDR if dose distribution and absorbed dose at normal organs have large differences between prescribed to point A and H.

  8. High-dose-rate brachytherapy using molds for oral cavity cancer. The technique and its limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Yokoe, Yoshihiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Okajima, Kaoru; Nishida, Mitsuo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    With the availability of a high-dose-rate (HDR) remote afterloading device, a Phase I/II protocol was initiated at our institution to assess the toxicity and efficacy of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy, using molds, in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were treated by the technique. The primary sites of the tumors were the buccal mucosa, oral floor, and gingiva. Two of the buccal mucosal cancers were located in the retromolar trigon. For each patient, a customized mold was fabricated, in which two to four afterloading catheters were placed for an 192 Ir HDR source. Four to seven fractions of 3-4 Gy, 5 mm below the mold surface, were given following external radiation therapy of 40-60 Gy/ 2 Gy. The total dose of HDR brachytherapy ranged from 16 to 28Gy. Although a good initial complete response rate of 7/8 (88%) was achieved, there was local recurrence in four of these seven patients. Both of the retromolar trigon tumors showed marginal recurrence. No serious (e.g., ulcer or bone exposure) late radiation damage has been observed thus far in the follow up period of 15-57 months. High-dose-rate brachytherapy using the mold technique seems a safe and useful method for selected early and superficial oral cavity cancer. However, it is not indicated for thick tumors and/or tumors located in the retromolar trigon. (author)

  9. Biology of dose rate in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles underlying brachytherapy, to understand why current treatment regimes are the way they are, and to discuss what the future may hold in store. Brachytherapy has a long history. It was suggested as long ago as 1903 by Alexander Graham Bell, and the optimal application of this technique has been a subject of debate ever since. 'Brachy' means 'short', and the essential features of conventional brachytherapy are: positioning of the source a short distance from, or in, the tumor, allowing good dose distributions; short overall treatment times, to counter tumor repopulation; low dose rate, enabling a good therapeutic advantage between tumor control and damage to late-responding tissue. The advantages of good dose distributions speak for themselves; in some situations, as we shall see, computer-based dose optimization can be used to improve them still further. The advantages of short overall times stem from the fact that accelerated repopulation of the tumor typically begins a few weeks after the start of a radiation treatment. If all the radiation can be crammed in before that time, the risks of tumor repopulation can be considerably reduced. In fact even external-beam radiotherapy is moving in this direction, with the use of highly accelerated protocols. The advantages of low dose rate stem from the differential response to fractionation of early- and late-responding tissues. Essentially, lowering the dose rate spares late-responding tissue more than it does early-responding tissue such as tumors. We shall also discuss some recent innovations in the context of the general principles that have been outlined. For example, High dose rate brachytherapy, particularly for the uterine cervix: Does it work? If so, when and why? Use of Ir-192 sources, with a half life of 70 days: Should corrections be made for changing biological effectiveness as the dose

  10. Mis-dose rate intracavitary therapy for cervical cancer with a Selectron; A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Ohtani, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Shigeru; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    Our early experience with Selectron MDR in treating cervical cancer patients at Osaka University Hospital is presented. From May 1991 through December 1992, a total of 22 patients (stage Ia, 1; stage Ib, 3; stage IIa, 1; stage IIb, 2; stage IIIb, 13 and stage IVa, 2) with previously untreated uterine cervical cancer and intact uterus were treated with mid-dose rate intracavitary therapy administered with a Selectron. A rigid applicator made of stainless steel for the Selectron was used for the treatment. The [sup 137]Cs source had an activity of 1.48 GBq as of reference time. Source loading corresponded to the Manchester System. Early tumor responses for all patients were complete. No acute radiation injury has been observed. There have been two local recurrences in stage IIIb patients. One of them developed para-aortic lymph node metastasis and died from distant metastasis. Another patient in stage IIIb had para-aortic and left supraclavicular lymph node metastasis and died from distant metastasis. Four patients developed rectal bleeding (grade 1, 3; grade 3, 1) . One of them had been treated for aplastic anemia with steroid. The cause of grade 3 rectal bleeding was considered to be technical failure in intracavitary application. The remaining two patients recovered without treatment. From our early experience, it is concluded that Selectron MDR can be used for cervical cancer patients as safely and effectively as our previously used high-dose rate machine. (author).

  11. Curative high dose rate vaginal apex brachytherapy in stage I papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, B.C.; Kacinski, B.M.; Gumbs, A.; Peschel, R.E.; Haffty, B.G.; Wilson, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We describe the presentation, local and distant control, survival, salvage rate, and complications for patients undergoing whole abdominal radiation therapy (WART), low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy, or high dose rate (HDR) vaginal brachytherapy in patients with stage I UPSC. Methods: Between 1976 and 1994 more than 1700 patients with endometrial carcinoma were treated with radiation therapy, 30 patients with stage I UPSC (1.8%) were treated with radiation before or following TAH/BSO. All patients underwent either preoperative Simon's packing or tandem and plaque which delivered 30-40 Gy to the serosa, WART, or HDR Ir-192 vaginal apex brachytherapy to a total dose of 21 Gy in 3 fractions at 0.5 cm from the vaginal mucosa. A total of 14 patients received HDR vaginal brachytherapy and (5(14)) patients received systemic chemotherapy. All patients presented with vaginal bleeding at a median age of 67 years (range 34-88). The group of 30 patients underwent TAH/BSO, 17 patients were completely staged pathologically (pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes, omentectomy, and pelvic washings), and 2 patients underwent omental biopsy and pelvic washings only. All specimens revealed UPSC, nuclear grade 3, and lymphovascular invasion (23%). The pathologic stage was IA: 23% (7), IB: 67% (20), and IC: 10% (3). The median follow-up for all patients was 49 months (range 13-187 months). For the patients receiving postoperative HDR vaginal brachytherapy the median time from surgery to radiation was 42 days (range 29-91). Results: The 5-year actuarial disease free survival for Figo stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 100% compared to 74% for stage I UPSC patient

  12. Novel use of ViewRay MRI guidance for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Huaising C; Huang, Jessie Y; Miller, Jessica R; Das, Rupak K; Wallace, Charles R; De Costa, Anna-Maria A; Francis, David M; Straub, Margaret R; Anderson, Bethany M; Bradley, Kristin A

    To characterize image quality and feasibility of using ViewRay MRI (VR)-guided brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Cervical cancer patients receiving intracavitary brachytherapy with tandem and ovoids, planned using 0.35T VR MRI at our institution, were included in this series. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), visible gross tumor volume, bladder, sigmoid, bowel, and rectum contours for each fraction of brachytherapy were evaluated for dosimetric parameters. Typically, five brachytherapy treatments were planned using the T2 sequence on diagnostic MRI for the first and third fractions, and a noncontrast true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence on VR or CT scan for the remaining fractions. Most patients received 5.5 Gy × 5 fractions using high-dose-rate Ir-192 following 45 Gy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy. The plan was initiated at 5.5 Gy to point A and subsequently optimized and prescribed to the HR-CTV. The goal equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for the combined external beam and brachytherapy dose was 85 Gy. Soft-tissue visualization using contrast-to-noise ratios to distinguish normal tissues from tumor at their interface was compared between diagnostic MRI, CT, and VR. One hundred and forty-two fractions of intracavitary brachytherapy were performed from April 2015 to January 2017 on 29 cervical cancer patients, ranging from stages IB1 to IVA. The median HR-CTV was 27.78 cc, with median D 90 HR-CTV of 6.1 Gy. The median time from instrument placement to start of treatment using VR was 65 min (scan time 2 min), compared to 105 min using diagnostic MRI (scan time 11 min) (t-test, p < 0.01). The contrast-to-noise ratio of tumor to cervix in both diagnostic MRI and VR had significantly higher values compared to CT (ANOVA and t-tests, p < 0.01). We report the first clinical use of VR-guided brachytherapy. Time to treatment using this approach was shorter compared to diagnostic MRI. VR also provided significant

  13. Physics and quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Lowell L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To review the physical aspects of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, including commissioning and quality assurance, source calibration and dose distribution measurements, and treatment planning methods. Following the introduction of afterloading in brachytherapy, development efforts to make it 'remote' culminated in 1964 with the near-simultaneous appearance of remote afterloaders in five major medical centers. Four of these machines were 'high dose rate', three employing 60Co and one (the GammaMed) using a single, cable-mounted 192Ir source. Stepping-motor source control was added to the GammaMed in 1974, making it the precursor of modern remote afterloaders, which are now suitable for interstitial as well as intracavitary brachytherapy by virtue of small source-diameter and indexer-accessed multiple channels. Because the 192Ir sources currently used in HDR remote afterloaders are supplied at a nominal air-kerma strength of 11.4 cGy cm2 s-1 (10 Ci), are not collimated in clinical use, and emit a significant fraction (15%) of photons at energies greater than 600 keV, shielding and facility design must be undertaken as carefully and thoroughly as for external beam installations. Licensing requirements of regulatory agencies must be met with respect both to maximum permissible dose limits and to the existence and functionality of safety devices (door interlocks, radiation monitors, etc.). Commissioning and quality assurance procedures that must be documented for HDR remote afterloading relate to (1) machine, applicator, guide-tube, and facility functionality checks, (2) source calibration, (3) emergency response readiness, (4) planning software evaluation, and (5) independent checks of clinical dose calculations. Source calibration checks must be performed locally, either by in-air measurement of air kerma strength or with a well ionization chamber calibrated (by an accredited standards laboratory) against an in-air measurement of air kerma strength for the

  14. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  15. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  16. The Creteil method of intracavitary brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierquin, B.; Marinello, G.

    1981-01-01

    This system is based on a principle of direct proportionality between the dimensions of the uterine cervix and the length of the vaginal sources. The system defines a reference isodose of fixed value encompassing a target volume of constant anatomic structures. The target volume always contains the same anatomic structures, independent of the tumor extent. The technique for doing the application is based upon certain practical principles: - the use of a cervical-vaginal plastic mould with a semi-rigid uterine tandem; - the use of 192 Ir wires; - the same uniform linear exposure rate for each source used in the application; - a single application for each patient; - the source in the uterus and the sources in the vagina are left in place for the same time. The maximum total dose is 60 Gy, calculated at the reference isodose of 4 Gy/day, assuming a linear nominal exposure rate of 1 mR x h -1 x m 2 x cm -1 . This corresponds to an effective dose rate which varies between 8 and 16 Gy/day, when the actual linear exposure rate of the 192 Ir wires is taken into account. The cervical dose, calculated at the level of the mucosa, is approximately twice the reference dose. It depends upon the size of the cervix, being 2.1 times the reference dose when the cervix is greater than 4 cm in diameter and 2.6 times when the cervix is less than 2.5 cm in diameter. The vaginal dose, calculated at the ''Cap Sassal point'', on the anterior part of the rectum, is always less than the reference dose [fr

  17. Case of severe intestinal complications caused by high dose-rate intracavitary irradiation for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Kenji; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Matsuki, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1987-02-01

    A 46-year-old woman with severe intestinal complication caused by high dose-rate intracavitary irradiation is reported. She received radiation treatment of stage IIb cervical cancer between July 24 and September 26, 1984: a dose of 2400 rad to a point A concurrently with 2000 rad to the parametrium following 4000 rad to the whole pelvis. Eight months later she developed diarrhea and bloody stool. Barium enema study revealed a stenosis at 20 to 25 cm from the anal ring and romanoscopy oozing coagula at the same site. On November 29, 1985 transverse colostomy was performed because of continuing bloody stool and abdominal pain. On January 30, 1986 resection of the ileum and ileostomy were done because of the ileum perforation located 26 cm apart from the ileum end. Some discussion on the causes of this complication are made, suggesting that short length of a tandem and deep location of ovoids influence its cause.

  18. Quality assurance of Vari-source high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy- remote after loader and cost effectiveness of Vari-source HDR- brachytherapy: NORI, Islamabad experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Mahmood, H.; Jafri, S.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A quality control of Vari-Source high dose rate (HDR) remote after loading brachytherapy machine was carried out and the cost effectiveness of HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated considering the cost of ten Iridium-192 wire sources at Nuclear Medicine, Oncology and Radiotherapy Institute (NORI), Islamabad, Pakistan. A total number of 253 intracavitary insertions were done in 98 patients from October 1996 to May 2001. The results of the quality control tests performed during 1996 to 2001 were within the acceptable limits. The cost effectiveness of Vari-Source HDR brachytherapy machine was also evaluated. The average cost per patient was calculated as US$ 491. Small number of patients was treated as the machine was used for gynecologic malignancies only. The objective was to assess the quality control status of HDR brachytherapy machine on patient treatment day, source exchange day and periodic day (monthly basis). It was found that the cost per patient can be minimized if other type of cancer patients are also treated on Vari-Source HDR machine. (author)

  19. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  20. Dose assessment for brachytherapy with Henschke applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Wu, Ching-Jung; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator is a major concern for the brachytherapy planning system (BPS) in recent years. To investigate dose impact owing to neglect of the metal shielding effect, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, BPS calculation, and film measurement have been performed for dose assessment in a water phantom. Additionally, a cylindrical air cavity representing the rectum was added into the MC simulation to study its effect on dose distribution. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) was used in this study to simulate the dose distribution using a mesh tally. This Monte Carlo simulation has been validated using the TG-43 data in a previous report. For the measurement, the Henschke applicator was placed in a specially-designed phantom, and Gafchromic films were inserted in the center plane for 2D dose assessment. Isodose distributions with and without the Henschke applicator by the MC simulation show significant deviation from those by the BPS. For MC simulation, the isodose curves shrank more significantly when the metal applicator was applied. For the impact of the added air cavity, the results indicate that it is hard to distinguish between with and without the cavity. Thus, the rectum cavity has little impact on the dose distribution around the Henschke applicator.

  1. Treatment of carcinoma of uterine cervix with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using Ralstron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, C.O.; Kim, G.E.; Loh, J.J.K.

    1988-01-01

    From May 1979 through December 1981, a total of 530 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with radiation therapy with curative intent. Of the 530 patients, 365 were treated with a high-dose-rate remote-controlled afterloading system (RALS) using a cobalt source, and 165 patients received a low dose rate using a radium source. External pelvic irradiation with a total of 40-50 Gy to the whole pelvis followed by intracavitary radiation (ICR) with a total dose of 30-39 Gy in ten to 13 fractions to point A was the treatment protocol. ICR was given three times a week with a dose of 3 Gy per fraction. Five-year actuarial survival rate with high-dose-rate ICR by stage was as follows: stage I:82.7% (N = 19) stage II:69.6% (N = 184), and stage III:52.2% (N = 156). The above results were comparable with those with conventional low-dose-rate ICR treatment, and late complications were far less. The application of high-dose-rate ICR was technically simple and easily performed on an outpatient basis without anesthesia, and the patients tolerated it very well. Radiation exposure to personnel was virtually none as compared with that of low-dose-rate ICR. Within a given period of time, more patients can be treated with high-dose-rate ICR because of the short treatment time. The authors therefore conclude that high-dose-rate ICR is suitable for a cancer center where a large number of patients are to be treated

  2. Bladder–Rectum Spacer Balloon in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Patel, Firuza D., E-mail: firuzapatel@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Chakraborty, Santam; Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Aprem, Abi Santhosh [Corporate R and D Division, HLL Lifecare Limited, Karamana, Trivandrum (India)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To compare bladder and rectum doses with the use of a bladder–rectum spacer balloon (BRSB) versus standard gauze packing in the same patient receiving 2 high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy fractions. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized study to compare the reduction in bladder and rectum doses with the use of a BRSB compared with standard gauze packing in patients with carcinoma of the cervix being treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. The patients were randomized between 2 arms. In arm A, vaginal packing was done with standard gauze packing in the first application, and BRSB was used in the second application. Arm B was the reverse of arm A. The International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) point doses and doses to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, 2-cm{sup 3}, 5-cm{sup 3}, and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes of bladder and rectum were compared. The patients were also subjectively assessed for the ease of application and the time taken for application. Statistical analysis was done using the paired t test. Results: A total of 43 patients were enrolled; however, 3 patients had to be excluded because the BRSB could not be inserted owing to unfavorable local anatomy. Thus 40 patients (80 plans) were evaluated. The application was difficult in 3 patients with BRSB, and in 2 patients with BRSB the application time was prolonged. There was no significant difference in bladder doses to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, 2 cm{sup 3}, 5 cm{sup 3}, and 10 cm{sup 3} and ICRU bladder point. Statistically significant dose reductions to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, and 2-cm{sup 3} volumes for rectum were observed with the BRSB. No significant differences in 5-cm{sup 3} and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes and ICRU rectum point were observed. Conclusion: A statistically significant dose reduction was observed for small high-dose volumes in rectum with the BRSB. The doses to bladder were comparable for BRSB and gauze packing. Transparent balloons of

  3. Developing A Directional High-Dose Rate (d-HDR) Brachytherapy Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Athena Yvonne

    Conventional sources used in brachytherapy provide nearly isotropic or radially symmetric dose distributions. Optimizations of dose distributions have been limited to varied dwell times at specified locations within a given treatment volume, or manipulations in source position for seed implantation techniques. In years past, intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) has been used to reduce the amount of radiation to surrounding sensitive structures in select intracavitary cases by adding space or partial shields. Previous work done by Lin et al., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown potential improvements in conformality for brachytherapy treatments using a directionally shielded low dose rate (LDR) source for treatments in breast and prostate. Directional brachytherapy sources irradiate approximately half of the radial angles around the source, and adequately shield a quarter of the radial angles on the opposite side, with sharp gradient zones between the treated half and shielded quarter. With internally shielded sources, the radiation can be preferentially emitted in such a way as to reduce toxicities in surrounding critical organs. The objective of this work is to present findings obtained in the development of a new directional high dose rate (d-HDR) source. To this goal, 103Pd (Z = 46) is reintroduced as a potential radionuclide for use in HDR brachytherapy. 103Pd has a low average photon energy (21 keV) and relatively short half -life (17 days), which is why it has historically been used in low dose rate applications and implantation techniques. Pd-103 has a carrier-free specific activity of 75000 Ci/g. Using cyclotron produced 103Pd, near carrier-free specific activities can be achieved, providing suitability for high dose rate applications. The evolution of the d-HDR source using Monte Carlo simulations is presented, along with dosimetric parameters used to fully characterize the source. In addition, a discussion on how to obtain elemental

  4. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H.; Rubo, R.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  5. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  6. Impact of 'optimized' treatment planning for tandem and ring, and tandem and ovoids, using high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Peters, Nancy E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Fowler, Jack F.; Buchler, Dolores A.; Stitt, Judith A.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Different treatment techniques are used in high dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer. We have investigated the differences between 'optimized' and 'nonoptimized' therapy using both a tandem and ring (T/R) applicator, and a tandem and ovoids (T/O), applicator. Methods and Materials: HDR afterloading brachytherapy using the Madison System for Stage IB cervical cancer was simulated for 10 different patients using both a T/R applicator and a T/O applicator. A treatment course consists of external beam irradiation and five insertions of HDR afterloading brachytherapy. Full dosimetry calculations were performed at the initial insertion for both applicators and used as a reference for the following four insertions of the appropriate applicator. Forty dosimetry calculations were performed to determine the dose delivered to Point M (similar to Point A), Point E (obturator lymph nodes), vaginal surface, bladder, and rectum. 'Optimized' doses were specified to Point M and to the vaginal surface. 'Nonoptimized' doses were specified to Point M only. Using the linear-quadratic equation, calculations have been performed to convert the delivered dose using HDR to the biologically equivalent doses at the conventional low dose rate (LDR) at 0.60 Gy/h. Results: Major differences between 'optimized' and 'nonoptimized' LDR equivalent doses were found at the vaginal surface, bladder, and rectum. Overdoses at the vaginal surface, bladder, and rectum were calculated to be 208%, nil, and 42%, respectively, for the T/R applicator with 'nonoptimization'. However, for the T/O applicator, the overdoses were smaller, being nil, 32%, and 27%, respectively, with 'nonoptimization'. Conclusion: Doses given in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy border on tissue tolerance. 'Optimization' of either applicator decreases the risk of a dose that may have potential for complications. Optimization of a tandem and ovoids best ensures

  7. A retrospective study of the role of intracavitary brachytherapy and prognotic factors determining local tumour control after primary radical radiotherapy in 903 non-disseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, P.M.L.; Kwan, W.H.; Yu, P.; Lee, W.Y.; Leung, S.F.; Choi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were to determine the role of intracavitary brachytherapy given shortly after external beam radiotherapy in the primary radical treatment of non-metastatic nasopharyngeal (NPC) cancer patients, and the prognostic factors governing local tumour control. From 1984 to 1989, 903 patients with non-disseminated NPC who had no previous treatment were managed at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, where investigation and treatment methods had been standardized according to a departmental protocol. In the 903 non-disseminated NPCs, the patient's age and tumour involvement of the skull base and cranial nerves were significant independent prognostic factors governing local tumour control. In the 358 patients with Ho T 3 disease, tumour involvement of the orbits and the laryngopharynx significantly worsened local tumour control. The presence of local persistence at 4 weeks after external radiotherapy, for which therapeutic brachytherapy was given, was marginally significant as a prognostic factor in addition to the presence of cranial nerve palsy. (author)

  8. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  9. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  10. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Cheng, Chih-Yao

    2010-01-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V 100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  11. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte

    2006-01-01

    patients,       treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were       sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised       surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically       optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index...... on the       regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was       larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target       volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose       plans between patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dwell time optimisation significantly......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  12. Brachytherapy radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Biase, Steven J.; Wallner, Kent; Tralins, Kevin; Sutlief, Steven

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of radiation dose to the neurovascular bundles (NVB) in brachytherapy-related impotence. Methods and Materials: Fourteen Pd-103 or I-125 implant patients were studied. For patients treated with implant alone, the prostate and margin (clinical target volume [CTV]) received a prescription dose of 144 Gy for I-125 or 115 Gy for Pd-103. Two patients received Pd-103 (90 Gy) with 46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Axial CT images were acquired 2 to 4 hours postoperatively for postimplant dosimetry. Because the NVBs cannot be visualized on CT, NVB calculation points were determined according to previously published anatomic descriptions. Bilateral NVB points were considered to lie posterior-laterally, approximately 2 mm from the prostatic capsule. NVB doses were recorded bilaterally, at 0.5-cm intervals from the prostatic base. Results: For Pd-103, the average NVB doses ranged from 150 Gy to 260 Gy, or 130% to 226% of the prescription dose. For I-125, the average NVB dose ranged from 200 Gy to 325 Gy, or 140% to 225% of the prescription dose. These was no consistent relationship between the NVB dose and the distance from the prostatic base. To examine the possible effect of minor deviations of our calculation points from the true NVB location, we performed NVB calculations at points 2 mm medial or lateral from the NVB calculation point in 8 patients. Doses at these alternate calculation points were comparable, although there was greater variability with small changes in the calculation point if sources were located outside the capsule, near the NVB calculation point. Three patients who developed early postimplant impotence had maximal NVB doses that far exceeded the average values. Conclusions: In the next few years, we hope to clarify the role of high NVB radiation doses on potency, by correlating NVB dose calculations with a large number of patients enrolled in an ongoing I-125 versus Pd-103 trial for early-stage patients

  13. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  14. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamer Refaat

    2011-06-12

    Jun 12, 2011 ... local control and survival of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy .... distance of 100 cm and a minimum source-to-skin distance of ... and tailored to the position of the intra-cavitary system. A Par-.

  15. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Andres, U.; Mendez, G.

    2003-01-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137 Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  16. Preliminary estimation of minimum target dose in intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, Kiyoshi; Oishi-Tanaka, Yumiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2001-08-01

    In intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) for cervical cancer, minimum target dose (D{sub min}) will pertain to local disease control more directly than will reference point A dose (D{sub A}). However, ICRT has been performed traditionally without specifying D{sub min} since the target volume was not identified. We have estimated D{sub min} retrospectively by identifying tumors using magnetic resonance (MR) images. Pre- and posttreatment MR images of 31 patients treated with high-dose-rate ICRT were used. ICRT was performed once weekly at 6.0 Gy D{sub A}, and involved 2-5 insertions for each patient, 119 insertions in total. D{sub min} was calculated arbitrarily simply at the point A level using the tumor width (W{sub A}) to compare with D{sub A}. W{sub A} at each insertion was estimated by regression analysis with pre- and posttreatment W{sub A}. D{sub min} for each insertion varied from 3.0 to 46.0 Gy, a 16-fold difference. The ratio of total D{sub min} to total D{sub A} for each patient varied from 0.5 to 6.5. Intrapatient D{sub min} difference between the initial insertion and final insertion varied from 1.1 to 3.4. Preliminary estimation revealed that D{sub min} varies widely under generic dose prescription. Thorough D{sub min} specification will be realized when ICRT-applicator insertion is performed under MR imaging. (author)

  17. A consideration of distributions and treatment schedules in high dose rate intracavitary therapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Suoh; Sato, Sigehiro; Nakano, Masao; Iida, Koyo; Yui, Nobuharu

    1979-01-01

    A remotely controlled afterloading device for high dose rate intracavitary radiation, the remote afterloader Shimadzu Ralstron MTSW-20, was installed at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital in 1973 and put into clinical use for the treatment of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Before the clinical use, isodose distributions and treatment schedules were investigated, compared with the low dose rate intracavitary radiation by linear sources of 137 Cs used hitherto. The isodose distributions, calculated by using an electronic computer, for various combinations of the length of uterine canal and the separation of vaginal applicators, were the same as those obtained with linear sources. As for the treatment schedules, by using PT (partial tolerance) which was derived from NSD concept of Ellis, a number of fractional radiation regimes with high dose rate, equivalent to continuous low dose rate radiation, was calculated. From these, a dose of 600 rad per fraction to point A every week has been chosen as the standard radiation schedule. The number of fractions has been varied with the clinical stages. Furthermore, some changes of total dose or small modification of dose distribution have been made for individual lesions. According to the preliminary results, three-year cumulative survival rate was 68.7% and complication rate was 15.2%. Comparing these results with those of the treatment at low dose rate, the former is nearly equal, while the latter is lower. The reduction of complication rate is probably due to the improvement of therapeutic techniques such as continuous observation by fractionated intracavitary radiation, variety of isodose distributions and accuracy of source placement by a short treatment time. (author)

  18. High dose rate brachytherapy for superficial cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, Philippe; D'Hombres, Anne; Truc, Gilles; Barillot, Isabelle; Michiels, Christophe; Bedenne, Laurent; Horiot, Jean Claude

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with external radiotherapy, combined modality treatment, or HDR brachytherapy alone to limited esophageal cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1996, 25 patients with limited superficial esophagus carcinomas were treated by high dose rate brachytherapy. The mean age was 63 years (43-86 years). Five patients showed superficial local recurrence after external radiotherapy. Eleven patients without invasion of the basal membrane were staged as Tis. Fourteen patients with tumors involving the submucosa without spreading to the muscle were staged as T1. Treatment consisted of HDR brachytherapy alone in 13 patients, external radiotherapy and brachytherapy in 8 cases, and concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy in 4 cases. External beam radiation was administered to a total dose of 50 Gy using 2 Gy daily fractions in 5 weeks. In cases of HDR brachytherapy alone (13 patients), 6 applications were performed once a week. Results: The mean follow-up is 31 months (range 24-96 months). Twelve patients received 2 applications and 13 patients received 6 applications. Twelve patients experienced a failure (48%), 11/12 located in the esophagus, all of them in the treated volume. One patient presented an isolated distant metastasis. In the patients treated for superficial recurrence, 4/5 were locally controlled (80%) by brachytherapy alone. After brachytherapy alone, 8/13 patients were controlled (61%). The mean disease-free survival is 14 months (1-36 months). Overall survival is 76% at 1 year, 37% at 2 years, and 14% at 3 years. Overall survival for Tis patients is 24% vs. 20% for T1 (p 0.83). Overall survival for patients treated by HDR brachytherapy alone is 43%. One patient presented with a fistula with local failure after external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Four stenosis were registered, two were diagnosed on barium swallowing without symptoms, and two required dilatations. Conclusion: High dose rate brachytherapy permits the treating

  19. High-dose-rate afterloading brachytherapy in carcinoma of the cervix: an experience of 1992 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorvidhaya, Vicharn; Tonusin, Anun; Changwiwit, Witit; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Srisomboon, Jatupol; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chawapun, Nisa; Sukthomya, Vimol

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of radiation therapy in carcinoma of the cervix treated by external irradiation and high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 2063 patients with histologically proven carcinoma of the cervix treated by external irradiation and HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between March 1985-December 1991. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival and disease-free survival analysis. Late complications in the bowel and bladder were calculated actuarially. Results: There were 71 patients who did not complete the course of irradiation so only 1992 patients were retrospectively analyzed for survival. There were 2 patients (0.1%) in Stage IA, 211 (10.2%) Stage IB, 225 (10.9%) in Stage IIA, 902 (43.7%) in Stage IIB, 14 (0.7%) in Stage IIIA, 675 (32.7%) in Stage IIIB, 16 (0.8%) in Stage IVA, and 16 (0.8%) in Stage IVB. The median follow-up time was 96 months. The actuarial 5-year disease-free survival rate was 79.5%, 70.0%, 59.4%, 46.1%, 32.3%, 7.8%, and 23.1% for Stage IB, IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVA, and IVB respectively. The actuarial 5-year disease-free survival rate for Stage IB 1 and IB 2 squamous cell carcinoma was 88.7% and 67.0%. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was 86.3%, 81.1%, 73.0%, 50.3%, 47.8%, 7.8%, and 30.8% for Stage IB, IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVA, and IVB respectively. Pattern of failure revealed 20.8% local recurrence, 18.7% distant metastases, and 4% in both. The late complication rate Grade 3 and 4 (RTOG) for bowel and bladder combined was 7.0% with 1.9% Grade 4. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy used in this series produced pelvic control and survival rates comparable to other LDR series

  20. Use of Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lieu of Intracavitary Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Inoperable Endometrial Neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmerer, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hernandez, Enrique; Ferriss, James S. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Valakh, Vladimir; Miyamoto, Curtis; Li, Shidong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Micaily, Bizhan, E-mail: bizhan.micaily@tuhs.temple.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of patients with invasive endometrial neoplasia who were treated with external beam radiation therapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost because of the inability to undergo surgery or brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 11 women with stage I-III endometrial cancer with a median age of 78 years that were not candidates for hysterectomy or intracavitary brachytherapy secondary to comorbidities (91%) or refusal (9%). Eight patients were American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I (3 stage IA, 5 stage IB), and 3 patients were AJCC stage III. Patients were treated to a median of 4500 cGy at 180 cGy per fraction followed by SBRT boost (600 cGy per fraction Multiplication-Sign 5). Results: The most common side effect was acute grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity in 73% of patients, with no late toxicities observed. With a median follow-up of 10 months since SBRT, 5 patients (45%) experienced locoregional disease progression, with 3 patients (27%) succumbing to their malignancy. At 12 and 18 months from SBRT, the overall freedom from progression was 68% and 41%, respectively. Overall freedom from progression (FFP) was 100% for all patients with AJCC stage IA endometrial carcinoma, whereas it was 33% for stage IB at 18 months. The overall FFP was 100% for International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology grade 1 disease. The estimated overall survival was 57% at 18 months from diagnosis. Conclusion: In this study, SBRT boost to the intact uterus was feasible, with encouragingly low rates of acute and late toxicity, and favorable disease control in patients with early-stage disease. Additional studies are needed to provide better insight into the best management of these clinically challenging cases.

  1. Mid-dose rate intracavitary therapy for uterine cervix cancer with a Selectron; An early experience of Osaka University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Takehiro; Sasaki, Shigeru; Ohtani, Masatoshi; Kozuka, Takahiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Hideya (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Murayama, Shigeyuki

    1993-05-01

    From May 1991 through September 1992, a total of 17 previously untreated patients with invasive uterine cervix cancer and with intact uterus were treated with mid-dose rate intracavitary therapy administered with a Selectron. Early primary tumor responses for all patients were complete. No acute or subacute radiation injury was observed except one patient with aplastic anemia who developed rectal ulcer. Two patients of Stage IIIb died from tumor because of local, paraaortic lymph node and distant metastases. Our early experience concluded that Selectron MDR can be used for cervix cancer patients as safely and effectively as our previously used high-dose rate machine. (author).

  2. Quality control of 192Ir high dose rate after loading brachytherapy dose veracity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhongsu; Xu Xiao; Liu Fen

    2008-01-01

    Recently, 192 Ir high dose rate (HDR) afterloading are widely used in brachytherapy. The advantage of using HDR systems over low dose rate systems are shorter treatment time and higher fraction dose. To guarantee the veracity of the delivery dose, several quality control methods are deseribed in this work. With these we can improve the position precision, time precision and dose precision of the brachytherapy. (authors)

  3. Carcinoma of Uterine Cervix Treated with High Dose Rate Intracavitary Irradiation : 1. Patterns of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Bae; Choi, Tae Jin; Kim, Jin Hee

    1993-01-01

    226 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with curative radiation therapy at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Dongsan hospital, Keimyung university, School of medicine, from July, 1988 to May, 1991 were evaluated. The patients with all stages of the disease were included in this study. The maximum and mean follow up durations were 60 and 43 months. The radiation therapy consisted of external irradiation to the whole pelvis (2700 - 4500 cGy) and boost parametrial doses(for a total of 4500 - 6300 cGy) with midline shill(4x10 cm), and combined with intracavitary irradiation irradiation(5700 - 7500 cGy to point A). The distribution of patients according to the stage was as follows: stage IB 37(16.4%), stage IIA 91 (40.3%), Stage IIB 58(25.7%), stage III 32(13.8%), stage IV 8 (3.5%). The overall failure rate was 23.9%(54 patients). The failure rate increased as a function of stage from 13.5% in stage 1B to 15.4% in stage IIA, 25.9% in stage IIB, 46.9% in stage III, and 62.5% in stage IV. The pelvic failure alone were 32 patients and 11 patients were as a components of other failure, and remaining 11 patients had distant metastasis only. Among the 43 patients of locoregional failure, 28 patients were not controlled initially and in other words nearly half of total failures were due to residual tumor. The mean medial paracervical(point A) doses were 6700 cGy in stage IIB, 7200 cGy in stage IIA, 7450 cGy in stage IIB, 7600 cGy in stage III and 8100 cGy in stage IV. The medial paracevical doses showed some correlation with tumor control rate in early stage of disease (stage Ib, IIA), but there were higher central failure rate in advanced stage in spite of higher paracervical doses. In advanced stage, failure were not reduced by simple Increment of paracervical doses. To improve a locoregional control rate in advanced stages, it is necessary to give additional treatment such as concomitant chemoradiation

  4. Intracavitary dosimetry: a comparison of MGHR prescription to doses at points A and B in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, D.E.; Stryker, J.A.; Velkley, D.E.; Chung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This study, involving 77 patients with carcinoma of the cervix, compares the doses at points A and B with the milligram-hour (mg-h) prescription for the intracavitary use of the Fletcher-Suit after loading applicators. The doses at points A and B were computer calculated. A linear least-square regression analysis was used to compare the two sets of data. Correlation coefficients between doses at points A and B and the mg-h prescription are 0.84 (p < 0.001) and 0.88 (p < 0.001) respectively. The slope of the point A line is 0.78 and the slope of the point B line is 0.24. Therefore, for purposes of a nominal comparison, the dose at point A is approximately 3/4 the mg-h prescription; the dose at point B is approximately 1/4 the mg-h prescription. The limitations and significance of the comparison of the two approaches to intracavitary dosimetry is discussed

  5. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author) [pt

  6. Implementation of microsource high dose rate (mHDR) brachytherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    Brachytherapy using remote afterloading of a single high dose rate 192 Ir microsource was developed in the 1970s. After its introduction to clinics, this system has spread rapidly among developed Member States and has become a highly desirable modality in cancer treatment. This technique is now gradually being introduced to the developing Member States. The 192 Ir sources are produced with a high specific activity. This results in a high dose rate (HDR) to the tumour and shorter treatment times. The high specific activity simultaneously results in a much smaller source (so-called micro source, around I mm in diameter) which may be easily inserted into tissue through a thin delivery tube, the so-called interstitial treatment, as well as easily inserted into body cavities, the so-called intracavitary or endoluminal treatment. Another advantage is the ability to change dwell time (the time a source remains in one position) of the stepping source which allows dose distribution to match the target volume more closely. The purpose of this TECDOC is to advise radiation oncologists, medical physicists and hospital administrators in hospitals which are planning to introduce 192 Ir microsource HDR (mHDR) remote afterloading systems. The document supplements IAEA-TECDOC-1040, Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, and will facilitate implementation of this new brachytherapy technology, especially in developing countries. The operation of the system, 'how to use the system', is not within the scope of this document. This TECDOC is based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting held in Vienna in April 1999

  7. A comparison of mghr prescription to doses at points A and B in intracavitary radiotherapy of cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.I.; Ha, S.W.; Kang, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    The 42 patients with carcinoma of the cervix, performed intracavitary radiotherapy, were analysed the doses at points A and B comparing to the mghr prescription. The doses at points A and B were calculated by PC-12 computer planning system. Correlation coefficiency between doses at points A and B and the mghr prescription are 0.82 (p<0.001) and 0.90 (p<0.001) respectively. The slope of the point A line is 0.70 and the slope of the point B is 0.21. Therefore, the dose at point A is approximately 3/4 the mghr prescription and the dose at point B is approximately 1/4 the mghr prescription. (author)

  8. Volume correction factor in time dose relationships in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, S.J.; Sasane, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Paterson's clinical data about the maximum tolerance doses for various volumes of interstitial implants with Ra-226 delivered in seven days was made use of in deriving volume correction factors for TDF and CRE concepts respectively for brachytherapy. The derived volume correction factors for TDF and for CRE differ fromthe one assumed for CRE by Kirk et al. and implied for TDF by Goitein. A normalising volume of 70 cc has been suggested for both CRE and TDF concepts for brachytherapy. A table showing the volume corrected TDF is presented for various volumes and dose rates for continuous irradiation. The use of this table is illustrated with examples. (orig.) [de

  9. Australian high-dose-rate brachytherapy protocols for gynaecological malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, C.; Dally, M.; Stevens, M.; Thornton, D.; Carruthers, S.; Jeal, P.

    2001-01-01

    There is no consensus over the optimal dose fractionation schedules for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used for gynaecological malignancy. In Australian public hospital departments of radiation oncology, HDR brachytherapy for gynaecological cancer is being more commonly used. A survey of public departments that are using this technology, or that plan to introduce this technology, was performed. Their current protocols are presented. In general, protocols are similar biologically; however, the practical aspects such as the number of fractions given do vary and may reflect resource restrictions or, alternatively, differences in interpretations of the literature and of the best protocols by clinicians. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. High versus low-dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Sonali S; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Ananth, Cande V; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003-2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (Puse of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High dose rate brachytherapy for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homs, Marjolein Y.V.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M.H.; Coen, Veronique L.M.A.; Haringsma, Jelle; Blankenstein, Mark van; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a commonly used palliative treatment for esophageal carcinoma. We evaluated the outcome of HDR brachytherapy in patients with malignant dysphagia. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis over a 10-year period was performed of 149 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy, administered in one or two sessions, at a median dose of 15 Gy. Patients were evaluated for functional outcome, complications, recurrent dysphagia, and survival. Results: At 6 weeks after HDR brachytherapy, dysphagia scores had improved from a median of 3 to 2 (n=104; P<0.001), however, dysphagia had not improved in 51 (49%) patients. Procedure-related complications occurred in seven (5%) patients. Late complications, including fistula formation or bleeding, occurred in 11 (7%) patients. Twelve (8%) patients experienced minor retrosternal pain. Median survival of the patients was 160 days with a 1-year survival rate of 15%. Procedure-related mortality was 2%. At follow-up, 55 (37%) patients experienced recurrent dysphagia. In 34 (23%) patients a metal stent was placed to relieve persistent or recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy is a moderately effective treatment for the palliation of malignant dysphagia. The incidence of early major complications is low, however, persistent and recurrent dysphagia occur frequently, and require often additional treatment

  12. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L.

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 192 Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for lung, 0.9x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for oesophagus and 0.48x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for colon, 7.8x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for stomach and 1.7x10 -2 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 , whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq -1 .min -1 ; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  13. Low dose rate and high dose rate intracavitary treatment for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    From 1984 through 1993, 144 previous untreated patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix were treated with either low dose rate 137 Cs therapy (LDR) or high dose rate 60 Co therapy (HDR). The local failure rates for more than 2-years for the primary lesions were 11.8% (8 of 63 patients) for LDR and 18.0% (11 of 61 patients). Rectal complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (14.3% VS. 32.8%. p<0.01). Also, bladder complication rates were significantly lower for HDR versus LDR (0% VS. 10.4%, p<0.005). Treatment results in term of local control were equivalent for HDR and LDR treatment. However, the incidence of complications was higher for the LDR group than for the HDR group. (author)

  14. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  15. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  16. The prediction of late rectal complications in patients treated with high dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Brenda G.; Souhami, Luis; Roman, Ted N.; Chappell, Rick; Evans, Michael D.C.; Fowler, Jack F.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate an unusually high rate of late rectal complications in a group of 43 patients treated with concomitant irradiation and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix between December 1988 and April 1991, with a view to identifying predictive factors. Methods and Materials: The biologically effective dose received by each patient to the rectal reference point defined by the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements, Report 38, were calculated. Radiotherapy consisted of 46 Gy external beam irradiation plus three high dose-rate intracavitary treatments of 10 Gy each prescribed to point A. Cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 was given weekly throughout the duration of the irradiation. The results have been compared to data from 119 patients treated with irradiation alone to assess the confounding effect of the cisplatin. Results: The relationship between the biologically effective dose delivered to the rectal reference point and the development of late complications shows a strong dose-response with a threshold for complications occurring at approximately 125 Gy 3 corresponding to a brachytherapy dose of approximately 8 Gy per fraction. This value is approximately the same biologically effective dose threshold as that found for external beam irradiation in the head and neck region. The data from the group of patients treated without cisplatin is comparable to the data from the first group of patients in the lower dose ranges; the higher doses were not used and thus are not available for comparison. Conclusion: Using the linear quadratic model applied to our clinical results, we have established a threshold for late rectal complications for patients treated with external beam irradiation and high dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix. This threshold is consistent with similar data for external beam irradiation in the head and neck region

  17. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  18. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  19. High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for primary or recurrent cancer in the vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beriwal, Sushil; Heron, Dwight E; Mogus, Robert; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Sukumvanich, Paniti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of HDR brachytherapy for primary or recurrent vaginal cancer. Between the years 2000 to 2006, 18 patients with primary or recurrent vaginal cancer were treated with brachytherapy (HDRB). Six patients had primary vaginal cancer (stage II to IVA) while 12 were treated for isolated vaginal recurrence (primary cervix = 4, vulva = 1 and endometrium = 7). Five patients had previous pelvic radiation therapy. All except one patient received external beam radiation therapy to a median dose of 45 Gy (range 31.2–55.8 Gy). The HDRB was intracavitary using a vaginal cylinder in 5 patients and interstitial using a modified Syed-Nesblett template in 13 patients. The dose of interstitial brachytherapy was 18.75 Gy in 5 fractions delivered twice daily. The median follow-up was 18 months (range 6–66 months). Complete response (CR) was achieved in all but one patient (94%). Of these 17 patients achieving a CR, 1 had local recurrence and 3 had systemic recurrence at a median time of 6 months (range 6–22 months). The 2-year actuarial local control and cause-specific survival for the entire group were 88% and 82.5%, respectively. In subset analysis, the crude local control was 100% for primary vaginal cancer, 100% for the group with recurrence without any prior radiation and 67% for group with recurrence and prior radiation therapy. Two patients had late grade 3 or higher morbidity (rectovaginal fistula in one patient and chronic vaginal ulcer resulting in bleeding in one patient). Both these patients had prior radiation therapy. Our small series suggests that HDRB is efficacious for primary or recurrent vaginal cancer. Patients treated with primary disease and those with recurrent disease without prior irradiation have the greatest benefit from HDRB in this setting. The salvage rate for patients with prior radiation therapy is lower with a higher risk of significant complications. Additional patients and follow-up are ongoing

  20. Intravascular ultrasound based dose assessment in endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Gianpiero; Tamburini, Vittorio; Colombo, Antonio; Nishida, Takahiro; Parisi, Giovanni; Mazzetta, Chiara; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background: the role of endovascular brachytherapy in restenosis prevention is well documented. Dose is usually prescribed at a fixed distance from the source axis by angiographic quantification of vessel diameter. Recently, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was introduced in dose prescription, allowing a better evaluation of the vessel anatomy. This study retrospectively explores the difference between prescription following angiographic vessel sizing and delivered dose calculated with IVUS. Methods and results: Seventeen lesions were studied with IVUS, identifying on irradiated segment, three sections on which measuring minimal and maximal distance from the centre of IVUS catheter to the adventitia; using dedicated software, corresponding doses were calculated. The dose ranged widely, with maximal and minimal values of 71.6 and 4.9 Gy; furthermore, heterogeneity in dose among different sections was observed. In the central section, the maximal dose was 206% of the one prescribed with the QCA model at 2 mm from the source axis, while the minimal dose was 96%. In proximal and distal sections, respective values were 182, 45, 243, and 122%. Conclusions: Our analysis confirmed the dose inhomogeneity delivered with an angiographic fixed-dose prescription strategy. A dose variation was found along the irradiated segment due to the differences in vessel thickness. IVUS emerged as an important tool in endovascular brachytherapy, especially for irregular-shaped vessels

  1. High dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: risk factors for late rectal complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun; Aruga, Moriyo; Kotaka, Kikuo; Fujimoto, Hajime; Minoura, Shigeki

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the incidence of late rectal complications in patients treated with high dose rate brachytherapy for FIGO stage IIB, IIIB carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and to evaluate the treatment factors associated with an increased probability of treatment complications. Materials and Methods: Records of 100 patients with FIGO IIB or IIIB cervical carcinoma treated with definitive irradiation using high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICR) between 1977 and 1994 were retrospectively reviewed. For each HDR-ICR session, 6 Gy isodose volume was reconstructed three dimensionally and the following three parameters were determined to represent this isodose volume, length (L); maximum longitudinal distance of 6 Gy isodose area in an oblique frontal plane containing the intrauterine applicator, width (W); maximum width of 6 Gy isodose area in the same plane, height (H); maximum dimension of 6 Gy isodose area perpendicular to the intrauterine applicator determined in the oblique sagittal plane. Point P/Q (2 cm ventral/dorsal from the proximal retention point of the intrauterine source) and point R/S (2 cm ventral/dorsal from the midpoint of the ovoid sources) were also defined retrospectively and HDR-ICR dose at these points were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the treatment factors predictive of late rectal complications. Results: The 5-year cumulative cause-specific disease-free survival rate was 50% for all, 74% for Stage IIB, and 38% for Stage IIIB, with a significant difference between two FIGO Stages (p=0.0004). Of patients treated for both stages, 30% and 36% had experienced moderate to severe (Grade 2-4) complications at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Average H value (p=0.013) and cumulative point S dose by HDR-ICR (p=0.020) were significantly correlated with the incidence of late rectal complications (Student's t-test), whereas these factors did not significantly affect the probability of pelvic control. No

  2. Routine quality control of high dose rate brachytherapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Calcina, Carmen S.; Almeida, Adelaide de; Rocha, Jose R. Oliveira

    2001-01-01

    A Quality Assurance program should be installed also for High Dose Rate brachytherapy, in the order to achieve a correct dose administration to the patient and for the safety to those involved directly with the treatment. The work presented here has the following purposes: Analyze the types of equipment tests presented by the official protocols (TG40, TG56 e ARCAL XXX), evaluate the brachytherapy routine tests of protocols from various national and international radiotherapy services and compare the latter with those presented in the official protocols. As a result, we conclude the following: TG56 presents a higher number of tests when compared to the other official protocols and most of the tests presented by the analyzed services are present in TG56. A suggestion for a basic protocol is presented, emphasizing the periodicity and tolerance level of each of the tests. (author)

  3. Dose calculation and isodose curves determination in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranhao, Frederico B.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Khoury, Helen J.

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of cancer treatment in which small radioactive sources are placed inside of, or close to small tumors, in order to cause tissue necrosis and, consequently, to interrupt the tumor growth process. A very important aspect to the planning of this therapy is the calculation of dose distributions in the tumor and nearby tissues, to avoid the unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissue. The objective of this work is to develop a computer program that will permit treatment planning for brachytherapy at low dose rates, minimizing the possible errors introduced when such calculations are done manually. Results obtained showed good agreement with those from programs such as BRA, which is widely used in medical practice. (author)

  4. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  6. Packing effects on the intracavitary radiation therapy of the uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jung Kun; Lee, Du Hyun; Si, Chang Kun; Choi, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Tae Yoon

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of the radio-therapy is maximize the radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the dose to the critical organ. Carcinoma of the uterine cervix treatment are external irradiation or an interstitial brachytherapy make use of isotope. Brachytherapy is a method of radiotherapy in advantage to achieve better local control with minimum radiation toxicity in comparison with external irradiation because radiation dose is distributed according to the inverse square low of gamma-ray emitted from the implanted sources. Authors make use of the patients data which 192 Ir gives medical treatment intracavity. Intracavitary radiation of the uterine cervix cancer, critical organ take 20% below than exposure dose of A point in the ICRU report. None the less of the advice, Radiation proctitis and radiation cystitis are frequent and problematic early complications in patients treated with radiation for the uterine cervix cancer. In brachytherapy of uterine cervical cancer using a high dose rate remote afterloading system, it is of prime importance to deliver a accurate dose in each fractionated treatment by minimizing the difference between the pre-treatment planned and post-treatment calculated doses. Use of packing to reduce late complications intracavitary radiation of the uterine cervix cancer. Bladder and rectum changes exposure dose rate by radiotherapy make use of packing.

  7. High-dose-rate afterloading intracavitary irradiation and expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis for malignant biliary obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Ohishi, Hajime; Yoshioka, Tetsuya [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan); and others

    1989-04-01

    A double lumen catheter was developed as an applicator for the remote afterloading system (RALS) of {sup 60}Co for the intracavitary irradiation of an obstructed common bile duct due to gallbladder cancer in 1 case and by cholangiocarcinoma in 7 cases. This was followed by the biliary endoprosthesis with expandable metallic stents to maintain patency. The mean survival period after treatment was not long (14 weeks). However, removal of the external drainage tube was possible in 7 of the 8 cases, and none of the 8 cases showed dislodgement or deformity of the stent, or obstruction of the bile duct in the stent-inserted area. This combination effectively provided palliation, and has considerable potential for malignant biliary obstruction. (author).

  8. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.V.; Hermoso, T.M.; Solis, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  9. Audits in high dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.; Rosa, L.A.; Velasco, A.; Paiva, E. de; Goncalves, M.; Castelo, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    The lack of well established dosimetry protocols for HDR sources is a point of great concern regarding the uniformity of procedures within a particular country. The main objective of this paper is to report the results of an implementation of the audit program in dosimetry of high dose rate brachytherapy sources used by the radiation therapy centers in Brazil. In Brazil, among 169 radiotherapy centers, 35 have HDR brachytherapy systems. This program started in August 2001 and until now eight radiotherapy services were audited. The audit program consists of the visit in loco to each center and the evaluation of the intensity of the source with a well type chamber specially design for HDR 192 Ir sources. The measurements was carried out with a HDR1000PLUS Brachytherapy Well Type Chamber and a MAX 4000 Electrometer, both manufactured by Standard Imaging Inc. The chamber was calibrated in air kerma strength by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin in the USA. The same chamber was calibrated in Brazil using a 192 lr high dose rate source whose intensity was determined by 60 Co gamma rays and 250 kV x rays interpolation methodology. The Nk of 60 Co and 250 kV x rays were provided by the Brazilian National Standard Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LMNRI)

  10. Comparison of efficacy of meperidine and fentanyl in terms of pain management and quality of life in patients with cervical cancer receiving intracavitary brachytherapy: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanthong, Saengrawee; Rojthamarat, Sirikorn; Worasawate, Wipra; Vichitvejpaisal, Phongthara; Nantajit, Danupon; Ieumwananontachai, Nantakarn

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two sedative regimens, a benzodiazepine with either meperidine or fentanyl, in relieving pain in patients with cervical cancer undergoing intracavitary brachytherapy in terms of pain score and quality of life. Forty unselected outpatients undergoing brachytherapy (160 fractions) were enrolled with informed consent and randomized to receive a benzodiazepine with either meperidine or fentanyl. The perceived pain score according to a standard 10-item numeric rating scale was collected every 15 min during the procedure, and the perceived quality of life was determined at the end of each procedure using the EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire. The patients and medical staff members directly involved with the procedure were blinded to the medication used. The patients' pain levels were mild in both analgesic groups. Meperidine appeared to be slightly more effective than fentanyl, although the differences in the average pain score and quality of life were not statistically significant. Both meperidine and fentanyl in combination with benzodiazepine were effective in relieving pain and discomfort in patients undergoing brachytherapy. NCT02684942, ClinicalTrials.gov.

  11. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Brömme, Jens O.; Geretschläger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3–23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  12. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Bojaxhiu, Beat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center, Bern (Switzerland); Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  13. Physics and quality assurance for brachytherapy - Part I: High dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Lowell L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To review the physical aspects of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, including commissioning and quality assurance, source calibration and dose distribution measurements, and treatment planning methods. Following the introduction of afterloading in brachytherapy, development efforts to make it 'remote' culminated in 1964 with the near-simultaneous appearance of remote afterloaders in five major medical centers. Four of these machines were 'high dose rate', three employing 60Co and one (the GammaMed) using a single, cable-mounted 192Ir source. Stepping-motor source control was added to the GammaMed in 1974, making it the precursor of modern remote afterloaders, which are now suitable for interstitial, well as intracavitary brachytherapy by virtue of small source-diameter and indexer-accessed multiple channels. Because the 192Ir sources currently used in HDR remote afterloaders are supplied at a nominal air-kerma strength of 11.4 cGy cm2 s-1 (10 Ci), are not collimated in clinical use, and emit a significant fraction (15%) of photons at energies greater than 600 keV, shielding and facility design must be undertaken as carefully and thoroughly as for external beam installations. Licensing requirements of regulatory agencies must be met with respect both to maximum permissible dose limits and to the existence and functionality of safety devices (door interlocks, radiation monitors, etc.). Commissioning and quality assurance procedures that must be documented for HDR remote afterloading relate to (1) machine, applicator, guide-tube, and facility functionality checks, (2) source calibration, (3) emergency response readiness, (4) planning software evaluation, and (5) independent checks of clinical dose calculations. Source calibration checks must be performed locally, either by in-air measurement of air kerma strength or with a well ionization chamber calibrated (by an accredited standards laboratory) against an in-air measurement of air kerma strength for the

  14. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Aided High-Dose-Rate Image-Based Interstitial Brachytherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ). Results: The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D 2cc of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Conclusions: Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results.

  15. A dose-volume analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-aided high-dose-rate image-based interstitial brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD(2)). The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D(2cc) of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose no Brasil High-dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carlos Barros Esteves

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose foi introduzida em nosso meio em janeiro de 1991. Desde então, houve uma mudança significativa na abordagem das neoplasias malignas em relação às vantagens do novo método, e também resolução da demanda reprimida de braquiterapia para as neoplasias ginecológicas. Nos primeiros dez anos de atividade, o Brasil tratou, em 31 serviços, 26.436 pacientes com braquiterapia, sendo mais de 50% das pacientes portadoras de neoplasias do colo uterino. Este estudo mostra o número e o perfil de pacientes tratados com esse método e a sua distribuição no território nacional, deixando explícito o benefício da braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose para o Brasil.High-dose rate brachytherapy was first introduced in Brazil in January 1991. Significant changes in the management of malignant neoplasms were observed since utilization of high-dose rate brachytherapy. The high number of gynecological patients awaiting for brachytherapy also decreased during this period. In the first ten years 26,436 patients were treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy. More than 50% of these patients presented neoplasms of the uterine cervix. In this study we present the number and profile of the patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy as well as the distribution of these patients in the Brazilian territory, proving the benefit of the use of high-dose rate brachytherapy in Brazil.

  17. Determining profile of dose distribution for PD-103 brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkay, Camgoz; Mehmet, N. Kumru; Gultekin, Yegin

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Brachytherapy is a particular radiotherapy for cancer treatments. By destructing cancerous cells using radiation, the treatment proceeded. When alive tissues are subject it is hazardous to study experimental. For brachytherapy sources generally are studied as theoretical using computer simulation. General concept of the treatment is to locate the radioactive source into cancerous area of related tissue. In computer studies Monte Carlo mathematical method that is in principle based on random number generations, is used. Palladium radioisotope is LDR (Low radiation Dose Rate) source. Main radioactive material was coated with titanium cylinder with 3mm length, 0.25 mm radius. There are two parts of Pd-103 in the titanium cylinder. It is impossible to investigate differential effects come from two part as experimental. Because the source dimensions are small compared with measurement distances. So there is only simulation method. In dosimetric studies it is aimed to determine absorbed dose distribution in tissue as radial and angular. In nuclear physics it is obligation to use computer based methods for researchers. Radiation studies have hazards for scientist and people interacted with radiation. When hazard exceed over recommended limits or physical conditions are not suitable (long work time, non economical experiments, inadequate sensitivity of materials etc.) it is unavoidable to simulate works and experiments before practices of scientific methods in life. In medical area, usage of radiation is required computational work for cancer treatments. Some computational studies are routine in clinics and other studies have scientific development purposes. In brachytherapy studies there are significant differences between experimental measurements and theoretical (computer based) output data. Errors of data taken from experimental studies are larger than simulation values errors. In design of a new brachytherapy source it is important to consider detailed

  18. Intracavitary therapy of craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Fig, L. M.; Gross, M.D.; Ann Arbor Nuclear Medicine Service, Ann Arbor, MI

    1999-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are benign cystic para-hypophyseal tumors often associated with hypopituitarism and visual-field abnormalities. Their therapy by surgery and external beam radiotherapy is imperfect. The intracavitary instillation of beta-emitting colloid radiopharmaceuticals into the cysts permits the delivery of far higher radiation doses to the cyst lining than is possible by external beam radiotherapy. This technique permits destruction of the lining epithelium with resultant elimination of cyst fluid formation and cyst shrinkage in up to 80% of cases

  19. Clinical feasibility of combined intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer employing MRI with a tandem/ring applicator in situ and virtual preplanning of the interstitial component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokdal, Lars; Tanderup, Kari; Hokland, Steffen Bjerre; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Paludan, Merete; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility of virtually planned needles, changes in DVH parameters and clinical feasibility of combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) for locally advanced cervical cancer based on 3D MRI preplanning. Material and methods: Fifty-eight consecutively patients accrued in the EMBRACE study were included. Treatment was initiated with external beam radiotherapy and cisplatin. Three BT implants and MRI with the applicator in situ were performed in all patients, i.e. week 5 (BT0), week 6 (BT1) and week 7 (BT2) of the treatment. BT0 was only used for preplanning of subsequent implantations, whereas BT1 and BT2 comprised 2 equal sized fractions of PDR BT. Results: Based on BT0, 24 patients (41%) were selected for a combined IC/IS implant at BT1 and BT2. Patients treated with IC/IS BT had significantly larger tumours compared with patients treated with IC BT only (p < 0.03). Additional time in general anaesthesia for the IC/IS component was on average 16 min. The number of preplanned virtual needles was 5.3 ± 2.7 compared to 5.3 ± 2.9 and 5.4 ± 3.0 needles implanted at BT1 and BT2, respectively (p = 0.72). Planned needle implantation depth was 33 ± 15 mm compared to 30 ± 10 mm at BT1 and 29 ± 11 mm at BT2 (p = 0.04). In the 24 patients selected for IC/IS BT both the virtual IC/IS plan (BT0) and the actually delivered plan (BT1 + BT2) significantly increased D90 and D100 for HR CTV (p < 0.01) and reduced D2cc for sigmoid (p < 0.01) and bowel (p = 0.04) compared to the optimised IC preplan (BT0). IC/IS BT was only associated with minor morbidity, which was resolved at a 3-month follow up. Conclusion: Combined IC/IS BT based on full 3D MRI preplanning is clinically feasible. The virtual preplanned needle positions are reproducible at subsequent BT applications leading to significantly improved DVH parameters and a clinically feasible and fast implant procedure

  20. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  1. Study of positional dependence of dose to bladder, pelvic wall and rectal points in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talluri, Anil Kumar; Alluri, Krishnam Raju; Gudipudi, Deleep Kumar; Ahamed, Shabbir; Sresty, Madhusudhana M.; Reddy, Aparna Yarrama

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the variation in doses to, Bladder, pelvic wall and Rectal Points when a patient is simulated in Supine (S Position) and Lithotomy M shaped positions (LM Position), respectively as part of Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer patients. Patients (n = 19) were simulated and orthogonal images were taken in S Position and LM Positions on a physical simulator. Digital orthogonal X-ray images were transferred to Brachyvision Treatment Planning System via Dicom to generate treatment plans. Radio opaque dye of 7 ml was injected into the Foley bulb for identification and digitization of International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) Bladder point. Pelvic side wall points were marked in accordance with ICRU 38 recommendations. A Rectal tube containing dummy source marker wire was used to identify Rectal Point. Students' t-test was used to analyze the results. Doses in LM Position were lower and statistically significant when compared to S Position for ICRU Bladder Point, pelvic walls and Rectal Point. It was observed that movement of applicator could be the reason for the variations in doses between the two positions. Bladder, pelvic wall and rectal points systematically registered lower doses in LM Position as compared to S Position. (author)

  2. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125 I and 103 Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S K ) standard for 125 I seeds and has also established an S K standard for 103 Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (Λ) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of Λ and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of Λ. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that Λ may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S K and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for Λ was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of Λ as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated Λ for 125 I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192 Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within ±1%. For the 103 Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the ±7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for Λ proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known

  3. Manual method for dose calculation in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Biaggio, Maria F. de

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a manual method for dose calculation in brachytherapy of gynecological tumors, which allows the calculation of the doses at any plane or point of clinical interest. This method uses basic principles of vectorial algebra and the simulating orthogonal films taken from the patient with the applicators and dummy sources in place. The results obtained with method were compared with the values calculated with the values calculated with the treatment planning system model Theraplan and the agreement was better than 5% in most cases. The critical points associated with the final accuracy of the proposed method is related to the quality of the image and the appropriate selection of the magnification factors. This method is strongly recommended to the radiation oncology centers where are no treatment planning systems available and the dose calculations are manually done. (author)

  4. Intravascular brachytherapy: a model for the calculation of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, Rosana; Martin, Gabriela; Rivera, Elena; Cricco, Graciela; Cocca, Claudia; Gutierrez, Alicia; Nunez, Mariel; Bergoc, Rosa; Guzman, Luis; Belardi, Diego

    2002-01-01

    In this study we present the radiation dose distribution for a theoretical model with Montecarlo simulation, and based on an experimental model developed for the study of the prevention of restenosis post-angioplasty employing intravascular brachytherapy. In the experimental in vivo model, the atherosclerotic plaques were induced in femoral arteries of male New Zealand rabbits through surgical intervention and later administration of cholesterol enriched diet. For the intravascular irradiation we employed a 32P source contained within the balloon used for the angioplasty. The radiation dose distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B according to a segment of a simulated artery. We studied the radiation dose distribution in the axial and radial directions for different thickness of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results will be correlated with the biologic effects observed by means of histological analysis of the irradiated arteries (Au)

  5. Comparison of one and two low dose rate brachytherapy insertions in the treatment of stage IIB cervix cancer with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Faria, S.L.C.O.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare one and two intracavitary brachytherapy with low dose rate in the management of stage IIB cervix cancer through a prospective and randomized trial. Materials and Methods: From September 1989 to December 1992, 81 patients with stage IIB cervix cancer were randomized in two arms according to the number of intracavitary brachytherapy insertion to be realized. Of these, 34 were treated by two intracavitary insertions (group A) and 47 by one insertion (group B). The external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was realized through a Cobalt unit at whole pelvis with total dose of 40Gy in 20 fractions of 2,0Gy, in box arrangement, followed by parametrial complementation of 10Gy. The brachytherapy was realized right after the end of EBRT. The patients from group A were underwent to two insertions of 25Gy, calculated at point A, defined by the Manchester system. The interval between each insertions was 2 weeks. The patients from group B were underwent to one insertion of 40 Gy at point A. The average dose rate was 60cGy per hour at point A. Results: With the follow up ranging from 36 to 75 months and medium of 55 months, the disease free survival of the patients from group A was not statistically different of those from group B, 70,6% and 72,3% respectively (p=0,711). Local recurrence occurred in four patients from group A (11,7%) and in eight from group B (17%). Distant metastasis occurred in one patient from group A (2,9%) and in two from group B (4,2%). Three patients from group A (8,8%) and three from group B (6,4%) were lost to follow up and considered as dead. The causes of death among patients from group A were progression of local disease in four, distant metastasis in one, complicated diabetes mellitus in one and actinic intestinal complications in other one. The cause of deaths among patients from group B were progression of local disease in eight and distant metastasis in two. The grade I and II rectal complications rate was 5,9% and 6,3% at

  6. SU-F-19A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Novel CT/MR Compatible Fletcher Applicator for Intracavitary Brachytherapy of the Cervix Uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, K; Han, T; Mourtada, F; Eifel, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a Monte Carlo model and evaluate the dosimetric capabilities of a novel commercial CT/MR compatible Fletcher applicator for cervical cancer brachytherapy. Methods: MCNPX 2.7.0 was used to model the Fletcher CT/MR shielded applicator (FA) and 192Ir HDR source. Energy deposition was calculated with a track length estimator modified by an energy-dependent heating function. A high density polystyrene phantom was constructed with three film pockets for validation of the MCNPX model. Three planes of data were calculated with the MCNPX model corresponding to the three film planes in phantom. The planes were located 1 cm from the most anterior, posterior, and medial extents of the FA right ovoid. Unshielded distributions were calculated by modeling the shielded cells as air instead of the tungsten alloy. A third order polynomial fit to the OD to dose curve was used to convert OD of the three film planes to dose. Each film and MCNPX plane dose distribution was normalized to a point 2 cm from the center of the film plane and in a region of low dose gradient. MCNPX and film were overlaid and compared with a distance-to-agreement criterion of (±2%/±2mm). Shielded and unshielded distributions were overlaid and a percent shielded plot was created. Results: 85.2%, 97.1%, and 96.6% of the MCNPX points passed the (±2%/±2mm) criterion respectively for the anterior, lateral, and posterior film comparison planes. A majority of the points in the anterior plane that exceeded the DTA criterion were either along edges of where the film was cut or near the terminal edges of the film. The percent shielded matrices indicated that the maximum % shielding was 50%. Conclusion: These data confirm the validity of the FA Monte Carlo model. The FA ovoid can shield up to 50% of the dose in the anteroposterior direction

  7. SU-F-19A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Novel CT/MR Compatible Fletcher Applicator for Intracavitary Brachytherapy of the Cervix Uteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gifford, K; Han, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mourtada, F [Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE (United States); Eifel, P [The UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a Monte Carlo model and evaluate the dosimetric capabilities of a novel commercial CT/MR compatible Fletcher applicator for cervical cancer brachytherapy. Methods: MCNPX 2.7.0 was used to model the Fletcher CT/MR shielded applicator (FA) and 192Ir HDR source. Energy deposition was calculated with a track length estimator modified by an energy-dependent heating function. A high density polystyrene phantom was constructed with three film pockets for validation of the MCNPX model. Three planes of data were calculated with the MCNPX model corresponding to the three film planes in phantom. The planes were located 1 cm from the most anterior, posterior, and medial extents of the FA right ovoid. Unshielded distributions were calculated by modeling the shielded cells as air instead of the tungsten alloy. A third order polynomial fit to the OD to dose curve was used to convert OD of the three film planes to dose. Each film and MCNPX plane dose distribution was normalized to a point 2 cm from the center of the film plane and in a region of low dose gradient. MCNPX and film were overlaid and compared with a distance-to-agreement criterion of (±2%/±2mm). Shielded and unshielded distributions were overlaid and a percent shielded plot was created. Results: 85.2%, 97.1%, and 96.6% of the MCNPX points passed the (±2%/±2mm) criterion respectively for the anterior, lateral, and posterior film comparison planes. A majority of the points in the anterior plane that exceeded the DTA criterion were either along edges of where the film was cut or near the terminal edges of the film. The percent shielded matrices indicated that the maximum % shielding was 50%. Conclusion: These data confirm the validity of the FA Monte Carlo model. The FA ovoid can shield up to 50% of the dose in the anteroposterior direction.

  8. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new treatment option permitting dose distribution optimization in interstitial implants. It possesses the advantage of equipment simplification and radiation protection to the staff, compared to the manually afterloading technique. This study pre...

  9. High dose rate brachytherapy in treatment of high grade astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Alejo, R.; Delgado, J.M.; Cerro, E. del; Torres, J.J.; Martinez, R.

    1996-01-01

    From May 1994 to June 1995, 18 patients with high grade astrocytomas were entered prospectively on a selective protocol combining surgery, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic interstitial implantation with HDR Iridium 192 and chemotherapy. Only those patients with tumor size 100cc or less average dimension, high grade astrocytoma, Karnofsky 70 or greater, unilateral, circumscribed, unifocal, tumor stable or responding to external radiation and supratentorial were included in the study. Ages ranged from 16 to 69 years. There were 13 males and 5 females. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 3 patients, subtotal resection in 11, and gross total resection in 4 patients. Focal external beam radiation portals included the contrast enhancing mass on CT scan plus a 3 cm margin. The protocol called for minimum tumor dose of 60 Gy to be given in 2 Gy daily fractions. An interstitial brachytherapy boost was to be performed two weeks after the conclusion of external beam radiation. The dose was 30 Gy in 4 fractions. The authors analyze on basis on their personal experience, the possibilities and the limits offered by this therapeutic procedure in neuro-oncology. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically possible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to be effective and may provide for an increase in tumor control in selected cases

  10. Controversies in external beam and high dose rate brachytherapy of oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, R.K.; Levin, V.C.; Malas, Simon; Donde, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Various controversies in the treatment of oesophageal carcinoma with external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate intracavitary irradiation have been reviewed. Conflicting results from different parts of the world has made it difficult to optimize the radiation dose that may give the best results. More studies and longer follow-up are needed before a definite conclusion can be made on the optimization of dose. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs

  11. An analysis of acute complications and perioperative morbidity from high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute morbidity and mortality for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy performed in an outpatient setting in the treatment of gynecological malignancies, and to identify possible risk factors for adverse outcomes. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients with cervical (n=129) or uterine (n=42) carcinoma with an intact uterus were evaluated and treated from August 1989 through December 1994, with at least part of their therapy delivered with intracavitary HDR 192 Ir radiation. A total of 830 ICR insertions were performed with greater than 95% done on an outpatient basis under heavy intravenous sedation using fentanyl and midazolam. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were recorded for any event occurring within 30 days of the completion of therapy. Anesthesia risk was evaluated retrospectively in all patients based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) Physical Class System. Results: The uterine patients, many treated with radiation alone because of morbid obesity or medical inoperability, had a significantly higher perioperative morbidity and mortality rate as compared to the cervix patient cohort. Thirteen of the 42 (31%) uterine patients and 8 of the 129 (6%) cervix patients required hospitalization within 30 days of treatment completion (p 2) experienced greater morbidity and mortality, while the best predictor of complications in the cervix patients was age greater than 70 years. For the entire cohort of patients, no correlation was found between the 30 day morbidity and mortality and the doses of fentanyl and midazolam used or the length of the procedure. Conclusions: The acute complication rate from HDR brachytherapy performed on an outpatient basis with heavy intravenous sedation is acceptable for the great majority of patients who present for treatment. However, the high morbidity and mortality experienced by certain patient cohorts suggests that careful assessment of the risk/benefit ratio for treatment

  12. Rectal dose assessment in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jetro Pereira de; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Bardella, Lucia Helena; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at developing a thermoluminescent dosimetric system capable of assessing the doses delivered to the rectum of patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. Materials and methods: LiF:Mg,Ti,Na powder was the thermoluminescent material utilized for evaluating the rectal dose. The powder was divided into small portions (34 mg) which were accommodated in a capillary tube. This tube was placed into a rectal probe that was introduced into the patient's rectum. Results: The doses delivered to the rectum of six patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer evaluated by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters presented a good agreement with the planned values based on two orthogonal (anteroposterior and lateral) radiographic images of the patients. Conclusion: The thermoluminescent dosimetric system developed in the present study is simple and easy to be utilized as compared to other rectal dosimetry methods. The system has shown to be effective in the evaluation of rectal doses in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. (author)

  13. Phantom's construction for dose measurement in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Harjanto; Hidayat Joko Puspito; Joko Triyanto

    2009-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, dose rate validation is the key for a successful process in therapy and diagnose of any deases. Therefore, the brachytherapy equipment being designed and constructed is to be validated its dose rate received by the radiated object. A phantom for such validation purpose is designed and constructed as a correct as if on site geometrical position of sources. The design of phantom consists of seven layers of flexi glass plates: 10 mm thick, 105 mm wide, and 280 mm length. All the plates are to be holed according to the size of the applicator to be used. Every surface of the flexi glass layers is grooved 1 mm wide, 1 mm depth, and 10 mm distance between the groove. The applicator inside the phantom is positioned at a certain reference for measurement. Every TLD installed has a fix position toward the reference coordinate and has an index number. By this system of phantom, the isodose system can be plotted. (author)

  14. High and low dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    For the brachytherapy component of the r[iation treatment of cervical carcinoma, high dose rate (HDR) is slowly replacing conventional low dose rate (LDR) due primarily to r[iation safety and other physical benefits attributed to the HDR modality. Many r[iation oncologists are reluctant to make this change because of perceived r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR. However, in clinical practice HDR appears to be as effective as LDR but with a lower risk of late complications, as demonstrated by one randomized clinical trial and two comprehensive literature and practice surveys. The reason for this appears to be that the r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR are outweighed by the physical [vantages. (orig.)

  15. Role of vaginal pallor reaction in predicting late vaginal stenosis after high-dose-rate brachytherapy in treatment-naive patients with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Nakamura, Satoaki; Masui, Koji; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Akiyama, Hironori; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Uesugi, Yasuo; Shimbo, Taiju; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    To assess actual rates of late vaginal stenosis and identify predisposing factors for complications among patients with previously untreated cervical cancer following high-dose-rate brachytherapy. We performed longitudinal analyses of 57 patients using the modified Dische score at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 60 months after treatment, which consisted of 15 interstitial brachytherapys and 42 conventional intracavitary brachytherapys, with a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 6 to 144 months). More than half of the patients developed grade 1 (mild) vaginal stenosis within the first year of follow-up, and grade 2 (97.5%, moderate) to grade 3 (severe) stenosis gradually increased with time. Actual stenosis rates for grade 1, 2, and 3 were 97.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.7 to 97.5), 60.7% (95% CI, 42.2 to 79.3), and 7.4% (95% CI, 0 to 18.4) at 3 years after treatment. Pallor reaction grade 2-3 at 6 months was only a statistically significant predisposing factor for grade 2-3 late vaginal stenosis 3 years or later with a hazard ratio of 3.48 (95% CI, 1.32 to 9.19; p=0.018) by a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Patients with grade 0-1 pallor reaction at 6 months showed a grade ≥2 vaginal stenosis rate of 53%, whereas the grade 2-3 pallor reaction group achieved a grade ≥2 vaginal stenosis rate at 3 years at 100% (p=0.001). High-dose-rate brachytherapy was associated with high incidence of late vaginal stenosis. Pallor reaction grade 2-3 at 6 months was predictive of late grade 2-3 vaginal stenosis at 3 years after treatment. These findings should prove helpful for patient counseling and preventive intervention.

  16. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  17. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Stephen M.

    The low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds employed in permanent radioactive-source implant treatments usually use one of two radionuclides, 125I or 103Pd. The theoretically expected source spectroscopic output from these sources can be obtained via Monte Carlo calculation based upon seed dimensions and materials as well as the bare-source photon emissions for that specific radionuclide. However the discrepancies resulting from inconsistent manufacturing of sources in comparison to each other within model groups and simplified Monte Carlo calculational geometries ultimately result in undesirably large uncertainties in the Monte Carlo calculated values. This dissertation describes experimentally attained spectroscopic outputs of the clinically used brachytherapy sources in air and in liquid water. Such knowledge can then be applied to characterize these sources by a more fundamental and metro logically-pure classification, that of energy-based dosimetry. The spectroscopic results contained within this dissertation can be utilized in the verification and benchmarking of Monte Carlo calculational models of these brachytherapy sources. This body of work was undertaken to establish a usable spectroscopy system and analysis methods for the meaningful study of LDR brachytherapy seeds. The development of a correction algorithm and the analysis of the resultant spectroscopic measurements are presented. The characterization of the spectrometer and the subsequent deconvolution of the measured spectrum to obtain the true spectrum free of any perturbations caused by the spectrometer itself is an important contribution of this work. The approach of spectroscopic deconvolution that was applied in this work is derived in detail and it is applied to the physical measurements. In addition, the spectroscopically based analogs to the LDR dosimetry parameters that are currently employed are detailed, as well as the development of the theory and measurement methods to arrive at these

  19. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Fernando Pereira de

    2006-01-01

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  20. A three-dimensional computed tomography-assisted Monte Carlo evaluation of ovoid shielding on the dose to the bladder and rectum in intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gifford, Kent A.; Horton, John L.; Pelloski, Christopher E.; Jhingran, Anuja; Court, Laurence E.; Mourtada, Firas; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of Fletcher Suit Delclos ovoid shielding on dose to the bladder and rectum during intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dose in 12 patients receiving low-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy with both shielded and unshielded ovoids. Cumulative dose-difference surface histograms were computed for the bladder and rectum. Doses to the 2-cm 3 and 5-cm 3 volumes of highest dose were computed for the bladder and rectum with and without shielding. Results: Shielding affected dose to the 2-cm 3 and 5-cm 3 volumes of highest dose for the rectum (10.1% and 11.1% differences, respectively). Shielding did not have a major impact on the dose to the 2-cm 3 and 5-cm 3 volumes of highest dose for the bladder. The average dose reduction to 5% of the surface area of the bladder was 53 cGy. Reductions as large as 150 cGy were observed to 5% of the surface area of the bladder. The average dose reduction to 5% of the surface area of the rectum was 195 cGy. Reductions as large as 405 cGy were observed to 5% of the surface area of the rectum. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the ovoid shields can greatly reduce the radiation dose delivered to the rectum. We did not find the same degree of effect on the dose to the bladder. To calculate the dose accurately, however, the ovoid shields must be included in the dose model

  1. Perioperative high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brygida Białas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was to present an original technique of catheter implantation for perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy in patients after palliative operations of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors and to estimate the influence of perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy on pain relief in terminal pancreatic cancer patients. Material and methods: Eight patients with pancreatic tumors located in the head of pancreas underwent palliative operations with the use of HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy. All patients qualified for surgery reported pain of high intensity and had received narcotic painkillers prior to operation. During the last phase of the surgery, the Nucletron® catheters were implanted in patients to prepare them for later perioperative brachytherapy. Since the 6th day after surgery HDR brachytherapy was performed. Before each brachytherapy fraction the location of implants were checked using fluoroscopy. A fractional dose was 5 Gy and a total dose was 20 Gy in the area of radiation. A comparative study of two groups of patients (with and without brachytherapy with stage III pancreatic cancer according to the TNM scale was taken in consideration. Results and Conclusions: The authors claim that the modification of catheter implantation using specially designed cannula, facilitates the process of inserting the catheter into the tumor, shortens the time needed for the procedure, and reduces the risk of complications. Mean survival time was 5.7 months. In the group of performed brachytherapy, the mean survival time was 6.7 months, while in the group of no brachytherapy performed – 4.4 months. In the group of brachytherapy, only one patient increased the dose of painkillers in the last month of his life. Remaining patients took constant doses of medicines. Perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy could be considered as a practical application of adjuvant therapy for pain relief in patients with an advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, 137 Cs and 60 Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  3. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  4. Demonstration of brachytherapy boost dose-response relationships in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, Penny K.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Larson, David A.; Prados, Michael D.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Weaver, Keith A.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Wara, William M.; Gutin, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate brachytherapy dose-response relationships in adults with glioblastoma undergoing temporary 125 I implant boost after external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Since June 1987, orthogonal radiographs using a fiducial marker box have been used to verify brain implant source positions and generate dose-volume histograms at the University of California, San Francisco. For adults who underwent brachytherapy boost for glioblastoma from June 1987 through December 1992, tumor volumes were reoutlined to ensure consistency and dose-volume histograms were recalculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses of various patient and treatment parameters were performed evaluating for influence of dose on freedom from local failure (FFLF) and actuarial survival. Results: Of 102 implant boosts, 5 were excluded because computer plans were unavailable. For the remaining 97 patients, analyses with adjustment for known prognostic factors (age, KPS, extent of initial surgical resection) and prognostic factors identified on univariate testing (adjuvant chemotherapy) showed that higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with improved FFLF (p = 0.001). A quadratic relationship was found between total biological effective dose and survival, with a trend toward optimal survival probability at 47 Gy minimum brachytherapy tumor dose (corresponding to about 65 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume); survival decreased with lower or higher doses. Two patients expired and one requires hospice care because of brain necrosis after brachytherapy doses > 63 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume with 60 Gy to > 18 cm 3 of normal brain. Conclusion: Although higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with better local control, a brachytherapy boost dose > 50-60 Gy may result in life-threatening necrosis. We recommend careful conformation of the prescription isodose line to the contrast enhancing tumor volume, delivery of a minimum brachytherapy

  5. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  6. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External ... In all cases of brachytherapy, the source of radiation is encapsulated ... non-radioactive metallic capsule. This prevents the radioactive materials ...

  7. Comparison of DVH parameters and loading patterns of standard loading, manual and inverse optimization for intracavitary brachytherapy on a subset of tandem/ovoid cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamema, Swamidas V.; Kirisits, Christian; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Trnkova, Petra; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Poetter, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of inverse planning with the standard clinical plan and with the manually optimized plan based on dose-volume parameters and loading patterns. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight patients who underwent MRI based HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer were selected for this study. Three plans were calculated for each patient: (1) standard loading, (2) manual optimized, and (3) inverse optimized. Dosimetric outcomes from these plans were compared based on dose-volume parameters. The ratio of Total Reference Air Kerma of ovoid to tandem (TRAK O/T ) was used to compare the loading patterns. Results: The volume of HR CTV ranged from 9-68 cc with a mean of 41(±16.2)cc. Mean V100 for standard, manual optimized and inverse plans was found to be not significant (p = 0.35, 0.38, 0.4). Dose to bladder (7.8 ± 1.6 Gy) and sigmoid (5.6 ± 1.4 Gy) was high for standard plans; Manual optimization reduced the dose to bladder (7.1 ± 1.7 Gy p = 0.006) and sigmoid (4.5 ± 1.0 Gy p = 0.005) without compromising the HR CTV coverage. The inverse plan resulted in a significant reduction to bladder dose (6.5 ± 1.4 Gy, p = 0.002). TRAK was found to be 0.49(±0.02), 0.44(±0.04) and 0.40(±0.04)cGy m -2 for the standard loading, manual optimized and inverse plans, respectively. It was observed that TRAK O/T was 0.82(±0.05), 1.7(±1.04) and 1.41(±0.93) for standard loading, manual optimized and inverse plans, respectively, while this ratio was 1 for the traditional loading pattern. Conclusions: Inverse planning offers good sparing of critical structures without compromising the target coverage. The average loading pattern of the whole patient cohort deviates from the standard Fletcher loading pattern.

  8. Comparison of DVH parameters and loading patterns of standard loading, manual and inverse optimization for intracavitary brachytherapy on a subset of tandem/ovoid cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamema, Swamidas V; Kirisits, Christian; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Trnkova, Petra; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Pötter, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Comparison of inverse planning with the standard clinical plan and with the manually optimized plan based on dose-volume parameters and loading patterns. Twenty-eight patients who underwent MRI based HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer were selected for this study. Three plans were calculated for each patient: (1) standard loading, (2) manual optimized, and (3) inverse optimized. Dosimetric outcomes from these plans were compared based on dose-volume parameters. The ratio of Total Reference Air Kerma of ovoid to tandem (TRAK(O/T)) was used to compare the loading patterns. The volume of HR CTV ranged from 9-68 cc with a mean of 41(±16.2) cc. Mean V100 for standard, manual optimized and inverse plans was found to be not significant (p=0.35, 0.38, 0.4). Dose to bladder (7.8±1.6 Gy) and sigmoid (5.6±1.4 Gy) was high for standard plans; Manual optimization reduced the dose to bladder (7.1±1.7 Gy p=0.006) and sigmoid (4.5±1.0 Gy p=0.005) without compromising the HR CTV coverage. The inverse plan resulted in a significant reduction to bladder dose (6.5±1.4 Gy, p=0.002). TRAK was found to be 0.49(±0.02), 0.44(±0.04) and 0.40(±0.04) cGy m(-2) for the standard loading, manual optimized and inverse plans, respectively. It was observed that TRAK(O/T) was 0.82(±0.05), 1.7(±1.04) and 1.41(±0.93) for standard loading, manual optimized and inverse plans, respectively, while this ratio was 1 for the traditional loading pattern. Inverse planning offers good sparing of critical structures without compromising the target coverage. The average loading pattern of the whole patient cohort deviates from the standard Fletcher loading pattern. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Calibration of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marechal, M H [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dozimetria, Rio de Jainero (Brazil); Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas, UERL, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sibata, C H [Roswell Park Cancer Inst., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A method for calibration of high dose rate sources used in afterloading brachytherapy systems is described. The calibration for {sup 192}Ir is determined by interpolating {sup 60}Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. All measurements were done using the same build up caps as described by Goetsch et al and recommended by AAPM. The attenuation correction factors were determined to be 0.9903, 0.9928 and 0.9993 for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 60}Co and 250 kV x-ray, respectively. A wall + cap thickness of 0.421 g.cm{sup -2} is recommended for all measurements to ensure electronic equilibrium for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-ray beams. A mathematical formalism is described for determination of (N{sub x}){sub Ir}. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig.

  10. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  11. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  12. Optimization of dose designs in intracavitary radiotherapy of patients with uterine body carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakova, G.A.; Afanas'ev, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    The potentialities of mathematical optimization were investigated with respect to dosimetric design of radiation therapy of endometral cancer patients using Agat-B and Agat-apparatus. The effectiveness of linear programming for creating in a pathological focus and in normal tissues of a dose distribution, meeting clinical requirements to the maximum, was shown

  13. Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The ICRU has previously published reports dealing with Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy with Photons and Electrons (ICRU Report 29, ICRU, 1978), Dose Specification for Reporting External Beam Therapy (ICRU Report 50, ICRU, 1993) and Dose and Volume Specification for Reporting Intracavitary Therapy in Gynecology (ICRU Report 38, ICRU, 1985). The present report addresses the problem of absorbed dose specification for report interstitial therapy. Although specific to interstitial therapy, many of the concepts developed in this report are also applicable to certain other kinds of brachytherapy applications. In particular, special cases of intraluminal brachytherapy and plesio-brachytherapy via surface molds employing x or gamma emitters are addressed in this report

  14. A Multi-institution, Retrospective Analysis of Cervix Intracavitary Brachytherapy Treatments. Part 1: Is EQD2 Good Enough for Reporting Radiobiological Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Emma C; Melvani, Rakhi; Hajdok, George; D'Souza, David; Jones, Bernard; Stuhr, Kelly; Diot, Quentin; Fisher, Christine M; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Todor, Dorin

    2017-09-01

    When brachytherapy doses are reported or added, biologically effective dose (BED) minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90) is used as if dose is delivered uniformly to the target. Unlike BED(D90), equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) and generalized biologically equivalent uniform dose (gBEUD) are quantities that integrate dose inhomogeneity. Here we compared BED(D90) and equivalent uniform BED (EUBED)/gBEUD in 3 settings: (1) 2 sites using tandem and ovoid (T&O) but different styles of implants; (2) 2 sites using different devices-T&O and tandem and ring (T&R)-and different styles; and (3) the same site using T&O and T&R with the same style. EUBED and gBEUD were calculated for 260 fractions from 3 institutions using BED(α/β = 10 Gy). EUBED uses an extra parameter α with smaller values associated with radioresistant tumors. Similarly, gBEUD uses a, which places variable emphasis on hot/cold spots. Distributions were compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnoff test at 5% significance. For the 2 sites using T&O, the distribution of EUBED-BED(D90) was not different for values of α = 0.5 to 0.3 Gy -1 but was statistically different for values of α = 0.15 to 0.05 Gy -1 (P=.01, .002). The mean percentage differences between EUBED and BED(D90) ranged from 20% to 100% for α = 0.5 Gy -1 to 0.05 Gy -1 . Using gBEUD-BED(D90), the P values indicate the distributions to be similar for a = -10 but to be significantly different for other values of a (-5, -1, 1). Between sites and at the same site using T&O versus T&R, the distributions were statistically different with EUBED/gBEUD irrespective of parameter values at which these quantities were computed. These differences indicate that EUBED/gBEUD capture differences between the techniques and applicators that are not detected by the BED(D90). BED(D90) is unable to distinguish between plans created by different devices or optimized differently. EUBED/gBEUD distinguish between dose distributions created by different

  15. Intracavitary irradiation of prostatic carcinoma by a high dose-rate afterloading technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odelberg-Johnson, O.; Underskog, I.; Johansson, J.E.; Bernshaw, D.; Sorbe, B.; Persson, J.E. (Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Urology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics)

    1991-01-01

    A high dose-rate ({sup 60}Co) afterloading technique was evaluated in a series of 73 patients with prostatic carcinoma stages I-IV. The intraurethral irradiation was combined with external pelvic radiotherapy. A minimum total dose of 78 Gy was delivered to the target volume. In a subgroup of patients extramustine (Estracyt) was given as adjuvant chemohormonal therapy during irradiation. The median follow-up for the whole group was 63 months. The crude 5-year survival rate was 60% and the corrected survival rate 90%. Survival was related to the tumor grade. Local pelvic recurrences were recorded in 17.8%. 'Viable cells' in posttherapy aspiration biopsy were not associated with tumor recurrences or survival. Four patients (5%) had grade 3 late radiation reactions with urethral structure or bladder fibrosis. Urinary tract infections and prior transurethral resections were not associated with a higher frequency of reactions. Concurrent estramustine therapy seemed to increase the frequency of both acute and chronic radiation reactions. Local control, recurrence, and survival were not affected by chemohormonal therapy. The use of tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound as aids to computerized dosimetry may improve local dose distribution and reduce the irradiated volume. (orig.).

  16. Dose rate correction in medium dose rate brachytherapy for carcinoma cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, F.D.; Negi, P.S.; Sharma, S.C.; Kapoor, R.; Singh, D.P.; Ghoshal, S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the magnitude of brachytherapy dose reduction required for stage IIB and III carcinoma cervix patients treated by external radiation and medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A.Materials and methods: In study-I, at the time of MDR brachytherapy application at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A, patients received either 3060 cGy, a 12.5% dose reduction (MDR-12.5), or 2450 cGy, a 30% dose reduction (MDR-30), to point A and they were compared to a group of previously treated LDR patients who received 3500 cGy to point A at a dose rate of 55-65 cGy/h. Study-II was a prospective randomized trial and patients received either 2450 cGy, a 30% dose reduction (MDR-II (30)) or 2800 cGy, a 20% dose reduction (MDR-II (20)), at point A. Patients were evaluated for local control of disease and morbidity. Results: In study-I the 5-year actuarial local control rate in the MDR-30 and MDR-12.5 groups was 71.7±10% and 70.5±10%, respectively, compared to 63.4±10% in the LDR group. However, the actuarial morbidity (all grades) in the MDR-12.5 group was 58.5±14% as against 34.9±9% in the LDR group (P 3 developed complication as against 62.5% of those receiving a rectal BED of (140 3 (χ 2 =46.43; P<0.001). Conclusion: We suggest that at a dose rate of 220±10 cGy/h at point A the brachytherapy dose reduction factor should be around 30%, as suggested by radiobiological data, to keep the morbidity as low as possible without compromising the local control rates. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbergen, Erik F.M. van; Fowler, Jack F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  18. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  19. Results in patients treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Shirane, Makoto; Ueda, Tsutomu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Eight patients were treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for oral tongue cancer between September 2000 and August 2004. The patient distribution was 1 T1, 5 T2, 1 T3, and 1 T4a. Patients received 50-60 Gy in 10 fractions over seven days with high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Six of the eight patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy (20-30 Gy) and interstitial brachytherapy. The two-year primary local control rate was 83% for initial case. High-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed safely even for an aged person, and was a useful treatment modality for oral tongue cancer. (author)

  20. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of base of tongue carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Major, T.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, F. [Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery, St. Rokus Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, E.; Kasler, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck, Maxillofacial and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2004-12-01

    Background and purpose: to date none of the studies examined the feasibility and efficacy of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the tongue base. Therefore the aim of this study was to contribute to this issue. Patients and methods: between 1992 and 2000 37 patients (mean age 55 years) with T1-4 and NO-3 carcinoma of the base of tongue were presented. Neck dissection was carried out in twelve cases (32%). 30 patients with advanced stage received brachytherapy boost after 50-66.5 Gy (mean, 60 Gy) locoregional external beam irradiation (EBI) and 7 patients with early stage (T1-2, NO) were managed locally with wide tumor excision and sole brachytherapy. 4 of them underwent neck dissection and the others were subjected to 50 Gy regional EBI. The mean dose of boost and sole brachytherapy was 18 Gy and 28 Gy, respectively. Results: the median follow-up time for surviving patients was 51 months. The 7 sole brachytherapy patients are living with no evidence of disease. For patients treated with EBI and brachytherapy boost, the 5-year actuarial rate of local, locoregional recurrence-free and overall survival was 60%, 52% and 46%, respectively. For all patients in univariate analysis larger tumor size (T4 vs. T1-3) was significant negative predictor of local (RR: 7.23) and locoregional control (RR: 3.87), but nodal involvement was not. Delayed soft tissue ulceration and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 4 (13%) EBI and brachytherapy treated patients. None of the sole brachytherapy patients experienced severe late radiation toxicity. Conclusion: EBI combined with interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost result in acceptable local tumor control with low incidence of late side effects in patients with advanced disease. Fractionated sole HDR brachytherapy following tumor excision is a feasible treatment option for patients with early stage cancer and gives excellent local results. (orig.)

  1. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  2. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Eduardo J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52, local recurrence (p = 0.68, or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06 rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix

  3. Brachytherapy for cervix cancer: low-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy – a meta-analysis of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Gustavo A; Manta, Gustavo B; Stefano, Eduardo J; de Fendi, Ligia I

    2009-01-01

    Background The literature supporting high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) in the treatment of cervical carcinoma derives primarily from retrospective series. However, controversy still persists regarding the efficacy and safety of HDR brachytherapy compared to low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, in particular, due to inadequate tumor coverage for stage III patients. Whether LDR or HDR brachytherapy produces better results for these patients in terms of survival rate, local control rate and the treatment complications remain controversial. Methods A meta-analysis of RCT was performed comparing LDR to HDR brachytherapy for cervix cancer treated for radiotherapy alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases, as well as abstracts published in the annual proceedings were systematically searched. We assessed methodological quality for each outcome by grading the quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. We used "recommend" for strong recommendations, and "suggest" for weak recommendations. Results Pooled results from five randomized trials (2,065 patients) of HDR brachytherapy in cervix cancer showed no significant increase of mortality (p = 0.52), local recurrence (p = 0.68), or late complications (rectal; p = 0.7, bladder; p = 0.95 or small intestine; p = 0.06) rates as compared to LDR brachytherapy. In the subgroup analysis no difference was observed for overall mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stages I, II and III. The quality of evidence was low for mortality and local recurrence in patients with clinical stage I, and moderate for other clinical stages. Conclusion Our meta-analysis shows that there are no differences between HDR and LDR for overall survival, local recurrence and late complications for clinical stages I, II and III. By means of the GRADE system, we recommend the use of HDR for all clinical stages of cervix cancer. PMID:19344527

  4. External beam radiotherapy alone or combined with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Y.; Taniguchi, M.; Kamikonya, N.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1988-01-01

    Autopsy findings of 35 patients, treated with radiotherapy for an esophageal carcinoma, were reviewed. A residual tumor was seen at autopsy in 7 of 16 patients treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation, in 13 of 14 patients treated with external irradiation of 50 Gy or more, and in all 5 patients treated with external irradiation of less than 50 Gy. Incidence on lymph node metastasis, at autopsy, did not diifer between the combined radiotherapy group and the external irradiation groups. However, it correlated with disease stage. It was observed in 11 of 17 patients with Stage 1 and Stage 2 disease, compared to 17 of 18 patients with Stage 3 and Stage 4 disease. Distant organ metastasis, at autopsy, also did not differ between the combined radiotherapy group and the external irradiation groups, and was also correlated with disease stage. It was found in 8 of 17 patients with Stage 1 and Stage 2 disease, compared to all 18 patients with Stage 3 and Stage 4 disease. Mean survival was different between the patients treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation and those treated by external irradiation alone; 11.3 months in the 16 patients treated with combined therapy, as compared to 6.9 months in the 14 patients who received external irradiation of 50 Gy or more, and 3.6 months in the 5 patients who received external irradiation of less than 50 Gy. 6 refs.; 5 tabs

  5. Design and construction of a holder to the safety handling of Cs-137 to be used in cervix cancer treatments using intracavitary brachytherapy by afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, E.; Lea, D.

    1996-01-01

    In venezuelan public hospitals where cervix cancer treatments are performed by means of Cs-137 manual afterloading systems, the handling of the sources is done with two type of holders, metallic and plastic, the plastic holders are pieces of induced serious radio-sanitary problem such as loser of the Cs-137 source and radioactive contamination in the treatment area, this has caused the interruption of the treatments in many hospitals. This interruption had a high social cost because of the thousands women waiting for intracavitary therapy. To start again with the treatments, the metallic holders were required but there were not enough funds in the budget, because of this problem in a short time IVIS'S health physics drew and made a low price source holder. (authors). 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. DuraSeal® as a spacer to reduce rectal doses in low-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkilä, Vesa-Pekka; Kärnä, Aarno; Vaarala, Markku H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of off-label use of DuraSeal® polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel in low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy seed implantation to reduce rectal doses. Diluted DuraSeal® was easy to use and, in spite of a clearance effect, useful in decreasing D 2cc rectal doses

  7. Estimation of the transit dose component in high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Romero, A.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Lozano Flores, F.J.; Lope Lope, R.; Canellas Anoz, M.

    2001-01-01

    Current high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning systems usually calculate dose only from source stopping positions (stationary component), but fails to account for the administered dose when the source is moving (dynamic component or transit dose). Numerical values of this transit dose depends upon the source velocity, implant geometry, source activity and prescribed dose. In some HDR treatments using particular geometry the transit dose cannot be ignored because it increases the dose at the prescriptions points and also could increase potential late tissue complications as predicted by the linear quadratic model. International protocols recommend to verify this parameter. The aim of this paper has been to establish a procedure for the transit dose calculation for the Gammamed 12i equipment at the RT Department in the Clinical University Hospital (Zaragoza-Spain). A numeric algorithm was implemented based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving HDR source and the calculated results for the entrance-exit transit dose was compared with TLD measurements made in some discrete points. (author) [es

  8. An analysis of acute complications and perioperative morbidity from high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkaria, Jann N; Petereit, Daniel G; Kinsella, Timothy J; Buchler, Dolores A

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute morbidity and mortality for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy performed in an outpatient setting in the treatment of gynecological malignancies, and to identify possible risk factors for adverse outcomes. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients with cervical (n=129) or uterine (n=42) carcinoma with an intact uterus were evaluated and treated from August 1989 through December 1994, with at least part of their therapy delivered with intracavitary HDR {sup 192}Ir radiation. A total of 830 ICR insertions were performed with greater than 95% done on an outpatient basis under heavy intravenous sedation using fentanyl and midazolam. Perioperative morbidity and mortality were recorded for any event occurring within 30 days of the completion of therapy. Anesthesia risk was evaluated retrospectively in all patients based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) Physical Class System. Results: The uterine patients, many treated with radiation alone because of morbid obesity or medical inoperability, had a significantly higher perioperative morbidity and mortality rate as compared to the cervix patient cohort. Thirteen of the 42 (31%) uterine patients and 8 of the 129 (6%) cervix patients required hospitalization within 30 days of treatment completion (p<0.001). Four of these uterine patients (10%) died of medical complications related to therapy or disease progression within 30 days, while 2 of the cervix patients (1.5%) died: one from disease progression and the other due to radiation enteritis (p=0.05). Preliminary analysis suggests that uterine patients with a high anesthesia risk score (ASA>2) experienced greater morbidity and mortality, while the best predictor of complications in the cervix patients was age greater than 70 years. For the entire cohort of patients, no correlation was found between the 30 day morbidity and mortality and the doses of fentanyl and midazolam used or the length of the procedure

  9. Efficacy of prophylactic single-dose therapy using fluoroquinolone for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takeo; Hirai, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Mutsushi; Inoue, Toru; Takahashi, Mika; Kawashima, Takayuki; Sato, Fuminori; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    There is little definitive evidence to guide the use of prophylactic antibiotics for prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence of postimplant infections in patients who receive antimicrobial prophylaxis with pazufloxacin (PZFX). A total of 84 patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy received a single intravenous dose of PZFX at 500 mg perioperatively for 1 day. No postimplant antibiotic medication was prescribed. Urinalysis, plasma white blood cell (WBC) count, and C reactive protein (CRP) levels were evaluated before the implantation, on the day after implantation, and on the 7th and 28th days after brachytherapy. None of the 84 patients (0.0%) developed a symptomatic urinary tract infection or had febrile infectious complications after brachytherapy. There were statistically significant elevations in the levels of erythrocytes, leukocytes, bacteria in urine, plasma WBC and CRP postoperatively, but these values did not exceed the normal range or were only slightly elevated on the day after brachytherapy (day 1) and on day 7. All laboratory examinations had returned to the normal range on day 28. Single-dose therapy with fluoroquinolone helps to prevent infections after prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  10. Determination of the dose of traffic in HDR brachytherapy with ALANINE/R PE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Calcina, C. S.; Chen, F.; Almeida, A. de; Baffa, O.

    2001-01-01

    It determines, experimentally, the dose of traffic in brachytherapy for High Dose Rate (HDR), using for the first-time the Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) technique with alanine detectors. The value obtained is the published next to obtained using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters [es

  11. Construction balance analysis of dose rate medium brachytherapy TDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandi Parapak

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important part of brachytherapy instrument design activities is analyze by determining the centroid point of construction in order to maintain the balance of brachytherapy instrument, either during operation as well as when transported. Operation of brachytherapy is not only done in one place so it is necessary to balance the analysis of the forces at the time did not move, moved on the horizontal floor and sloping floor. Calculation approach who is done to calculate the weight of mechanical components on each module, and then calculate the centroid of each module, for the balance of forces analysis performed with the assumption at the time of brachytherapy in the position of not moving on a horizontal floor, moved from a place to another on the horizontal floor and on the floor with sloping angle 30°. Base on the results of this analysis are expected to balance the four wheels can move without slipping at the time of decline or incline. Also, results of analysis can be used in designing a mobile construction brachytherapy taking into consideration the aesthetic ideal, easy to operate, ensure the safety of equipment, operator and patient. (author)

  12. In vivo dosimetry with semiconductors in medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Jaberi, Ramin; Aghili, Mehdi; Ghahremani, Fatemeh; Geraily, Ghazale

    2013-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the role of in vivo dosimetry with semiconductor detectors in gynaecological medium dose rate brachytherapy, and to compare the actual doses delivered to organs at risk (as measured using in vivo dosimetry) with those calculated during treatment planning. Doses to the rectum and bladder were measured in a group of patients with cervical carcinoma using semiconductor detectors and compared to the doses calculated using a treatment planning system. 36 applications of brachytherapy at dose rates of 1.8-2.3 Gy/h were performed in the patients. The mean differences between the measured and calculated doses were 3 % for the rectum and 11 % for the bladder. The main reason for the differences between the measured and calculated doses was patient movement. To reduce the risk of large errors in the dose delivered, in vivo dosimetry should be performed in addition to treatment planning system computations.

  13. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (α=0.15 Gy -1 and α/β=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD 2 ) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125 I and 103 Pd implants. The EUD 2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V 100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D 90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125 I and 103 Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125 I and 1.3-1.6 for 103 Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  14. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; de Haas-Kock, Danielle; Visser, Peter; van Gils, Francis; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-01

    The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D(90) was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although our results are too limited to draw conclusions regarding clinical significance.

  15. Retrospective analysis of dose delivery in intra-operative high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, M.; Avadhani, J.S.; Malhotra, H.K.; Cunningham, B.; Tripp, P.; Jaggernauth, W.; Podgorsak, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Background. This study was performed to quantify the inaccuracy in clinical dose delivery due to the incomplete scatter conditions inherent in intra-operative high dose rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy. Methods. Treatment plans of 10 patients previously treated in our facility, which had irregular shapes of treated areas, were used. Treatment geometries reflecting each clinical case were simulated using a phantom assembly with no added build-up on top of the applicator. The treatment planning geometry (full scatter surrounding the applicator) was subsequently simulated for each case by adding bolus on top of the applicator. Results. For geometries representing the clinical IOHDR incomplete scatter environment, measured doses at the 5 mm and 10 mm prescription depths were lower than the corresponding prescribed doses by about 7.7% and 11.1%, respectively. Also, for the two prescription methods, an analysis of the measured dose distributions and their corresponding treatment plans showed average decreases of 1.2 mm and 2.2 mm in depth of prescription dose, respectively. Conclusions. Dosimetric calculations with the assumption of an infinite scatter environment around the applicator and target volume have shown to result in dose delivery errors that significantly decrease the prescription depth for IOHDR treatment.(author)

  16. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  17. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  18. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  19. Novel high dose rate lip brachytherapy technique to improve dose homogeneity and reduce toxicity by customized mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Jon; Appelbaum, Limor; Sela, Mordechay; Voskoboinik, Ninel; Kadouri, Sarit; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Orion, Itzhak; Meirovitz, Amichay

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a novel brachytherapy technique for lip Squamous Cell Carcinoma, utilizing a customized mold with embedded brachytherapy sleeves, which separates the lip from the mandible, and improves dose homogeneity. Seven patients with T2 lip cancer treated with a “sandwich” technique of High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy to the lip, consisting of interstitial catheters and a customized mold with embedded catheters, were reviewed for dosimetry and outcome using 3D planning. Dosimetric comparison was made between the “sandwich” technique to “classic” – interstitial catheters only plan. We compared dose volume histograms for Clinical Tumor Volume (CTV), normal tissue “hot spots” and mandible dose. We are reporting according to the ICRU 58 and calculated the Conformal Index (COIN) to show the advantage of our technique. The seven patients (ages 36–81 years, male) had median follow-up of 47 months. Four patients received Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiation Therapy, 3 patients received brachytherapy alone. All achieved local control, with excellent esthetic and functional results. All patients are disease free. The Customized Mold Sandwich technique (CMS) reduced the high dose region receiving 150% (V150) by an average of 20% (range 1–47%), The low dose region (les then 90% of the prescribed dose) improved by 73% in average by using the CMS technique. The COIN value for the CMS was in average 0.92 as opposed to 0.88 for the interstitial catheter only. All differences (excluding the low dose region) were statistically significant. The CMS technique significantly reduces the high dose volume and increases treatment homogeneity. This may reduce the potential toxicity to the lip and adjacent mandible, and results in excellent tumor control, cosmetic and functionality

  20. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  1. Interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy as boost for anal canal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Alexander Tuan; Claren, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; François, Eric; Gautier, Mathieu; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess clinical outcomes of patients treated with a high-dose rate brachytherapy boost for anal canal cancer (ACC). From August 2005 to February 2013, 28 patients presenting an ACC treated by split-course external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy in a French regional cancer center in Nice were retrospectively analyzed. Median age was 60.6 years [34 – 83], 25 patients presented a squamous cell carcinoma and 3 an adenocarcinoma; 21 received chemotherapy. Median dose of EBRT was 45 Gy [43.2 – 52]. Median dose of HDR brachytherapy was 12 Gy [10 - 15] with a median duration of 2 days. Median overall treatment time was 63 days and median delay between EBRT and brachytherapy was 20 days. Two-year local relapse free, metastatic free, disease free and overall survivals were 83%, 81.9%, 71.8% and 87.7% respectively. Acute toxicities were frequent but not severe with mostly grade 1 toxicities: 37% of genito-urinary, 40.7% of gastro-intestinal and 3.7% of cutaneous toxicities. Late toxicities were mainly G1 (43.1%) and G2 (22%). Two-year colostomy-free survival was 75.1%, one patient had a definitive sphincter amputation. High-dose rate brachytherapy for anal canal carcinoma as boost represents a feasible technique compared to low or pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy. This technique remains an excellent approach to precisely boost the tumor in reducing the overall treatment time

  2. Quality control in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy; Controle de qualite en curietherapie de debit de dose pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metayer, Y.; Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Meyer, P. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2009-07-15

    A prospective multicenter study (P.D.R.) was leaded on pulsed dose rate brachytherapy over 2 years (2005/2006) in 20 French centres, as part of a programme entitled (Support for the innovative and expensive techniques) S.t.i.c.-P.D.R. and supported by the French ministry of health. Eight hundred and fifty patients were treated for cervix carcinoma with 2D classic or 3D innovative brachytherapy (425 in each arm). The main objectives of this study were to assess the cost of P.D.R. brachytherapy with dose optimization compared to traditional treatments, and to evaluate the complications and local control. A joint programme of quality control was established by the physicists of the different centres, concerning the software treatment planning, the source replacement, the projector and the technical parameters of the course of patient treatment. This technical note lists these controls, and their frequency. (authors)

  3. Focal low-dose rate brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong WY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Y Tong, Gilad Cohen, Yoshiya Yamada Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Whole-gland low-dose rate (LDR brachytherapy has been a well-established modality of treating low-risk prostate cancer. Treatment in a focal manner has the advantages of reduced toxicity to surrounding organs. Focal treatment using LDR brachytherapy has been relatively unexplored, but it may offer advantages over other modalities that have established experiences with a focal approach. This is particularly true as prostate cancer is being detected at an earlier and more localized stage with the advent of better detection methods and newer imaging modalities. Keywords: prostate cancer, focal, low dose rate, brachytherapy

  4. Application of Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms in Anatomy Based Dose Optimization in Brachytherapy and its Comparation with Deterministic Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milickovic, Natasa

    2001-01-01

    In High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy the conventional dose optimization algorithms consider the multiple objectives in the form of an aggregate function which combines individual objectives into a single utility value...

  5. Cost minimization analysis of high-dose-rate versus low-dose-rate brachytherapy in endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinilla, James

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Endometrial cancer is a common, usually curable malignancy whose treatment frequently involves low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. These treatments involve substantial resource commitments and this is increasingly important. This paper presents a cost minimization analysis of HDR versus LDR brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The perspective of the analysis is that of the payor, in this case the Ministry of Health. One course of LDR treatment is compared to two courses of HDR treatment. The two alternatives are considered to be comparable with respect to local control, survival, and toxicities. Labor, overhead, and capital costs are accounted for and carefully measured. A 5% inflation rate is used where applicable. A univariate sensitivity analysis is performed. Results: The HDR regime is 22% less expensive compared to the LDR regime. This is $991.66 per patient or, based on the current workload of this department (30 patients per year) over the useful lifetime of the after loader, $297,498 over 10 years in 1997 dollars. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy minimizes costs in the treatment of endometrial cancer relative to LDR brachytherapy. These results may be used by other centers to make rational decisions regarding brachytherapy equipment replacement or acquisition

  6. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer--a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Liu

    Full Text Available To compare the efficacy and safety of high dose rate (HDR and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy in treating early-stage oral cancer.A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases, restricted to English language up to June 1, 2012, was performed to identify potentially relevant studies.Only randomized controlled trials (RCT and controlled trials that compared HDR to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of early-stage oral cancer (stages I, II and III were of interest.Two investigators independently extracted data from retrieved studies and controversies were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. One RCT and five controlled trials (607 patients: 447 for LDR and 160 for HDR met the inclusion criteria. The odds ratio showed no statistically significant difference between LDR group and HDR group in terms of local recurrence (OR = 1.12, CI 95% 0.62-2.01, overall mortality (OR = 1.01, CI 95% 0.61-1.66 and Grade 3/4 complications (OR = 0.86, CI 95% 0.52-1.42.This meta-analysis indicated that HDR brachytherapy was a comparable alternative to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of oral cancer. HDR brachytherapy might become a routine choice for early-stage oral cancer in the future.

  7. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, L.; Bianchi, C.; Novario, R.; Nicolini, G.; Tanzi, F.; Conte, L

    2002-07-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with {sup 192}Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rando phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from coronary treatment were 2.4x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for lung, 0.9x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for oesophagus and 0.48x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for colon, 7.8x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for stomach and 1.7x10{sup -2} mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1} for liver. Coronary treatment involved an effective dose of 0.046 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}, whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq{sup -1}.min{sup -1}; there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low. (author)

  8. Brachytherapy for Buccal Cancer: From Conventional Low Dose Rate (LDR) or Mold Technique to High Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Masui, Koji; Yoshida, Ken; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Akiyama, Hironori; Murakami, Shumei; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2017-12-01

    To examine the effectiveness of newly-installed high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for buccal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 36 patients (25 men and 11 women) with buccal cancer treated with curative brachytherapy with or without external radiotherapy with a median follow-up of 99 months. A total of 15 HDR-ISBT (median 48 Gy/ 8 fractions, range=24-60 Gy) patients were compared to conventional 15 cases LDR-ISBT (70 Gy, range=42.8-110 Gy) and 7 molds techniques (15 Gy, range=9-74 Gy). A total of 31 patients also underwent external radiotherapy (30 Gy, range=24-48 Gy). They comprised of 3T1, 23 T2, 8 T3, 3 T4 including 11 node positive cases. HDR-ISBT provided 82% of local control rate at 5 years, whereas conventional brachytherapy showed 72% [p=0.44; LDR-ISBT (65%), mold therapy (85.7%)]. Patients with early lesions (T1-2 or stage I-II) showed better local control rates than those with advanced lesions (T3-4 or stage III-IV). Severe late grade 3 complications developed in two patients treated with LDR-ISBT and EBRT. There is no significant difference in toxicity grade ≤2 between conventional brachytherapy (5/15=33%) and HDR-ISBT (7/32=32%, p=0.92). HDR-ISBT achieved good and comparable local control rates to conventional brachytherapy without elevating the toxicity. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application

  10. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Neeharika [Department of Sciences, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cifter, Gizem [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sajo, Erno [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Electronic Materials Research Institute and Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ngwa, Wilfred, E-mail: wngwa@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application

  11. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 04: Commissioning and Implementation of a Cobalt-60 High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dysart, Jonathan [Horizon Health Network (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    An Eckert & Ziegler Bebig Co0.A86 cobalt 60 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy source was commissioned for clinical use. Long-lived Co-60 HDR sources offer potential logistical and economic advantages over Ir-192 sources, and should be considered for low to medium workload brachytherapy departments where modest increases in treatment times are not a factor. In optimized plans, the Co-60 source provides a similar dose distribution to Ir-192 despite the difference in radiation energy. By switching to Co-60, source exchange frequency can be reduced by a factor of 20, resulting in overall financial savings of more than 50% compared to Ir-192 sources. In addition, a reduction in Physicist QA workload of roughly 200 hours over the 5 year life of the Co-60 source is also expected. These benefits should be considered against the modest increases in average treatment time compared to those of Ir-192 sources, as well as the centre-specific needs for operating room shielding modification.

  12. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestaut, Matthew M.; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J.; Hasan, Salman A.; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  13. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestaut, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.Gestaut@BSWHealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Cai, Wendi [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Vyas, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Patel, Belur J. [Department of Urology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Hasan, Salman A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); MunozMaldonado, Yolanda [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  14. The needs for brachytherapy source calibrations in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coursey, B.M.; Goodman, L.J.; Hoppes, D.D.; Loevinger, R.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Soares, C.G.; Weaver, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Brachytherapy sources of beta and gamma radiation ('brachy' is from the Greek, meaning 'near') have a long history of use in interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and ocular radiation therapy. In the past the US national standards for these sources were often specified in activity or milligram radium equivalent. With the introduction of new radionuclide sources to replace radium, source strength calibrations are now expressed as air kerma rate at a meter. In this paper, we review the NIST standards for brachytherapy sources, list some of the common radionuclides and source encapsulations in use in the US radiology community, and describe the latest NIST work, in collaboration with several US medical institutions, on a method of two- and three-dimensional dose mapping of brachytherapy sources using radiochromic films. (orig.)

  15. Staff dose of hospitalization in the treatment of patients in ophthalmic brachytherapy with 125 I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terron Leon, J. A.; Gomez Palacios, M.; Moreno Reyes, J. C.; Perales Molina, A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work, therefore, has been the evaluation of the dose levels which nursing staff can receive in care for ophthalmic brachytherapy patients treated with 125 I from measurements made on the same, evaluating, in an experimental way, job security following the PR rules laid down for these treatments. (Author)

  16. Surface membrane based bladder registration for evaluation of accumulated dose during brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2011-01-01

    of the fixed surface. Optional landmark based matches can be included in the suggested iterative solver. The technique is demonstrated for bladder registration in brachytherapy treatment evaluation of cervical cancer. It holds promise to better estimate the accumulated but unintentional dose delivered...

  17. High-dose-rate brachytherapy alone post-hysterectomy for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, Craig; Fowler, Allan; Duval, Peter; D'Costa, Ieta; Dalrymple, Chris; Firth, Ian; Elliott, Peter; Atkinson, Ken; Carter, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of post-hysterectomy adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 143 patients with endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy alone post-hysterectomy from 1985 to June 1993. Of these patients, 141 received 34 Gy in four fractions prescribed to the vaginal mucosa in a 2-week period. The median follow-up was 6.9 years. Patients were analyzed for treatment parameters, survival, local recurrence, distant relapse, and toxicity. Results: Five-year relapse free survival and overall survival was 100% and 88% for Stage 1A, 98% and 94% for Stage IB, 100% and 86% for Stage IC, and 92% and 92% for Stage IIA. The overall vaginal recurrence rate was 1.4%. The overall late-toxicity rate was low, and no RTOG grade 3, 4, or 5 complications were recorded. Conclusion: These results are similar to reported international series that have used either low-dose-rate or HDR brachytherapy. The biological effective dose was low for both acute and late responding tissues compared with some of the HDR brachytherapy series, and supports using this lower dose and possibly decreasing late side-effects with no apparent increased risk of vaginal recurrence

  18. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Cinthia M.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand

  19. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ping; Baumann, René; Dunst, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immed...

  20. Interaction of 2-Gy Equivalent Dose and Margin Status in Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Moreno, Marta; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Julian, Mikel; Alcalde, Juan; Jurado, Matias

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of local control (LC) in a series of patients treated with either perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (Group 1) or with PHDRB combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (Group 2). Patient and Methods: Patients (n = 312) enrolled in several PHDRB prospective Phase I-II studies conducted at the Clinica Universidad de Navarra were analyzed. Treatment with PHDRB alone, mainly because of prior irradiation, was used in 126 patients to total doses of 32 Gy/8 b.i.d. or 40 Gy/10 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections. Treatment with PHDRB plus EBRT was used in 186 patients to total doses of 16 Gy/4 b.i.d. or 24 Gy/6 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections along with 45 Gy of EBRT with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: No dose-margin interaction was observed in Group 1 patients. In Group 2 patients there was a significant interaction between margin status and 2-Gy equivalent (Eq2Gy) dose (p = 0.002): (1) patients with negative margins had 9-year LC of 95.7% at Eq2Gy = 62.9Gy; (2) patients with close margins of >1 mm had 9-year LC of 92.4% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy, and (3) patients with positive/close <1-mm margins had 9-year LC of 68.0% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy. Conclusions: Two-gray equivalent doses ≥70 Gy may compensate the effect of close margins ≥1 mm but do not counterbalance the detrimental effect of unfavorable (positive/close <1 mm) resection margins. No dose-margin interaction is observed in patients treated at lower Eq2Gy doses ≤50 Gy with PHDRB alone.

  1. Independent verification of the delivered dose in High-Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portillo, P.; Feld, D.; Kessler, J.

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect of a Quality Assurance program in Clinical Dosimetry is an independent verification of the dosimetric calculation done by the Treatment Planning System for each radiation treatment. The present paper is aimed at creating a spreadsheet for the verification of the dose recorded at a point of an implant with radioactive sources and HDR in gynecological injuries. An 192 Ir source automatic differed loading equipment, GammaMedplus model, Varian Medical System with HDR installed at the Angel H. Roffo Oncology Institute has been used. The planning system implemented for getting the dose distribution is the BraquiVision. The sources coordinates as well as those of the calculation point (Rectum) are entered into the Excel-devised verification program by assuming the existence of a point source in each one of the applicators' positions. Such calculation point has been selected as the rectum is an organ at risk, therefore determining the treatment planning. The dose verification is performed at points standing at a sources distance having at least twice the active length of such sources, so they may be regarded as point sources. Most of the sources used in HDR brachytherapy with 192 Ir have a 5 mm active length for all equipment brands. Consequently, the dose verification distance must be at least of 10 mm. (author)

  2. Independent technique of verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Korb, Leroy J.; Darnell, Brenda; Krishna, K. V.; Ulewicz, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: An independent technique for verifying high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans has been formulated and validated clinically. Methods and Materials: In HDR brachytherapy, dwell times at respective dwell positions are computed, using an optimization algorithm in a HDR treatment-planning system to deliver a specified dose to many target points simultaneously. Because of the variability of dwell times, concerns have been expressed regarding the ability of the algorithm to compute the correct dose. To address this concern, a commercially available low-dose rate (LDR) algorithm was used to compute the doses at defined distances, based on the dwell times obtained from the HDR treatment plans. The percent deviation between doses computed using the HDR and LDR algorithms were reviewed for HDR procedures performed over the last year. Results: In this retrospective study, the difference between computed doses using the HDR and LDR algorithms was found to be within 5% for about 80% of the HDR procedures. All of the reviewed procedures have dose differences of less than 10%. Conclusion: An independent technique for verifying HDR brachytherapy treatment plans has been validated based on clinical data. Provided both systems are available, this technique is universal in its applications and not limited to either a particular implant applicator, implant site, or implant type

  3. High dose-rate brachytherapy source position quality assurance using radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.D.C.; Devic, S.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, radiographic film has been used to verify high-dose-rate brachytherapy source position accuracy by co-registering autoradiographic and diagnostic images of the associated applicator. Filmless PACS-based clinics that do not have access to radiographic film and wet developers may have trouble performing this quality assurance test in a simple and practical manner. We describe an alternative method for quality assurance using radiochromic-type film. In addition to being easy and practical to use, radiochromic film has some advantages in comparison with traditional radiographic film when used for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance

  4. Single-dose brachytherapy versus metal stent placement for the palliation of dysphagia from oesophageal cancer: multicentre randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homs, Marjolein Y. V.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M. H.; Tilanus, Hugo W.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Bartelsman, Joep F. W. M.; van Lanschot, Jan J. B.; Wijrdeman, Harm K.; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Reinders, Janny G.; Boot, Henk; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2004-01-01

    Background Both single-dose brachytherapy and self-expanding metal stent placement are commonly used for palliation of oesophageal obstruction due to inoperable cancer, but their relative merits are unknown. We under-took a randomised trial to compare the outcomes of brachytherapy and stent

  5. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 05: Surface Collimation Applied to Superficial Flap High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Derek; Sabondjian, Eric; Lawrence, Kailin; Sankreacha, Raxa [University of Toronto, Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Center, Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Center, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To apply surface collimation for superficial flap HDR skin brachytherapy utilizing common clinical resources and to demonstrate the potential for OAR dose reduction within a clinically relevant setting. Methods: Two phantom setups were used. 3 mm lead collimation was applied to a solid slab phantom to determine appropriate geometries relating to collimation and dwell activation. The same collimation was applied to the temple of an anthropomorphic head phantom to demonstrate lens dose reduction. Each setup was simulated and planned to deliver 400 cGy to a 3 cm circular target to 3 mm depth. The control and collimated irradiations were sequentially measured using calibrated radiochromic films. Results: Collimation for the slab phantom attenuated the dose beyond the collimator opening, decreasing the fall-off distances by half and reducing the area of healthy skin irradiated. Target coverage can be negatively impacted by a tight collimation margin, with the required margin approximated by the primary beam geometric penumbra. Surface collimation applied to the head phantom similarly attenuated the surrounding normal tissue dose while reducing the lens dose from 84 to 68 cGy. To ensure consistent setup between simulation and treatment, additional QA was performed including collimator markup, accounting for collimator placement uncertainties, standoff distance verification, and in vivo dosimetry. Conclusions: Surface collimation was shown to reduce normal tissue dose without compromising target coverage. Lens dose reduction was demonstrated on an anthropomorphic phantom within a clinical setting. Additional QA is proposed to ensure treatment fidelity.

  6. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 05: Surface Collimation Applied to Superficial Flap High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Derek; Sabondjian, Eric; Lawrence, Kailin; Sankreacha, Raxa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To apply surface collimation for superficial flap HDR skin brachytherapy utilizing common clinical resources and to demonstrate the potential for OAR dose reduction within a clinically relevant setting. Methods: Two phantom setups were used. 3 mm lead collimation was applied to a solid slab phantom to determine appropriate geometries relating to collimation and dwell activation. The same collimation was applied to the temple of an anthropomorphic head phantom to demonstrate lens dose reduction. Each setup was simulated and planned to deliver 400 cGy to a 3 cm circular target to 3 mm depth. The control and collimated irradiations were sequentially measured using calibrated radiochromic films. Results: Collimation for the slab phantom attenuated the dose beyond the collimator opening, decreasing the fall-off distances by half and reducing the area of healthy skin irradiated. Target coverage can be negatively impacted by a tight collimation margin, with the required margin approximated by the primary beam geometric penumbra. Surface collimation applied to the head phantom similarly attenuated the surrounding normal tissue dose while reducing the lens dose from 84 to 68 cGy. To ensure consistent setup between simulation and treatment, additional QA was performed including collimator markup, accounting for collimator placement uncertainties, standoff distance verification, and in vivo dosimetry. Conclusions: Surface collimation was shown to reduce normal tissue dose without compromising target coverage. Lens dose reduction was demonstrated on an anthropomorphic phantom within a clinical setting. Additional QA is proposed to ensure treatment fidelity.

  7. The Meaning and Experience of Patients Undergoing Rectal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Samara; Néron, Sylvain; Benc, Renata; Rosberger, Zeev; Vuong, Té

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a precise form of radiation therapy that targets cancerous tumors by directly applying the radiation source at the site or directly next to the tumor. Patients often experience but underreport pain and anxiety related to cancer treatments. At present, there is no research available concerning the pervasiveness and intensity of patients' pain and anxiety during rectal brachytherapy. The aim of this study was to examine patients' thoughts, emotions, coping strategies, physical sensations, and needs during rectal HDR brachytherapy treatment. Twenty-five patients with rectal cancer were interviewed using a semi-structured qualitative interview following the completion of their brachytherapy treatment delivered at a Montreal-based hospital in Quebec, Canada. The experiences of pain and discomfort varied greatly between patients and were linked to the meaning patients attributed to the treatment itself, sense of time, the body's lithotomic position, insertion of the treatment applicator, and the patients' sense of agency and empowerment during the procedure. Patients drew upon a variety of internal and external resources to help them cope with discomfort. Staff need to know about the variation in the physical and emotional experiences of patients undergoing this treatment. Clinical teams can tailor their procedural behavior (eg, using certain language, psychosocial interventions) according to patients' needs to increase patients' comfort and ultimately improve their experience of HDR rectal brachytherapy.

  8. Fractionated high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy in palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Ranjan K.; Donde, Bernard; Levin, Victor C.; Mannell, Aylwyn

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the dose of fractionated brachytherapy for palliation of advanced esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-two patients with advanced esophageal cancer were randomized to receive 12 Gy/2 fractions (group A); 16 Gy/2 fractions (group B), and 18 Gy/3 fractions (group C) by high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDRILBT). Treatment was given weekly and dose prescribed at 1 cm from the source axis. Patients were followed up monthly and assessed for dysphagia relief and development of complications. Results: Twenty-two patients died before completing treatment due to advanced disease and poor general condition. The overall survival was 19.4% at the end of 12 months for the whole group (A--9.8%, B--22.46%, C--35.32%; p > 0.05). The dysphagia-free survival was 28.9% at 12 months for the whole group (A--10.8%, B--25.43%, C--38.95%; p > 0.05). Forty-three patients developed fibrotic strictures needing dilatation (A--5 of 35, B--15 of 60, C--23 of 55; p = 0.032). Twenty-seven patients had persistent luminal disease (A--11, B--6, C--10), 15 of which progressed to fistulae (A--7, B--2, C--6; p = 0.032). There was no effect of age, sex, race, histology, performance status, previous dilation, presenting dysphagia score, presenting weight, grade, tumor length, and stage on overall survival, dysphagia-free, and complication-free survival (p > 0.05). On a multivariate analysis, brachytherapy dose (p = 0.002) and tumor length (p = 0.0209) were found to have a significant effect on overall survival; brachytherapy dose was the only factor that had an impact on local tumor control (p = 0.0005), while tumor length was the only factor that had an effect on dysphagia-free survival (p = 0.0475). When compared to other forms of palliation currently available (bypass surgery, laser, chemotherapy, intubation, external radiotherapy), fractionated brachytherapy gave the best results with a median survival of 6.2 months. Conclusions: Fractionated

  9. Dose rate effect from the relationship between ICRU rectal dose and local control rate in intracavitary radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Six fraction HDR and three-fraction LDR in three weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jingu, Kenichi; Akita, Yuzou; Ohmagari, Jyunichi

    2001-01-01

    The dose rate effect, low dose rate radiotherapy (LDR)/high dose rate radiotherapy (HDR), was calculated using the isoeffect ICRU rectal dose by intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) for uterine cervix cancer. The subjects analyzed consisted of 78 LDR and 74 HDR patients whose ICRU rectal dose could be calculated and whose local control as stage II/III cases could be evaluated. The point A dose in ICRT was 45-55 Gy/3 fractions/3 weeks for LDR and 30 Gy/6 fractions/3 weeks for HDR. The dose effect relationships associated with local control at each whole pelvis external radiation dose were calculated using the double integration method and Probit analysis, and the 50% and 90% local control ICRU rectal doses were calculated from this relationship. Finally, the dose rate effect LDR/HDR was determined from 50% and 90% local control doses. The dose rate effect calculated from the 50% local control dose was 1.24 and that from the 90% local control dose was 1.14. (author)

  10. Radiobiological equivalent of low/high dose rate brachytherapy and evaluation of tumor and normal responses to the dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological equivalent of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in terms of the more recent linear quadratic (LQ) model, which leads to theoretical estimation of biological equivalence. One of the key features of the LQ model is that it allows a more systematic radiobiological comparison between different types of treatment because the main parameters alpha/beta and micro are tissue-specific. Such comparisons also allow assessment of the likely change in the therapeutic ratio when switching between LDR and HDR treatments. The main application of LQ methodology, which focuses on by increasing the availability of remote afterloading units, has been to design fractionated HDR treatments that can replace existing LDR techniques. In this study, with LDR treatments (39 Gy in 48 h) equivalent to 11 fractions of HDR irradiation at the experimental level, there are increasing reports of reproducible animal models that may be used to investigate the biological basis of brachytherapy and to help confirm theoretical predictions. This is a timely development owing to the nonavailability of sufficient retrospective patient data analysis. It appears that HDR brachytherapy is likely to be a viable alternative to LDR only if it is delivered without a prohibitively large number of fractions (e.g., fewer than 11). With increased scientific understanding and technological capability, the prospect of a dose equivalent to HDR brachytherapy will allow greater utilization of the concepts discussed in this article.

  11. Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR - BT) brachytherapy in treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast became widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of RT after breast conservation is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 45 to 50 Gy. Initially brachytherapy for breast cancer was used in addition of external radiation to boost a portion of the breast to higher doses. However, over the past 10 years, the application of brachytherapy in breast cancer has changed. In early stage breast cancer, research has shown that the area that requires radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from returning is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Because this typically includes only a part of the breast, brachytherapy is now being used to treat the targeted portion of the breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose so that treatment is completed in four to five days. Another indications for PDR - BT as a part of treatment in locally advanced breast cancer or as a palliative treatment are discussed in the paper, too. Preliminary results with PDR - BT boost technique are promising. However, more experience and longer follow-up are required to define whether these methods might improve local tumor control for breast cancer patients. In this article the current status, indications, technical aspects and published results of PDR brachytherapy (PDR - BT) in breast cancer treatment are reviewed. (author)

  12. Evaluation of functioning of high dose rate brachytherapy at the Instituto Nacional do Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, Laura M.A.; Barreto, Rodrigo V.; Silva, Penha M.; Macedo, Afranio A.; Borges, Solange C.; Martinez, Valeria P.O.

    2001-01-01

    Quality control tests are very useful tools to assure the quality of patient's treatment. A daily control of the high dose rate micro selectron was performed based on the security parameters of the equipment and on the quickness of performance. The purpose of this report is to evaluate and to discuss the errors found during the first three years with the high dose rate brachytherapy, at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer. (author)

  13. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  14. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J; Hasan, Salman A; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (Pcryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (Pcryotherapy patients was -35°C (range, -96°C to -6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Patient selection criteria for consideration of cryotherapy and brachytherapy are similar in terms of anesthesia candidacy. Therefore, cryotherapy would not be recommended as a first-line local therapy for this particular

  15. Assessment of Absorbed Dose in Persons close to the Patients during 192Ir brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joo Young; Kang, Se Sik

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2007 Annual Report of the National Cancer Registry, cervical cancer showed an occurring frequency of 7th in female cancers and 4rd in females with an age of 35-64 years. Both radiotherapy and chemotherapy are mainly used for the treatment of cervical cancer. In case of radiotherapy, brachytherapy using radioisotopes in conjunction with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using a linear accelerator is used in most cases to improve the outcome of cancer treatment. Brachytherapy, one of the cervical cancer radiotherapies, is a method that can minimize the damage of normal tissues restricting absorbed dose to uterus. It is, however, necessary to conduct a quantitative assessment on brachytherapy because it may cause radiation exposure to medical care providers during the radiotherapy. Therefore, the study provides the basic research data regarding brachytherapy for cervical cancer, estimating the absorbed dose in persons close to the patients using a mathematical phantom during 192Ir brachytherapy for cervical cancer

  16. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 06: 3D Printed Surface Applicators for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Scott; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Robar, James [Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Capital District Health Authority (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a new applicator for administering high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 3D printing technology. Primary advantages of using a 3D printed applicator will be to offer a more streamlined approach for therapists and patients while achieving better conformity, reproducibility, and patient specific applicators. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a 3D printed surface applicator by analyzing tumours on three locations of the body: the foot, nose, and scalp. The applicator was designed using Eclipse and further modified using Blender to create the catheter tunnels before being printed on a Lulzbot Taz 5 3D printer. A radiation plan was made using Oncentra Brachytherapy for a control treatment option using Freiburg Flaps and one with the novel method of a 3D printed applicator. A comparative analysis was made using D90, D100, V100, V150, and V200 Results: The 3D printed applicator showed comparable dose coverage with significant improvements on highly irregular surfaces when analyzed against a plan made using Freiburg Flaps. Although both plans exhibited complete tumour coverage, the 3D applicator showed improvements in D90 and V150 and the 3D applicator had a dose homogeneity index (DHI) of 0.99 compared to a DHI of 0.97 for the control. Therapist prep time also dropped significantly due to the lack of need for a thermoplastic mesh. Conclusions: 3D printed applicators for treatment of superficial sites proved to offer more patient convenience, less prep time, better conformity and tighter margins.

  17. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 06: 3D Printed Surface Applicators for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Scott; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Robar, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a new applicator for administering high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 3D printing technology. Primary advantages of using a 3D printed applicator will be to offer a more streamlined approach for therapists and patients while achieving better conformity, reproducibility, and patient specific applicators. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a 3D printed surface applicator by analyzing tumours on three locations of the body: the foot, nose, and scalp. The applicator was designed using Eclipse and further modified using Blender to create the catheter tunnels before being printed on a Lulzbot Taz 5 3D printer. A radiation plan was made using Oncentra Brachytherapy for a control treatment option using Freiburg Flaps and one with the novel method of a 3D printed applicator. A comparative analysis was made using D90, D100, V100, V150, and V200 Results: The 3D printed applicator showed comparable dose coverage with significant improvements on highly irregular surfaces when analyzed against a plan made using Freiburg Flaps. Although both plans exhibited complete tumour coverage, the 3D applicator showed improvements in D90 and V150 and the 3D applicator had a dose homogeneity index (DHI) of 0.99 compared to a DHI of 0.97 for the control. Therapist prep time also dropped significantly due to the lack of need for a thermoplastic mesh. Conclusions: 3D printed applicators for treatment of superficial sites proved to offer more patient convenience, less prep time, better conformity and tighter margins.

  18. Applicability and dosimetric impact of ultrasound-based preplanning in high-dose-rate brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aebersold, D.M.; Isaak, B.; Behrensmeier, F.; Kolotas, C.; Mini, R.; Greiner, R.H.; Thalmann, G.; Kranzbuehler, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: analyses of permanent brachytherapy seed implants of the prostate have demonstrated that the use of a preplan may lead to a considerable decrease of dosimetric implant quality. The authors aimed to determine whether the same drawbacks of preplanning also apply to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients and methods: 15 patients who underwent two separate HDR brachytherapy implants in addition to external-beam radiation therapy for advanced prostate cancer were analyzed. A pretherapeutic transrectal ultrasound was performed in all patients to generate a preplan for the first brachytherapy implant. For the second brachytherapy, a subset of patients were treated by preplans based on the ultrasound from the first brachytherapy implant. Preplans were compared with the respective postplans assessing the following parameters: coverage index, minimum target dose, homogeneity index, and dose exposure of organs at risk. The prostate geometries (volume, width, height, length) were compared as well. Results: at the first brachytherapy, the matching between the preplan and actual implant geometry was sufficient in 47% of the patients, and the preplan could be applied. The dosimetric implant quality decreased considerably: the mean coverage differed by -0.11, the mean minimum target dose by -0.15, the mean homogeneity index by -0.09. The exposure of organs at risk was not substantially altered. At the second brachytherapy, all patients could be treated by the preplan; the differences between the implant quality parameters were less pronounced. The changes of prostate geometry between preplans and postplans were considerable, the differences in volume ranging from -8.0 to 13.8 cm 3 and in dimensions (width, height, length) from -1.1 to 1.0 cm. Conclusion: preplanning in HDR brachytherapy of the prostate is associated with a substantial decrease of dosimetric implant quality, when the preplan is based on a pretherapeutic ultrasound. The implant quality

  19. Economic assessment of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution for cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P.; Carrere, M.O.; Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P.; Pommier, P.; Haie-Meder, C.; Quetin, P.; Kerr, C.; Delannes, M.; Castelain, B.; Peignaux, K.; Kirova, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Williaume, D.; Krzisch, C.; Thomas, L.; Lang, P.; Baron, M.H.; Cussac, A.; Lesaunier, F.; Maillard, S.; Barillot, I.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Our study aims at evaluating the cost of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution versus traditional treatments (iridium wires, cesium, non-optimized P.D.R.). Issues surrounding reimbursement were also explored. Materials and methods: This prospective, multi-centre, non-randomized study conducted in the framework of a project entitled 'Support Program for Costly Diagnostic and Therapeutic Innovations' involved 21 hospitals. Patients with cervix carcinoma received either classical brachytherapy or the innovation. The direct medical costs of staff and equipment, as well as the costs of radioactive sources, consumables and building renovation were evaluated from a hospital point of view using a micro costing approach. Subsequent costs per brachytherapy were compared between the four strategies. Results: The economic study included 463 patients over two years. The main resources categories associated with P.D.R. brachytherapy (whether optimized or not) were radioactive sources (1053 Euros) and source projectors (735 Euros). Optimized P.D.R. induced higher cost of imagery and dosimetry (respectively 130 Euros and 367 Euros) than non-optimized P.D.R. (47 Euros and 75 Euros). Extra costs of innovation over the less costly strategy (iridium wires) reached more than 2100 Euros per treatment, but could be reduced by half in the hypothesis of 40 patients treated per year (instead of 24 in the study). Conclusion: Aside from staff, imaging and dosimetry, the current hospital reimbursements largely underestimated the cost of innovation related to equipment and sources. (authors)

  20. Radiation safety program in high dose rate brachytherapy facility at INHS Asvini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy concerns primarily the use of radioactive sealed sources which are inserted into catheters or applicators and placed directly into tissue either inside or very close to the target volume. The use of radiation in treatment of patients involves both benefits and risks. It has been reported that early radiation workers had developed radiation induced cancers. These incidents lead to continuous work for the improvement of radiation safety of patients and personnel The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy needs appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize the risks to both patients and medical staff. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control, quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program developedfor a high dose rate brachytherapy facility at our centre which may serve as a guideline for other centres intending to install a similar facility.

  1. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  2. Three dimensional implementation of anisotropy corrected fast fourier transform dose calculation around brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyeremeh, P.O.

    2011-01-01

    Current-available brachytherapy dose computation algorithms ignore heterogeneities such as tissue-air interfaces, shielded gynaecological colpostats, and tissue-composition variations in source implants despite dose computation errors as large as 40%. A convolution kernel, which takes into consideration anisotropy of the dose distribution around a brachytherapy source, and to compute dose in the presence of tissue and applicator heterogeneities, has been established. Resulting from the convolution kernel are functions with polynomial and exponential terms. the solution to the convolution integral was represented by the Fast Fourier transform. The Fast Fourier transform has shown enough potency in accounting for errors due to these heterogeneities and the versatility of this Fast Fourier transform is evident from its capability of switching in between fields. Thus successful procedures in external beam could be adopted in brachytherapy to a yield similar effect. A dose deposition kernel was developed for a 64x64x64 matrix size with wrap around ordering and convoluted with the distribution of the sources in 3D. With MatLab's inverse Fast Fourier transform, dose rate distribution for a given array of interstitial sources, typical of brachytherapy was calculated. The shape of the dose rate distribution peaks appeared comparable with the output expected from computerized treatment planning systems for brachytherapy. Subsequently, the study confirmed the speed and accuracy of dose computation using the FFT convolution as well juxtaposed. Although, dose rate peaks from both the FFT convolution and the TPS(TG43) did not compare quantitatively, which was mainly due to the TPS(TG43) initiation computations from the origin (0,0,0) unlike the FFT convolution which uses sampling points; N=1,2,3..., there is a strong basis for establishing parity since the dose rate peaks compared qualitatively. With both modes compared, the discrepancies in the dose rates ranged between 3.6% to

  3. Custom-made micro applicators for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of chronic psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we present the treatment of the psoriatic nail beds of patients refractory to standard therapies using high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. The custom-made micro applicators (CMMA were designed and constructed for radiation dose delivery to small curvy targets with complicated topology. The role of the HDR brachytherapy treatment was to stimulate the T cells for an increased immune response. Material and methods: The patient diagnosed with psoriatic nail beds refractory to standard therapies received monthly subunguinal injections that caused significant pain and discomfort in both hands. The clinical target was defined as the length from the fingertip to the distal interphalangeal joint. For the accurate and reproducible setup in the multi-fractional treatment delivery, the CMMAs were designed. Five needles were embedded into the dense plastic mesh and covered with 5 mm bolus material for each micro applicator. Five CMMAs were designed, resulting in the usage of 25 catheters in total. Results: The prescription dose was planned to the depth of the anterior surface of the distal phalanx, allowing for the sparing of the surrounding tissue. The total number of the active dwell positions was 145 with step size of 5 mm. The total treatment time was 115 seconds with a 7.36 Ci activity of the 192Ir source. The treatment resulted in good pain control. The patient did not require further injections to the nail bed. After this initial treatment, additional two patients with similar symptoms received HDR brachytherapy. The treatment outcome was favorable in all cases. Conclusions : The first HDR brachytherapy treatment of psoriasis of the nail bed is presented. The initial experience revealed that brachytherapy treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in adequate control of the disease. A larger cohort of patients will be required for additional conclusions related to the long-term clinical benefits.

  4. A novel two-step optimization method for tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manju; Fields, Emma C; Todor, Dorin A

    2015-01-01

    To present a novel method allowing fast volumetric optimization of tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate treatments and to quantify its benefits. Twenty-seven CT-based treatment plans from 6 consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with four to five intracavitary tandem and ovoid insertions were used. Initial single-step optimized plans were manually optimized, approved, and delivered plans created with a goal to cover high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) with D90 >90% and minimize rectum, bladder, and sigmoid D2cc. For the two-step optimized (TSO) plan, each single-step optimized plan was replanned adding a structure created from prescription isodose line to the existent physician delineated HR-CTV, rectum, bladder, and sigmoid. New, more rigorous dose-volume histogram constraints for the critical organs at risks (OARs) were used for the optimization. HR-CTV D90 and OAR D2ccs were evaluated in both plans. TSO plans had consistently smaller D2ccs for all three OARs while preserving HR-CTV D90. On plans with "excellent" CTV coverage, average D90 of 96% (91-102%), sigmoid, bladder, and rectum D2cc, respectively, reduced on average by 37% (16-73%), 28% (20-47%), and 27% (15-45%). Similar reductions were obtained on plans with "good" coverage, average D90 of 93% (90-99%). For plans with "inferior" coverage, average D90 of 81%, the coverage increased to 87% with concurrent D2cc reductions of 31%, 18%, and 11% for sigmoid, bladder, and rectum, respectively. The TSO can be added with minimal planning time increase but with the potential of dramatic and systematic reductions in OAR D2ccs and in some cases with concurrent increase in target dose coverage. These single-fraction modifications would be magnified over the course of four to five intracavitary insertions and may have real clinical implications in terms of decreasing both acute and late toxicities. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Monte Carlo dosimetry of the IRAsource high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabiasl, Akbar; Ayoobian, Navid; Jabbari, Iraj; Poorbaygi, Hossein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a common method for cancer treatment in clinical brachytherapy. Because of the different source designs, there is a need for specific dosimetry data set for each HDR model. The purpose of this study is to obtain detailed dose rate distributions in water phantom for a first prototype HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source model, IRAsource, and compare with the other published works. In this study, Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP version 4C) code was used to simulate the dose rate distributions around the HDR source. A full set of dosimetry parameters reported by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43U1 was evaluated. Also, the absorbed dose rate distributions in water, were obtained in an along-away look-up table. The dose rate constant, Λ, of the IRAsource was evaluated to be equal to 1.112 ± 0.005 cGy h −1 U −1 . The results of dosimetry parameters are presented in tabulated and graphical formats and compared with those reported from other commercially available HDR 192 Ir sources, which are in good agreement. This justifies the use of specific data sets for this new source. The results obtained in this study can be used as input data in the conventional treatment planning systems.

  6. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriantsizafy, R D; Ramanandraibe, M J [Madagascar Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, Antananarivo (Madagascar); Raboanary, R [Institut of astro and High-Energy Physics Madagascar, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2007-07-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  7. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriantsizafy, R.D.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Raboanary, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  8. Combination of high-dose rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of advanced scalp angiosarcoma - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentil, Andre Cavalcanti; Lima Junior, Carlos Genesio Bezerra; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Pereira, Adelino Jose; Pellizon, Antonio Carlos Assis

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient with an extensive angiosarcoma of the scalp that was submitted only to radiotherapy with a combination of orthovoltage roentgentherapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy, using a mould. The clinical and technical features as well as the therapeutic outcome are presented, and the usefulness and peculiarities of high-dose rate brachytherapy for this particular indication is discussed. A comparative analysis of the difficulties and limitations of employing low-dose rate brachytherapy is also presented. The authors concluded that high-dose rate brachytherapy might be an useful, practical and safe option to treat neoplastic lesions of the scalp, and an alternative treatment to electrontherapy. (author)

  9. Bladder accumulated dose in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer and its relation to urinary toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Gaudet, Marc; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate locally accumulated dose to the bladder in multi-fraction high-dose-date (HDR) image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy (IG-ICBT) for cervical cancer, and study the locally-accumulated dose parameters as predictors of late urinary toxicity. A retrospective study of 60 cervical cancer patients who received five HDR IG-ICBT sessions was performed. The bladder outer and inner surfaces were segmented for all sessions and a bladder-wall contour point-set was created in MATLAB. The bladder-wall point-sets for each patient were registered using a deformable point-set registration toolbox called coherent point drift (CPD), and the fraction doses were accumulated. Various dosimetric and volumetric parameters were calculated using the registered doses, including r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum dose to the most exposed n-cm3 volume of bladder wall), r V n Gy (wall volume receiving at least m Gy), and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum equivalent biologically weighted dose to the most exposed n-cm3 of bladder wall), where n  =  1/2/5/10 and m  =  3/5/10. Minimum dose to contiguous 1 and 2 cm3 hot-spot volumes was also calculated. The unregistered dose volume histogram (DVH)-summed equivalent of r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} parameters (i.e. s{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} and s\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} ) were determined for comparison. Late urinary toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA scale, with toxicity Grade 0-1 categorized as Controls and Grade 2-4 as Cases. A two-sample t-test was used to identify the differences between the means of Control and Case groups for all parameters. A binomial logistic regression was also performed between the registered dose parameters and toxicity grouping. Seventeen patients were in the Case and 43 patients in the Control group. Contiguous

  10. Gynecological brachytherapy - from low-dose-rate to high-tech. Gynaekologische Brachytherapie - von Low-dose-rate zu High-tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, T. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany)); Christen, N. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany)); Alheit, H.D. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    The transition from low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to high-dose-rate (HDR) afterloading treatment is in progress in most centres of radiation therapy. First reports of studies comparing HDR and LDR treatment in cervix cancer demonstrate nearly equal local control. In our own investigations on 319 patients with primary irradiated carcinoma of the cervix (125 HDR/194 LDR) we found the following control rates: Stage FIGO I 95.4%/82.9% (HDR versus LDR), stage FIGO II 71.4%/73.7%, stage FIGO III 57.9%/38.5%. The results are not significant. The side effects - scored after EORT/RTOG criteria - showed no significant differences between both therapies for serious radiogenic late effects on intestine, bladder and vagina. The study and findings from the literature confirm the advantage of the HDR-procedure for patient and radiooncologist and for radiation protection showing at least the same results as in the LDR-area. As for radiobiolgical point of view it is important to consider that the use of fractionation in the HDR-treatment is essential for the sparing of normal tissues and therefore a greater number of small fractionation doses in the brachytherapy should be desirable too. On the other hand the rules, which are true for fractionated percutaneous irradiation therapy (overall treatment time as short as possible to avoid reppopulation of tumor cells) should be taken into consideration in combined brachy-teletherapy regime in gynecologic tumors. The first step in this direction may be accelerated regime with a daily application of both treatment procedures. The central blocking of the brachytherapy region from the whole percutaneous treatment target volume should be critically reflected, especially in the case of advanced tumors. (orig.)

  11. American brachytherapy society recommends no change for prostate permanent implant dose prescriptions using iodine-125 or palladium-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, M.J.; Butler, W.M.; Merrick, G.S.; Devlin, P.M.; Hayes, J.K.; Hearn, R.A.; Lief, E.P.; Meigooni, A.S.; Williamson, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - In 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) issued a report outlining recommended 125 I and 103 Pd datasets for consistency in calculating brachytherapy dose distributions. In 2005, to aid evaluating the clinical impact of implementing these datasets, the AAPM assessed the historical dependence of how prescribed doses differed from administered doses for 125 I and 103 Pd for permanent implantation of the prostate. Consequently, the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) considered the nature of these changes towards issuing recommended dose prescriptions for 125 I and 103 Pd interstitial brachytherapy implants for mono-therapy and standard boosts. Methods and materials - An investigation was performed of the 2005 AAPM analysis to determine changes in administered dose while affixing prescribed dose using 2004 AAPM 125 I and 103 Pd brachytherapy dosimetry datasets for prostate implants. For 125 I and 103 Pd, administered dose would change by +1.4% and +4.2%, respectively. The biological and societal impact of changing prescribed dose was considered. Results - Based on the need for clinical constancy and in recognition of overall uncertainties, the ABS recommends immediate implementation of the 2004 AAPM consensus brachytherapy dosimetry datasets and no changes to 125 I and 103 Pd dose prescriptions at this time. Conclusions - Radiation oncologists should continue to prescribe mono-therapy doses of 145 Gy and 125 Gy for 125 I and 105 Pd, respectively, and standard boost doses of 100-110 Gy and 90-100 Gy for 125 I and 103 Pd, respectively. (authors)

  12. Accurate assessment of the distortions produced by the transit dose in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nani, E.K.; Kyere, A.W.K.; Tetteh, K.

    2001-01-01

    Current polynomial methods used in the modelling of the dose distributions in HDR brachytherapy have been reformulated to improve accuracy. An example is provided to show the effects of the transit dose on the output. The transit dose, which is neglected by current computer software for calculating doses, can result in significant dosimetric errors. These additional unrecognised doses imply over-dosing and distortions in the dose distributions within the irradiated volume. Assessment of dose to critical and radiosensitive organs is therefore inaccurate. These could increase late tissue complications as predicted by the Linear Quadratic Model. Our model works very well for straight catheters and is highly recommended for the evaluation of the transit dose around such catheters. (author)

  13. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate (HDR) Endobronchial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hyesook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Won Dong; Kim, Woo Sung; Koh, Youn Suck [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-12-15

    Authors described the remote afterloading endobronchial brachytherapy (EBBT) technique using the microSelectron HDR Ir-192 and the Asan Medical Center experience. Total 28 EBBT in 9 patients were performed since November 1989 and 24 EBBT in 8 patients were employed for palliation and 3 EBBT in 1 patient was treated curatively. Authors observed a significant relief of obstructive symptom with tumor regression in 7 patients out of 8 who were treated palliatively but one of them died of pulmonary congestion in 3 weeks after EBBT. One patient with prior therapy of extensive electrocautery expired within 1 day after 2nd EBBT procedure with massive hemorrhage from the lesion. EBBT procedure has been tolerable and can be performed as an outpatient.

  14. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate (HDR) Endobronchial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyesook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Won Dong; Kim, Woo Sung; Koh, Youn Suck

    1991-01-01

    Authors described the remote afterloading endobronchial brachytherapy (EBBT) technique using the microSelectron HDR Ir-192 and the Asan Medical Center experience. Total 28 EBBT in 9 patients were performed since November 1989 and 24 EBBT in 8 patients were employed for palliation and 3 EBBT in 1 patient was treated curatively. Authors observed a significant relief of obstructive symptom with tumor regression in 7 patients out of 8 who were treated palliatively but one of them died of pulmonary congestion in 3 weeks after EBBT. One patient with prior therapy of extensive electrocautery expired within 1 day after 2nd EBBT procedure with massive hemorrhage from the lesion. EBBT procedure has been tolerable and can be performed as an outpatient

  15. Dose mapping of the rectal wall during brachytherapy with an array of scintillation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, L. E.; Suchowerska, N.; Yin, Y.; Lambert, J.; Haque, M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In pelvic brachytherapy treatments, the rectum is an organ at risk. The authors have developed an array of scintillation dosimeters suitable for in vivo use that enables quality assurance of the treatment delivery and provides an alert to potential radiation accidents. Ultimately, this will provide evidence to direct treatment planning and dose escalation and correlate dose with the rectal response. Methods: An array of 16 scintillation dosimeters in an insertable applicator has been developed. The dosimeters were calibrated simultaneously in a custom designed circular jig before use. Each dosimeter is optically interfaced to a set of pixels on a CCD camera located outside the treatment bunker. A customized software converts pixel values into dose rate and accumulates dose for presentation during treatment delivery. The performance of the array is tested by simulating brachytherapy treatments in a water phantom. The treatment plans were designed to deliver a known dose distribution on the surface of the rectal applicator, assumed to represent the dose to the rectal wall. Results: The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment plan and found to be in agreement to within the uncertainty in measurement, usually within 3%. The array was also used to track the progression of the source as it moved along the catheter. The measured position was found to agree with the position reported by the afterloader to within the measurement uncertainty, usually within 2 mm. Conclusions: This array is capable of measuring the actual dose received by each region of the rectal wall during brachytherapy treatments. It will provide real time monitoring of treatment delivery and raise an alert to a potential radiation accident. Real time dose mapping in the clinical environment will give the clinician additional confidence to carry out dose escalation to the tumor volume while avoiding rectal side effects.

  16. Comparison of high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayed, Alaa; Mutch, David G.; Rader, Janet S.; Gibb, Randall K.; Powell, Matthew A.; Wright, Jason D.; El Naqa, Issam; Zoberi, Imran; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes for endometrial carcinoma patients treated with either high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 1,179 patients divided into LDR (1,004) and HDR groups (175). Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) surgical Stages I-III were included. All patients were treated with postoperative irradiation. In the LDR group, the postoperative dose applied to the vaginal cuff was 60-70 Gy surface doses to the vaginal mucosa. The HDR brachytherapy prescription was 6 fractions of 2 Gy each to a depth of 0.5 cm from the surface of the vaginal mucosa. Overall survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications were endpoints. Results: For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the LDR group were 70%, 69%, and 81%, respectively. For all stages combined, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years in the HDR group were 68%, 62%, and 78%, respectively. There were no significant differences in early or late Grade III and IV complications in the HDR or LDR groups. Conclusion: Survival outcomes, pelvic tumor control, and Grade III and IV complications were not significantly different in the LDR brachytherapy group compared with the HDR group

  17. Low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy preserves good quality of life in buccal mucosa cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayier, A.; Hayashi, Keiji; Yoshimura, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the results and long-term changes in radiation toxicity of stage I-II buccal mucosa cancer patients treated by low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy with 198 Au grains. A total of 133 stage I-II buccal mucosa carcinomas patients received 198 Au grain implantation brachytherapy between January 1982 and July 2005: 75 of them were treated by 198 Au grain implantation alone and 58 were treated by 198 Au implantation in combination with external irradiation. The average 198 Au-grain dose was 70 Gy in 7 days. Gross tumor areas ranged from 2.4 cm 2 to 9 cm 2 , and the clinical target areas ranged from 6 cm 2 to 15 cm 2 . The follow-up periods ranged from 3 months to 20 years (mean: 5 years 11 months and median: 5 years 1 months). Failure at the site of the primary lesion occurred in 17 patients. Post-treatment mucosal ulceration developed in 15 patients, and all were cured within 25 months by conservative treatment. Osteoradionecrosis was diagnosed in 8 patients, but only one patient required surgical treatment. No severe complications or aggravation of complications developed more than 10 years after treatment. The results of low-dose-rate (LDR)-brachytherapy (BT) alone and LDR-BT in combination with external irradiation at a total dose of 25 Gy were acceptable from the standpoint of cure rate and quality of life (QOL). (author)

  18. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M; Van Hecke, H; Boterberg, T; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  19. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  20. SU-E-T-579: Impact of Cylinder Size in High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDRBT) for Primary Cancer in the Vagina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Gopalakrishnan, M; Lee, P; Sathiaseelan, V [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact of cylinder size in high dose rate Brachytherapy for primary vaginal cancers. Methods: Patients treated with HDR vaginal vault radiation in a list of cylinders ranging from 2.5 to 4 cm in diameter at 0.5 cm increment were analyzed. All patients’ doses were prescribed at the 0.5 cm from the vaginal surface with different treatment lengths. A series of reference points were created to optimize the dose distribution. The fraction dose was 5.5 Gy, the treatment was repeated for 4 times in two weeks. A cylinder volume was contoured in each case according to the prescribed treatment length, and then expanded to 5 mm to get a volume Cylinder-5mm-exp. A volume of PTV-Eval was obtained by subtracting the cylinder volume from the Cylinder-5mm-exp. The shell volume, PTV-Eval serves as the target volume for dosimetric evaluation. Results: DVH curves and average doses of PTV-Eval were obtained. Our results indicated that the DVH curves shifted toward higher dose side when larger cylinder was used instead of smaller ones. When 3.0 cm cylinder was used instead of 2.5 cm, for 3.0 cm treatment length, the average dose only increased 1%, from 790 to 799 cGy. However, the average doses for 3.5 and 4 cm cylinders respectively are 932 and 1137 cGy at the same treatment length. For 5.0 cm treatment length, the average dose is 741 cGy for 2.5 cm cylinder, and 859 cGy for 3 cm cylinder. Conclusion: Our data analysis suggests that for the vaginal intracavitary HDRBT, the average dose is at least 35% larger than the prescribed dose in the studied cases; the size of the cylinder will impact the dose delivered to the target volume. The cylinder with bigger diameter tends to deliver larger average dose to the PTV-Eval.

  1. The status of low dose rate and future of high dose rate Cf-252 brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F.; Chuba, P.J.; Fontanesi, J.

    1997-12-01

    This work describes the current status of the US low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252 brachytherapy program. The efforts undertaken towards development of a high dose rate (HDR) remotely after loaded Cf-252 source, which can accommodate 1 mg or greater Cf-252, are also described. This HDR effort is a collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), commercial remote after loader manufactures, the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center (ROC), and Wayne State University. To achieve this goal, several advances in isotope chemistry and source preparation at ORNL must be achieved to yield a specific material source loading of greater than or equal 1 mg Cf-252 per mm3. Development work with both radioactive and non-radioactive stand-ins for Cf-252 have indicated the feasibility of fabricating such sources. As a result, the decreased catheter diameter and computer controlled source placement will permit additional sites (e.g. brain, breast, prostate, lung, parotid, etc.) to be treated effectively with Cf-252 sources. Additional work at the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center (REDC) remains in source fabrication, after loader modification, and safe design. The current LDR Cf-252 Treatment Suite at the ROC is shielded and licensed to hold up to 1 mg of Cf-252. This was designed to maintain cumulative personnel exposure, both external to the room and in direct isotope handling, at less than 20 microSv/hr. However, cumulative exposure may be greatly decreased if a Cf-252 HDR unit is employed which would eliminate direct isotope handling and decrease treatment times from tilde 3 hours to an expected range of 3 to 15 minutes. Such a Cf-252 HDR source will also demonstrate improved dose distributions over current LDR treatments due to the ability to step the point-like source throughout the target volume and weight the dwell time accordingly

  2. Primary treatment of endometrial carcinoma with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: results of 12 years of experience with 280 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knocke, Tomas H.; Kucera, Herwig; Weidinger, Barbara; Hoeller, Walpurga; Poetter, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) in the primary treatment of endometrial carcinoma. The results of 12 years of experience (1981-1992) covering 280 patients (mean age 72 years) and their follow-up over 10 years (mean 55 months) are reported. Methods and Materials: Staging was based on clinical examination and fractionated curettage. There were 116 patients in clinical Stage Ia, 119 in Stage Ib, 37 in Stage II, and 8 in Stage III. HDRB was performed four to five times (8.5 Gy) with a one-channel intracavitary applicator and one to two times (7 Gy) with an intravaginal cylinder applicator. Overall and disease-specific survival, local control according to stage and histology, and late side effects were analyzed retrospectively (actuarial method). Results: At 5 years, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and local control were 52.7%, 76.6%, and 75.4% (Stage Ia: 63.9%, 84.9%, and 86.0%; Stage Ib: 47.3%, 73.3%, and 68.8%; and Stage II: 40.2%, 68.6%, and 60.5%) according to histopathologic Grade 1: 65.1%, 83.5%, and 77.7%; for Grade 2: 44.7%, 75.4%, and 75.8%; and for Grade 3: 37.7%, 63.9%, and 74.1%. Eight patients showed progressive disease, 64 developed recurrence after a median of 13 months (45 of whom had a local recurrence only, and 6 of whom had a local recurrence with distant metastases), 6 developed a lymph node recurrence only, and 7 developed distant metastases only. The calculated probability for developing a Grade III late side effect was 5.2% at 5 years. Conclusion: At Stages Ia, Ib, and II in endometrial carcinoma, HDRB is a very effective treatment modality with acceptable local control rates and disease-specific survival for patients who are not fit for surgery. During the time frame of 12 years and in 280 patients the method has proven to have a low risk of acute complications and an acceptable risk of long-term side effects

  3. Generation of uniformly distributed dose points for anatomy-based three-dimensional dose optimization methods in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahanas, M; Baltas, D; Giannouli, S; Milickovic, N; Zamboglou, N

    2000-05-01

    We have studied the accuracy of statistical parameters of dose distributions in brachytherapy using actual clinical implants. These include the mean, minimum and maximum dose values and the variance of the dose distribution inside the PTV (planning target volume), and on the surface of the PTV. These properties have been studied as a function of the number of uniformly distributed sampling points. These parameters, or the variants of these parameters, are used directly or indirectly in optimization procedures or for a description of the dose distribution. The accurate determination of these parameters depends on the sampling point distribution from which they have been obtained. Some optimization methods ignore catheters and critical structures surrounded by the PTV or alternatively consider as surface dose points only those on the contour lines of the PTV. D(min) and D(max) are extreme dose values which are either on the PTV surface or within the PTV. They must be avoided for specification and optimization purposes in brachytherapy. Using D(mean) and the variance of D which we have shown to be stable parameters, achieves a more reliable description of the dose distribution on the PTV surface and within the PTV volume than does D(min) and D(max). Generation of dose points on the real surface of the PTV is obligatory and the consideration of catheter volumes results in a realistic description of anatomical dose distributions.

  4. Dose Distributions of an 192Ir Brachytherapy Source in Different Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used MCNPX code to investigate the brachytherapy 192Ir dose distributions in water, bone, and lung tissue and performed radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter measurements to verify the obtained MCNPX results. The results showed that the dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function in water were highly consistent with data in the literature. However, the lung dose near the source would be overestimated by up to 12%, if the lung tissue is assumed to be water, and, hence, if a tumor is located in the lung, the tumor dose will be overestimated, if the material density is not taken into consideration. In contrast, the lung dose far from the source would be underestimated by up to 30%. Radial dose functions were found to depend not only on the phantom size but also on the material density. The phantom size affects the radial dose function in bone more than those in the other tissues. On the other hand, the anisotropy function in lung tissue was not dependent on the radial distance. Our simulation results could represent valid clinical reference data and be used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with lung cancer.

  5. Time, dose and volume factors in interstitial brachytherapy combined with external irradiation for oral tongue carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorozu, Atsunori

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 136 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of stages I and II of the oral tongue who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy alone or in combination with external irradiation between 1976 and 1991. Control of the primary lesion and the occurrence of late complications were analyzed with respect to dose, time and tumor size with the Cox hazard model. The 5-year survival rates for stages I and II were 84.5% and 75.6%. The 5-year primary control rate was 91.3% for stage I and 77.3% for stage II (p 50 Gy compared with a brachytherapy dose 30 mm. Late complications should be reduced by using a spacer, improvements in dental and oral hygiene, and a sophisticated implant method. (author)

  6. [Historical overview and the current practice of intracavitary treatment of cervical and endometrial cancer in the Oncoradiology Center of Budapest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkó, Dániel; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Pallinger, Ágnes; Weisz, Csaba; Naszály, Attila; Landherr, László

    2015-06-01

    The aims of our study were to describe the history and development of intracavitary brachytherapy in the treatment of gynecological tumors, to introduce our current practice for intracavitary brachytherapy treatments based on CT planning. Gynecological intracavitary brachytherapy has been applied in our department since the early 1930s. After a long development it has been completely renewed by 2014. In our center definitive and/or preoperative gynecological HDR-AL brachytherapy treatments were given to 25 patients (13 corpus uterine cancer patients and 12 cervical cancer patients) during the period of 01. 01. 2014-31. 01. 2015. In each case, target volumes were planned by CT images, DVH (dose volume histogram) analysis was performed in order to calculate the radiation tolerance dose of rectum and urinary bladder. Evaluation was performed by the EclipseTM 11.0.47. brachytherapy treatment planning system. During the definitive treatments of the 13 uterine cancer patients the D2cc value related to rectum tolerance was 66.3 GyEQD2 (46-91 Gy). The average D2cc value of urinary bladder tolerance was 76.5 GyEQD2 (30-112 Gy). CI was 0.72 (0.6-0.95). Average value of COIN was 0.57 (0.35-0.78). Compared to the prescribed dose D100 and D90 values were given in ratios. Compared to the volume which receives 100% of reference dose V150 and V200 values were also given in ratios. D100 and D90 were calculated to be 0.66 (0.47-0.97) and 0.91 (0.8-1.25). V150 and V200 volumes were 0.11 (0.04-0.18) and 0.06 (0.02-0.1). During the definitive treatments of 12 cervical cancer patients the D2cc value related to rectum tolerance calculated by DVH was 75.2 GyEQD2 (60-82 Gy). The average D2cc value of urinary bladder tolerance was 85 GyEQD2 based on DVH. CI was 0.66 (0.42-0.76). Average value of COIN was 0.52 (0.32-0.78). Mean value of DHI was 0.46 (0.27-0.54). D100 and D90 were calculated to be 0.72 (0.57-0.89) and 0.91 (0.84-1.11). V150 and V200 volumes were 0.057 (0.02-0.13) and 0.02 (0

  7. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  8. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  9. Radiation proctitis after the high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Masashi; Katsumata, Tomoe; Satoh, Takefumi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 12 patients treated for rectal bleeding after high-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. All patients developed grade 2 proctitis according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAC) and no patients needed blood transfusion. The patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and/or steroid suppositories. The bleeding stopped or improved in 11 patients. Although re-bleeding was noticed in 7 patients the same treatment was effective in 5 patients. (author)

  10. Medium dose rate brachytherapy for patients with cervical carcinoma; early result of a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amouzegar Hashemi F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Treatment of cervical carcinoma is routinely performed with Low Dose Rate (LDR brachytherapy, but Brachytherapy in our department is done with Medium Dose Rate (MDR due to the technical characteristics of the machine available here. Thus we decided to evaluate the results of this treatment in our department in a prospective study. "nMethods: Between March 2006 and July 2008, 140 patients with histologic diagnosis of cervical carcinoma referred to Tehran Cancer Institute; were treated with external beam radiotherapy (44-64 Gy to whole pelvis and MDR brachytherapy (8-30 Gy to Point A with a dose rate of 2.2±0.3 Gy/h. "nResults: 121 patients were followed up for a median time of 18 months (range: 9-39 m. There were 11%(6/54 local recurrence for surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy group; 25%(16/65 for radical radiotherapy group, and 19%(23/121 for all patients. Rectal and bladder complications incidence for all patients were 10%(12/121 and 13%(16/121 respectively. High grade complication was shown only in one patient in radical radiotherapy group. In this study 3-years disease free survival and overall survival were 73% and 92% respectively, and disease stage (p=0.007 and overall treatment time (p=0.05 were the significant factors affecting disease free survival. "nConclusions: Results of this series suggest that the use of external beam radiotherapy and MDR brachytherapy with about 20% dose reduction in comparison with LDR can be an acceptable technique with regard to local control and complications.

  11. Fitting and benchmarking of Monte Carlo output parameters for iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquah, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy, the use of radioactive sources for the treatment of tumours is an important tool in radiation oncology. Accurate calculations of dose delivered to malignant and normal tissues are the main responsibility of the Medical Physics staff. With the use of Treatment Planning System (TPS) computers now becoming a standard practice in the Radiation Oncology Departments, Independent calculations to certify the results of these commercial TPSs are important part of a good quality management system for brachytherapy implants. There are inherent errors in the dose distributions produced by these TPSs due to its failure to account for heterogeneity in the calculation algorithms and Monte Carlo (MC) method seems to be the panacea for these corrections. In this study, a fit functional form using MC output parameters was performed to reduce dose calculation uncertainty using the Matlab software curve fitting applications. This includes the modification of the AAPM TG-43 parameters to accommodate the new developments for a rapid brachytherapy dose rate calculation. Analytical computations were performed to hybridize the anisotropy function, F(r,θ) and radial dose function, g(r) into a single new function f(r,θ) for the Nucletron microSelectron High Dose Rate 'new or v2' (mHDRv2) 192 Ir brachytherapy source. In order to minimize computation time and to improve the accuracy of manual calculations, the dosimetry function f(r,θ) used fewer parameters and formulas for the fit. Using MC outputs as the standard, the percentage errors for the fits were calculated and used to evaluate the average and maximum uncertainties. Dose rate deviation between the MC data and fit were also quantified as errors(E), which showed minimal values. These results showed that the dosimetry parameters from this study as compared to those of MC outputs parameters were in good agreement and better than the results obtained from literature. The work confirms a lot of promise in building robust

  12. Geometrical Sparing Factors for the Rectum and Bladder in the Prediction of Grade 2 and Higher Complications After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.-W.; Liang, J.-A.; Hung, Y.-C.; Yeh, L.-S.; Chang, W.-C.; Yang, S.-N.; Lin, F.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the predictive values of geometrical sparing factors for the rectum and bladder in high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) for Grade 2 and higher late sequelae in patients with cervical cancer. Methods: A total of 392 patients were enrolled in this study. They were treated with external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis, after which HDRICB was performed using Ir-192 remote after-loading at 1-week intervals for three or four sessions. The geometrical sparing factor (GSF) was defined as the average of the ratios between the reference doses and the Point A dose. Results: A total of 46 patients (11.7%) had Grade 2 or higher late rectal complications (36 Grade 2, 9 Grade 3, and 1 Grade 4). In all, 32 patients (8.2%) had Grade 2 or higher late bladder complications (14 Grade 2, 16 Grade 3, and 2 Grade 4). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a high risk of rectal sequelae in patients who developed bladder complications (p = 0.0004, hazard ratio 3.54) and had a rectal GSF greater than 0.7 (p = 0.01, hazard ratio 1.99). The high risk factors for bladder complications were development of rectal complications (p = 0.0004, hazard ratio 3.74), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.0001, relative risk 3.94), and a bladder GSF greater than 0.9 (p = 0.01, hazard ratio, 2.53). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the predictive value of GSFs in HDRICB for cervical cancer. Patients with rectal GSFs greater than 0.7 or bladder GSFs greater than 0.9 are at risk for Grade 2 and higher late sequelae.

  13. Geometrical sparing factors for the rectum and bladder in the prediction of grade 2 and higher complications after high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Liang, Ji-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Yeh, Lian-Shung; Chang, Wei-Chun; Yang, Shih-Neng; Lin, Fang-Jen

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the predictive values of geometrical sparing factors for the rectum and bladder in high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) for Grade 2 and higher late sequelae in patients with cervical cancer. A total of 392 patients were enrolled in this study. They were treated with external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis, after which HDRICB was performed using Ir-192 remote after-loading at 1-week intervals for three or four sessions. The geometrical sparing factor (GSF) was defined as the average of the ratios between the reference doses and the Point A dose. A total of 46 patients (11.7%) had Grade 2 or higher late rectal complications (36 Grade 2, 9 Grade 3, and 1 Grade 4). In all, 32 patients (8.2%) had Grade 2 or higher late bladder complications (14 Grade 2, 16 Grade 3, and 2 Grade 4). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a high risk of rectal sequelae in patients who developed bladder complications (p = 0.0004, hazard ratio 3.54) and had a rectal GSF greater than 0.7 (p = 0.01, hazard ratio 1.99). The high risk factors for bladder complications were development of rectal complications (p = 0.0004, hazard ratio 3.74), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.0001, relative risk 3.94), and a bladder GSF greater than 0.9 (p = 0.01, hazard ratio, 2.53). This study demonstrates the predictive value of GSFs in HDRICB for cervical cancer. Patients with rectal GSFs greater than 0.7 or bladder GSFs greater than 0.9 are at risk for Grade 2 and higher late sequelae.

  14. Multicentre treatment planning study of MRI-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison between tandem-ovoid applicator users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Van Limbergen, Erik; Brabandere, Marisol de; Nulens, An; Nout, Remi A.; Laman, Mirjam; Ketelaars, Martijn; Lutgens, Ludovicus; Reniers, Brigitte; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare MRI-guided treatment planning approaches between four centres that use tandem-ovoid applicators. Material and methods: Four centres generated three treatment plans for four patients: standard, optimised intracavitary, and optimised intracavitary/interstitial. Prescribed D90 High-Risk CTV (HR-CTV) was 85 Gy EQD2 (external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy), while the D 2cc OAR limit was 90 Gy EQD2 for bladder and 75 Gy EQD2 for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel, respectively. DVH-parameters, source loading patterns and spatial dose distributions of the three treatment plans were compared. Results: The standard plans of the different centres were comparable with respect to the D90 HR-CTV, but differed in OAR doses. MRI-guided intracavitary optimisation resulted in organ sparing and smaller variation in DVH parameters between the centres. Adding interstitial needles led to target dose escalation while respecting the OAR constraints. However, substantial differences in relative weights of the applicator parts resulted in an increased variation in DVH parameters and locations of high dose regions. Conclusions: MRI-guided brachytherapy treatment planning optimisation provides the possibility to increase the dose to the HR-CTV and spare the OARs. Depending on the degree of conformity the centres make different choices in relative weighting of applicator parts, leading to different dose distributions

  15. The Preliminary Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satmoko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary prototype of a brachytherapy equipment has been constructed. The work started by developing conceptual design, followed by basic design and detailed design. In the conceptual design, design requirements are stated. In the basic design, technical specifications for main components are determined. In detailed design, general drawings are discussed. The prototype consists of three main systems: a mechanical system, an instrumentation system, and a safety system. The mechanical system assures the movement mechanism of the isotope source position beginning from the standby position until the applicators. It consists of three main modules: a position handling module, a container module, and a channel distribution module. The position handling module serves to move the isotope source position. As shielding, the second module is to store the source when the equipment is in standby position. The prototype provides 12 output channels. The channel selection is performed by the third module. The instrumentation system controls the movement of source position by handling motor operations. It consists of several modules. A microcontroller module serves as a control center whose task includes both controlling motors and communicating with computer. A motor module serves to handle motors. 10 sensors, including their signal conditionings, are introduced to read the environment conditions of the equipment. LEDs are used to display these conditions. In order to facilitate the operators’ duty, communication via RS232 is provided. The brachytherapy equipment can therefore be operated by using computer. Interface software is developed using C# language. To complete both mechanical and instrumentation systems performance, a safety system is developed to make sure that the safety for operator and patients from receiving excessive radiation. An interlock system is introduced to guard against abnormal conditions. In the worst case, a manual intervention

  16. Implementation of three-dimensional planning in brachytherapy of high dose rate for gynecology therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Camila Pessoa de

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to implement the three-dimensional (3D) planning for gynecological brachytherapy treatments. For this purpose, tests of acceptance and commissioning of brachytherapy equipment were performed to establish a quality and periodic assurance program. For this purpose, an important step was searching for a material to be used as a dummy source, since the applicators do not have any specific dummy. In addition, the validation of the use of applicators library was made for reconstruction in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to validate 3D planning, comparison of doses in dose assessment points used in bidimensional (2D) plans have been performed with volumetric doses to adjacent organs to the tumor. Finally, a protocol was established for 3D brachytherapy planning alternately using magnetic resonance image (MRI) and CT images, making evaluation of the dose in the tumor through the recording of MR and CT images. It was not possible to find a suitable material that could be used as dummy in MRI. However, the acquisition of the license's library for the applicators made possible the 3D planning based on MRI. No correlation was found between volumetric and specific doses analyzed, showing the importance of the implementation of 3D planning. The average ratio between D 2cc and ICRU Bladder dose was 1,74, 22% higher than the ratio found by others authors. For the rectum, D 2cc was less than dose point for 60% of fractions; the average difference was 12,5%. The average ratio between D 2cc and point dose rectum, 0,85, is equivalent to the value showed by Kim et al, 0,91. The D 2cc for sigmoid was 69% higher than point dose used, unless it was not possible compare this value, since the sigmoid point used in the 2D procedures is not used in others institutes. Relative dose in 2 cc of sigmoid was 57% of the prescription dose, the same value was found by in literature. This work enabled the implementation of a viable

  17. Minimal percentage of dose received by 90% of the urethra (%UD90) is the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Anai, Satoshi; Hirayama, Akihide; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2012-09-14

    To clarify the significant clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters to predict PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer. We studied 200 consecutive patients who received LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and November 2008. Of them, 137 patients did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. One hundred and forty-two patients were treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and 58 were treated with LDR-brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy. The cut-off value of PSA bounce was 0.1 ng/mL. The incidence, time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were investigated. Clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters were evaluated to elucidate independent factors to predict PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy alone. Fifty patients (25%) showed PSA bounce and 10 patients (5%) showed PSA failure. The median time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were 17 months, 0.29 ng/mL, and 7.0 months, respectively. In 103 hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and univariate Cox proportional regression hazard model indicated that age and minimal percentage of the dose received by 30% and 90% of the urethra were independent predictors of PSA bounce. With a multivariate Cox proportional regression hazard model, minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant parameter of PSA bounce. Minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone.

  18. High dose-rate brachytherapy for elderly patients with uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Liang, Ji-An; Yang, Shih-Neng; Lin, Fang-Jen

    2003-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy (RT) in cancer treatment for the elderly patient is growing. The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy and complication rate for radiotherapy, using external-beam irradiation (EBRT) and high dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB), for patients aged 70 years or older with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. From September 1992 to December 1997, 295 patients diagnosed with uterine cervical cancer completed RT at the Shin Kong Memorial Hospital and China Medical College Hospital. Two hundred and fifty-eight patients [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage distribution: 35 Ib, 26 IIa, 122 IIb, 10 IIIa, 58 IIIb, 7 IVa] who had undergone at least two courses of HDRICB and a minimum of 3 years of follow-up, were evaluated. A retrospective analysis was conducted to compare the outcome of radiation therapy for the 179 patients under 70 years of age (younger group) and the 79 patients aged 70 years or older (older group). The RT consisted of EBRT followed by HDRICB. After a total EBRT dose of 40-45 Gy/20 in 25 fractions, irradiating the whole pelvis over 4-5 weeks, dosage for patients diagnosed as FIGO stage IIb-IVa bilateral parametrial disease was boosted to 54-58 Gy, with central shielding. HDRICB was administered at 1-week intervals using an Ir-192 remote after-loading technique. Ninety-nine patients (38.4%) received three fractions of HDRICB, while 156 patients (60.5%) had four fractions. Total prescribed Point A dosages (EBRT+HDRICB) ranged from 58 to 71.6 Gy (median, 65.6 Gy) for stage IB-IIA, while for larger lesions (stage IIB-IVA) analogous dosages were 59-75.6 Gy (median, 65.6 Gy). Median follow-up durations for the older and younger groups were 56/55 months, respectively. The respective 5-year actuarial survivals (AS) for the older and younger groups were 82/85% for stage Ib, 65/65% for IIa, 61/71% for IIb and 35/59% for IIIa-b. The 5-year cause-specific survivals (CSS) for the older and

  19. The brachytherapy with low dose-rate iridium for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momma, Tetsuo; Saito, Shiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Toya, Kazuhito; Dokiya, Takushi; Murai, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy as an option for the treatment of prostate cancer has been commonly performed in USA. As the permanent seeding of the radioactive materials is strictly restricted by the law in Japan, brachytherapy must be performed by the temporary implant. This treatment has been performed at a few facilities in Japan mostly using high dose-rate iridium. Only our facility has been using low dose-rate iridium (LDR-Ir) for prostate cancer. This study evaluates the clinical results of the treatment. Since December 1997 to December 1999, 26 patients with histologically diagnosed as prostate cancer (Stage B, 92%; Stage C, 8%) underwent brachytherapy. Twenty-two patients received brachytherapy alone, three were treated with a combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy (ERT) and one was treated with a combination of brachytherapy and neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients ranged in age from 61 to 84 (median 76) years old. Treatment was initiated with perineal needle placement. From 10 to 14 needles were placed through the holes on the template which was fixed to the stabilizer of the transrectal ultrasound probe. After the needle placement, CT scan was performed to draw distribution curves for the treatment planning. LDR-Ir wires were introduced to the sheath and indwelled during the time calculated from dosimetry. Peripheral dose was 70 Gy for the monotherapy of brachytherapy. For the combination therapy, 40 Gy was given by brachytherapy and 36 Gy with ERT afterwards. LDR-Ir wires were removed after completion of the radiation and patients were followed with serum PSA level and annual biopsy. During 2 to 26 (median 12) months follow-up, 8 out of 9 patients with initial PSA level above 20 ng/ml showed PSA failure. All 13 patients with initial PSA level lower than 20 ng/ml were free from PSA failure. Eight out of 11 patients with Gleason's score 7 or higher showed PSA failure, and all 14 patients (including three patients with combined therapy) with

  20. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  1. Dose distribution and risk factors in tele cobalt therapy and intracavitary treatment with sealed sources of Cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briquet, C.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate dose to organs, outside the treatment volume. The experimental measurements were done using TLD dosemeters, placed in various regions of a Rando Alderson Phantom. The theoretical absorbed doses were calculated using the Monte Carlo method applied to a mathematical phantom. (author)

  2. Comparative study of reference points by dosimetric analyses for late complications after uniform external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.-W.; Liang, J.-A.; Yeh, L.-S.; Yang, S.-N.; Shiau, A.-C.; Lin, F.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to correlate and compare the predictive values of rectal and bladder reference doses of uniform external beam radiotherapy without shielding and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB) with late sequelae in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Methods and materials: Between September 1992 and December 1998, 154 patients who survived more than 12 months after treatment were studied. Initially, they were treated with 10-MV X-rays (44 to 45 Gy/22 to 25 fractions over 4 to 5 weeks) to the whole pelvis, after which HDRICB was performed using 192 Ir remote afterloading at 1-week intervals for 4 weeks. The standard prescribed dose for each HDRICB was 6.0 Gy to point A. Patient- and treatment-related-factors were evaluated for late rectal complications using logistic regression modeling. Results: The probability of rectal complications showed better correlation of dose-response with increasing total ICRU (International Committee on Radiotherapy Units and Measurements) rectal dose. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a high risk of late rectal sequelae in patients who developed rectal complications (p 0.0001;relative risk, 15.06;95% CI, 2.89∼43.7) and total ICRU rectal dose greater than 16 Gy (p = 0.02;relative risk, 2.07;95% CI, 1.13∼4.55). The high risk factors for bladder complications were seen in patients who developed rectal complications (p = 0.0001;relative risk, 15.2;95% CI, 2.81∼44.9) and total ICRU bladder dose greater than 24 Gy (p = 0.02;relative risk, 8.93;95% CI, 1.79∼33.1). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the predictive value of ICRU rectal and bladder reference dosing in HDRICB for patients receiving uniform external beam radiation therapy without central shielding. Patients who had a total ICRU rectal dose greater than 16 Gy, or a total ICRU bladder dose over 24 Gy, were at risk of late sequelae

  3. Application of the Monte Carlo integration method in calculations of dose distributions in HDR-Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltas, D; Geramani, K N; Ioannidis, G T; Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Giannouli, S [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Source anisotropy is a very important factor in brachytherapy quality assurance of high dose rate HDR Ir 192 afterloading stepping sources. If anisotropy is not taken into account then doses received by a brachytherapy patient in certain directions can be in error by a clinically significant amount. Experimental measurements of anisotropy are very labour intensive. We have shown that within acceptable limits of accuracy, Monte Carlo integration (MCI) of a modified Sievert integral (3D generalisation) can provide the necessary data within a much shorter time scale than can experiments. Hence MCI can be used for routine quality assurance schedules whenever a new design of HDR or PDR Ir 192 is used for brachytherapy afterloading. Our MCI calculation results are comparable with published experimental data and Monte Carlo simulation data for microSelectron and VariSource Ir 192 sources. We have shown not only that MCI offers advantages over alternative numerical integration methods, but also that treating filtration coefficients as radial distance-dependent functions improves Sievert integral accuracy at low energies. This paper also provides anisotropy data for three new Ir 192 sources, one for microSelectron-HDR and two for the microSelectron-PDR, for which data currently is not available. The information we have obtained in this study can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  4. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  5. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  6. Non-uniform dwell times in line source high dose rate brachytherapy: physical and radiobiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Tan, L.T.; Freestone, G.; Bleasdale, C.; Myint, S.; Littler, J.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to vary source dwell times in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy allows for the use of non-uniform dwell times along a line source. This may have advantages in the radical treatment of tumours depending on individual tumour geometry. This study investigates the potential improvements in local tumour control relative to adjacent normal tissue isoeffects when intratumour source dwell times are increased along the central portion of a line source (technique A) in radiotherapy schedules which include a relatively small component of HDR brachytherapy. Such a technique is predicted to increase the local control for tumours of diameters ranging between 2 cm and 4 cm by up to 11% compared with a technique in which there are uniform dwell times along the line source (technique B). There is no difference in the local control rates for the two techniques when used to treat smaller tumours. Normal tissue doses are also modified by the technique used. Technique A produces higher normal tissue doses at points perpendicular to the centre of the line source and lower dose at points nearer the ends of the line source if the prescription point is not in the central plane of the line source. Alternatively, if the dose is prescribed at a point in the central plane of the line source, the dose at all the normal tissue points are lower when technique A is used. (author)

  7. Fractionation in medium dose rate brachytherapy of cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack F.; Leborgne, Jose H.; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Chappell, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an optimum fractionation for medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy from retrospective data of patients treated with different MDR schedules in comparison with a low dose rate (LDR) schedule. Methods and Materials: The study population consists of consecutive Stage IB-IIA-IIB patients who received radiotherapy alone with full dose brachytherapy plus external beam pelvic and parametrial irradiation from 1986-1993. Patients also receiving surgery or chemotherapy were excluded. The LDR group (n = 102, median follow-up: 80 months) received a median dose to Point A of two 32.5 Gy fractions at 0.44 Gy/h plus 18 Gy of external whole pelvic irradiation. The MDR1 group (n = 30, median follow-up: 45 months) received a mean dose of two 32 Gy fractions at 1.68 Gy/h. An individual dose reduction of 12.5% was planned for this group according to the Manchester experience, but only a 4.8% dose reduction was achieved. The MDR2 group (n = 10, median follow-up: 36 months) received a dose of two 24 Gy fractions at 1.65 Gy/h. The MDR3 group (n = 10, median follow-up 33 months) received a mean dose of three 15.3 Gy fractions at 1.64 Gy/h. And finally, the MDR4 group (n = 38, median follow-up: 24 months) received six 7.7 Gy fractions from two pulses 6 h apart in each of three insertions at 1.61 Gy/h. The median external pelvic dose to MDR schedules was between 12 and 20 Gy. The linear quadratic (LQ) formula was used to calculate the biologically effective dose (BED) to tumor (Gy 10 ) and rectum (Gy 3 ), assuming T(1(2)) for repair = 1.5 h. Results: The crude central recurrence rate was 6% for LDR (mean BED = 95.4 Gy 10 ) and 10% for MDR4 (mean BED = 77.0 Gy 10 ) (p = NS). The remaining MDR groups had no recurrences. Grade 2 and 3 rectal or bladder complications were 0% for LDR (rectal BED = 109 Gy 3 ), 83% for MDR1 (BED = 206 Gy 3 ), and 30% for MDR3 (BED = 127 Gy 3 ). The MDR2 and MDR4 groups presented no complications (BED, 123 Gy 3 , and 105 Gy 3 , respectively

  8. MRI dosimetry using an echo-quotient technique for high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansbacher, W.

    1996-01-01

    MRI gel dosimetry is a relatively new technique that has many advantages over conventional methods, and is particularly suited to High Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy. The dosimeter has high spatial resolution and a water-equivalent response over a wide range of photon energies. Because it is an integrating dosimeter, it allows for efficient mapping of the dynamically-produced distributions from an HDR source. As an example of this technique, the dose response, which is calibrated in terms of the change in spin-spin relaxation time, has been used to investigate the anisotropy of an HDR source. (author). 1 fig

  9. High dose rate versus medium dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy in inoperable esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, J.; Jager, J.; Jong, J. de; Rijken, J.; Pannebakker, M.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the results of medium dose rate (MDR) intraluminal brachytherapy (ILBT) and high dose rate (HDR) ILBT in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma, with regard to dysphagia, complication rate and survival. Material and methods: Included were 114 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer who were treated with a single session of ILBT. In all cases a single dose of 15 Gy was administered, calculated at a 1 cm radius. Forty-eight patients were treated with MDR ( 137 Cs)ILBT. In June 1990 MDR was replaced by HDR and from then 66 patients were treated with HDR ( 192 Ir). Dysphagia was prospectively scored using a 5-point scale at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Results: No significant differences were noted between the two groups with regard to pretreatment variables. In patients treated with MDR-ILBT improvement of swallowing ability was noted in 30 out of 42 evaluable patients (71%), no change in 9 (21%) and progression of dysphagia in 3 patients (8%), as compared to 34 out of 59 evaluable patients (58%), 16 (27%) and 6 (15%) resp. in de HDR-ILBT group. In the latter category, progression of dysphagia was caused by fistulae in 2 patients. The differences were not significant (ns). Additional treatment in case of recurrent or persistent dysphagia was needed in 50% of the cases in the MDR-ILBT group as compared to 41% in the HDR-ILBT group (ns). The median survival of the MDR-ILBT group was 3.9 months as compared to 4.3 months in the HDR-ILBT group (ns). In 2 patients (4%) treated with MDR-ILBT bronchio-oesphageal fistulae developed at 6 weeks and 2 months. In the HDR-ILBT group fistulae were noted in 7 cases (11%) at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 2, 3, 3, 4 and 9 months (ns). In all of these cases persistent of recurrent tumour was present. Conclusions: No significant differences were noted with regard to palliation of dysphagia, survival and complication rate between MDR-ILBT and HDR-ILBT in the management of esophageal

  10. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  11. Intracavitary radiation for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basrur, V.R. (Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Hamilton (Canada). Hamilton Clinic); Knight, P.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients with low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma have been treated with intra-cavitary radiation (Papillon's technique). Twenty-three were treated for cure and 12 for palliation. The indications for curative intracavity radiation were mobile polypoid tumors, less than 3 cm in diameter, with Broder's Grades 1 and 2 differentiation lying less than 11 cm from the anal verge. Doses between 2000 and 4000 cGy were delivered to a total of 7000 to 20000 cGy with complete resolution of the tumors. Eighty-seven per cent in the curative group are alive and well up to 42 months after treatment with a minimum follow-up of six months. Of the 23 patients treated for cure, three patients had recurrences within 18 months of therapy. Two of the three patients are alive following surgery. The third patient died in the postoperative period. The results of intracavitary radiation are comparable to ablative surgery and avoid a permanent colostomy. Age, frailty, or other medical conditions do not preclude this treatment. Anesthesia and hospitalization are not required. This method can also be used for palliation of recurrent tumors and in patients who are unsuitable for surgery.

  12. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; D’Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for 192 Ir sources and 50 kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator. (paper)

  13. Mucosal dose prescription in endobronchial brachytherapy: a study based on CT-dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Murrer, Lars H.P.; Pan, Connie de; Roos, Martin; Senan, Suresh

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the consequences of using different dose prescription methods for endobronchial brachytherapy (EB), both with and without the use of a centered applicator. Materials and Methods: A CT scan was performed during EB procedures in 13 patients after insertion of the lung applicator. A dosimetric analysis was subsequently performed in five of these patients using a 3D-brachytherapy treatment planning system (PLATO v13.3, Nucletron). Results: Dose prescription to the mucosa yields uniform dose distributions to the bronchial mucosa when a centrally positioned applicator is used. When non-centrally positioned applicators are used, mucosal dosing results in a significant underdosage to parts of the target volume. Due to the rapid dose fall-off in EB, dose prescription to the mucosa resulted in inadequate coverage of the outer portion of the bronchial wall and adjacent peribronchial space. When compared to mucosal dose prescription, prescription to the outer aspect of the bronchial wall appears to improve target coverage while limiting the hyperdose (i.e., 200%) volume. The diameters of the different bronchial segments, as determined by CT measurements in 13 patients, correlated well with calculated values based upon the tracheal diameter. Conclusions: Mucosal dose prescription should only be used in combination with centered EB applicators. Given the rapid dose fall-off in EB mucosal dose prescription should be used with caution in curative treatments where EB, without additional external radiotherapy, is used as the sole treatment modality. In curative EB, both improved target coverage and a limited hyperdose volume can be achieved by dose prescription to the outer aspect of the bronchial wall

  14. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either 60 Co, 192 Ir, or 169 Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for 60 Co and 1 mm for both 192 Ir and 169 Yb. Transmission data for 60 Co and 192 Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898–4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for 169 Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified. (paper)

  15. A comparison between tandem and ovoids and interstitial gynecologic template brachytherapy dosimetry using a hypothetical computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, I-Chow J.; Speight, Joycelyn; Hai, Jenny; Vigneault, Eric; Phillips, Theodore; Pouliot, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution within the clinical target volume between two gynecologic brachytherapy systems - the tandem and ovoids and the Syed-Neblett gynecologic template - using a hypothetical computer model. Methods and Materials: Source positions of an intracavitary system (tandem and ovoids) and an interstitial system (GYN template) were digitized into the Nucletron Brachytherapy Planning System. The GYN template is composed of a 13-catheter implant (12 catheters plus a tandem) based on the Syed-Neblett gynecologic template. For the tandem and ovoids, the dwell times of all sources were evenly weighted to produce a pear-shaped isodose distribution. For the GYN template, the dwell times were determined using volume optimization. The prescribed dose was then normalized to point A in the intracavitary system and to a selected isodose line in the interstitial system. The treated volume in the two systems was kept approximately the same, and a cumulative dose-volume histogram of the treated volume was then generated with the Nucletron Brachytherapy Planning System to use for comparison. To evaluate the dose to a hypothetical target, in this case the cervix, a 2-cm-long, 3-cm-diameter cylinder centered along the tandem was digitized as the clinical target volume. The location of this hypothetical cervix was based on the optimal application of the brachytherapy system. A visual comparison of clinical target coverage by the treated volume on three different orthogonal planes through the treated volume was performed. The percentage dose-volume histograms of the target were generated for comparison. Multiple midline points were also placed at 5-mm intervals away from the tandem in the plane of the cervix to simulate the location of potential bladder and rectal dose points. Doses to these normal structures were calculated for comparison. Results: Although both systems covered the hypothetical cervix adequately, the interstitial system had a better

  16. High dose rate brachytherapy for medically inoperable stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petereit, Daniel G; Sarkaria, Jann N; Schink, Julian; Springman, Scott R; Kinsella, Timothy J; Buchler, Dolores A

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with medically inoperable endometrial cancer clinically confined to the corpus. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with endometrial cancer and an intact uterus have been treated since 1989 with HDR brachytherapy. Twenty-six patients with medically inoperable Stage I disease were treated with radiation alone and form the basis of this study. Obesity was assessed using the body mass index (BMI kg/m{sup 2}) scale. Patients with a BMI above 28 were considered obese and those above 35 morbidly obese, per standard anesthesia guidelines. Brachytherapy was delivered in 5 HDR insertions, 1 week apart, without any external beam radiation. The following doses were delivered per insertion: 5.7 Gy to point S, 7.0 Gy to point W, 8.2 Gy to the vaginal surface and 9.2 Gy to point M. Point M represents the conventional point A dose, while points S and W are myometrial points. A single tandem with either ovoids or cylinders was placed, unless the uterine cavity would accommodate 2 tandems. All treatments were outpatient using intravenous fentanyl and midazolam for sedation. Pelvic ultrasound was commonly used at the time of brachytherapy to verify tandem placement. Three year clinical endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for the study cohort was 21 months with follow-up greater than 36 months in 11 patients. Seventeen of the 26 patients were inoperable due to morbid obesity (median weight and BMI; 316 lbs and 55 kg/m{sup 2}, respectively); the other patients had poor cardiopulmonary reserve {+-} obesity. The median age, KPS (Karnofsky Performance Status), weight, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists' Physical Class System) and BMI were 63 yrs, 80%, 285 lbs, 3 and 49 kg/m{sup 2}, respectively. Two patients with an ASA of 3 and 4 died from acute cardio-pulmonary events within 30 days of the last insertion, emphasizing the need

  17. High dose rate brachytherapy for medically inoperable stage I endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Schink, Julian; Springman, Scott R.; Kinsella, Timothy J.; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with medically inoperable endometrial cancer clinically confined to the corpus. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with endometrial cancer and an intact uterus have been treated since 1989 with HDR brachytherapy. Twenty-six patients with medically inoperable Stage I disease were treated with radiation alone and form the basis of this study. Obesity was assessed using the body mass index (BMI kg/m 2 ) scale. Patients with a BMI above 28 were considered obese and those above 35 morbidly obese, per standard anesthesia guidelines. Brachytherapy was delivered in 5 HDR insertions, 1 week apart, without any external beam radiation. The following doses were delivered per insertion: 5.7 Gy to point S, 7.0 Gy to point W, 8.2 Gy to the vaginal surface and 9.2 Gy to point M. Point M represents the conventional point A dose, while points S and W are myometrial points. A single tandem with either ovoids or cylinders was placed, unless the uterine cavity would accommodate 2 tandems. All treatments were outpatient using intravenous fentanyl and midazolam for sedation. Pelvic ultrasound was commonly used at the time of brachytherapy to verify tandem placement. Three year clinical endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for the study cohort was 21 months with follow-up greater than 36 months in 11 patients. Seventeen of the 26 patients were inoperable due to morbid obesity (median weight and BMI; 316 lbs and 55 kg/m 2 , respectively); the other patients had poor cardiopulmonary reserve ± obesity. The median age, KPS (Karnofsky Performance Status), weight, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists' Physical Class System) and BMI were 63 yrs, 80%, 285 lbs, 3 and 49 kg/m 2 , respectively. Two patients with an ASA of 3 and 4 died from acute cardio-pulmonary events within 30 days of the last insertion, emphasizing the need for accurate pre

  18. Gold nanoparticle-aided brachytherapy with vascular dose painting: estimation of dose enhancement to the tumor endothelial cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical microdosimetry at the subcellular level is employed in this study to estimate the dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cell nuclei, caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) targeting the tumor endothelium, during brachytherapy. A tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) is modeled as a slab of 2 μm (thickness) × 10 μm (length) × 10 μm (width). The EC contains a nucleus of 5 μm diameter and thickness of 0.5-1 μm, corresponding to nucleus size 5%-10% of cellular volume, respectively. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the dose enhancement to the nucleus caused by photo/Auger electrons from AuNPs attached to the exterior surface of the EC. The nucleus dose enhancement factor (nDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the nucleus with and without the presence of gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations. The investigated concentration range considers the potential for significantly higher local concentration near the EC due to preferential accumulation of AuNP in the tumor vasculature. Four brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, and 50 kVp x-rays were investigated. For nucleus size of 10% of the cellular volume and AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, brachytherapy sources Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 5.6-73, 4.8-58.3, 4.7-56.6, and 3.2-25.8, respectively. Meanwhile, for nucleus size 5% of the cellular volume in the same concentration range, Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 6.9-79.2, 5.1-63.2, 5.0-61.5, and 3.3-28.3, respectively. The results predict that a substantial dose boost to the nucleus of endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs in combination with brachytherapy. Such vascular dose boosts could induce tumor vascular shutdown, prompting extensive tumor cell death.

  19. Gold nanoparticle-aided brachytherapy with vascular dose painting: Estimation of dose enhancement to the tumor endothelial cell nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Theoretical microdosimetry at the subcellular level is employed in this study to estimate the dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cell nuclei, caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) targeting the tumor endothelium, during brachytherapy. Methods: A tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) is modeled as a slab of 2 {mu}m (thickness) x 10 {mu}m (length) x 10 {mu}m (width). The EC contains a nucleus of 5 {mu}m diameter and thickness of 0.5-1 {mu}m, corresponding to nucleus size 5%-10% of cellular volume, respectively. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the dose enhancement to the nucleus caused by photo/Auger electrons from AuNPs attached to the exterior surface of the EC. The nucleus dose enhancement factor (nDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the nucleus with and without the presence of gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations. The investigated concentration range considers the potential for significantly higher local concentration near the EC due to preferential accumulation of AuNP in the tumor vasculature. Four brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, and 50 kVp x-rays were investigated. Results: For nucleus size of 10% of the cellular volume and AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, brachytherapy sources Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 5.6-73, 4.8-58.3, 4.7-56.6, and 3.2-25.8, respectively. Meanwhile, for nucleus size 5% of the cellular volume in the same concentration range, Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 6.9-79.2, 5.1-63.2, 5.0-61.5, and 3.3-28.3, respectively. Conclusions: The results predict that a substantial dose boost to the nucleus of endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs in combination with brachytherapy. Such vascular dose boosts could induce tumor vascular shutdown, prompting

  20. Applying gold nanoparticles as tumor-vascular disrupting agents during brachytherapy: estimation of endothelial dose enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I

    2010-01-01

    Tumor vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer, in view of the tumor vasculature's pivotal role in tumor survival, growth and metastasis. VDAs targeting the tumor's dysmorphic endothelial cells can cause selective and rapid occlusion of the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell death from ischemia and extensive hemorrhagic necrosis. In this study, the potential for applying gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as VDAs, during brachytherapy, is examined. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the endothelial dose enhancement caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from AuNPs targeting the tumor endothelium. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the endothelium with and without gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations, and endothelial cell thicknesses. Four brachytherapy sources were investigated, I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, as well as 50 kVp x-rays. The results reveal that, even at relatively low intra-vascular AuNP concentrations, ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells due to photo/Auger electrons from the AuNPs can be achieved. Pd-103 registered the highest EDEF values of 7.4-271.5 for local AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 350 mg g -1 , respectively. Over the same concentration range, I-125, 50 kVp and Yb-169 yielded values of 6.4-219.9, 6.3-214.5 and 4.0-99.7, respectively. Calculations of the EDEF as a function of endothelial cell thickness showed that lower energy sources like Pd-103 reach the maximum EDEF at smaller thicknesses. The results also reveal that the highest contribution to the EDEF comes from Auger electrons, apparently due to their shorter range. Overall, the data suggest that ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs as adjuvants to brachytherapy, with

  1. Applying gold nanoparticles as tumor-vascular disrupting agents during brachytherapy: estimation of endothelial dose enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I, E-mail: mmakrigiorgos@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-11-07

    Tumor vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer, in view of the tumor vasculature's pivotal role in tumor survival, growth and metastasis. VDAs targeting the tumor's dysmorphic endothelial cells can cause selective and rapid occlusion of the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell death from ischemia and extensive hemorrhagic necrosis. In this study, the potential for applying gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as VDAs, during brachytherapy, is examined. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the endothelial dose enhancement caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from AuNPs targeting the tumor endothelium. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the endothelium with and without gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations, and endothelial cell thicknesses. Four brachytherapy sources were investigated, I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, as well as 50 kVp x-rays. The results reveal that, even at relatively low intra-vascular AuNP concentrations, ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells due to photo/Auger electrons from the AuNPs can be achieved. Pd-103 registered the highest EDEF values of 7.4-271.5 for local AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 350 mg g{sup -1}, respectively. Over the same concentration range, I-125, 50 kVp and Yb-169 yielded values of 6.4-219.9, 6.3-214.5 and 4.0-99.7, respectively. Calculations of the EDEF as a function of endothelial cell thickness showed that lower energy sources like Pd-103 reach the maximum EDEF at smaller thicknesses. The results also reveal that the highest contribution to the EDEF comes from Auger electrons, apparently due to their shorter range. Overall, the data suggest that ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs as adjuvants to

  2. Applying gold nanoparticles as tumor-vascular disrupting agents during brachytherapy: estimation of endothelial dose enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer, in view of the tumor vasculature's pivotal role in tumor survival, growth and metastasis. VDAs targeting the tumor's dysmorphic endothelial cells can cause selective and rapid occlusion of the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell death from ischemia and extensive hemorrhagic necrosis. In this study, the potential for applying gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as VDAs, during brachytherapy, is examined. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the endothelial dose enhancement caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from AuNPs targeting the tumor endothelium. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the endothelium with and without gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations, and endothelial cell thicknesses. Four brachytherapy sources were investigated, I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, as well as 50 kVp x-rays. The results reveal that, even at relatively low intra-vascular AuNP concentrations, ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells due to photo/Auger electrons from the AuNPs can be achieved. Pd-103 registered the highest EDEF values of 7.4-271.5 for local AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 350 mg g-1, respectively. Over the same concentration range, I-125, 50 kVp and Yb-169 yielded values of 6.4-219.9, 6.3-214.5 and 4.0-99.7, respectively. Calculations of the EDEF as a function of endothelial cell thickness showed that lower energy sources like Pd-103 reach the maximum EDEF at smaller thicknesses. The results also reveal that the highest contribution to the EDEF comes from Auger electrons, apparently due to their shorter range. Overall, the data suggest that ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs as adjuvants to brachytherapy, with lower

  3. Phantom study of radiation doses outside the target volume brachytherapy versus external radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt; Persson, Essie; Westman, Gunnar; Persliden, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is sometimes suggested as an adjuvant treatment after surgery of some tumours. When introducing this, it would be useful to have an estimate of the dose distribution to different body sites, both near and distant to target, comparing conventional external irradiation to brachytherapy. The aim of the present study was to determine radiation doses with both methods at different body sites, near and distant to target, in an experimental situation on an operated left sided breast cancer on a female Alderson phantom. Methods: Five external beam treatments with isocentric tangential fields were given by a linear accelerator. A specified dose of 1.0 Gy was given to the whole left sided breast volume. Five interstitial brachytherapy treatments were given to the upper, lateral quadrant of the left breast by a two plane, 10 needles implant. A dose of 1.0 Gy specified according to the Paris system was administered by a pulsed dose rate afterloading machine. Absorbed dose in different fixed dose points were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results: Both methods yielded an absorbed dose of the same size to the bone marrow and internal organs distant to target, 1.0-1.4% of the prescribed dose. There was a trend of lower doses to the lower half of the trunk and higher doses to the upper half of the trunk, respectively, by brachytherapy. A 90% reduction of absorbed dose with brachytherapy compared to external irradiation was found in the near-target region within 5 cm from target boundary where parts of the left lung and the heart are situated. If an adjuvant dose of 50 Gy is given with the external radiotherapy and brachytherapy, the absorbed dose in a part of the myocardium could be reduced from 31.8 to 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: Near target, brachytherapy yielded a considerably lower absorbed dose which is of special importance when considering radiation effects on the myocard and lungs. We could not demonstrate any difference of

  4. Resolving the brachytherapy challenges with government funded hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, D S; Jagtap, A S; Vinothraj, R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to rationalize the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of high dose rate (HDR) cobalt 60 (Co-60) source versus 192-Iridium (192-Ir) source brachytherapy in government funded hospitals and treatment interruption gap because of exchange of sources. A retrospective study of gynecological cancer patients, treated by radiotherapy with curative intent between April 2005 and September 2012 was conducted. We analyzed the total number of patients treated for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (Intracavitary brachytherapy or cylindrical vaginal source). The dates for 192-Ir sources installation and the last date and first date of brachytherapy procedure before and after source installation respectively were also analyzed and calculated the gap in days for brachytherapy interruptions. The study was analyzed the records of 2005 to September 2012 year where eight 192-Ir sources were installed. The mean gap between treatment interruptions was 123.12 days (range 1-647 days). The Institutional incidence of gynecological cancer where radiotherapy was treatment modality (except ovary) is 34.9 percent. Around 52.25 percent of patients who received EBRT at this institute were referred to outside hospital for brachytherapy because of unavailability of Iridium source. The cost for 5 year duration for single cobalt source is approximately 20-22 lakhs while for 15 Iridium sources is approximately 52-53 lakhs. The combined HDR Co-60 brachytherapy and EBRT provide a useful modality in the treatment of gynecological cancer where radiotherapy is indicated, the treatment interruption because of source exchange is longer and can be minimized by using cobalt source as it is cost-effective and has 5 year working life. Thus, Co-60 source for brachytherapy is a feasible option for government funded hospitals in developing countries.

  5. Dosimetric Effects of Air Pockets Around High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Vaginal Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most physicians use a single-channel vaginal cylinder for postoperative endometrial cancer brachytherapy. Recent published data have identified air pockets between the vaginal cylinders and the vaginal mucosa. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence, size, and dosimetric effects of these air pockets. Methods and Materials: 25 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff brachytherapy with a high-dose rate vaginal cylinders were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 200 to 400 cGy per fraction prescribed at 5 mm depth. Computed tomography simulation for brachytherapy treatment planning was performed for each fraction. The quantity, volume, and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the cylinder were quantified. Results: In 25 patients, a total of 90 air pockets were present in 150 procedures (60%). Five patients had no air pockets present during any of their treatments. The average number of air pockets per patient was 3.6, with the average total air pocket volume being 0.34 cm 3 (range, 0.01-1.32 cm 3 ). The average dose reduction to the vaginal mucosa at the air pocket was 27% (range, 9-58%). Ten patients had no air pockets on their first fraction but air pockets occurred in subsequent fractions. Conclusion: Air pockets between high-dose rate vaginal cylinder applicators and the vaginal mucosa are present in the majority of fractions of therapy, and their presence varies from patient to patient and fraction to fraction. The existence of air pockets results in reduced radiation dose to the vaginal mucosa.

  6. Endobronchial and endoesophageal high dose rate brachytherapy for malignant airway and digestive tract obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Minesh P.

    1996-01-01

    With an annual incidence of more than 160,000 cases and a local failure rate between 30-50%, endobronchial occlusion seen with lung cancer is a common and potentially life-threatening complication. Several methods of managing this exist and recently endobronchial brachytherapy has been used extensively as a consequence of the development of fiberoptic bronchoscopy and high dose rate remote afterloading technology. Procedurally, one or more afterloading catheters are inserted in the involved portions of the tracheobronchial tree through fiberoptic guidance. Treatment techniques range from 1-4 applications fractionated over several weeks or given over 2 days with a single insertion procedure. Almost all procedures are currently performed in the outpatient setting. The major application of this technology is in the palliation of occlusive symptomatology. Clinical improvement ranges from 50-100%, radiographic reaeration ranges from 46-88% and bronchoscopic responses ranges from 59-100%. Symptomatic relief is usually quite durable with more than 70% of the patients' remaining life-time rendered symptom-free and symptom-improved. Recently, this modality has been explored for its curative potential as a boost following external beam radiotherapy. It is clear from these series, that in selected patients, endobronchial boost produces significant reaeration and sparing of lung volume from subsequent external radiation, and a few cases may even become resectable. Demonstration of the survival advantage will, however, require larger clinical trials with adequate controls. Some reports have suggested an unacceptably high rate of fatal hemoptysis following HDR endobronchial brachytherapy. Review of the world literature suggests that fatal hemoptysis rates range from 0-50% with an average of about 8%, comparable to an average of 5% with low dose rate brachytherapy. Other recognized complications include fistulae and radiation bronchitis. Because the majority of patients with

  7. Monte Carlo simulation study on dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sungkoo; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Chanhyeong; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2010-01-01

    Radiation dose enhancement by injection of a high atomic number (Z) material into tumor volumes has been studied for various radiation sources and different concentrations of gold nanoparticles. Brachytherapy employs low energy photons of less than ∼0.5 MeV, which indeed is the optimal energy range for radiation dose enhancement by introduction of high-Z material. The present study uses the MCNPX TM code to estimate the dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles for the four common brachytherapy sources ( 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 125 I, and 103 Pd). Additionally, cisplatin (H 6 Cl 2 N 2 Pt), a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug, was used to evaluate the dose enhancement. The simulated source models were evaluated with reference to the calculated TG-43 parameter values. The dose enhancement in the tumor region due to the gold nanoparticles and cisplatin was evaluated according to the dose enhancement factor (DEF). The maximum values of the average DEFs were found to be 1.03, 1.11, 3.43, and 2.17 for the 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 125 I, and 103 Pd sources, respectively. The dose enhancement values for the low-energy sources were significantly higher than those for the high-energy sources. The dose enhancement due to cisplatin was calculated by using the same approach and was found to be comparable to that of the gold nanoparticles. The maximum value of the average DEF for cisplatin was 1.12 for the 5% concentration level in water and a 192 Ir source. We confirmed that cisplatin could be applied to cancer therapy that combines chemotherapeutic drugs with radiation therapy. The results presented herein will be used to study dose enhancement in tumor regions using various radiation modalities with high atomic number materials.

  8. Reduction of rectal doses by removal of gas in the rectum during vaginal cuff brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, S.; Sevillano, M.M.; Andres, I.; Berenguer, R. [Complejo Hospitalario Univ. de Albacete (CHUA) (Spain). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Machin-Hamalainen, S. [C.S. General Ricardos, Madrid (Spain); Mueller, K.; Arenas, M. [Hospital Univ. Sant Joan, Reus (Spain). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-11-15

    Objective: The goal of this work was to evaluate whether the volume reduction related to removal of gas in the rectum could be translated in lower doses to organs at risk (OAR) during vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VBT). Material and methods: Fourteen pairs of brachytherapy planning CT scans derived from 11 patients were re-segmented and re-planned using the same parameters. The only difference between pairs of CTs was the presence or lack of gas in the rectum. The first CT showed the basal status and the second was carried out after gas removal with a tube. A set of values derived from bladder and rectum dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose-surface histograms (DSH) were extracted. Moreover the cylinder position related to the patient craniocaudal axis was recorded. Results: Rectum volume decreased significantly from 77.8 {+-} 45 to 55.43 {+-} 17.6 ml (p = 0.0052) after gas removal. Such volume diminution represented a significant reduction on all rectal DVH parameters analyzed except D{sub 25%} and D{sub 50%}. DSH parameter results were similar to previous ones. A nonsignificant increase of the bladder volume was observed and was associated with an increase of the DVH metrics analyzed. Conclusion: Removal of gas pockets is a simple and inexpensive maneuver that decreases rectal dose parameters on VBT, which can be translated as a better therapeutic ratio. It also suggests that other actions directed to empty the rectum could have a similar effect. (orig.)

  9. Cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients with high-dose brachytherapy after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Felipe; Pineda, Beatriz E

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: to reveal cosmetic results in patients at early stages of low risk breast cancer treated with partial accelerated radiotherapy using high dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and materials: from March 2001 to July 2003,14 stages l and ll breast cancer patients were treated at the Colombian national cancer institute in Bogota with conservative surgery and radiotherapy upon the tumor bed (partial accelerated radiotherapy), using interstitial implants with iridium 192 (high dose rate brachytherapy) with a dose of 32 Gys, over 4 days, at 8 fractions twice a day. Results: with an average follow up of 17.7 months, good cosmetic results were found among 71.4 % of patients and excellent results among 14.3% of patients, furthermore none of the patients neither local nor regional or distant relapses. Conclusion: among patients who suffer from breast cancer at early stages, it showed is possible to apply partial accelerated radiotherapy upon the tumor bed with high doses over 4 days with good to excellent cosmetic results

  10. Toward endobronchial Ir-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy therapeutic optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, H A; Allison, R R; Downie, G H; Mota, H C; Austerlitz, C; Jenkins, T; Sibata, C H

    2007-01-01

    A number of patients with lung cancer receive either palliative or curative high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy. Up to a third of patients treated with endobronchial HDR die from hemoptysis. Rather than accept hemoptysis as an expected potential consequence of HDR, we have calculated the radial dose distribution for an Ir-192 HDR source, rigorously examined the dose and prescription points recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS), and performed a radiobiological-based analysis. The radial dose rate of a commercially available Ir-192 source was calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on the linear quadratic model, the estimated palliative, curative and blood vessel rupture radii from the center of an Ir-192 source were obtained for the ABS recommendations and a series of customized HDR prescriptions. The estimated radius at risk for blood vessel perforation for the ABS recommendations ranges from 7 to 9 mm. An optimized prescription may in some situations reduce this radius to 4 mm. The estimated blood perforation radius is generally smaller than the palliative radius. Optimized and individualized endobronchial HDR prescriptions are currently feasible based on our current understanding of tumor and normal tissue radiobiology. Individualized prescriptions could minimize complications such as fatal hemoptysis without sacrificing efficacy. Fiducial stents, HDR catheter centering or spacers and the use of CT imaging to better assess the relationship between the catheter and blood vessels promise to be useful strategies for increasing the therapeutic index of this treatment modality. Prospective trials employing treatment optimization algorithms are needed

  11. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer, and the importance of brachytherapy timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, Daniel G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Czyzewski, Ann; Buchler, Dolores A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the efficacy of HDR versus LDR brachytherapy for Stage IIIB cervical cancer patients. Material and Methods: Forty-four HDR patients were retrospectively compared to 51 LDR patients treated at the same institution from 1977 to 1988 (LDR) and from 1989 to 1995 (HDR). A tumor burden score (TBS) of 2-9 was calculated for both groups of patients to assess volume of disease (2-4 low tumor burden, 5-9 high tumor burden). LDR and HDR patients received 60 Gy to the whole pelvis at 1.7 Gy/Fx. The majority of LDR patients were treated after completion of external beam radiation (EBR) with one 25 Gy implant to Point A (55 cGy/h). The HDR patients were treated with 4-5 HDR fractions of 3.7 Gy to 5.8 Gy/Fx for an LDR equivalence of 20-25 Gy (median dose/Fx 4.3 Gy, median insertion number 5). Clinical endpoints were calculated actuarially with significance determined by the log rank test and the relative risk (RR). Results: The median follow-up for the HDR and LDR groups was 1.8 and 5 years, respectively. Pelvic control and survival was better in the LDR group than the HDR group, 51%, 73%, 32%, 44% (p = 0.004, RR = 0.4), with grade III and above RTOG complications of 19% and 15%, respectively. The median age and performance status were similar between the two groups; however, a TBS score ≥7 was present in 23% of the HDR patients and in 9% of the LDR patients. Pelvic control in the HDR group was 58% with a TBS ≤4, and 17% with a TBS >4 (p = 0.01, RR = 0.4). The median EBR dose at the first HDR insertion was 31 Gy while all the LDR patients received 60 Gy before the insertion. Pelvic control rates in Table 1 indicate a trend towards improved outcome within the HDR group and same TBS if more external beam radiation was given prior to the first HDR insertion. Pelvic control was also higher within the HDR group when Point A received a BED Gy 10≥100 versus <100: 62%, 40%, respectively (RR 0.6). Conclusion: These retrospective results of HDR versus

  12. The relations between the quantity of milligram hours and doses to points A and B in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, H.L.; Albuquerque, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper shows that the mathematic relation used in doses prescription systems of gynecologic brachytherapy is precarious and it only be used in isolated cases, with the owing restrictions. The material, methods and the results are cited, analysing the dose ratio in function of some variables as: ovoid load, uterine probe curvature, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  14. Assessment of dose homogeneity in conformal interstitial breast brachytherapy with special respect to ICRU recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the results of dose homogeneity analysis for breast cancer patients treated with image-basedconformal interstitial brachytherapy, and to investigate the usefulness of the ICRU recommendations. Material and methods: Treatment plans of forty-nine patients who underwent partial breast irradiation with interstitialbrachytherapy were analyzed. Quantitative parameters were used to characterize dose homogeneity. Dose nonuniformityratio (DNR, dose homogeneity index (DHI, uniformity index (UI and quality index (QI were calculated.Furthermore, parameters recommended by the ICRU 58 such as minimum target dose (MTD, mean central dose (MCD,high dose volume, low dose volume and the spread between local minimum doses were determined. Correlationsbetween the calculated homogeneity parameters and usefulness of the ICRU parameters in image-based brachytherapywere investigated. Results: Catheters with mean number of 15 (range: 6-25 were implanted in median 4 (range: 3-6 planes. The volu -me of the PTV ranged from 15.5 cm3 to 176 cm3. The mean DNR was 0.32, the DHI 0.66, the UI 1.49 and the QI 1.94. Relatedto the prescribed dose, the MTD was 69% and the MCD 135%. The mean high dose volume was 8.1 cm3 (10%, whilethe low dose volume was 63.8 cm3 (96%. The spread between minimum doses in central plane ranged from –14% to+20%. Good correlation was found between the DNR and the DHI (R2 = 0.7874, and the DNR correlated well with theUI (R2 = 0.7615 also. No correlation was found between the ICRU parameters and any other volumetric parameters. Conclusions: To characterize the dose uniformity in high-dose rate breast implants, DVH-related homogeneityparameters representing the full 3D dose distributions are mandatory to be used. In many respects the current re commendationsof the ICRU Report 58 are already outdated, and it is well-timed to set up new recommendations, whichare more feasible for image-guided conformal interstitial brachytherapy.

  15. On the use of multi-dimensional scaling and electromagnetic tracking in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Th I.; Ermer, M.; Salas-González, D.; Kellermeier, M.; Strnad, V.; Bert, Ch; Hensel, B.; Tomé, A. M.; Lang, E. W.

    2017-10-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy affords a frequent reassurance of the precise dwell positions of the radiation source. The current investigation proposes a multi-dimensional scaling transformation of both data sets to estimate dwell positions without any external reference. Furthermore, the related distributions of dwell positions are characterized by uni—or bi—modal heavy—tailed distributions. The latter are well represented by α—stable distributions. The newly proposed data analysis provides dwell position deviations with high accuracy, and, furthermore, offers a convenient visualization of the actual shapes of the catheters which guide the radiation source during the treatment.

  16. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Biaggio, M.F.; D R, M.F.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  17. Post-operative high dose rate brachytherapy in patients with low to intermediate risk endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearcey, R.G.; Petereit, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the outcome using different dose/fractionation schedules in high dose rate (HDR) post-operative vaginal vault radiotherapy in patients with low to intermediate risk endometrial cancer. The world literature was reviewed and thirteen series were analyzed representing 1800 cases. A total of 12 vaginal vault recurrences were identified representing an overall vaginal control rate of 99.3%. A wide range of dose fractionation schedules and techniques have been reported. In order to analyze a dose response relationship for tumor control and complications, the biologically effective doses to the tumor and late responding tissues were calculated using the linear quadratic model. A threshold was identified for complications, but not vaginal control. While dose fractionation schedules that delivered a biologically effective dose to the late responding tissues in excess of 100 Gy 3 (LQED = 60 Gy) predicted for late complications, dose fractionation schedules that delivered a modest dose to the vaginal surface (50 Gy 10 or LQED = 30 Gy) appeared tumoricidal with vaginal control rates of at least 98%. By using convenient, modest dose fractionation schedules, HDR vaginal vault - brachytherapy yields very high local control and extremely low morbidity rates. (author)

  18. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with {sup 137} Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters; Medicion de la dosis absorbida en organos criticos durante braquiterapia de baja tasa de dosis con {sup 137} Cs usando dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, A. [UAEM, Fac. de Medicina, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gonzalez, P.R. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Furetta, C.; Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Andres, U.; Mendez, G. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Tabasco, A. Gregorio Mendez No. 2838, Col. Atasta, 86100 Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose {sup 137}Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  19. LDR brachytherapy: can low dose rate hypersensitivity from the "inverse" dose rate effect cause excessive cell killing to peripherial connective tissues and organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B E; Lucas, A C

    2009-02-01

    Examined here are the possible effects of the "inverse" dose rate effect (IDRE) on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) effect benefits cell killing in radiotherapy, and IDRE and HRS/IRR seem to be generated from the same radioprotective mechanisms. We have computed the IDRE excess cell killing experienced in LDR brachytherapy using permanent seed implants. We conclude, firstly, that IDRE is a dose rate-dependent manifestation of HRS/IRR. Secondly, the presence of HRS/IRR or IDRE in a cell species or tissue must be determined by direct dose-response measurements. Thirdly, a reasonable estimate is that 50-80% of human adjoining connective and organ tissues experience IDRE from permanent implanted LDR brachytherapy. If IDRE occurs for tissues at point A for cervical cancer, the excess cell killing will be about a factor of 3.5-4.0 if the initial dose rate is 50-70 cGy h(-1). It is greater for adjacent tissues at lower dose rates and higher for lower initial dose rates at point A. Finally, higher post-treatment complications are observed in LDR brachytherapy, often for unknown reasons. Some of these are probably a result of IDRE excess cell killing. Measurements of IDRE need be performed for connective and adjacent organ tissues, i.e. bladder, rectum, urinary tract and small bowels. The measured dose rate-dependent dose responses should extended to tissues and organs remain above IDRE thresholds).

  20. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S.; Dumas, I.; Lhomme, C.; Morice, P.; Barillot, I.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  1. SU-E-T-397: Include Organ Deformation Into Dose Calculation of Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Y; Shen, D; Chen, R; Wang, A; Lian, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an important curative treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. In brachytherapy, rectal balloon is generally needed to adjust for unfavorable prostate position for seed placement. However, rectal balloon causes prostate deformation, which is not accounted for in dosimetric planning. Therefore, it is possible that brachytherapy dosimetry deviates significantly from initial plan when prostate returns to its non-deformed state (after procedure). The goal of this study is to develop a method to include prostate deformation into the treatment planning of brachytherapy dosimetry. Methods: We prospectively collected ultrasound images of prostate pre- and post- rectal balloon inflation from thirty five consecutive patients undergoing I-125 brachytherapy. Based on the cylinder coordinate systems, we learned the initial coordinate transformation parameters between the manual segmentations of both deformed and non-deformed prostates of each patient in training set. With the nearest-neighbor interpolation, we searched the best transformation between two coordinate systems to maximum the mutual information of deformed and non-deformed images. We then mapped the implanted seeds of five selected patients from the deformed prostate into non-deformed prostate. The seed position is marked on original pre-inflation US image and it is imported into VariSeed software for dose calculation. Results: The accuracy of image registration is 87.5% as quantified by Dice Index. The prostate coverage V100% dropped from 96.5±0.5% of prostate deformed plan to 91.9±2.6% (p<0.05) of non-deformed plan. The rectum V100% decreased from 0.44±0.26 cc to 0.10±0.18 cc (p<0.05). The dosimetry of the urethra showed mild change but not significant: V150% changed from 0.05±0.10 cc to 0.14±0.15 cc (p>0.05) and D1% changed from 212.9±37.3 Gy to 248.4±42.8 Gy (p>0.05). Conclusion: We have developed a deformable image registration method that allows

  2. Manual method for dose calculation in gynecologic brachytherapy; Metodo manual para o calculo de doses em braquiterapia ginecologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Biaggio, Maria F. de [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a manual method for dose calculation in brachytherapy of gynecological tumors, which allows the calculation of the doses at any plane or point of clinical interest. This method uses basic principles of vectorial algebra and the simulating orthogonal films taken from the patient with the applicators and dummy sources in place. The results obtained with method were compared with the values calculated with the values calculated with the treatment planning system model Theraplan and the agreement was better than 5% in most cases. The critical points associated with the final accuracy of the proposed method is related to the quality of the image and the appropriate selection of the magnification factors. This method is strongly recommended to the radiation oncology centers where are no treatment planning systems available and the dose calculations are manually done. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Evaluation of radiation doses on critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Taciana; Jansem, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one type of treatment of the cervix carcinoma. During the planning for this therapy, especial attention is given to proximal normal organs such as bladder and rectum. In fact, due to their radiosensibility and localization, bladder and rectum are considered as critical organs. In this work we have studied the influence of the positioning of patient legs in the dose delivered to these critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy. (author)

  4. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of uterine cervix cancer. Analysis of dose effectiveness and late complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Fogarolli, Ricardo Cesar; Gentil, Andre Cavalcanti; Salvajoli, Joao Victor

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective analysis aims to report results of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From September 1992 to December 1996, 138 patients with FIGO Stages II and III and mean age of 56 years were treated. Median EBR to the whole pelvis was 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Parametrial boost was performed in 93% of patients, with a median dose of 14.4 Gy. Brachytherapy with HDR was performed during EBR or following its completion with a dose of 24 Gy in four weekly fractions of 6 Gy to point A. Median overall treatment time was of 60 days. Patient age, tumor stage, and overall treatment time were variables analyzed for survival and local control. Cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at rectal and bladder reference points were correlated with late complications in these organs and dose of EBR at parametrium was correlated with small bowel complications. Results: Median follow-up time was 38 months. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control at 5 years was 53.7%, 52.7%, and 62%, respectively. By multivariate and univariate analysis, overall treatment time up to 50 days was the only statistically significant adverse variable for overall survival (p=0.003) and actuarial local control (p=0.008). The 5-year actuarial incidence of rectal, bladder, and small bowel late complications was 16%, 11%, and 14%, respectively. Patients treated with cumulative BED at rectum points above 110 Gy 3 and at bladder point above 125 Gy 3 had a higher but not statistically significant 5-year actuarial rate of complications at these organs (18% vs. 12%, p=0.49 and 17% vs. 9%, p=0.20, respectively). Patients who received parametrial doses larger than 59 Gy had a higher 5-year actuarial rate of complications in the small bowel; however, this was not statistically significant (19% vs. 10%, p=0.260). Conclusion: This series suggests that 45 Gy to the whole pelvis combined with

  5. Dose verification in HDR brachytherapy and IMRT with Fricke gel-layer dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Bartesaghi, G.; Pirola, L.; Carrara, M.; Gambini, I.; Tomatis, S.; Fallai, C.; Zonca, G.; Stokucova, J.

    2009-10-01

    At the Department of Physics of the Universita degli Studi di Milano in collaboration with the Medical Physics Unit and the Radiotherapy Unit of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano the research of a dosimetric technique based on Fricke gel layers and optical analysis in under study. In fact, Fricke gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) have various advantages such as the tissue-equivalence for photons in the clinical energy interval, the possibility to obtain the spatial information about continuous dose distribution and not only a point dose distribution as it is for example in the case of ionization chambers, TLD or diodes and the possibility to obtain the information about 3D dose distributions. In this work, specific applications of FGLD to absolute dosimetry in radiotherapy have been studied, i.e. in-phantom measurements of complex intensity modulated radiation therapy fields (IMRT) and complex brachytherapy fields. (Author)

  6. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Materials and methods Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement...... at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV ⩾ 85 Gy EQD2) while reducing...... bladder and rectum (D2cm3) were reduced by 2 ± 2 Gy and 3 ± 2 Gy, respectively (p

  7. Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Hali, E-mail: hamorris@ualberta.ca; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic film dosimetry is typically performed for high energy photons and moderate doses characterizing external beam radiotherapy (XRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of previously established film calibration procedures used in XRT when applied to low-energy, seed-based brachytherapy at higher doses, and to determine necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. Methods: Gafchromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 75 kVp, 200 kVp, 6 MV, and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. For the latter irradiations a custom phantom was built to hold a single I-125 seed. Film pieces were scanned with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner and the resulting 48-bit RGB TIFF images were analyzed using both FilmQA Pro software andMATLAB. Calibration curves relating dose and optical density via a rational functional form for all three color channels at each irradiation energy were determined with and without the inclusion of uncertainties in the measured optical densities and dose values. The accuracy of calibration curve variations obtained using piecewise fitting, a reduced film measurement area for I-125 irradiation, and a reduced number of dose levels was also investigated. The energy dependence of the film lot used was also analyzed by calculating normalized optical density values. Results: Slight differences were found in the resulting calibration curves for the various fitting methods used. The accuracy of the calibration curves was found to improve at low doses and worsen at high doses when including uncertainties in optical densities and doses, which may better represent the variability that could be seen in film optical density measurements. When exposing the films to doses > 8 Gy, two-segment piecewise fitting was found to be necessary to achieve similar accuracies in absolute dose measurements as when using smaller dose ranges. When reducing the film measurement

  8. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  9. High dose rate afterloading intraluminal brachytherapy for advanced inoperable rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, Peter J.; Canha, Sandra M. de; Bownes, Peter; Bryant, Linda; Jones, Rob Glynne

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy for tumours of the rectal and anal canal which were inoperable either because of the age and frailty of the patient or because of advanced disease has been evaluated. Patients and methods: In a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients the two main indications for brachytherapy were as part of a radical radiation programme in those unfit for major surgery (26 patients) or as palliation for advanced or metastatic disease (22 patients). Radical treatment was either sole treatment delivering 6 Gy fraction 2 to 3 times weekly up to 36 Gy or as a boost of 12 Gy after 45 Gy in 25 fractions external beam chemoradiation. Palliative treatments were given predominantly as a single dose of 10 Gy. Results: This was predominantly a group of frail elderly patients with a median age of 82 years (range 35-91). Local tumour response was seen in 21/25 assessable patients with 14 complete responses. Median survival for the entire population was 6 months (range 1-54 months); in patients treated with 'radical' intent this was 25 months (range 1.5-54) and in the palliative group 7.2 months (range 1-37). The most common presenting symptom was bleeding per rectum for which a 64% response rate was obtained with 57% complete responses. Mucous discharge responded in 64% with 28% complete responses. The median duration of response was 7 months. Conclusion: Intraluminal HDR brachytherapy is an effective local treatment for patients otherwise unfit for radical surgery both as a component of radical treatment, or as a simple single palliative procedure

  10. Tumour alpha/beta ratios and dose-rate selection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally brachytherapy employed low dose rate (LDR) techniques. Recent adoption of high dose rate (HDR) applications, addressing radiation protection concerns, has sparked debate over possible reductions in therapeutic ratio. The radiobiological characteristics of two contrasting examples, prostate cancer and cervical cancer, are examined. Both in-vitro and clinical observations of prostate cancer suggest a low α/β ratio. Labelling indices are below 2.5%, translating into long potential doubling times (Tpot ) of 16 to 61 days or more. Clinical PSA doubling times are in the order of years. Analysis of clinical endpoints in prostate cancer treated with either LDR or HDR techniques indicates that its α/β ratio may lie between 1 - 4 Gy, similar to slowly proliferating late reacting tissues. As such, therapeutic gain may arise from the use of hypofractionated HDR treatments, exploiting the sensitivity to large fraction sizes, effectively escalating dose. The slow proliferative rate also gives credence to the use of LDR, although several tumour doublings may occur during the effective treatment time, and analysis of the clinical data using a low α/β ratio suggests that LDR doses are only equivalent to 70 Gy with conventional fractionation. Cervical carcinoma is a rapidly proliferating tumour with Tpot values of 3-6 days. LDR implants were delivered over relatively short treatment times, negating repopulation effects, and the 'hyperfractionation' effect of LDR was suited to the high α/β ratio. HDR, although also preventing significant repopulation, has the potential to decrease the therapeutic ratio if low α/β , late-reacting tissues are not protected. Clinical data however show improved outcomes and reduced morbidity with HDR through reduced doses to normal tissues. Choosing the optimal dose rate in brachytherapy depends on tumour behaviour and achievable accuracy. HDR offers some advantages even for high α/β ratio tumours, and may be the technique of

  11. SU-F-19A-12: Split-Ring Applicator with Interstitial Needle for Improved Volumetric Coverage in HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherertz, T; Ellis, R; Colussi, V; Mislmani, M; Traughber, B; Herrmann, K; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric coverage of a Mick Radionuclear titanium Split-Ring applicator (SRA) with/without interstitial needle compared to an intracavitary Vienna applicator (VA), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary ring and tandem applicator (RTA). Methods: A 57 year-old female with FIGO stage IIB cervical carcinoma was treated following chemoradiotherapy (45Gy pelvic and 5.4Gy parametrial boost) with highdose- rate (HDR) brachytherapy to 30Gy in 5 fractions using a SRA. A single interstitial needle was placed using the Ellis Interstitial Cap for the final three fractions to increase coverage of left-sided gross residual disease identified on 3T-MRI. High-risk (HR) clinical target volume (CTV) and intermediate-risk (IR) CTV were defined using axial T2-weighted 2D and 3D MRI sequences (Philips PET/MRI unit). Organs-at-risks (OARs) were delineated on CT. Oncentra planning system was used for treatment optimization satisfying GEC-ESTRO guidelines for target coverage and OAR constraints. Retrospectively, treatment plans (additional 20 plans) were simulated using intracavitary SRA (without needle), intracavitary VA (without needle), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary RTA with this same patient case. Plans were optimized for each fraction to maintain coverage to HR-CTV. Results: Interstitial-intracavitary SRA achieved the following combined coverage for external radiation and brachytherapy (EQD2): D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy; Bladder-2cc =88.9Gy; Rectum-2cc =65.1Gy; Sigmoid-2cc =48.9Gy; Left vaginal wall (VW) =103Gy, Right VW =99.2Gy. Interstitial-intracavitary VA was able to achieve identical D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy, yet Bladder-2cc =91.9Gy (exceeding GEC-ESTRO recommendations of 2cc<90Gy) and Left VW =120.8Gy and Right VW =115.5Gy. Neither the SRA nor VA without interstitial needle could cover HR-CTV adequately without exceeding dose to Bladder-2cc. Conventional RTA was unable to achieve target coverage for the HR-CTV >80Gy without severely

  12. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    This presentation first defines the radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques, indicates the used ionizing radiations (electromagnetic and particles), describes the mechanisms and processes of action of ionizing radiations: they can be physical by photon-matter interactions (Compton effect and photoelectric effect) or due to electron-matter interactions (excitation, ionization), physical-chemical by direct or indirect action (DNA damage), cellular (mitotic or apoptotic death), tissue (sane and tumorous tissues and differential effect). It discusses the biological efficiency of these treatments which depends on different parameters: intrinsic radio-sensitivity, time (session fractioning and organisation in time), oxygen, radiation quality, cellular cycle, dose rate, temperature. It presents the different types of radiotherapy: external radiotherapy (general sequence, delineation, dosimetry, protection of critical organs, treatment session, quality control, monitoring consultation) and briefly presents some specific techniques (total body irradiation, total cutaneous electron therapy, pre-operation radiotherapy, radio-surgery, hadron-therapy). It proposes an overview of the main indications for this treatment: brain tumours, upper aero digestive tract tumours, bronchial tumours, oesophagus, stomach and pancreas tumours, breast tumours, cervix cancer, rectum tumour, and so on, and indicates the possible associated treatments. The next part addresses brachytherapy. It presents the principles and comments the differences with radiotherapy. It indicates the used radio-elements (Caesium 137, Iridium 192, Iodine 125), describes the implementation techniques (plastic tubes, use of iodine 125, intracavitary and endo-luminal radiation therapy). It proposes an overview of the different treated tumours (skin, breast, prostates, bronchial, oesophagus, ENT) and indicates possible early and late secondary effects for different organs

  13. On the impact of improved dosimetric accuracy on head and neck high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, Vasiliki; Pappas, Eleftherios; Major, Tibor; Takácsi-Nagy, Zoltán; Pantelis, Evaggelos; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    To study the effect of finite patient dimensions and tissue heterogeneities in head and neck high dose rate brachytherapy. The current practice of TG-43 dosimetry was compared to patient specific dosimetry obtained using Monte Carlo simulation for a sample of 22 patient plans. The dose distributions were compared in terms of percentage dose differences as well as differences in dose volume histogram and radiobiological indices for the target and organs at risk (mandible, parotids, skin, and spinal cord). Noticeable percentage differences exist between TG-43 and patient specific dosimetry, mainly at low dose points. Expressed as fractions of the planning aim dose, percentage differences are within 2% with a general TG-43 overestimation except for the spine. These differences are consistent resulting in statistically significant differences of dose volume histogram and radiobiology indices. Absolute differences of these indices are however small to warrant clinical importance in terms of tumor control or complication probabilities. The introduction of dosimetry methods characterized by improved accuracy is a valuable advancement. It does not appear however to influence dose prescription or call for amendment of clinical recommendations for the mobile tongue, base of tongue, and floor of mouth patient cohort of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exposure dose estimation of nursing personnel and visitors following "1"2"5I brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazato, Kazuhisa; Kikuchi, Hirosumi; Hotta, Harumi; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2007-01-01

    An automated access management system to the controlled sickrooms for "1"2"5I brachytherapy was developed. The system consists of access control and video surveillance units. The patients implanted "1"2"5I seeds were isolated for about 20 h after surgery in the controlled sickrooms. The maximum doses and dose rates of the nurses and visitors were estimated by using the legal upper limit activity of 1,300 MBq, the measured longest staying time, and the shortest distance between the patients and individuals. Video analysis revealed activities of the nurses, patients, and visitors in the controlled sickroom, and relationships between the access frequency and staying time. The nurses' measured doses ranged from 1 to 3 μSv, and averaged 1.6 μSv. The nurses' maximum dose and dose rate were 16 μSv and 5.6 nSv·h"-"1·MBq"-"1. The visitors' maximum dose and dose rate were 6 μSv and 2.6 nSv·h"-"1·MBq"-"1. The nurses and visitors' exposure doses per patient were estimated to be negligible compared with the annual limit of the public. (author)

  15. Point kernels and superposition methods for scatter dose calculations in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Point kernels have been generated and applied for calculation of scatter dose distributions around monoenergetic point sources for photon energies ranging from 28 to 662 keV. Three different approaches for dose calculations have been compared: a single-kernel superposition method, a single-kernel superposition method where the point kernels are approximated as isotropic and a novel 'successive-scattering' superposition method for improved modelling of the dose from multiply scattered photons. An extended version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used for generating the kernels and for benchmarking the absorbed dose distributions calculated with the superposition methods. It is shown that dose calculation by superposition at and below 100 keV can be simplified by using isotropic point kernels. Compared to the assumption of full in-scattering made by algorithms currently in clinical use, the single-kernel superposition method improves dose calculations in a half-phantom consisting of air and water. Further improvements are obtained using the successive-scattering superposition method, which reduces the overestimates of dose close to the phantom surface usually associated with kernel superposition methods at brachytherapy photon energies. It is also shown that scatter dose point kernels can be parametrized to biexponential functions, making them suitable for use with an effective implementation of the collapsed cone superposition algorithm. (author)

  16. The incorporation of specific tissue/nuclide attenuation data into the Anderson method for producing brachytherapy volume-dose histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loft, S.M.; Dale, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Anderson (1986) has proposed an analytical method for deriving volume-dose histograms relating to three-dimensional brachytherapy distributions. Because the mathematical transformation allows the otherwise dominant effects of the inverse-square fall-off about individual sources to be effectively suppressed, resulting histograms provide the potential for visually and numerically assessing overall quality of a brachytherapy treatment. In this paper the Anderson equations have been combined with the radial-dose polynomials of Dale, which are applicable to a number of tissue/nuclide combinations, and the predictions of the combined formalism used to further investigate the physical aspects of brachytherapy dosimetry. The problems associated with the dosimetry of low-energy γ-emitters such as 125 I are once again highlighted, as are potential advantages of using a radionuclide with an intermediate γ-ray energy. (author)

  17. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.; Salinas, B.; Hernandez O, O.; Santillan B, L.; Molero M, C.; Montoya M, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm < ± 1.0 mm; the confidence limit Δ, is in the emergency level, Δ=3.2 mm. c) verification of absorbed dose to water DW, given by the hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ≤ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%

  18. Brachytherapy dose-volume histogram computations using optimized stratified sampling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karouzakis, K.; Lahanas, M.; Milickovic, N.; Giannouli, S.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N.

    2002-01-01

    A stratified sampling method for the efficient repeated computation of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in brachytherapy is presented as used for anatomy based brachytherapy optimization methods. The aim of the method is to reduce the number of sampling points required for the calculation of DVHs for the body and the PTV. From the DVHs are derived the quantities such as Conformity Index COIN and COIN integrals. This is achieved by using partial uniform distributed sampling points with a density in each region obtained from a survey of the gradients or the variance of the dose distribution in these regions. The shape of the sampling regions is adapted to the patient anatomy and the shape and size of the implant. For the application of this method a single preprocessing step is necessary which requires only a few seconds. Ten clinical implants were used to study the appropriate number of sampling points, given a required accuracy for quantities such as cumulative DVHs, COIN indices and COIN integrals. We found that DVHs of very large tissue volumes surrounding the PTV, and also COIN distributions, can be obtained using a factor of 5-10 times smaller the number of sampling points in comparison with uniform distributed points

  19. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm 3 NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR 192 Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility ( 2 =1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for 192 Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2±0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0±0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments

  20. Does initial 45Gy of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduce late complications in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer? A cohort control study using definitive chemoradiotherapy with high-dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shang-Wen; Liang, Ji-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Yeh, Lian-Shung; Chang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Wu-Chou; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Comparing initial 45 Gy of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and non-IMRT in terms of the late toxicities associated with advanced cervical cancer that has also been treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy and high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDRICB). This retrospective study included 320 stage IB2-IIIB cervical cancer patients treated with CCRT (83 IMRT and 237 non-IMRT). The two groups had similar stage and HDRICB ratings. Following 45 Gy to the pelvis, HDRICB of 24 Gy in four courses was prescribed. Late toxicities, including rectal complications (RC), bladder complications (BC) and non-rectal intestinal injury (NRRII), were scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of the complications. With a median follow-up duration of 33 and 77 months for IMRT and non-IMRT, 33 patients had Grade 2 or higher late RC (7.2% IMRT, 11.4% non-IMRT), whereas that for BC was 40 (9.6% IMRT, 13.5% non-IMRT) and for NRRII was 48 (12.0% IMRT, 16.0% non-IMRT). The cumulative rate for total grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities was 8.4% and 11.8% (p = 0.33). IMRT did not reduce the OR for all endpoints; however, the ORs for rectum and bladder reference doses to Point A were associated with RC and BC. Locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with initial 45Gy of pelvic IMRT and HDRICB have similar treatment-related late toxicities as those treated with non-IMRT. Optimization of the brachytherapy scheme is essential to minimize late toxicities

  1. Adjuvant high dose rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy for early stage endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannehill, S.P.; Petereit, D.G.; Schink, J.C.; Grosen, E.A.; Hartenbach, E.M.; Thomadsen, B.R.; Buchler, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant high dose rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) in patients (pts) with low risk endometrial carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Since 1989, 154 patients were treated with outpatient adjuvant VCB for low risk endometrial cancer (Stage IA-14%, Stage IB-82%). Four percent of patients with stage IC disease were treated with VCB only because of medical contraindications to pelvic radiation. Patients had the following histologic grades: 53% grade 1, 40% grade 2, 5% grade 3 and 3% unknown (99%-adenocarcinoma, <1% papillary serous histology). Seventy-three percent of patients had their surgery (TAH-BSO) performed at an outside institution with minimal surgical assessment of the lymph nodes. At a median of 6 weeks after surgery, patients were treated with 2 HDR VCB insertions delivered 1 week apart. Ovoids were placed at the vaginal apex to deliver 16.2 Gy per fraction to the vaginal surface (LDR equivalent of 60 Gy at 100 cGy/h) under conscious outpatient sedation. All clinical endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. Complications were scored using the RTOG 5-tiered system. Results: The median time in the brachytherapy suite was 60 minutes with no acute complications observed. With a median follow-up of 33 months (3-79 months), the 4-year overall and disease-free survival were 93% and 96% respectively. Five patients (3%) recurred: 2 intra-abdominally, 1 with lung metastases, and 2 in the pelvic lymph nodes. There were no vaginal cuff recurrences. The single patient with an isolated pelvic sidewall recurrence was salvaged with pelvic RT. Six patients developed a small area of asymptomatic necrosis at the vaginal cuff, which spontaneously healed at a median time of 4 months. There were no grade 3 or greater late tissue toxicities. No patient experienced significant vaginal stenosis, with 20% of the patients experiencing mild fibrosis of the vaginal apex. Conclusions: Adjuvant HDR VCB in 2

  2. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids: Feasibility and Early Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping, E-mail: ping.jiang@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Baumann, René [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Geenen, Matthias [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, Lubinus Clinic Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Siebert, Frank-André [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Niehoff, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Community Clinic Köln, Köln (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Witten/Herdecke, Witten (Germany); Bertolini, Julia; Druecke, Daniel [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immediate perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy; 3 patients had been previously treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy and presented with recurrences in the pretreated areas. Two or more different treatment modalities had been tried in all patients and had failed to achieve remission. After (re-)excision of the keloids, a single brachytherapy tube was placed subcutaneously before closing the wound. The target volume covered the scar in total length. Brachytherapy was given in 3 fractions with a single dose of 6 Gy in 5 mm tissue depth. The first fraction was given within 6 hours after surgery, the other 2 fractions on the first postoperative day. Thus, a total dose of 18 Gy in 3 fractions was administered within 36 hours after the resection. Results: The treatment was feasible in all patients. No procedure-related complications (eg, secondary infections) occurred. Nineteen patients had keloid-related symptoms before treatment like pain and pruritus; disappearance of symptoms was noticed in all patients after treatment. After a median follow-up of 29.4 months (range, 7.9-72.4 months), 2 keloid recurrences and 2 mildly hypertrophied scars were observed. The local control rate was 94%. Pigmentary abnormalities were detected in 3 patients, and an additional 6 patients had a mild delay in the wound-healing process. Conclusions: The early results of this study prove the feasibility and the efficacy of brachytherapy for the prevention of keloids. The results also suggest that brachytherapy may be advantageous in the management of high-risk keloids or as salvage treatment for failure after external beam therapy.

  3. SU-F-T-06: Development of a Formalism for Practical Dose Measurements in Brachytherapy in the German Standard DIN 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, F [Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Chofor, N [Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Schoenfeld, A [University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Harder, D [Georg-August University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the steep dose gradients in the vicinity of a radiation source and due to the properties of the changing photon spectra, dose measurements in Brachytherapy usually have large uncertainties. Working group DIN 6803-3 is presently discussing recommendations for practical brachytherapy dosimetry incorporating recent theoretical developments in the description of brachytherapy radiation fields as well as new detectors and phantom materials. The goal is to prepare methods and instruments to verify dose calculation algorithms and for clinical dose verification with reduced uncertainties. Methods: After analysis of the distance dependent spectral changes of the radiation field surrounding brachytherapy sources, the energy dependent response of typical brachytherapy detectors was examined with Monte Carlo simulations. A dosimetric formalism was developed allowing the correction of their energy dependence as function of source distance for a Co-60 calibrated detector. Water equivalent phantom materials were examined with Monte Carlo calculations for their influence on brachytherapy photon spectra and for their water equivalence in terms of generating equivalent distributions of photon spectra and absorbed dose to water. Results: The energy dependence of a detector in the vicinity of a brachytherapy source can be described by defining an energy correction factor kQ for brachytherapy in the same manner as in existing dosimetry protocols which incorporates volume averaging and radiation field distortion by the detector. Solid phantom materials were identified which allow precise positioning of a detector together with small correctable deviations from absorbed dose to water. Recommendations for the selection of detectors and phantom materials are being developed for different measurements in brachytherapy. Conclusion: The introduction of kQ for brachytherapy sources may allow more systematic and comparable dose measurements. In principle, the corrections can be

  4. Calculating of Dose Distribution in Tongue Brachytherapy by Different Radioisotopes using Monte Carlo Simulation and Comparing by Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Zeinali Rafsanjani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among different kinds of oral cavity cancers, the frequency of tongue cancer occurrence is more significant. Brachytherapy is the most common method to cure tongue cancers. Long sources are used in different techniques of tongue brachytherapy. The objective of this study is to asses the dose distribution around long sources, comparing different radioisotopes as brachytherapy sources, measuring the homogeneity of delivered dose to treatment volume and also comparing mandible dose and dose of tongue in the regions near the mandible with and without using shield. Material and Method: The Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used for simulation. The accuracy of simulation was verified by comparing the results with experimental data. The sources like Ir-192, Cs-137, Ra-226, Au-198, In-111 and Ba-131 were simulated and the position of sources was determined by Paris system. Results: The percentage of mandible dose reduction with use of 2 mm Pb shield for the sources mentioned above were: 35.4%, 20.1%, 86.6%, 32.24%, 75.6%, and 36.8%. The tongue dose near the mandible with use of shied did not change significantly. The dose homogeneity from the most to least was obtained from these sources: Cs-137, Au-198, Ir-192, Ba-131, In-111 and Ra-226. Discussion and Conclusion: Ir-192 and Cs-137 were the best sources for tongue brachytherapy treatment but In-111 and Ra-226 were not suitable choices for tongue brachytherapy. The sources like Au-198 and Ba-131 had rather the same performance as Ir-192

  5. Fast dose kernel interpolation using Fourier transform with application to permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derek; Sloboda, Ron S

    2014-05-01

    Boyer and Mok proposed a fast calculation method employing the Fourier transform (FT), for which calculation time is independent of the number of seeds but seed placement is restricted to calculation grid points. Here an interpolation method is described enabling unrestricted seed placement while preserving the computational efficiency of the original method. The Iodine-125 seed dose kernel was sampled and selected values were modified to optimize interpolation accuracy for clinically relevant doses. For each seed, the kernel was shifted to the nearest grid point via convolution with a unit impulse, implemented in the Fourier domain. The remaining fractional shift was performed using a piecewise third-order Lagrange filter. Implementation of the interpolation method greatly improved FT-based dose calculation accuracy. The dose distribution was accurate to within 2% beyond 3 mm from each seed. Isodose contours were indistinguishable from explicit TG-43 calculation. Dose-volume metric errors were negligible. Computation time for the FT interpolation method was essentially the same as Boyer's method. A FT interpolation method for permanent prostate brachytherapy TG-43 dose calculation was developed which expands upon Boyer's original method and enables unrestricted seed placement. The proposed method substantially improves the clinically relevant dose accuracy with negligible additional computation cost, preserving the efficiency of the original method.

  6. Estimation of frequency, population doses and stochastic risks in brachytherapy in Japan, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Nishizawa, Kanae; Furuya, Yoshiro; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the replies to a questionnaire distributed throughout Japan in 1983, genetically significant dose (GSD), per Caput mean bone marrow dose (CMD), leukemogenically significant dose (LSD), malignantly significant dose (MSD), and per Caput effective dose equivalent (EDE) from using small sealed radiation sources for radiotherapy were estimated. Annual frequencies of brachytherapy were estimated to be 2.6 x 10 3 for men and 36.3 x 10 3 for women, with a total of 38.9 x 10 3 . The annual frequencies of using afterloading technique were 0.3 x 10 3 for men and 18.8 x 10 3 for women, with a total of 19.1 x 10 3 . The annual population doses per person were 7.9 nGy for GSD, 118 μGy for CMD, 19.3 μGy for LSD, 172 μGy for MSD, and 428 μGy for EDE. The annual collective effective dose equivalent was estimated to be 5.13 x 10 4 man Sv. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F. [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Nursing Service, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Insititute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  8. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  9. Perioperative fractionated high-dose rate brachytherapy for malignant bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Masahiko; Inoue, Takehiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Teshima, Teruki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshida, Ken; Imai, Atsushi; Shiomi, Hiroya; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Araki, Nobuto; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Uchida, Atsumasa; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the viability of perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy for malignant bone and soft tissue tumors, analyzing the influence of surgical margin. Methods and Materials: From July 1992 through May 1996, 16 lesions of 14 patients with malignant bone and soft tissue tumors (3 liposarcomas, 3 MFHs, 2 malignant schwannomas, 2 chordomas, 1 osteosarcoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, 1 epithelioid sarcoma, and 1 synovial sarcoma) were treated at the Osaka University Hospital. The patients' ages ranged from 14 to 72 years (median: 39 years). Treatment sites were the pelvis in 6 lesions, the upper limbs in 5, the neck in 4, and a lower limb in 1. The resection margins were classified as intracapsular in 5 lesions, marginal in 5, and wide in 6. Postoperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy was started on the 4th-13th day after surgery (median: 6th day). The total dose was 40-50 Gy/7-10 fr/ 4-7 day (bid) at 5 or 10 mm from the source. Follow-up periods were between 19 and 46 months (median: 30 months). Results: Local control rates were 75% at 1 year and 48% in 2 years, and ultimate local control was achieved in 8 (50%) of 16 lesions. Of the 8 uncontrolled lesions, 5 (63%) had intracapsular (macroscopically positive) resection margins, and all the 8 controlled lesions (100%) had marginal (microscopically positive) or wide (negative) margins. Of the total, 3 patients died of both tumor and metastasis, 3 of metastasis alone, 1 of tumor alone, and 7 showed no evidence of disease. Peripheral nerve palsy was seen in one case after this procedure, but no infection or delayed wound healing caused by tubing or irradiation has occurred. Conclusion: Perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy is safe, well tolerated, and applicable to marginal or wide surgical margin cases

  10. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer with salvage interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    To assess the long-term results of protocol-based interstitial pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as reirradiation combined with simultaneous chemotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia in selected patients with recurrent head and neck tumors. A total of 104 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with interstitial PDR brachytherapy. Salvage surgery had also been undergone by 53/104 (51 %) patients (R1 or R2 resection in > 80 % of patients). Salvage brachytherapy alone was administered in 81 patients (78 %), with a median total dose of 56.7 Gy. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was performed in 23/104 patients (32 %), using a median total dose of D{sub REF} = 24 Gy. Simultaneously to PDR brachytherapy, concomitant chemotherapy was administered in 58/104 (55.8 %) patients. A single session of interstitial hyperthermia was also used to treat 33/104 (31.7 %) patients. The analysis was performed after a median follow-up of 60 months. Calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, local tumor control rates after 2, 5, and 10 years were 92.5, 82.4, and 58.9 %, respectively. Comparing results of salvage PDR brachytherapy with or without simultaneous chemotherapy, the 10-year local control rates were 76 vs. 39 % (p= 0014), respectively. No other patient- or treatment-related parameters had a significant influence on treatment results. Soft tissue necrosis or bone necrosis developed in 18/104 (17.3 %) and 11/104 (9.6 %) patients, respectively, but only 3 % of patients required surgical treatment. PDR interstitial brachytherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy is a very effective and, in experienced hands, also a safe treatment modality in selected patients with head and neck cancer in previously irradiated areas. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte die Analyse der Langzeitergebnisse einer protokollbasierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (Re-Bestrahlung) mit simultaner Chemotherapie und interstitieller Hyperthermie

  11. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M; Thomson, R M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with(125)I, (103)Pd, or (131)Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20-30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%-10% and 13%-14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%-17% and 29%-34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model

  12. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with 125 I, 103 Pd, or 131 Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up

  13. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192 Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water-in-medium (D w,m ). The relation between D m,m and D w,m for 192 Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of D w,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: D m,m, D w,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. D w,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between D w,m (SCT) and D w,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between D m,m and D w,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between D m,m and D w,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. (paper)

  14. Late complications after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Takehiro; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Teshima, Teruki; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study was to analyze the treatment results and late complications of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for early (T1N0, T2N0) mobile tongue cancer using the microSelectron-HDR. From January 1993 through April 2001, a total of 72 patients with early squamous cell carcinomas of the mobile tongue were treated with microSelectron-HDR interstitial brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital. Of the patients, 18% were treated with a combination of prior external radiation and HDR-ISBT, and 82% were treated with HDR-ISBT alone. For HDR-ISBT alone, all cases were treated with a total dose of 54 Gy/9 fractions every 5 days or 60 Gy/10 fractions every 8 days. In combined therapy with an external dose of 30 to 40 Gy, HDR-ISBT was given at a total dose of 42-50 Gy. The Brinkman and alcohol indexes were used to analyze the incidence of late complications after HDR-ISBT. The 2- and 5-year local control rates were 85% and 82%, respectively. Fifteen of 72 patients (21%) treated with HDR-ISBT had late complications. Ten of 15 patients (67%) with late complications had a Brinkman index exceeding 600. HDR-ISBT is useful and easily applied under local anesthesia to early or superficial lesions of the mobile tongue. However, we found an increase in late complications, such as soft-tissue ulcers and bone exposure, after irradiation of tongue cancer with 60 Gy HDR-ISBT in patients with a Brinkman index greater than 600. (author)

  15. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  16. Study of Different Tissue Density Effects on the Dose Distribution of a 103Pd Brachytherapy Source Model MED3633

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical application of encapsulated radioactive brachytherapy sources has a major role in cancer treatment. In the present research, the effects of different tissue densities on the dose distribution of a 103Pd brachytherapy source in a spherical phantom of 50 cm radius have been studied. Material and Methods: As is well known, absorbed dose in tissue depends to its density, but this difference is not clear in measurements. Therefore, we applied the MCNP code to evaluate the effect of density on the dose distribution. 103Pd brachytherapy sources are used to treat prostate, breast and other cancers. Results: Absorbed dose has been calculated and presented around a source placed in the center of the phantom for different tissue densities. Also, we derived anisotropy and radial dose functions and compared our Monte Carlo results with experimental results of Rivard and Li et al. for F(1, θ and g(r in 1.040 g/cm3 tissue. Conclusion: The results of this study show that relative dose variations around the source center are very considerable at different densities, because of the presence of a photoabsorber (Au-Cu alloy in the source core. Dose variation exceeds 80% at the point (Z = 2.4 mm, Y = 0 mm. Computed values of anisotropy and radial dose functions are in good agreement with the experimental results of Rivard and Li et al.

  17. Spectroscopic output of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher-Moga, Jacqueline; Beach, Stephen M.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Global Physics Solutions, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    The spectroscopic output of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources is dependent on the physical design and construction of the source. Characterization of the emitted photons from 12 {sup 125}I and 3 {sup 103}Pd LDR brachytherapy source models is presented. Photon spectra, both along the transverse bisector and at several polar angles, were measured in air with a high-purity reverse electrode germanium (REGe) detector. Measured spectra were corrected to in vacuo conditions via Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The tabulated and plotted spectroscopic data provide a more complete understanding of each source model's output characteristics than can be obtained with other measurement techniques. The variation in fluorescence yield of the {sup 125}I sources containing silver caused greater differences in the emitted spectra and average energies among these seed models than was observed for the {sup 103}Pd sources or the {sup 125}I sources that do not contain silver. Angular spectroscopic data further highlighted the effects of source construction unique to each model, as well as the asymmetric output of many seeds. These data demonstrate the need for the incorporation of such physically measured output characteristics in the Monte Carlo modeling process.

  18. Pilot Quality Control Program for Brachytherapy of Low Dose Rate at the General Hospital of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Tovar M., V.; Salinas, B.; Hernández O., O.; Santillán B., L.; Molero M., C.; Montoya M., J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe the pilot quality control program for brachytherapy of low dose rate proposed to be used in the Radiotherapy Department at the General Hospital of Mexico. The program consists of three parts: a) development of calibration procedures, performed in terms of air-kerma strength for calibration of 137Cs and 192Ir brachytherapy sources, and for the calibration of well-type ionization chambers for 137Cs, b) performance of localisation and reconstruction techniques for radioactive sources with a Baltas' phantom. The results obtained for the media deviation , are in the optimum level, ± 0.5 mm hospital. It consists on the characterisation of a TLD-100 powder dosimetry system at SSDL: The calibration curves for powder response (nC or nC/ mg) vs Dw and the control charts for the Harshaw 3500 reader were obtained. The statistical validation of the calibration curve by normality of the residuals and the lack of fit tests were realised. In the other hand, TLD's were irradiated in the hospital to a nominal Dw = 2 Gy with sources of 137Cs. The percent deviations Δ%, between the Dw imparted by the Hospital and the determined by SSDL, are 1.2% Δ⩽ 6.5 % which are consistent with the expanded uncertainty U% for DW, 5.6 U% 10%.

  19. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our study......- and dose prescription concept of prescribing a lower dose to the whole gland and an escalated dose to the GTV using LDR-BT seed planning was technically feasible and resulted in a significant dose-reduction to urethra and bladder neck....

  20. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Whitaker, May

    2016-06-01

    Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected.

  1. Genitourinary Toxicity After High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Analysis to Determine the Correlation Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters in HDR Brachytherapy and Severity of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kitano, Masashi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kotani, Shouko; Uemae, Mineko; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Okusa, Hiroshi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Baba, Shiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the severity of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to explore factors that might affect the severity of GU toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 Japanese men with prostate cancer underwent 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Mean (SD) dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 (0.7) Gy per fraction of HDR. After 5 fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administrated. The urethral volume receiving 1-15 Gy per fraction in HDR brachytherapy (V1-V15) and the dose to at least 5-100% of urethral volume in HDR brachytherapy (D5-D100) were compared between patients with Grade 3 toxicity and those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Prostate volume, patient age, and International Prostate Symptom Score were also compared between the two groups. Results: Of the 100 patients, 6 displayed Grade 3 acute GU toxicity, and 12 displayed Grade 3 late GU toxicity. Regarding acute GU toxicity, values of V1, V2, V3, and V4 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Regarding late GU toxicity, values of D70, D80, V12, and V13 were significantly higher in patients with Grade 3 toxicity than in those with Grade 0-2 toxicity. Conclusions: The severity of GU toxicity in HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer was relatively high. The volume of prostatic urethra was associated with grade of acute GU toxicity, and urethral dose was associated with grade of late GU toxicity.

  2. The usefulness of metal markers for CTV-based dose prescription in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Mitomo, Masanori; Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Yoshida, Mineo

    2002-01-01

    We employ a clinical target volume (CTV)-based dose prescription for high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. However, it is not easy to define CTV and organs at risk (OAR) from X-ray film or CT scanning. To solve this problem, we have utilized metal markers since October 1999. Moreover, metal markers can help modify dose prescription. By regulating the doses to the metal markers, refining the dose prescription can easily be achieved. In this research, we investigated the usefulness of the metal markers. Between October 1999 and May 2001, 51 patients were implanted with metal markers at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (OMCC), Osaka National Hospital (ONH) and Sanda City Hospital (SCH). Forty-nine patients (head and neck: 32; pelvis: 11; soft tissue: 3; breast: 3) using metal markers were analyzed. During operation, we implanted 179 metal markers (49 patients) to CTV and 151 markers (26 patients) to OAR. At treatment planning, CTV was reconstructed judging from the metal markers, applicator position and operation records. Generally, we prescribed the tumoricidal dose to an isodose surface that covers CTV. We also planned to limit the doses to OAR lower than certain levels. The maximum normal tissue doses were decided 80%, 150%, 100%, 50% and 200% of the prescribed doses for the rectum, the urethra, the mandible, the skin and the large vessel, respectively. The doses to the metal markers using CTV-based dose prescription were generated. These were compared with the doses theoretically calculated with the Paris system. Treatment results were also investigated. The doses to the 158 metal markers (42 patients) for CTV were higher than ''tumoricidal dose''. In 7 patients, as a result of compromised dose prescription, 9 markers were lower than the tumoricidal dose. The other 12 markers (7%) were excluded from dose evaluation because they were judged as miss-implanted. The doses to the 142 metal markers (24 patients) for OAR were lower

  3. Vaginal Dose Is Associated With Toxicity in Image Guided Tandem Ring