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Sample records for intracardiac ultrasound imaging

  1. Left ventricle myocardial border detection in three-dimensional intracardiac ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weidong; Kanani, Prapti; Allan, John; Kerber, Richard; McKay, Charles R.; Sonka, Milan

    1997-05-01

    We have previously reported an automated approach to detection of endocardial and epicardial borders in individual intracardiac ultrasound (ICUS) images. Here, we report the method's extension to 3D ICUS image data sets. Our method is based on fully automated detection of epicardial and endocardial borders inside a single interactively identified region of interest. BOrder detection is based on an optimal graph-searching approach that utilizes a priori knowledge about left ventricular (LV) anatomy and ultrasound imaging physics. Eight cadaveric pig hearts were used for validation. Two ICUS sequences were obtained from each heart, with a 10 MHz CVIS 10F catheter positioned in the LV across (1) the aortic valve and (2) the mitral valve. Performance of the 3D automated border detection method was assessed by comparing the observer- defined and computer-determined quantitative indices of LV volume and by border positioning errors. The 3D reconstruction of the lV was performed from the sequences of the detected epicardial and endocardial borders using shape- based interpolation and surface rendering.

  2. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging in live rabbit hearts using clinical intracardiac catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian

    between the recording electrode distance and the measured AE signal amplitude in gel phantoms and excised porcine heart tissue using a clinical intracardiac catheter. Sensitivity of UCSDI with catheter was 4.7 microV/mA (R2 = 0.999) in cylindrical gel (0.9% NaCl), and 3.2 microV/mA (R2 = 0.92) in porcine heart tissue. The AE signal was detectable more than 25 mm away from the source in cylindrical gel (0.9% NaCl). Effect of transducer properties on UCSDI sensitivity is also investigated using simulation. The optimal ultrasound transducer parameters chosen for cardiac imaging are center frequency = 0.5 MHz and f/number = 1.4. Last but not least, this dissertation shows the result of implementing the optimized ultrasound parameters in live rabbit heart preparation, the comparison of different recording electrode configuration and multichannel UCSDI recording and reconstruction. The AE signal detected using the 0.5 MHz transducer was much stronger (2.99 microV/MPa) than the 1.0 MHz transducer (0.42 microV/MPa). The clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without being too invasive. 3-dimensional cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes were also demonstrated for the first time. Cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing were calculated based on the activation maps. The future outlook of this dissertation includes integrating UCSDI with 2-dimensional ultrasound transducer array for fast imaging, and developing a multi-modality catheter with 4-dimensional UCSDI, multi-electrode recording and echocardiography capacity.

  3. Utility of intracardiac ultrasound imaging to guide pulmonary vein ablation using laser balloon catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Luiz; Su, Wilber; Johnson, Susan B; Milton, Mark; Henz, Benhur; Sarabanda, Alvaro; Santos, Simone N; Packer, Douglas L

    2009-12-01

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with balloon catheter has been used as the endpoint for AF ablation. To determine the usefulness of intracardiac ultrasound (ICUS) to guide PVI using laser balloon catheter. 59 PVs were ablated in 27 dogs. Doppler imaging was used to identify blood flow leaks between PV and balloon. After each energy delivery, the circular mapping catheter was repositioned to check if isolation had been achieved. The leak position was then correlated with the gap position at the pathological study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken. 59 PV were ablated. Mean burn time was 279+/-177 sec, mean balloon diameter was 23+/-3 mm, and mean balloon length was 25+/-4 mm. Complete isolation was achieved in 38/59 (64%) cases, and it was significantly more common when there was no leak: [30/38 (79%) versus 8/23 (35%), p<0.001]. This occurred regardless of time of laser application (302+/-223 sec. vs. 266+/-148 sec., p=ns), laser power (3.5 W/cm, 4.5 W/cm, and 5.5 W/cm), balloon diameter (24+/- 3 mm vs. 22+/- 3 mm, p=ns) and length (27+/-4 mm vs. 24+/-4mm, p=ns). The positive predictive value for predicting incomplete isolation was 65% and the negative predictive value was 83%. An identifiable leak between PV and the LBA device seen at the ICUS is predictive of lower PV isolation rates. ICUS may be useful for leak detection to avoid ineffective energy application during circumferential PV ablation. This could also be helpful when other types of energy are used.

  4. Forward-looking intracardiac ultrasound imaging using a 1-D CMUT array integrated with custom front-end electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoozadeh, Amin; Wygant, Ira O; Lin, Der-Song; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, A Sanli; Stephens, Douglas N; Thomenius, Kai E; Dentinger, Aaron M; Wildes, Douglas; Akopyan, Gina; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Mahajan, Aman; Sahn, David J; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2008-12-01

    Minimally invasive catheter-based electrophysiological (EP) interventions are becoming a standard procedure in diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. As a result of technological advances that enable small feature sizes and a high level of integration, nonfluoroscopic intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) imaging catheters are attracting increasing attention. ICE catheters improve EP procedural guidance while reducing the undesirable use of fluoroscopy, which is currently the common catheter guidance method. Phased-array ICE catheters have been in use for several years now, although only for side-looking imaging. We are developing a forward-looking ICE catheter for improved visualization. In this effort, we fabricate a 24-element, fine-pitch 1-D array of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT), with a total footprint of 1.73 mm x 1.27 mm. We also design a custom integrated circuit (IC) composed of 24 identical blocks of transmit/ receive circuitry, measuring 2.1 mm x 2.1 mm. The transmit circuitry is capable of delivering 25-V unipolar pulses, and the receive circuitry includes a transimpedance preamplifier followed by an output buffer. The CMUT array and the custom IC are designed to be mounted at the tip of a 10-Fr catheter for high-frame-rate forward-looking intracardiac imaging. Through-wafer vias incorporated in the CMUT array provide access to individual array elements from the back side of the array. We successfully flip-chip bond a CMUT array to the custom IC with 100% yield. We coat the device with a layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to electrically isolate the device for imaging in water and tissue. The pulse-echo in water from a total plane reflector has a center frequency of 9.2 MHz with a 96% fractional bandwidth. Finally, we demonstrate the imaging capability of the integrated device on commercial phantoms and on a beating ex vivo rabbit heart (Langendorff model) using a commercial ultrasound imaging system.

  5. 3-D ultrasound imaging using a forward-looking CMUT ring array for intravascular/intracardiac applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, David T; Oralkan, Omer; Wygant, Ira O; O'Donnell, Matthew; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2006-06-01

    Forward-viewing ring arrays can enable new applications in intravascular and intracardiac ultrasound. This work presents compelling, full-synthetic, phased-array volumetric images from a forward-viewing capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) ring array wire bonded to a custom integrated circuit front end. The CMUT ring array has a diameter of 2 mm and 64 elements each 100 microm x 100 microm in size. In conventional mode, echo signals received from a plane reflector at 5 mm had 70% fractional bandwidth around a center frequency of 8.3 MHz. In collapse mode, 69% fractional bandwidth is measured around 19 MHz. Measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echo averaged 16 times was 29 dB for conventional operation and 35 dB for collapse mode. B-scans were generated of a target consisting of steel wires 0.3 mm in diameter to determine resolution performance. The 6 dB axial and lateral resolutions for the B-scan of the wire target are 189 microm and 0.112 radians for 8 MHz, and 78 microm and 0.051 radians for 19 MHz. A reduced firing set suitable for real-time, intravascular applications was generated and shown to produce acceptable images. Rendered three-dimensional (3-D) images of a Palmaz-Schatz stent also are shown, demonstrating that the imaging quality is sufficient for practical applications.

  6. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

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    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  7. Use of intra-cardiac ultrasound in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Faizel; Steeds, Rick

    2007-10-01

    A 46-year old lady was under regular follow up for aortic valve replacement done in 2002 for aortic stenosis. The valve was a Carbomedics 19 mm bi-leaflet aortic valve prosthesis for which she had adequate anticoagulation since implantation. She had a past history of end stage renal failure, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. She was asymptomatic and had a routine transthoracic echocardiogram performed which revealed that her aortic valve prosthesis was well seated with an elevated velocity across the valve; the aortic valve leaflets were poorly visualised but appeared to be mobile. A transoesophageal echocardiogram (TOE) confirmed the markedly increased forward velocity across the aortic valve (maximum velocity 4.6 m/s) with small aortic root raising the possibility of pressure recovery phenomenon. Once again the leaflets were not clearly seen but appeared mobile despite the use of deep trans-gastric view. Fluoroscopy was performed and revealed that one of the leaflets was not moving. The patient had an intra-cardiac ultrasound scan (ACUSON AcuNav; Siemens) with the probe of the scanner within the right atrium. A long-axis view demonstrated the prosthetic aortic valve leaflets clearly (Fig. 1). A short-axis view of the prosthetic valve revealed an echogenic area at the six o'clock position; this may be due to pannus formation (Fig. 2); colour flow across the valve during systole revealed absence of colour flow though one of the leaflets due to the leaflet being stuck (Fig. 3). The sewing cuff of the Carbomedics valve is coated with biolite carbon, which is an anti-thrombotic agent that prevents adhesion of thrombus or pannus on the sewing cuff. There are few reports of Carbomedics valve dysfunction by pannus formation in the mitral position but none in the aortic position. Fluoroscopy can be used to visualize mobility of valve leaflets but is unable to identify thrombus/pannus formation that may be causing the

  8. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, E.G.; Doherty, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound was used as early as 1950 in attempts to detect malignant tumors within the human breast and brain. In the years following, however, little attention was paid to this method of imaging by the radiologic community. Extensive work with this technique was not begun until the 1960s, when bistable ultrasound enabled sonographers to display organ outlines for the first time. Prior to the development of bistable ultrasound, sonographic images were limited to A-mode displays, which were merely a series of amplitude spikes on a graph. Over the past 20 or so years, major advances in ultrasound technology have gradually taken us from the simple graphic A-mode display, through bistable organ outlines, to gray-scale images with excellent parenchymal detail, and finally to real-time ultrasound

  9. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3- ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. What is ... into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos related to General Ultrasound Sponsored by ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  3. Navigation accuracy for an intracardiac procedure using ultrasound enhanced virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Andrew D.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Christopher; Linte, Cristian A.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Jones, Douglas L.; Peters, Terry M.

    2007-03-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for use inside the beating heart, such as mitral valve replacement and septal defect repair, are the focus of this work. Traditional techniques for these procedures require an open chest approach and a cardiopulmonary bypass machine. New techniques using port access and a combined surgical guidance tool that includes an overlaid two-dimensional ultrasound image in a virtual reality environment are being developed. To test this technique, a cardiac phantom was developed to simulate the anatomy. The phantom consists of an acrylic box filled with a 7% glycerol solution with ultrasound properties similar to human tissue. Plate inserts mounted in the box simulate the physical anatomy. An accuracy assessment was completed to evaluate the performance of the system. Using the cardiac phantom, a 2mm diameter glass toroid was attached to a vertical plate as the target location. An elastic material was placed between the target and plate to simulate the target lying on a soft tissue structure. The target was measured using an independent measurement system and was represented as a sphere in the virtual reality system. The goal was to test the ability of a user to probe the target using three guidance methods: (i) 2D ultrasound only, (ii) virtual reality only and (iii) ultrasound enhanced virtual reality. Three users attempted the task three times each for each method. An independent measurement system was used to validate the measurement. The ultrasound imaging alone was poor in locating the target (5.42 mm RMS) while the other methods proved to be significantly better (1.02 mm RMS and 1.47 mm RMS respectively). The ultrasound enhancement is expected to be more useful in a dynamic environment where the system registration may be disturbed.

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... can only see the outer surface of bony structures and not what lies within (except in infants ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for a procedure like angioplasty . top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose- ... are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  13. An ethnic predilection for fetal echogenic intracardiac focus identified during targeted midtrimester ultrasound examination: A retrospective review

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    Monda Susan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echogenic intracardiac focus (EIF has been identified as a common ultrasound finding in association with fetal aneuploidy. Little is known about the association of this soft marker aneuploidy in various ethnic groups. Although it is commonly thought Asians in general have a higher incidence of EIF, it is unknown whether this also applies to Japanese as a subpopulation. The purpose of this study is to determine the antenatal incidence and postnatal significance of EIF observed during sonography in Japanese patients. Methods A cohort of Japanese patients who underwent ultrasound screening from 1997 to 1999 in the ultrasound unit at the New York University School of Medicine was identified. Variables included age, gestational age, serum markers, and the presence or absence of aneuploidy. Patients with first degree paternal or maternal Japanese ancestry were included for analysis. Examinations were performed between 14 and 24 weeks gestation. The prevalence of EIF was calculated. The control group was based on previously published data in the U.S (7.3% prevalence. Results A total of 154 subjects were identified, 148 were available for final analysis. Twenty-two fetuses had an EIF, 19 (86.4% left-sided, 3 (13.6% right-sided. Seventeen patients had other sonographic markers associated with aneuploidy. The mean maternal age at diagnosis was 30.7 ± 3.9 years and the mean gestational age was 19.8 ± 1.6 weeks. The prevalence of EIF was 14.8%. Compared to published population prevalence, there was a statistically significant difference (p Conclusion Asians of Japanese origin may have a higher prevalence of echogenic intracardiac foci, thus affecting the positive predictive value of this sonographic marker for aneuploidy.

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  15. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate ... for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging ...

  19. Intracardiac flow patterns studied by cine MR flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Firmin, D.N.; Klipstein, R.H.; Rees, R.S.O.; Longmore, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity mapping by means of cine-MR imaging allows accurate measurement of velocity and flow within the cardiovascular system. A cine display and color coding simplify interpretation. The author have used the technique in a variety of patients to illustrate its potential. Velocity mapping in coronary artery by pass grafts in six patients provided a measure of graft function. Coronary artery velocities were measured in three subjects. Flow was measured through defects in the atrial septum, the ventricular septum, and a Gerbode defect. Velocity was reduced distal to coarctation of the aorta and was increased at the level of a partial venous occlusion by thrombosis. In a patient with isomerism, velocity mapping in the central vessels aided interpretation. Cine-MR imaging velocity mapping combined with conventional imaging yields important functional information on the cardiovascular system

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  5. Portable Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso

    This PhD project investigates hardware strategies and imaging methods for hand-held ultrasound systems. The overall idea is to use a wireless ultrasound probe linked to general-purpose mobile devices for the processing and visualization. The approach has the potential to reduce the upfront costs ...

  6. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

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    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... while the ultrasound images are reviewed. The branches of the carotid ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can ... Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... can often determine whether a patient is a good candidate for a procedure like angioplasty . top of ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and congenital vascular malformations reduced or absent blood ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ... children or adults). For visualizing internal structure of bones or certain joints, other imaging modalities such as ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare for an abdominal ultrasound exam? ... are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  14. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    a sufficient amount of data for high precision flow estimation. These constrictions can be lifted by employing SA imaging. Here data is acquired simultaneously from all directions over a number of emissions, and the full image can be reconstructed from this data. The talk will demonstrate the many benefits...... short imaging sequences, whereby both the correct velocity magnitude and angle can be estimated. A number of examples of both phantom and in-vivo SA images will be presented measured by the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS to demonstrate the many benefits of SA imaging....

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? ...

  16. Recursive ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for recursive ultrasound imaging is presented. The method uses a Synthetic Transmit Aperture, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created at every pulse emission. In receive, parallel beam forming is implemented. The beam formed RF data is added to the previously...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a clear picture of the internal organs and blood vessels within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help ... tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  13. Utilidade do Ultrassom intracardíaco no isolamento de veias pulmonares usando cateter-balão a laser Utilidad del ultrasonido intracardíaco en el aislamiento de venas pulmonares usando catéter-balón láser Utility of intracardiac ultrasound imaging to guide pulmonary vein ablation using laser balloon catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Leite

    2009-12-01

    . Se obtuvo el aislamiento completo en 38/59 (64%, y fue significantemente más común sin derrame: [30/38 (79% versus 8/23 (35%, pBACKGROUND: Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI with balloon catheter has been used as the endpoint for AF ablation. OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of intracardiac ultrasound (ICUS to guide PVI using laser balloon catheter. METHODS: 59 PVs were ablated in 27 dogs. Doppler imaging was used to identify blood flow leaks between PV and balloon. After each energy delivery, the circular mapping catheter was repositioned to check if isolation had been achieved. The leak position was then correlated with the gap position at the pathological study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken. RESULTS: 59 PV were ablated. Mean burn time was 279±177 sec, mean balloon diameter was 23±3 mm, and mean balloon length was 25±4 mm. Complete isolation was achieved in 38/59 (64% cases, and it was significantly more common when there was no leak: [30/38 (79% versus 8/23 (35%, p<0.001]. This occurred regardless of time of laser application (302±223 sec. vs. 266±148 sec., p=ns, laser power (3.5 W/cm, 4.5 W/cm, and 5.5 W/cm, balloon diameter (24± 3 mm vs. 22± 3 mm, p=ns and length (27±4 mm vs. 24±4mm, p=ns. The positive predictive value for predicting incomplete isolation was 65% and the negative predictive value was 83%. CONCLUSION: An identifiable leak between PV and the LBA device seen at the ICUS is predictive of lower PV isolation rates. ICUS may be useful for leak detection to avoid ineffective energy application during circumferential PV ablation. This could also be helpful when other types of energy are used.

  14. Deconvolution of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1992-01-01

    Based on physical models, it is indicated that the received pressure field in ultrasound B-mode images can be described by a convolution between a tissue reflection signal and the emitted pressure field. This result is used in a description of current image formation and in formulating a new...... processing scheme. The suggested estimator can take into account the dispersive attenuation, the temporal and spatial variation of the pulse, and the change in reflection strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Details of the algorithm and the estimation of parameters to be used are given. The performance...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ... Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  1. High dynamic range ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Perrin, Douglas P; Howe, Robert D

    2018-03-16

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is a popular computational photography technique that has found its way into every modern smartphone and camera. In HDR imaging, images acquired at different exposures are combined to increase the luminance range of the final image, thereby extending the limited dynamic range of the camera. Ultrasound imaging suffers from limited dynamic range as well; at higher power levels, the hyperechogenic tissue is overexposed, whereas at lower power levels, hypoechogenic tissue details are not visible. In this work, we apply HDR techniques to ultrasound imaging, where we combine ultrasound images acquired at different power levels to improve the level of detail visible in the final image. Ultrasound images of ex vivo and in vivo tissue are acquired at different acoustic power levels and then combined to generate HDR ultrasound (HDR-US) images. The performance of five tone mapping operators is quantitatively evaluated using a similarity metric to determine the most suitable mapping for HDR-US imaging. The ex vivo and in vivo results demonstrated that HDR-US imaging enables visualizing both hyper- and hypoechogenic tissue at once in a single image. The Durand tone mapping operator preserved the most amount of detail across the dynamic range. Our results strongly suggest that HDR-US imaging can improve the utility of ultrasound in image-based diagnosis and procedure guidance.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive sound that can be heard ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ... heart failure, and to assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound of the heart is commonly called an “ ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... illness. Ultrasound is used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... can be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ... is full when the scan begins. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a variety of conditions and to assess organ damage following ... the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart conditions, including valve problems and congestive ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  14. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a ... the scan begins. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... uterus and ovaries. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal discomfort. If a Doppler ultrasound ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do we get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? ...

  1. Ultrasound Imaging and its modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Modern medical ultrasound scanners are used for imaging nearly all soft tissue structures in the body. The anatomy can be studied from gray-scale B-mode images, where the reflectivity and scattering strength of the tissues are displayed. The imaging is performed in real time with 20 to 100 images...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys ... as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an inflamed appendix guide procedures such as biopsies, in which needles, ...

  13. Intracardiac foreign body resulting from a transmediastinal gunshot mimics an extracardiac foreign body: An image presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsun-Yi Fu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A transmediastinal gunshot wound (TMGW is one of the most severe traumatic injuries, with a high mortality rate. Prompt diagnosis and emergency surgical intervention with or without cardiopulmonary bypass are usually required to save lives. We report a particular case of TMGW in which the computed tomography imaging findings indicated an extracardiac foreign body. However, intraoperative findings revealed an intracardiac foreign body, and urgent cardiopulmonary bypass was performed to remove the foreign body. We suggest that cardiopulmonary bypass should be on standby during an exploratory sternotomy for TMGW, when the trajectory of the bullet hints at a cardiac-penetrating injury according to imaging studies and the location of the bullet remains unaffected by the patient's postural changes.

  14. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyhen, Deydre; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular deficits have been linked with chronic musculoskeletal conditions. The use of ultrasound imaging(USI) to aid rehabilitation of neuromusculoskeletal disorders has been called rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI)and defined as ‘a procedure used by physical therapists to evaluate muscle and related soft tissue morphology and function during exercise and physical tasks. RUSI is used to assist in the application of therapeutic interventions,providing feedback to the patient and physical therapist (Teyhen 2006). Brightness mode (b-mode) USI is the most common form used by physical therapists and will be the focus of this summary. USI can distinguish between healthy adults and those with low back pain (LBP). Those with LBP have decreased muscle thickness, side-to-side asymmetry,and decreased ability to thicken the muscles during a contraction (Teyhen et al 2009). Moreover, when measured by USI, lumbar multifidus muscle asymmetry appears to be predictive of future episode of LBP up to three years later(Hides et al 2001). Finally, USI can distinguish between changes in muscle thickness during common LBP exercises when performed by healthy adults (Teyhen et al 2008) and is preliminarily supported as a biofeedback tool to enhance exercise effectiveness (Henry and Teyhan 2007). CRITERION-RELATED VALIDITY: In a recent systematic review Koppenhaver et al (2009a) concluded that b-mode USI when applied in a rehabilitative setting is a valid tool to measure trunk muscle size and muscle activation during most submaximal contracted states. When comparing muscle thickness obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and USI, researchers have demonstrated substantial agreement(ICC 0.84 to –0.95) with only minimal differences between the modalities (0.03 to 0.21 cm2) (Hides et al 1995, 2006). Although comparisons between electromyography and change in muscle thickness obtained by USI have most often demonstrated a curvilinear relationship (Hodges et al 2003), the ability

  15. Image processing in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    This Ph.D project addresses image processing in medical ultrasound and seeks to achieve two major scientific goals: First to develop an understanding of the most significant factors influencing image quality in medical ultrasound, and secondly to use this knowledge to develop image processing...... multiple imaging setups. This makes the system well suited for development of new processing methods and for clinical evaluations, where acquisition of the exact same scan location for multiple methods is important. The second project addressed implementation, development and evaluation of SASB using...... methods for enhancing the diagnostic value of medical ultrasound. The project is an industrial Ph.D project co-sponsored by BK Medical ApS., with the commercial goal to improve the image quality of BK Medicals scanners. Currently BK Medical employ a simple conventional delay-and-sum beamformer to generate...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... because greater amounts of tissue attenuate (weaken) the sound waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Videos related to General Ultrasound Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... asked to drink up to six glasses of water two hours prior to your exam and avoid ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s internal organs and to examine ... help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of examining many ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... For others you may be asked to drink up to six glasses of water two hours prior ... ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s internal organs ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, ... the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... a blood vessel. Power Doppler is a newer technique that is more sensitive than color Doppler and ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface of bony structures and not what lies within (except in infants ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a woman's vagina to view the uterus and ovaries. top ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  20. OSPACS: Ultrasound image management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessant Conrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound scanning uses the medical imaging format, DICOM, for electronically storing the images and data associated with a particular scan. Large health care facilities typically use a picture archiving and communication system (PACS for storing and retrieving such images. However, these systems are usually not suitable for managing large collections of anonymized ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. Results We have developed a system enabling the accurate archiving and management of ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. It is based upon a Windows application utilizing an open-source DICOM image viewer and a relational database. The system automates the bulk import of DICOM files from removable media by cross-validating the patient information against an external database, anonymizing the data as well as the image, and then storing the contents of the file as a field in a database record. These image records may then be retrieved from the database and presented in a tree-view control so that the user can select particular images for display in a DICOM viewer or export them to external media. Conclusion This system provides error-free automation of ultrasound image archiving and management, suitable for use in a clinical trial. An open-source project has been established to promote continued development of the system.

  1. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: help a physician determine ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top ... waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and ovaries. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  8. Adaptive Beamforming for Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund

    This dissertation investigates the application of adaptive beamforming for medical ultrasound imaging. The investigations have been concentrated primarily on the Minimum Variance (MV) beamformer. A broadband implementation of theMV beamformer is described, and simulated data have been used...... to demonstrate the performance. The MV beamformer has been applied to different sets of ultrasound imaging sequences; synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and plane wave ultrasound imaging. And an approach for applying MV optimized apodization weights on both the transmitting and the receiving apertures...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... an area of tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Once the imaging ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the ... provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ... information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures ... Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by ...

  18. Recursive Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1999-01-01

    transducer element is used after N-xmt emissions. For each emission the signals from the individual elements are beam-formed in parallel for all directions in the image. A new frame is created by adding the new RF lines to the RF lines from the previous frame. The RF data recorded at the previous emission......This paper presents a new imaging method, applicable for both 2D and 3D imaging. It is based on Synthetic Transmit Aperture Focusing, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created after every pulse emission. The elements from a linear transducer array emit pulses one after another. The same...... with the same element are subtracted. This yields a new image after each pulse emission and can give a frame rate of e.g. 5000 images/sec. The paper gives a derivation of the recursive imaging technique and compares simulations for fast B-mode imaging with measurements. A low value of N-xmt is necessary...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that is used to do ... image is immediately visible on a video display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... In most cases, barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a ... or certain joints, other imaging modalities such as MRI are typically used. top of page This page ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  5. Ultrasound Assisted Optical Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Nan

    2002-01-01

    .... A novel image reconstruction algorithm has been proposed and implemented. It reconstructs lower orders moments of targets from limited information from a diffusive system, and is more robust than conventional iterative algorithms...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation ... imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. It is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... graphically, in terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... by taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient ... caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child- ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on the examination table, the radiologist (a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations) or sonographer will apply a warm water-based gel to the area of the body ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or ...

  15. Ultrasound imaging using coded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Athanasios

    coded excitation can be used for increasing the frame rate. The work includes both simulated results using Field II, and experimental results based on measurements on phantoms as well as clinical images. Initially a mathematical foundation of signal modulation is given. Pulse compression based...... is described. Application of coded excitation in array imaging is evaluated through simulations in Field II. The low degree of the orthogonality among coded signals for ultrasound systems is first discussed, and the effect of mismatched filtering in the cross-correlation properties of the signals is evaluated...... emissions. Finally, a novel coding technique which uses pulse train excitation is presented....

  16. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ... is rarely needed for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  19. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  20. Non-linear Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang

    are performed under water by two geometrical focused piston transducers. It can be seen that the time pulses measured from a 0.5 inch diameter transducer and linearly simulated using the ASA are fairly comparable. The root mean square (RMS) error for the second harmonic field simulated by the ASA is 10.......3% relative to the measurement from a 1 inch diameter transducer. A preliminary study for harmonic imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) has been demonstrated. A wire phantom underwater measurement is made by an experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS...

  1. Transrectal ultrasound imaging and prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, Tjerk; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most important causes of death from cancer in men. Ultrasound imaging is frequently used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. This paper presents an overview of currently available ultrasound imaging techniques. The underlying principles and methods are discussed

  2. Micromachined Integrated Transducers for Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Mette Funding

    The purpose of this project is to develop capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for medical imaging. Medical ultrasound transducers used today are fabricated using piezoelectric materials and bulk processing. To fabricate transducers capable of delivering a higher imaging...

  3. Breast ultrasound image segmentation: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinghua; Luo, Yaozhong; Zhang, Qiangzhi

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women worldwide. Ultrasound imaging is one of the most frequently used diagnostic tools to detect and classify abnormalities of the breast. Recently, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems using ultrasound images have been developed to help radiologists to increase diagnosis accuracy. However, accurate ultrasound image segmentation remains a challenging problem due to various ultrasound artifacts. In this paper, we investigate approaches developed for breast ultrasound (BUS) image segmentation. In this paper, we reviewed the literature on the segmentation of BUS images according to the techniques adopted, especially over the past 10 years. By dividing into seven classes (i.e., thresholding-based, clustering-based, watershed-based, graph-based, active contour model, Markov random field and neural network), we have introduced corresponding techniques and representative papers accordingly. We have summarized and compared many techniques on BUS image segmentation and found that all these techniques have their own pros and cons. However, BUS image segmentation is still an open and challenging problem due to various ultrasound artifacts introduced in the process of imaging, including high speckle noise, low contrast, blurry boundaries, low signal-to-noise ratio and intensity inhomogeneity CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of the approaches developed for segmentation of BUS images. With most techniques involved, this paper will be useful and helpful for researchers working on segmentation of ultrasound images, and for BUS CAD system developers.

  4. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M; Hall, Timothy J

    2016-02-15

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How should we prepare for an abdominal ultrasound exam? Your child should be dressed in comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on the type of examination. ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. What is ... within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound examination. ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed ... ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  10. Automated tissue classification of intracardiac optical coherence tomography images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yu; Tsay, David; Amir, Syed B.; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-03-01

    Remodeling of the myocardium is associated with increased risk of arrhythmia and heart failure. Our objective is to automatically identify regions of fibrotic myocardium, dense collagen, and adipose tissue, which can serve as a way to guide radiofrequency ablation therapy or endomyocardial biopsies. Using computer vision and machine learning, we present an automated algorithm to classify tissue compositions from cardiac optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Three dimensional OCT volumes were obtained from 15 human hearts ex vivo within 48 hours of donor death (source, NDRI). We first segmented B-scans using a graph searching method. We estimated the boundary of each region by minimizing a cost function, which consisted of intensity, gradient, and contour smoothness. Then, features, including texture analysis, optical properties, and statistics of high moments, were extracted. We used a statistical model, relevance vector machine, and trained this model with abovementioned features to classify tissue compositions. To validate our method, we applied our algorithm to 77 volumes. The datasets for validation were manually segmented and classified by two investigators who were blind to our algorithm results and identified the tissues based on trichrome histology and pathology. The difference between automated and manual segmentation was 51.78 +/- 50.96 μm. Experiments showed that the attenuation coefficients of dense collagen were significantly different from other tissue types (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Importantly, myocardial fibrosis tissues were different from normal myocardium in entropy and kurtosis. The tissue types were classified with an accuracy of 84%. The results show good agreements with histology.

  11. Ultrasound Imaging of Cystic Nephroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Greco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic nephroma is a rare, benign multicystic lesion of the kidney. This tumor occurs both in children and in adults. In children, it is highly prevalent in males; in adults, it is more frequent in women. The term “cystic nephroma” represents two apparently different entities: pediatric cystic nephroma, a benign form thought to originate from metanephric tissue, and adult cystic nephroma, considered as a lesion of mixed epithelial stromal tumor. The clinical presentation may be a palpable mass or nonspecific symptoms such as abdominal pain, hematuria, and urinary tract infections. In this review, we summarize the ultrasound imaging features of cystic nephroma and describe the characteristics of the most common renal cystic lesions and the differential diagnosis of cystic nephroma with other renal cystic lesions.

  12. Linear description of ultrasound imaging systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    These notes have been prepared for the international summer school on advanced ultrasound imaging sponsored by The Danish Research Academy. The notes should be read in conjunction with the notes prepared by Anderson and Trahey1. The intended audience is Ph.D. students working in medical ultrasound...

  13. Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Pedersen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    with high precision, and the imaging is easily extended to real-time 3D scanning. This paper presents the work done at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging in the area of SA imaging. Three areas that benefit from SA imaging are described. Firstly a preliminary in-vivo evaluation comparing conventional B...

  14. Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Christopher; Barkley, Joel; Smith, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    Intrauterine photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging are probe-based imaging modalities with translational potential for use in detecting endometrial diseases. This deep-tissue imaging probe design allows for the retrofitting of commercially available endometrial sampling curettes. The imaging probe presented here has a 2.92-mm diameter and approximate length of 26 cm, which allows for entry into the human endometrial cavity, making it possible to use photoacoustic imaging and high-resolution ultrasound to characterize the uterus. We demonstrate the imaging probes' ability to provide structural information of an excised pig uterus using ultrasound imaging and detect photoacoustic signals at a radial depth of 1 cm. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide the insertion of a catheter or other drainage device and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound ...

  16. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Charles F

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound is a rapidly advancing field with many emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For diagnostics, new vascular targets are routinely identified and mature technologies are being translated to humans, while other recent innovations may bring about the creation of acoustic reporter genes and micron-scale resolution with ultrasound. As a cancer therapy, ultrasound is being explored as an adjuvant to immune therapies and to deliver acoustically or thermally active drugs to tumor regions. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) could potentially be very impactful for brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases where the BBB often impedes the delivery of therapeutic molecules. In this minireview, we provide an overview of these topics in the field of ultrasound that are especially relevant to the interests of World Molecular Imaging Society.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on the type of examination. For some scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... can be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect ... biopsies, in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. ... child should be dressed in comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real- ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an ... sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide the ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be tilted ... you at the conclusion of your examination. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and congenital vascular malformations reduced or absent blood ... vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, ... the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the ... of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  13. First In Vivo Use of a Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer Array–Based Imaging and Ablation Catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Truong, Uyen T.; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Ömer; Seo, Chi Hyung; Cannata, Jonathan; Dentinger, Aaron; Thomenius, Kai; de la Rama, Alan; Nguyen, Tho; Lin, Feng; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; O’Donnell, Matt; Sahn, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective was to test in vivo for the first time the general operation of a new multifunctional intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter constructed with a microlinear capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (ML-CMUT) imaging array. Secondarily, we examined the compatibility of this catheter with electroanatomic mapping (EAM) guidance and also as a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) catheter. Preliminary thermal strain imaging (TSI)-derived temperature data were obtained from within the endocardium simultaneously during RFA to show the feasibility of direct ablation guidance procedures. Methods The new 9F forward-looking ICE catheter was constructed with 3 complementary technologies: a CMUT imaging array with a custom electronic array buffer, catheter surface electrodes for EAM guidance, and a special ablation tip, that permits simultaneous TSI and RFA. In vivo imaging studies of 5 anesthetized porcine models with 5 CMUT catheters were performed. Results The ML-CMUT ICE catheter provided high-resolution real-time wideband 2-dimensional (2D) images at greater than 8 MHz and is capable of both RFA and EAM guidance. Although the 24-element array aperture dimension is only 1.5 mm, the imaging depth of penetration is greater than 30 mm. The specially designed ultrasound-compatible metalized plastic tip allowed simultaneous imaging during ablation and direct acquisition of TSI data for tissue ablation temperatures. Postprocessing analysis showed a first-order correlation between TSI and temperature, permitting early development temperature-time relationships at specific myocardial ablation sites. Conclusions Multifunctional forward-looking ML-CMUT ICE catheters, with simultaneous intracardiac guidance, ultrasound imaging, and RFA, may offer a new means to improve interventional ablation procedures. PMID:22298868

  14. First in vivo use of a capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array-based imaging and ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Douglas N; Truong, Uyen T; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Seo, Chi Hyung; Cannata, Jonathan; Dentinger, Aaron; Thomenius, Kai; de la Rama, Alan; Nguyen, Tho; Lin, Feng; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; O'Donnell, Matt; Sahn, David J

    2012-02-01

    The primary objective was to test in vivo for the first time the general operation of a new multifunctional intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter constructed with a microlinear capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (ML-CMUT) imaging array. Secondarily, we examined the compatibility of this catheter with electroanatomic mapping (EAM) guidance and also as a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) catheter. Preliminary thermal strain imaging (TSI)-derived temperature data were obtained from within the endocardium simultaneously during RFA to show the feasibility of direct ablation guidance procedures. The new 9F forward-looking ICE catheter was constructed with 3 complementary technologies: a CMUT imaging array with a custom electronic array buffer, catheter surface electrodes for EAM guidance, and a special ablation tip, that permits simultaneous TSI and RFA. In vivo imaging studies of 5 anesthetized porcine models with 5 CMUT catheters were performed. The ML-CMUT ICE catheter provided high-resolution real-time wideband 2-dimensional (2D) images at greater than 8 MHz and is capable of both RFA and EAM guidance. Although the 24-element array aperture dimension is only 1.5 mm, the imaging depth of penetration is greater than 30 mm. The specially designed ultrasound-compatible metalized plastic tip allowed simultaneous imaging during ablation and direct acquisition of TSI data for tissue ablation temperatures. Postprocessing analysis showed a first-order correlation between TSI and temperature, permitting early development temperature-time relationships at specific myocardial ablation sites. Multifunctional forward-looking ML-CMUT ICE catheters, with simultaneous intracardiac guidance, ultrasound imaging, and RFA, may offer a new means to improve interventional ablation procedures.

  15. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... images reproduce most of the important characteristics of the measured US image....

  16. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  17. Ultrasound imaging and contrast agents: a safe alternative to MRI?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, Margot H.; Wijkstra, Hessel; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.

    2006-01-01

    Microbubble contrast media are used to enhance ultrasound images. Because ultrasound is a real-time investigation, contrast-enhanced ultrasound offers possibilities for perfusion imaging. This review is conducted to evaluate the safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and its possible role in medical

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top ... waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  2. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  3. Deconvolution of in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1990-01-01

    In an ultrasound image, the influence of the pulse and attenuation should be removed from the picture in order to display a more consistent and uniform image. The author describes an algorithm to remove the influence of the attenuated pulse on the image. The algorithm takes into account the varyi....... Examples of 1-D deconvoluted pictures of phantom data and in vivo data are given. They show, especially for the phantom data, an increased contrast and resolution...

  4. An image registration based ultrasound probe calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Kumar, Dinesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Narayanan, Ram

    2012-02-01

    Reconstructed 3D ultrasound of prostate gland finds application in several medical areas such as image guided biopsy, therapy planning and dose delivery. In our application, we use an end-fire probe rotated about its axis to acquire a sequence of rotational slices to reconstruct 3D TRUS (Transrectal Ultrasound) image. The image acquisition system consists of an ultrasound transducer situated on a cradle directly attached to a rotational sensor. However, due to system tolerances, axis of probe does not align exactly with the designed axis of rotation resulting in artifacts in the 3D reconstructed ultrasound volume. We present a rigid registration based automatic probe calibration approach. The method uses a sequence of phantom images, each pair acquired at angular separation of 180 degrees and registers corresponding image pairs to compute the deviation from designed axis. A modified shadow removal algorithm is applied for preprocessing. An attribute vector is constructed from image intensity and a speckle-insensitive information-theoretic feature. We compare registration between the presented method and expert-corrected images in 16 prostate phantom scans. Images were acquired at multiple resolutions, and different misalignment settings from two ultrasound machines. Screenshots from 3D reconstruction are shown before and after misalignment correction. Registration parameters from automatic and manual correction were found to be in good agreement. Average absolute differences of translation and rotation between automatic and manual methods were 0.27 mm and 0.65 degree, respectively. The registration parameters also showed lower variability for automatic registration (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.50 mm, σrotation = 0.52 degree) compared to the manual approach (pooled standard deviation σtranslation = 0.62 mm, σrotation = 0.78 degree).

  5. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  6. Needle Tip Visibility in 3D Ultrasound Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Arif (Muhammad); A. Moelker (Adriaan); T.W. van Walsum (Theo)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAim: Needle visibility is crucial for effective and safe ultrasound-guided interventional procedures. Several studies have investigated needle visibility in 2D ultrasound imaging, but less information is available for 3D ultrasound imaging, a modality that has great potential for image

  7. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  8. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis

  9. Lesion Contrast Enhancement in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.; Macovski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of low-contrast lesions in medical ultrasound imaging are described. Differences in the frequency spectra and amplitude distributions of the lesion and its surroundings can be used to increase the CNR of the lesion relative to the background...

  10. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rogers, B; Walsh, N. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the ... provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  15. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue har- monic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a compar- ative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined......, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technol- ogy 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and pen- etration. In-vivo scans were also...

  16. Sampling system for in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Mathorne, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Newly developed algorithms for processing medical ultrasound images use the high frequency sampled transducer signal. This paper describes demands imposed on a sampling system suitable for acquiring such data and gives details about a prototype constructed. It acquires full clinical images at a s...... at a sampling frequency of 20 MHz with a resolution of 12 bits. The prototype can be used for real time image processing. An example of a clinical in vivo image is shown and various aspects of the data acquisition process are discussed....

  17. Fast simulation of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2000-01-01

    Realistic B-mode and flow images can be simulated with scattering maps based on optical, CT, or MR images or parametric flow models. The image simulation often includes using 200,000 to 1 million point scatterers. One image line typically takes 1800 seconds to compute on a state-of-the-art PC...... be split among a number of PCs for speeding up the simulation. A full 3D one second volume simulation then takes 7,500 seconds on a 32 CPU 600 MHz Pentium III PC cluster....

  18. Automatic assessment of ultrasound image usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Luca; Funka-Lea, Gareth; Stoll, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for evaluating the quality of ultrasound images. Image acquisition is sensitive to skin contact and transducer orientation and requires both time and technical skill to be done properly. Images commonly suffer degradation due to acoustic shadows and signal attenuation, which present as regions of low signal intensity masking anatomical details and making the images partly or totally unusable. As ultrasound image acquisition and analysis becomes increasingly automated, it is beneficial to also automate the estimation of image quality. Towards this end, we present an algorithm that classifies regions of an image as usable or un-usable. Example applications of this algorithm include improved compounding of free-hand 3D ultrasound volumes by eliminating unusable data and improved automatic feature detection by limiting detection to only usable areas. The algorithm operates in two steps. First, it classifies the image into bright areas, likely to have image content, and dark areas, likely to have no content. Second, it classifies the dark areas into unusable (i.e. due to shadowing and/or signal loss) and usable (i.e. anatomically accurate dark regions, such as with a blood vessel) sub-areas. The classification considers several factors, including statistical information, gradient intensity and geometric properties such as shape and relative position. Relative weighting of factors was obtained through the training of a Support Vector Machine. Classification results for both human and phantom images are presented and compared to manual classifications. This method achieves 91% sensitivity and 91% specificity for usable regions of human scans.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water- ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ... information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures ... Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... imaging of the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by ...

  3. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  4. Synthetic aperture tissue and flow ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav

    imaging applied to medical ultrasound. It is divided into two major parts: tissue and blood flow imaging. Tissue imaging using synthetic aperture algorithms has been investigated for about two decades, but has not been implemented in medical scanners yet. Among the other reasons, the conventional scanning...... and beamformation methods are adequate for the imaging modalities in clinical use - the B-mode imaging of tissue structures, and the color mapping of blood flow. The acquisition time, however, is too long, and these methods fail to perform real-time three-dimensional scans. The synthetic transmit aperture......, on the other hand, can create a Bmode image with as little as 2 emissions, thus significantly speeding-up the scan procedure. The first part of the dissertation describes the synthetic aperture tissue imaging. It starts with an overview of the efforts previously made by other research groups. A classification...

  5. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.; Needles, A.; Willmann, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic.

  6. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  7. Lesion Contrast Enhancement in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.; Macovski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of low-contrast lesions in medical ultrasound imaging are described. Differences in the frequency spectra and amplitude distributions of the lesion and its surroundings can be used to increase the CNR of the lesion relative to the background....... Automated graylevel mapping is used in combination with a contrast-weighted form of frequency-diversity speckle reduction. In clinical studies, the techniques have yielded mean CNR improvements of 3.2 dB above ordinary frequency-diversity imaging and 5.6 dB over sharper conventional images, with no post...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ... improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's ( ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  16. The Usefulness of Ultrasound Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Courtney A

    2018-04-01

    Pelvic ultrasound examination is the primary imaging modality for evaluating a wide range of female pelvic symptomatology, and is often the first imaging test to detect a gynecologic malignancy. Ultrasound imaging is particularly useful for evaluating the thickness and appearance of the endometrium in patients with abnormal bleeding, and in detecting and characterizing ovarian lesions. This article reviews the ultrasound appearance of gynecologic neoplasms grouped by anatomic site of origin, the ultrasound appearance of select benign pelvic pathology not to be misinterpreted as malignancy, as well as available ultrasound imaging-based guidelines for managing potential gynecologic neoplasms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Lunula: An ultrasound imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2001-01-01

    The lunula is the white, half-moon-shaped area seen on some, but not all nails. Usually the lunula is the topographic marker of the distal part of the nail matrix, and known to have the ability of nail production. Ultrasonographic imaging of the lunula has not been reported before. This study was undertaken to demonstrate normal ultrasonographic features of the lunula. Ultrasonographic examination of the lunula was performed in the right thumb of 20 healthy volunteers (10M, 10F, mean age 30, range 26-36 years) with a real-time, high-resolution ultrasound unit (Sequoia 512, Acuson, Mountain view, CA, USA) with 8-15 MHz linear transducers. Gray scale color, and special Doppler imagings were performed with longitudinal scanning. The lunula was not seen inspection in three of the 20 volunteers. The mean size of the lunula in the other 17 volumteen was 3.31 ± 1.24 mm (range 2-6.2 mm). Gray scale ultrasound imaging showed the lunula; ovoid shaped hypo-echoic zone in proximal fingernail in 18 of 20 volunteers (mean size, 6.74 ± 0.98 mm, range 5-8.8 mm). In two of 20 volunteers, the lunula was indistinct on gray scale ultrasound examination. However, all lunula were identifiable on color Doppler imaging by detecting vascularity within the lunula. Spectral wave pattern of the lunula was a bi-directional pulsatile wave. Peak velocity was within 5-15 m/sec (mean 8 m/sec). The lunula is identifiable on ultrasound examination as a hyper-vascular, ovoid shaped, hypo-echoic zone in proximal fingernail. This normal structure should not be misinterpreted as an abnormal sub-ungual lesion.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or ...

  1. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    that addresses the drawbacks of the circular symmetric apodization function was proposed and described. The new layout was shown to be effective in both simulations and with measurements on in-house produced CMUT arrays. The measurements included both intensity measurements of the edge waves and imaging...

  2. Real-time image fusion involving diagnostic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Lucian G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our article is to give an overview of the current and future possibilities of real-time image fusion involving ultrasound. We present a review of the existing English-language peer-reviewed literature assessing this technique, which covers technical solutions (for ultrasound and endosc......The aim of our article is to give an overview of the current and future possibilities of real-time image fusion involving ultrasound. We present a review of the existing English-language peer-reviewed literature assessing this technique, which covers technical solutions (for ultrasound...... and endoscopic ultrasound), image fusion in several anatomic regions, and electromagnetic needle tracking....

  3. Wireless image streaming in mobile ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Brett W; Pedersen, Peder C

    2010-03-01

    This work evaluates the feasibility of using 802.11 g ad hoc and 3G cellular broadband networks to wirelessly stream ultrasound video in real-time. Telemedicine ultrasound applications in events such as disaster relief and first-response triage can incorporate these technologies, enabling onsite medical personnel to receive assistance with diagnostic decisions by remote medical experts. The H.264 scalable video codec was used to encode echocardiographic video streams at various image resolutions (video graphics array [VGA] and quarter video graphics array [QVGA]) and frame rates (10, 15, 20, and 30 frames/s). The video stream was transmitted using 802.11 g and 3G cellular technologies, and pertinent transmission parameters such as data rate, packet loss, delay jitter, and latency were measured. 802.11 g permits high frame rate and VGA resolution and has low latency and jitter, but it is suitable only for short communication ranges, whereas the 3G cellular network allows medium to low frame rate streaming at QVGA image resolution with medium latency. However, video streaming can take place from any location with 3G service to any other site with Internet connectivity. The transmitted ultrasound video streams were subsequently recorded and evaluated by physicians with expertise in medical ultrasonography who evaluated the diagnostic value of the received video streams relative to the original videos. They expressed the opinion that image quality in the case of both 802.11 g and 3G was fully to adequately preserved, but missed frames could momentarily decrease the diagnostic value. This research demonstrates that 3G and 802.11 g wireless networks combined with efficient video compression make diagnostically valuable wireless streaming of ultrasound video feasible.

  4. with Ultrasound Color Doppler Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Takayama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Color Doppler imaging (CDI can be used to noninvasively create images of human blood vessels and quantitatively evaluate blood flow in real-time. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of acupuncture on the blood flow of the peripheral, mesenteric, and retrobulbar arteries by CDI. Statistical significance was defined as P values less than 0.05. Blood flow in the radial and brachial arteries was significantly lower during needle stimulation on LR3 than before in healthy volunteers, but was significantly higher after needle stimulation than before. LR3 stimulation also resulted in a significant decrease in the vascular resistance of the short posterior ciliary artery and no significant change of blood flow through the superior mesenteric artery (SMA during acupuncture. In contrast, ST36 stimulation resulted in a significant increase in blood flow through the SMA and no significant change in the vascular resistance of the retrobulbar arteries. Additionally, acupuncture at previously determined acupoints in patients with open-angle glaucoma led to a significant reduction in the vascular resistance of the central retinal artery and short posterior ciliary artery. Our results suggest that acupuncture can affect blood flow of the peripheral, mesenteric, and retrobulbar arteries, and CDI can be useful to evaluate hemodynamic changes by acupuncture.

  5. Signal Processing in Medical Ultrasound B-mode Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tai Kyong

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging is the most widely used modality among modern imaging device for medical diagnosis and the system performance has been improved dramatically since early 90's due to the rapid advances in DSP performance and VLSI technology that made it possible to employ more sophisticated algorithms. This paper describes 'main stream' digital signal processing functions along with the associated implementation considerations in modern medical ultrasound imaging systems. Topics covered include signal processing methods for resolution improvement, ultrasound imaging system architectures, roles and necessity of the applications of DSP and VLSI technology in the development of the medical ultrasound imaging systems, and array signal processing techniques for ultrasound focusing

  6. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Marcel R.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Tiemann, Klaus; Hall, Christopher S.; Gruell, Holger; Steinbach, Oliver C.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaging has been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Important advances in this field are based on a combination of progress in guiding and monitoring ultrasound energy, novel drug classes becoming available, the development of smart delivery vehicles, and more in depth understanding of the mechanisms of the cellular and molecular basis of diseases. Recent research demonstrates that both pressure sensitive and temperature sensitive delivery systems hold promise for local treatment. The use of ultrasound for the delivery of drugs has been demonstrated in particular the field of cardiology and oncology for a variety of therapeutics ranging from small drug molecules to biologics and nucleic acids.

  7. APES Beamforming Applied to Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Ann E. A.; Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Austeng, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Recently, adaptive beamformers have been introduced to medical ultrasound imaging. The primary focus has been on the minimum variance (MV) (or Capon) beamformer. This work investigates an alternative but closely related beamformer, the Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) beamformer. APES offers...... added robustness at the expense of a slightly lower resolution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the APES beamformer on medical imaging data, since correct amplitude estimation often is just as important as spatial resolution. In our simulations we have used a 3.5 MHz, 96...... element linear transducer array. When imaging two closely spaced point targets, APES displays nearly the same resolution as the MV, and at the same time improved amplitude control. When imaging cysts in speckle, APES offers speckle statistics similar to that of the DAS, without the need for temporal...

  8. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of the abdominal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Gill, Norman W; Whittaker, Jackie L; Henry, Sharon M; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) of the abdominal muscles is increasingly being used in the management of conditions involving musculoskeletal dysfunctions associated with the abdominal muscles, including certain types of low back and pelvic pain. This commentary provides an overview of current concepts and evidence related to RUSI of the abdominal musculature, including issues addressing the potential role of ultrasound imaging in the assessment and training of these muscles. Both quantitative and qualitative aspects associated with clinical and research applications are considered, as are the possible limitations related to the interpretation of measurements made with RUSI. Research to date has utilized a range of methodological approaches, including different transducer placements and imaging techniques. The pros and cons of the various methods are discussed, and guidelines for future investigations are presented. Potential implications and opportunities for clinical use of RUSI to enhance evidence-based practice are outlined, as are suggestions for future research to further clarify the possible role of RUSI in the evaluation and treatment of abdominal muscular morphology and function.

  9. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  10. PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS-ULTRASOUND IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajkovska Meri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous system, apart from the main portal vein, includes its tributaries: superior and inferior mesenteric vein, as well as splenic vein, so the term portal venous thrombosis encompasses a broad spectrum of pathological conditions. Usually, one or more causative factors can be recognized, either local endothelial/ flow disturbances, or systemic inherited /acquired conditions. Portal vein thrombosis can be associated with benign or malignant disorders. Weather we are speaking about acute or chronic thrombosis, the clinical presentation is different. Acute thrombosis can be presented in a wide range, from mild abdominal discomfort to a state of intestinal ischemia and life-threatening infarction. Chronic thrombosis is usually recognized when variceal bleeding or other symptoms of portal hypertension express. Fast and accurate diagnosis sometimes is a life-saving procedure, especially in acute vascular alterations. Recently, due to the improvement of imaging procedures the number of patients with diagnosed portal vein thrombosis is increasingly growing. With a negative predictive value of 98% color Doppler ultrasound is considered as imaging modality of choice in detecting portal vein thrombosis. Based on large studies it is presumed that overall risk of getting portal vein thrombosis during lifetime is 1% in general population, but much bigger 5%-15% in cirrhotic patients. Existence of specific ultrasound criteria, if fulfilled, has ensured that diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis is fast and non-invasive. Procedure is convenient for the patient and healthcare providers, and above all, allows prompt treatment preventing further deterioration.

  11. SQL based cardiovascular ultrasound image classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopalan, S; Suryanarayana, Adiga B; Sudarshan, T S B; Chandrashekar, Dhanalakshmi; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to analyze and classify the cardiovascular ultrasound echocardiographic images using Naïve-Bayesian model via database OLAP-SQL. Efficient data mining algorithms based on tightly-coupled model is used to extract features. Three algorithms are proposed for classification namely Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Discrete variables (NBCD) with SQL, NBCD with OLAP-SQL, and Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Continuous variables (NBCC) using OLAP-SQL. The proposed model is trained with 207 patient images containing normal and abnormal categories. Out of the three proposed algorithms, a high classification accuracy of 96.59% was achieved from NBCC which is better than the earlier methods.

  12. Novel contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenge, Martijn; Mischi, Massimo; Laguna Pes, M. Pilar; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this paper were to present the current status of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound imaging and to discuss the latest achievements and techniques now under preclinical testing. Although grayscale transrectal ultrasound is the standard method for prostate imaging, it lacks

  13. The Application of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound in Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Chung, Jin Haeung; Hwang, Sung Il

    2009-01-01

    Microbubble contrast agent for ultrasound imaging has come of age, adding entirely new capabilities to real time ultrasound imaging. These new ultrasound imaging techniques exploit the nonlinear echoes that result from the unique interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles, which are readily distinguishable from the echoes of tissues. Contrast enhanced ultrasound can be used to quantify both flow rate and relative vascular volume of the microvasculature in solid lesions or organs, which makes it possible for it to be one of the modalities in molecular imaging. Angiogenesis is one of the important processes contributing to new blood vessel growth that occurs in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. It is essential for spread and growth of malignant tumors. The advantages of contrast enhanced ultrasound are that it is a noninvasive method for observing tumor angiogenesis. Sonoporation utilizes the interaction of ultrasound with ultrasound contrast agents to temporarily permeabilized the cell membrane allowing for the uptake of DNA, drugs, and other therapeutic compounds from the extracellular environment. Thus, sonoporation is a promising drug delivery and gene therapy technique, limited only by lack of understanding regarding the biophysical mechanism that results in the cell membrane permeability change. In conclusion, ultrasound contrast agent could have a role not only in the molecular imaging field with the advantage of noninvasive quantification of angiogenesis, but also in the field of drug treatment of cells using sonoporation

  14. Imaging of Groin Pain: Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Imaging Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan C; Endo, Yoshimi; Potter, Hollis G

    Evaluation of groin pain in athletes may be challenging as pain is typically poorly localized and the pubic symphyseal region comprises closely approximated tendons and muscles. As such, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) may help determine the etiology of groin pain. A PubMed search was performed using the following search terms: ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, and groin pain. Date restrictions were not placed on the literature search. Clinical review. Level 4. MRI is sensitive in diagnosing pathology in groin pain. Not only can MRI be used to image rectus abdominis/adductor longus aponeurosis and pubic bone pathology, but it can also evaluate other pathology within the hip and pelvis. MRI is especially helpful when groin pain is poorly localized. Real-time capability makes ultrasound useful in evaluating the pubic symphyseal region, as it can be used for evaluation and treatment. MRI and US are valuable in diagnosing pathology in athletes with groin pain, with the added utility of treatment using US-guided intervention. Strength-of Recommendation Taxonomy: C.

  15. A new architecture for fast ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruza, J. F. [Instituto de Tecnologías Físicas y de la Información ' ' Torres Quevedo' ' Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Camacho, J.; Moreno, J. M.; Medina, L. [Instituto de Tecnologías Físicas y de la Información Torres Quevedo Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-18

    Some ultrasound imaging applications require high frame rate, for example 3D imaging and automated inspections of large components. Being the signal-processing throughput of the system the main bottleneck, parallel beamforming is required to achieve hundreds to thousands of images per second. Simultaneous A-scan line beamforming in all active channels is required to reach the intended high frame rate. To this purpose, a new parallel beamforming architecture that exploits the currently available processing resources available in state-of-the-art FPGAs is proposed. The work aims to get the optimal resource usage, high scalability and flexibility for different applications. To achieve these goals, the basic beamforming function is reformulated to be adapted to the DSP-cell architecture of state-of-the-art FPGAs. This allows performing simultaneous dynamic focusing on multiple A-scan lines. Some realistic examples are analyzed, evaluating resource requirements and maximum operating frequency. For example, a 128-channel system, with 128 scan lines and acquiring at 20 MSPS, can be built with 4 mid-range FPGAs, achieving up to 18000 frames per second, just limited by the maximum PRF. The gold standard Synthetic Transmit Aperture method (also called Total Focusing Method) can be carried out in real time at a processing rate of 140 high-resolution images per second (16 cm depth on steel)

  16. Automatic Segmentation of Ultrasound Tomography Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound tomography (UST image segmentation is fundamental in breast density estimation, medicine response analysis, and anatomical change quantification. Existing methods are time consuming and require massive manual interaction. To address these issues, an automatic algorithm based on GrabCut (AUGC is proposed in this paper. The presented method designs automated GrabCut initialization for incomplete labeling and is sped up with multicore parallel programming. To verify performance, AUGC is applied to segment thirty-two in vivo UST volumetric images. The performance of AUGC is validated with breast overlapping metrics (Dice coefficient (D, Jaccard (J, and False positive (FP and time cost (TC. Furthermore, AUGC is compared to other methods, including Confidence Connected Region Growing (CCRG, watershed, and Active Contour based Curve Delineation (ACCD. Experimental results indicate that AUGC achieves the highest accuracy (D=0.9275 and J=0.8660 and FP=0.0077 and takes on average about 4 seconds to process a volumetric image. It was said that AUGC benefits large-scale studies by using UST images for breast cancer screening and pathological quantification.

  17. Speckle suppressing anisotropic diffusion filter for medical ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovireddy, Saraniya; Muthusamy, Ezhilarasi

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonography is often preferred over the other medical imaging modalities due to its noninvasive nature, cost-effectiveness, and portability. However, the resolution of the ultrasound image greatly depends upon the presence of speckle noise. Speckle noise generally tends to reduce the image resolution and contrast, thereby reducing the diagnostic resolution of this imaging modality. In this paper, we propose a speckle suppressing anisotropic diffusion (SSAD) filter, to remove the speckle noise from B-Mode Ultrasound images. The performance of the SSAD filter is compared with the existing diffusion filters. The evaluation is based on their application to images simulated by Field II (developed by Jensen et al.). The algorithms were also tested for clinical ultrasound images of polycystic ovaries obtained from HDI 5000 Ultrasound Scanner. Performance evaluation was done by both numerical and functional parameters. The proposed filter yields better results in terms of greatest structural similarity index map (SSIM) of 0.95 and accuracy of 99.5.

  18. Despeckle filtering for ultrasound imaging and video II selected applications

    CERN Document Server

    Loizou, Christos P

    2015-01-01

    In ultrasound imaging and video visual perception is hindered by speckle multiplicative noise that degrades the quality. Noise reduction is therefore essential for improving the visual observation quality or as a pre-processing step for further automated analysis, such as image/video segmentation, texture analysis and encoding in ultrasound imaging and video. The goal of the first book (book 1 of 2 books) was to introduce the problem of speckle in ultrasound image and video as well as the theoretical background, algorithmic steps, and the MatlabTM for the following group of despeckle filters:

  19. Plane Wave Medical Ultrasound Imaging Using Adaptive Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the adaptive, minimum variance (MV) beamformer is applied to medical ultrasound imaging. The Significant resolution and contrast gain provided by the adaptive, minimum variance (MV) beamformer, introduces the possibility of plane wave (PW) ultrasound imaging. Data is obtained using...... Field H and a 7 MHz, 128-elements, linear array transducer with lambda/2-spacing. MV is compared to the conventional delay-and-sum (DS) beamformer with Boxcar and Hanning weights. Furthermore, the PW images are compared to the a conventional ultrasound image, obtained from a linear scan sequence...

  20. Proceedings: Beyond Ultrasound First Forum on Improving the Quality of Ultrasound Imaging in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacerraf, Beryl R; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B; Bromley, Bryann S; Coley, Brian D; Doubilet, Peter M; Lee, Wesley; Maslak, Samuel H; Pellerito, John S; Perez, James J; Savitsky, Eric; Scarborough, Norman A; Wax, Joseph; Abuhamad, Alfred Z

    2018-01-01

    The Beyond Ultrasound First Forum was conceived to increase awareness that the quality of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound can be improved, and is inconsistent throughout the country, likely due to multiple factors, including the lack of a standardized curriculum and competency assessment in ultrasound teaching. The forum brought together representatives from many professional associations; the imaging community including radiology, obstetrics and gynecology, and emergency medicine among others; in addition to government agencies, insurers, industry, and others with common interest in obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound. This group worked together in focus sessions aimed at developing solutions on how to standardize and improve ultrasound training at the resident level and beyond. A new curriculum and competency assessment program for teaching residents (obstetrics and gynecology, radiology, and any other specialty doing obstetrics and gynecology ultrasound) was presented, and performance measures of ultrasound quality in clinical practice were discussed. The aim of this forum was to increase and unify the quality of ultrasound examinations in obstetrics and gynecology with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety and quality of clinical care. This report describes the proceedings of this conference including possible approaches to resident teaching and means to improve the inconsistent quality of ultrasound examinations performed today. © 2017, Elsevier Inc. This article is being simultaneously published in American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  3. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of pelvic floor muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Thompson, Judith A; Teyhen, Deydre S; Hodges, Paul

    2007-08-01

    This commentary provides an overview of the current concepts and evidence related to rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of pelvic floor (levator ani) function. As this is an emerging topic, the goal is to provide a basic understanding of ultrasound imaging applications related to levator ani function: the available quantitative and qualitative information, the limitations, as well as how ultrasound imaging can be incorporated as a form of biofeedback during rehabilitation. Furthermore, as the ability to compile and compare existing evidence depends on the degree of similarity in methodology by investigators, this commentary highlights points of consideration and provides guidelines, as well as an agenda, for future investigation.

  4. A Methodology for Anatomic Ultrasound Image Diagnostic Quality Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lange, Theis; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for assessment of ultrasound image quality based on our experiences with evaluating new methods for anatomic imaging. It presents a methodology to ensure a fair assessment between competing imaging methods using clinically relevant evaluations. The methodology...... to properly reveal the clinical value. The paper exemplifies the methodology using recent studies of Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming tissue harmonic imaging....

  5. Proceedings: Beyond Ultrasound First Forum on improving the quality of ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacerraf, Beryl R; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B; Bromley, Bryann S; Coley, Brian D; Doubilet, Peter M; Lee, Wesley; Maslak, Samuel H; Pellerito, John S; Perez, James J; Savitsky, Eric; Scarborough, Norman A; Wax, Joseph; Abuhamad, Alfred Z

    2018-01-01

    The Beyond Ultrasound First Forum was conceived to increase awareness that the quality of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound can be improved, and is inconsistent throughout the country, likely due to multiple factors, including the lack of a standardized curriculum and competency assessment in ultrasound teaching. The forum brought together representatives from many professional associations; the imaging community including radiology, obstetrics and gynecology, and emergency medicine among others; in addition to government agencies, insurers, industry, and others with common interest in obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound. This group worked together in focus sessions aimed at developing solutions on how to standardize and improve ultrasound training at the resident level and beyond. A new curriculum and competency assessment program for teaching residents (obstetrics and gynecology, radiology, and any other specialty doing obstetrics and gynecology ultrasound) was presented, and performance measures of ultrasound quality in clinical practice were discussed. The aim of this forum was to increase and unify the quality of ultrasound examinations in obstetrics and gynecology with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety and quality of clinical care. This report describes the proceedings of this conference including possible approaches to resident teaching and means to improve the inconsistent quality of ultrasound examinations performed today. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D ultrasound imaging : Fast and cost-effective morphometry of musculoskeletal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, Guido; Van Der Zwaard, Stephan; Huijing, Peter A.; Jaspers, Richard T.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    The developmental goal of 3D ultrasound imaging (3DUS) is to engineer a modality to perform 3D morphological ultrasound analysis of human muscles. 3DUS images are constructed from calibrated freehand 2D B-mode ultrasound images, which are positioned into a voxel array. Ultrasound (US) imaging allows

  7. Quality Improvement of Liver Ultrasound Images Using Fuzzy Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Azadeh; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Radmard, Amir Reza; Nejad, Ahmadreza Farzaneh

    2016-12-01

    Liver ultrasound images are so common and are applied so often to diagnose diffuse liver diseases like fatty liver. However, the low quality of such images makes it difficult to analyze them and diagnose diseases. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to improve the contrast and quality of liver ultrasound images. In this study, a number of image contrast enhancement algorithms which are based on fuzzy logic were applied to liver ultrasound images - in which the view of kidney is observable - using Matlab2013b to improve the image contrast and quality which has a fuzzy definition; just like image contrast improvement algorithms using a fuzzy intensification operator, contrast improvement algorithms applying fuzzy image histogram hyperbolization, and contrast improvement algorithms by fuzzy IF-THEN rules. With the measurement of Mean Squared Error and Peak Signal to Noise Ratio obtained from different images, fuzzy methods provided better results, and their implementation - compared with histogram equalization method - led both to the improvement of contrast and visual quality of images and to the improvement of liver segmentation algorithms results in images. Comparison of the four algorithms revealed the power of fuzzy logic in improving image contrast compared with traditional image processing algorithms. Moreover, contrast improvement algorithm based on a fuzzy intensification operator was selected as the strongest algorithm considering the measured indicators. This method can also be used in future studies on other ultrasound images for quality improvement and other image processing and analysis applications.

  8. A comparison between skinfold callipers and ultrasound imaging for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison between skinfold callipers and ultrasound imaging for assessing body composition in recreationally active students. Kim Nolte, Reon A. Van der Merwe, Cindy A. Helena, Heinrich W. Nolte, Julia van der Meulen ...

  9. Ultrasound imaging of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.G.; Holsbeek, M.T. van; Gauthier, T.P.; Cook, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Sports-related injuries of the musculoskeletal system affect millions of individuals every year. Integrating high-frequency Tissue Harmonic Imaging ultrasound with MRI and CT gives the greatest opportunity for diagnosing specific injuries. (orig.)

  10. Scalable ultrasound PACS: evolving needs for multimode ultrasound image and data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David E.; Klepper, John R.; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Yongmin

    1994-05-01

    We propose a scalable approach to ultrasound PACS. The general lack of any network interface capability on a large percentage of installed ultrasound scanners limits the solution available in the near term. A staged implementation beginning with a small number of ultrasound scanners interfaced to a single networked acquisition station is proposed. Initial mini-PACS may provide better utilization of the shared resources, such as archive and print servers and imagers, which would be cost prohibitive in a one-machine-per-scanner configuration. As the system requirements grow and ultrasound systems add direct network support, mini-PACS performances can overcome the initial single acquisition node bottleneck encountered with video-capture based systems, and ultrasound PACS can be integrated into a full hospital-wide PACS.

  11. Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging: Part II: Parallel Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the current state-of-theart in ultrasound parallel acquisition systems for flow imaging using spherical and plane waves emissions. The imaging methods are explained along with the advantages of using these very fast and sensitive velocity estimators. These experimental...... ultrasound imaging for studying brain function in animals. The paper explains the underlying acquisition and estimation methods for fast 2-D and 3-D velocity imaging and gives a number of examples. Future challenges and the potentials of parallel acquisition systems for flow imaging are also discussed....

  12. BL_Wiener Denoising Method for Removal of Speckle Noise in Ultrasound Image

    OpenAIRE

    Suhaila Sari; Zuliana Azreen Zulkifeli; Hazli Roslan; Nabilah Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging techniques are extremely important tools in medical diagnosis. One of these important imaging techniques is ultrasound imaging. However, during ultrasound image acquisition process, the quality of image can be degraded due to corruption by speckle noise. The enhancement of ultrasound images quality from the 2D ultrasound imaging machines is expected to provide medical practitioners more reliable medical images in their patients’ diagnosis. However, developing a denoising techn...

  13. Current Uses of Ultrasound Imaging in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopowicz, Robert; Jopowicz, Małgorzata; Czarnocki, Łukasz; Deszczyński, Jarosław Michał; Deszczyński, Jarosław

    2017-12-13

    The term Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging (RUSI) refers to the use of ultrasound imaging by physiothera-pists. Ultrasound is used by physiotherapists to evaluate the morphology of muscles and other associated soft tissues not only at rest but also for a dynamic assessment of those structures during physical activities and tasks. RUSI is most commonly utilized as part of a biofeedback mechanism, which shows good efficacy in lower back pain treatment. Several possibilities have been also described for clinically adapting this method in the rehabilitation of the shoulder and knee and postoperative improvement of tendons. RUSI is a novel method with a high clinical potential to support physiotherapeutic therapies.

  14. Spatial Angular Compounding Technique for H-Scan Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairalseed, Mawia; Xiong, Fangyuan; Kim, Jung-Whan; Mattrey, Robert F; Parker, Kevin J; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    H-Scan is a new ultrasound imaging technique that relies on matching a model of pulse-echo formation to the mathematics of a class of Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials. This technique may be beneficial in the measurement of relative scatterer sizes and in cancer therapy, particularly for early response to drug treatment. Because current H-scan techniques use focused ultrasound data acquisitions, spatial resolution degrades away from the focal region and inherently affects relative scatterer size estimation. Although the resolution of ultrasound plane wave imaging can be inferior to that of traditional focused ultrasound approaches, the former exhibits a homogeneous spatial resolution throughout the image plane. The purpose of this study was to implement H-scan using plane wave imaging and investigate the impact of spatial angular compounding on H-scan image quality. Parallel convolution filters using two different Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials that describe ultrasound scattering events are applied to the radiofrequency data. The H-scan processing is done on each radiofrequency image plane before averaging to get the angular compounded image. The relative strength from each convolution is color-coded to represent relative scatterer size. Given results from a series of phantom materials, H-scan imaging with spatial angular compounding more accurately reflects the true scatterer size caused by reductions in the system point spread function and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Preliminary in vivo H-scan imaging of tumor-bearing animals suggests this modality may be useful for monitoring early response to chemotherapeutic treatment. Overall, H-scan imaging using ultrasound plane waves and spatial angular compounding is a promising approach for visualizing the relative size and distribution of acoustic scattering sources. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intraoperative ultrasound using phase inversion harmonic imaging: first experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Ozgur, Burak; Singel, Soren; Wilkening, Wilko G; Mattrey, Robert F; Sang, Hoi

    2007-04-01

    To study the feasibility of intraoperative ultrasound using the phase inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI) technique. Eight patients with intracranial middle cerebral artery aneurysms and five patients with arteriovenous malformations were studied after written informed consent. A first ultrasound study was performed through the intact dura mater after cranial trepanation to assess the pathology, its feeding artery, and downstream segments. A second ultrasound study was performed immediately after intervention to monitor the success of the procedure. All patients were studied using a Siemens Sonoline Antares ultrasound machine (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Malvern, PA) before and after intravenous administration of an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). Other than conventional brightness mode, PIHI is sensitive to the nonlinear acoustic response of tissue, and especially to ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. The latter enables contrast-specific vascular imaging. PIHI provided anatomically detailed information. In combination with an ultrasound contrast agent, angiography-like views of the vascular pathologies, including their surrounding vessels, could be obtained. Flow velocities in afferent and downstream vascular segments, as well as inside the pathology, could be assessed. Flow dynamics inside the aneurysm sac or the arteriovenous malformation could be studied in real-time. Postintervention, contrast-enhanced PIHI could be used to immediately monitor the success of the surgical procedure. PIHI enables intraoperative visualization and morphological assessment of neurovascular pathologies, such as middle cerebral artery aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. In combination with an ultrasound contrast agent, the flow dynamics of these lesions can be displayed in real-time.

  16. An Axial Array for Volumetric Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alles, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a medical imaging modality aimed at imaging blood vessel walls from within the vessel. Current commercial IVUS catheters are designed to yield two-dimensional cross-sectional images perpendicular to the vessel wall. By pulling the catheter back through the artery

  17. Application of reinforcement learning for segmentation of transrectal ultrasound images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tizhoosh Hamid R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among different medical image modalities, ultrasound imaging has a very widespread clinical use. But, due to some factors, such as poor image contrast, noise and missing or diffuse boundaries, the ultrasound images are inherently difficult to segment. An important application is estimation of the location and volume of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS images. For this purpose, manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming procedure. Methods We introduce a new method for the segmentation of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound images, using a reinforcement learning scheme. This algorithm is used to find the appropriate local values for sub-images and to extract the prostate. It contains an offline stage, where the reinforcement learning agent uses some images and manually segmented versions of these images to learn from. The reinforcement agent is provided with reward/punishment, determined objectively to explore/exploit the solution space. After this stage, the agent has acquired knowledge stored in the Q-matrix. The agent can then use this knowledge for new input images to extract a coarse version of the prostate. Results We have carried out experiments to segment TRUS images. The results demonstrate the potential of this approach in the field of medical image segmentation. Conclusion By using the proposed method, we can find the appropriate local values and segment the prostate. This approach can be used for segmentation tasks containing one object of interest. To improve this prototype, more investigations are needed.

  18. Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging With Cascaded Dual-Polarity Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Guo, Yuexin; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound imaging using plane or diverging waves, instead of focused beams, has advanced greatly the development of novel ultrasound imaging methods for evaluating tissue functions beyond anatomical information. However, the sonographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ultrafast imaging remains limited due to the lack of transmission focusing, and thus insufficient acoustic energy delivery. We hereby propose a new ultrafast ultrasound imaging methodology with cascaded dual-polarity waves (CDWs), which consists of a pulse train with positive and negative polarities. A new coding scheme and a corresponding linear decoding process were thereby designed to obtain the recovered signals with increased amplitude, thus increasing the SNR without sacrificing the frame rate. The newly designed CDW ultrafast ultrasound imaging technique achieved higher quality B-mode images than coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC) and multiplane wave (MW) imaging in a calibration phantom, ex vivo pork belly, and in vivo human back muscle. CDW imaging shows a significant improvement in the SNR (10.71 dB versus CPWC and 7.62 dB versus MW), penetration depth (36.94% versus CPWC and 35.14% versus MW), and contrast ratio in deep regions (5.97 dB versus CPWC and 5.05 dB versus MW) without compromising other image quality metrics, such as spatial resolution and frame rate. The enhanced image qualities and ultrafast frame rates offered by CDW imaging beget great potential for various novel imaging applications.

  19. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (pig hearts.

  20. Ultrasound, normal placenta - Braxton Hicks (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... performed at 17 weeks gestation. It shows the placenta during a normal (Braxton Hicks) contraction. Throughout the ... contracts to facilitate better blood flow through the placenta and the fetus. In this ultrasound, the placenta ...

  1. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord is ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in the ...

  2. Tumor functional and molecular imaging utilizing ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Baohong; Rychak, Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Tumor functional and molecular imaging has significantly contributed to cancer preclinical research and clinical applications. Among typical imaging modalities, ultrasonic and optical techniques are two commonly used methods; both share several common features such as cost efficiency, absence of ionizing radiation, relatively inexpensive contrast agents, and comparable maximum-imaging depth. Ultrasonic and optical techniques are also complementary in imaging resolution, molecular sensitivity, and imaging space (vascular and extravascular). The marriage between ultrasonic and optical techniques takes advantages of both techniques. This review introduces tumor functional and molecular imaging using microbubble-based ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated optical imaging techniques. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Integration of ultrasound imaging into pre-clinical dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashova, T; De Wan, D; Briones, M U; Kondrashov, P

    2017-11-01

    Patients have complex healthcare needs and typically require more than one healthcare discipline to address issues regarding their health. Interprofessional teams of healthcare professionals may be able to address these complex needs and improve patient outcomes by combining resources. To evaluate the feasibility of integrating ultrasound into a dental school curriculum to teach anatomy as part of an interprofessional education experience, the current study surveyed first-year dental students to determine their perceptions of the integration of ultrasound techniques into the curriculum. Ultrasound laboratory exercises were developed for first-year dental students as part of their anatomy course. The exercises were focused on head, neck and abdominal anatomy. To assess student perception of the integration of ultrasound into the dental curriculum, a survey was created specifically for the current study. Between 2013 and 2015, two classes of first-year dental students participated in the ultrasound laboratory exercise and completed the survey (n = 83). Student survey responses suggested ultrasound was a valuable teaching tool because it allowed them to visualise anatomical structures using live imaging. They also agreed that the ultrasound laboratory exercises were an efficient learning tool, but the majority did not believe that they would use ultrasound regularly in their future practice. Results of the current study suggested first-year dental students were satisfied with the integration of ultrasound techniques into the dental curriculum. Survey results indicated that the students enjoyed the ultrasound laboratory exercise and felt ultrasound was an effective learning tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Standardized ultrasound templates for diagnosing appendicitis reduce annual imaging costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Andrew B; Sales, Stephen; Nielsen, Jason W; Adler, Brent; Bates, David Gregory; Kenney, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound is preferred over computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing appendicitis in children to avoid undue radiation exposure. We previously reported our experience in instituting a standardized appendicitis ultrasound template, which decreased CT rates by 67.3%. In this analysis, we demonstrate the ongoing cost savings associated with using this template. Retrospective chart review for the time period preceding template implementation (June 2012-September 2012) was combined with prospective review through December 2015 for all patients in the emergency department receiving diagnostic imaging for appendicitis. The type of imaging was recorded, and imaging rates and ultrasound test statistics were calculated. Estimated annual imaging costs based on pretemplate ultrasound and CT utilization rates were compared with post-template annual costs to calculate annual and cumulative savings. In the pretemplate period, ultrasound and CT rates were 80.2% and 44.3%, respectively, resulting in a combined annual cost of $300,527.70. Similar calculations were performed for each succeeding year, accounting for changes in patient volume. Using pretemplate rates, our projected 2015 imaging cost was $371,402.86; however, our ultrasound rate had increased to 98.3%, whereas the CT rate declined to 9.6%, yielding an annual estimated cost of $224,853.00 and a savings of $146,549.86. Since implementation, annual savings have steadily increased for a cumulative cost savings of $336,683.83. Standardizing ultrasound reports for appendicitis not only reduces the use of CT scans and the associated radiation exposure but also decreases annual imaging costs despite increased numbers of imaging studies. Continued cost reduction may be possible by using diagnostic algorithms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Versatile robotic probe calibration for position tracking in ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirik Bø, Lars; Fagertun Hofstad, Erlend; Lindseth, Frank; Hernes, Toril A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Within the field of ultrasound-guided procedures, there are a number of methods for ultrasound probe calibration. While these methods are usually developed for a specific probe, they are in principle easily adapted to other probes. In practice, however, the adaptation often proves tedious and this is impractical in a research setting, where new probes are tested regularly. Therefore, we developed a method which can be applied to a large variety of probes without adaptation. The method used a robot arm to move a plastic sphere submerged in water through the ultrasound image plane, providing a slow and precise movement. The sphere was then segmented from the recorded ultrasound images using a MATLAB programme and the calibration matrix was computed based on this segmentation in combination with tracking information. The method was tested on three very different probes demonstrating both great versatility and high accuracy.

  6. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Bulman, J. B.; Ganezer, K. S.; Halcrow, P. W.; Neeson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statisti...

  7. Compact Beamformer Design with High Frame Rate for Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In medical field, two-dimension ultrasound images are widely used in clinical diagnosis. Beamformer is critical in determining the complexity and performance of an ultrasound imaging system. Different from traditional means implemented with separated chips, a compact beamformer with 64 effective channels in a single moderate Field Programmable Gate Array has been presented in this paper. The compactness is acquired by employing receive synthetic aperture, harmonic imaging, time sharing and linear interpolation. Besides that, multi-beams method is used to improve the frame rate of the ultrasound imaging system. Online dynamic configuration is employed to expand system’s flexibility to two kinds of transducers with multi-scanning modes. The design is verified on a prototype scanner board. Simulation results have shown that on-chip memories can be saved and the frame rate can be improved on the case of 64 effective channels which will meet the requirement of real-time application.

  8. Implementation of Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Kortbek, Jacob; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    The main advantage of medical ultrasound imaging is its real time capability, which makes it possible to visualize dynamic structures in the human body. Real time synthetic aperture imaging puts very high demands on the hardware, which currently cannot be met. A method for reducing the number...... of calculations and still retain the many advantages of SA imaging is described. It consists of a dual stage beamformer, where the first can be a simple fixed focus analog beamformer and the second an ordinary digital ultrasound beamformer. The performance and constrictions of the approach is described....

  9. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the concept of virtual source elements. It suggests a common framework for increasing the resolution, and penetration depth of several imaging modalities by applying synthetic aperture focusing (SAF). SAF is used either as a post focusing procedure on the beamformed data, ...

  10. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...

  11. Optical Molecular Imaging of Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derieppe, M.P.P.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop optical molecular imaging methods to study drug delivery facilitated by ultrasound waves (US) and hyperthermia. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), together with dedicated image analysis, was used in vitro on a cell monolayer, and in vivo at

  12. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography using Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared (IR) thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and IR imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with IR-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (− 0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (− 0.69 ± 0.18 °C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the IR measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45 – 50 °C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies where thermocouples or water-bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results show that high resolution IR thermography provides a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  13. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel E; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the background and appraisal of endoluminal ultrasound of the pelvic floor. It provides a detailed anatomic assessment of the muscles and surrounding organs of the pelvic floor. Different anatomic variability and pathology, such as prolapse, fecal incontinence, urinary incontinence, vaginal wall cysts, synthetic implanted material, and pelvic pain, are easily assessed with endoluminal vaginal ultrasound. With pelvic organ prolapse in particular, not only is the prolapse itself seen but the underlying cause related to the anatomic and functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor muscle structures are also visualized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis with intracardiac extension and pulmonary benign metastases on FDG PET/CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui Chun; Wang, Yu Bin; Chen, Xiao Hong; Cu, Lan Lan [PET/CT Center, Gansu Provincial Hospital, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 50-day history of irregular vaginal bleeding and lower abdominal pain. Ultrasound indicated an extremely large occupying lesion in the pelvic cavity that was highly suggestive of malignancy. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to further assess the nature of pelvic abnormality. PET/CT images demonstrated a diffusely lobulated mass ranging from cervix up to the inferior pole of kidneys with mild FDG uptake. Simultaneously, multiple nodules in bilateral lungs and a hypodense lesion in the right ventricle were shown without FDG-avidity. Based on the imaging results, the presumptive diagnosis was uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis with intracardiac extension and pulmonary benign metastases, which was subsequently confirmed by MRI and the lesion biopsy.

  16. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demi, Libertario, E-mail: l.demi@tue.nl; Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Wijkstra, Hessel [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Urology Dept., University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  17. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B; Schroeder, T V

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease. Prospective and blinded comparative study. 100 limbs in 100 consecutive patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease, 74% suffering critical limb ischemia, were enrolled during a 9 months period. One physician with limited ultrasound experience performed all the ultrasound examinations of the arteries of the most symptomatic limb. Before enrolling any patients 15 duplex ultrasound examinations were performed supervised by an experienced vascular technologist. All patients had a digital subtraction arteriography performed by an experienced vascular radiologist, unaware of the ultrasound result. The number of insufficiently insonated segments (non-diagnostic segments) was significantly reduced during the study; from 9% among the initial 50 limbs to 2% among the last 50 limbs (Pultrasound and arteriography from the initial 50 patients (overall Kappa=0.66, (95%-CI: 0.60-0.72); supragenicular Kappa=0.73 (95%-CI: 0.64-0.82); infragenicular Kappa=0.61 (95%-CI: 0.54-0.69)) to the last 50 patients (overall Kappa=0.66 (95%-CI: 0.60-0.72), supragenicular Kappa=0.67 (95%-CI: 0.57-0.76); infragenicular Kappa=0.66 (95%-CI: 0.58-0.73)). The minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease appears to be less than 50 ultrasound examinations (probably only 15 examinations) for the supragenicular segments and 100 examinations for the infragenicular segments.

  18. Aptamer-conjugated nanobubbles for targeted ultrasound molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Fen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-06-07

    Targeted ultrasound contrast agents can be prepared by some specific bioconjugation techniques. The biotin-avidin complex is an extremely useful noncovalent binding system, but the system might induce immunogenic side effects in human bodies. Previous proposed covalently conjugated systems suffered from low conjugation efficiency and complex procedures. In this study, we propose a covalently conjugated nanobubble coupling with nucleic acid ligands, aptamers, for providing a higher specific affinity for ultrasound targeting studies. The sgc8c aptamer was linked with nanobubbles through thiol-maleimide coupling chemistry for specific targeting to CCRF-CEM cells. Further improvements to reduce the required time and avoid the degradation of nanobubbles during conjugation procedures were also made. Several investigations were used to discuss the performance and consistency of the prepared nanobubbles, such as size distribution, conjugation efficiency analysis, and flow cytometry assay. Further, we applied our conjugated nanobubbles to ex vivo ultrasound targeted imaging and compared the resulting images with optical images. The results indicated the availability of aptamer-conjugated nanobubbles in targeted ultrasound imaging and the practicability of using a highly sensitive ultrasound system in noninvasive biological research.

  19. MMSE Reconstruction for 3D Freehand Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of 3D ultrasound (US images from mechanically registered, but otherwise irregularly positioned, B-scan slices is of great interest in image guided therapy procedures. Conventional 3D ultrasound algorithms have low computational complexity, but the reconstructed volume suffers from severe speckle contamination. Furthermore, the current method cannot reconstruct uniform high-resolution data from several low-resolution B-scans. In this paper, the minimum mean-squared error (MMSE method is applied to 3D ultrasound reconstruction. Data redundancies due to overlapping samples as well as correlation of the target and speckle are naturally accounted for in the MMSE reconstruction algorithm. Thus, the reconstruction process unifies the interpolation and spatial compounding. Simulation results for synthetic US images are presented to demonstrate the excellent reconstruction.

  20. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera ePaefgen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents. There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular contrast agents enable functional analyses, e.g. to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles’ shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by ultrasound pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that ultrasound contrast agents are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of ultrasound contrast agents and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in ultrasound probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given.

  1. Ultrasound imaging of the lactating breast: methodology and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geddes Donna T

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound imaging has been used extensively to detect abnormalities of the non-lactating breast. In contrast, the use of ultrasound for the investigation of pathology of the lactating breast is limited. Recent studies have re-examined the anatomy of the lactating breast highlighting features unique to this phase of breast development. These features should be taken into consideration along with knowledge of common lactation pathologies in order to make an accurate diagnosis when examining the lactating breast. Scanning techniques and ultrasound appearances of the normal lactating breast will be contrasted to those of the non-lactating breast. In addition ultrasound characteristics of common pathologies encountered during lactation will be described.

  2. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  3. Ultrasound contrast agent and ultrasound vascular image enhancement system; Choonpa zoeizai oyobi zoei gazo system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soetanto, K

    1998-09-15

    Ultrasonic diagnosing equipment is effective on the diagnosis of soft tissue inside the body, however, it has a week point in which the ultrasound wave was sheltered by air in hard tissues such as bone and lungs or air in the stomach and intestines. An ultrasound contrast agent was developed to remedy such a basic weak point of ultra wave and to enhance image contrast. As for this contrast agent, several types made of materials such as physiological saline, medicament, gas carbide, and a material containing bubbles have been studied. The most effective one to enhance image contrast among those materials was the ultrasound contrast agent using bubbles. In this paper, the outline of the micro-bubble ultrasound contrast agent was introduced. The week point of the bubble type contrast agent was a short lifetime of bubbles inside blood vessels and the limitation of size and scale. How to overcome the technical problems has become an urgent subject for the development of ultrasound diagnosis. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  5. Regularized Image Reconstruction for Ultrasound Attenuation Transmission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Peterlik

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on ultrasonic transmission tomography as a potential medical imaging modality, namely for breast cancer diagnosis. Ultrasound attenuation coefficient is one of the tissue parameters which are related to the pathological tissue state. A technique to reconstruct images of attenuation distribution is presented. Furthermore, an alternative to the commonly used filtered backprojection or algebraic reconstruction techniques is proposed. It is based on regularization of the image reconstruction problem which imposes smoothness in the resulting images while preserving edges. The approach is analyzed on synthetic data sets. The results show that it stabilizes the image restoration by compensating for main sources of estimation errors in this imaging modality.

  6. Vascular applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kunal S; Lee, Jake J; Taha, Ashraf A; Avgerinos, Efthymios; Chaer, Rabih A

    2017-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging is a powerful noninvasive modality offering numerous potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in vascular medicine. CEUS imaging uses microbubble contrast agents composed of an encapsulating shell surrounding a gaseous core. These microbubbles act as nearly perfect intravascular reflectors of ultrasound energy and may be used to enhance the overall contrast and quality of ultrasound images. The purpose of this narrative review is to survey the current literature regarding CEUS imaging and discuss its diagnostic and therapeutic roles in current vascular and selected nonvascular applications. The PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase databases were searched until July 2016 using the PubMed and Ovid Web-based search engines. The search terms used included contrast-enhanced, microbubble, ultrasound, carotid, aneurysm, and arterial. The diagnostic and therapeutic utility of CEUS imaging has grown exponentially, particularly in the realms of extracranial carotid arterial disease, aortic disease, and peripheral arterial disease. Studies have demonstrated that CEUS imaging is diagnostically superior to conventional ultrasound imaging in identifying vessel irregularities and measuring neovascularization to assess plaque vulnerability and end-muscle perfusion. Groups have begun to use microbubbles as agents in therapeutic applications for targeted drug and gene therapy delivery as well as for the enhancement of sonothrombolysis. The emerging technology of microbubbles and CEUS imaging holds considerable promise for cardiovascular medicine and cancer therapy given its diagnostic and therapeutic utility. Overall, with proper training and credentialing of technicians, the clinical implications are innumerable as microbubble technology is rapidly bursting onto the scene of cardiovascular medicine. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  9. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, C.L.; Wilson, D.J. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Coltman, T.P. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  10. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, C.L.; Wilson, D.J.; Coltman, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  12. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  13. Adaptive ultrasound temperature imaging for monitoring radiofrequency ablation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Da Liu

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency ablation (RFA has been widely used as an alternative treatment modality for liver tumors. Monitoring the temperature distribution in the tissue during RFA is required to assess the thermal dosage. Ultrasound temperature imaging based on the detection of echo time shifts has received the most attention in the past decade. The coefficient k, connecting the temperature change and the echo time shift, is a medium-dependent parameter used to describe the confounding effects of changes in the speed of sound and thermal expansion as temperature increases. The current algorithm of temperature estimate based on echo time shift detection typically uses a constant k, resulting in estimation errors when ablation temperatures are higher than 50°C. This study proposes an adaptive-k algorithm that enables the automatic adjustment of the coefficient k during ultrasound temperature monitoring of RFA. To verify the proposed algorithm, RFA experiments on in vitro porcine liver samples (total n = 15 were performed using ablation powers of 10, 15, and 20 W. During RFA, a clinical ultrasound system equipped with a 7.5-MHz linear transducer was used to collect backscattered signals for ultrasound temperature imaging using the constant- and adaptive-k algorithms. Concurrently, an infrared imaging system and thermocouples were used to measure surface temperature distribution of the sample and internal ablation temperatures for comparisons with ultrasound estimates. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed adaptive-k method improved the performance in visualizing the temperature distribution. In particular, the estimation errors were also reduced even when the temperature of the tissue is higher than 50°C. The proposed adaptive-k ultrasound temperature imaging strategy has potential to serve as a thermal dosage evaluation tool for monitoring high-temperature RFA.

  14. In-vivo synthetic aperture flow imaging in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    A new method for acquiring flow images using synthetic aperture techniques in medical ultrasound is presented. The new approach makes it possible to have a continuous acquisition of flow data throughout the whole image simultaneously, and this can significantly improve blood velocity estimation.......2% and a mean relative bias of 3.4% using 24 pulse emissions at a flow angle of 45 degrees. The 24 emissions can be used for making a full-color flow map image. An in-vivo image of How in the carotid artery for a 29-year-old male also is presented. The full image is acquired using 24 emissions....

  15. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood–brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood–brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that

  16. Mechanical scanning in intravascular ultrasound imaging: Artifacts and driving mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. ten Hoff (H.); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); C.M. Korbijn (Carin); F. Mastik (Frits); C.T. Lancée (Charles); N. Bom (Klaas)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Currently, intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging catheters are developed and produced to provide a complementary diagnostic method in the treatment of blood vessel obstructive disease. Typical catheter dimensions are a diameter of 1–2.5 mm and a length of 1–1.5 m. A real-time

  17. Fourier beamformation of multistatic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimirad, Elahe; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A new Fourier beamformation (FB) algorithm is presented for multistatic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. It can reduce the number of computations by a factor of 20 compared to conventional Delay-and-Sum (DAS) beamformers. The concept is based on the wavenumber algorithm from radar and sonar...

  18. Compressive 3D ultrasound imaging using a single sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kruizinga (Pieter); Pim van der Meulen, (); Fedjajevs, A. (Andrejs); F. Mastik (Frits); T. Springeling (Tirza); Nico de Jong, (); J.G. Bosch (Hans); Leus, G. (Geert)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional ultrasound is a powerful imaging technique, but it requires thousands of sensors and complex hardware. Very recently, the discovery of compressive sensing has shown that the signal structure can be exploited to reduce the burden posed by traditional sensing

  19. Compressive 3D ultrasound imaging using a single sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, P.; van der Meulen, P.F.; Fedjajevs, A.; Mastik, F; Springeling, Geert; de Jong, N.; Bosch, J.G.; Leus, G.J.T.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound is a powerful imaging technique, but it requires thousands of sensors and complex hardware. Very recently, the discovery of compressive sensing has shown that the signal structure can be exploited to reduce the burden posed by traditional sensing requirements. In this

  20. uper-resolution Axial Localization of Ultrasound Scatter Using Multi-focal Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Greenaway, Alan H.; Anderson, Tom

    2017-01-01

    to noise ratio in each image. Conclusion: Super-resolution axial imaging from optical microscopy has been successfully translated into ultrasound imaging by using raw ultrasound data and standard beamforming. Significance: The normalized sharpness method has the potential to be used in scatterer...... localization applications and contribute in current super-resolution ultrasound imaging techniques.......This paper aims to develop a method for achieving micrometre axial scatterer localization for medical ultrasound, surpassing the inherent, pulse length dependence limiting ultrasound imaging. Methods: The method, directly translated from cellular microscopy, is based on multi-focal imaging...

  1. Imaging the premature brain: ultrasound or MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de; Benders, Manon J.N.L.; Groenendaal, Floris [UMC Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, PO Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Neuroimaging of preterm infants has become part of routine clinical care, but the question is often raised on how often cranial ultrasound should be done and whether every high risk preterm infant should at least have one MRI during the neonatal period. An increasing number of centres perform an MRI either at discharge or around term equivalent age, and a few centres have access to a magnet in or adjacent to the neonatal intensive care unit and are doing sequential MRIs. In this review, we try to discuss when best to perform these two neuroimaging techniques and the additional information each technique may provide. (orig.)

  2. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  3. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological......-average intensity for parallel beamforming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details...

  4. Shear Modulus Imaging with Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force

    OpenAIRE

    McAleavey, Stephen; Menon, Manoj; Elegbe, Etana

    2009-01-01

    The application of Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force (SMURF) to shear modulus imaging is demonstrated in tissue mimicking phantoms and porcine liver. Scanning and data acquisition was performed with a Siemens Antares ultrasound scanner and VF7-3 linear array operating at 4.21 MHz. Modulus estimates in uniform phantoms of Zerdine™ with shear moduli of 5.1 and 12.4 kPa exhibited standard deviations within 6% of the mean value. Zerdine spheres 1 cm in diameter (nominally 2.7, 4.7, a...

  5. Hepatic Steatosis Assessment with Ultrasound Small-Window Entropy Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Tai, Dar-In; Wan, Yung-Liang; Tseng, Jeng-Hwei; Lin, Yi-Ru; Wu, Shuicai; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Liao, Yin-Yin; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2018-04-02

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a type of hepatic steatosis that is not only associated with critical metabolic risk factors but can also result in advanced liver diseases. Ultrasound parametric imaging, which is based on statistical models, assesses fatty liver changes, using quantitative visualization of hepatic-steatosis-caused variations in the statistical properties of backscattered signals. One constraint with using statistical models in ultrasound imaging is that ultrasound data must conform to the distribution employed. Small-window entropy imaging was recently proposed as a non-model-based parametric imaging technique with physical meanings of backscattered statistics. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using small-window entropy imaging in the assessment of fatty liver disease and evaluated its performance through comparisons with parametric imaging based on the Nakagami distribution model (currently the most frequently used statistical model). Liver donors (n = 53) and patients (n = 142) were recruited to evaluate hepatic fat fractions (HFFs), using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and to evaluate the stages of fatty liver disease (normal, mild, moderate and severe), using liver biopsy with histopathology. Livers were scanned using a 3-MHz ultrasound to construct B-mode, small-window entropy and Nakagami images to correlate with HFF analyses and fatty liver stages. The diagnostic values of the imaging methods were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves. The results demonstrated that the entropy value obtained using small-window entropy imaging correlated well with log 10 (HFF), with a correlation coefficient r = 0.74, which was higher than those obtained for the B-scan and Nakagami images. Moreover, small-window entropy imaging also resulted in the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.80 for stages equal to or more severe than mild; 0.90 for equal to or more severe than moderate; 0

  6. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demi, Libertario; Van Sloun, Ruud J G; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization. (fast track communication)

  7. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30-110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was -3.4 ± 2.1 mm and -0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small uncertainties in the PAM

  8. Estimation of fetal gestational age from ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Valiollah

    1992-06-01

    Estimation of fetal gestational age, weight, and determination of fetal growth from the measurements of certain parameters of fetal head, abdomen, and femur have been well established in prenatal sonography. The measurements are made from the two dimensional, B- mode, ultrasound images of the fetus. The most common parameters measured are, biparietal diameter, occipital frontal diameter, head circumference, femur diaphysis length, and abdominal circumference. Since the fetal head has an elliptical shape and the femur has a linear shape, fitting the ellipse on the image of the fetal head, a line on the image of the femur are the tasks of image processing which are discussed in this paper.

  9. Modelling human musculoskeletal functional movements using ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenlund Hans

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A widespread and fundamental assumption in the health sciences is that muscle functions are related to a wide variety of conditions, for example pain, ischemic and neurological disorder, exercise and injury. It is therefore highly desirable to study musculoskeletal contributions in clinical applications such as the treatment of muscle injuries, post-surgery evaluations, monitoring of progressive degeneration in neuromuscular disorders, and so on. The spatial image resolution in ultrasound systems has improved tremendously in the last few years and nowadays provides detailed information about tissue characteristics. It is now possible to study skeletal muscles in real-time during activity. Methods The ultrasound images are transformed to be congruent and are effectively compressed and stacked in order to be analysed with multivariate techniques. The method is applied to a relevant clinical orthopaedic research field, namely to describe the dynamics in the Achilles tendon and the calf during real-time movements. Results This study introduces a novel method to medical applications that can be used to examine ultrasound image sequences and to detect, visualise and quantify skeletal muscle dynamics and functions. Conclusions This new objective method is a powerful tool to use when visualising tissue activity and dynamics of musculoskeletal ultrasound registrations.

  10. Early Detection of Breast Cancer on Mammograms Using: Perceptual Feedback, Computer Processed Images and Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    amDlitude distortions in ultrasound mammography.. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Breast Cancer Detection, Biofeedback , Ultrasound , Image Processing 16...PROCESSED IMAGES AND ULTRASOUND PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter Bloch, Ph.D. D,.L~kiX2D 3 CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Pennsylvania Office of...Cancer on Mammograms Using. Perceptual Feedback, Computer Processed Images and Ultrasound Peter Bloch, Ph.D., Principal Investigator Page Numbers Front

  11. Study of Ultrasound Imaging Technique for Diagnosing Osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Han, S. M. [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. R. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-15

    Ultrasonic has been proposed as an attractive means of detecting bone loss. There have been several commercial ultrasound devices developed for measuring the heel to predict fracture at other bones. However, these devices select only single point of heel bone as measurement site. It causes poor assessment of bone quality due to the error of transducer positioning. In an effort to improve current ultrasound systems, we evaluated the linear scanning method which provides better prediction of bone quality and an accurate image of bone shape. The system used in this study biaxially scans a heel bone using automated linear scanning technique. The results demonstrated that the values of ultrasound parameters varied with different positions within bone specimen. It has been also found that the linear scanning method could better predict bone quality, eliminating the error of transducer positioning

  12. Potential of coded excitation in medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Athanasios; Gammelmark, Kim; Jørgensen, C. H.

    2000-01-01

    Improvement in SNR and/or penetration depth can be achieved in medical ultrasoundby using long coded waveforms, in a similar manner as in radars or sonars.However, the time-bandwidth product (TB) improvement, and thereby SNRimprovement is considerably lower in medical ultrasound, due...... codes have a larger bandwidth than the transducerin a typical medical ultrasound system can drive, a more careful code designhas been proven essential. Simulation results are also presented forcomparison.This paper presents an improved non-linear FM signal appropriatefor ultrasonic applications. The new....... The range sidelobes, at thesame time, are well beyond the typical dynamic range of an ultrasound image.The energy of the sidelobe region is also reduced by lowering the distantsidelobes caused by the ripples of the spectrum's amplitude. The compressedsignal-to-noise ratio loss is only -...dB. The effect...

  13. Development of a control algorithm for the ultrasound scanning robot (NCCUSR) using ultrasound image and force feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeoun Jae; Seo, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hong Rae; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2017-06-01

    Clinicians who frequently perform ultrasound scanning procedures often suffer from musculoskeletal disorders, arthritis, and myalgias. To minimize their occurrence and to assist clinicians, ultrasound scanning robots have been developed worldwide. Although, to date, there is still no commercially available ultrasound scanning robot, many control methods have been suggested and researched. These control algorithms are either image based or force based. If the ultrasound scanning robot control algorithm was a combination of the two algorithms, it could benefit from the advantage of each one. However, there are no existing control methods for ultrasound scanning robots that combine force control and image analysis. Therefore, in this work, a control algorithm is developed for an ultrasound scanning robot using force feedback and ultrasound image analysis. A manipulator-type ultrasound scanning robot named 'NCCUSR' is developed and a control algorithm for this robot is suggested and verified. First, conventional hybrid position-force control is implemented for the robot and the hybrid position-force control algorithm is combined with ultrasound image analysis to fully control the robot. The control method is verified using a thyroid phantom. It was found that the proposed algorithm can be applied to control the ultrasound scanning robot and experimental outcomes suggest that the images acquired using the proposed control method can yield a rating score that is equivalent to images acquired directly by the clinicians. The proposed control method can be applied to control the ultrasound scanning robot. However, more work must be completed to verify the proposed control method in order to become clinically feasible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Pixel-Level Tissue Classification for Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazinato, Daniel V; Stein, Bernardo V; de Almeida, Waldir R; Werneck, Rafael de O; Mendes Júnior, Pedro R; Penatti, Otávio A B; Torres, Ricardo da S; Menezes, Fábio H; Rocha, Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-level tissue classification for ultrasound images, commonly applied to carotid images, is usually based on defining thresholds for the isolated pixel values. Ranges of pixel values are defined for the classification of each tissue. The classification of pixels is then used to determine the carotid plaque composition and, consequently, to determine the risk of diseases (e.g., strokes) and whether or not a surgery is necessary. The use of threshold-based methods dates from the early 2000s but it is still widely used for virtual histology. We propose the use of descriptors that take into account information about a neighborhood of a pixel when classifying it. We evaluated experimentally different descriptors (statistical moments, texture-based, gradient-based, local binary patterns, etc.) on a dataset of five types of tissues: blood, lipids, muscle, fibrous, and calcium. The pipeline of the proposed classification method is based on image normalization, multiscale feature extraction, including the proposal of a new descriptor, and machine learning classification. We have also analyzed the correlation between the proposed pixel classification method in the ultrasound images and the real histology with the aid of medical specialists. The classification accuracy obtained by the proposed method with the novel descriptor in the ultrasound tissue images (around 73%) is significantly above the accuracy of the state-of-the-art threshold-based methods (around 54%). The results are validated by statistical tests. The correlation between the virtual and real histology confirms the quality of the proposed approach showing it is a robust ally for the virtual histology in ultrasound images.

  15. Techniques to Improve Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandukuri, Jayanth

    Novel approaches to the improvement of ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging--a relatively new imaging modality that combines ultrasound and optical imaging techniques--have been proposed for early cancer detection. In USF, a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beam is used to induce temperature rise within its acoustic focal region due to which a thermo-sensitive USF contrast agent undergoes a switch in its state by increasing the output of fluorescence photons. By using an increase in fluorescence, one can isolate and quantify the fluorescence properties within the ultrasonic focal area. Therefore, USF is able to provide fluorescence contrast while maintaining ultrasound resolution in tissue. The major challenge of the conventional USF technique is its low axial resolution and its sensitivity (i.e. its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)). This work focuses on investigating and developing a novel USF system design that can improve the resolution and SNR of USF imaging for biological applications. This work can be divided into two major parts: characterizing the performance of a high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer; and improving the axial resolution and sensitivity of the USF technique. Preliminary investigation was conducted by using an IR camera setup to detect temperature variation and thereby study the performance of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer to quantify different parameters of ultrasound-induced temperature focal size (UTFS). Investigations are conducted for the purpose of high-resolution imaging with an emphasis on HIFU-induced thermal focus size, short duration of HIFU-induced temperature increase (to avoid thermal diffusion or conduction), and control of HIFU-induced temperature increase within a few degrees Celsius. Next, the focus was shifted to improving the sensitivity of the ultrasound-switchable fluorescence-imaging technique. In this study, the USF signal is encoded with the modulation frequency of the

  16. Simulation of ultrasound image data by a quadrature method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, P.; Braun, M.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Simulation is an important step in the process of developing reliable and accurate methods for medical image segmentation. Ultrasound data available from commercial scanners is most easily obtained in envelope detected form. Although bandpass and quadrature data is available it is not clear whether data in these forms would improve segmentation. Previous work (Bamber JC and Dickinson RJ, Phys Med Biol 25,3:463-479,1980) has simulated ultrasound data in bandpass (RF) form, requiring a high sampling rate and large data sets. We present a method for simulation of medical ultrasound images which produces data in quadrature form. The quadrature form allows a lower sampling rate which is dependent only on transducer bandwidth and is independent of centre frequency. We consider a two dimensional ultrasound data set I b (x, z) where x and z denote lateral and axial spatial coordinates and let I b (x, z) be bandpass in the axial direction. We then use a quadrature representation: I b (x, z) = Re[I c (x, z) exp jk 0 z ], where I c (x, z) = I p (x, z) + jI q (x, z), and I p and I q are (low-pass) quadrature components. We derive an expression for the power spectral density of I c and from this deduce expressions for the magnitude and phase of the Fourier transform of I p and I q . Taking the inverse Fourier transform then yields the simulated data sets I p and I q . The above quadrature simulation method has been implemented in a MATLAB like environment. We have demonstrated it to be a simple method for simulation of medical ultrasound images in a quadrature form. The method is essentially the same as previous work however produces quadrature data directly and provides a manageable data set independent of transducer centre frequency

  17. Ultrasound in Radiology: from Anatomic, Functional, Molecular Imaging to Drug Delivery and Image-Guided Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, ultrasound has expanded medical imaging well beyond the “traditional” radiology setting - a combination of portability, low cost and ease of use makes ultrasound imaging an indispensable tool for radiologists as well as for other medical professionals who need to obtain imaging diagnosis or guide a therapeutic intervention quickly and efficiently. Ultrasound combines excellent ability for deep penetration into soft tissues with very good spatial resolution, with only a few exceptions (i.e. those involving overlying bone or gas). Real-time imaging (up to hundreds and thousands frames per second) enables guidance of therapeutic procedures and biopsies; characterization of the mechanical properties of the tissues greatly aids with the accuracy of the procedures. The ability of ultrasound to deposit energy locally brings about the potential for localized intervention encompassing: tissue ablation, enhancing penetration through the natural barriers to drug delivery in the body and triggering drug release from carrier micro- and nanoparticles. The use of microbubble contrast agents brings the ability to monitor and quantify tissue perfusion, and microbubble targeting with ligand-decorated microbubbles brings the ability to obtain molecular biomarker information, i.e., ultrasound molecular imaging. Overall, ultrasound has become the most widely used imaging modality in modern medicine; it will continue to grow and expand. PMID:26200224

  18. A Comparison of Speckle Reduction Techniques in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina STOLOJESCU-CRISAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Speckle noise is a multiplicative noise that degrades the visual evaluation in ultrasound imaging. In addition, it limits the efficient application of intelligent image processing algorithms, such as segmentation techniques. Thus, speckle noise reduction is considered an essential pre-processing step. The objective of this paper is to carry out a comparative evaluation of speckle filtering techniques, based on two image quality evaluation metrics, the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR, and the Structural SIMilarity (SSIM index, and visual evaluation.

  19. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo Z.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  20. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C; Pelissari, Pedro I B G B; Deana, Alessandro M; Carneiro, Antonio A O; Pavan, Theo Z

    2017-01-21

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  1. Automatic 3D lesion segmentation on breast ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsien-Chi; Giger, Maryellen L.; Reiser, Ingrid; Drukker, Karen; Edwards, Alexandra; Sennett, Charlene A.

    2013-02-01

    Automatically acquired and reconstructed 3D breast ultrasound images allow radiologists to detect and evaluate breast lesions in 3D. However, assessing potential cancers in 3D ultrasound can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, we evaluate a 3D lesion segmentation method, which we had previously developed for breast CT, and investigate its robustness on lesions on 3D breast ultrasound images. Our dataset includes 98 3D breast ultrasound images obtained on an ABUS system from 55 patients containing 64 cancers. Cancers depicted on 54 US images had been clinically interpreted as negative on screening mammography and 44 had been clinically visible on mammography. All were from women with breast density BI-RADS 3 or 4. Tumor centers and margins were indicated and outlined by radiologists. Initial RGI-eroded contours were automatically calculated and served as input to the active contour segmentation algorithm yielding the final lesion contour. Tumor segmentation was evaluated by determining the overlap ratio (OR) between computer-determined and manually-drawn outlines. Resulting average overlap ratios on coronal, transverse, and sagittal views were 0.60 +/- 0.17, 0.57 +/- 0.18, and 0.58 +/- 0.17, respectively. All OR values were significantly higher the 0.4, which is deemed "acceptable". Within the groups of mammogram-negative and mammogram-positive cancers, the overlap ratios were 0.63 +/- 0.17 and 0.56 +/- 0.16, respectively, on the coronal views; with similar results on the other views. The segmentation performance was not found to be correlated to tumor size. Results indicate robustness of the 3D lesion segmentation technique in multi-modality 3D breast imaging.

  2. Ultrasound images transmitted via FaceTime are non-inferior to images on the ultrasound machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Andrea R; Buchner, Jessica A; Verceles, Avelino C; Zubrow, Marc T; Mallemat, Haney A; Papali, Alfred; McCurdy, Michael T

    2016-06-01

    Remote telementored ultrasound (RTMUS) systems can deliver ultrasound (US) expertise to regions lacking highly trained bedside ultrasonographers and US interpreters. To date, no studies have evaluated the quality and clinical utility of US images transmitted using commercially available RTMUS systems. This prospective pilot evaluated the quality of US images (right internal jugular vein, lung apices and bases, cardiac subxiphoid view, bladder) obtained using a commercially available iPad operating FaceTime software. A bedside non-physician obtained images and a tele-intensivist interpreted them. All US screen images were simultaneously saved on the US machine and captured via a FaceTime screen shot. The tele-intensivist and an independent US expert rated image quality and utility in guiding clinical decisions. The tele-intensivist rated FaceTime images as high quality (90% [69/77]) and could comfortably make clinical decisions using these images (96% [74/77]). Image quality did not differ between FaceTime and US images (97% (75/77). Strong inter-rater reliability existed between tele-intensivist and US expert evaluations (Spearman's rho 0.43; PFaceTime are not inferior to those obtained directly with the US machine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed.

  4. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of ... What are the limitations of Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? Obstetric ultrasound cannot identify all fetal abnormalities. Consequently, when ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  7. Patient viewing of the ultrasound image prior to abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Katrina; Upadhyay, Ushma D; Foster, Diana G; Gatter, Mary; Weitz, Tracy A

    2013-11-01

    Little research has investigated women's interest in and factors associated with viewing their ultrasound image in abortion care. Using medical records for all abortion care visits in 2011 (n = 15,575) at an urban abortion provider, we determined the proportion of women who chose to view by sociodemographic and pregnancy-related characteristics. We used bivariate and multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression models to examine associations between individual-level factors and the decision to view. A total of 42.6% of women chose to view. Identifying as nonwhite, being under age 25, being at or below the federal poverty level, and having medium or low decision certainty about the abortion were associated with increased odds of viewing. Being age 30 and over, having previously been pregnant and being more than 9 weeks gestation were associated with decreased odds of viewing. Many women seeking abortion care want to view their ultrasound image when offered the opportunity. © 2013.

  8. Model-Based Reconstructive Elasticity Imaging Using Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salavat R. Aglyamov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity imaging is a reconstructive imaging technique where tissue motion in response to mechanical excitation is measured using modern imaging systems, and the estimated displacements are then used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of Young's modulus. Here we present an ultrasound elasticity imaging method that utilizes the model-based technique for Young's modulus reconstruction. Based on the geometry of the imaged object, only one axial component of the strain tensor is used. The numerical implementation of the method is highly efficient because the reconstruction is based on an analytic solution of the forward elastic problem. The model-based approach is illustrated using two potential clinical applications: differentiation of liver hemangioma and staging of deep venous thrombosis. Overall, these studies demonstrate that model-based reconstructive elasticity imaging can be used in applications where the geometry of the object and the surrounding tissue is somewhat known and certain assumptions about the pathology can be made.

  9. A 4-DOF Robot for Positioning Ultrasound Imaging Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschak, Paul M; Degirmenci, Alperen; Tenzer, Yaroslav; Howe, Robert D

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present the design, fabrication, and testing of a robot for automatically positioning ultrasound imaging catheters. Our system will point ultrasound (US) catheters to provide real-time imaging of anatomical structures and working instruments during minimally invasive surgeries. Manually navigating US catheters is difficult and requires extensive training in order to aim the US imager at desired targets. Therefore, a four DOF robotic system was developed to automatically navigate US imaging catheters for enhanced imaging. A rotational transmission enables three DOF for pitch, yaw, and roll of the imager. This transmission is translated by the fourth DOF. An accuracy analysis was conducted to calculate the maximum allowable joint motion error. Rotational joints must be accurate to within 1.5° and the translational joint must be accurate within 1.4 mm. Motion tests were then conducted to validate the accuracy of the robot. The average resulting errors in positioning of the rotational joints were measured to be 0.28°-0.38° with average measured backlash error 0.44°. Average translational positioning and backlash errors were measured to be significantly lower than the reported accuracy of the position sensor. The resulting joint motion errors were well within the required specifications for accurate robot motion. Such effective navigation of US imaging catheters will enable better visualization in various procedures ranging from cardiac arrhythmia treatment to tumor removal in urological cases.

  10. Front-end IC design for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaner, Yalçın Feysel; Yamaner, Yalcin Feysel; Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Bozkurt, Ayhan

    2008-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers(cMUT) technology is a new trend for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. Large bandwidth, high sensitivity and compatibility to CMOS processes makes the cMUT a better choice compared to the conventional piezoelectric transducer. To exploit the merits of cMUT technology, an accurately designed front end circuit is required. The circuit functions as an output pulse driver for the generation of the acoustic signal and buffers the return echo. F...

  11. Plantar fascia segmentation and thickness estimation in ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussouar, Abdelhafid; Meziane, Farid; Crofts, Gillian

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging offers significant potential in diagnosis of plantar fascia (PF) injury and monitoring treatment. In particular US imaging has been shown to be reliable in foot and ankle assessment and offers a real-time effective imaging technique that is able to reliably confirm structural changes, such as thickening, and identify changes in the internal echo structure associated with diseased or damaged tissue. Despite the advantages of US imaging, images are difficult to interpret during medical assessment. This is partly due to the size and position of the PF in relation to the adjacent tissues. It is therefore a requirement to devise a system that allows better and easier interpretation of PF ultrasound images during diagnosis. This study proposes an automatic segmentation approach which for the first time extracts ultrasound data to estimate size across three sections of the PF (rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot). This segmentation method uses artificial neural network module (ANN) in order to classify small overlapping patches as belonging or not-belonging to the region of interest (ROI) of the PF tissue. Features ranking and selection techniques were performed as a post-processing step for features extraction to reduce the dimension and number of the extracted features. The trained ANN classifies the image overlapping patches into PF and non-PF tissue, and then it is used to segment the desired PF region. The PF thickness was calculated using two different methods: distance transformation and area-length calculation algorithms. This new approach is capable of accurately segmenting the PF region, differentiating it from surrounding tissues and estimating its thickness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Beef quality parameters estimation using ultrasound and color images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Jose; Piquerez, Martín; Pujadas, Leonardo; Armstrong, Eileen; Fernández, Alicia; Lecumberry, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Beef quality measurement is a complex task with high economic impact. There is high interest in obtaining an automatic quality parameters estimation in live cattle or post mortem. In this paper we set out to obtain beef quality estimates from the analysis of ultrasound (in vivo) and color images (post mortem), with the measurement of various parameters related to tenderness and amount of meat: rib eye area, percentage of intramuscular fat and backfat thickness or subcutaneous fat. An algorithm based on curve evolution is implemented to calculate the rib eye area. The backfat thickness is estimated from the profile of distances between two curves that limit the steak and the rib eye, previously detected. A model base in Support Vector Regression (SVR) is trained to estimate the intramuscular fat percentage. A series of features extracted on a region of interest, previously detected in both ultrasound and color images, were proposed. In all cases, a complete evaluation was performed with different databases including: color and ultrasound images acquired by a beef industry expert, intramuscular fat estimation obtained by an expert using a commercial software, and chemical analysis. The proposed algorithms show good results to calculate the rib eye area and the backfat thickness measure and profile. They are also promising in predicting the percentage of intramuscular fat.

  13. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; van Neer, Paul L. M. J.; Cachard, Christian; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Basset, Olivier; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p'', of the same frequency f0 and the same amplitude P0 to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  14. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; Van Neer, Paul L M J; Van der Steen, Antonius F W; De Jong, Nico; Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p'', of the same frequency f 0 and the same amplitude P 0 to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  15. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally focusing is done by taking out one sample in the received signal from each transducer element and then sum these signals. This method does not take into account the temporal or spatial spread of the received signal from a point scatterer and does not make an optimal focus of the data...... for beamforming the received RF signals from the individual transducer elements. The matched filter is applied on RF signals from individual transducer elements, thus properly taking into account the spatial spread of the received signal. The method can be applied to any transducer and can also be used...... for synthetic aperture imaging for single element transducers. It is evaluated using the Field II program. Data from a single 3 MHz transducer focused at a distance of 80 mm is processed. Far from the transducer focal region, the processing greatly improves the image resolution: the lateral slice...

  16. Plane-Wave Imaging Challenge in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebgott, Herve; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Plane-Wave imaging enables very high frame rates, up to several thousand frames per second. Unfortunately the lack of transmit focusing leads to reduced image quality, both in terms of resolution and contrast. Recently, numerous beamforming techniques have been proposed to compensate for this eff......Plane-Wave imaging enables very high frame rates, up to several thousand frames per second. Unfortunately the lack of transmit focusing leads to reduced image quality, both in terms of resolution and contrast. Recently, numerous beamforming techniques have been proposed to compensate...... for this effect, but comparing the different methods is difficult due to the lack of appropriate tools. PICMUS, the Plane-Wave Imaging Challenge in Medical Ultrasound aims to provide these tools. This paper describes the PICMUS challenge, its motivation, implementation, and metrics....

  17. Double difference tomography for breast ultrasound sound speed imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Rama, Olsi; Burger, Angelika; Polin, Lisa; Nechiporchik, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Double difference (DD) tomography utilizes more accurate differential time-of-flight (ToF) data to reconstruct the sound speed structure of the breast. It can produce more precise and better resolution sound speed images than standard tomography that uses absolute ToF data. We apply DD tomography to phantom data and excised mouse mammary glands data. DD tomograms demonstrate sharper sound speed contrast than the standard tomograms.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Encoding in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation two methods for spatio-temporal encoding in medical ultrasound imaging are investigated. The first technique is based on a frequency division approach. Here, the available spectrum of the transducer is divided into a set of narrow bands. A waveform is designed for each band...... the signal to noise ratio and simultaneously the penetration depth so that the medical doctor can image deeper lying structures. The method is tested both experimentally and in simulation and has also evaluated for the purpose of blood flow estimation. The work presented is based on four papers which...

  19. Liver Ultrasound Image Segmentation Using Region-Difference Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nishant; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, region-difference filters for the segmentation of liver ultrasound (US) images are proposed. Region-difference filters evaluate maximum difference of the average of two regions of the window around the center pixel. Implementing the filters on the whole image gives region-difference image. This image is then converted into binary image and morphologically operated for segmenting the desired lesion from the ultrasound image. The proposed method is compared with the maximum a posteriori-Markov random field (MAP-MRF), Chan-Vese active contour method (CV-ACM), and active contour region-scalable fitting energy (RSFE) methods. MATLAB code available online for the RSFE method is used for comparison whereas MAP-MRF and CV-ACM methods are coded in MATLAB by authors. Since no comparison is available on common database for the performance of the three methods, therefore, performance comparison of the three methods and proposed method was done on liver US images obtained from PGIMER, Chandigarh, India and from online resource. A radiologist blindly analyzed segmentation results of the 4 methods implemented on 56 images and had selected the segmentation result obtained from the proposed method as best for 46 test US images. For the remaining 10 US images, the proposed method performance was very near to the other three segmentation methods. The proposed segmentation method obtained the overall accuracy of 99.32% in comparison to the overall accuracy of 85.9, 98.71, and 68.21% obtained by MAP-MRF, CV-ACM, and RSFE methods, respectively. Computational time taken by the proposed method is 5.05 s compared to the time of 26.44, 24.82, and 28.36 s taken by MAP-MRF, CV-ACM, and RSFE methods, respectively.

  20. Simulation of High Quality Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Kortbek, Jacob; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates if the influence on image quality using physical transducers can be simulated with an sufficient accuracy to reveal system performance. The influence is investigated in a comparative study between Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation (SASB) and Dynamic Receive Focus...... is modeled by incorporating measured element pulse echo responses into the simulation software. Validation is performed through measurements on a water phantom with three metal wires, each with a diameter of 0.07 mm. Results show that when comparing measurement and simulation, the lateral beam profile using...

  1. A Compressed Sensing Strategy for Synthetic Transmit Aperture Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; He, Qiong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    A novel beamforming technique, named compressed sensing based synthetic transmit aperture (CS-STA) is proposed to speed up the acquisition of ultrasound imaging. This technique consists of three steps. First, the ultrasound transducer transmits randomly apodized plane waves for a number of times and receives the backscattered echoes. Second, the recorded backscattered echoes are used to recover the full channel dataset of synthetic transmit aperture (STA) with a compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction algorithm. Finally, an STA image is beamformed from the recovered full STA dataset. As CS allows recovering a signal from its few linear measurements with high probability, CS-STA is capable of recovering the STA image with fewer firings (i.e., higher frame rate) and retaining the high resolution of STA. In addition, the contrast of the STA image can be improved at the same time owing to the higher energy of plane wave firing in CS-STA. Simulations demonstrate that CS-STA is capable of recovering the STA channel dataset with a smaller number of firings. The performance of CS-STA is evaluated in phantom experiments through comparisons with STA, multi-element STA, conventional focused mode and coherent plane wave imaging. The results demonstrate that, implemented with the same frame rate, CS-STA achieves higher or comparable resolution and contrast. Moreover, comparisons are conducted on the biceps brachii muscle and thyroid of a human subject, and the results demonstrate the feasibility and competitiveness of CS-STA in the in vivo conditions.

  2. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy.

  3. WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagzebski, J. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging. Learning Objectives: Gain familiarity with common elements of a QA/QC program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging dentify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools Learn ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements Jennifer Walter is an employee of American College of Radiology on Ultrasound Accreditation.

  4. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging : Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M.D.; De Jong, N.; Vos, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher

  5. Investigation of ultrasound image processing to improve perceptibility of microcalcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Naohisa; Okamura, Yoko; Kakee, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Hideyuki

    2008-09-01

    This article describes an investigation of the detectability of breast microcalcifications by ultrasound imaging. Two kinds of experiments were performed to evaluate the spatial and contrast resolution of microstructures in an agar graphite phantom and to analyze human perception of tiny spots. The results showed that most of the difficulties in finding microstructures were not only due to lower echo levels but also to obstructions in the surrounding texture of the image. Based on these results, a new image processing method was proposed to emphasize microcalcifications in mammary glands. This method utilized statistical analysis of the echo signals and also considered the structural pattern of the mammary gland. Processed images from some clinical cases showed adequate extraction of the microcalcifications with efficient cancellation of the mammary gland structure. The results suggested that the perception of microcalcifications could be improved by the proposed method.

  6. Determination of fish gender using fractal analysis of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan J.; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Støttrup, Josianne

    2009-01-01

    The gender of cod Gadus morhua can be determined by considering the complexity in their gonadal ultrasonographic appearance. The fractal dimension (DB) can be used to describe this feature in images. B-mode gonadal ultrasound images in 32 cod, where gender was known, were collected. Fractal...... by subjective analysis alone. The mean (and standard deviation) of the fractal dimension DB for male fish was 1.554 (0.073) while for female fish it was 1.468 (0.061); the difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). The area under the ROC curve was 0.84 indicating the value of fractal analysis in gender...... result. Fractal analysis is useful for gender determination in cod. This or a similar form of analysis may have wide application in veterinary imaging as a tool for quantification of complexity in images...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is ... in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  11. Parametric Beamformer for Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    . The beamformer consists of a number of identical beamforming blocks, each processing data from several channels and producing part of the image. A number of these blocks can be accommodated in a modern field-programmable gate array device (FPGA), and a whole synthetic aperture system can be implemented using...... several FPGAs. For the current implementation, the input data is sampled at 4 times the center frequency of the excitation pulse and is match-filtered in the frequency domain. In-phase and quadrature data are beamformed with a sub-sample precision of the focusing delays of 1/16th of the sampling period...... with 255 levels. A beamforming block uses input data from 4 elements and produces a set of 10 lines. Linear interpolation is used to implement sub-sample delays. The VHDL code for the beamformer has been synthesized for a Xilinx V4FX100 speed grade 11 FPGA, where it can operate at a maximum clock frequency...

  12. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values...... for in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image...... calibration curves combined with the use of a maximum-likelihood algorithm is then able to estimate, with high precision, the depth location of any emitter fron each single image. Estimated values are compared with the ground truth demonstrating that an accuracy of 28.6 µm (0.13λ) is achieved for a 4 mm depth...

  13. Evaluation of multimodality imaging using image fusion with ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging in an experimental animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paprottka, P M; Zengel, P; Cyran, C C; Ingrisch, M; Nikolaou, K; Reiser, M F; Clevert, D A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging by comparison to multimodality imaging using image fusion with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and conventional grey scale imaging with additional elasticity-ultrasound in an experimental small-animal-squamous-cell carcinoma-model for the assessment of tissue morphology. Human hypopharynx carcinoma cells were subcutaneously injected into the left flank of 12 female athymic nude rats. After 10 days (SD ± 2) of subcutaneous tumor growth, sonographic grey scale including elasticity imaging and MRI measurements were performed using a high-end ultrasound system and a 3T MR. For image fusion the contrast-enhanced MRI DICOM data set was uploaded in the ultrasonic device which has a magnetic field generator, a linear array transducer (6-15 MHz) and a dedicated software package (GE Logic E9), that can detect transducers by means of a positioning system. Conventional grey scale and elasticity imaging were integrated in the image fusion examination. After successful registration and image fusion the registered MR-images were simultaneously shown with the respective ultrasound sectional plane. Data evaluation was performed using the digitally stored video sequence data sets by two experienced radiologist using a modified Tsukuba Elasticity score. The colors "red and green" are assigned for an area of soft tissue, "blue" indicates hard tissue. In all cases a successful image fusion and plan registration with MRI and ultrasound imaging including grey scale and elasticity imaging was possible. The mean tumor volume based on caliper measurements in 3 dimensions was ~323 mm3. 4/12 rats were evaluated with Score I, 5/12 rates were evaluated with Score II, 3/12 rates were evaluated with Score III. There was a close correlation in the fused MRI with existing small necrosis in the tumor. None of the scored II or III lesions was visible by conventional grey scale. The comparison of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging enables a

  14. The iterative adaptive approach in medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Are Charles; Austeng, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Many medical ultrasound imaging systems are based on sweeping the image plane with a set of narrow beams. Usually, the returning echo from each of these beams is used to form one or a few azimuthal image samples. We model, for each radial distance, jointly the full azimuthal scanline. The model consists of the amplitudes of a set of densely placed potential reflectors (or scatterers), cf. sparse signal representation. To fit the model, we apply the iterative adaptive approach (IAA) on data formed by a sequenced time delay and phase shift. The performance of the IAA in combination with our time-delayed and phase-shifted data are studied on both simulated data of scenes consisting of point targets and hollow cyst-like structures, and recorded ultrasound phantom data from a specially adapted commercially available scanner. The results show that the proposed IAA is more capable of resolving point targets and gives better defined and more geometrically correct cyst-like structures in speckle images compared with the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. Compared with a Capon beamformer, the IAA showed an improved rendering of cyst-like structures and a similar point-target resolvability. Unlike the Capon beamformer, the IAA has no user parameters and seems unaffected by signal cancellation. The disadvantage of the IAA is a high computational load.

  15. Sparse dictionary for synthetic transmit aperture medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Jiang, Jin-Yang; Li, Na; Luo, Han-Wu; Li, Fang; Cui, Shi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    It is possible to recover a signal below the Nyquist sampling limit using a compressive sensing technique in ultrasound imaging. However, the reconstruction enabled by common sparse transform approaches does not achieve satisfactory results. Considering the ultrasound echo signal's features of attenuation, repetition, and superposition, a sparse dictionary with the emission pulse signal is proposed. Sparse coefficients in the proposed dictionary have high sparsity. Images reconstructed with this dictionary were compared with those obtained with the three other common transforms, namely, discrete Fourier transform, discrete cosine transform, and discrete wavelet transform. The performance of the proposed dictionary was analyzed via a simulation and experimental data. The mean absolute error (MAE) was used to quantify the quality of the reconstructions. Experimental results indicate that the MAE associated with the proposed dictionary was always the smallest, the reconstruction time required was the shortest, and the lateral resolution and contrast of the reconstructed images were also the closest to the original images. The proposed sparse dictionary performed better than the other three sparse transforms. With the same sampling rate, the proposed dictionary achieved excellent reconstruction quality.

  16. Processed images in human perception: A case study in ultrasound breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Moi Hoon [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, FH09, Ergonomics and Safety Research Institute, Holywell Park (United Kingdom)], E-mail: M.H.Yap@lboro.ac.uk; Edirisinghe, Eran [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, FJ.05, Garendon Wing, Holywell Park, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Bez, Helmut [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, Room N.2.26, Haslegrave Building, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Two main research efforts in early detection of breast cancer include the development of software tools to assist radiologists in identifying abnormalities and the development of training tools to enhance their skills. Medical image analysis systems, widely known as Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) systems, play an important role in this respect. Often it is important to determine whether there is a benefit in including computer-processed images in the development of such software tools. In this paper, we investigate the effects of computer-processed images in improving human performance in ultrasound breast cancer detection (a perceptual task) and classification (a cognitive task). A survey was conducted on a group of expert radiologists and a group of non-radiologists. In our experiments, random test images from a large database of ultrasound images were presented to subjects. In order to gather appropriate formal feedback, questionnaires were prepared to comment on random selections of original images only, and on image pairs consisting of original images displayed alongside computer-processed images. We critically compare and contrast the performance of the two groups according to perceptual and cognitive tasks. From a Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis, we conclude that the provision of computer-processed images alongside the original ultrasound images, significantly improve the perceptual tasks of non-radiologists but only marginal improvements are shown in the perceptual and cognitive tasks of the group of expert radiologists.

  17. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of vascular parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Meiburger, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the development of quantitative techniques for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging in the assessment of architectural and vascular parameters. It presents morphological vascular research based on the development of quantitative imaging techniques for the use of clinical B-mode ultrasound images, and preclinical architectural vascular investigations on quantitative imaging techniques for ultrasounds and photoacoustics. The book is divided into two main parts, the first of which focuses on the development and validation of quantitative techniques for the assessment of vascular morphological parameters that can be extracted from B-mode ultrasound longitudinal images of the common carotid artery. In turn, the second part highlights quantitative imaging techniques for assessing the architectural parameters of vasculature that can be extracted from 3D volumes, using both contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and photoacoustic imaging without the addition of any contrast agent. Sharing and...

  19. Improving the Image Quality of Synthetic Transmit Aperture Ultrasound Images - Achieving Real-Time In-Vivo Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Kim

    Synthetic transmit aperture (STA) imaging has the potential to increase the image quality of medical ultrasound images beyond the levels obtained by conventional imaging techniques (linear, phased, and convex array imaging). Currently, however, in-vivo applications of STA imaging is limited by a ......-vivo imaging, and that the obtained image quality is highly competitive with the techniques applied in current medical ultrasound scanners. Hereby, the goals of the PhD have been successfully achieved......., these issues need to solved. The goal of this PhD study has been to find methods that can be used to overcome the above mentioned limitations, and hereby improve the image quality of STA imaging to a clinically desirable level, enabling real-time in-vivo STA imaging. The thesis investigates a new method...

  20. Real-time images of tidal recruitment using lung ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusman, Gerardo; Acosta, Cecilia M; Nicola, Marco; Esperatti, Mariano; Bohm, Stephan H; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury is a form of mechanical damage leading to a pulmonary inflammatory response related to the use of mechanical ventilation enhanced by the presence of atelectasis. One proposed mechanism of this injury is the repetitive opening and closing of collapsed alveoli and small airways within these atelectatic areas-a phenomenon called tidal recruitment. The presence of tidal recruitment is difficult to detect, even with high-resolution images of the lungs like CT scan. The purpose of this article is to give evidence of tidal recruitment by lung ultrasound. A standard lung ultrasound inspection detected lung zones of atelectasis in mechanically ventilated patients. With a linear probe placed in the intercostal oblique position. We observed tidal recruitment within atelectasis as an improvement in aeration at the end of inspiration followed by the re-collapse at the end of expiration. This mechanism disappeared after the performance of a lung recruitment maneuver. Lung ultrasound was helpful in detecting the presence of atelectasis and tidal recruitment and in confirming their resolution after a lung recruitment maneuver.

  1. Experimental ultrasound system for real-time synthetic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Holm, Ole; Jensen, Lars Joost

    1999-01-01

    Digital signal processing is being employed more and more in modern ultrasound scanners. This has made it possible to do dynamic receive focusing for each sample and implement other advanced imaging methods. The processing, however, has to be very fast and cost-effective at the same time. Dedicated...... chips are used in order to do real time processing. This often makes it difficult to implement radically different imaging strategies on one platform and makes the scanners less accessible for research purposes. Here flexibility is the prime concern, and the storage of data from all transducer elements...... over 5 to 10 seconds is needed to perform clinical evaluation of synthetic and 3D imaging. This paper describes a real-time system specifically designed for research purposes. The purpose of the system is to make it possible to acquire multi-channel data in real-time from clinical multi...

  2. Measurement of blood perfusion using photoacoustic, ultrasound, and strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Sethuraman, Shriram; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2007-02-01

    In many clinical and research applications including cancer diagnosis, tumor response to therapy, reconstructive surgery, monitoring of transplanted tissues and organs, and quantitative evaluation of angiogenesis, sequential and quantitative assessment of microcirculation in tissue is required. In this paper we present an imaging technique capable of spatial and temporal measurements of blood perfusion through microcirculation. To demonstrate the developed imaging technique, studies were conducted using phantoms with modeled small blood vessels of various diameters positioned at different depths. A change in the magnitude of the photoacoustic signal was observed during vessel constriction and subsequent displacement of optically absorbing liquid present in the vessels. The results of the study suggest that photoacoustic, ultrasound and strain imaging could be used to sequentially monitor and qualitatively assess blood perfusion through microcirculation.

  3. Digital Path Approach Despeckle Filter for Ultrasound Imaging and Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Szczepański

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel filtering technique capable of reducing the multiplicative noise in ultrasound images that is an extension of the denoising algorithms based on the concept of digital paths. In this approach, the filter weights are calculated taking into account the similarity between pixel intensities that belongs to the local neighborhood of the processed pixel, which is called a path. The output of the filter is estimated as the weighted average of pixels connected by the paths. The way of creating paths is pivotal and determines the effectiveness and computational complexity of the proposed filtering design. Such procedure can be effective for different types of noise but fail in the presence of multiplicative noise. To increase the filtering efficiency for this type of disturbances, we introduce some improvements of the basic concept and new classes of similarity functions and finally extend our techniques to a spatiotemporal domain. The experimental results prove that the proposed algorithm provides the comparable results with the state-of-the-art techniques for multiplicative noise removal in ultrasound images and it can be applied for real-time image enhancement of video streams.

  4. Shear modulus imaging with spatially-modulated ultrasound radiation force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Stephen; Menon, Manoj; Elegbe, Etana

    2009-10-01

    The application of Spatially-Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force (SMURF) to shear modulus imaging is demonstrated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine liver. Scanning and data acquisition was performed with a Siemens Antares ultrasound scanner and VF7-3 linear array operating at 4.21 MHz. Modulus estimates in uniform phantoms of Zerdine with shear moduli of 5.1 and 12.4 kPa exhibited standard deviations within 6% of the mean value. Zerdine spheres 1 cm in diameter (nominally 2.7, 4.7 and 15 kPa) in a 8 kPa (nominal) background are clearly resolved. Cross sectional images of a soft conical inclusion in a gelatin-based phantom indicate a spatial resolution of approximately 2.5 mm. Images of the shear modulus of an ex-vivo sample of porcine liver tissue show an average value of 3 kPa. A stifflesion induced with 0.5 mL of 10% glutaraldehyde is clearly visible as a region of shear modulus in excess of 10 kPa. A modulus gradient associated with the diffusion of the glutaraldehyde is visible. Two pulse sequences were examined, differing only in the timing of the beams used to generate the shear waves. Details of the beam sequences and subsequent signal processing are presented.

  5. Shear Modulus Imaging with Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Stephen; Menon, Manoj; Elegbe, Etana

    2011-01-01

    The application of Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force (SMURF) to shear modulus imaging is demonstrated in tissue mimicking phantoms and porcine liver. Scanning and data acquisition was performed with a Siemens Antares ultrasound scanner and VF7-3 linear array operating at 4.21 MHz. Modulus estimates in uniform phantoms of Zerdine™ with shear moduli of 5.1 and 12.4 kPa exhibited standard deviations within 6% of the mean value. Zerdine spheres 1 cm in diameter (nominally 2.7, 4.7, and 15 kPa) in a 8 kPa (nominal) background are clearly resolved. Cross sectional images of a soft conical inclusion in a gelatin-based phantom indicate a spatial resolution of approximately 2.5 mm. Images of the shear modulus of an ex-vivo sample of porcine liver tissue show an average value of 3kPa. A stiff lesion induced with 0.5 mL of 10% glutaraldehyde is clearly visible as a region of shear modulus in excess of 10 kPa. A modulus gradient associated with the diffusion of the glutaraldehyde is visible. Two pulse sequences were examined, differing only in the timing of the beams used to generate the shear waves. Details of the beam sequences and subsequent signal processing are presented. PMID:20458875

  6. Knee cartilage segmentation and thickness computation from ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Amir; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Goh, Siew-Li; Lai, Khin Wee

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative thickness computation of knee cartilage in ultrasound images requires segmentation of a monotonous hypoechoic band between the soft tissue-cartilage interface and the cartilage-bone interface. Speckle noise and intensity bias captured in the ultrasound images often complicates the segmentation task. This paper presents knee cartilage segmentation using locally statistical level set method (LSLSM) and thickness computation using normal distance. Comparison on several level set methods in the attempt of segmenting the knee cartilage shows that LSLSM yields a more satisfactory result. When LSLSM was applied to 80 datasets, the qualitative segmentation assessment indicates a substantial agreement with Cohen's κ coefficient of 0.73. The quantitative validation metrics of Dice similarity coefficient and Hausdorff distance have average values of 0.91 ± 0.01 and 6.21 ± 0.59 pixels, respectively. These satisfactory segmentation results are making the true thickness between two interfaces of the cartilage possible to be computed based on the segmented images. The measured cartilage thickness ranged from 1.35 to 2.42 mm with an average value of 1.97 ± 0.11 mm, reflecting the robustness of the segmentation algorithm to various cartilage thickness. These results indicate a potential application of the methods described for assessment of cartilage degeneration where changes in the cartilage thickness can be quantified over time by comparing the true thickness at a certain time interval.

  7. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanter, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  8. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanter, M. [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique (France)

    2015-06-15

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  9. A novel fusion imaging system for endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe; Saftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Navigation of a flexible endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) probe inside the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is problematic due to the small window size and complex anatomy. The goal of the present study was to test the feasibility of a novel fusion imaging (FI) system which uses...... time was 24.6 ± 6.6 min, while the time to reach the clinical target was 8.7 ± 4.2 min. CONCLUSIONS: The FI system is feasible for clinical use, and can reduce the learning curve for EUS procedures and improve navigation and targeting in difficult anatomic locations....

  10. Stolt's f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wave-fronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. To perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to outline the advantages of PWI with Stolt's f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt's f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J.-Y. Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a stateof- the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles, thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu's and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes for the Stolt's f-k migration for PWI are provided.

  11. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  12. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  13. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammet, S. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  14. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammet, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  15. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  16. [Resection of intracardiac myxoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Delgado, Víctor Manuel; Deloya-Maldonado, Angélica María; Carranza-Bernal, María Lourdes; Hinojosa-Pérez, Arturo; Farías-Mayene, Leobardo

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors, which are considered emergency surgery. The resection should not be delayed because 8-9% of affected patients may die due to intracardiac blood flow obstruction. We presente a clinical case of a 47 year old female, history of dyslipidemia. Disease starts with retrosternal oppression feeling, dyspnea on moderate exercise, dizziness, pain in joints hands. Arrhytmic heart sounds, diastolic mitral murmur II/IV, breth sounds present, no lymph. Laboratory: hemoglobin 11.0, leucocyte 9000, glucose 96 mg/dL, chest RX medium arch prominence cardiac silhouette. ECO transthoracic LVEF 60 %, with left atrial intracardiac tumor 13x11 cm, pedicle fixed the interatrial septum, the mitral valve bulges, with mild mitral valve. Half sternotomy is performed intracardiac tumor resection, pericardial placement interatrial with extracorporeal circulation support 65', aortic clamping time of 40'. Intracardiac tumor surgical findings interatrial septum fixed to left side, pedicle, rounded, yellow, multiloculated, soft, 13x10 cm in diameter. Histopathological diagnosis cardiac myxoma. We conclude that the tumor resection was carried in a timely manner with satisfactory evolution.

  17. A Leadless Intracardiac Transcatheter Pacing System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Dwight; Duray, Gabor Z.; Omar, Razali; Soejima, Kyoko; Neuzil, Petr; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Steinwender, Clemens; Brugada, Josep; Lloyd, Michael; Roberts, Paul R.; Sagi, Venkata; Hummel, John; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Knops, Reinoud E.; Ellis, Christopher R.; Gornick, Charles C.; Bernabei, Matthew A.; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Williams, Eric R.; Hudnall, J. Harrison; Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Zoltan; Roberts, Paul; Gornick, Charles; Ellis, Christopher; Gonzalez, Efrain; Boersma, Lucas V. A.; Chinitz, Larry; Bernabei, Matthew; Shinn, Timothy; Jones, Randy; Schoenhard, John; Kusano, Kengo; Philippon, Francois; Atwater, Brett; Voigt, Andrew; Asano, Taku; Kowal, Robert; Simmers, Timothy Alexander; Milasinovic, Goran; Bahl, Vinay Kumar; Seger, John; Shehata, Michael; Thibault, Bernard T.; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Sra, Jasbir; Giocondo, Michael; Johnson, Eric; Wilkoff, Bruce; Collier, Jack; Hill, John; Vardas, Panos E.; Mittal, Suneet; Grubman, Eric; Ferguson, John; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Chin, Ashley; Rogers, John; Jadonath, Ram; Tyagi, Sanjay; Ghali, Magdi; Coyne, Robert; Esberg, Douglas; Duray, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    A leadless intracardiac transcatheter pacing system has been designed to avoid the need for a pacemaker pocket and transvenous lead. In a prospective multicenter study without controls, a transcatheter pacemaker was implanted in patients who had guideline-based indications for ventricular pacing.

  18. Intracardiac and intracerebral thrombosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thromboembolic complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary thrombophilias are also known to increase vascular thrombosis. We present a case that has been followed up for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS) in which intracardiac and intracranial ...

  19. Speckle noise reduction in breast ultrasound images: SMU (srad median unsharp) approch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njeh, I.; Sassi, O. B.; Ben Hamida, A.; Chtourou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Image denoising has become a very essential for better information extraction from the image and mainly from so noised ones, such as ultrasound images. In certain cases, for instance in ultrasound images, the noise can restrain information which is valuable for the general practitioner. Consequently medical images are very inconsistent, and it is crucial to operate case to case. This paper presents a novel algorithm SMU (Srad Median Unsharp) for noise suppression in ultrasound breast images in order to realize a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) for breast cancer.

  20. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, J B; Ganezer, K S; Halcrow, P W; Neeson, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statistical and systematic errors associated with the variability in the pressure applied by the clinician to the transmitting transducer that NCU might provide. The authors also undertook this study in order to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. A noncontact ultrasound imaging system using a pair of specially designed broadband, 1.5 MHz noncontact piezoelectric transducers and cortical bone phantoms, were used to determine bone mineral density (BMD), speed of sound (SOS), integrated response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were also used in the collection of data from phantoms of nominal mass densities that varied from 1.17 to 2.25 g/cm(3) and in bone mineral density from 0 to 1.7 g/cm(3). Good correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 17 phantoms, and methods for quantifying and minimizing sources of systematic errors were outlined. The BMD of the phantom sets extended through most of the in vivo range found in cortical bone. A total of 16-20 repeated measurements of the SOS, thickness, and IR for the phantom set that were conducted over a period of several months showed a small variation in the range of measurements of ±1%-2%. These NCU data were shown to be in agreement with similar results using contact ultrasound to be within 1%-2%. Transmittance

  1. Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    University Page 2 of 13 1. INTRODUCTION: Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves at frequencies above the human hearing range to image organs within the body ... Imaging of phantom in a rotating water tank which revolves the sample around the probe body . (D) Deconstructed ultrasound image of the phantom...other disciplines ? This work will have a substantial impact on multiple disciplines including medical imaging , focal therapies, and medical

  2. Wavelet compression algorithm applied to abdominal ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Hsun; Pan, Su-Feng; LU, Chin-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Che

    2006-01-01

    We sought to investigate acceptable compression ratios of lossy wavelet compression on 640 x 480 x 8 abdominal ultrasound (US) images. We acquired 100 abdominal US images with normal and abnormal findings from the view station of a 932-bed teaching hospital. The US images were then compressed at quality factors (QFs) of 3, 10, 30, and 50 followed outcomes of a pilot study. This was equal to the average compression ratios of 4.3:1, 8.5:1, 20:1 and 36.6:1, respectively. Four objective measurements were carried out to examine and compare the image degradation between original and compressed images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also introduced for subjective assessment. Five experienced and qualified radiologists as reviewers blinded to corresponding pathological findings, analysed paired 400 randomly ordered images with two 17-inch thin film transistor/liquid crystal display (TFT/LCD) monitors. At ROC analysis, the average area under curve (Az) for US abdominal image was 0.874 at the ratio of 36.6:1. The compressed image size was only 2.7% for US original at this ratio. The objective parameters showed the higher the mean squared error (MSE) or root mean squared error (RMSE) values, the poorer the image quality. The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) values indicated better image quality. The average RMSE, PSNR at 36.6:1 for US were 4.84 ± 0.14, 35.45 dB, respectively. This finding suggests that, on the basis of the patient sample, wavelet compression of abdominal US to a ratio of 36.6:1 did not adversely affect diagnostic performance or evaluation error for radiologists' interpretation so as to risk affecting diagnosis

  3. Real Time Deconvolution of In-Vivo Ultrasound Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    based model for the ultrasound pulse and can include a depth varying pulse and spatially varying signal-to-noise ration. An autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of orders 8 and 9 is used for the pulse, and the ARMA parameters are determined as a function of depth using a minimum variance algorithm...... resolution has been determined from the in-vivo liver image using the auto-covariance function. From the envelope of the estimated pulse the axial resolution at Full-Width-Half-Max is 0.581 mm corresponding to 1.13 l at 3 MHz. The algorithm increases the resolution to 0.116 mm or 0.227 l corresponding...... to a factor of 5.1. The basic pulse can be estimated in roughly 0.176 seconds on a single CPU core on an Intel i5 CPU running at 1.8 GHz. An in-vivo image consisting of 100 lines of 1600 samples can be processed in roughly 0.1 seconds making it possible to perform real-time deconvolution on ultrasound data...

  4. A comparative study in ultrasound breast imaging classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Moi Hoon; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Bez, Helmut E.

    2009-02-01

    American College of Radiology introduces a standard in classification, the breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS), standardize the reporting of ultrasound findings, clarify its interpretation, and facilitate communication between clinicians. The effective use of new technologies to support healthcare initiatives is important and current research is moving towards implementing computer tools in the diagnostics process. Initially a detailed study was carried out to evaluate the performance of two commonly used appearance based classification algorithms, based on the use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and two dimensional linear discriminant analysis (2D-LDA). The study showed that these two appearance based classification approaches are not capable of handling the classification of ultrasound breast image lesions. Therefore further investigations in the use of a popular feature based classifier - Support Vector Machine (SVM) was conducted. A pre-processing step before feature based classification is feature extraction, which involve shape, texture and edge descriptors for the Region of Interest (ROI). The input dataset to SVM classification is from a fully automated ROI detection. We achieve the success rate of 0.550 in PCA, 0.500 in LDA, and 0.931 in SVM. The best combination of features in SVM classification is to combine the shape, texture and edge descriptors, with sensitivity 0.840 and specificity 0.968. This paper briefly reviews the background to the project and then details the ongoing research. In conclusion, we discuss the contributions, limitations, and future plans of our work.

  5. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatiotemporal matrix image formation for programmable ultrasound scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Morichau-Beauchant, Pierre; Porée, Jonathan; Garofalakis, Anikitos; Tavitian, Bertrand; Tanter, Mickael; Provost, Jean

    2018-02-01

    As programmable ultrasound scanners become more common in research laboratories, it is increasingly important to develop robust software-based image formation algorithms that can be obtained in a straightforward fashion for different types of probes and sequences with a small risk of error during implementation. In this work, we argue that as the computational power keeps increasing, it is becoming practical to directly implement an approximation to the matrix operator linking reflector point targets to the corresponding radiofrequency signals via thoroughly validated and widely available simulations software. Once such a spatiotemporal forward-problem matrix is constructed, standard and thus highly optimized inversion procedures can be leveraged to achieve very high quality images in real time. Specifically, we show that spatiotemporal matrix image formation produces images of similar or enhanced quality when compared against standard delay-and-sum approaches in phantoms and in vivo, and show that this approach can be used to form images even when using non-conventional probe designs for which adapted image formation algorithms are not readily available.

  7. Ultrasound Image Quality Assessment: A framework for evaluation of clinical image quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2010-01-01

    Improvement of ultrasound images should be guided by their diagnostic value. Evaluation of clinical image quality is generally performed subjectively, because objective criteria have not yet been fully developed and accepted for the evaluation of clinical image quality. Based on recommendation 500...... from the International Telecommunication Union - Radiocommunication (ITU-R) for such subjective quality assessment, this work presents equipment and a methodology for clinical image quality evaluation for guiding the development of new and improved imaging. The system is based on a BK-Medical 2202 Pro...... information, which is fast enough to get sufficient number of scans under realistic operating conditions, so that statistical evaluation is valid and reliable....

  8. Robust microbubble tracking for super resolution imaging in ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer B.; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Currently ultrasound resolution is limited by diffraction to approximately half the wavelength of the sound wave employed. In recent years, super resolution imaging techniques have overcome the diffraction limit through the localization and tracking of a sparse set of microbubbles through...... the vasculature. However, this has only been performed on fixated tissue, limiting its clinical application. This paper proposes a technique for making super resolution images on non-fixated tissue by first compensating for tissue movement and then tracking the individual microbubbles. The experiment is performed...... on the kidney of a anesthetized Sprage-Dawley rat by infusing SonoVue at 0.1× original concentration. The algorithm demonstrated in vivo that the motion compensation was capable of removing the movement caused by the mechanical ventilator. The results shows that microbubbles were localized with a higher...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  10. Psychomotor skills in medical ultrasound imaging: an analysis of the core skill set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Delwyn; Sweet, Linda; Hyett, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Sonographers use psychomotor skills to perform medical ultrasound examinations. Psychomotor skills describe voluntary movements of the limb, joints, and muscles in response to sensory stimuli and are regulated by the motor neural cortex in the brain. We define a psychomotor skill in relation to medical ultrasound imaging as "the unique mental and motor activities required to execute a manual task safely and efficiently for each clinical situation." Skills in clinical ultrasound practice may be open or closed; most skills used in medical ultrasound imaging are open. Open skills are both complex and multidimensional. Visuomotor and visuospatial psychomotor skills are central components of medical ultrasound imaging. Both types of skills rely on learners having a visual exemplar or standard of performance with which to reference their skill performance and evaluate anatomic structures. These are imperative instructional design principles when teaching psychomotor skills. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. The spectrum of cranial ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, L. S.; Gunardi, H.; Barth, P. G.; Bok, L. A.; Verboon-Maciolek, M. A.; Groenendaal, F.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can lead to severe neurological sequelae and (progressive) sensorineural deafness. Neonatal imaging data is mainly based on cranial ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). The additional value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in

  12. Surveillance of hemodialysis vascular access with ultrasound vector flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Andreas H.; Olesen, Jacob B.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.; Rix, Marianne; Jensen, Jørgen A.; Nielsen, Michael B.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was prospectively to monitor the volume flow in patients with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with the angle independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging (VFI). Volume flow values were compared with Ultrasound dilution technique (UDT). Hemodialysis patients need a well-functioning vascular access with as few complications as possible and preferred vascular access is an AVF. Dysfunction due to stenosis is a common complication, and regular monitoring of volume flow is recommended to preserve AVF patency. UDT is considered the gold standard for volume flow surveillance, but VFI has proven to be more precise, when performing single repeated instantaneous measurements. Three patients with AVF were monitored with UDT and VFI monthly for five months. A commercial ultrasound scanner with a 9 MHz linear array transducer with integrated VFI was used to obtain data. UDT values were obtained with Transonic HD03 Flow-QC Hemodialysis Monitor. Three independent measurements at each scan session were obtained with UDT and VFI each month. Average deviation of volume flow between UDT and VFI was 25.7 % (Cl: 16.7% to 34.7%) (p= 0.73). The standard deviation for all patients, calculated from the mean variance of each individual scan sessions, was 199.8 ml/min for UDT and 47.6 ml/min for VFI (p = 0.002). VFI volume flow values were not significantly different from the corresponding estimates obtained using UDT, and VFI measurements were more precise than UDT. The study indicates that VFI can be used for surveillance of volume flow.

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  14. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in Crohn's disease: a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthast, S.; Rieber, A.; Wruk, D.; Brambs, H.-J.; Tirpitz, C. von; Adler, G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to compare MRI of the abdomen with ultrasound of the abdomen and gastrointestinal tract in patients with Crohn's disease. Forty-six patients were included in the study. We analyzed the localization of Crohn's lesions, the number of affected bowel segments, the number of stenoses, and the presence of abscesses, fistulae, and any additional findings. Findings were verified by means of one or more of the following: enteroclysis; surgical findings; and colonoscopy. The results show that MRI is superior to ultrasound in the localization of affected bowel segments (sensitivity: MRI 97.5%; US 76%) and in recognizing fistulae (sensitivity: MRI 87%; US 31%), stenoses (sensitivity: MRI 100%; US 58%) and abscesses (sensitivity: MRI 100%; US 89%). Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen should be obtained to clarify discrepant clinical and sonographic findings. In addition, despite its higher cost, MRI of the abdomen is justified in patients in whom Crohn's lesions are known or suspected in anatomic areas proximal to the terminal or neoterminal ileum and in cases with suspicion of fistulae and abscesses. (orig.)

  15. Enhanced pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using superparamagnetic nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrmohammadi, M; Qu, M; Emelianov, S Y; Yoon, K Y; Johnston, K P

    2011-01-01

    Recently, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging augmented with ultra-small magnetic nanoparticles has been introduced as a tool capable of imaging events at molecular and cellular levels. The sensitivity of a pMMUS system depends on several parameters, including the size, geometry and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Under the same magnetic field, larger magnetic nanostructures experience a stronger magnetic force and produce larger displacement, thus improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of pMMUS imaging. Unfortunately, large magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles are typically ferromagnetic and thus are very difficult to stabilize against colloidal aggregation. In the current study we demonstrate improvement of pMMUS image quality by using large size superparamagnetic nanoclusters characterized by strong magnetization per particle. Water-soluble magnetic nanoclusters of two sizes (15 and 55 nm average size) were synthesized from 3 nm iron precursors in the presence of citrate capping ligand. The size distribution of synthesized nanoclusters and individual nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissue mimicking phantoms containing single nanoparticles and two sizes of nanoclusters were imaged using a custom-built pMMUS imaging system. While the magnetic properties of citrate-coated nanoclusters are identical to those of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the magneto-motive signal detected from nanoclusters is larger, i.e. the same magnetic field produced larger magnetically induced displacement. Therefore, our study demonstrates that clusters of superparamagnetic nanoparticles result in pMMUS images with higher contrast and SNR.

  16. State-of-the-art imaging techniques in endoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has recently evolved through technological improvement of equipment, with a major clinical impact in digestive and mediastinal diseases. State-of-the-art EUS equipment now includes real-time sono-elastography, which might be useful for a better characterization of lesions and increased accuracy of differential diagnosis (for e.g. lymph nodes or focal pancreatic lesions). Contrast-enhanced EUS imaging is also available, and is already being used for the differential diagnosis of focal pancreatic masses. The recent development of low mechanical index contrast harmonic EUS imaging offers hope for improved diagnosis, staging and monitoring of anti-angiogenic treatment. Tridimensional EUS (3D-EUS) techniques can be applied to enhance the spatial understanding of EUS anatomy, especially for improved staging of tumors, obtained through a better assessment of the relationship with major surrounding vessels. Despite the progress gained through all these imaging techniques, they cannot replace cytological or histological diagnosis. However, real-time optical histological diagnosis can be achieved through the use of single-fiber confocal laser endomicroscopy techniques placed under real-time EUS-guidance through a 22G needle. Last, but not least, EUS-assisted natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures offer a whole new area of imaging applications, used either for combination of NOTES peritoneoscopy and intraperitoneal EUS, but also for access of retroperitoneal organs through posterior EUS guidance. PMID:21390138

  17. Find, Fight, Follow: Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, P.G.; Gruell, H.; Steinbach, O.C.

    2012-01-01

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaginghas been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Therapeutic applications using ultrasound, for example thermal ablation, hyperthermia or ultrasound induced drug

  18. Learning to Diagnose Cirrhosis with Liver Capsule Guided Ultrasound Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a computer-aided cirrhosis diagnosis system to diagnose cirrhosis based on ultrasound images. We first propose a method to extract a liver capsule on an ultrasound image, then, based on the extracted liver capsule, we fine-tune a deep convolutional neural network (CNN model to extract features from the image patches cropped around the liver capsules. Finally, a trained support vector machine (SVM classifier is applied to classify the sample into normal or abnormal cases. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively extract the liver capsules and accurately classify the ultrasound images.

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  20. Envelope based nonlinear blind deconvolution approach for ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.T. Chira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of ultrasound medical images is yet an important problem despite of the researchers efforts. In this paper we presents a nonlinear blind deconvolution to eliminate the blurring effect based on the measured radio-frequency signal envelope. This algorithm is executed in two steps. Firslty we make an estimation for Point Spread Function (PSF and, secondly we use the estimated PSF to remove, iteratively their effect. The proposed algorithm is a greedy algorithm, called also matching pursuit or CLEAN. The use of this algorithm is motivated beacause theorically it avoid the so called inverse problem, which usually needs regularization to obtain an optimal solution. The results are presented using 1D simulated signals in term of visual evaluation and nMSE in comparison with the two most kwown regularisation solution methods for least square problem, Thikonov regularization or l2-norm and Total Variation or l1 norm.

  1. Fast microcalcification detection in ultrasound images using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Baek Hwan; Chang, Chuho; Lee, Jong-Ha; Ko, Eun Young; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Woo, Kyoung-Gu

    2013-02-01

    The existence of microcalcifications (MCs) is an important marker of malignancy in breast cancer. In spite of the benefits in mass detection for dense breasts, ultrasonography is believed that it might not reliably detect MCs. For computer aided diagnosis systems, however, accurate detection of MCs has the possibility of improving the performance in both Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon description for calcifications and malignancy classification. We propose a new efficient and effective method for MC detection using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics (TAS). The main idea of TAS is to threshold an image and to count the number of white pixels with a given number of adjacent white pixels. Our contribution is to adopt TAS features and apply image enhancement to facilitate MC detection in ultrasound images. We employed fuzzy logic, tophat filter, and texture filter to enhance images for MCs. Using a total of 591 images, the classification accuracy of the proposed method in MC detection showed 82.75%, which is comparable to that of Haralick texture features (81.38%). When combined, the performance was as high as 85.11%. In addition, our method also showed the ability in mass classification when combined with existing features. In conclusion, the proposed method exploiting image enhancement and TAS features has the potential to deal with MC detection in ultrasound images efficiently and extend to the real-time localization and visualization of MCs.

  2. Intracardiac leiomyomatosis: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous leiomyomatosis is an example of unusual growth patterns that is sometimes exhibited by uterine leiomyomas, characterized by smooth muscle proliferations within the uterine or pelvic veins. Extension into the heart via the inferior vena cava is even rarer and is designated as intracardiac leiomyomatosis. This is a report of two such cases that had preoperative diagnoses of a thrombus and right atrial myxoma, respectively.

  3. From 4D Medical Images (CT, MRI, and Ultrasound to 4D Structured Mesh Models of the Left Ventricular Endocardium for Patient-Specific Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Canè

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With cardiovascular disease (CVD remaining the primary cause of death worldwide, early detection of CVDs becomes essential. The intracardiac flow is an important component of ventricular function, motion kinetics, wash-out of ventricular chambers, and ventricular energetics. Coupling between Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations and medical images can play a fundamental role in terms of patient-specific diagnostic tools. From a technical perspective, CFD simulations with moving boundaries could easily lead to negative volumes errors and the sudden failure of the simulation. The generation of high-quality 4D meshes (3D in space + time with 1-to-1 vertex becomes essential to perform a CFD simulation with moving boundaries. In this context, we developed a semiautomatic morphing tool able to create 4D high-quality structured meshes starting from a segmented 4D dataset. To prove the versatility and efficiency, the method was tested on three different 4D datasets (Ultrasound, MRI, and CT by evaluating the quality and accuracy of the resulting 4D meshes. Furthermore, an estimation of some physiological quantities is accomplished for the 4D CT reconstruction. Future research will aim at extending the region of interest, further automation of the meshing algorithm, and generating structured hexahedral mesh models both for the blood and myocardial volume.

  4. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 66. Cosgrove DO, Eckersley RJ, Harvey CJ, Lim A. Ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. ... by: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also ...

  5. Selective imaging modalities after first pyelonephritis failed to identify significant urological anomalies, despite normal antenatal ultrasounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mola, Gylli; Wenger, Therese Ramstad; Salomonsson, Petra

    2017-01-01

    scintigraphies. Using the European Association of Paediatric Urology guidance would have missed three urological patients, one with initial surgery, and avoided 46 scintigraphies. Investigating patients under two years with ultrasound and scintigraphy, and just ultrasound in children over two years, would have...... identified all patients initially treated with surgery and avoided 65 scintigraphies. CONCLUSION: Dilated VUR was the dominant anomaly in a cohort with first time pyelonephritis and normal antenatal ultrasound. The optimal imaging strategy after pyelonephritis must be identified....

  6. 67. Do prenatal intracardiac echogenic foci affect postnatal cardiac function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bader

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Echogenic foci in the prenatal hear is not an uncommon finding. To determine whether prenatally diagnosed intracardiac echogenic foci are associated with neonatal cardiac dysfunction and persistence. Fetuses in which intracardiac echogenic foci were shown on prenatal sonography at 1 perinatal center from (September 2009 to December 2013 underwent postnatal echocardiography at ages 1 month to1 year. A single pediatric cardiologist assessed cardiac function by measuring the left ventricular shortening fraction and myocardial performance index. The presence of tricuspid valve regurgitation was also sought. Prenatally 60 fetuses had intracardiac echogenic foci mean age ± SD at diagnosis (23 ± 3.1. 53 (88.3% had left ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci, and 7 (11.6% had right ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci. 12 preganant ladies were lost for follow up (2 fetuses of 7 (28.5% with right ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci., and 10 fetuses of 53 (18.8% with LV intracardiac echogenic foci %. Post natally, those infants, 32 (66.6% males and 16 (33.3% females were examined. At a mean age ± SD of 7.4 ± 3.1 months. Prenatally, all infants had a normal left ventricular shortening fraction. The overall mean left ventricular myocardial performance index (reference value, 0.36 ± 0.06, was normal for both infants with left ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci (0.32 ± 0.01 and those with right ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci (0.33 ± 0.05. Trace tricuspid valve regurgitation were noted in 15 (31% of the infants. Left ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci persisted in 15 infants (34.8%, whereas right ventricular intracardiac echogenic foci persisted in 1 infant (20%. Prenatally diagnosed intracardiac echogenic foci can be persistent but is not associated with myocardial dysfunction in the first year of life.

  7. Clinical combination of multiphoton tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging for evaluation of skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, K.; Speicher, M.; Koehler, M. J.; Scharenberg, R.; Elsner, P.; Kaatz, M.

    2010-02-01

    For the first time, high frequency ultrasound imaging, multiphoton tomography, and dermoscopy were combined in a clinical study. Different dermatoses such as benign and malign skin cancers, connective tissue diseases, inflammatory skin diseases and autoimmune bullous skin diseases have been investigated with (i) state-of-the-art and highly sophisticated ultrasound systems for dermatology, (ii) the femtosecond-laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM and (iii) dermoscopes. Dermoscopy provides two-dimensional color imaging of the skin surface with a magnification up to 70x. Ultrasound images are generated from reflections of the emitted ultrasound signal, based on inhomogeneities of the tissue. These echoes are converted to electrical signals. Depending on the ultrasound frequency the penetration depth varies from about 1 mm to 16 mm in dermatological application. The 100-MHz-ultrasound system provided an axial resolution down to 16 μm and a lateral resolution down to 32 μm. In contrast to the wide-field ultrasound images, multiphoton tomography provided horizontal optical sections of 0.36×0.36 mm2 down to 200 μm tissue depth with submicron resolution. The autofluorescence of mitochondrial coenzymes, melanin, and elastin as well as the secondharmonic- generation signal of the collagen network were imaged. The combination of ultrasound and multiphoton tomography provides a novel opportunity for diagnostics of skin disorders.

  8. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  9. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  10. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using a discrete wavelet transform-based image fusion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Sung Yun

    2015-01-01

    Here, the speckle noise in ultrasonic images is removed using an image fusion-based denoising method. To optimize the denoising performance, each discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and filtering technique was analyzed and compared. In addition, the performances were compared in order to derive the optimal input conditions. To evaluate the speckle noise removal performance, an image fusion algorithm was applied to the ultrasound images, and comparatively analyzed with the original image without the algorithm. As a result, applying DWT and filtering techniques caused information loss and noise characteristics, and did not represent the most significant noise reduction performance. Conversely, an image fusion method applying SRAD-original conditions preserved the key information in the original image, and the speckle noise was removed. Based on such characteristics, the input conditions of SRAD-original had the best denoising performance with the ultrasound images. From this study, the best denoising technique proposed based on the results was confirmed to have a high potential for clinical application.

  11. Radiological imaging in early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzgummer, H.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C.

    2012-01-01

    For optimal therapy management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) specific and sensitive diagnostic methods are essential for assessment of disease activity. In addition to projection radiography, imaging techniques, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) are becoming increasingly more important for the early diagnosis of RA. The MRI and US techniques play a key role in the early imaging diagnostics of RA. Measurement of inflammation activity represents the basis of therapeutic decision-making and can be quantitatively and qualitatively determined with MRI and US. Synovitis and bone marrow edema are predictors of erosion. (orig.) [de

  12. TU-EF-210-04: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, K. [National Cancer Institute (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare.

  13. TU-EF-210-04: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare

  14. Pectoralis major tears: anatomy, classification, and diagnosis with ultrasound and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiavaras, Mary M. [McMaster University, Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Smith, Jay [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Anatomy, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Dahm, Diane L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Accurate characterization of pectoralis major tears is important to guide management. Imaging evaluation with ultrasound and MR imaging can be difficult given the complex regional anatomy. In addition, recent literature has redefined the anatomy of the distal pectoralis major. The purpose of this study is to review pectoralis major injuries taking into account new anatomic descriptions using ultrasound and MR imaging, including cadaveric dissection, surgically produced pectoralis tears, and clinical pectoralis tendon tear with surgical correlation. (orig.)

  15. Prostate segmentation in transrectal ultrasound using magnetic resonance imaging priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qi; Samei, Golnoosh; Karimi, Davood; Kesch, Claudia; Mahdavi, Sara S; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2018-03-27

    In the current standard of care, real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is commonly used for prostate brachytherapy guidance. As TRUS provides limited soft tissue contrast, segmenting the prostate gland in TRUS images is often challenging and subject to inter-observer and intra-observer variability, especially at the base and apex where the gland boundary is hard to define. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has higher soft tissue contrast allowing the prostate to be contoured easily. In this paper, we aim to show that prostate segmentation in TRUS images informed by MRI priors can improve on prostate segmentation that relies only on TRUS images. First, we compare the TRUS-based prostate segmentation used in the treatment of 598 patients with a high-quality MRI prostate atlas and observe inconsistencies at the apex and base. Second, motivated by this finding, we propose an alternative TRUS segmentation technique that is fully automatic and uses MRI priors. The algorithm uses a convolutional neural network to segment the prostate in TRUS images at mid-gland, where the gland boundary can be clearly seen. It then reconstructs the gland boundary at the apex and base with the aid of a statistical shape model built from an MRI atlas of 78 patients. Compared to the clinical TRUS segmentation, our method achieves similar mid-gland segmentation results in the 598-patient database. For the seven patients who had both TRUS and MRI, our method achieved more accurate segmentation of the base and apex with the MRI segmentation used as ground truth. Our results suggest that utilizing MRI priors in TRUS prostate segmentation could potentially improve the performance at base and apex.

  16. Texture Based Quality Analysis of Simulated Synthetic Ultrasound Images Using Local Binary Patterns †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Singh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Speckle noise reduction is an important area of research in the field of ultrasound image processing. Several algorithms for speckle noise characterization and analysis have been recently proposed in the area. Synthetic ultrasound images can play a key role in noise evaluation methods as they can be used to generate a variety of speckle noise models under different interpolation and sampling schemes, and can also provide valuable ground truth data for estimating the accuracy of the chosen methods. However, not much work has been done in the area of modeling synthetic ultrasound images, and in simulating speckle noise generation to get images that are as close as possible to real ultrasound images. An important aspect of simulated synthetic ultrasound images is the requirement for extensive quality assessment for ensuring that they have the texture characteristics and gray-tone features of real images. This paper presents texture feature analysis of synthetic ultrasound images using local binary patterns (LBP and demonstrates the usefulness of a set of LBP features for image quality assessment. Experimental results presented in the paper clearly show how these features could provide an accurate quality metric that correlates very well with subjective evaluations performed by clinical experts.

  17. Shadow effects in simulated ultrasound images derived from computed tomography images using a focused beam tracing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Lundgren, Bo; Stage, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasound images based on computed tomography (CT) data has previously been performed with different approaches. Shadow effects are normally pronounced in ultrasound images, so they should be included in the simulation. In this study, a method to capture the shadow effects has been......Focus ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) equipped with a dedicated research interface giving access to beamformed radio frequency data. CT images were obtained with an Aquilion ONE Toshiba CT scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tochigi, Japan). CT data were mapped from Hounsfield units...

  18. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  19. Optical fiber laser ultrasound transmitter with electrospun composite for minimally invasive medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduval, Radhika; Noimark, Sacha; Colchester, Richard; Macdonald, Tom; Parkin, Ivan; Desjardins, Adrien; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2017-07-01

    We report an optical fiber ultrasound transmitter with electrospun MWCNT-polymer composite, generating high-amplitude broadband ultrasound. They produced pressures in the range of conventional intravascular imaging transducers, and can be incorporated into catheters/needles for keyhole surgery

  20. A preliminary evaluation of self-made nanobubble in contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Wu, Kaizhi; Li, Jing; Liu, Haijuan; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale bubbles (nanobubbles) have been reported to improve contrast in tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, a self-made nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was preliminarily characterized and evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Fundamental properties such as morphology appearance, size distribution, zeta potential, bubble concentration (bubble numbers per milliliter contrast agent suspension) and the stability of nanobubbles were assessed by light microscope and particle sizing analysis. Then the concentration intensity curve and time intensity curves (TICs) were acquired by ultrasound imaging experiment in-vitro. Finally, the contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was performed on rat to investigate the procedure of liver perfusion. The results showed that the nanobubbles had good shape and uniform distribution with the average diameter of 507.9 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.527, and zeta potential of -19.17 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in in-vitro ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently in-vitro. Slightly contrast enhancement was observed in in-vivo ultrasound imaging, indicating that the nanobubbles are not stable enough in-vivo. Future work will be focused on improving the ultrasonic imaging performance, stability, and antibody binding of the nanoscale ultrasound contrast agent.

  1. Second order Statistical Texture Features from a New CSLBPGLCM for Ultrasound Kidney Images Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelladurai CALLINS CHRISTIYANA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a new method called Center Symmetric Local Binary Pattern Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (CSLBPGLCM for the purpose of extracting second order statistical texture features in ultrasound kidney images. These features are then feed into ultrasound kidney images retrieval system for the point of medical applications. This new GLCM matrix combines the benefit of CSLBP and conventional GLCM. The main intention of this CSLBPGLCM is to reduce the number of grey levels in an image by not simply accumulating the grey levels but incorporating another statistical texture feature in it. The proposed approach is cautiously evaluated in ultrasound kidney images retrieval system and has been compared with conventional GLCM. It is experimentally proved that the proposed method increases the retrieval efficiency, accuracy and reduces the time complexity of ultrasound kidney images retrieval system by means of second order statistical texture features.

  2. Clutter filter design for ultrasound color flow imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjaerum, Steinar; Torp, Hans; Kristoffersen, Kjell

    2002-02-01

    For ultrasound color flow images with high quality, it is important to suppress the clutter signals originating from stationary and slowly moving tissue sufficiently. Without sufficient clutter rejection, low velocity blood flow cannot be measured, and estimates of higher velocities will have a large bias. The small number of samples available (8 to 16) makes clutter filtering in color flow imaging a challenging problem. In this paper, we review and analyze three classes of filters: finite impulse response (FIR), infinite impulse response (IIR), and regression filters. The quality of the filters was assessed based on the frequency response, as well as on the bias and variance of a mean blood velocity estimator using an autocorrelation technique. For FIR filters, the frequency response was improved by allowing a non-linear phase response. By estimating the mean blood flow velocity from two vectors filtered in the forward and backward direction, respectively, the standard deviation was significantly lower with a minimum phase filter than with a linear phase filter. For IIR filters applied to short signals, the transient part of the output signal is important. We analyzed zero, step, and projection initialization, and found that projection initialization gave the best filters. For regression filters, polynomial basis functions provide effective clutter suppression. The best filters from each of the three classes gave comparable bias and variance of the mean blood velocity estimates. However, polynomial regression filters and projection-initialized IIR filters had a slightly better frequency response than could be obtained with FIR filters.

  3. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of the posterior paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Maria; Hides, Julie; Elliott, James; Kiesel, Kyle; Hodges, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Interest in rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) of the posterior paraspinal muscles is growing, along with the body of literature to support integration of this technique into routine physical therapy practice. This clinical commentary reviews how RUSI can be used as an evaluative and treatment tool and proposes guidelines for its use for the posterior muscles of the lumbar and cervical regions. Both quantitative and qualitative applications are described, as well as measurement reliability and validity. Measurement of morphological characteristics of the muscles (morphometry) in healthy populations and people with spinal pathology are described. Preliminary normal reference data exist for measurements of cross-sectional area (CSA), linear dimensions (muscle depth/thickness and width), and shape ratios. Compared to individuals without low back pain, changes in muscles' size at rest and during the contracted state have been observed using RUSI in people with spinal pathology. Visual observation of the image during contraction indicates that RUSI may be a valuable biofeedback tool. Further investigation of many of these observations is required using controlled studies to provide conclusive evidence that RUSI enhances clinical practice.

  4. Hybrid simulation using mixed reality for interventional ultrasound imaging training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, C; Parrini, S; Dinelli, N; Ferrari, M; Ferrari, V

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging offers advantages over other imaging modalities and has become the most widespread modality for many diagnostic and interventional procedures. However, traditional 2D US requires a long training period, especially to learn how to manipulate the probe. A hybrid interactive system based on mixed reality was designed, implemented and tested for hand-eye coordination training in diagnostic and interventional US. A hybrid simulator was developed integrating a physical US phantom and a software application with a 3D virtual scene. In this scene, a 3D model of the probe with its relative scan plane is coherently displayed with a 3D representation of the phantom internal structures. An evaluation study of the diagnostic module was performed by recruiting thirty-six novices and four experts. The performances of the hybrid (HG) versus physical (PG) simulator were compared. After the training session, each novice was required to visualize a particular target structure. The four experts completed a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. Seventy-eight percentage of the HG novices successfully visualized the target structure, whereas only 45% of the PG reached this goal. The mean scores from the questionnaires were 5.00 for usefulness, 4.25 for ease of use, 4.75 for 3D perception, and 3.25 for phantom realism. The hybrid US training simulator provides ease of use and is effective as a hand-eye coordination teaching tool. Mixed reality can improve US probe manipulation training.

  5. Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques: Multimodality Imaging with Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingwala, Divyata R; Chandrasekhakan, Kesavadas; Thomas, Bejoy; Sylaja, P N; Unnikrishnan, M; Kapilamoorthy, T R

    2017-01-01

    The imaging of carotid plaques has undergone a paradigm shift increasing importance being given to plaque characterization. Patients with "vulnerable" plaques are more prone to develop future neurovascular events. The purpose of this study is to analyze the role of multimodality imaging techniques in the assessment of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Twenty-six patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. Patients underwent multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography, ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the carotid arteries with special emphasis on the carotid bifurcation. The mean age of patients was 65.41 years. Twenty-one were males. Plaque neovascularization was seen in 10 of the 18 plaques studied (55.56%). Based on the predominant components of the plaque, plaques were characterized as lipid (3), lipid with recent hemorrhage (1), fibrous (7), fibrofatty (4), fibrofatty with some hemorrhagic components (3), and recent hemorrhage (2). Together, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, CT, and MRI provide complete information about the plaque characteristics.

  6. Microbubble Composition and Preparation for High-Frequency Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging : In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daeichin, Verya; van Rooij, Tom; Skachkov, Ilya; Ergin, Bulent; Specht, Patricia A.C.; Lima, Alexandre; Ince, Can; Bosch, Johan G.; van der Steen, A.F.W.; de Jong, N.; Kooiman, Klazina

    2017-01-01

    Although high-frequency ultrasound imaging is gaining attention in various applications, hardly any ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) dedicated to such frequencies (>15 MHz) are available for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging. Moreover, the composition of the limited commercially

  7. Microbubble Composition and Preparation for High-Frequency Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daeichin, Verya; van Rooij, Tom; Skachkov, Ilya; Ergin, Bulent; Specht, Patricia A. C.; Lima, Alexandre; Ince, Can; Bosch, Johan G.; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Kooiman, Klazina

    2017-01-01

    Although high-frequency ultrasound imaging is gaining attention in various applications, hardly any ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) dedicated to such frequencies (>15 MHz) are available for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging. Moreover, the composition of the limited commercially available

  8. Microbubble Composition and Preparation for High-Frequency Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging: In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Daeichin (Verya); T. van Rooij (Tom); I. Skachkov (Ilya); B. Ergin (Bulent); P. Specht (Patricia); A.A.P. Lima (Alexandre ); C. Ince (Can); J.G. Bosch (Hans); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); N. de Jong (Nico); K. Kooiman (Klazina)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAlthough high-frequency ultrasound imaging is gaining attention in various applications, hardly any ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) dedicated to such frequencies (>15 MHz) are available for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging. Moreover, the composition of the limited

  9. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  10. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  11. Ultrasound Images of the Tongue: A Tutorial for Assessment and Remediation of Speech Sound Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L.; McAllister Byun, Tara; Boyce, Suzanne E.; Hamilton, Sarah; Tiede, Mark; Phillips, Emily; Rivera-Campos, Ahmed; Whalen, Douglas H.

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been a common tool in medical practice for several decades. It provides a safe and effective method for imaging structures internal to the body. There has been a recent increase in the use of ultrasound technology to visualize the shape and movements of the tongue during speech, both in typical speakers and in clinical populations. Ultrasound imaging of speech has greatly expanded our understanding of how sounds articulated with the tongue (lingual sounds) are produced. Such information can be particularly valuable for speech-language pathologists. Among other advantages, ultrasound images can be used during speech therapy to provide (1) illustrative models of typical (i.e. "correct") tongue configurations for speech sounds, and (2) a source of insight into the articulatory nature of deviant productions. The images can also be used as an additional source of feedback for clinical populations learning to distinguish their better productions from their incorrect productions, en route to establishing more effective articulatory habits. Ultrasound feedback is increasingly used by scientists and clinicians as both the expertise of the users increases and as the expense of the equipment declines. In this tutorial, procedures are presented for collecting ultrasound images of the tongue in a clinical context. We illustrate these procedures in an extended example featuring one common error sound, American English /r/. Images of correct and distorted /r/ are used to demonstrate (1) how to interpret ultrasound images, (2) how to assess tongue shape during production of speech sounds, (3), how to categorize tongue shape errors, and (4), how to provide visual feedback to elicit a more appropriate and functional tongue shape. We present a sample protocol for using real-time ultrasound images of the tongue for visual feedback to remediate speech sound errors. Additionally, example data are shown to illustrate outcomes with the procedure. PMID

  12. In vivo breast sound-speed imaging with ultrasound tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Cuiping [KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE; Duric, Neb [KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE; Littrup, Peter [KARMONOS CANCER INSTITUTE

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For all four breast types from fatty to dense, the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m{center_dot} s) {sup -1}) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4 fold compared to the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422 {+-} 9 mls (mean{+-} SD) and1487 {+-} 21 mls, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions (1548{+-}17 mls) was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513{+-}27 mls) (one-sided p

  13. Multigradient Field Active Contour for Multilayer Detection of Ultrasound Rectal Wall Image

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao, Di

    2001-01-01

    .... One of the aims is to apply this technique for multilayer boundary detection of ultrasound rectal wall image, which is important in colorectal clinical diagnosis for rectal tumor staging The core...

  14. Ultrasound image edge detection based on a novel multiplicative gradient and Canny operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yinfei; Zhou, Yali; Zhou, Hao; Gong, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    To achieve the fast and accurate segmentation of ultrasound image, a novel edge detection method for speckle noised ultrasound images was proposed, which was based on the traditional Canny and a novel multiplicative gradient operator. The proposed technique combines a new multiplicative gradient operator of non-Newtonian type with the traditional Canny operator to generate the initial edge map, which is subsequently optimized by the following edge tracing step. To verify the proposed method, we compared it with several other edge detection methods that had good robustness to noise, with experiments on the simulated and in vivo medical ultrasound image. Experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm has higher speed for real-time processing, and the edge detection accuracy could be 75% or more. Thus, the proposed method is very suitable for fast and accurate edge detection of medical ultrasound images. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Texture-based classification of periventricular leukomalacia in preterm ultrasound images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Vansteenkiste (Ewout); B. Huysmans (Bruno); P. Govaert (Paul); M.H. Lequin (Maarten); W. Philips (Wilfried)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAltered white brain matter structure in neonatal Ultrasound (US) images has prognostic implications for certain disorders. Commonly, physicians classify pathological white brain matter on a discrete categorical scale based on relevant qualitative characteristics. For certain pathologies,

  16. New approach to intracardiac hemodynamic measurements in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Kristian; Olsen, Niels T; Dimaano, Veronica L

    2012-01-01

    Invasive measurements of intracardiac hemodynamics in animal models have allowed important advances in the understanding of cardiac disease. Currently they are performed either through a carotid arteriotomy or via a thoracotomy and apical insertion. Both of these techniques have disadvantages...... and are not conducive to repeated measurements. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a new technique for measuring intracardiac hemodynamics....

  17. Image analysis for beef quality prediction from serial scan ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui L.; Wilson, Doyle E.; Rouse, Gene H.; Izquierdo, Mercedes M.

    1995-01-01

    The prediction of intramuscular fat (or marbling) of live beef animals using serially scanned ultrasound images was studied in this paper. Image analysis, both in gray scale intensity domain and in frequency spectrum domain, were used to extract image features of tissue characters to get useful parameters for prediction models. One, 2 and 3 order multi-variable prediction models were developed from randomly selected data sets and tested using the remained data sets. The comparisons of prediction results between using serially scanned images and only final scanned ones showed good improvement of prediction accuracy. The correlation of predicted percent fat and actual percent fat increase from .68 to .80 and from .72 to .76 separately for two groups of data, the R squares increase from .65 to .68 and from .68 to .72, and the root of mean square errors decrease from 1.70 to 1.52 and from 1.22 to 1.12 separately. This study indicates that serially obtained ultrasound images from live beef animals have good potential for improving the prediction accuracy of percent fat.

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams are also used to ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...