WorldWideScience

Sample records for intra-family gene diversity

  1. Intra-Family Gamete Donation: A Solution to Concerns Regarding Gamete Donation in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Juhong; Devolder, Katrien

    2016-09-01

    Gamete donation from third parties is controversial in China as it severs blood ties, which are considered of utmost importance in Confucian tradition. In recent years, infertile couples are increasingly demonstrating a preference for the use of gametes donated by family members to conceive children-known as "intra-family gamete donation." The main advantage of intra-family gamete donation is that it maintains blood ties between children and both parents. To date there is no practice of intra-family gamete donation in China. In this paper, we investigate intra-family adoption in China in order to illustrate that intra-family gamete donation is consistent with Confucian tradition regarding the importance of maintaining blood ties within the family. There are several specific ethical issues raised by intra-family gamete donation. It may, for example, result in consanguinity and the semblance of incest, lead to confused family relationships, and raise concerns about possible coercion of familial donors. Confucian tradition provides a new approach to understand and deal with these ethical issues in a way that Western tradition does not. As a result, we suggest intra-family gamete donation could be an acceptable solution to the problem of infertility in China. However, further discussion and open debates on the ethical issues raised by intra-family gamete donation are needed in China.

  2. Interpersonal factors and personality disorders as discriminators between intra-familial and extra-familial child molesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Stefan; Declercq, Frédéric; Vanheule, Stijn; Palmans, Vicky

    2005-02-01

    This article presents the results of research investigating the relation between interpersonal factors and personality disorders and intra-familial versus extra-familial child molesters. The sample contained 41 intra-familial and 43 extra-familial child molesters as well as a matched comparison group of 80 subjects. The analysis of the research results show that interpersonal factors, such as parental sensitivity, trust, and adult romantic attachment, discriminate between intra-familial and extra-familial child molesters. These findings structure the heterogeneous field of child molesters, as intra-familial child molesting seems to be related to relational attitude as well as personality disorders, whereas extra-familial child molesting is mainly related to personality disorders without showing significant deficits in the interpersonal factors that were measured. These results contribute to the explanation of this deviant sexual conduct and to the development and differentiation of the treatment of child molesters.

  3. A model for intra-familial distribution of an infectious disease (Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Feitosa

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available A probabilistic model for intra-familial distribution of infectous disease is proposed and applied to the prevalence of positive serology for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Northeastern Brazilian sample. This double with one tail excess model fits satisfactorily to the data and its interpretation says that around 51% of these 982 families are free of infection risk; among those that are at risk, 3% have a high risk (0.66, probably due to high domestic infestation of the vector bug; while 97% show a small risk (0.11, probably due to accidental, non-domestic transmission.

  4. Gene structure of Drosophila diaphorase-1: diversity of transcripts in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Ivanova P. M., Dunkov B. H. and Ralchev K. H. 2008 Gene structure of Drosophila diaphorase-1: diversity of transcripts in adult males and females, in different ... ditions, close to 60 kD, indicating a monomeric structure. (Ralchev et al. .... Diversity in the exon–intron organization of diaphorase-1 gene. The six transcripts with ...

  5. Gene Expression and the Diversity of Identified Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, L.; Stein, R.; Palazzolo, M.; Anderson, D. J.; Axel, R.

    1983-01-01

    Nervous systems consist of diverse populations of neurons that are anatomically and functionally distinct. The diversity of neurons and the precision with which they are interconnected suggest that specific genes or sets of genes are activated in some neurons but not expressed in others. Experimentally, this problem may be considered at two levels. First, what is the total number of genes expressed in the brain, and how are they distributed among the different populations of neurons? Second, ...

  6. Tomato Fruits Show Wide Phenomic Diversity but Fruit Developmental Genes Show Low Genomic Diversity.

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    Vijee Mohan

    Full Text Available Domestication of tomato has resulted in large diversity in fruit phenotypes. An intensive phenotyping of 127 tomato accessions from 20 countries revealed extensive morphological diversity in fruit traits. The diversity in fruit traits clustered the accessions into nine classes and identified certain promising lines having desirable traits pertaining to total soluble salts (TSS, carotenoids, ripening index, weight and shape. Factor analysis of the morphometric data from Tomato Analyzer showed that the fruit shape is a complex trait shared by several factors. The 100% variance between round and flat fruit shapes was explained by one discriminant function having a canonical correlation of 0.874 by stepwise discriminant analysis. A set of 10 genes (ACS2, COP1, CYC-B, RIN, MSH2, NAC-NOR, PHOT1, PHYA, PHYB and PSY1 involved in various plant developmental processes were screened for SNP polymorphism by EcoTILLING. The genetic diversity in these genes revealed a total of 36 non-synonymous and 18 synonymous changes leading to the identification of 28 haplotypes. The average frequency of polymorphism across the genes was 0.038/Kb. Significant negative Tajima'D statistic in two of the genes, ACS2 and PHOT1 indicated the presence of rare alleles in low frequency. Our study indicates that while there is low polymorphic diversity in the genes regulating plant development, the population shows wider phenotype diversity. Nonetheless, morphological and genetic diversity of the present collection can be further exploited as potential resources in future.

  7. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... somatic sexual differentiation culminated with its functional analysis through transgenesis and knockdown experiments in diverse species of ... us to understand the evolution of genes involved in sex de- termination in ...... splicing of the doublesex gene in the economically important pest species Lucilia ...

  8. Diverse gene functions in a soil mobilome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Wenting; Xu, Zhuofei; Riber, Leise

    2016-01-01

    , the soil mobilome sampled from a well-characterized field in Hygum, Denmark. Soil bacterial cells were obtained by Nycodenz extraction, total DNA was purified by removing sheared chromosomal DNA using exonuclease digestion, and the remaining circular DNA was amplified with the phi29 polymerase and finally...... sequenced. The soil mobilome represented a wide range of known bacterial gene functions and highlighted the enrichment of plasmids, transposable elements and phages when compared to a well-characterized soil metagenome that, on the other hand, was dominated by basic biosynthesis and metabolism functions....... Approximately one eighth of the gene set was of plasmid-intrinsic traits, including replication, conjugation, mobilization and stability based on Pfam database analysis. Resistance determinants toward aminoglycosides, beta-lactams and glycopeptides as well as multi-drug functions indicated that a substantial...

  9. Genetic gain and gene diversity of seed orchard crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyu-Suk [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2001-07-01

    Seed orchards are the major tool for deploying the improvement generated by breeding programs and assuring the consistent supply of genetically improved seed. Attainment of genetic gain and monitoring of gene diversity through selection and breeding were studied considering the factors: selection intensity; genetic value; coancestry; fertility variation; and pollen contamination. The optimum goal of a seed orchard is achieved when the orchard population is under an idealized situation, i.e., panmixis, equal gamete contributions from all parental genotypes, non-relatedness and no pollen contamination. In practice, however, due to relatedness among parents, variation in clonal fertility and ramet number, and gene migration from outside, the realized genetic gain and gene diversity deviate from the expectation. In the present study, the genetic value of seed orchard crops (genetic gain, G) could be increased by selective harvest, genetic thinning and/or both. Status number (N{sub S}) was used to monitor the loss of gene diversity in the process of forest tree domestication, and calculated to be reasonably high in most seed orchards. Fertility of parents was estimated based on the assessment of flowering or seed production, which was shown to be under strong genetic control. Variation in fertility among orchard parents was a general feature and reduced the predicted gene diversity of the orchard crop. Fertility variation among parents could be described by the sibling coefficient ({psi}). {psi} was estimated to be 2 (CV = 100% for fertility). In calculating {psi}, it was possible to consider, besides fertility variation, the phenotypic correlation between maternal and parental fertilities, and pollen contamination. Status number was increased by controlling parental fertility, e.g., equal seed harvest, mixing seed in equal proportions and balancing parental contribution. By equalizing female fertility among over-represented parents, it was possible to effect a

  10. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 3. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan domestic and Tibetan chicken populations. YUAN SU DIYAN LI UMA GAUR YAN WANG NAN WU BINLONG CHEN HONGXIAN XU HUADONG YIN YAODONG HU QING ZHU. RESEARCH ARTICLE ...

  11. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity Predicts Groundwater Contamination and Ecosystem Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhili; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Linwei; Rocha, Andrea M; Tu, Qichao; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Bo; Qin, Yujia; Wang, Jianjun; Yan, Qingyun; Curtis, Daniel; Ning, Daliang; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Wu, Liyou; Yang, Yunfeng; Elias, Dwayne A; Watson, David B; Adams, Michael W W; Fields, Matthew W; Alm, Eric J; Hazen, Terry C; Adams, Paul D; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2018-02-20

    Contamination from anthropogenic activities has significantly impacted Earth's biosphere. However, knowledge about how environmental contamination affects the biodiversity of groundwater microbiomes and ecosystem functioning remains very limited. Here, we used a comprehensive functional gene array to analyze groundwater microbiomes from 69 wells at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN), representing a wide pH range and uranium, nitrate, and other contaminants. We hypothesized that the functional diversity of groundwater microbiomes would decrease as environmental contamination (e.g., uranium or nitrate) increased or at low or high pH, while some specific populations capable of utilizing or resistant to those contaminants would increase, and thus, such key microbial functional genes and/or populations could be used to predict groundwater contamination and ecosystem functioning. Our results indicated that functional richness/diversity decreased as uranium (but not nitrate) increased in groundwater. In addition, about 5.9% of specific key functional populations targeted by a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 5) increased significantly ( P contamination and ecosystem functioning. This study indicates great potential for using microbial functional genes to predict environmental contamination and ecosystem functioning. IMPORTANCE Disentangling the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is an important but poorly understood topic in ecology. Predicting ecosystem functioning on the basis of biodiversity is even more difficult, particularly with microbial biomarkers. As an exploratory effort, this study used key microbial functional genes as biomarkers to provide predictive understanding of environmental contamination and ecosystem functioning. The results indicated that the overall functional gene richness/diversity decreased as uranium increased in groundwater, while specific key microbial guilds increased significantly as

  12. Gene diversity and genetic variation in lung flukes (genus Paragonimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David; Nawa, Yukifumi; Mitreva, Makedonka; Doanh, Pham Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis caused by lung flukes (genus Paragonimus) is a neglected disease occurring in Asia, Africa and the Americas. The genus is species-rich, ancient and widespread. Genetic diversity is likely to be considerable, but investigation of this remains confined to a few populations of a few species. In recent years, studies of genetic diversity have moved from isoenzyme analysis to molecular phylogenetic analysis based on selected DNA sequences. The former offered better resolution of questions relating to allelic diversity and gene flow, whereas the latter is more suitable for questions relating to molecular taxonomy and phylogeny. A picture is emerging of a highly diverse taxon of parasites, with the greatest diversity found in eastern and southern Asia where ongoing speciation might be indicated by the presence of several species complexes. Diversity of lung flukes in Africa and the Americas is very poorly sampled. Functional molecules that might be of value for immunodiagnosis, or as targets for medical intervention, are of great interest. Characterisation of these from Paragonimus species has been ongoing for a number of years. However, the imminent release of genomic and transcriptomic data for several species of Paragonimus will dramatically increase the rate of discovery of such molecules, and illuminate their diversity within and between species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Diversity analysis of streptomycetes and associated phosphotranspherase genes in soil.

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    Paris Laskaris

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to verify the observation that Streptomyces griseus was prevalent in soil based on isolation work. A genus-specific PCR was developed for Streptomyces based on the housekeeping gene atpD and used to investigate species diversity within selected soils. The presence of S. griseus was investigated to determine coexistence of resistance-only streptomycin phosphotransferase (strA in the same soil as streptomycin producers. Two additional PCR-based assays were developed; one specific for strA in association with production, the other for more diverse strA and other related phosphotranferases. Both the S. griseus atpD and strA genes were below the PCR detection limit in all soils examined. A number of more diverse phosphotransferase genes were amplified, a minority of which may be associated with streptomycin production. We conclude that neither streptomycin producers nor S. griseus are prevalent in the fresh or chitin and starch-amended soils examined (less than 0.1% of soil actinobacteria. One of the soil sites had received plantomycin (active ingredient: streptomycin and diversity studies suggested that this altered the streptomycete populations present in the soil.

  14. Domestication rewired gene expression and nucleotide diversity patterns in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Christopher; Rau, Andrea; Aichholz, Charlotte; Chadoeuf, Joël; Sarah, Gautier; Ruiz, Manuel; Santoni, Sylvain; Causse, Mathilde; David, Jacques; Glémin, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    Plant domestication has led to considerable phenotypic modifications from wild species to modern varieties. However, although changes in key traits have been well documented, less is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, such as the reduction of molecular diversity or global gene co-expression patterns. In this study, we used a combination of gene expression and population genetics in wild and crop tomato to decipher the footprints of domestication. We found a set of 1729 differentially expressed genes (DEG) between the two genetic groups, belonging to 17 clusters of co-expressed DEG, suggesting that domestication affected not only individual genes but also regulatory networks. Five co-expression clusters were enriched in functional terms involving carbohydrate metabolism or epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We detected differences in nucleotide diversity between the crop and wild groups specific to DEG. Our study provides an extensive profiling of the rewiring of gene co-expression induced by the domestication syndrome in one of the main crop species. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. When Assessing Intra-Familial Relationships, Are Sociologists, Psychoanalysts and Psychiatrists Really Considering Different Constructs? An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falissard, Bruno; Barry, Caroline; Hassler, Christine; Letrait, Muriel; Macher, Guillaume; Marty, François; Ramos, Elsa; Revah-Lévy, Anne; Robert, Philippe; de Singly, François

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to look for the existence of a common core when envisaging intra-familial interactions as perceived by adolescents, which could be shared by sociology, psychoanalysis and child and adolescent psychiatry. An empirical study based on a mixed-method design collected the responses of 194 adolescents to the instruction “In the next half hour, would you please write as freely as you wish about your relationships in your family, explaining how things are”. All answers were then analyzed and 18 dimensions related to 3 different theoretical frameworks were rated blind using numerical scores by two independent raters from each discipline. Inter-rater reliability was good. A parallel analysis evidenced a strong underlying factor explaining a large amount of variance (>50%). This factor is bipolar, it reflects the level of positivity/negativity in the adolescent’s point of view concerning his/her intra-familial relationships. A second factor can marginally be considered (10% of the variance). The 2-factor analysis found one factor related to positive feelings and the other to negative feelings. This finding of unidimensionality supports family study as an intervention science. PMID:26186606

  16. Generation of diversity in Streptococcus mutans genes demonstrated by MLST.

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    Thuy Do

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, consisting of serotypes c, e, f and k, is an oral aciduric organism associated with the initiation and progression of dental caries. A total of 135 independent Streptococcus mutans strains from caries-free and caries-active subjects isolated from various geographical locations were examined in two versions of an MLST scheme consisting of either 6 housekeeping genes [accC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase biotin carboxylase subunit, gki (glucokinase, lepA (GTP-binding protein, recP (transketolase, sodA (superoxide dismutase, and tyrS (tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase] or the housekeeping genes supplemented with 2 extracellular putative virulence genes [gtfB (glucosyltransferase B and spaP (surface protein antigen I/II] to increase sequence type diversity. The number of alleles found varied between 20 (lepA and 37 (spaP. Overall, 121 sequence types (STs were defined using the housekeeping genes alone and 122 with all genes. However pi, nucleotide diversity per site, was low for all loci being in the range 0.019-0.007. The virulence genes exhibited the greatest nucleotide diversity and the recombination/mutation ratio was 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.3-1.15] compared to 8.3 [95% confidence interval 5.0-14.5] for the 6 concatenated housekeeping genes alone. The ML trees generated for individual MLST loci were significantly incongruent and not significantly different from random trees. Analysis using ClonalFrame indicated that the majority of isolates were singletons and no evidence for a clonal structure or evidence to support serotype c strains as the ancestral S. mutans strain was apparent. There was also no evidence of a geographical distribution of individual isolates or that particular isolate clusters were associated with caries. The overall low sequence diversity suggests that S. mutans is a newly emerged species which has not accumulated large numbers of mutations but those that have occurred have been shuffled as a consequence of

  17. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity Predicts Groundwater Contamination and Ecosystem Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Linwei; Rocha, Andrea M.; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Bo; Qin, Yujia; Wang, Jianjun; Yan, Qingyun; Curtis, Daniel; Ning, Daliang; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; Watson, David B.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Alm, Eric J.; Adams, Paul D.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contamination from anthropogenic activities has significantly impacted Earth’s biosphere. However, knowledge about how environmental contamination affects the biodiversity of groundwater microbiomes and ecosystem functioning remains very limited. Here, we used a comprehensive functional gene array to analyze groundwater microbiomes from 69 wells at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN), representing a wide pH range and uranium, nitrate, and other contaminants. We hypothesized that the functional diversity of groundwater microbiomes would decrease as environmental contamination (e.g., uranium or nitrate) increased or at low or high pH, while some specific populations capable of utilizing or resistant to those contaminants would increase, and thus, such key microbial functional genes and/or populations could be used to predict groundwater contamination and ecosystem functioning. Our results indicated that functional richness/diversity decreased as uranium (but not nitrate) increased in groundwater. In addition, about 5.9% of specific key functional populations targeted by a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 5) increased significantly (P contamination and ecosystem functioning. This study indicates great potential for using microbial functional genes to predict environmental contamination and ecosystem functioning. PMID:29463661

  18. The diversity and evolution of Wolbachia ankyrin repeat domain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Siozios

    Full Text Available Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes are common in the eukaryotic and viral domains of life, but they are rare in bacteria, the exception being a few obligate or facultative intracellular Proteobacteria species. Despite having a reduced genome, the arthropod strains of the alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia contain an unusually high number of ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes ranging from 23 in wMel to 60 in wPip strain. This group of genes has attracted considerable attention for their astonishing large number as well as for the fact that ankyrin proteins are known to participate in protein-protein interactions, suggesting that they play a critical role in the molecular mechanism that determines host-Wolbachia symbiotic interactions. We present a comparative evolutionary analysis of the wMel-related ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes present in different Drosophila-Wolbachia associations. Our results show that the ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes change in size by expansion and contraction mediated by short directly repeated sequences. We provide examples of intra-genic recombination events and show that these genes are likely to be horizontally transferred between strains with the aid of bacteriophages. These results confirm previous findings that the Wolbachia genomes are evolutionary mosaics and illustrate the potential that these bacteria have to generate diversity in proteins potentially involved in the symbiotic interactions.

  19. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  1. Effects of Intra-Family Parameters: Educative Style and Academic Knowledge of Parents and Their Economic Conditions on Teenagers' Personality and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtavar, Mohammad; Bayova, Rana

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects of intra-family parameters; educative styles and academic knowledge of parents and their economic condition on teenagers' personality and behavior. The present study is a descriptive survey. The statistical sample of the study included 166 teenage students from Baku, Azerbaijan and 332 of their…

  2. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms.

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    Ryan D Groussman

    Full Text Available Ferroproteins arose early in Earth's history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world's oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III permease; iron storage (ferritin; iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6 and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases. Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of

  3. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussman, Ryan D; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Ferroproteins arose early in Earth's history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world's oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III) permease); iron storage (ferritin); iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6) and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases). Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of paralogs. This

  4. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

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    Xuexia Jiang

    Full Text Available Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB. In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III. Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating

  5. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating soil sample were significantly smaller than they were between different soils based on a UniFrac distance analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The SUPERMAN gene family in Populus: nucleotide diversity and gene expression in a dioecious plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuepeng; Ma, Kaifeng; Ci, Dong; Tian, Xueyuan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-08-01

    SUP gene family expression and regulation patterns reported in dioecious woody plant. Phylogenetic and nucleotide diversity analysis indicated PtoSUP1 is highly conserved and has undergone strong purifying selection. The molecular basis of SUPERMAN (SUP) regulation during floral development in monoecious plants has been extensively studied, but little is known of the SUP gene family in dioecious woody plants. In this study, we systematically examined the diversification of the SUP gene family in Populus, integrating genomic organization, expression, and phylogeny data. SUP family members showed sex-specific expression throughout flower development. Transcript profiling of rare gynomonoecious poplar flowers revealed that a significant reduction in PtoSUP1 mRNA might be important for stamen development in gynomonoecious poplar flowers. We found that the coding regions of Populus SUP genes are very highly conserved and that synonymous sites in exon regions have undergone strong purifying selection during SUP evolution in Populus. These results indicate that SUP genes play an important role in floral development of dioecious plants. Expression analysis of SUP suggested possible regulatory mechanisms for gynomonoecious poplar flower development. These findings provide an important insight into the mechanisms of the evolution of SUP function and may help enable engineered regulation of flower development for breeding improved tree varieties.

  7. Genes in the Field : On-Farm Conservation of Crop Diversity | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Genes in the Field : On-Farm Conservation of Crop Diversity. Couverture du livre Genes in the Field : On-Farm Conservation of Crop Diversity. Directeur(s):. Stephen B. Brush. Maison(s) d'édition: IPGRI, Lewis Publishers, CRDI. 1 janvier 2000. ISBN : Épuisé. 300 pages. e-ISBN : 1552503275. Téléchargez le PDF.

  8. Intra-familial physical violence among Mexican and Egyptian youth Violência física intra-familiar entre jovens mexicanos e egípcios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Rivera-Rivera

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of experiencing intra-familial violence among Mexican and Egyptian youth and to describe its associated risk factors. METHODS: Data from questionnaires applied to 12,862 Mexican and 5,662 Egyptian youth, aged 10 to 19, who attended public schools were analyzed. Biviarate and logistic regression analysis were used to determine the relationship between socio-demographics, the experience of intra-familial violence and violence perpetration. RESULTS: The prevalence of having experienced intra-familial violence was comparable across the Mexican and Egyptian populations (14% and 17%, respectively. In Mexico, young men were more likely to have experienced such violence (OR=2.36 than women, whereas in Egypt, young women were at slightly greater risk than young men (OR=1.25. Older age, male gender and urban residence were independent correlates of experiencing intra-familial violence among Mexican youth. For Egyptian adolescents, in contrast, younger age, female gender and having non-married parents were independent correlates of victimization. Intra-familial violence victims were also more likely than non-victims to perpetrate violence (Mexico: OR=13.13; Egypt: OR=6.58. CONCLUSIONS: Mexican and Egyptian youth experienced intra-familial violence at a relatively low prevalence when compared with youth of other countries. A strong association was found between experiencing intra-familial violence and perpetrating violence.OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência da violência intra-familiar sofrida por jovens mexicanos e egípcios, e descrever os fatores de risco associados. MÉTODOS: Os dados analisados foram obtidos de questionários aplicados a 12.862 mexicanos e 5.662 egípcios, jovens de 10 a 19 anos, que freqüentam escolas públicas. O relacionamento entre fatores sociodemográficos, a violência sofrida e sua perpetração foram investigados por meio de análise bivariada e regressão logística. RESULTADOS: A

  9. Violencia intrafamiliar, realidad de la mujer latinoamericana Intra-family violence, a reality of Latin-American woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Espinosa Morales

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la aparición de la violencia intrafamiliar hacia la mujer latinoamericana como fenómeno que trasciende las barreras culturales, religiosas y sociales, que exige una transformación y pronto accionar por los sistemas nacionales de salud, pues ocupa en la actualidad un lugar importante dentro de los problemas de la salud pública; para solucionarlo es indispensable conocerlo y realizar acciones en su prevención y control. Se muestra cómo está adquiriendo auge en las diferentes sociedades. Se reconocen sus diferentes clasificaciones según contexto, y se evalúan los diferentes modelos teóricos que tratan de explicar esta realidad sociocultural, con el objetivo profundizar sobre el tema y contribuir, de esta forma, a ampliar el conocimiento de todo el personal de las ciencias médicas en esa arista del saber. Tratar el gran problema de la violencia intrafamiliar condujo a indagar sobre su origen y tratar de resolver las interrogantes de cómo enfrentarla, prevenirla y erradicarla, y llegar a ser agentes de cambio que fomenten la salud estilos de vida saludables.The intra-family violence to Latin-American woman is analyzed like a phenomenon going beyond the cultural, religious and social barriers, demanding a transformation and a fast action by part of the national health systems, since it has nowadays an important place within the public health problems and for its solution it is necessary to know it and to carried out actions for prevention and control. It is demonstrated how this problem is increasing in the different societies. The different classifications of this problem are recognized according to the context and we assessed the different theoretical models trying to explain this sociocultural reality to deepen on the subject and to contribute in this way, to develop the knowledge of all the medical sciences staff in this area. Approaching of this serious problem of intrafamily violence leads to investigate on its origin and

  10. Association of candidate genes with drought tolerance traits in diverse perennial ryegrass accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoqing Yu; Guihua Bai; Shuwei Liu; Na Luo; Ying Wang; Douglas S. Richmond; Paula M. Pijut; Scott A. Jackson; Jianming Yu; Yiwei. Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress limiting growth of perennial grasses in temperate regions. Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that is controlled by multiple genes. Candidate gene association mapping provides a powerful tool for dissection of complex traits. Candidate gene association mapping of drought tolerance traits was conducted in 192 diverse...

  11. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in 11 expressed resistance candidate genes in Lolium perenne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asp Torben

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association analysis is an alternative way for QTL mapping in ryegrass. So far, knowledge on nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in ryegrass is lacking, which is essential for the efficiency of association analyses. Results 11 expressed disease resistance candidate (R genes including 6 nucleotide binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR like genes and 5 non-NBS-LRR genes were analyzed for nucleotide diversity. For each of the genes about 1 kb genomic fragments were isolated from 20 heterozygous genotypes in ryegrass. The number of haplotypes per gene ranged from 9 to 27. On average, one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was present per 33 bp between two randomly sampled sequences for the 11 genes. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed a high degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 22 bp between two randomly sampled sequences. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed very high non-synonymous mutation rates, leading to altered amino acid sequences. Particularly LRR regions showed very high diversity with on average one SNP every 10 bp between two sequences. In contrast, non-NBS LRR resistance candidate genes showed a lower degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 112 bp. 78% of haplotypes occurred at low frequency ( Conclusion Substantial LD decay was found within a distance of 500 bp for most resistance candidate genes in this study. Hence, LD based association analysis is feasible and promising for QTL fine mapping of resistance traits in ryegrass.

  12. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change.

  13. Available nitrogen is the key factor influencing soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Xu, Han; Li, Yide; Deng, Ye; Li, Diqiang; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-08-20

    Tropical rainforests cover over 50% of all known plant and animal species and provide a variety of key resources and ecosystem services to humans, largely mediated by metabolic activities of soil microbial communities. A deep analysis of soil microbial communities and their roles in ecological processes would improve our understanding on biogeochemical elemental cycles. However, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforests and causative factors remain unclear. GeoChip, contained almost all of the key functional genes related to biogeochemical cycles, could be used as a specific and sensitive tool for studying microbial gene diversity and metabolic potential. In this study, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest was analyzed by using GeoChip technology. Gene categories detected in the tropical rainforest soils were related to different biogeochemical processes, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling. The relative abundance of genes related to C and P cycling detected mostly derived from the cultured bacteria. C degradation gene categories for substrates ranging from labile C to recalcitrant C were all detected, and gene abundances involved in many recalcitrant C degradation gene categories were significantly (P The relative abundance of genes related to N cycling detected was significantly (P the uncultured bacteria. The gene categories related to ammonification had a high relative abundance. Both canonical correspondence analysis and multivariate regression tree analysis showed that soil available N was the most correlated with soil microbial functional gene structure. Overall high microbial functional gene diversity and different soil microbial metabolic potential for different biogeochemical processes were considered to exist in tropical rainforest. Soil available N could be the key factor in shaping the soil microbial functional gene structure and metabolic potential.

  14. Diversity Analysis of the Immunoglobulin M Heavy Chain Gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A full-length cDNA encoding the immunoglobulin (IgM) heavy chain gene of Nile tilapia was successfully cloned using the 5' and 3' RACE techniques. The complete cDNA of the Nile tilapia IgM heavy chain gene is 1,921 bp in length and has an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,740 bp, which corresponds to 580 amino acid ...

  15. Genes in the Field: On-Farm Conservation of Crop Diversity | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The diversity of crop plants is one of our most important biological resources, and the most important source of crop genes are the fields of peasant farmers in regions where crop domestication and evolution have occurred. Today, however, crop genes are threatened by social and technological change such as human ...

  16. Swainsonine Biosynthesis Genes in Diverse Symbiotic and Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cook

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine—a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug—is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glory symbiont belonging to order Chaetothyriales. Genome sequence analyses revealed that these fungi share orthologous gene clusters, designated “SWN,” which included a multifunctional swnK gene comprising predicted adenylylation and acyltransferase domains with their associated thiolation domains, a β-ketoacyl synthase domain, and two reductase domains. The role of swnK was demonstrated by inactivating it in M. robertsii through homologous gene replacement to give a ∆swnK mutant that produced no detectable swainsonine, then complementing the mutant with the wild-type gene to restore swainsonine biosynthesis. Other SWN cluster genes were predicted to encode two putative hydroxylases and two reductases, as expected to complete biosynthesis of swainsonine from the predicted SwnK product. SWN gene clusters were identified in six out of seven sequenced genomes of Metarhzium species, and in all 15 sequenced genomes of Arthrodermataceae, a family of fungi that cause athlete’s foot and ringworm diseases in humans and other mammals. Representative isolates of all of these species were cultured, and all Metarhizium spp. with SWN clusters, as well as all but one of the Arthrodermataceae, produced swainsonine. These results suggest a new biosynthetic hypothesis for this alkaloid, extending the known taxonomic breadth of swainsonine producers to at least four orders of Ascomycota, and suggest that swainsonine has roles in mutualistic symbioses and diseases of plants and animals.

  17. Genetic diversity and gene flow revealed by microsatellite DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dacryodes edulis is a multipurpose tree integrated in the cropping system of Central African region still dominated by subsistence agriculture. Some populations grown are wild which can provide information on the domestication process, and could also represent a potential source of gene flow. Leaves samples for DNA ...

  18. Diverse expression of sucrose transporter gene family in Zea mays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-03-04

    Mar 4, 2015 ... Phosphate starvation had led to an increase in the level of ZmSUT1 and ... resistance. Sugar signalling is the immediate response of Pi starvation in a plant which follows increased sucrose biosyn- thesis in source tissues (Karthikeyan et al. 2007). .... ation of several genes involved in overcoming phosphate.

  19. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The sense of bitter taste plays a critical role in animals as it can help them to avoid intake of toxic and harmful substances. Previous research had revealed that chicken has only three bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2r1, Tas2r2 and Tas2r7). To better understand the genetic polymorphisms and importance of bitter ...

  20. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene at the bottom of the sex-determination cascade is the best characterized candidate so far, and is conserved from worms (mab3 of Caenorhabditis elegans) to mammals (Dmrt-1). Studies of dsx homologues from insect species belonging to different orders position them at the bottom of ...

  1. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... product of a constitutive gene tra-2, ensures doublesex (dsx) pre-mRNA to follow the female splicing pathway, producing female-specific dsx mRNA (Hoshijima et al. 1991; Tian and. Maniatis 1992). In males, the dsx pre-mRNA splices in a de- fault manner to produce male-specific mRNA (Hoshijima et al.

  2. Global patterns of genetic diversity and signals of natural selection for human ADME genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Hang; Stoneking, Mark; Tang, Kun

    2011-02-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in many genes related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME genes) contribute to the high heterogeneity of drug responses in humans. However, the extent to which genetic variation in ADME genes may contribute to differences among human populations in drug responses has not been studied. In this work, we investigate the global distribution of genetic diversity for 31 core and 252 extended ADME genes. We find that many important ADME genes are highly differentiated across continental regions. Additionally, we analyze the genetic differentiation associated with clinically relevant, functional polymorphism alleles, which is important for evaluating potential among-population heterogeneity in drug treatment effects. We find that ADME genes show significantly greater variation in levels of population differentiation, and we find numerous signals of recent positive selection on ADME genes. These results suggest that genetic differentiation at ADME genes could contribute to population heterogeneity in drug responses.

  3. Diversity in expression of phosphorus (P responsive genes in Cucumis melo L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphorus (P is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth in many soils. Studies in model species have identified genes involved in plant adaptations to low soil P availability. However, little information is available on the genetic bases of these adaptations in vegetable crops. In this respect, sequence data for melon now makes it possible to identify melon orthologues of candidate P responsive genes, and the expression of these genes can be used to explain the diversity in the root system adaptation to low P availability, recently observed in this species. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Transcriptional responses to P starvation were studied in nine diverse melon accessions by comparing the expression of eight candidate genes (Cm-PAP10.1, Cm-PAP10.2, Cm-RNS1, Cm-PPCK1, Cm-transferase, Cm-SQD1, Cm-DGD1 and Cm-SPX2 under P replete and P starved conditions. Differences among melon accessions were observed in response to P starvation, including differences in plant morphology, P uptake, P use efficiency (PUE and gene expression. All studied genes were up regulated under P starvation conditions. Differences in the expression of genes involved in P mobilization and remobilization (Cm-PAP10.1, Cm-PAP10.2 and Cm-RNS1 under P starvation conditions explained part of the differences in P uptake and PUE among melon accessions. The levels of expression of the other studied genes were diverse among melon accessions, but contributed less to the phenotypical response of the accessions. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first time that these genes have been described in the context of P starvation responses in melon. There exists significant diversity in gene expression levels and P use efficiency among melon accessions as well as significant correlations between gene expression levels and phenotypical measurements.

  4. Diversity in expression of phosphorus (P) responsive genes in Cucumis melo L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fita, Ana; Bowen, Helen C; Hayden, Rory M; Nuez, Fernando; Picó, Belén; Hammond, John P

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth in many soils. Studies in model species have identified genes involved in plant adaptations to low soil P availability. However, little information is available on the genetic bases of these adaptations in vegetable crops. In this respect, sequence data for melon now makes it possible to identify melon orthologues of candidate P responsive genes, and the expression of these genes can be used to explain the diversity in the root system adaptation to low P availability, recently observed in this species. Transcriptional responses to P starvation were studied in nine diverse melon accessions by comparing the expression of eight candidate genes (Cm-PAP10.1, Cm-PAP10.2, Cm-RNS1, Cm-PPCK1, Cm-transferase, Cm-SQD1, Cm-DGD1 and Cm-SPX2) under P replete and P starved conditions. Differences among melon accessions were observed in response to P starvation, including differences in plant morphology, P uptake, P use efficiency (PUE) and gene expression. All studied genes were up regulated under P starvation conditions. Differences in the expression of genes involved in P mobilization and remobilization (Cm-PAP10.1, Cm-PAP10.2 and Cm-RNS1) under P starvation conditions explained part of the differences in P uptake and PUE among melon accessions. The levels of expression of the other studied genes were diverse among melon accessions, but contributed less to the phenotypical response of the accessions. This is the first time that these genes have been described in the context of P starvation responses in melon. There exists significant diversity in gene expression levels and P use efficiency among melon accessions as well as significant correlations between gene expression levels and phenotypical measurements.

  5. Diversity in the Toll-Like Receptor Genes of the African Penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Desiré Lee; Vermaak, Elaine; Roelofse, Marli; Kotze, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The African penguin, Spheniscus demersus, is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to the drastic reduction in population numbers over the last 20 years. To date, the only studies on immunogenetic variation in penguins have been conducted on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. It was shown in humans that up to half of the genetic variability in immune responses to pathogens are located in non-MHC genes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are now increasingly being studied in a variety of taxa as a broader approach to determine functional genetic diversity. In this study, we confirm low genetic diversity in the innate immune region of African penguins similar to that observed in New Zealand robin that has undergone several severe population bottlenecks. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity across TLRs varied between ex situ and in situ penguins with the number of non-synonymous alterations in ex situ populations (n = 14) being reduced in comparison to in situ populations (n = 16). Maintaining adaptive diversity is of vital importance in the assurance populations as these animals may potentially be used in the future for re-introductions. Therefore, this study provides essential data on immune gene diversity in penguins and will assist in providing an additional monitoring tool for African penguin in the wild, as well as to monitor diversity in ex situ populations and to ensure that diversity found in the in situ populations are captured in the assurance populations.

  6. Gastrointestinal Fibroblasts Have Specialized, Diverse Transcriptional Phenotypes: A Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Higuchi

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are the principal stromal cells that exist in whole organs and play vital roles in many biological processes. Although the functional diversity of fibroblasts has been estimated, a comprehensive analysis of fibroblasts from the whole body has not been performed and their transcriptional diversity has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional diversity of human fibroblasts within the whole body.Global gene expression analysis was performed on 63 human primary fibroblasts from 13 organs. Of these, 32 fibroblasts from gastrointestinal organs (gastrointestinal fibroblasts: GIFs were obtained from a pair of 2 anatomical sites: the submucosal layer (submucosal fibroblasts: SMFs and the subperitoneal layer (subperitoneal fibroblasts: SPFs. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we elucidated identifiable subgroups of fibroblasts and analyzed the transcriptional character of each subgroup.In unsupervised clustering, 2 major clusters that separate GIFs and non-GIFs were observed. Organ- and anatomical site-dependent clusters within GIFs were also observed. The signature genes that discriminated GIFs from non-GIFs, SMFs from SPFs, and the fibroblasts of one organ from another organ consisted of genes associated with transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling.GIFs are characteristic fibroblasts with specific gene expressions from transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling related genes. In addition, the anatomical site- and organ-dependent diversity of GIFs was also discovered. These features of GIFs contribute to their specific physiological function and homeostatic maintenance, and create a functional diversity of the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Arab gene geography: From population diversities to personalized medical genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmouri, Ghazi O.; Sastry, Konduru S.; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    Genetic disorders are not equally distributed over the geography of the Arab region. While a number of disorders have a wide geographical presence encompassing 10 or more Arab countries, almost half of these disorders occur in a single Arab country or population. Nearly, one-third of the genetic disorders in Arabs result from congenital malformations and chromosomal abnormalities, which are also responsible for a significant proportion of neonatal and perinatal deaths in Arab populations. Strikingly, about two-thirds of these diseases in Arab patients follow an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. High fertility rates together with increased consanguineous marriages, generally noticed in Arab populations, tend to increase the rates of genetic and congenital abnormalities. Many of the nearly 500 genes studied in Arab people revealed striking spectra of heterogeneity with many novel and rare mutations causing large arrays of clinical outcomes. In this review we provided an overview of Arab gene geography, and various genetic abnormalities in Arab populations, including disorders of blood, metabolic, circulatory and neoplasm, and also discussed their associated molecules or genes responsible for the cause of these disorders. Although studying Arab-specific genetic disorders resulted in a high value knowledge base, approximately 35% of genetic diseases in Arabs do not have a defined molecular etiology. This is a clear indication that comprehensive research is required in this area to understand the molecular pathologies causing diseases in Arab populations. PMID:25780794

  8. Diversity of ABC transporter genes across the plant kingdom and their potential utility in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thomas S; Rempe, Caroline S; Davitt, Jack; Staton, Margaret E; Peng, Yanhui; Soltis, Douglas Edward; Melkonian, Michael; Deyholos, Michael; Leebens-Mack, James H; Chase, Mark; Rothfels, Carl J; Stevenson, Dennis; Graham, Sean W; Yu, Jun; Liu, Tao; Pires, J Chris; Edger, Patrick P; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Yinlong; Zhu, Ying; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Stewart, C Neal

    2016-05-31

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene superfamily is ubiquitous among extant organisms and prominently represented in plants. ABC transporters act to transport compounds across cellular membranes and are involved in a diverse range of biological processes. Thus, the applicability to biotechnology is vast, including cancer resistance in humans, drug resistance among vertebrates, and herbicide and other xenobiotic resistance in plants. In addition, plants appear to harbor the highest diversity of ABC transporter genes compared with any other group of organisms. This study applied transcriptome analysis to survey the kingdom-wide ABC transporter diversity in plants and suggest biotechnology applications of this diversity. We utilized sequence similarity-based informatics techniques to infer the identity of ABC transporter gene candidates from 1295 phylogenetically-diverse plant transcriptomes. A total of 97,149 putative (approximately 25 % were full-length) ABC transporter gene members were identified; each RNA-Seq library (plant sample) had 88 ± 30 gene members. As expected, simpler organisms, such as algae, had fewer unique members than vascular land plants. Differences were also noted in the richness of certain ABC transporter subfamilies. Land plants had more unique ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter gene members on average (p plant groups (p plant groups. An increase in the number of gene family members present in the ABCB, ABCC, and ABCD transporter subfamilies may indicate an expansion of the ABC transporter superfamily among green land plants, which include all crop species. The striking difference between the number of ABCA subfamily transporter gene members between ferns and other plant taxa is surprising and merits further investigation. Discussed is the potential exploitation of ABC transporters in plant biotechnology, with an emphasis on crops.

  9. Estimating variation within the genes and inferring the phylogeny of 186 sequenced diverse Escherichia coli genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    for creating better phylogenies, for determination of molecular clocks and for improved typing techniques. Results We find 3,051 gene clusters/families present in at least 95% of the genomes and 1,702 gene clusters present in 100% of the genomes. The former 'soft core' of about 3,000 gene families is perhaps...... more biologically relevant, especially considering that many of these genome sequences are draft quality. The E. coli pan-genome for this set of isolates contains 16,373 gene clusters. A core-gene tree, based on alignment and a pan-genome tree based on gene presence/absence, maps the relatedness...... of the 186 sequenced E. coli genomes. The core-gene tree displays high confidence and divides the E. coli strains into the observed MLST type clades and also separates defined phylotypes. Conclusion The results of comparing a large and diverse E. coli dataset support the theory that reliable and good...

  10. Global sequence diversity of the lactate dehydrogenase gene in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpalipan, Phumin; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai

    2018-01-09

    Antigen-detecting rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been recommended by the World Health Organization for use in remote areas to improve malaria case management. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of Plasmodium falciparum is one of the main parasite antigens employed by various commercial RDTs. It has been hypothesized that the poor detection of LDH-based RDTs is attributed in part to the sequence diversity of the gene. To test this, the present study aimed to investigate the genetic diversity of the P. falciparum ldh gene in Thailand and to construct the map of LDH sequence diversity in P. falciparum populations worldwide. The ldh gene was sequenced for 50 P. falciparum isolates in Thailand and compared with hundreds of sequences from P. falciparum populations worldwide. Several indices of molecular variation were calculated, including the proportion of polymorphic sites, the average nucleotide diversity index (π), and the haplotype diversity index (H). Tests of positive selection and neutrality tests were performed to determine signatures of natural selection on the gene. Mean genetic distance within and between species of Plasmodium ldh was analysed to infer evolutionary relationships. Nucleotide sequences of P. falciparum ldh could be classified into 9 alleles, encoding 5 isoforms of LDH. L1a was the most common allelic type and was distributed in P. falciparum populations worldwide. Plasmodium falciparum ldh sequences were highly conserved, with haplotype and nucleotide diversity values of 0.203 and 0.0004, respectively. The extremely low genetic diversity was maintained by purifying selection, likely due to functional constraints. Phylogenetic analysis inferred the close genetic relationship of P. falciparum to malaria parasites of great apes, rather than to other human malaria parasites. This study revealed the global genetic variation of the ldh gene in P. falciparum, providing knowledge for improving detection of LDH-based RDTs and supporting the candidacy of

  11. Diversity of Nitrogen Fixation Genes in the Symbiotic Intestinal Microflora of the Termite Reticulitermes speratus

    OpenAIRE

    Ohkuma, M.; Noda, S.; Usami, R.; Horikoshi, K.; Kudo, T.

    1996-01-01

    The diversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms in the symbiotic intestinal microflora of a lower termite, Reticulitermes speratus, was investigated without culturing the resident microorganisms. Fragments of the nifH gene, which encodes the dinitrogenase reductase, were directly amplified from the DNA of the mixed microbial population in the termite gut and were clonally isolated. The phylogenetic analysis of the nifH product amino acid sequences showed that there was a remarkable diversity of ni...

  12. Ethnic diversity in a critical gene responsible for glutathione synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Alecia S; Freeman, Michael L; Summar, Samantha R; Barr, Frederick E; Williams, Scott M; Dawson, Elliott; Summar, Marshall L

    2003-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is an important biomolecule that acts as a scavenger of free radicals and plays a role in a number of other cellular processes. A number of diseases, including Parkinson's disease, cancer, sickle cell anemia, and HIV infection, are thought to involve oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione. The heterodimeric enzyme glutamate cysteine ligase catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of glutathione. Functional polymorphisms within the gene encoding the subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase have the potential to affect the body's capacity to synthesize glutathione and thus, may affect those diseases in which oxidative stress and glutathione have roles. We undertook systematic screening for polymorphisms within the exons and intronic flanking sequences of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC). We identified 11 polymorphisms in GCLC and established allele frequencies for those polymorphisms in a population fitting the demographics of the middle Tennessee area. The nonsynonymous polymorphism C1384T was found only in individuals of African descent. In addition, allele frequencies for three other polymorphisms differ between Caucasians and African-Americans. Understanding these polymorphisms may lead to better understanding of diseases where glutathione is important so that better treatments may be developed.

  13. The transmission of trauma in refugee families: associations between intra-family trauma communication style, children's attachment security and psychosocial adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, Nina Thorup; Todd, Brenda Kathryn; Daniel, Sarah I F; Montgomery, Edith

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the transmission of trauma in 30 Middle Eastern refugee families in Denmark, where one or both parents were referred for treatment of PTSD symptoms and had non-traumatized children aged 4-9 years. The aim of the study was to explore potential risk and protective factors by examining the association between intra-family communication style regarding the parents' traumatic experiences from the past, children's psychosocial adjustment and attachment security. A negative impact of parental trauma on children might be indicated, as children's Total Difficulties Scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were significantly higher than the Danish norms. A negative association between children's attachment security as measured by the Attachment and Traumatization Story Task and higher scores on the SDQ Total Difficulties Scale approached significance, suggesting that the transmission of trauma may be associated with disruptions in children's attachment representations. Furthermore a significant association between parental trauma communication and children's attachment style was found.

  14. The impact of founder effects, gene flow, and European admixture on native American genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Keith; Healy, Meghan

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have concluded that the global pattern of neutral genetic diversity in humans reflects a series of founder effects and population movements associated with our recent expansion out of Africa. In contrast, regional studies tend to emphasize the significance of more complex patterns of colonization, gene flow, and secondary population movements in shaping patterns of diversity. Our objective in this study is to examine how founder effects, gene flow, and European admixture have molded patterns of neutral genetic diversity in the Americas. Our strategy is to test the fit of a serial founder effects process to the pattern of neutral autosomal genetic variation and to examine the contribution of gene flow and European admixture to departures from fit. The genetic data consist of 678 autosomal microsatellite loci assayed by Wang and colleagues in 530 individuals in 29 widely distributed Native American populations. We find that previous evidence for serial founder effects in the Americas may be driven in part by high levels of European admixture in northern North America, intermediate levels in Central America, and low levels in eastern South America. Geographically patterned admixture may also account for previously reported genetic differences between Andean and Amazonian groups. Though admixture has obscured the precise details of precontact evolutionary processes, we find that genetic diversity is still largely hierarchically structured and that gene flow between neighboring groups has had surprisingly little impact on macrogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in the Americas. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Genetic diversity of bacterial communities and gene transfer agents in northern South China Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA major capsid gene (g5 was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS, temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments.

  16. Diversity of human tRNA genes from the 1000-genomes project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisien, Marc; Wang, Xiaoyun; Pan, Tao

    2013-12-01

    The sequence diversity of individual human genomes has been extensively analyzed for variations and phenotypic implications for mRNA, miRNA, and long non-coding RNA genes. TRNA (tRNA) also exhibits large sequence diversity in the human genome, but tRNA gene sequence variation and potential functional implications in individual human genomes have not been investigated. Here we capitalize on the sequencing data from the 1000-genomes project to examine the diversity of tRNA genes in the human population. Previous analysis of the reference human genome indicated an unexpected large number of diverse tRNA genes beyond the necessity of translation, suggesting that some tRNA transcripts may perform non-canonical functions. We found 24 new tRNA sequences in>1% and 76 new tRNA sequences in>0.2% of all individuals, indicating that tRNA genes are also subject to evolutionary changes in the human population. Unexpectedly, two abundant new tRNA genes contain base-pair mismatches in the anticodon stem. We experimentally determined that these two new tRNAs have altered structures in vitro; however, one new tRNA is not aminoacylated but extremely stable in HeLa cells, suggesting that this new tRNA can be used for non-canonical function. Our results show that at the scale of human population, tRNA genes are more diverse than conventionally understood, and some new tRNAs may perform non-canonical, extra-translational functions that may be linked to human health and disease.

  17. An rpoD gene sequence based evaluation of cultured Pseudomonas diversity on different growth media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghyselinck, Jonas; Coorevits, An; Van Landschoot, Anita; Samyn, Emly; Heylen, Kim; De Vos, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The last decade has shown an increased interest in the utilization of bacteria for applications ranging from bioremediation to wastewater purification and promotion of plant growth. In order to extend the current number of micro-organism mediated applications, a continued quest for new agents is required. This study focused on the genus Pseudomonas, which is known to harbour strains with a very diverse set of interesting properties. The aim was to identify growth media that allow retrieval of a high Pseudomonas diversity, as such increasing the chance of isolating isolates with beneficial properties. Three cultivation media: trypticase soy agar (TSA), potato dextrose agar (PDA) and Pseudomonas isolation agar (PIA) were evaluated for their abilities to grow Pseudomonas strains. TSA and PDA were found to generate the largest Pseudomonas diversity. However, communities obtained with both media overlapped. Communities obtained with PIA, on the other hand, were unique. This indicated that the largest diversity is obtained by sampling from either PDA or TSA and from PIA in parallel. To evaluate biodiversity of the isolated Pseudomonas members on the media, an appropriate biomarker had to be identified. Hence, an introductory investigation of the taxonomic resolution of the 16S rRNA, rpoD, gyrB and rpoB genes was performed. The rpoD gene sequences not only had a high phylogenetic content and the highest taxonomic resolution amongst the genes investigated, it also had a gene phylogeny that related well with that of the 16S rRNA gene.

  18. Functional diversity of bacterial genes associated with aromatic hydrocarbon degradation in anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gomes Germano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the catabolic gene diversity for the bacterial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE and their biochar (BC. Functional diversity analyses in ADE soils can provide information on how adaptive microorganisms may influence the fertility of soils and what is their involvement in biogeochemical cycles. For this, clone libraries containing the gene encoding for the alpha subunit of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (α-ARHD bacterial gene were constructed, totaling 800 clones. These libraries were prepared from samples of an ADE soil under two different land uses, located at the Caldeirão Experimental Station - secondary forest (SF and agriculture (AG -, and the biochar (SF_BC and AG_BC, respectively. Heterogeneity estimates indicated greater diversity in BC libraries; and Venn diagrams showed more unique operational protein clusters (OPC in the SF_BC library than the ADE soil, which indicates that specific metabolic processes may occur in biochar. Phylogenetic analysis showed unidentified dioxygenases in ADE soils. Libraries containing functional gene encoding for the alpha subunit of the aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHD gene from biochar show higher diversity indices than those of ADE under secondary forest and agriculture.

  19. Demographic factors shaped diversity in the two gene pools of wild common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidi, S; Rossi, M; Moghaddam, S M; Annam, D; Lee, R; Papa, R; McClean, P E

    2013-01-01

    Wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is distributed throughout the Americas from Mexico to northern Argentina. Within this range, the species is divided into two gene pools (Andean and Middle American) along a latitudinal gradient. The diversity of 24 wild common bean genotypes from throughout the geographic range of the species was described by using sequence data from 13 loci. An isolation–migration model was evaluated using a coalescent analysis to estimate multiple demographic parameters. Using a Bayesian approach, Andean and Middle American subpopulations with high percentage of parentages were observed. Over all loci, the Middle American gene pool was more diverse than the Andean gene pool (πsil=0.0089 vs 0.0068). The two subpopulations were strongly genetically differentiated over all loci (Fst=0.29). It is estimated that the two current wild gene pools diverged from a common ancestor ∼111 000 years ago. Subsequently, each gene pool underwent a bottleneck immediately after divergence and lasted ∼40 000 years. The Middle American bottleneck population size was ∼46% of the ancestral population size, whereas the Andean was 26%. Continuous asymmetric gene flow was detected between the two gene pools with a larger number of migrants entering Middle American gene pool from the Andean gene pool. These results suggest that because of the complex population structure associated with the ancestral divergence, subsequent bottlenecks in each gene pool, gene pool-specific domestication and intense selection within each gene pool by breeders; association mapping would best be practised within each common bean gene pool. PMID:23169559

  20. Gene transfer agent (GTA) genes reveal diverse and dynamic Roseobacter and Rhodobacter populations in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Wang, Kui; Budinoff, Charles; Buchan, Alison; Lang, Andrew; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2009-03-01

    Within the bacterial class Alphaproteobacteria, the order Rhodobacterales contains the Roseobacter and Rhodobacter clades. Roseobacters are abundant and play important biogeochemical roles in marine environments. Roseobacter and Rhodobacter genomes contain a conserved gene transfer agent (GTA) gene cluster, and GTA-mediated gene transfer has been observed in these groups of bacteria. In this study, we investigated the genetic diversity of these two groups in Chesapeake Bay surface waters using a specific PCR primer set targeting the conserved Rhodobacterales GTA major capsid protein gene (g5). The g5 gene was successfully amplified from 26 Rhodobacterales isolates and the bay microbial communities using this primer set. Four g5 clone libraries were constructed from microbial assemblages representing different regions and seasons of the bay and yielded diverse sequences. In total, 12 distinct g5 clusters could be identified among 158 Chesapeake Bay clones, 11 fall within the Roseobacter clade, and one falls in the Rhodobacter clade. The vast majority of the clusters (10 out of 12) lack cultivated representatives. The composition of g5 sequences varied dramatically along the bay during the wintertime, and a distinct Roseobacter population composition between winter and summer was observed. The congruence between g5 and 16S rRNA gene phylogenies indicates that g5 may serve as a useful genetic marker to investigate diversity and abundance of Roseobacter and Rhodobacter in natural environments. The presence of the g5 gene in the natural populations of Roseobacter and Rhodobacter implies that genetic exchange through GTA transduction could be an important mechanism for maintaining the metabolic flexibility of these groups of bacteria.

  1. Genetic diversity of FLO1 and FLO5 genes in wine flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Di Gianvito, Paola; Schirone, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-11-17

    Twenty-eight flocculent wine strains were tested for adhesion and flocculation phenotypic variability. Moreover, the expression patterns of the main genes involved in flocculation (FLO1, FLO5 and FLO8) were studied both in synthetic medium and in presence of ethanol stress. Molecular identification and typing were achieved by PCR-RFLP of the 5.8S ITS rRNA region and microsatellite PCR fingerprinting, respectively. All isolates belong to Saccharomyces cerevisiae species. The analysis of microsatellites highlighted the intraspecific genetic diversity of flocculent wine S. cerevisiae strains allowing obtaining strain-specific profiles. Moreover, strains were characterized on the basis of adhesive properties. A wide biodiversity was observed even if none of the tested strains were able to form biofilms (or 'mats'), or to adhere to polystyrene. Moreover, genetic diversity of FLO1 and FLO5 flocculating genes was determined by PCR. Genetic diversity was detected for both genes, but a relationship with the flocculation degree was not found. So, the expression patterns of FLO1, FLO5 and FLO8 genes was investigated in a synthetic medium and a relationship between the expression of FLO5 gene and the flocculation capacity was established. To study the expression of FLO1, FLO5 and FLO8 genes in floc formation and ethanol stress resistance qRT-PCR was carried out and also in this case strains with flocculent capacity showed higher levels of FLO5 gene expression. This study confirmed the diversity of flocculation phenotype and genotype in wine yeasts. Moreover, the importance of FLO5 gene in development of high flocculent characteristic of wine yeasts was highlighted. The obtained collection of S. cerevisiae flocculent wine strains could be useful to study the relationship between the genetic variation and flocculation phenotype in wine yeasts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinct Patterns of Gene Gain and Loss: Diverse Evolutionary Modes of NBS-Encoding Genes in Three Solanaceae Crop Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lan-Hua; Zhou, Guang-Can; Sun, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Zhao; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Xue, Jia-Yu; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2017-05-05

    Plant resistance conferred by nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance genes plays a key role in the defense against various pathogens throughout the entire plant life cycle. However, comparative analyses for the systematic evaluation and determination of the evolutionary modes of NBS-encoding genes among Solanaceae species are rare. In this study, 447, 255, and 306 NBS-encoding genes were identified from the genomes of potato, tomato, and pepper, respectively. These genes usually clustered as tandem arrays on chromosomes; few existed as singletons. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three subclasses [TNLs (TIR-NBS-LRR), CNLs (CC-NBS-LRR), and RNLs (RPW8-NBS-LRR)] each formed a monophyletic clade and were distinguished by unique exon/intron structures and amino acid motif sequences. By comparing phylogenetic and systematic relationships, we inferred that the NBS-encoding genes in the present genomes of potato, tomato, and pepper were derived from 150 CNL, 22 TNL, and 4 RNL ancestral genes, and underwent independent gene loss and duplication events after speciation. The NBS-encoding genes therefore exhibit diverse and dynamic evolutionary patterns in the three Solanaceae species, giving rise to the discrepant gene numbers observed today. Potato shows a "consistent expansion" pattern, tomato exhibits a pattern of "first expansion and then contraction," and pepper presents a "shrinking" pattern. The earlier expansion of CNLs in the common ancestor led to the dominance of this subclass in gene numbers. However, RNLs remained at low copy numbers due to their specific functions. Along the evolutionary process of NBS-encoding genes in Solanaceae, species-specific tandem duplications contributed the most to gene expansions. Copyright © 2017 Qian et al.

  3. How Much Do rRNA Gene Surveys Underestimate Extant Bacterial Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Castro, Juan C; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Cole, James R; Tiedje, James M; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2018-03-15

    The most common practice in studying and cataloguing prokaryotic diversity involves the grouping of sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity level, often using partial gene sequences, such as PCR-generated amplicons. Due to the high sequence conservation of rRNA genes, organisms belonging to closely related yet distinct species may be grouped under the same OTU. However, it remains unclear how much diversity has been underestimated by this practice. To address this question, we compared the OTUs of genomes defined at the 97% or 98.5% 16S rRNA gene identity level against OTUs of the same genomes defined at the 95% whole-genome average nucleotide identity (ANI), which is a much more accurate proxy for species. Our results show that OTUs resulting from a 98.5% 16S rRNA gene identity cutoff are more accurate than 97% compared to 95% ANI (90.5% versus 89.9% accuracy) but indistinguishable from any other threshold in the 98.29 to 98.78% range. Even with the more stringent thresholds, however, the 16S rRNA gene-based approach commonly underestimates the number of OTUs by ∼12%, on average, compared to the ANI-based approach (∼14% underestimation when using the 97% identity threshold). More importantly, the degree of underestimation can become 50% or more for certain taxa, such as the genera Pseudomonas , Burkholderia , Escherichia , Campylobacter , and Citrobacter These results provide a quantitative view of the degree of underestimation of extant prokaryotic diversity by 16S rRNA gene-defined OTUs and suggest that genomic resolution is often necessary. IMPORTANCE Species diversity is one of the most fundamental pieces of information for community ecology and conservational biology. Therefore, employing accurate proxies for what a species or the unit of diversity is are cornerstones for a large set of microbial ecology and diversity studies. The most common proxies currently used rely on the clustering of 16S r

  4. Gene diversity in some Muslim populations of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarzoo, S Shabana; Afzal, Mohammad

    2005-06-01

    North Indian Muslim populations have historical, linguistic, and socioreligious significance to the Indian subcontinent. Although sociocultural and political dimensions of their demography are well documented, no detailed genetic structure of the populations is available. We have undertaken a survey of the gene frequencies of the ABO, Rh, PTC taste ability, sickling, and G6PD systems for different endogamous groups: Sheikh, Syed, Pathan, Ansari, Saifi, and Hindu Bania. All the groups at most loci showed statistically nonsignificant differences, except for ABO and PTC traits, for which interpopulational differences were seen. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.048 to 0.617 among the Sheikh, 0.149 to 0.599 among the Pathan, 0.105 to 0.585 among the Ansari, 0.25 to 0.869 among the Syed, 0.107 to 0.565 among the Saifi, and 0.100 to 0.492 among the Hindu Bania. The average D(ST) and G(ST) values for the five marker loci were 0.0625 +/- 0.098 and 0.1072 +/- 0.041, respectively. A dendrogram was constructed using the UPGMA clustering method. Our results revealed that the Pathan and the Sheikh form one cluster, the Syed and the Hindu Bania form another cluster, and the two clusters join together (the so-called higher caste); also, the Saifi and the Ansari form a separate cluster (lower caste). The results of the genetic distance analysis are useful for understanding the pattern of genetic relationships between different endogamous groups of Muslims.

  5. Diversity analysis of the immunoglobulin M heavy chain gene in Nile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nu tom

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... production by plasma B cells and the functions of cytotoxic T ... During B cell development, the diversity of antigen-binding elements begins with rearrangement mediated by recombination- activating gene (RAG), which initiates the assembly of ..... glycosylation sites were found as NSS in the Cµ2, NKT in.

  6. YAGM: a web tool for mining associated genes in yeast based on diverse biological associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Chung-Ching; Jhou, Meng-Jhun; Wang, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Investigating association between genes can be used in understanding the relations of genes in biological processes. STRING and GeneMANIA are two well-known web tools which can provide a list of associated genes of a query gene based on diverse biological associations such as co-expression, co-localization, co-citation and so on. However, the transcriptional regulation association and mutant phenotype association have not been used in these two web tools. Since the comprehensive transcription factor (TF)-gene binding data, TF-gene regulation data and mutant phenotype data are available in yeast, we developed a web tool called YAGM (Yeast Associated Genes Miner) which constructed the transcriptional regulation association, mutant phenotype association and five commonly used biological associations to mine a list of associated genes of a query yeast gene. In YAGM, we collected seven kinds of datasets including TF-gene binding (TFB) data, TF-gene regulation (TFR) data, mutant phenotype (MP) data, functional annotation (FA) data, physical interaction (PI) data, genetic interaction (GI) data, and literature evidence (LE) data. Then by using the hypergeometric test to calculate the association scores of all gene pairs in yeast, we constructed seven biological associations including two transcriptional regulation associations (TFB association and TFR association), MP association, FA association, PI association, GI association, and LE association. Moreover, the expression profile association from SPELL database was also included in YAGM. When using YAGM, users can input a query gene and choose any possible subsets of the eight biological associations, then a list of associated genes of the query gene will be returned based on the chosen biological associations. In this study, we presented the YAGM which provides eight biological associations for mining associated genes of a query gene in yeast. Among the eight biological associations constructed in YAGM, three (TFB

  7. Recent population decline and selection shape diversity of taxol-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgarella, C; Navascués, M; Zabal-Aguirre, M; Berganzo, E; Riba, M; Mayol, M; Vendramin, G G; González-Martínez, S C

    2012-06-01

    Taxanes are defensive metabolites produced by Taxus species (yews) and used in anticancer therapies. Despite their medical interest, patterns of natural diversity in taxane-related genes are unknown. We examined variation at five main genes of Taxus baccata in the Iberian Peninsula, a region where unique yew genetic resources are endangered. We looked at several gene features and applied complementary neutrality tests, including diversity/divergence tests, tests solely based on site frequency spectrum (SFS) and Zeng's compound tests. To account for specific demography, microsatellite data were used to infer historical changes in population size based on an Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) approach. Polymorphism-divergence tests pointed to positive selection for genes TBT and TAT and balancing selection for DBAT. In addition, neutrality tests based on SFS found that while a recent reduction in population size may explain most statistics' values, selection may still be in action in genes TBT and DBAT, at least in some populations. Molecular signatures on taxol genes suggest the action of frequent selective waves with different direction or intensity, possibly related to varying adaptive pressures produced by the host-enemy co-evolution on defence-related genes. Such natural selection processes may have produced taxane variants still undiscovered. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Managing diversity: Domestication and gene flow in Stenocereus stellatus Riccob. (Cactaceae) in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Parker, Kathleen C; Friar, Elizabeth A; Huang, Daisie I; Mashayekhi, Saeideh; Prince, Linda M; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro

    2013-05-01

    Microsatellite markers (N = 5) were developed for analysis of genetic variation in 15 populations of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus, managed under traditional agriculture practices in central Mexico. Microsatellite diversity was analyzed within and among populations, between geographic regions, and among population management types to provide detailed insight into historical gene flow rates and population dynamics associated with domestication. Our results corroborate a greater diversity in populations managed by farmers compared with wild ones (H E = 0.64 vs. 0.55), but with regional variation between populations among regions. Although farmers propagated S. stellatus vegetatively in home gardens to diversify their stock, asexual recruitment also occurred naturally in populations where more marginal conditions have limited sexual recruitment, resulting in lower genetic diversity. Therefore, a clear-cut relationship between the occurrence of asexual recruitment and genetic diversity was not evident. Two managed populations adjacent to towns were identified as major sources of gene movement in each sampled region, with significant migration to distant as well as nearby populations. Coupled with the absence of significant bottlenecks, this suggests a mechanism for promoting genetic diversity in managed populations through long distance gene exchange. Cultivation of S. stellatus in close proximity to wild populations has led to complex patterns of genetic variation across the landscape that reflects the interaction of natural and cultural processes. As molecular markers become available for nontraditional crops and novel analysis techniques allow us to detect and evaluate patterns of genetic diversity, genetic studies provide valuable insights into managing crop genetic resources into the future against a backdrop of global change. Traditional agriculture systems play an important role in maintaining genetic diversity for plant species.

  9. Genetic diversity and natural selection footprints of the glycine amidinotransferase gene in various human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asifullah; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Yuan, Kai; Xu, Shuhua

    2016-01-05

    The glycine amidinotransferase gene (GATM) plays a vital role in energy metabolism in muscle tissues and is associated with multiple clinically important phenotypes. However, the genetic diversity of the GATM gene remains poorly understood within and between human populations. Here we analyzed the 1,000 Genomes Project data through population genetics approaches and observed significant genetic diversity across the GATM gene among various continental human populations. We observed considerable variations in GATM allele frequencies and haplotype composition among different populations. Substantial genetic differences were observed between East Asian and European populations (FST = 0.56). In addition, the frequency of a distinct major GATM haplotype in these groups was congruent with population-wide diversity at this locus. Furthermore, we identified GATM as the top differentiated gene compared to the other statin drug response-associated genes. Composite multiple analyses identified signatures of positive selection at the GATM locus, which was estimated to have occurred around 850 generations ago in European populations. As GATM catalyzes the key step of creatine biosynthesis involved in energy metabolism, we speculate that the European prehistorical demographic transition from hunter-gatherer to farming cultures was the driving force of selection that fulfilled creatine-based metabolic requirement of the populations.

  10. Gene flow from North Africa contributes to differential human genetic diversity in southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botigué, Laura R.; Henn, Brenna M.; Gravel, Simon; Maples, Brian K.; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Corona, Erik; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry; Flores, Carlos; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Comas, David; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic diversity in southern Europe is higher than in other regions of the continent. This difference has been attributed to postglacial expansions, the demic diffusion of agriculture from the Near East, and gene flow from Africa. Using SNP data from 2,099 individuals in 43 populations, we show that estimates of recent shared ancestry between Europe and Africa are substantially increased when gene flow from North Africans, rather than Sub-Saharan Africans, is considered. The gradient of North African ancestry accounts for previous observations of low levels of sharing with Sub-Saharan Africa and is independent of recent gene flow from the Near East. The source of genetic diversity in southern Europe has important biomedical implications; we find that most disease risk alleles from genome-wide association studies follow expected patterns of divergence between Europe and North Africa, with the principal exception of multiple sclerosis. PMID:23733930

  11. Functional Gene Diversity and Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in an Estuary-Shelf Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes play crucial roles in various biogeochemical processes in the ocean, including carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P cycling. Functional gene diversity and the structure of the microbial community determines its metabolic potential and therefore its ecological function in the marine ecosystem. However, little is known about the functional gene composition and metabolic potential of bacterioplankton in estuary areas. The East China Sea (ECS is a dynamic marginal ecosystem in the western Pacific Ocean that is mainly affected by input from the Changjiang River and the Kuroshio Current. Here, using a high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip, we analyzed the functional gene diversity, composition, structure, and metabolic potential of microbial assemblages in different ECS water masses. Four water masses determined by temperature and salinity relationship showed different patterns of functional gene diversity and composition. Generally, functional gene diversity [Shannon–Weaner’s H and reciprocal of Simpson’s 1/(1-D] in the surface water masses was higher than that in the bottom water masses. The different presence and proportion of functional genes involved in C, N, and P cycling among the bacteria of the different water masses showed different metabolic preferences of the microbial populations in the ECS. Genes involved in starch metabolism (amyA and nplT showed higher proportion in microbial communities of the surface water masses than of the bottom water masses. In contrast, a higher proportion of genes involved in chitin degradation was observed in microorganisms of the bottom water masses. Moreover, we found a higher proportion of nitrogen fixation (nifH, transformation of hydroxylamine to nitrite (hao and ammonification (gdh genes in the microbial communities of the bottom water masses compared with those of the surface water masses. The spatial variation of microbial functional genes was significantly correlated

  12. Functional Gene Diversity and Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in an Estuary-Shelf Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Rui; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zheng, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2017-01-01

    Microbes play crucial roles in various biogeochemical processes in the ocean, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycling. Functional gene diversity and the structure of the microbial community determines its metabolic potential and therefore its ecological function in the marine ecosystem. However, little is known about the functional gene composition and metabolic potential of bacterioplankton in estuary areas. The East China Sea (ECS) is a dynamic marginal ecosystem in the western Pacific Ocean that is mainly affected by input from the Changjiang River and the Kuroshio Current. Here, using a high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip), we analyzed the functional gene diversity, composition, structure, and metabolic potential of microbial assemblages in different ECS water masses. Four water masses determined by temperature and salinity relationship showed different patterns of functional gene diversity and composition. Generally, functional gene diversity [Shannon-Weaner's H and reciprocal of Simpson's 1/(1- D )] in the surface water masses was higher than that in the bottom water masses. The different presence and proportion of functional genes involved in C, N, and P cycling among the bacteria of the different water masses showed different metabolic preferences of the microbial populations in the ECS. Genes involved in starch metabolism ( amyA and nplT ) showed higher proportion in microbial communities of the surface water masses than of the bottom water masses. In contrast, a higher proportion of genes involved in chitin degradation was observed in microorganisms of the bottom water masses. Moreover, we found a higher proportion of nitrogen fixation ( nifH ), transformation of hydroxylamine to nitrite ( hao ) and ammonification ( gdh ) genes in the microbial communities of the bottom water masses compared with those of the surface water masses. The spatial variation of microbial functional genes was significantly correlated with

  13. Subgenomic Diversity Patterns Caused by Directional Selection in Bread Wheat Gene Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Voss-Fels

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity represents the fundamental key to breeding success, providing the basis for breeders to select varieties with constantly improving yield performance. On the other hand, strong selection during domestication and breeding have eliminated considerable genetic diversity in the breeding pools of major crops, causing erosion of genetic potential for adaptation to emerging challenges like climate change. High-throughput genomic technologies can address this dilemma by providing detailed knowledge to characterize and replenish genetic diversity in breeding programs. In hexaploid bread wheat ( L., the staple food for 35% of the world’s population, bottlenecks during allopolyploidisation followed by strong artificial selection have considerably narrowed diversity to the extent that yields in many regions appear to be unexpectedly stagnating. In this study, we used a 90,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP wheat genotyping array to assay high-frequency, polymorphic SNP markers in 460 accessions representing different phenological diversity groups from Asian, Australian, European, and North American bread wheat breeding materials. Detailed analysis of subgroup diversity at the chromosome and subgenome scale revealed highly distinct patterns of conserved linkage disequilibrium between different gene pools. The data enable identification of genome regions in most need of rejuvenation with novel diversity and provide a high-resolution molecular basis for genomic-assisted introgression of new variation into chromosome segments surrounding directionally selected metaloci conferring important adaptation and quality traits.

  14. Integrating Diverse Types of Genomic Data to Identify Genes that Underlie Adverse Pregnancy Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril Hirbo

    Full Text Available Progress in understanding complex genetic diseases has been bolstered by synthetic approaches that overlay diverse data types and analyses to identify functionally important genes. Pre-term birth (PTB, a major complication of pregnancy, is a leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. A major obstacle in addressing PTB is that the mechanisms controlling parturition and birth timing remain poorly understood. Integrative approaches that overlay datasets derived from comparative genomics with function-derived ones have potential to advance our understanding of the genetics of birth timing, and thus provide insights into the genes that may contribute to PTB. We intersected data from fast evolving coding and non-coding gene regions in the human and primate lineage with data from genes expressed in the placenta, from genes that show enriched expression only in the placenta, as well as from genes that are differentially expressed in four distinct PTB clinical subtypes. A large fraction of genes that are expressed in placenta, and differentially expressed in PTB clinical subtypes (23-34% are fast evolving, and are associated with functions that include adhesion neurodevelopmental and immune processes. Functional categories of genes that express fast evolution in coding regions differ from those linked to fast evolution in non-coding regions. Finally, there is a surprising lack of overlap between fast evolving genes that are differentially expressed in four PTB clinical subtypes. Integrative approaches, especially those that incorporate evolutionary perspectives, can be successful in identifying potential genetic contributions to complex genetic diseases, such as PTB.

  15. Bacterial human virulence genes across diverse habitats as assessed by in silico analysis of environmental metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte Andreasen Søborg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and distribution of clinically relevant bacterial virulence genes across natural (non-human environments is not well understood. We aimed to investigate the occurrence of homologues to bacterial human virulence genes in a variety of ecological niches to better understand the role of natural environments in the evolution of bacterial virulence. Twentyfour bacterial virulence genes were analyzed in 47 diverse environmental metagenomic datasets, representing various soils, seawater, freshwater, marine sediments, hot springs, the deep-sea, hypersaline mats, microbialites, gutless worms and glacial ice. Homologues to 17 bacterial human virulence genes, involved in urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal diseases, skin diseases, and wound and systemic infections, showed global ubiquity. A principal component analysis did not demonstrate clear trends across the metagenomes with respect to occurrence and frequency of observed gene homologues. Full-length (>95% homologues of several virulence genes were identified, and translated sequences of the environmental and clinical genes were up to 50-100% identical. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicated deep branching positions of some of the environmental gene homologues, suggesting that they represent ancient lineages in the phylogeny of the clinical genes. Fifteen virulence gene homologues were detected in metagenomes based on metatranscriptomic data, providing evidence of environmental expression. The ubiquitous presence and transcription of the virulence gene homologues in non-human environments point to an important ecological role of the genes for the activity and survival of environmental bacteria. Furthermore, the high degree of sequence conservation between several of the environmental and clinical genes suggests common ancestral origins.

  16. Nucleotide diversity analysis of three major bacterial blight resistance genes in rice.

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    Waikhom Bimolata

    Full Text Available Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS were present in Xa26 (π = 0.01958; SVS = 182 followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and 'G' to 'A' transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima's D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed.

  17. Diversity of Integron- and Culture-Associated Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Floc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drudge, Christopher N.; Elliott, Amy V. C.; Plach, Janina M.; Ejim, Linda J.; Wright, Gerard D.; Droppo, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically important antibiotic resistance genes were detected in culturable bacteria and class 1 integron gene cassettes recovered from suspended floc, a significant aquatic repository for microorganisms and trace elements, across freshwater systems variably impacted by anthropogenic activities. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in floc total community DNA differed appreciably in number and type from genes detected in bacteria cultured from floc. The number of floc antibiotic resistance gene cassette types detected across sites was positively correlated with total (the sum of Ag, As, Cu, and Pb) trace element concentrations in aqueous solution and in a component of floc readily accessible to bacteria. In particular, concentrations of Cu and Pb in the floc component were positively correlated with floc resistance gene cassette diversity. Collectively, these results identify suspended floc as an important reservoir, distinct from bulk water and bed sediment, for antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments ranging from heavily impacted urban sites to remote areas of nature reserves and indicate that trace elements, particularly Cu and Pb, are geochemical markers of resistance diversity in this environmental reservoir. The increase in contamination of global water supplies suggests that aquatic environments will become an even more important reservoir of clinically important antibiotic resistance in the future. PMID:22467502

  18. Bioinformatic analysis reveals high diversity of bacterial genes for laccase-like enzymes.

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    Luka Ausec

    Full Text Available Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three-domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications.

  19. Reduced genetic diversity and alteration of gene flow in a fiddler crab due to mangrove degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochzius, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The fiddler crab Austruca occidentalis is a dominant species in mangrove forests along the East African coast. It enhances soil aeration and, through its engineering activities, makes otherwise-inaccessible food available for other marine organisms. Despite its importance, the habitat of A. occidentalis is threatened by human activities. Clearing the mangroves for salt farming and selective logging of mangroves trees continue to jeopardise mangrove ecosystems in the Western Indian Ocean. This study aims to use partial mitochondrial COI gene sequences and nuclear microsatellites to determine whether salt farming activities in mangroves have a negative impact on the genetic diversity and gene flow of A. occidentalis collected along the Tanzania coast. The level of genetic diversity for both mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellites are relatively lower in samples from salt ponds compared to natural mangrove sites. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) among all populations showed low but significant differentiation (COI: Fst = 0.022, P mangroves sites (COI: Fct = 0.033, P < 0.05; microsatellites: Fct = 0.018, P = < 0.01). These results indicate that salt farming has a significant negative impact on the genetic diversity of A. occidentalis. Since higher genetic diversity contributes to a stable population, restoring the cleared habitats might be the most effective measures for the conservation of genetic diversity and hence adaptive potential to environmental change in this species. PMID:28837577

  20. Expanded functional diversity of shaker K(+ channels in cnidarians is driven by gene expansion.

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    Timothy Jegla

    Full Text Available The genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis (starlet sea anemone provides a molecular genetic view into the first nervous systems, which appeared in a late common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Nematostella has a surprisingly large and diverse set of neuronal signaling genes including paralogs of most neuronal signaling molecules found in higher metazoans. Several ion channel gene families are highly expanded in the sea anemone, including three subfamilies of the Shaker K(+ channel gene family: Shaker (Kv1, Shaw (Kv3 and Shal (Kv4. In order to better understand the physiological significance of these voltage-gated K(+ channel expansions, we analyzed the function of 18 members of the 20 gene Shaker subfamily in Nematostella. Six of the Nematostella Shaker genes express functional homotetrameric K(+ channels in vitro. These include functional orthologs of bilaterian Shakers and channels with an unusually high threshold for voltage activation. We identified 11 Nematostella Shaker genes with a distinct "silent" or "regulatory" phenotype; these encode subunits that function only in heteromeric channels and serve to further diversify Nematostella Shaker channel gating properties. Subunits with the regulatory phenotype have not previously been found in the Shaker subfamily, but have evolved independently in the Shab (Kv2 family in vertebrates and the Shal family in a cnidarian. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that regulatory subunits were present in ancestral cnidarians, but have continued to diversity at a high rate after the split between anthozoans and hydrozoans. Comparison of Shaker family gene complements from diverse metazoan species reveals frequent, large scale duplication has produced highly unique sets of Shaker channels in the major metazoan lineages.

  1. Diversity of arsenate reductase genes (arsC Genes) from arsenic-resistant environmental isolates of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhvinder; Kamli, Majid Rasool; Ali, Arif

    2009-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to assess the occurrence and diversity of arsenate reductase gene (arsC gene) in arsenic-resistant environmental E. coli strains. For this purpose, two different sets of primers were designed for the specific amplification of approximately 370-bp fragments from the arsC gene. These primers were used to screen a collection of 25 environmental arsenic-resistant strains isolated from different geographical regions of India, as well as Bangladesh. The PCR results showed that 17 out of the 25 environmental isolates (68%) contained a gene related to the arsC family. Phylogenetic analysis of the protein sequences deduced from the amplicons indicated a prevalence of arsC genes in the isolated strains. A significant divergence in the DNA sequence was found in the arsC genes among As-resistant environmental E. coli strains from this study, and arsenic resistance, a genetic character, arose from a common ancestral background.

  2. High Prevalence of Intra-Familial Co-colonization by Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin Resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Preschool Children and Their Parents in Dutch Households

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    Apostolos Liakopoulos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant (ESCR Enterobacteriaceae pose a serious infection control challenge for public health. The emergence of the ESCR phenotype is mostly facilitated by plasmid-mediated horizontal extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and AmpC gene transfer within Enterobacteriaceae. Current data regarding the plasmid contribution to this emergence within the Dutch human population is limited. Hence, the aim of this study was to gain insight into the role of plasmids in the dissemination of ESBL/AmpC genes inside Dutch households with preschool children and precisely delineate co-colonization. In 87 ESCREnterobacteriaceae from fecal samples of parents and preschool children within 66 Dutch households, genomic localization, plasmid type and insertion sequences linked to ESBL/AmpC genes were determined. Chromosomal location of ESBL/AmpC genes was confirmed when needed. An epidemiologically relevant subset of the isolates based on household co-carriage was assessed by Multilocus Sequence Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for genetic relatedness. The narrow-host range I1α and F plasmids were the major facilitators of ESBL/AmpC-gene dissemination. Interestingly, we documented a relatively high occurrence of chromosomal integration of typically plasmid-encoded ESBL/AmpC-genes. A high diversity of non-epidemic Escherichia coli sequence types (STs was revealed; the predominant STs belonged to the pandemic lineages of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli ST131 and ST69. Intra-familiar co-carriage by identical ESCREnterobacteriaceae was documented in 7 households compared to 14 based on sole gene typing, as previously reported. Co-carriage was more frequent than expected based on pure chance, suggesting clonal transmission between children and parents within the household.

  3. Comprehensive phylogenetic diversity of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes in termite gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Bodington, Dylan; Zhang, Chong; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori; Hongoh, Yuichi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA) in termite guts was assessed by pyrosequencing PCR amplicons obtained using newly designed primers. Of 8,066 reads, 776 hydA phylotypes, defined with 97% nucleotide sequence identity, were recovered from the gut homogenates of three termite species, Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, Reticulitermes speratus, and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. The phylotype coverage was 92-98%, and the majority shared only low identity with database sequences. It was estimated that 194-745 hydA phylotypes existed in the gut of each termite species. Our results demonstrate that hydA gene diversity in the termite gut microbiota is much higher than previously estimated.

  4. Lichen Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Part II: Homology Mapping Suggests a Functional Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Robert L; Abdel-Hameed, Mona; Sorensen, John L

    2018-02-27

    Lichens are renowned for their diverse natural products though little is known of the genetic programming dictating lichen natural product biosynthesis. We sequenced the genome of Cladonia uncialis and profiled its secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. Through a homology searching approach, we can now propose specific functions for gene products as well as the biosynthetic pathways that are encoded in several of these gene clusters. This analysis revealed that the lichen genome encodes the required enzymes for patulin and betaenones A-C biosynthesis, fungal toxins not known to be produced by lichens. Within several gene clusters, some (but not all) genes are genetically similar to genes devoted to secondary metabolite biosynthesis in Fungi. These lichen clusters also contain accessory tailoring genes without such genetic similarity, suggesting that the encoded tailoring enzymes perform distinct chemical transformations. We hypothesize that C. uncialis gene clusters have evolved by shuffling components of ancestral fungal clusters to create new series of chemical steps, leading to the production of hitherto undiscovered derivatives of fungal secondary metabolites.

  5. fimH gene cloning, of Escherichia coli uropathogen and examination of its subsequence diversity

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    Samaneh Ostad Mohammadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Escherichia coli uropathogen is the most prevalent pathogen separated from urinary tract that often is originated from intestinal flora of the own person. Urinary tract infection is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in Human. Whereas binding stage has an important role in bacteria colonization and then the infection is created, one of the most important strategies for inhibiting the infection is inhibiting the bacterial binding. As fimH protein is acting as adhesion it could be an appropriate candidate for producingvaccine. Material and Methods: First, genomic DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria extracted from strain 35218 ATCC. Upon designing primer for fimH gene, the PCR reaction has been applied with Taq DNA Polymerase and then pfu DNA polymerase enzymes. pBluescript (SK- plasmid has been applied for cloning the product of PCR. Using ClustalW and MEGA4 software, the subsequence was alignmented with the gene subsequence existing in gene bank and its gene diversity was examined. Results: After sequencing the cloned fimH gene using ClustalW and MEGA4 software, the result of this subsequence were alignmented with the subsequence of Escherichia coli containing fimH gene existing in gene bank and based on this alignment, N terminal on the protein surface and DNA are protected. Conclusion: N terminal domain of fimH gene is a conserved sequence among clinical isolates and it could be used for designing a vaccine against urinary tract infection.

  6. Bacterial human virulence genes across diverse habitats as assessed by In silico analysis of environmental metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Ditte Andreasen; Hendriksen, Niels B.; Kilian, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of clinically relevant bacterial virulence genes across natural (non-human) environments is not well understood. We aimed to investigate the occurrence of homologs to bacterial human virulence genes in a variety of ecological niches to better understand the role...... of natural environments in the evolution of bacterial virulence. Twenty four bacterial virulence genes were analyzed in 46 diverse environmental metagenomic datasets, representing various soils, seawater, freshwater, marine sediments, hot springs, the deep-sea, hypersaline mats, microbialites, gutless worms...... and glacial ice. Homologs to 16 bacterial human virulence genes, involved in urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal diseases, skin diseases, and wound and systemic infections, showed global ubiquity. A principal component analysis did not demonstrate clear trends across the metagenomes with respect...

  7. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

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    Huping Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study, ovine mastitis (ED133, pig (ST398, chicken (ED98, and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9 were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may

  8. Conservation of gene cassettes among diverse viruses of the human gut.

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    Samuel Minot

    Full Text Available Viruses are a crucial component of the human microbiome, but large population sizes, high sequence diversity, and high frequencies of novel genes have hindered genomic analysis by high-throughput sequencing. Here we investigate approaches to metagenomic assembly to probe genome structure in a sample of 5.6 Gb of gut viral DNA sequence from six individuals. Tests showed that a new pipeline based on DeBruijn graph assembly yielded longer contigs that were able to recruit more reads than the equivalent non-optimized, single-pass approach. To characterize gene content, the database of viral RefSeq proteins was compared to the assembled viral contigs, generating a bipartite graph with functional cassettes linking together viral contigs, which revealed a high degree of connectivity between diverse genomes involving multiple genes of the same functional class. In a second step, open reading frames were grouped by their co-occurrence on contigs in a database-independent manner, revealing conserved cassettes of co-oriented ORFs. These methods reveal that free-living bacteriophages, while usually dissimilar at the nucleotide level, often have significant similarity at the level of encoded amino acid motifs, gene order, and gene orientation. These findings thus connect contemporary metagenomic analysis with classical studies of bacteriophage genomic cassettes. Software is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/optitdba/.

  9. GDdom: An Online Tool for Calculation of Dominant Marker Gene Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzayed, Mazen; El-Dabba, Nourhan; Frary, Anne; Doganlar, Sami

    2017-04-01

    Gene diversity (GD), also called polymorphism information content, is a commonly used measure of molecular marker polymorphism. Calculation of GD for dominant markers such as AFLP, RAPD, and multilocus SSRs is valuable for researchers. To meet this need, we developed a free online computer program, GDdom, which provides easy, quick, and accurate calculation of dominant marker GD with a commonly used formula. Results are presented in tabular form for quick interpretation.

  10. Genetic diversity and gene flow decline with elevation in montane mayflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polato, N R; Gray, M M; Gill, B A; Becker, C G; Casner, K L; Flecker, A S; Kondratieff, B C; Encalada, A C; Poff, N L; Funk, W C; Zamudio, K R

    2017-08-01

    Montane environments around the globe are biodiversity 'hotspots' and important reservoirs of genetic diversity. Montane species are also typically more vulnerable to environmental change than their low-elevation counterparts due to restricted ranges and dispersal limitations. Here we focus on two abundant congeneric mayflies (Baetis bicaudatus and B. tricaudatus) from montane streams over an elevation gradient spanning 1400 m. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, we measured population diversity and vulnerability in these two species by: (i) describing genetic diversity and population structure across elevation gradients to identify mechanisms underlying diversification; (ii) performing spatially explicit landscape analyses to identify environmental drivers of differentiation; and (iii) identifying outlier loci hypothesized to underlie adaptive divergence. Differences in the extent of population structure in these species were evident depending upon their position along the elevation gradient. Heterozygosity, effective population sizes and gene flow all declined with increasing elevation, resulting in substantial population structure in the higher elevation species (B. bicaudatus). At lower elevations, populations of both species are more genetically similar, indicating ongoing gene flow. Isolation by distance was detected at lower elevations only, whereas landscape barriers better predicted genetic distance at higher elevations. At higher elevations, dispersal was restricted due to landscape effects, resulting in greater population isolation. Our results demonstrate differentiation over small spatial scales along an elevation gradient, and highlight the importance of preserving genetic diversity in more isolated high-elevation populations.

  11. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  12. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  13. Frequent CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion in diverse types of T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Pora; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sangok; Kang, So Young; Jang, Hye Yoon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jaesang; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2016-06-01

    CTLA4 and CD28 are co-regulatory receptors with opposite roles in T-cell signaling. By RNA sequencing, we identified a fusion between the two genes from partial gene duplication in a case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The fusion gene, which codes for the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and the cytoplasmic region of CD28, is likely capable of transforming inhibitory signals into stimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Ectopic expression of the fusion transcript in Jurkat and H9 cells resulted in enhanced proliferation and AKT and ERK phosphorylation, indicating activation of downstream oncogenic pathways. To estimate the frequency of this gene fusion in mature T-cell lymphomas, we examined 115 T-cell lymphoma samples of diverse subtypes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and Sanger sequencing. We identified the fusion in 26 of 45 cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (58%), nine of 39 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified (23%), and nine of 31 extranodal NK/T cell lymphomas (29%). We further investigated the mutation status of 70 lymphoma-associated genes using ultra-deep targeted resequencing for 74 mature T-cell lymphoma samples. The mutational landscape we obtained suggests that T-cell lymphoma results from diverse combinations of multiple gene mutations. The CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion is likely a major contributor to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas and represents a potential target for anti-CTLA4 cancer immunotherapy. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  14. Diversity of MHC DQB and DRB Genes in the Endangered Australian Sea Lion (Neophoca cinerea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Chow, Natalie; Gray, Rachael; Gongora, Jaime; Higgins, Damien P

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have an important role in vertebrate adaptive immunity, being responsible for recognizing, binding, and presenting specific antigenic peptides to T lymphocytes. Here, we study the MHC class II DQB and DRB exon 2 genes of the Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea), an endangered pinniped species that experiences high pup mortality. Following characterization of N. cinerea DQB and DRB by molecular cloning, and evaluation of diversity in pups across 2 colonies using variant screening (n = 47), 3 DQB alleles and 10 DRB variants (including 1 pseudogene allele) were identified. The higher diversity at DRB relative to DQB is consistent with other studies in marine mammals. Despite overall lower MHC class II allelic diversity relative to some other pinniped species, we observed similar levels of nucleotide diversity and selection in N. cinerea. In addition, we provide support for recent divergence of MHC class II alleles. The characterization of MHC class II diversity in the Australian sea lion establishes a baseline for further investigation of associations with disease, including endemic hookworm infection, and contributes to the conservation management of this species. © The American Genetic Association. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Investigation of diversity of plasmids carrying the blaTEM-52 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielak, Eliza Maria; Bergenholtz, Rikke D.; Jørgensen, Mikael Skaanning

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diversity of plasmids that carry blaTEM-52 genes among Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica originating from animals, meat products and humans. METHODS: A collection of 22 blaTEM-52-encoding plasmids was characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism...... of self-transfer to a plasmid-free E. coli recipient. CONCLUSIONS: The blaTEM-52 gene found in humans could have been transmitted on transferable plasmids originating from animal sources. Some of the blaTEM-52 plasmids carry replicons that differ from the classical ones. Two novel replicons were detected...... (RFLP), replicon typing (by PCR or replicon sequencing), susceptibility testing, assessment of plasmid ability to self-transfer by conjugation and typing of the genetic environment of the blaTEM-52 gene. Detected IncI1 plasmids underwent further plasmid multilocus sequence typing. RESULTS: RFLP profiles...

  16. Diversity and expression of nitrogenase genes (nifH) from ectomycorrhizas of Corsican pine (Pinus nigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hironari; Anderson, Ian C; Alexander, Ian J; Killham, Ken; Moore, Edward R B

    2006-12-01

    The diversity of bacterial nitrogenase genes (nifH) and their mRNA transcription in ectomycorrhizas of Corsican pine (Pinus nigra) were examined. DNA and RNA were extracted from surface-sterilized and non-sterilized Corsican pine roots colonized by the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Suillus variegatus and Tomentellopsis submollis. DNA-derived nifH polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were obtained from all samples, but only a few reverse transcription PCRs for nifH mRNA were successful, suggesting that nitrogenase genes were not always transcribed. Several different nifH sequences were detected and the bacteria actively transcribing nifH were different from those whose genes were detected through DNA-based PCR. Putative nitrogenase amino acid sequences revealed that more than half of the nifH products were derived from methylotrophic bacteria, such as Methylocella spp. The next most frequent sequence types were similar to those from Burkholderia.

  17. Pantoea ananatis Genetic Diversity Analysis Reveals Limited Genomic Diversity as Well as Accessory Genes Correlated with Onion Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Shaun P.; Stumpf, Spencer D.; Gitaitis, Ron D.; Kvitko, Brian H.; Dutta, Bhabesh

    2018-01-01

    Pantoea ananatis is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and an enigmatic plant pathogen with a broad host range. Although P. ananatis strains can be aggressive on onion causing foliar necrosis and onion center rot, previous genomic analysis has shown that P. ananatis lacks the primary virulence secretion systems associated with other plant pathogens. We assessed a collection of fifty P. ananatis strains collected from Georgia over three decades to determine genetic factors that correlated with onion pathogenic potential. Previous genetic analysis studies have compared strains isolated from different hosts with varying diseases potential and isolation sources. Strains varied greatly in their pathogenic potential and aggressiveness on different cultivated Allium species like onion, leek, shallot, and chive. Using multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) and repetitive extragenic palindrome repeat (rep)-PCR techniques, we did not observe any correlation between onion pathogenic potential and genetic diversity among strains. Whole genome sequencing and pan-genomic analysis of a sub-set of 10 strains aided in the identification of a novel series of genetic regions, likely plasmid borne, and correlating with onion pathogenicity observed on single contigs of the genetic assemblies. We named these loci Onion Virulence Regions (OVR) A-D. The OVR loci contain genes involved in redox regulation as well as pectate lyase and rhamnogalacturonase genes. Previous studies have not identified distinct genetic loci or plasmids correlating with onion foliar pathogenicity or pathogenicity on a single host pathosystem. The lack of focus on a single host system for this phytopathgenic disease necessitates the pan-genomic analysis performed in this study. PMID:29491851

  18. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsar U. Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  20. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

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    Antoine Claessens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4% yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  1. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

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    Claessens, Antoine; Hamilton, William L; Kekre, Mihir; Otto, Thomas D; Faizullabhoy, Adnan; Rayner, Julian C; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2014-12-01

    The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations) were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4%) yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  2. Diversity and evolution of plant diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGATs unveiled by phylogenetic, gene structure and expression analyses

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    Andreia Carina Turchetto-Zolet

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the first diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT gene was characterized in plants, a number of studies have focused on understanding the role of DGAT activity in plant triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis. DGAT enzyme is essential in controlling TAGs synthesis and is encoded by different genes. DGAT1 and DGAT2 are the two major types of DGATs and have been well characterized in many plants. On the other hand, the DGAT3 and WS/DGAT have received less attention. In this study, we present the first general view of the presence of putative DGAT3 and WS/DGAT in several plant species and report on the diversity and evolution of these genes and its relationships with the two main DGAT genes (DGAT1 and DGAT2. According to our analyses DGAT1, DGAT2, DGAT3 and WS/DGAT are very divergent genes and may have distinct origin in plants. They also present divergent expression patterns in different organs and tissues. The maintenance of several types of genes encoding DGAT enzymes in plants demonstrates the importance of DGAT activity for TAG biosynthesis. Evolutionary history studies of DGATs coupled with their expression patterns help us to decipher their functional role in plants, helping to drive future biotechnological studies.

  3. PapG Gene cloning, Escherichia coli uropathogen and examination of its subsequence diversity

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    Faezeh Hamidiyeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available infections are one of the most prevalent human infections. Despite different antigens and toxins of interfering bacteria in infection, one of the important agents in the infections arising from Escherichia coli and the other gram negative bacteria is bacterial binding to host cell surface, so inhibiting the bacterial binding is an appropriate strategy to inhibit the infection. Whereas PapG protein acts as adhesion, it can be an appropriate candidate for developingvaccine. Material and Methods: A Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli bacterium extracted from clinical strain containing PapGII gene. Upon designing primer for PapGII gene, the PCR reaction was applied. The product of PCR was cloned in pBluescript (SK- plasmid. Using Clustal W and MEGA4 software, the gained subsequence was alignmented with the gene subsequence existing in gene bank and its gene diversity was studied. Results: Based on was down alignment, N terminal on the protein surface and DNA are protected. Conclusion: N terminal domain of PapG gene is a conserved sequence among clinical straines? And it could be used for designing a vaccine against urinary tract infection.

  4. Sequence diversity and differential expression of major phenylpropanoid-flavonoid biosynthetic genes among three mango varieties.

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    Hoang, Van L T; Innes, David J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Monteith, Gregory R; Gidley, Michael J; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-07-30

    Mango fruits contain a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds which impart potential health benefits; their biosynthesis is catalysed by enzymes in the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid (PF) pathway. The aim of this study was to reveal the variability in genes involved in the PF pathway in three different mango varieties Mangifera indica L., a member of the family Anacardiaceae: Kensington Pride (KP), Irwin (IW) and Nam Doc Mai (NDM) and to determine associations with gene expression and mango flavonoid profiles. A close evolutionary relationship between mango genes and those from the woody species poplar of the Salicaceae family (Populus trichocarpa) and grape of the Vitaceae family (Vitis vinifera), was revealed through phylogenetic analysis of PF pathway genes. We discovered 145 SNPs in total within coding sequences with an average frequency of one SNP every 316 bp. Variety IW had the highest SNP frequency (one SNP every 258 bp) while KP and NDM had similar frequencies (one SNP every 369 bp and 360 bp, respectively). The position in the PF pathway appeared to influence the extent of genetic diversity of the encoded enzymes. The entry point enzymes phenylalanine lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-mono-oxygenase (C4H) and chalcone synthase (CHS) had low levels of SNP diversity in their coding sequences, whereas anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) showed the highest SNP frequency followed by flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Quantitative PCR revealed characteristic patterns of gene expression that differed between mango peel and flesh, and between varieties. The combination of mango expressed sequence tags and availability of well-established reference PF biosynthetic genes from other plant species allowed the identification of coding sequences of genes that may lead to the formation of important flavonoid compounds in mango fruits and facilitated characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms between varieties. We discovered an association between the extent of sequence variation and

  5. Reduced genetic diversity and alteration of gene flow in a fiddler crab due to mangrove degradation.

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    Alex Nehemia

    Full Text Available The fiddler crab Austruca occidentalis is a dominant species in mangrove forests along the East African coast. It enhances soil aeration and, through its engineering activities, makes otherwise-inaccessible food available for other marine organisms. Despite its importance, the habitat of A. occidentalis is threatened by human activities. Clearing the mangroves for salt farming and selective logging of mangroves trees continue to jeopardise mangrove ecosystems in the Western Indian Ocean. This study aims to use partial mitochondrial COI gene sequences and nuclear microsatellites to determine whether salt farming activities in mangroves have a negative impact on the genetic diversity and gene flow of A. occidentalis collected along the Tanzania coast. The level of genetic diversity for both mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellites are relatively lower in samples from salt ponds compared to natural mangrove sites. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA among all populations showed low but significant differentiation (COI: Fst = 0.022, P < 0.05; microsatellites: Fst = 0.022, P < 0.001. A hierarchical AMOVA indicates lower but significant genetic differentiation among populations from salt ponds and natural mangroves sites (COI: Fct = 0.033, P < 0.05; microsatellites: Fct = 0.018, P = < 0.01. These results indicate that salt farming has a significant negative impact on the genetic diversity of A. occidentalis. Since higher genetic diversity contributes to a stable population, restoring the cleared habitats might be the most effective measures for the conservation of genetic diversity and hence adaptive potential to environmental change in this species.

  6. Genetic diversity and virulence genes in Streptococcus uberis strains isolated from bovine mastitis

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    Rafael Ambrósio Loures

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is one of the most common and costly infectious diseases in dairy cattle worldwide. This is a multifactorial illness caused by different microorganisms, including virus, yeasts, algae, parasites, and several species of bacteria. Among these bacteria, Streptococcus uberis is an important environmental pathogen that is responsible for a large range of clinical and subclinical mammary infections, especially in intensively managed herds. Despite the increasing importance of this pathogen in the etiology of bovine mastitis, data on its virulence and diversity in Brazilian dairy herds are scarce. The aims of the present study were to investigate the virulence characteristics of S. uberis isolated from bovine mastitis and to assess the molecular epidemiology of the Brazilian isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. In this work, 46 strains of S. uberis isolated from bovine mastitis from 26 Brazilian dairy herds were evaluated regarding their genetic diversity by PFGE using with the SmaI enzyme. Additionally, the presence of the virulence genes skc and pauA, which encode plasminogen activators, and the gene sua, which encodes an adhesion molecule in mammary epithelial cells, were assessed by PCR. Our results showed a high genetic diversity in the population, displaying many different patterns in the PFGE analysis. A high proportion of strains was positive for virulence genes in the sampled population (sua [100%], pauA [91%], and skc [91%]. The high frequency of skc, pauA, and sua genes among the studied strains suggests the importance of these virulence factors, possibly helping S. uberis in the colonization of the bovine mammary gland. Surveys of the genetic and molecular characteristics of this pathogen can improve our knowledge of bacterial activity and identify molecules that have roles in the establishment of the infection. This might help in the development of more effective measures to control and prevent bovine mastitis.

  7. Virulence gene profiles: alpha-hemolysin and clonal diversity in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine clinical mastitis in China.

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    Zhang, Limei; Gao, Jian; Barkema, Herman W; Ali, Tariq; Liu, Gang; Deng, Youtian; Naushad, Sohail; Kastelic, John P; Han, Bo

    2018-03-02

    Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause of bovine mastitis, is known for its ability to acquire to antimicrobial resistance and to secrete numerous virulence factors that can exacerbate inflammation. In addition, alpha-hemolysin has an important role in S. aureus infections, diversity of the hla gene (that produces alpha-hmolysin) in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis has not been well characterized. The objective was, therefore, to determine diversity of virulence genes, hla gene sequences, and clonal profiles of S. aureus from bovine mastitis in Chinese dairy herds, and to evaluate inter-relationships. The antimicrobials resistance varies from as low as 1.9% (2/103) for CTX to as high as 76.7% (79/103) for penicilin in the 103 isolates and 46 (44.7%) S. aureus were determined as multi-resistant isolates with diverse resistance patterns. Thirty-eight virulence gene patterns (with variable frequencies) were identified in the 103 isolates and correlated with MLST types, indicating a great diversity. Although the hla gene also had great diversity (14 genotypes), Hla peptides were relatively more conserved. With 7 clonal complexes identified from 24 spa types and 7 MLST types. Regarding the letter, ST 97 was the dominant type in S. aureus from bovine mastitis in China. Furthermore, based on phylogenetic analysis, there was a distinct evolutionary relationship between the hla gene and MLST. Multi-resistant S. aureus occurred in bovine mastitis with diverse resistance patterns. The diversity of virulence gene profiles, especially the hla gene and, their relationship with molecular types were reported for the first time in S. aureus from bovine mastitis, which will be useful for future studies on immunogenicity and vaccine development. In addition, based on the distinct evolutionary relationship between the hla gene and MLST types, we inferred that the hla gene has potential role for molecular typing of S. aureus.

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

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    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Diverse enterotoxin gene profiles among clonal complexes of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the Bronx, New York.

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    Varshney, Avanish K; Mediavilla, José R; Robiou, Natalie; Guh, Alice; Wang, Xiabo; Gialanella, Philip; Levi, Michael H; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Fries, Bettina C

    2009-11-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) can cause toxin-mediated disease, and those that function as superantigens are implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The prevalence of 19 enterotoxin genes was determined by PCR in clinical S. aureus strains derived from wounds (108) and blood (99). We performed spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine clonal origin, and for selected strains staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Strains carried a median of five SE genes. For most SE genes, the prevalence rates among methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates, as well as wound- and blood-derived isolates, did not differ. At least one SE gene was detected in all except two S. aureus isolates (>99%). Complete egc clusters were found in only 11% of S. aureus isolates, whereas the combination of sed, sej, and ser was detected in 24% of clinical strains. S. aureus strains exhibited distinct combinations of SE genes, even if their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and MLST patterns demonstrated clonality. USA300 strains also showed considerable variability in SE content, although they contained a lower number of SE genes (mean, 3). By contrast, SE content was unchanged in five pairs of serial isolates. SEB production by individual strains varied up to 200-fold, and even up to 15-fold in a pair of serial isolates. In conclusion, our results illustrate the genetic diversity of S. aureus strains with respect to enterotoxin genes and suggest that horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements encoding virulence genes occurs frequently.

  10. Sequence diversity within the capsular genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup 6 and 19.

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    Karin Elberse

    Full Text Available The main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the capsule. The polysaccharides comprising this capsule are encoded by approximately 15 genes and differences in these genes result in different serotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the sequence diversity of the capsular genes of serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, 19A and 19F and to explore a possible effect of vaccination on variation and distribution of these serotypes in the Netherlands. The complete capsular gene locus was sequenced for 25 serogroup 6 and for 20 serogroup 19 isolates. If one or more genes varied in 10 or more base pairs from the reference sequence, it was designated as a capsular subtype. Allele-specific PCRs and specific gene sequencing of highly variable capsular genes were performed on 184 serogroup 6 and 195 serogroup 19 isolates to identify capsular subtypes. This revealed the presence of 6, 3 and a single capsular subtype within serotypes 6A, 6B and 6C, respectively. The serotype 19A and 19F isolates comprised 3 and 4 capsular subtypes, respectively. For serogroup 6, the genetic background, as determined by multi locus sequence typing (MLST and multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA, seemed to be closely related to the capsular subtypes, but this was less pronounced for serogroup 19 isolates. The data also suggest shifts in the occurrence of capsular subtypes within serotype 6A and 19A after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine. The shifts within these non-vaccine serotypes might indicate that these capsular subtypes are filling the niche of the vaccine serotypes. In conclusion, there is considerable DNA sequence variation of the capsular genes within pneumococcal serogroup 6 and 19. Such changes may result in altered polysaccharides or in strains that produce more capsular polysaccharides. Consequently, these altered capsules may be less sensitive for vaccine induced immunity.

  11. A tree of life based on ninety-eight expressed genes conserved across diverse eukaryotic species.

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    Pawan Kumar Jayaswal

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in DNA sequencing technologies have resulted in the accumulation of large data sets in the public domain, facilitating comparative studies to provide novel insights into the evolution of life. Phylogenetic studies across the eukaryotic taxa have been reported but on the basis of a limited number of genes. Here we present a genome-wide analysis across different plant, fungal, protist, and animal species, with reference to the 36,002 expressed genes of the rice genome. Our analysis revealed 9831 genes unique to rice and 98 genes conserved across all 49 eukaryotic species analysed. The 98 genes conserved across diverse eukaryotes mostly exhibited binding and catalytic activities and shared common sequence motifs; and hence appeared to have a common origin. The 98 conserved genes belonged to 22 functional gene families including 26S protease, actin, ADP-ribosylation factor, ATP synthase, casein kinase, DEAD-box protein, DnaK, elongation factor 2, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, phosphatase 2A, ras-related protein, Ser/Thr protein phosphatase family protein, tubulin, ubiquitin and others. The consensus Bayesian eukaryotic tree of life developed in this study demonstrated widely separated clades of plants, fungi, and animals. Musa acuminata provided an evolutionary link between monocotyledons and dicotyledons, and Salpingoeca rosetta provided an evolutionary link between fungi and animals, which indicating that protozoan species are close relatives of fungi and animals. The divergence times for 1176 species pairs were estimated accurately by integrating fossil information with synonymous substitution rates in the comprehensive set of 98 genes. The present study provides valuable insight into the evolution of eukaryotes.

  12. Alkane Hydroxylase Gene (alkB Phylotype Composition and Diversity in Northern Gulf of Mexico Bacterioplankton

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    Conor Blake Smith

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural and anthropogenic activities introduce alkanes into marine systems where they are degraded by alkane hydroxylases expressed by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Partial sequences for alkB, one of the structural genes of alkane hydroxylase, have been used to assess the composition of alkane-degrading communities, and to determine their responses to hydrocarbon inputs. We present here the first spatially extensive analysis of alkB in bacterioplankton of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM, a region that experiences numerous hydrocarbon inputs. We have analyzed 401 partial alkB gene sequences amplified from genomic extracts collected during March 2010 from 17 water column samples that included surface waters and bathypelagic depths. Previous analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these and related samples have shown that nGoM bacterial community composition and structure stratify strongly with depth, with distinctly different communities above and below 100 m. Although we hypothesized that alkB gene sequences would exhibit a similar pattern, PCA analyses of operational protein units (OPU indicated that community composition did not vary consistently with depth or other major physical-chemical variables. We observed 22 distinct OPUs, one of which was ubiquitous and accounted for 57% of all sequences. This OPU clustered with alkB sequences from known hydrocarbon oxidizers (e.g., Alcanivorax and Marinobacter. Some OPUs could not be associated with known alkane degraders, however, and perhaps represent novel hydrocarbon-oxidizing populations or genes. These results indicate that the capacity for alkane hydrolysis occurs widely in the nGoM, but that alkane degrader diversity varies substantially among sites and responds differently than bulk communities to physical-chemical variables.

  13. Phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen fixation genes in the intestinal tract of Reticulitermes chinensis Snyder.

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    Du, Xin; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yin; Peng, Jianxin; Hong, Huazhu; Yang, Hong

    2012-11-01

    Wood-feeding termites live on cellulolytic materials that typically lack of nitrogen sources. It was reported that symbiotic microbes play important roles in the maintenance of a normal nitrogen contents in termite by different metabolisms including nitrogen fixation. In this study, the diversity of nitrogen-fixing organisms in the symbiotic intestinal microflora of Reticulitermes chinensis Snyder was investigated with culture independent method. Fragments of the nifH genes, which encode dinitrogenase reductase, were directly amplified from the DNA of the mixed microbial population in the termite gut with four sets of primers corresponding to the conserved regions of the genes. Clones were randomly selected and analyzed by RFLP. Sequence analysis revealed that a large number of nifH sequences retrieved from the termite gut were most closely related to strict anaerobic bacteria such as clostridia and spirochetes, some of the others were affiliated with proteobacteria, bacteroides, or methanogenic archaea. The results showed that there was a remarkable diversity of nitrogenase genes in the gut of Reticulitermes chinensis Snyder.

  14. Gene flow, recombination, and positive selection in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: mechanisms underlying the diversity of the widespread opportunistic pathogen.

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    Yu, Dong; Yin, Zhiqiu; Li, Beiping; Jin, Yuan; Ren, Hongguang; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Long; Yue, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a global multidrug-resistant human opportunistic pathogen in clinical environments. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is also ubiquitous in aqueous environments, soil, and plants. Various molecular typing methods have revealed that S. maltophilia exhibits high levels of phenotypic and genotypic diversity. However, information regarding the genomic diversity within S. maltophilia and the corresponding genetic mechanisms resulting in said diversity remain scarce. The genome sequences of 17 S. maltophilia strains were selected to investigate the mechanisms contributing to genetic diversity at the genome level. The core and large pan-genomes of the species were first estimated, resulting in a large, open pan-genome. A species phylogeny was also reconstructed based on 344 orthologous genes with one copy per genome, and the contribution of four evolutionary mechanisms to the species genome diversity was quantified: 15%-35% of the genes showed evidence for recombination, 0%-25% of the genes in one genome were likely gained, 0%-44% of the genes in some genomes were likely lost, and less than 0.3% of the genes in a genome were under positive selection pressures. We observed that, among the four main mechanisms, homologous recombination plays a key role in maintaining diversity in S. maltophilia. In this study, we provide an overview of evolution in S. maltophilia to provide a better understanding of its evolutionary dynamics and its relationship with genome diversity.

  15. Comparative SNP diversity among four Eucalyptus species for genes from secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways

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    Foley William J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little information about the DNA sequence variation within and between closely related plant species. The combination of re-sequencing technologies, large-scale DNA pools and availability of reference gene sequences allowed the extensive characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes of four biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of ecologically relevant secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus. With this approach the occurrence and patterns of SNP variation for a set of genes can be compared across different species from the same genus. Results In a single GS-FLX run, we sequenced over 103 Mbp and assembled them to approximately 50 kbp of reference sequences. An average sequencing depth of 315 reads per nucleotide site was achieved for all four eucalypt species, Eucalyptus globulus, E. nitens, E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba. We sequenced 23 genes from 1,764 individuals and discovered 8,631 SNPs across the species, with about 1.5 times as many SNPs per kbp in the introns compared to exons. The exons of the two closely related species (E. globulus and E. nitens had similar numbers of SNPs at synonymous and non-synonymous sites. These species also had similar levels of SNP diversity, whereas E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba had much higher SNP diversity. Neither the pathway nor the position in the pathway influenced gene diversity. The four species share between 20 and 43% of the SNPs in these genes. Conclusion By using conservative statistical detection methods, we were confident about the validity of each SNP. With numerous individuals sampled over the geographical range of each species, we discovered one SNP in every 33 bp for E. nitens and one in every 31 bp in E. globulus. In contrast, the more distantly related species contained more SNPs: one in every 16 bp for E. camaldulensis and one in 17 bp for E. loxophleba, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest frequency of SNPs

  16. Characteristics of the molecular diversity of the outer membrane protein A gene of Haemophilus parasuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Yue, Hua; Yang, Falong; Shao, Guoqing; Hai, Quan; Chen, Xiaofei; Guo, Dingqian

    2010-01-01

    The molecular diversity of the gene encoding the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Haemophilus parasuis has been unclear. In this study, the structural characteristics, sequence types, and genetic diversity of ompA were investigated in 15 H. parasuis reference strains of different serovars and 20 field isolates. Three nucleotide lengths of the complete open reading frame (ORF) of ompA were found: 1098 base pairs (bp), 1104 bp, and 1110 bp. The OmpA contained 4 hypervariable domains, mainly encoding the 4 putative surface-exposed loops, which makes it a potential molecular marker for genotyping. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant OmpAs of serovars 4 and 5 could cross-react with antiserum to all 15 serovars. Hence, although ompA of H. parasuis exhibited high variation among serovars, this variation did not seem to affect the strong antigenic characteristics of OmpA. PMID:20885850

  17. Diversity of immune genes and associated gill microbes of European plaice Pleuronectes platessa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K. Mathias; Shama, Lisa N. S.; Kellnreitner, Florian; Pockberger, Moritz

    2012-08-01

    Genetic variability of marine fish species is much higher than in most other vertebrates. Nevertheless, some species with large population sizes including flatfish such as European plaice Pleuronectes platessa show signs of population collapse and inbreeding. Taking plaice as a flagship example for fisheries-induced genetic changes also affecting the Wadden Sea, we determined the amount of genetic variability at antigen-presenting genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and its potential interaction with the microbiota associated to gill tissue using a next-generation parallel tag sequencing approach. Genetic variation at MHC class IIB genes was extremely large, with 97 alleles found in 40 fish from different age cohorts. Although a strong signal of positive selection was present (dN/dS = 4.01) and we found significantly higher allelic diversity in 0+ fish than in older age classes, the amount of genetic variation maintained within the population may not have exceeded neutral expectations derived from mitochondrial markers. Associated microbes revealed significant spatiotemporal structure with 0+ fish displaying the highest microbial diversity as well as the highest diversity of potentially pathogenic genera. Overall the correlation between MHC genotypes and bacterial abundance was weak, and only few alleles significantly correlated with certain bacterial genera. These associations all conferred susceptibility (i.e. presence of an allele correlated to higher number of bacteria), either suggesting age-dependent selection on common alleles or weak selection on resistance against these bacterial genera. Taken together, our data suggest that selection coefficients of balancing selection maintaining immunogenetic diversity may be relatively small in large marine populations. However, if population sizes are further reduced by overharvesting, the response to increasing balancing selection coefficients will be largely unpredictable and may also negatively

  18. Diversity of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen genes in the Philippines.

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    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ybanez, Adrian Patalinghug; Ybanez, Rochelle Haidee Daclan; Perez, Zandro Obligado; Guswanto, Azirwan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-01

    Babesia bovis is the causative agent of fatal babesiosis in cattle. In the present study, we investigated the genetic diversity of B. bovis among Philippine cattle, based on the genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs). Forty-one B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples from cattle were used to amplify the msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c genes. In phylogenetic analyses, the msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c gene sequences generated from Philippine B. bovis-positive DNA samples were found in six, three, and four different clades, respectively. All of the msa-1 and most of the msa-2b sequences were found in clades that were formed only by Philippine msa sequences in the respective phylograms. While all the msa-1 sequences from the Philippines showed similarity to those formed by Australian msa-1 sequences, the msa-2b sequences showed similarity to either Australian or Mexican msa-2b sequences. In contrast, msa-2c sequences from the Philippines were distributed across all the clades of the phylogram, although one clade was formed exclusively by Philippine msa-2c sequences. Similarities among the deduced amino acid sequences of MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c from the Philippines were 62.2-100, 73.1-100, and 67.3-100%, respectively. The present findings demonstrate that B. bovis populations are genetically diverse in the Philippines. This information will provide a good foundation for the future design and implementation of improved immunological preventive methodologies against bovine babesiosis in the Philippines. The study has also generated a set of data that will be useful for futher understanding of the global genetic diversity of this important parasite. © 2013.

  19. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression in primate taste buds reveals links to diverse processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hevezi

    Full Text Available Efforts to unravel the mechanisms underlying taste sensation (gustation have largely focused on rodents. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in primate taste buds. Our findings reveal unique new insights into the biology of taste buds. We generated a taste bud gene expression database using laser capture microdissection (LCM procured fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds from primates. We also used LCM to collect the top and bottom portions of CV taste buds. Affymetrix genome wide arrays were used to analyze gene expression in all samples. Known taste receptors are preferentially expressed in the top portion of taste buds. Genes associated with the cell cycle and stem cells are preferentially expressed in the bottom portion of taste buds, suggesting that precursor cells are located there. Several chemokines including CXCL14 and CXCL8 are among the highest expressed genes in taste buds, indicating that immune system related processes are active in taste buds. Several genes expressed specifically in endocrine glands including growth hormone releasing hormone and its receptor are also strongly expressed in taste buds, suggesting a link between metabolism and taste. Cell type-specific expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in cell fate, including KIT, reveals the taste bud as an active site of cell regeneration, differentiation, and development. IKBKAP, a gene mutated in familial dysautonomia, a disease that results in loss of taste buds, is expressed in taste cells that communicate with afferent nerve fibers via synaptic transmission. This database highlights the power of LCM coupled with transcriptional profiling to dissect the molecular composition of normal tissues, represents the most comprehensive molecular analysis of primate taste buds to date, and provides a foundation for further studies in diverse aspects of taste biology.

  1. Genetic diversity and natural selection of Plasmodium knowlesi merozoite surface protein 1 paralog gene in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Atique; Fauzi, Muh; Han, Eun-Taek

    2018-03-14

    Human infections due to the monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is on the rise in most Southeast Asian countries specifically Malaysia. The C-terminal 19 kDa domain of PvMSP1P is a potential vaccine candidate, however, no study has been conducted in the orthologous gene of P. knowlesi. This study investigates level of polymorphisms, haplotypes and natural selection of full-length pkmsp1p in clinical samples from Malaysia. A total of 36 full-length pkmsp1p sequences along with the reference H-strain and 40 C-terminal pkmsp1p sequences from clinical isolates of Malaysia were downloaded from published genomes. Genetic diversity, polymorphism, haplotype and natural selection were determined using DnaSP 5.10 and MEGA 5.0 software. Genealogical relationships were determined using haplotype network tree in NETWORK software v5.0. Population genetic differentiation index (F ST ) and population structure of parasite was determined using Arlequin v3.5 and STRUCTURE v2.3.4 software. Comparison of 36 full-length pkmsp1p sequences along with the H-strain identified 339 SNPs (175 non-synonymous and 164 synonymous substitutions). The nucleotide diversity across the full-length gene was low compared to its ortholog pvmsp1p. The nucleotide diversity was higher toward the N-terminal domains (pkmsp1p-83 and 30) compared to the C-terminal domains (pkmsp1p-38, 33 and 19). Phylogenetic analysis of full-length genes identified 2 distinct clusters of P. knowlesi from Malaysian Borneo. The 40 pkmsp1p-19 sequences showed low polymorphisms with 16 polymorphisms leading to 18 haplotypes. In total there were 10 synonymous and 6 non-synonymous substitutions and 12 cysteine residues were intact within the two EGF domains. Evidence of strong purifying selection was observed within the full-length sequences as well in all the domains. Shared haplotypes of 40 pkmsp1p-19 were identified within Malaysian Borneo haplotypes. This study is the first to report on the genetic diversity and natural

  2. Efficient gene disruption in diverse strains of Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/CAS9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bang; Brown, Kevin M; Lee, Tobie D; Sibley, L David

    2014-05-13

    Toxoplasma gondii has become a model for studying the phylum Apicomplexa, in part due to the availability of excellent genetic tools. Although reverse genetic tools are available in a few widely utilized laboratory strains, they rely on special genetic backgrounds that are not easily implemented in natural isolates. Recent progress in modifying CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), a system of DNA recognition used as a defense mechanism in bacteria and archaea, has led to extremely efficient gene disruption in a variety of organisms. Here we utilized a CRISPR/CAS9-based system with single guide RNAs to disrupt genes in T. gondii. CRISPR/CAS9 provided an extremely efficient system for targeted gene disruption and for site-specific insertion of selectable markers through homologous recombination. CRISPR/CAS9 also facilitated site-specific insertion in the absence of homology, thus increasing the utility of this approach over existing technology. We then tested whether CRISPR/CAS9 would enable efficient transformation of a natural isolate. Using CRISPR/CAS9, we were able to rapidly generate both rop18 knockouts and complemented lines in the type I GT1 strain, which has been used for forward genetic crosses but which remains refractory to reverse genetic approaches. Assessment of their phenotypes in vivo revealed that ROP18 contributed a greater proportion to acute pathogenesis in GT1 than in the laboratory type I RH strain. Thus, CRISPR/CAS9 extends reverse genetic techniques to diverse isolates of T. gondii, allowing exploration of a much wider spectrum of biological diversity. Genetic approaches have proven very powerful for studying the biology of organisms, including microbes. However, ease of genetic manipulation varies widely among isolates, with common lab isolates often being the most amenable to such approaches. Unfortunately, such common lab isolates have also been passaged frequently in vitro and have thus lost many of the

  3. Evolutionary dynamics and genetic diversity from three genes of Anguillid rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellec, Laure; Cabon, Joelle; Bergmann, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Wild freshwater eel populations have dramatically declined in recent past decades in Europe and America, partially through the impact of several factors including the wide spread of infectious diseases. The anguillid rhabdoviruses eel virus European X (EVEX) and eel virus American (EVA) potentially...... play a role in this decline, even if their real contribution is still unclear. In this study, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics and genetic diversity of anguiillid rhabdoviruses by analysing sequences from the glycoprotein, nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein (P) genes of 57 viral strains collected...

  4. Linking secondary metabolites to gene clusters through genome sequencing of six diverse Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbølling, Inge; Vesth, Tammi C.; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2018-01-01

    to determine phylogeny and genetic diversity, showing that each presented genome contains 15–27% genes not found in other sequenced Aspergilli. In particular, A. novofumigatus was compared with the pathogenic species A. fumigatus. This suggests that A. novofumigatus can produce most of the same allergens......, virulence, and pathogenicity factors as A. fumigatus, suggesting that A. novofumigatus could be as pathogenic as A. fumigatus. Furthermore, SMs were linked to gene clusters based on biological and chemical knowledge and analysis, genome sequences, and predictive algorithms. We thus identify putative SM....... campestris, A. novofumigatus, A. ochraceoroseus, and A. steynii) have been whole-genome PacBio sequenced to provide genetic references in three Aspergillus sections. A. taichungensis and A. candidus also were sequenced for SM elucidation. Thirteen Aspergillus genomes were analyzed with comparative genomics...

  5. Genetic variations and haplotype diversity of the UGT1 gene cluster in the Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    Full Text Available Vertebrates require tremendous molecular diversity to defend against numerous small hydrophobic chemicals. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs are a large family of detoxification enzymes that glucuronidate xenobiotics and endobiotics, facilitating their excretion from the body. The UGT1 gene cluster contains a tandem array of variable first exons, each preceded by a specific promoter, and a common set of downstream constant exons, similar to the genomic organization of the protocadherin (Pcdh, immunoglobulin, and T-cell receptor gene clusters. To assist pharmacogenomics studies in Chinese, we sequenced nine first exons, promoter and intronic regions, and five common exons of the UGT1 gene cluster in a population sample of 253 unrelated Chinese individuals. We identified 101 polymorphisms and found 15 novel SNPs. We then computed allele frequencies for each polymorphism and reconstructed their linkage disequilibrium (LD map. The UGT1 cluster can be divided into five linkage blocks: Block 9 (UGT1A9, Block 9/7/6 (UGT1A9, UGT1A7, and UGT1A6, Block 5 (UGT1A5, Block 4/3 (UGT1A4 and UGT1A3, and Block 3' UTR. Furthermore, we inferred haplotypes and selected their tagSNPs. Finally, comparing our data with those of three other populations of the HapMap project revealed ethnic specificity of the UGT1 genetic diversity in Chinese. These findings have important implications for future molecular genetic studies of the UGT1 gene cluster as well as for personalized medical therapies in Chinese.

  6. Yersinia enterocolitica of porcine origin: carriage of virulence genes and genotypic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Daniel A; Bahnson, Peter B; Funk, Julie A; Morrow, W E Morgan; Abley, Melanie J; Ponte, Valeria A; Thakur, Siddhartha; Wittum, Thomas; DeGraves, Fred J; Rajala-Schultz, Paivi J; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an important foodborne pathogen, and pigs are recognized as a major reservoir and potential source of pathogenic strains to humans. A total of 172 Y. enterocolitica recovered from conventional and antimicrobial-free pig production systems from different geographic regions (North Carolina, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa) were investigated to determine their pathogenic significance to humans. Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of the isolates was assessed using antibiogram, serogrouping, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Carriage of chromosomal and plasmid-borne virulence genes were investigated using polymerase chain reaction. A total of 12 antimicrobial resistance patterns were identified. More than two-thirds (67.4%) of Y. enterocolitica were pan-susceptible, and 27.9% were resistant against β-lactams. The most predominant serogroup was O:3 (43%), followed by O:5 (25.6%) and O:9 (4.1%). Twenty-two of 172 (12.8%) isolates were found to carry Yersinia adhesion A (yadA), a virulence gene encoded on the Yersinia virulence plasmid. Sixty-nine (40.1%) isolates were found to carry ail gene. The ystA and ystB genes were detected in 77% and 26.2% of the strains, respectively. AFLP genotyping of isolates showed wide genotypic diversity and were grouped into nine clades with an overall genotypic similarity of 66.8-99.3%. AFLP analysis revealed that isolates from the same production system showed clonal relatedness, while more than one genotype of Y. enterocolitica circulates within a farm.

  7. Diversity of nitrite reductase genes (nirS) in the denitrifying water column of the coastal Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, D.A.; Francis, C.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ward, B.B.

    are investigated. Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide is the key step in the denitrification pathway, and is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is encoded by the genes nirS and nirK. The diversity and distribution of nirS genes in relation to nitrite...

  8. Natural diversity in daily rhythms of gene expression contributes to phenotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montaigu, Amaury; Giakountis, Antonis; Rubin, Matthew; Tóth, Réka; Cremer, Frédéric; Sokolova, Vladislava; Porri, Aimone; Reymond, Matthieu; Weinig, Cynthia; Coupland, George

    2015-01-20

    Daily rhythms of gene expression provide a benefit to most organisms by ensuring that biological processes are activated at the optimal time of day. Although temporal patterns of expression control plant traits of agricultural importance, how natural genetic variation modifies these patterns during the day and how precisely these patterns influence phenotypes is poorly understood. The circadian clock regulates the timing of gene expression, and natural variation in circadian rhythms has been described, but circadian rhythms are measured in artificial continuous conditions that do not reflect the complexity of biologically relevant day/night cycles. By studying transcriptional rhythms of the evening-expressed gene gigantea (GI) at high temporal resolution and during day/night cycles, we show that natural variation in the timing of GI expression occurs mostly under long days in 77 Arabidopsis accessions. This variation is explained by natural alleles that alter light sensitivity of GI, specifically in the evening, and that act at least partly independent of circadian rhythms. Natural alleles induce precise changes in the temporal waveform of GI expression, and these changes have detectable effects on phytochrome interacting factor 4 expression and growth. Our findings provide a paradigm for how natural alleles act within day/night cycles to precisely modify temporal gene expression waveforms and cause phenotypic diversity. Such alleles could confer an advantage by adjusting the activity of temporally regulated processes without severely disrupting the circadian system.

  9. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naveed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ. Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization.

  10. Genetic diversity of ORF3 and spike genes of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temeeyasen, Gun; Srijangwad, Anchalee; Tripipat, Thitima; Tipsombatboon, Pavita; Piriyapongsa, Jittima; Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo; Chuanasa, Taksina; Tantituvanont, Angkana; Nilubol, Dachrit

    2014-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has become endemic in the Thai swine industry, causing economic losses and repeated outbreaks since its first emergence in 2007. In the present study, 69 Thai PEDV isolates were obtained from 50 swine herds across Thailand during the period 2008-2012. Both partial and complete nucleotide sequences of the spike (S) glycoprotein and the nucleotide sequences of ORF3 genes were determined to investigate the genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of Thai PEDV. Based on the analysis of the partial S glycoprotein genes, the Thai PEDV isolates were clustered into 2 groups related to Korean and Chinese field isolates. The results for the complete spike genes, however, demonstrated that both groups were grouped in the same cluster. Interestingly, both groups of Thai PEDV isolates had a 4-aa (GENQ) insertion between positions 55 and 56, a 1-aa insertion between positions 135 and 136, and a 2-aa deletion between positions 155 and 156, making them identical to the Korean KNU series and isolates responsible for outbreaks in China in recent years. In addition to the complete S sequences, the ORF3 gene analyses suggested that the isolates responsible for outbreaks in Thailand are not vaccine related. The results of this study suggest that the PEDV isolates responsible for outbreaks in Thailand since its emergence represent a variant of PEDV that was previously reported in China and Korea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of a partitioned var gene repertoire of Plasmodium falciparum on antigenic diversity and the acquisition of clinical immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinaminpathy Nimalan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exploits antigenic diversity and within-host antigenic variation to evade the host's immune system. Of particular importance are the highly polymorphic var genes that encode the family of cell surface antigens PfEMP1 (Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1. It has recently been shown that in spite of their extreme diversity, however, these genes fall into distinct groups according to chromosomal location or sequence similarity, and that recombination may be confined within these groups. Methods This study presents a mathematical analysis of how recombination hierarchies affect diversity, and, by using simple stochastic simulations, investigates how intra- and inter-genic diversity influence the rate at which individuals acquire clinical immunity. Results The analysis demonstrates that the partitioning of the var gene repertoire has a limiting effect on the total diversity attainable through recombination and that the limiting effect is strongly influenced by the respective sizes of each of the partitions. Furthermore, by associating expression of one of the groups with severe malaria it is demonstrated how a small number of infections can be sufficient to protect against disease despite a seemingly limitless number of possible non-identical repertoires. Conclusion Recombination hierarchies within the var gene repertoire of P. falciparum have a severe effect on strain diversity and the process of acquiring immunity against clinical malaria. Future studies will show how the existence of these recombining groups can offer an evolutionary advantage in spite of their restriction on diversity.

  12. Phylogenetic Diversity of aprA Genes in Subseafloor Sediments on the Northwestern Pacific Margin off Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masataka; Kakiuchi, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Takai, Ken; Inagaki, Fumio; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Markedly diverse sequences of the adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase alpha subunit gene (aprA), which encodes a key enzyme in microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation, were detected in subseafloor sediments on the northwestern Pacific off Japan. The aprA gene sequences were grouped into 135 operational taxonomic units (90% sequence identity), including genes related to putative sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominantly detected in sulfate-depleted deep sediments. Our results suggest that microbial ecosystems in the subseafloor biosphere have phylogenetically diverse genetic potentials to mediate cryptic sulfur cycles in sediments, even where sulfate is rarely present.

  13. Inhibition of RORγT Skews TCRα Gene Rearrangement and Limits T Cell Repertoire Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanism of RORγT transcriptional regulation of Th17 differentiation and function. RORγT was initially identified as a transcription factor required for thymopoiesis by maintaining survival of CD4+CD8+ (DP thymocytes. While RORγ antagonists are currently being developed to treat autoimmunity, it remains unclear how RORγT inhibition may impact thymocyte development. In this study, we show that in addition to regulating DP thymocytes survival, RORγT also controls genes that regulate thymocyte migration, proliferation, and T cell receptor (TCRα selection. Strikingly, pharmacological inhibition of RORγ skews TCRα gene rearrangement, limits T cell repertoire diversity, and inhibits development of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, targeting RORγT not only inhibits Th17 cell development and function but also fundamentally alters thymic-emigrant recognition of self and foreign antigens. The analysis of RORγ inhibitors has allowed us to gain a broader perspective of the diverse function of RORγT and its impact on T cell biology.

  14. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on ?sequence capture? reveals functional diversity in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahr?n, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agric...

  15. High diversity and no significant selection signal of human ADH1B gene in Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background ADH1B is one of the most studied human genes with many polymorphic sites. One of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1229984, coding for the Arg48His substitution, have been associated with many serious diseases including alcoholism and cancers of the digestive system. The derived allele, ADH1B*48His, reaches high frequency only in East Asia and Southwest Asia, and is highly associated with agriculture. Micro-evolutionary study has defined seven haplogroups for ADH1B based on seven SNPs encompassing the gene. Three of those haplogroups, H5, H6, and H7, contain the ADH1B*48His allele. H5 occurs in Southwest Asia and the other two are found in East Asia. H7 is derived from H6 by the derived allele of rs3811801. The H7 haplotype has been shown to have undergone significant positive selection in Han Chinese, Hmong, Koreans, Japanese, Khazak, Mongols, and so on. Methods In the present study, we tested whether Tibetans also showed evidence for selection by typing 23 SNPs in the region covering the ADH1B gene in 1,175 individuals from 12 Tibetan populations representing all districts of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Multiple statistics were estimated to examine the gene diversities and positive selection signals among the Tibetans and other populations in East Asia. Results The larger Tibetan populations (Qamdo, Lhasa, Nagqu, Nyingchi, Shannan, and Shigatse) comprised mostly farmers, have around 12% of H7, and 2% of H6. The smaller populations, living on hunting or recently switched to farming, have lower H7 frequencies (Tingri 9%, Gongbo 8%, Monba and Sherpa 6%). Luoba (2%) and Deng (0%) have even lower frequencies. Long-range haplotype analyses revealed very weak signals of positive selection for H7 among Tibetans. Interestingly, the haplotype diversity of H7 is higher in Tibetans than in any other populations studied, indicating a longer diversification history for that haplogroup in Tibetans. Network analysis on the long-range haplotypes revealed

  16. Similar diversity of Alphaproteobacteria and nitrogenase gene amplicons on two related Sphagnum mosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia eBragina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum mosses represent a main component in ombrotrophic wetlands. They harbor a specific and diverse microbial community with essential functions for the host. To understand extend and degree of host specificity, Sphagnum fallax and S. angustifolium, two phylogenetically closely related species, which show distinct habitat preference with respect to the nutrient level, were analyzed by a multifaceted approach. Microbial fingerprints obtained by PCR-SSCP (single-strand conformation polymorphism using universal, group-specific and functional primers were highly similar. Similarity was confirmed for colonization patterns obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM: Alphaproteobacteria were the main colonizers inside the hyaline cells of Sphagnum leaves. A deeper survey of Alphaproteobacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing reveals a high diversity with Acidocella, Acidisphaera, Rhodopila and Phenylobacterium as major genera for both mosses. Pathogen defense and nitrogen fixation are important functions of Sphagnum-associated bacteria, which are fulfilled by microbial communities of both Sphagna in a similar way. NifH libraries of Sphagnum-associated microbial communities were characterized by high diversity and abundance of Alphaproteobacteria but contained also diverse amplicons of other taxa, e.g. Cyanobacteria, Geobacter and Spirochaeta. Statistically significant differences between the microbial communities of both Sphagnum species could not be discovered in any of the experimental approach. Our results show that the same close relationship, which exists between the physical, morphological and chemical characteristics of Sphagnum mosses and the ecology and function of bog ecosystems, also connects moss plantlets with their associated bacterial communities.

  17. Heterogeneity and diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in select Saudi Arabian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Malik, S

    2015-07-14

    In order to investigate the diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in the Saudi Arabian population, we assembled the phenotypic data of approximately 66,000 subjects from ten representative Saudi populations: Al-Khobar, Riyadh, Tabuk/Madina Al-Munawaara, Jeddah, Abha, South region, Sakaka, Domah, Al-Qurayat, and Sweer. The frequencies of p[A], q[B], and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus were observed to be 0.1688, 0.1242, and 0.7070, respectively, and the frequency of the D allele at the Rh locus was 0.7138. The heterozygosities at the ABO and Rh loci were 0.4563 and 0.4086, respectively, while the combined heterozygosity was 0.4324. Homogeneity tests revealed the population of Abha to be the most heterogeneous while that of Tabuk/Madina was found to be the least heterogeneous. Homogeneity was higher among the Northern populations while Southern populations demonstrated subdivisions and stratification. Gene diversity analyses yielded a total heterozygosity value of 0.4449. The coefficient of gene differentiation was 0.0090. Nei's genetic distance analyses showed that there was close affinity between the populations of Al-Khobar and Riyadh. The largest differences were observed between the populations of Sakaka and Domah. Furthermore, negative correlations were found between p[A] and r[O] alleles, and between q[B] and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus. Clinal analyses revealed that the r[O] allele showed an increasing trend from North-East to South-West, and conversely the q[B] allele exhibited a decreasing trend at these coordinates. These analyses present interesting aspects of the blood group allele distribution across the geography of Saudi Arabia.

  18. Unexpected nondenitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene diversity and abundance in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Robert A; Wagner, Darlene D; Wu, Qingzhong; Chee-Sanford, Joanne C; Thomas, Sara H; Cruz-García, Claribel; Rodríguez, Gina; Massol-Deyá, Arturo; Krishnani, Kishore K; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Nissen, Silke; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Löffler, Frank E

    2012-11-27

    Agricultural and industrial practices more than doubled the intrinsic rate of terrestrial N fixation over the past century with drastic consequences, including increased atmospheric nitrous oxide (N(2)O) concentrations. N(2)O is a potent greenhouse gas and contributor to ozone layer destruction, and its release from fixed N is almost entirely controlled by microbial activities. Mitigation of N(2)O emissions to the atmosphere has been attributed exclusively to denitrifiers possessing NosZ, the enzyme system catalyzing N(2)O to N(2) reduction. We demonstrate that diverse microbial taxa possess divergent nos clusters with genes that are related yet evolutionarily distinct from the typical nos genes of denitirifers. nos clusters with atypical nosZ occur in Bacteria and Archaea that denitrify (44% of genomes), do not possess other denitrification genes (56%), or perform dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA; (31%). Experiments with the DNRA soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans demonstrated that the atypical NosZ is an effective N(2)O reductase, and PCR-based surveys suggested that atypical nosZ are abundant in terrestrial environments. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that atypical nos clusters possess distinctive regulatory and functional components (e.g., Sec vs. Tat secretion pathway in typical nos), and that previous nosZ-targeted PCR primers do not capture the atypical nosZ diversity. Collectively, our results suggest that nondenitrifying populations with a broad range of metabolisms and habitats are potentially significant contributors to N(2)O consumption. Apparently, a large, previously unrecognized group of environmental nosZ has not been accounted for, and characterizing their contributions to N(2)O consumption will advance understanding of the ecological controls on N(2)O emissions and lead to refined greenhouse gas flux models.

  19. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  20. Analysis of Prolactin Gene Exon 4 Diversity in Peking, White Mojosari, and Peking White Mojosari Crossbreed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Indriati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic marker linked to loci reproductive traits could be used to increase an effectiveness of improvement in animal breeding. Association between DNA polymorphism and a trait could be considered as candidate genetic marker for marker assisted selection (MAS programs. Prolactin (PRL is one of polypeptide hormones secreted by anterior pituitary gland in vertebrates. PRL plays an important role in onset of poultry incubation and brooding behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of prolactin gene and to characterize the type of mutation in partial intron 3, intron 4 and exon 4 of duck prolactin gene. Blood extraction was collected from 168 ducks consisted of 19 Peking, 36 Mojosari, and 113 Peking White Mojosari (Peking Mojosari putih ducks. Polymerase chain reaction of fragment prolactin gene exon 4 and partial intron 3 and 4 have been successfully amplified with length of base pair were 496 bp. A total of 30 µL PCR product from each sample were sequenced for forward sequence using BIOTRACE 3730 by First Base Company, Malaysia. Alignment analysis found six SNP consisted of g.3941T>G, g.3975C>A, g.4110T>C, INDEL 3724A, INDEL 34031, and INDEL 3939A. Analysis of SNP frequency result indicated mutation of INDEL 3724A, g.3941T>G, g.3975C>A, INDEL 4031A and g.4110T>A in duck sample were polymorphic and INDEL 3939A were monomorphic.

  1. Metagenomic analysis revealed highly diverse microbial arsenic metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-arsenic contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Ke-Qing; Li, Li-Guan; Ma, Li-Ping; Zhang, Si-Yu; Bao, Peng; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) metabolism plays a critical role in global As cycle, and As metabolism involves different types of genes encoding proteins facilitating its biotransformation and transportation processes. Here, we used metagenomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing and constructed As metabolism protein databases to analyze As metabolism genes in five paddy soils with low-As contents. The results showed that highly diverse As metabolism genes were present in these paddy soils, with varied abundances and distribution for different types and subtypes of these genes. Arsenate reduction genes (ars) dominated in all soil samples, and significant correlation existed between the abundance of arr (arsenate respiration), aio (arsenite oxidation), and arsM (arsenite methylation) genes, indicating the co-existence and close-relation of different As resistance systems of microbes in wetland environments similar to these paddy soils after long-term evolution. Among all soil parameters, pH was an important factor controlling the distribution of As metabolism gene in five paddy soils (p = 0.018). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics approach in characterizing As metabolism genes in the five paddy soil, showing their great potential in As biotransformation, and therefore in mitigating arsenic risk to humans. - Highlights: • Use metagenomics to analyze As metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-As content. • These genes were ubiquitous, abundant, and associated with diverse microbes. • pH as an important factor controlling their distribution in paddy soil. • Imply combinational effect of evolution and selection on As metabolism genes. - Metagenomics was used to analyze As metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-As contents. These genes were ubiquitous, abundant, and associated with diverse microbes.

  2. Exploiting genes and functional diversity of chlorogenic acid and luteolin biosyntheses in Lonicera japonica and their substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Zhouyong; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Xumin; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-25

    Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) and luteolin are active compounds in Lonicera japonica, a plant of high medicinal value in traditional Chinese medicine. This study provides a comprehensive overview of gene families involved in chlorogenic acid and luteolin biosynthesis in L. japonica, as well as its substitutes Lonicera hypoglauca and Lonicera macranthoides. The gene sequence feature and gene expression patterns in various tissues and buds of the species were characterized. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 14 chlorogenic acid and luteolin biosynthesis-related genes were identified from the L. japonica transcriptome assembly. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the function of individual gene could be differentiation and induce active compound diversity. Their orthologous genes were also recognized in L. hypoglauca and L. macranthoides genomic datasets, except for LHCHS1 and LMC4H2. The expression patterns of these genes are different in the tissues of L. japonica, L. hypoglauca and L. macranthoides. Results also showed that CGAs were controlled in the first step of biosynthesis, whereas both steps controlled luteolin in the bud of L. japonica. The expression of LJFNS2 exhibited positive correlation with luteolin levels in L. japonica. This study provides significant information for understanding the functional diversity of gene families involved in chlorogenic acid and the luteolin biosynthesis, active compound diversity of L. japonica and its substitutes, and the different usages of the three species. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Diversification of the monoterpene synthase gene family (TPSb) in Protium, a highly diverse genus of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Felipe; Fine, Paul V A

    2013-09-01

    Plant monoterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites mediating biotic and abiotic interactions with direct effects on plant fitness. To evaluate the hypothesis that monoterpene diversity is related to functional diversification after gene duplication, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of monoterpene synthases (TPSb)--the genes underlying monoterpene synthesis--in Protium, a taxonomically and chemically diverse genus of tropical trees. We isolated multiple copies of TPSb genes from chemically divergent Protium species, reconstructed the phylogeny of this gene family, used maximum-likelihood estimation of selection coefficients, and inferred residues evolving under positive selection. We found evidence for one ancient and multiple more recent duplication events giving rise to three, and potentially five, copies of TPSb genes currently present in Protium. There was evidence for adaptive evolution in one copy with a positively selected residue likely involved in protein folding and product specificity. All other copies were inferred to be evolving under a combination of stabilizing and/or relaxed selection. Although gene copy number is consistent with the extensive phenotypic diversity in monoterpenes shown in Protium, selection analyses suggest that not all copies are undergoing divergent selection consistent with a coevolutionary arms race with enemies, but instead may be under stabilizing and relaxed selection consistent with signaling or physiological stress functionality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hunting down frame shifts: Ecological analysis of diverse functional gene sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eStrejcek

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional gene ecological analyses using amplicon sequencing can be challenging as translated sequences are often burdened with shifted reading frames. The aim of this work was to evaluate several bioinformatics tools designed to correct errors which arise during sequencing in an effort to reduce the number of frame-shifts (FS. Genes encoding for alpha subunits of biphenyl (bphA and benzoate (benA dioxygenases were used as model sequences. FrameBot, a FS correction tool, was able to reduce the number of detected FS to zero. However, up to 43.1% of sequences were discarded by FrameBot as non-specific targets. Therefore, we proposed a de novo mode of FrameBot for FS correction, which works on a similar basis as common chimera identifying platforms and is not dependent on reference sequences. By nature of FrameBot de novo design, it is crucial to provide it with data as error free as possible. We tested the ability of several publicly available correction tools to decrease the number of errors in the data sets. The combination of Maximum Expected Error (MEE filtering and single linkage pre-clustering (SLP proved the most efficient read procession. Applying FrameBot de novo on the processed data enabled analysis of BphA sequences with minimal losses of potentially functional sequences not homologous to those previously known. This experiment also demonstrated the extensive diversity of dioxygenases in soil. A script which performs FrameBot de novo is presented in the supplementary material to the study and the tool was implemented into FunGene Pipeline available at http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/FunGenePipeline/ and https://github.com/rdpstaff/Framebot.

  5. Trichomonas vaginalis vast BspA-like gene family: evidence for functional diversity from structural organisation and transcriptomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Noel, CJ; Diaz, N

    2010-01-01

    were characterized by a considerable structural diversity between their TpLRR and other types of repetitive sequences and two subfamilies possessed distinct classic sorting signal motifs for endocytosis. One TvBspA subfamily also shared a glycine-rich protein domain with proteins from Clostridium...... difficile pathogenic strains and C. difficile phages. Consistent with the hypothesis that TvBspA protein structural diversity implies diverse roles, we demonstrated for several TvBspA genes differential expression at the transcript level in different growth conditions. Identified variants of repetitive...... were also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: The biased mucosal habitat for microbial species encoding BspA-like proteins, the characterization of a vast structural diversity for the TvBspA proteins, differential expression of a subset of TvBspA genes and the cellular localisation and immunological data...

  6. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium of nine genes with putative effects on flowering time in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Alice; Lenk, Ingo; Petersen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of flowering is an important breeding goal in forage and turf grasses, such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). Nine floral control genes including Lolium perenne CONSTANS (LpCO), SISTER OF FLOWERING LOCUS T (LpSFT), TERMINAL FLOWER1 (LpTFL1), VERNALIZATION1 (LpVRN1, identical......, one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was present per 127 bp between two randomly sampled sequences for the nine genes (π = 0.00790). Two MADS-box genes, LpMADS1 and LpMADS10, involved in timing of flowering showed high nucleotide diversity and rapid LD decay, whereas MADS-box genes involved...

  7. Endophytic actinobacteria: Diversity, secondary metabolism and mechanisms to unsilence biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Raghavan; Srinivasan, Veeraraghavan; T E, Sheeja; Anandaraj, Muthuswamy; Srambikkal, Hamza

    2017-09-01

    Endophytic actinobacteria, which reside in the inner tissues of host plants, are gaining serious attention due to their capacity to produce a plethora of secondary metabolites (e.g. antibiotics) possessing a wide variety of biological activity with diverse functions. This review encompasses the recent reports on endophytic actinobacterial species diversity, in planta habitats and mechanisms underlying their mode of entry into plants. Besides, their metabolic potential, novel bioactive compounds they produce and mechanisms to unravel their hidden metabolic repertoire by activation of cryptic or silent biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for eliciting novel secondary metabolite production are discussed. The study also reviews the classical conservative techniques (chemical/biological/physical elicitation, co-culturing) as well as modern microbiology tools (e.g. next generation sequencing) that are being gainfully employed to uncover the vast hidden scaffolds for novel secondary metabolites produced by these endophytes, which would subsequently herald a revolution in drug engineering. The potential role of these endophytes in the agro-environment as promising biological candidates for inhibition of phytopathogens and the way forward to thoroughly exploit this unique microbial community by inducing expression of cryptic BGCs for encoding unseen products with novel therapeutic properties are also discussed.

  8. Diversity of HLA-DQA1 gene in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K W; Jung, Y-A; Oh, D H

    2007-04-01

    Genotype of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA1 locus was analyzed in Koreans (n= 467) using the 14th International Workshop protocol established to characterize the sequences of exons 1-4 of the gene. Unexpectedly, it appeared that the DQA1 (19 alleles) was more diverse than DQB1 (15 alleles) in the study population. DQA1*010201, DQA1*0303, DQA1*0103, and DQA1*0302 appeared to be major alleles exhibiting more than 10%. Among six allele groups, DQA1*01-*06, DQA1*01 showed highest diversity exhibiting seven different alleles. Analysis using maximum likelihood method showed numerous multi-locus HLA haplotypes. High relative linkage disequilibrium values (RLD) of the two-locus haplotypes and exclusive association of a specific DQA1 allele with a specific DRB1 and/or DQB1 alleles suggested tight linkage of DQA1 to DRB1 and DQB1. In HLA-matching process for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, however, DQA1 typing would be informative for individuals carrying specific DRB1 allele (DRB1*0802, DRB1*1201, or DRB1*1403) that could be associated with multiple DQA1 alleles in the study population. Information obtained in this study will be useful in medical and forensic areas as well as in anthropology.

  9. Diversity of conotoxin gene superfamilies in the venomous snail, Conus victoriae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Robinson

    Full Text Available Animal venoms represent a vast library of bioactive peptides and proteins with proven potential, not only as research tools but also as drug leads and therapeutics. This is illustrated clearly by marine cone snails (genus Conus, whose venoms consist of mixtures of hundreds of peptides (conotoxins with a diverse array of molecular targets, including voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and neurotransmitter transporters. Several conotoxins have found applications as research tools, with some being used or developed as therapeutics. The primary objective of this study was the large-scale discovery of conotoxin sequences from the venom gland of an Australian cone snail species, Conus victoriae. Using cDNA library normalization, high-throughput 454 sequencing, de novo transcriptome assembly and annotation with BLASTX and profile hidden Markov models, we discovered over 100 unique conotoxin sequences from 20 gene superfamilies, the highest diversity of conotoxins so far reported in a single study. Many of the sequences identified are new members of known conotoxin superfamilies, some help to redefine these superfamilies and others represent altogether new classes of conotoxins. In addition, we have demonstrated an efficient combination of methods to mine an animal venom gland and generate a library of sequences encoding bioactive peptides.

  10. Formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene diversity in the guts of higher termites with different diets and lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we examine gene diversity for formyl-tetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), a key enzyme in homoacetogenesis, recovered from the gut microbiota of six species of higher termites. The "higher" termites (family Termitidae), which represent the majority of extant termite species and genera, engage in a broader diversity of feeding and nesting styles than the "lower" termites. Previous studies of termite gut homoacetogenesis have focused on wood-feeding lower termites, from which the preponderance of FTHFS sequences recovered were related to those from acetogenic treponemes. While sequences belonging to this group were present in the guts of all six higher termites examined, treponeme-like FTHFS sequences represented the majority of recovered sequences in only two species (a wood-feeding Nasutitermes sp. and a palm-feeding Microcerotermes sp.). The remaining four termite species analyzed (a Gnathamitermes sp. and two Amitermes spp. that were recovered from subterranean nests with indeterminate feeding strategies and a litter-feeding Rhynchotermes sp.) yielded novel FTHFS clades not observed in lower termites. These termites yielded two distinct clusters of probable purinolytic Firmicutes and a large group of potential homoacetogens related to sequences previously recovered from the guts of omnivorous cockroaches. These findings suggest that the gut environments of different higher termite species may select for different groups of homoacetogens, with some species hosting treponeme-dominated homoacetogen populations similar to those of wood-feeding, lower termites while others host Firmicutes-dominated communities more similar to those of omnivorous cockroaches.

  11. Diversity of cyanobacterial biomarker genes from the stromatolites of Shark Bay, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garby, Tamsyn J; Walter, Malcolm R; Larkum, Anthony W D; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-05-01

    Families of closely related chemical compounds, which are relatively resistant to degradation, are often used as biomarkers to help trace the evolutionary history of early groups of organisms and the environments in which they lived. Biomarkers derived from hopanoid variations are particularly useful in determining bacterial community compositions. 2-Methylhopananoids have been thought to be diagnostic for cyanobacteria, and 2-methylhopanes in the geological record are taken as evidence for the presence of cyanobacteria-containing communities at the time of sediment deposition. Recently, however, doubt has been cast on the validity of 2-methylhopanes as cyanobacterial biomarkers, since non-cyanobacterial species have been shown to produce significant amounts of 2-methylhopanoids. This study examines the diversity of hpnP, the hopanoid biosynthesis gene coding for the enzyme that methylates hopanoids at the C2 position. Genomic DNA isolated from stromatolite-associated pustular and smooth microbial mat samples from Shark Bay, Western Australia, was analysed for bacterial diversity, and used to construct an hpnP clone library. A total of 117 partial hpnP clones were sequenced, representing 12 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 11 of these OTUs, representing 115 sequences, cluster within the cyanobacterial clade. We conclude that the dominant types of microorganisms with the detected capability of producing 2-methylhopanoids within pustular and smooth microbial mats in Shark Bay are cyanobacteria. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Gene flow and genetic diversity in cultivated and wild cacao (Theobroma cacao) in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumacero de Schawe, Claudia; Durka, Walter; Tscharntke, Teja; Hensen, Isabell; Kessler, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The role of pollen flow within and between cultivated and wild tropical crop species is little known. To study the pollen flow of cacao, we estimated the degree of self-pollination and pollen dispersal distances as well as gene flow between wild and cultivated cacao (Theobroma cacao L.). We studied pollen flow and genetic diversity of cultivated and wild cacao populations by genotyping 143 wild and 86 cultivated mature plants and 374 seedlings raised from 19 wild and 25 cultivated trees at nine microsatellite loci. A principal component analysis distinguished wild and cultivated cacao trees, supporting the notion that Bolivia harbors truly wild cacao populations. Cultivated cacao had a higher level of genetic diversity than wild cacao, presumably reflecting the varied origin of cultivated plants. Both cacao types had high outcrossing rates, but the paternity analysis revealed 7-14% self-pollination in wild and cultivated cacao. Despite the tiny size of the pollinators, pollen was transported distances up to 3 km; wild cacao showed longer distances (mean = 922 m) than cultivated cacao (826 m). Our data revealed that 16-20% of pollination events occurred between cultivated and wild populations. We found evidence of self-pollination in both wild and cultivated cacao. Pollination distances are larger than those typically reported in tropical understory tree species. The relatively high pollen exchange from cultivated to wild cacao compromises genetic identity of wild populations, calling for the protection of extensive natural forest tracts to protect wild cacao in Bolivia.

  13. The distribution, diversity, and importance of 16S rRNA gene introns in the order Thermoproteales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Zackary J; Inskeep, William P

    2015-07-09

    Intron sequences are common in 16S rRNA genes of specific thermophilic lineages of Archaea, specifically the Thermoproteales (phylum Crenarchaeota). Environmental sequencing (16S rRNA gene and metagenome) from geothermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has expanded the available datasets for investigating 16S rRNA gene introns. The objectives of this study were to characterize and curate archaeal 16S rRNA gene introns from high-temperature habitats, evaluate the conservation and distribution of archaeal 16S rRNA introns in geothermal systems, and determine which "universal" archaeal 16S rRNA gene primers are impacted by the presence of intron sequences. Several new introns were identified and their insertion loci were constrained to thirteen locations across the 16S rRNA gene. Many of these introns encode homing endonucleases, although some introns were short or partial sequences. Pyrobaculum, Thermoproteus, and Caldivirga 16S rRNA genes contained the most abundant and diverse intron sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of introns revealed that sequences within the same locus are distributed biogeographically. The most diverse set of introns were observed in a high-temperature, circumneutral (pH 6) sulfur sediment environment, which also contained the greatest diversity of different Thermoproteales phylotypes. The widespread presence of introns in the Thermoproteales indicates a high probability of misalignments using different "universal" 16S rRNA primers employed in environmental microbial community analysis.

  14. Pseudoplusia includens single nucleopolyhedrovirus: genetic diversity, phylogeny and hypervariability of the pif-2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craveiro, Saluana R; Melo, Fernando L; Ribeiro, Zilda Maria A; Ribeiro, Bergmann M; Báo, Sônia Nair; Inglis, Peter W; Castro, Maria Elita B

    2013-11-01

    The soybean looper (Pseudoplusia includens Walker, 1857) has become a major pest of soybean crops in Brazil. In order to determine the genetic diversity and phylogeny of variants of Pseudoplusia includens single nucleopolyhedrovirus (PsinSNPV-IA to -IG), partial sequences of the genes lef-8, lef-9, pif-2, phr and polh were obtained following degenerate PCR and phylogenetic trees constructed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. The aligned sequences showed polymorphisms among the isolates, where the pif-2 gene was by far the most variable and is predicted to be under positive selection. Furthermore, some of the pif-2 DNA sequence mutations are predicted to result in significant amino acid substitutions, possibly leading to changes in oral infectivity of this baculovirus. Cladistic analysis revealed two closely related monophyletic groups, one containing PsinNPV isolates IB, IC and ID and another containing isolates IA, IE, IF and IG. The phylogeny of PsinSNPV in relation to 56 other baculoviruses was also determined from the concatenated partial LEF-8, LEF-9, PIF-2 and POLH/GRAN deduced amino acid sequences, using maximum-parsimony and Bayesian methods. This analysis clearly places PsinSNPV with the Group II Alphabaculovirus, where PsinSNPV is most closely related to Chrysodeixis chalcites NPV and Trichoplusia ni SNPV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequence Diversity in MIC6 Gene among Toxoplasma gondii Isolates from Different Hosts and Geographical Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Yuan; Song, Hui-Qun; Chen, Jia; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic protozoan parasite that can infect almost all warm-blooded animals including humans with a worldwide distribution. Micronemes play an important role in invasion process of T. gondii, associated with the attachment, motility, and host cell recognition. In this research, sequence diversity in microneme protein 6 (MIC6) gene among 16 T. gondii isolates from different hosts and geographical regions and 1 reference strain was examined. The results showed that the sequence of all the examined T. gondii strains was 1,050 bp in length, and their A + T content was between 45.7% and 46.1%. Sequence analysis presented 33 nucleotide mutation positions (0-1.1%), resulting in 23 amino acid substitutions (0-2.3%) aligned with T. gondii RH strain. Moreover, T. gondii strains representing the 3 classical genotypes (Type I, II, and III) were separated into different clusters based on the locus of MIC6 using phylogenetic analyses by Bayesian inference (BI), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML), but T. gondii strains belonging to ToxoDB #9 were separated into different clusters. Our results suggested that MIC6 gene is not a suitable marker for T. gondii population genetic studies.

  16. Analysis of bacterial genetic diversity in biofloc by using ARDRA 16S-rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    , Widanarni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity of bacteria associated in bioflocs using 16S-rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR with ARDRA technique. A total of 38 dominant bacterial isolates was obtained from bioflocs samples and of these isolates, 16S-rRNA gene was then isolated and amplified using PCR. The 16S-rRNA gene of the isolates was then cut using HaeIII (5’-GG↓CC and HhaI (5’-GCG↓C restriction enzymes resulting an ARDRA pattern which was further used as the binary data for the construction of phylogenetics tree that was used to estimate the group of bacteria. The result with HaeIII cut restriction enzyme from biofloc-associated bacteria gave 11 ARDRA patterns, while with the restriction enzyme HhaI gave eight ARDRA patterns. Phylogenetics of bacterial populations from biofloc-based cultivation system water consisted of at least 13 different bacterial species. Result of sequencing from two gene sample 16S-rRNA were identified as Microbacterium foliorumand and Pseudomonas putida. Keywords: bacterial diversity, ARDRA, biofloc, phylogeny  ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis keragaman genetika bakteri bioflok menggunakan metode polymerase chain reaction (PCR 16S-rRNA dengan teknik ARDRA. Sebanyak 38 isolat bakteri dominan yang diperoleh diamplifikasi gen 16S-rRNAnya dengan PCR, kemudian dipotong dengan enzim restriksi HaeIII (5’-GG↓CC dan HhaI (5’-GCG↓C. Pola ARDRA ini dijadikan data biner sebagai input untuk konstruksi pohon filogenetika yang dapat digunakan untuk memerkirakan jenis bakteri yang ada. Gen 16S-rRNA hasil PCR setelah dipotong dengan enzim restriksi HaeIII didapatkan 11 pola ARDRA, sedangkan dengan enzim restriksi HhaI menghasilkan delapan pola ARDRA. Berdasarkan pohon filogenetika, diketahui populasi bakteri pada air sistem budidaya bioflok sedikitnya terdiri atas 13 jenis bakteri. Berdasarkan sekuensing dari dua sampel gen 16S-rRNA teridentifikasi jenis bakteri Microbacterium

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of Pasteurellaceae and horizontal gene transfer of leukotoxin in wild and domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Scott T; Cassirer, E Frances; Weiser, Glen C; Safaee, Shirin

    2007-01-01

    Wild and domestic animal populations are known to be sources and reservoirs of emerging diseases. There is also a growing recognition that horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) plays an important role in bacterial pathogenesis. We used molecular phylogenetic methods to assess diversity and cross-transmission rates of Pasteurellaceae bacteria in populations of bighorn sheep, Dall's sheep, domestic sheep and domestic goats. Members of the Pasteurellaceae cause an array of deadly illnesses including bacterial pneumonia known as "pasteurellosis", a particularly devastating disease for bighorn sheep. A phylogenetic analysis of a combined dataset of two RNA genes (16S ribosomal RNA and RNAse P RNA) revealed remarkable evolutionary diversity among Pasteurella trehalosi and Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica bacteria isolated from sheep and goats. Several phylotypes appeared to associate with particular host species, though we found numerous instances of apparent cross-transmission among species and populations. Statistical analyses revealed that host species, geographic locale and biovariant classification, but not virulence, correlated strongly with Pasteurellaceae phylogeny. Sheep host species correlated with P. trehalosi isolates phylogeny (PTP test; P=0.002), but not with the phylogeny of M. haemolytica isolates, suggesting that P. trehalosi bacteria may be more host specific. With regards to populations within species, we also discovered a strong correlation between geographic locale and isolate phylogeny in the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (PTP test; P=0.001). We also investigated the potential for HGT of the leukotoxin A (lktA) gene, which produces a toxin that plays an integral role in causing disease. Comparative analysis of the combined RNA gene phylogeny and the lktA phylogenies revealed considerable incongruence between the phylogenies, suggestive of HGT. Furthermore, we found identical lktA alleles in unrelated bacterial species, some of which had been isolated

  18. Virulence genes and genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 isolates from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneerat, K; Yongkiettrakul, S; Kramomtong, I; Tongtawe, P; Tapchaisri, P; Luangsuk, P; Chaicumpa, W; Gottschalk, M; Srimanote, P

    2013-11-01

    Isolates of Streptococcus suis from different Western countries as well as those from China and Vietnam have been previously well characterized. So far, the genetic characteristics and relationship between S. suis strains isolated from both humans and pigs in Thailand are unknown. In this study, a total of 245 S. suis isolates were collected from both human cases (epidemic and sporadic) and pigs (diseased and asymptomatic) in Thailand. Bacterial strains were identified by biochemical tests and PCR targeting both, the 16S rRNA and gdh genes. Thirty-six isolates were identified as serotype 2 based on serotyping and the cps2-PCR. These isolates were tested for the presence of six virulence-associated genes: an arginine deiminase (arcA), a 38-kDa protein and protective antigen (bay046), an extracellular factor (epf), an hyaluronidase (hyl), a muramidase-released protein (mrp) and a suilysin (sly). In addition, the genetic diversities of these isolates were studied by RAPD PCR and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Four virulence-associated gene patterns (VAGP 1 to 4) were obtained, and the majority of isolates (32/36) carried all genes tested (VAGP1). Each of the three OPB primers used provided 4 patterns designated RAPD-A to RAPD-D. Furthermore, MLST analysis could also distinguish the 36 isolates into four sequence types (STs): ST1 (n = 32), ST104 (n = 2), ST233 (n = 1) and a newly identified ST, ST336 (n = 1). Dendrogram constructions based on RAPD patterns indicated that S. suis serotype 2 isolates from Thailand could be divided into four groups and that the characteristics of the individual groups were in complete agreement with the virulence gene profiles and STs. The majority (32/36) of isolates recovered from diseased pigs, slaughterhouse pigs or human patients could be classified into a single group (VAGP1, RAPD-A and ST1). This genetic information strongly suggests the transmission of S. suis isolates from pigs to humans in Thailand. Our findings are

  19. Genetic diversity of the flagellin genes of Clostridium botulinum groups I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudstra, Cedric; Lambert, Dominic; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Austin, John; Fach, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by phenotypically and genetically different Clostridium species, including Clostridium botulinum and some strains of Clostridium baratii (serotype F) and Clostridium butyricum (serotype E). BoNT-producing clostridia responsible for human botulism encompass strains of group I (secreting proteases, producing toxin serotype A, B, or F, and growing optimally at 37°C) and group II (nonproteolytic, producing toxin serotype E, B, or F, and growing optimally at 30°C). Here we report the development of real-time PCR assays for genotyping C. botulinum strains of groups I and II based on flaVR (variable region sequence of flaA) sequences and the flaB gene. Real-time PCR typing of regions flaVR1 to flaVR10 and flaB was optimized and validated with 62 historical and Canadian C. botulinum strains that had been previously typed. Analysis of 210 isolates of European origin allowed the identification of four new C. botulinum flaVR types (flaVR11 to flaVR14) and one new flaVR type specific to C. butyricum type E (flaVR15). The genetic diversity of the flaVR among C. botulinum strains investigated in the present study reveals the clustering of flaVR types into 5 major subgroups. Subgroups 1, 3, and 4 contain proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, subgroup 2 is made up of nonproteolytic C. botulinum only, and subgroup 5 is specific to C. butyricum type E. The genetic variability of the flagellin genes carried by C. botulinum and the possible association of flaVR types with certain geographical areas make gene profiling of flaVR and flaB promising in molecular surveillance and epidemiology of C. botulinum.

  20. DNA microarray analysis reveals that antibiotic resistance-gene diversity in human gut microbiota is age related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Na; Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Liying; Yang, Xi; Yin, Yeshi; Lei, Fang; Zhu, Yongliang; Du, Qin; Wang, Xin; Meng, Zhiqi; Zhu, Baoli

    2014-03-12

    The human gut is a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes. In this report, we used a DNA microarray chip covering 369 resistance types to investigate the relationship between antibiotic resistance-gene diversity and human age. Metagenomic DNA from fecal samples from 124 healthy volunteers of four different age groups (pre-school-aged children (CH), school-aged children (SC), high school students (HSS) and adults (AD)) were hybridized to the microarray chip. The results showed that 80 different gene types were recovered from the gut microbiota of the 124 individuals: 25 from CH, 37 from SC, 58 from HSS and 72 from AD. Further analysis indicated that the antibiotic resistance genes in the CH, SC and AD groups clustered independently, whereas the gene types in the HSS group were more divergent. Our results indicated that antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut microbiota accumulate from childhood to adulthood and become more complex with age.

  1. Physical linkage of a human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene segment to diversity and joining region elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.W. Jr.; Walter, M.A.; Hofker, M.H.; Ebens, A.; Van Dijk, K.W.; Liao, L.C.; Cox, D.W.; Milner, E.C.B.; Perlmutter, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Antibody genes are assembled from a series of germ-line gene segments that are juxtaposed during the maturation of B lymphocytes. Although diversification of the adult antibody repertoire results in large part from the combinatorial joining of these gene segments, a restricted set of antibody heavy chain variable (V H ), diversity (D H ), and joining (J H ) region gene segments appears preferentially in the human fetal repertoire. The authors report here that one of these early-expressed V H elements (termed V H 6) is the most 3' V H gene segment, positioned 77 kilobases on the 5' side of the J H locus and immediately adjacent to a set of previously described D H sequences. In addition to providing a physical map linking human V H , D H , and J H elements, these results support the view that the programmed development of the antibody V H repertoire is determined in part by the chromosomal position of these gene segments

  2. DNA microarray analysis reveals that antibiotic resistance-gene diversity in human gut microbiota is age related

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Na; Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Liying; Yang, Xi; Yin, Yeshi; Lei, Fang; Zhu, Yongliang; Du, Qin; Wang, Xin; Meng, Zhiqi; Zhu, Baoli

    2014-01-01

    The human gut is a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes. In this report, we used a DNA microarray chip covering 369 resistance types to investigate the relationship between antibiotic resistance-gene diversity and human age. Metagenomic DNA from fecal samples from 124 healthy volunteers of four different age groups (pre-school-aged children (CH), school-aged children (SC), high school students (HSS) and adults (AD)) were hybridized to the microarray chip. The results showed that 80 different gene types were recovered from the gut microbiota of the 124 individuals: 25 from CH, 37 from SC, 58 from HSS and 72 from AD. Further analysis indicated that the antibiotic resistance genes in the CH, SC and AD groups clustered independently, whereas the gene types in the HSS group were more divergent. Our results indicated that antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut microbiota accumulate from childhood to adulthood and become more complex with age. PMID:24618772

  3. Aquaporins in the wild: natural genetic diversity and selective pressure in the PIP gene family in five Neotropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigeos, Delphine; Buonamici, Anna; Belkadi, Laurent; Rymer, Paul; Boshier, David; Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Scotti, Ivan

    2010-06-29

    Tropical trees undergo severe stress through seasonal drought and flooding, and the ability of these species to respond may be a major factor in their survival in tropical ecosystems, particularly in relation to global climate change. Aquaporins are involved in the regulation of water flow and have been shown to be involved in drought response; they may therefore play a major adaptive role in these species. We describe genetic diversity in the PIP sub-family of the widespread gene family of Aquaporins in five Neotropical tree species covering four botanical families. PIP Aquaporin subfamily genes were isolated, and their DNA sequence polymorphisms characterised in natural populations. Sequence data were analysed with statistical tests of standard neutral equilibrium and demographic scenarios simulated to compare with the observed results. Chloroplast SSRs were also used to test demographic transitions. Most gene fragments are highly polymorphic and display signatures of balancing selection or bottlenecks; chloroplast SSR markers have significant statistics that do not conform to expectations for population bottlenecks. Although not incompatible with a purely demographic scenario, the combination of all tests tends to favour a selective interpretation of extant gene diversity. Tropical tree PIP genes may generally undergo balancing selection, which may maintain high levels of genetic diversity at these loci. Genetic variation at PIP genes may represent a response to variable environmental conditions.

  4. Fingerprinting and diversity of bacterial copA genes in response to soil types, soil organic status and copper contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejon, David P H; Nowak, Virginie; Bouko, Sabrina; Pascault, Noémie; Mougel, Christophe; Martins, Jean M F; Ranjard, Lionel

    2007-09-01

    A molecular fingerprinting assay was developed to assess the diversity of copA genes, one of the genetic determinants involved in bacterial resistance to copper. Consensus primers of the copA genes were deduced from an alignment of sequences from proteobacterial strains. A PCR detection procedure was optimized for bacterial strains and allowed the description of a novel copA genetic determinant in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The copA DNA fingerprinting procedure was optimized for DNA directly extracted from soils differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and in their organic status (SOS). Particular copA genetic structures were obtained for each studied soil and a coinertia analysis with soil physico-chemical characteristics revealed the strong influence of pH, soil texture and the quality of soil organic matter. The molecular phylogeny of copA gene confirmed that specific copA genes clusters are specific for each SOS. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that this approach was sensitive to short-term responses of copA gene diversity to copper additions to soil samples, suggesting that community adaptation is preferentially controlled by the diversity of the innate copA genes rather than by the bioavailability of the metal.

  5. Aquaporins in the wild: natural genetic diversity and selective pressure in the PIP gene family in five Neotropical tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vendramin Giovanni G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tropical trees undergo severe stress through seasonal drought and flooding, and the ability of these species to respond may be a major factor in their survival in tropical ecosystems, particularly in relation to global climate change. Aquaporins are involved in the regulation of water flow and have been shown to be involved in drought response; they may therefore play a major adaptive role in these species. We describe genetic diversity in the PIP sub-family of the widespread gene family of Aquaporins in five Neotropical tree species covering four botanical families. Results PIP Aquaporin subfamily genes were isolated, and their DNA sequence polymorphisms characterised in natural populations. Sequence data were analysed with statistical tests of standard neutral equilibrium and demographic scenarios simulated to compare with the observed results. Chloroplast SSRs were also used to test demographic transitions. Most gene fragments are highly polymorphic and display signatures of balancing selection or bottlenecks; chloroplast SSR markers have significant statistics that do not conform to expectations for population bottlenecks. Although not incompatible with a purely demographic scenario, the combination of all tests tends to favour a selective interpretation of extant gene diversity. Conclusions Tropical tree PIP genes may generally undergo balancing selection, which may maintain high levels of genetic diversity at these loci. Genetic variation at PIP genes may represent a response to variable environmental conditions.

  6. Management with willow short rotation coppice increase the functional gene diversity and functional activity of a heavy metal polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, K; van Nostrand, J D; Vangronsveld, J; Witters, N; Janssen, J O; Kumpiene, J; Siebielec, G; Galazka, R; Giagnoni, L; Arenella, M; Zhou, J-Z; Renella, G

    2015-11-01

    We studied the microbial functional diversity, biochemical activity, heavy metals (HM) availability and soil toxicity of Cd, Pb and Zn contaminated soils, kept under grassland or short rotation coppice (SRC) to attenuate the risks associated with HM contamination and restore the soil ecological functions. Soil microbial functional diversity was analyzed by the GeoChip, a functional gene microarray containing probes for genes involved in nutrient cycling, metal resistance and stress response. Soil under SRC showed a higher abundance of microbial genes involved in C, N, P and S cycles and resistance to various HM, higher microbial biomass, respiration and enzyme activity rates, and lower HM availability than the grassland soil. The linkages between functional genes of soil microbial communities and soil chemical properties, HM availability and biochemical activity were also investigated. Soil toxicity and N, P and Pb availability were important factors in shaping the microbial functional diversity, as determined by CCA. We concluded that in HM contaminated soils the microbial functional diversity was positively influenced by SRC management through the reduction of HM availability and soil toxicity increase of nutrient cycling. The presented results can be important in predicting the long term environmental sustainability of plant-based soil remediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sexuality Generates Diversity in the Aflatoxin Gene Cluster: Evidence on a Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Geromy G.; Elliott, Jacalyn L.; Singh, Rakhi; Horn, Bruce W.; Dorner, Joe W.; Stone, Eric A.; Chulze, Sofia N.; Barros, German G.; Naik, Manjunath K.; Wright, Graeme C.; Hell, Kerstin; Carbone, Ignazio

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in oil-rich seed and grain crops and are a serious problem in agriculture, with aflatoxin B1 being the most carcinogenic natural compound known. Sexual reproduction in these species occurs between individuals belonging to different vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). We examined natural genetic variation in 758 isolates of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes sampled from single peanut fields in the United States (Georgia), Africa (Benin), Argentina (Córdoba), Australia (Queensland) and India (Karnataka). Analysis of DNA sequence variation across multiple intergenic regions in the aflatoxin gene clusters of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) organized into distinct blocks that are conserved across different localities, suggesting that genetic recombination is nonrandom and a global occurrence. To assess the contributions of asexual and sexual reproduction to fixation and maintenance of toxin chemotype diversity in populations from each locality/species, we tested the null hypothesis of an equal number of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating-type individuals, which is indicative of a sexually recombining population. All samples were clone-corrected using multi-locus sequence typing which associates closely with VCG. For both A. flavus and A. parasiticus, when the proportions of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 were significantly different, there was more extensive LD in the aflatoxin cluster and populations were fixed for specific toxin chemotype classes, either the non-aflatoxigenic class in A. flavus or the B1-dominant and G1-dominant classes in A. parasiticus. A mating type ratio close to 1∶1 in A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes was associated with higher recombination rates in the aflatoxin cluster and less pronounced chemotype differences in populations. This work shows that the reproductive nature of the population (more

  8. Sexuality generates diversity in the aflatoxin gene cluster: evidence on a global scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geromy G Moore

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in oil-rich seed and grain crops and are a serious problem in agriculture, with aflatoxin B₁ being the most carcinogenic natural compound known. Sexual reproduction in these species occurs between individuals belonging to different vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs. We examined natural genetic variation in 758 isolates of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes sampled from single peanut fields in the United States (Georgia, Africa (Benin, Argentina (Córdoba, Australia (Queensland and India (Karnataka. Analysis of DNA sequence variation across multiple intergenic regions in the aflatoxin gene clusters of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium (LD organized into distinct blocks that are conserved across different localities, suggesting that genetic recombination is nonrandom and a global occurrence. To assess the contributions of asexual and sexual reproduction to fixation and maintenance of toxin chemotype diversity in populations from each locality/species, we tested the null hypothesis of an equal number of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating-type individuals, which is indicative of a sexually recombining population. All samples were clone-corrected using multi-locus sequence typing which associates closely with VCG. For both A. flavus and A. parasiticus, when the proportions of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 were significantly different, there was more extensive LD in the aflatoxin cluster and populations were fixed for specific toxin chemotype classes, either the non-aflatoxigenic class in A. flavus or the B₁-dominant and G₁-dominant classes in A. parasiticus. A mating type ratio close to 1∶1 in A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. minisclerotigenes was associated with higher recombination rates in the aflatoxin cluster and less pronounced chemotype differences in populations. This work shows that the reproductive nature of

  9. Genetic diversity of the conserved motifs of six bacterial leaf blight resistance genes in a set of rice landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Basabdatta; Sengupta, Samik; Prasad, Manoj; Ghose, Tapas Kumar

    2014-07-12

    Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by the vascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious diseases leading to crop failure in rice growing countries. A total of 37 resistance genes against Xoo has been identified in rice. Of these, ten BLB resistance genes have been mapped on rice chromosomes, while 6 have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. Diversity analysis at the resistance gene level of this disease is scanty, and the landraces from West Bengal and North Eastern states of India have received little attention so far. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity at conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes in a set of 22 rice accessions including landraces and check genotypes collected from the states of Assam, Nagaland, Mizoram and West Bengal. In this study 34 pairs of primers were designed from conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes; Xa1, xa5, Xa21, Xa21(A1), Xa26 and Xa27. The designed primer pairs were used to generate PCR based polymorphic DNA profiles to detect and elucidate the genetic diversity of the six genes in the 22 diverse rice accessions of known disease phenotype. A total of 140 alleles were identified including 41 rare and 26 null alleles. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) value was 0.56/primer pair. The DNA profiles identified each of the rice landraces unequivocally. The amplified polymorphic DNA bands were used to calculate genetic similarity of the rice landraces in all possible pair combinations. The similarity among the rice accessions ranged from 18% to 89% and the dendrogram produced from the similarity values was divided into 2 major clusters. The conserved domains identified within the sequenced rare alleles include Leucine-Rich Repeat, BED-type zinc finger domain, sugar transferase domain and the domain of the carbohydrate esterase 4 superfamily. This study revealed high genetic diversity at conserved domains of six BLB resistance genes in a set of 22

  10. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on ‘sequence capture’ reveals functional diversity in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. PMID:26490729

  11. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on 'sequence capture' reveals functional diversity in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-12-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  12. Identifying gene coexpression networks underlying the dynamic regulation of wood-forming tissues in Populus under diverse environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkgraf, Matthew; Liu, Lijun; Groover, Andrew; Filkov, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Trees modify wood formation through integration of environmental and developmental signals in complex but poorly defined transcriptional networks, allowing trees to produce woody tissues appropriate to diverse environmental conditions. In order to identify relationships among genes expressed during wood formation, we integrated data from new and publically available datasets in Populus. These datasets were generated from woody tissue and include transcriptome profiling, transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility and genome-wide association mapping experiments. Coexpression modules were calculated, each of which contains genes showing similar expression patterns across experimental conditions, genotypes and treatments. Conserved gene coexpression modules (four modules totaling 8398 genes) were identified that were highly preserved across diverse environmental conditions and genetic backgrounds. Functional annotations as well as correlations with specific experimental treatments associated individual conserved modules with distinct biological processes underlying wood formation, such as cell-wall biosynthesis, meristem development and epigenetic pathways. Module genes were also enriched for DNase I hypersensitivity footprints and binding from four transcription factors associated with wood formation. The conserved modules are excellent candidates for modeling core developmental pathways common to wood formation in diverse environments and genotypes, and serve as testbeds for hypothesis generation and testing for future studies. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Probing the diversity of the Arabidopsis glutathione S-transferase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ulrich; Edwards, Robert; Dixon, David P; Mauch, Felix

    2002-07-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) appear to be ubiquitous in plants and have defined roles in herbicide detoxification. In contrast, little is known about their roles in normal plant physiology and during responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Forty-seven members of the GST super-family were identified in the Arabidopsis genome, grouped into four classes, with amino acid sequence identity between classes being below 25%. The two small zeta (GSTZ) and theta (GSTT) classes have related GSTs in animals while the large phi (GSTF) and tau (GSTU) classes are plant specific. As a first step to functionally characterize this diverse super-family, 10 cDNAs representing all GST classes were cloned by RT-PCR and used to study AtGST expression in response to treatment with phytohormones, herbicides, oxidative stress and inoculation with virulent and avirulent strains of the downy mildew pathogen Peronospora parasitica. The abundance of transcripts encoding AtGSTF9, AtGSTF10, AtGSTU5, AtGSTU13 and AtGSTT1 were unaffected by any of the treatments. In contrast, AtGSTF6 was upregulated by all treatments while AtGSTF2, AtGSTF8, AtGSTU19 and AtGSTZ1 each showed a selective spectrum of inducibility to the different stresses indicating that regulation of gene expression in this super-family is controlled by multiple mechanisms. The respective cDNAs were over expressed in E. coli. All GSTs except AtGSTF10 formed soluble proteins which catalysed a specific range of glutathione conjugation or glutathione peroxidase activities. Our results give further insights into the complex regulation and enzymic functions of this plant gene super-family.

  14. Diverse patterns of cyclooxygenase-independent metalloproteinase gene regulation in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reel, Buket; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Huang, Wei-Chun; Newby, Andrew C

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production from monocyte/macrophages is implicated in matrix remodelling and modulation of inflammation. However, knowledge of the patterns and mechanisms of gene regulation of MMPs and their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) is fragmentary. MMP up-regulation may be a target for cyclooxygenase (COX) and prostaglandin (PG) receptor inhibition, but the extent and mechanisms of COX-independent MMP up-regulation are unclear. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We studied MMP mRNA expression and selected protein levels in human peripheral blood monocytes before and after adhesion, upon stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PGE(2) or forskolin and after culturing with monocyte colony-stimulating factor on plastic or human fibronectin for up to 7 days. KEY RESULTS Monocyte adherence for 2 h transiently up-regulated COX-2, MMP-1, MMP-7 and MMP-10 mRNAs, and persistently up-regulated MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-14 and MMP-19 mRNAs. LPS, PGE(2) or forskolin selectively increased MMP-1, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12 and MMP-14 mRNAs. LPS increased PGE(2) production through COX but up-regulated MMP levels independently of COX. Differential dependence on inhibition of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, c-jun N-terminal kinase and inhibitor of κB kinase2 paralleled the diverse patterns of MMP stimulation by LPS. Differentiation on plastic increased mRNA levels of MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-12 and MMP-14 and TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 independently of COX; fibronectin accelerated MMP but not TIMP up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Adhesion, LPS stimulation and maturation of human monocytes lead to selective, COX-independent MMP and TIMP gene regulation, which is a potential target for selective inhibition by signalling kinase inhibitors. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Genetic diversity of avenin-like b genes in Aegilops tauschii Coss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Baolong; Liu, Dengcai; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Huaigang

    2018-02-01

    Avenin-like storage proteins influence the rheological properties and processing quality in common wheat, and the discovery of new alleles will benefit wheat quality improvement. In this study, 13 avenin-like b alleles (TaALPb7D-A-M) were discovered in 108 Aegilops tauschii Coss. accessions. Ten alleles were reported for the first time, while the remaining three alleles were the same as alleles in other species. A total of 15 nucleotide changes were detected in the 13 alleles, resulting in only 11 amino acid changes because of synonymous mutations. Alleles TaALPb7D-E, TaALPb7D-G, and TaALPb7D-J encoded the same protein. These polymorphic sites existed in the N-terminus, Repetitive region (Left), Repetitive region (Right) and C-terminus domains, with no polymorphisms in the signal peptide sequence nor in those encoding the 18 conserved cysteine residues. Phylogenetic analysis divided the TaALPb7Ds into four clades. The Ae. tauschii alleles were distributed in all four clades, while the alleles derived from common wheat, TaALPb7D-G and TaALPb7D-C, belonged to clade III and IV, respectively. Alleles TaALPb7D-G and TaALPb7D-C were the most widely distributed, being present in nine and six countries, respectively. Iran and Turkey exhibited the highest genetic diversity with respect to TaALPb7D alleles, accessions from these countries carrying seven and six alleles, respectively, which implied that these countries were the centers of origin of the avenin-like b gene. The new alleles discovered and the phylogenetic analysis of avenin-like b genes will provide breeding materials and a theoretical basis for wheat quality improvement.

  16. Genetic diversity of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus based on two hypervariable effector genes in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttamuk, Thamrongjet; Zhou, Lijuan; Thaveechai, Niphone; Zhang, Shouan; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. HLB is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' (Las) being the most widely distributed around the world, and the only species detected in Thailand. To understand the genetic diversity of Las bacteria in Thailand, we evaluated two closely-related effector genes, lasAI and lasAII, found within the Las prophages from 239 infected citrus and 55 infected psyllid samples collected from different provinces in Thailand. The results indicated that most of the Las-infected samples collected from Thailand contained at least one prophage sequence with 48.29% containing prophage 1 (FP1), 63.26% containing prophage 2 (FP2), and 19.38% containing both prophages. Interestingly, FP2 was found to be the predominant population in Las-infected citrus samples while Las-infected psyllids contained primarily FP1. The multiple banding patterns that resulted from amplification of lasAI imply extensive variation exists within the full and partial repeat sequence while the single band from lasAII indicates a low amount of variation within the repeat sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of Las-infected samples from 22 provinces in Thailand suggested that the bacterial pathogen may have been introduced to Thailand from China and the Philippines. This is the first report evaluating the genetic variation of a large population of Ca. L. asiaticus infected samples in Thailand using the two effector genes from Las prophage regions.

  17. Diversity of nitrite reductase (nirK and nirS) gene fragments in forested upland and wetland soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priemé, Anders; Braker, Gesche; Tiedje, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of nitrite reductase gene (nirK and nirS) fragments from denitrifying prokaryotes in forested upland and marsh soil was investigated using molecular methods. nirK gene fragments could be amplified from both soils, whereas nirS gene fragments could be amplified only from...... the marsh soil. PCR products were cloned and screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and representative fragments were sequenced. The diversity of nirK clones was lower than the diversity of nirS clones. Among the 54 distinct nirK RFLP patterns identified in the two soils, only one...... marsh clones and all upland clones. Only a few of the nirK clone sequences branched with those of known denitrifying bacteria. The nirS clones formed two major clusters with several subclusters, but all nirS clones showed less than 80% identity to nirS sequences from known denitrifying bacteria. Overall...

  18. Exposure to West Nile Virus Increases Bacterial Diversity and Immune Gene Expression in Culex pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Steven D; Van Slyke, Greta A; Palumbo, Michael J; Kramer, Laura D; Ciota, Alexander T

    2015-10-27

    Complex interactions between microbial residents of mosquitoes and arboviruses are likely to influence many aspects of vectorial capacity and could potentially have profound effects on patterns of arbovirus transmission. Such interactions have not been well studied for West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) and Culex spp. mosquitoes. We utilized next-generation sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial genes derived from Culex pipiens Linnaeus following WNV exposure and/or infection and compared bacterial populations and broad immune responses to unexposed mosquitoes. Our results demonstrate that WNV infection increases the diversity of bacterial populations and is associated with up-regulation of classical invertebrate immune pathways including RNA interference (RNAi), Toll, and Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription). In addition, WNV exposure alone, without the establishment of infection, results in similar alterations to microbial and immune signatures, although to a lesser extent. Multiple bacterial genera were found in greater abundance inWNV-exposed and/or infected mosquitoes, yet the most consistent and notable was the genus Serratia.

  19. Constraints on lateral gene transfer in promoting fimbrial usher protein diversity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Christopher J; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor; Heinz, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Fimbriae are long, adhesive structures widespread throughout members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are multimeric extrusions, which are moved out of the bacterial cell through an integral outer membrane protein called usher. The complex folding mechanics of the usher protein were recently revealed to be catalysed by the membrane-embedded translocation and assembly module (TAM). Here, we examine the diversity of usher proteins across a wide range of extraintestinal (ExPEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli , and further focus on a so far undescribed chaperone-usher system, with this usher referred to as UshC. The fimbrial system containing UshC is distributed across a discrete set of EPEC types, including model strains like E2348/67, as well as ExPEC ST131, currently the most prominent multi-drug-resistant uropathogenic E. coli strain worldwide. Deletion of the TAM from a naive strain of E. coli results in a drastic time delay in folding of UshC, which can be observed for a protein from EPEC as well as for two introduced proteins from related organisms, Yersinia and Enterobacter We suggest that this models why the TAM machinery is essential for efficient folding of proteins acquired via lateral gene transfer. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Evolving gene banks: improving diverse populations of crop and exotic germplasm with optimal contribution selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W A; Li, L; Siddique, K H M; Henryon, M; Berg, P; Banks, R G; Kinghorn, B P

    2017-04-01

    We simulated pre-breeding in evolving gene banks - populations of exotic and crop types undergoing optimal contribution selection for long-term genetic gain and management of population genetic diversity. The founder population was based on crosses between elite crop varieties and exotic lines of field pea (Pisum sativum) from the primary genepool, and was subjected to 30 cycles of recurrent selection for an economic index composed of four traits with low heritability: black spot resistance, flowering time and stem strength (measured on single plants), and grain yield (measured on whole plots). We compared a small population with low selection pressure, a large population with high selection pressure, and a large population with moderate selection pressure. Single seed descent was compared with S0-derived recurrent selection. Optimal contribution selection achieved higher index and lower population coancestry than truncation selection, which reached a plateau in index improvement after 40 years in the large population with high selection pressure. With optimal contribution selection, index doubled in 38 years in the small population with low selection pressure and 27-28 years in the large population with moderate selection pressure. Single seed descent increased the rate of improvement in index per cycle but also increased cycle time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. High diversity of Cryptosporidium subgenotypes identified in Malaysian HIV/AIDS individuals targeting gp60 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there is a lack of vital information in the genetic makeup of Cryptosporidium especially in developing countries. The present study aimed at determining the genotypes and subgenotypes of Cryptosporidium in hospitalized Malaysian human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, 346 faecal samples collected from Malaysian HIV positive patients were genetically analysed via PCR targeting the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60 gene. Eighteen (5.2% of 346 isolates were determined as Cryptosporidium positive with 72.2% (of 18 identified as Cryptosporidium parvum whilst 27.7% as Cryptosporidium hominis. Further gp60 analysis revealed C. parvum belonging to subgenotypes IIaA13G1R1 (2 isolates, IIaA13G2R1 (2 isolates, IIaA14G2R1 (3 isolates, IIaA15G2R1 (5 isolates and IIdA15G1R1 (1 isolate. C. hominis was represented by subgenotypes IaA14R1 (2 isolates, IaA18R1 (1 isolate and IbA10G2R2 (2 isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings highlighted the presence of high diversity of Cryptosporidium subgenotypes among Malaysian HIV infected individuals. The predominance of the C. parvum subgenotypes signified the possibility of zoonotic as well as anthroponotic transmissions of cryptosporidiosis in HIV infected individuals.

  2. Expression of venom gene homologs in diverse python tissues suggests a new model for the evolution of snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Card, Daren C; Andrew, Audra L; Shaney, Kyle J; Adams, Richard H; Schield, Drew R; Casewell, Nicholas R; Mackessy, Stephen P; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom gene evolution has been studied intensively over the past several decades, yet most previous studies have lacked the context of complete snake genomes and the full context of gene expression across diverse snake tissues. We took a novel approach to studying snake venom evolution by leveraging the complete genome of the Burmese python, including information from tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. We identified the orthologs of snake venom genes in the python genome, and conducted detailed analysis of gene expression of these venom homologs to identify patterns that differ between snake venom gene families and all other genes. We found that venom gene homologs in the python are expressed in many different tissues outside of oral glands, which illustrates the pitfalls of using transcriptomic data alone to define "venom toxins." We hypothesize that the python may represent an ancestral state prior to major venom development, which is supported by our finding that the expansion of venom gene families is largely restricted to highly venomous caenophidian snakes. Therefore, the python provides insight into biases in which genes were recruited for snake venom systems. Python venom homologs are generally expressed at lower levels, have higher variance among tissues, and are expressed in fewer organs compared with all other python genes. We propose a model for the evolution of snake venoms in which venom genes are recruited preferentially from genes with particular expression profile characteristics, which facilitate a nearly neutral transition toward specialized venom system expression. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. GeoChip-based analysis of microbial functional gene diversity in a landfill leachate-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria A.; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    The functional gene diversity and structure of microbial communities in a shallow landfill leachate-contaminated aquifer were assessed using a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0). Water samples were obtained from eight wells at the same aquifer depth immediately below a municipal landfill or along the predominant downgradient groundwater flowpath. Functional gene richness and diversity immediately below the landfill and the closest well were considerably lower than those in downgradient wells. Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) suggested that various geochemical parameters had a significant impact on the subsurface microbial community structure. That is, leachate from the unlined landfill impacted the diversity, composition, structure, and functional potential of groundwater microbial communities as a function of groundwater pH, and concentrations of sulfate, ammonia, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Historical geochemical records indicate that all sampled wells chronically received leachate, and the increase in microbial diversity as a function of distance from the landfill is consistent with mitigation of the impact of leachate on the groundwater system by natural attenuation mechanisms.

  4. Genetic diversity and structure of the zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) gene pool based on SSR marker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachapak, Sujinna; Somta, Prakit; Poonchaivilaisak, Supalak; Yimram, Tarika; Srinives, Peerasak

    2017-04-01

    Zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) is an underutilized legume species and a useful gene source for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, although there is little understanding on its genetic diversity and structure. In this study, 422 (408 wild and 14 cultivated) accessions of zombi pea from diverse origins (201 from Africa, 126 from America, 85 from Australia, 5 from Asia and 5 from unknown origin) were analyzed with 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to determine its genetic diversity and genetic structure. The SSR markers detected 273 alleles in total with a mean of 13.6 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content values of the markers varied from 0.58 to 0.90 with an average of 0.76. Overall gene diversity was 0.715. Gene diversity and average allelic richness was highest in Africa (0.749 and 8.08, respectively) and lowest in America (0.435 and 4.10, respectively). Nei's genetic distance analysis revealed that the highest distance was between wild Australia and cultivated Africa (0.559), followed by wild West Africa and wild Australia (0.415). STRUCTURE, neighbor-joining (NJ), and principal coordinate analyses consistently showed that these zombi pea accessions were clustered into three major groups, viz. America, Africa and Asia, and Australia. NJ tree also suggested that American and Australian accessions are originated from East African zombi peas, and that the cultivated accessions from Africa and Asia were genetically distinct, while those from America were clustered with some cultivated accessions from Africa. These results suggest that Africa is the center of origin and diversity of zombi pea, and that domestication of this pea took place more than once in different regions.

  5. Analysis of the robustness of network-based disease-gene prioritization methods reveals redundancy in the human interactome and functional diversity of disease-genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Guney

    Full Text Available Complex biological systems usually pose a trade-off between robustness and fragility where a small number of perturbations can substantially disrupt the system. Although biological systems are robust against changes in many external and internal conditions, even a single mutation can perturb the system substantially, giving rise to a pathophenotype. Recent advances in identifying and analyzing the sequential variations beneath human disorders help to comprehend a systemic view of the mechanisms underlying various disease phenotypes. Network-based disease-gene prioritization methods rank the relevance of genes in a disease under the hypothesis that genes whose proteins interact with each other tend to exhibit similar phenotypes. In this study, we have tested the robustness of several network-based disease-gene prioritization methods with respect to the perturbations of the system using various disease phenotypes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database. These perturbations have been introduced either in the protein-protein interaction network or in the set of known disease-gene associations. As the network-based disease-gene prioritization methods are based on the connectivity between known disease-gene associations, we have further used these methods to categorize the pathophenotypes with respect to the recoverability of hidden disease-genes. Our results have suggested that, in general, disease-genes are connected through multiple paths in the human interactome. Moreover, even when these paths are disturbed, network-based prioritization can reveal hidden disease-gene associations in some pathophenotypes such as breast cancer, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, leukemia, parkinson disease and obesity to a greater extend compared to the rest of the pathophenotypes tested in this study. Gene Ontology (GO analysis highlighted the role of functional diversity for such diseases.

  6. Carotenoids gene markers for sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam): applications in genetic mapping, diversity evaluation and cross-species transference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizio, C M; Costa Tártara, S M; Manifesto, M M

    2014-04-01

    Carotenoids play essential biological roles in plants, and genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway are evolutionarily conserved. Orange sweetpotato is an important source of β-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. In spite of this, only a few research studies have focussed on the molecular aspects of carotenoid genes regarding their specific sequence and structure. In this study, we used published carotenoid gene sequences from Ipomoea and other species for "exon-primed intron-crossing" approaches. Fifteen pairs of primers representing six carotenoid genes were designed for different introns, eleven of which amplified scorable and reproducible alleles. The sequence of PCR products showed high homology to the original ones. Moreover, the structure and sequence of the introns and exons from five carotenoid structural genes were partially defined. Intron length polymorphism and intron single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in amplified sequences. Marker dosages and allelic segregations were analysed in a mapping population. The developed markers were evaluated in a set of Ipomoeas batatas accessions so as to analyse genetic diversity and conservation applicability. Using CG strategy combined with EPIC-PCR technique, we developed carotenoid gene markers in sweetpotato. We reported the first set of polymorphic Candidate Gene markers for I. batatas, and demonstrated transferability in seven wild Ipomoea species. We described the sequence and structure of carotenoid genes and introduced new information about genomic constitution and allele dosage.

  7. Metagenomic analysis revealed highly diverse microbial arsenic metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-arsenic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke-Qing; Li, Li-Guan; Ma, Li-Ping; Zhang, Si-Yu; Bao, Peng; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-04-01

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) metabolism plays a critical role in global As cycle, and As metabolism involves different types of genes encoding proteins facilitating its biotransformation and transportation processes. Here, we used metagenomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing and constructed As metabolism protein databases to analyze As metabolism genes in five paddy soils with low-As contents. The results showed that highly diverse As metabolism genes were present in these paddy soils, with varied abundances and distribution for different types and subtypes of these genes. Arsenate reduction genes (ars) dominated in all soil samples, and significant correlation existed between the abundance of arr (arsenate respiration), aio (arsenite oxidation), and arsM (arsenite methylation) genes, indicating the co-existence and close-relation of different As resistance systems of microbes in wetland environments similar to these paddy soils after long-term evolution. Among all soil parameters, pH was an important factor controlling the distribution of As metabolism gene in five paddy soils (p = 0.018). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics approach in characterizing As metabolism genes in the five paddy soil, showing their great potential in As biotransformation, and therefore in mitigating arsenic risk to humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative gene expression analysis throughout the life cycle of Leishmania braziliensis: diversity of expression profiles among clinical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Adaui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most of the Leishmania genome is reported to be constitutively expressed during the life cycle of the parasite, with a few regulated genes. Inter-species comparative transcriptomics evidenced a low number of species-specific differences related to differentially distributed genes or the differential regulation of conserved genes. It is of uppermost importance to ensure that the observed differences are indeed species-specific and not simply specific of the strains selected for representing the species. The relevance of this concern is illustrated by current study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 5 clinical isolates of L. braziliensis characterized by their diversity of clinical and in vitro phenotypes. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed on promastigote and amastigote life stages to assess gene expression profiles at seven time points covering the whole life cycle. We tested 12 genes encoding proteins with roles in transport, thiol-based redox metabolism, cellular reduction, RNA poly(A-tail metabolism, cytoskeleton function and ribosomal function. The general trend of expression profiles showed that regulation of gene expression essentially occurs around the stationary phase of promastigotes. However, the genes involved in this phenomenon appeared to vary significantly among the isolates considered. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results clearly illustrate the unique character of each isolate in terms of gene expression dynamics. Results obtained on an individual strain are not necessarily representative of a given species. Therefore, extreme care should be taken when comparing the profiles of different species and extrapolating functional differences between them.

  9. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  10. Adding to Yersinia enterocolitica Gene Pool Diversity: Two Cryptic Plasmids from a Biotype 1A Isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lepka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the nucleotide sequence of two novel cryptic plasmids (4357 and 14 662 base pairs carried by a Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strain isolated from pork. As distinguished from most biotype 1A strains, this isolate, designated 07-04449, exhibited adherence to eukaryotic cells. The smaller plasmid pYe4449-1 carries five attributable open reading frames (ORFs encoding the first CcdA/CcdB-like antitoxin/toxin system described for a Yersinia plasmid, a RepA-like replication initiation protein, and mobilizing factors MobA and MobC. The deduced amino acid sequences showed highest similarity to proteins described in Salmonella (CcdA/B, Klebsiella (RepA, and Plesiomonas (MobA/C indicating genomic fluidity among members of the Enterobacteriaceae. One additional ORF with unknown function, termed ORF5, was identified with an ancestry distinct from the rest of the plasmid. While the C+G content of ORF5 is 38.3%, the rest of pYe4449-1 shows a C+G content of 55.7%. The C+G content of the larger plasmid pYe4449-2 (54.9% was similar to that of pYe4449-1 (53.7% and differed from that of the Y. enterocolitica genome (47.3%. Of the 14 ORFs identified on pYe4449-2, only six ORFs showed significant similarity to database entries. For three of these ORFs likely functions could be ascribed: a TnpR-like resolvase and a phage replication protein, localized each on a low C+G island, and DNA primase TraC. Two ORFs of pYe4449-2, ORF3 and ORF7, seem to encode secretable proteins. Epitope-tagging of ORF3 revealed protein expression at 4°C but not at or above 27°C suggesting adaptation to a habitat outside swine. The hypothetical protein encoded by ORF7 is the member of a novel repeat protein family sharing the DxxGN(xnDxxGN motif. Our findings illustrate the exceptional gene pool diversity within the species Y. enterocolitica driven by horizontal gene transfer events.

  11. Phenotypic diversity, major genes and production potential of local chickens and guinea fowl in Tamale, northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mensah Brown

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Our study provides information on phenotypes of local chickens and guinea fowl and their body measures as well as on major genes in local chickens in northern Ghana. Methods Qualitative and morphometric traits were recorded on 788 local chickens and 394 guinea fowl in urban households in Tamale, Ghana. Results The results showed considerable variation of color traits and numerous major genes in local chickens, while color variations and related genotypes in guinea fowl were limited. In local chickens, white was preferred for plumage, whereas dark colors were preferred for beak and shanks. More than half of the chickens carried at least one major gene, but the contributions of single gene carriers were low. All calculated allele frequencies were significantly lower than their expected Mendelian allele frequencies. We observed higher mean body weight and larger linear body measures in male as compared to female chickens. In female chickens, we detected a small effect of major genes on body weight and chest circumference. In addition, we found some association between feather type and plumage color. In guinea fowl, seven distinct plumage colors were observed, of which pearl grey pied and pearl grey were the most prevalent. Male pearl grey pied guinea fowl were inferior to pearl grey and white guinea fowl in terms of body weight, body length and chest circumference; their shank length was lower than that of pearl grey fowl. Conclusion Considerable variation in qualitative traits of local chickens may be indicative of genetic diversity within local chicken populations, but major genes were rare. In contrast, phenotypic and genetic diversity in local guinea fowl is limited. Broader genetic diversity studies and evaluation of trait preferences of local poultry producers are required for the design of appropriate breeding programs.

  12. Metagenomic-based study of the phylogenetic and functional gene diversity in Galápagos land and marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Mao, Yuejian; Ortiz-Kofoed, Shannon; Shah, Rushabh; Cann, Isaac; Mackie, Roderick I

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a metagenome-based analysis of the fecal samples from the macrophytic algae-consuming marine iguana (MI; Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and terrestrial biomass-consuming land iguanas (LI; Conolophus spp.) was conducted. Phylogenetic affiliations of the fecal microbiome were more similar between both iguanas than to other mammalian herbivorous hosts. However, functional gene diversities in both MI and LI iguana hosts differed in relation to the diet, where the MI fecal microbiota had a functional diversity that clustered apart from the other terrestrial-biomass consuming reptilian and mammalian hosts. A further examination of the carbohydrate-degrading genes revealed that several of the prevalent glycosyl hydrolases (GH), glycosyl transferases (GT), carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), and carbohydrate esterases (CE) gene classes were conserved among all examined herbivorous hosts, reiterating the important roles these genes play in the breakdown and metabolism of herbivorous diets. Genes encoding some classes of carbohydrate-degrading families, including GH2, GH13, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM48, CE4, and CE11, as well as genes associated with sulfur metabolism and dehalogenation, were highly enriched or unique to the MI. In contrast, gene sequences that relate to archaeal methanogenesis were detected only in LI fecal microbiome, and genes coding for GH13, GH66, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM13, CE4, and CE8 carbohydrate active enzymes were highly abundant in the LI. Bacterial populations were enriched on various carbohydrates substrates (e.g., glucose, arabinose, xylose). The majority of the enriched bacterial populations belong to genera Clostridium spp. and Enterococcus spp. that likely accounted for the high prevalence of GH13 and GH2, as well as the GT families (e.g., GT2, GT4, GT28, GT35, and GT51) that were ubiquitously present in the fecal microbiota of all herbivorous hosts.

  13. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theunissen, P.T.; Robinson, J.F.; Pennings, J.L.A.; Herwijnen, M.H. van; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Piersma, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  14. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theunissen, P.T., E-mail: Peter.Theunissen@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Robinson, J.F. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pennings, J.L.A. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Herwijnen, M.H. van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kleinjans, J.C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Piersma, A.H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  15. Metagenomic-Based Study of the Phylogenetic and Functional Gene Diversity in Galápagos Land and Marine Iguanas

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-12-19

    In this study, a metagenome-based analysis of the fecal samples from the macrophytic algae-consuming marine iguana (MI; Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and terrestrial biomass-consuming land iguanas (LI; Conolophus spp.) was conducted. Phylogenetic affiliations of the fecal microbiome were more similar between both iguanas than to other mammalian herbivorous hosts. However, functional gene diversities in both MI and LI iguana hosts differed in relation to the diet, where the MI fecal microbiota had a functional diversity that clustered apart from the other terrestrial-biomass consuming reptilian and mammalian hosts. A further examination of the carbohydrate-degrading genes revealed that several of the prevalent glycosyl hydrolases (GH), glycosyl transferases (GT), carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), and carbohydrate esterases (CE) gene classes were conserved among all examined herbivorous hosts, reiterating the important roles these genes play in the breakdown and metabolism of herbivorous diets. Genes encoding some classes of carbohydrate-degrading families, including GH2, GH13, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM48, CE4, and CE11, as well as genes associated with sulfur metabolism and dehalogenation, were highly enriched or unique to the MI. In contrast, gene sequences that relate to archaeal methanogenesis were detected only in LI fecal microbiome, and genes coding for GH13, GH66, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM13, CE4, and CE8 carbohydrate active enzymes were highly abundant in the LI. Bacterial populations were enriched on various carbohydrates substrates (e.g., glucose, arabinose, xylose). The majority of the enriched bacterial populations belong to genera Clostridium spp. and Enterococcus spp. that likely accounted for the high prevalence of GH13 and GH2, as well as the GT families (e.g., GT2, GT4, GT28, GT35, and GT51) that were ubiquitously present in the fecal microbiota of all herbivorous hosts.

  16. Molecular detection and diversity of novel diterpenoid dioxygenase DitA1 genes from proteobacterial strains and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Robert; Aly, Hamdy A H; Strömpl, Carsten; Wray, Victor; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2007-05-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic diterpenoids naturally synthesized by trees that are released from wood during pulping processes. Using a newly designed primer set, genes similar to that encoding the DitA1 catalytic alpha-subunit of the diterpenoid dioxygenase, a key enzyme in abietane resin acid degradation by Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9, could be amplified from different Pseudomonas strains, whereas ditA1 gene sequence types representing distinct branches in the evolutionary tree were amplified from Burkholderia and Cupriavidus isolates. All isolates harbouring a ditA1-homologue were capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid as the sole source of carbon and energy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in three strains confirmed that ditA1 was expressed constitutively or in response to DhA, demonstrating its involvement in DhA-degradation. Evolutionary analyses indicate that gyrB (as a phylogenetic marker) and ditA1 genes have coevolved under purifying selection from their ancestral variants present in the most recent common ancestor of the genera Pseudomonas, Cupriavidus and Burkholderia. A polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation poylmorphism fingerprinting method was established to monitor the diversity of ditA1 genes in environmental samples. The molecular fingerprints indicated the presence ofa broad, previously unrecognized diversity of diterpenoid dioxygenase genes in soils, and suggest that other bacterial phyla may also harbour the genetic potential for DhA-degradation.

  17. Diversity of Ligninolytic Enzymes and Their Genes in Strains of the Genus Ganoderma: Applicable for Biodegradation of Xenobiotic Compounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Farradá, Giselle; Manzano León, Ana M.; Rineau, François; Ledo Alonso, Lucía L.; Sánchez-López, María I.; Thijs, Sofie; Colpaert, Jan; Ramos-Leal, Miguel; Guerra, Gilda; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    White-rot fungi (WRF) and their ligninolytic enzymes (laccases and peroxidases) are considered promising biotechnological tools to remove lignin related Persistent Organic Pollutants from industrial wastewaters and contaminated ecosystems. A high diversity of the genus Ganoderma has been reported in Cuba; in spite of this, the diversity of ligninolytic enzymes and their genes remained unexplored. In this study, 13 native WRF strains were isolated from decayed wood in urban ecosystems in Havana (Cuba). All strains were identified as Ganoderma sp. using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-method based on ITS sequences. All Ganoderma sp. strains produced laccase enzymes at higher levels than non-specific peroxidases. Native-PAGE of extracellular enzymatic extracts revealed a high diversity of laccase isozymes patterns between the strains, suggesting the presence of different amino acid sequences in the laccase enzymes produced by these Ganoderma strains. We determined the diversity of genes encoding laccases and peroxidases using a PCR and cloning approach with basidiomycete-specific primers. Between two and five laccase genes were detected in each strain. In contrast, only one gene encoding manganese peroxidase or versatile peroxidase was detected in each strain. The translated laccases and peroxidases amino acid sequences have not been described before. Extracellular crude enzymatic extracts produced by the Ganoderma UH strains, were able to degrade model chromophoric compounds such as anthraquinone and azo dyes. These findings hold promises for the development of a practical application for the treatment of textile industry wastewaters and also for bioremediation of polluted ecosystems by well-adapted native WRF strains. PMID:28588565

  18. Glutathione S-Transferase (GST Gene Diversity in the Crustacean Calanus finmarchicus--Contributors to Cellular Detoxification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Roncalli

    Full Text Available Detoxification is a fundamental cellular stress defense mechanism, which allows an organism to survive or even thrive in the presence of environmental toxins and/or pollutants. The glutathione S-transferase (GST superfamily is a set of enzymes involved in the detoxification process. This highly diverse protein superfamily is characterized by multiple gene duplications, with over 40 GST genes reported in some insects. However, less is known about the GST superfamily in marine organisms, including crustaceans. The availability of two de novo transcriptomes for the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, provided an opportunity for an in depth study of the GST superfamily in a marine crustacean. The transcriptomes were searched for putative GST-encoding transcripts using known GST proteins from three arthropods as queries. The identified transcripts were then translated into proteins, analyzed for structural domains, and annotated using reciprocal BLAST analysis. Mining the two transcriptomes yielded a total of 41 predicted GST proteins belonging to the cytosolic, mitochondrial or microsomal classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the cytosolic GSTs validated their annotation into six different subclasses. The predicted proteins are likely to represent the products of distinct genes, suggesting that the diversity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus exceeds or rivals that described for insects. Analysis of relative gene expression in different developmental stages indicated low levels of GST expression in embryos, and relatively high expression in late copepodites and adult females for several cytosolic GSTs. A diverse diet and complex life history are factors that might be driving the multiplicity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus, as this copepod is commonly exposed to a variety of natural toxins. Hence, diversity in detoxification pathway proteins may well be key to their survival.

  19. Diversity of Ligninolytic Enzymes and Their Genes in Strains of the Genus Ganoderma: Applicable for Biodegradation of Xenobiotic Compounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Torres-Farradá

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available White-rot fungi (WRF and their ligninolytic enzymes (laccases and peroxidases are considered promising biotechnological tools to remove lignin related Persistent Organic Pollutants from industrial wastewaters and contaminated ecosystems. A high diversity of the genus Ganoderma has been reported in Cuba; in spite of this, the diversity of ligninolytic enzymes and their genes remained unexplored. In this study, 13 native WRF strains were isolated from decayed wood in urban ecosystems in Havana (Cuba. All strains were identified as Ganoderma sp. using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR-method based on ITS sequences. All Ganoderma sp. strains produced laccase enzymes at higher levels than non-specific peroxidases. Native-PAGE of extracellular enzymatic extracts revealed a high diversity of laccase isozymes patterns between the strains, suggesting the presence of different amino acid sequences in the laccase enzymes produced by these Ganoderma strains. We determined the diversity of genes encoding laccases and peroxidases using a PCR and cloning approach with basidiomycete-specific primers. Between two and five laccase genes were detected in each strain. In contrast, only one gene encoding manganese peroxidase or versatile peroxidase was detected in each strain. The translated laccases and peroxidases amino acid sequences have not been described before. Extracellular crude enzymatic extracts produced by the Ganoderma UH strains, were able to degrade model chromophoric compounds such as anthraquinone and azo dyes. These findings hold promises for the development of a practical application for the treatment of textile industry wastewaters and also for bioremediation of polluted ecosystems by well-adapted native WRF strains.

  20. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Indian Salmon, Eleutheronema tetradactylum from South Asian Countries Based on Mitochondrial COI Gene Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan THIRUMARAISELVI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleutheronema tetradactylum is an important commercial fish species exposed to intense exploitation both in Southeast Asian countries and Northern parts of Australia. Research on the population structure of E. tetradactylum in these coastal waters is substantial in order to ensure sustainable use and appropriate resource management. In this study, genetic variation, diversity and population structure of E. tetradactylum among four FAO fishing areas, along South Asian countries, were evaluated using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene. Totally 30 sequences of COI gene were collected from four FAO fishing areas. Among these 30 individuals, 18 distinct haplotypes were defined. High levels of haplotype diversity (hd = 0.952 ± 0.096 and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.01536 ± 0.00312 were observed in the population within the Bay of Bengal. No haplotype and nucleotide diversity were observed in South China Sea population. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicated that 0.81% of the genetic variation occurred within the populations, while 7.09% variation occurred among populations. Significant genealogical branches were recognized in North Australian populations (one clade, South China Sea populations (one clade, Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal populations (one clade on the neighbor-joining tree. These results suggested that E. tetradactylum populations in FAO fishing areas 51, 57 and 61 have developed different genetic structures. Tests of neutral evolution and mismatch distribution suggest that a population growth of E. tetradactylum may take place in these fishing areas.

  1. Phytoplasma adapt to the diverse environments of their plant and insect hosts by altering gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarova, Olga; MacLean, Allyson M.; Nicolaisen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are intracellular insect-transmitted phytopathogenic bacteria with small genomes. To understand how Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain witches' broom (AY-WB) adapts to their hosts, we performed qRT-PCR analysis of 179 in silico functionally annotated AY-WB genes that are likely to have...... a role in host adaptation. 74 genes were up-regulated in insects and included genes involved in stress response, phospholipid synthesis, malate and pyruvate metabolism, hemolysin and transporter genes, multiple copies of thymidylate kinase, sigma factor and Zn-proteases genes. In plants, 34 genes...

  2. Fate of potential indicator antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial community diversity in simulated manure-soil microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mianzhi; Liu, Peng; Xiong, Wenguang; Zhou, Qin; Wangxiao, Junyi; Zeng, Zhenling; Sun, Yongxue

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fate of nine potential indicator antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) (sul1, sul2, tetB, tetM, ermB, ermF, fexA, cfr, intI1) and the diversity of bacterial communities in response to poultry manure applications to arable soil over a 90 day period. Quantitative real time PCR and Illumina high-throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA gene were used to quantify and trace ARG fate. The levels of all genes dramatically decreased over time and intI1, sul1, sul2 and tetM always had the greatest abundance and lowest dissipation rates. This indicated that more effort should be focused on the ARG elimination from manure rather than waiting for subsequent attenuation in the environment. Our sequencing results documented dramatic changes in the microbial community structure and diversity during these experiments. In poultry manure groups, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were the two dominant phyla while Acidobacteria dominated the control groups. Moreover, the relative abundance of genera Corynebacterium, Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum, Actinomadura and Bacillus, which contained potential opportunistic pathogens, changed over time suggesting that poultry manure not only strongly influenced bacterial community composition, but also selected specific bacterial communities. This study provides a glimpse of ARG fates and bacterial community diversity in soil after the application of poultry manure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic diversity and virulence genes of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis isolated from meats and eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardsanei, Fatemeh; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Zahraei Salehi, Taghi; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Memariani, Hamed; Nikkhahi, Farhad

    2017-06-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the leading causes of food-borne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated food products of animal origin. Little is known about the genetic diversity and virulence content of S. Enteritidis isolated from poultry meats and eggs in Iran. A total of 34 S. Enteritidis strains were collected from different food sources of animal origin in Tehran from May 2015 to July 2016. All of the S. Enteritidis strains were serotyped, antimicrobial susceptibility tested, and characterized for virulence genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was also applied for comparison of genetic relatedness. All of the strains harbored invA, hilA, ssrA, sefA, spvC, and sipA genes. A high prevalence of resistance against certain antibiotics such as cefuroxime (79.4%), nalidixic acid (47%), and ciprofloxacin (44.2%) was also observed. Regarding PFGE, S. Enteritidis strains from different sources showed considerable overlap, suggesting the lack of diversity among these isolates. Moreover, no correlation between virulence profiles or antibiotypes and PFGE clusters was observed. In conclusion, our study provided valuable information on virulence gene content, antibiotic resistance, and genetic diversity of S. Enteritidis isolated from food sources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid transcriptional plasticity of duplicated gene clusters enables a clonally reproducing aphid to colonise diverse plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Thomas C; Chen, Yazhou; Kaithakottil, Gemy; Legeai, Fabrice; Mugford, Sam T; Baa-Puyoulet, Patrice; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Clavijo, Bernardo; Colella, Stefano; Collin, Olivier; Dalmay, Tamas; Derrien, Thomas; Feng, Honglin; Gabaldón, Toni; Jordan, Anna; Julca, Irene; Kettles, Graeme J; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Lavenier, Dominique; Lenzi, Paolo; Lopez-Gomollon, Sara; Loska, Damian; Mapleson, Daniel; Maumus, Florian; Moxon, Simon; Price, Daniel R G; Sugio, Akiko; van Munster, Manuella; Uzest, Marilyne; Waite, Darren; Jander, Georg; Tagu, Denis; Wilson, Alex C C; van Oosterhout, Cock; Swarbreck, David; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2017-02-13

    The prevailing paradigm of host-parasite evolution is that arms races lead to increasing specialisation via genetic adaptation. Insect herbivores are no exception and the majority have evolved to colonise a small number of closely related host species. Remarkably, the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, colonises plant species across 40 families and single M. persicae clonal lineages can colonise distantly related plants. This remarkable ability makes M. persicae a highly destructive pest of many important crop species. To investigate the exceptional phenotypic plasticity of M. persicae, we sequenced the M. persicae genome and assessed how one clonal lineage responds to host plant species of different families. We show that genetically identical individuals are able to colonise distantly related host species through the differential regulation of genes belonging to aphid-expanded gene families. Multigene clusters collectively upregulate in single aphids within two days upon host switch. Furthermore, we demonstrate the functional significance of this rapid transcriptional change using RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knock-down of genes belonging to the cathepsin B gene family. Knock-down of cathepsin B genes reduced aphid fitness, but only on the host that induced upregulation of these genes. Previous research has focused on the role of genetic adaptation of parasites to their hosts. Here we show that the generalist aphid pest M. persicae is able to colonise diverse host plant species in the absence of genetic specialisation. This is achieved through rapid transcriptional plasticity of genes that have duplicated during aphid evolution.

  5. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in the Bengali population of northern West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, P; Bhattacharjee, S; Chaudhuri, T K

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Subcontinent exhibits extensive diversity in its culture, religion, ethnicity and linguistic heritage, which symbolizes extensive genetic variations within the populations. The highly polymorphic Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) family plays an important role in tracing genetic differentiation in human population. In this study, we aimed to analyse the KIR gene polymorphism in the Bengali population of northern West Bengal, India. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the KIR gene polymorphism in the Bengalis of West Bengal, India. Herein, we have studied the distribution of 14 KIR genes (KIR3DL1-3DL3, KIR2DL1-2DL5, KIR2DS1-2DS5 AND KIR3DS1) and two pseudogenes (KIR3DP1 and 2DP1) in the Bengalis. Apart from the framework genes (KIR2DL4, 3DL2, 3DL3 and 3DP1), which are present in all the individuals, the gene frequencies of other KIR genes varied between 0.34 and 0.88. Moreover, upon comparing the KIR polymorphism of the Bengalis with the available published data of other world populations, it has been found that the Indo-European-speaking Bengalis from the region share both Dravidian and Indo-Aryan gene pool with considerable influences of mongoloid and European descents. Furthermore, evidences from previously published data on human leucocyte antigen and Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity support the view. Our results will help to understand the genetic background of the Bengali population, in illustrating the population migration events in the eastern and north-eastern part of India, in explaining the extensive genetic admixture amongst the different linguistic groups of the region and also in KIR-related disease researches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Estimating the Prevalence of Potential Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Intimin Gene Diversity in a Human Community by Monitoring Sanitary Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Pagaling, Eulyn

    2014-01-01

    Presently, the understanding of bacterial enteric diseases in the community and their virulence factors relies almost exclusively on clinical disease reporting and examination of clinical pathogen isolates. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of an alternative approach that monitors potential enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) prevalence and intimin gene (eae) diversity in a community by directly quantifying and characterizing target virulence genes in the sanitary sewage. The quantitative PCR (qPCR) quantification of the eae, stx1, and stx2 genes in sanitary sewage samples collected over a 13-month period detected eae in all 13 monthly sewage samples at significantly higher abundance (93 to 7,240 calibrator cell equivalents [CCE]/100 ml) than stx1 and stx2, which were detected sporadically. The prevalence level of potential EPEC in the sanitary sewage was estimated by calculating the ratio of eae to uidA, which averaged 1.0% (σ = 0.4%) over the 13-month period. Cloning and sequencing of the eae gene directly from the sewage samples covered the majority of the eae diversity in the sewage and detected 17 unique eae alleles belonging to 14 subtypes. Among them, eae-β2 was identified to be the most prevalent subtype in the sewage, with the highest detection frequency in the clone libraries (41.2%) and within the different sampling months (85.7%). Additionally, sewage and environmental E. coli isolates were also obtained and used to determine the detection frequencies of the virulence genes as well as eae genetic diversity for comparison. PMID:24141131

  7. High prevalence of intra-familial co-colonization by extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae in preschool children and their parents in Dutch households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Bunt, van den Gerrita; Geurts, Yvon; Bootsma, Martin C.J.; Toleman, Mark; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Pelt, van Wilfrid; Mevius, Dik J.

    2018-01-01

    Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant (ESCR) Enterobacteriaceae pose a serious infection control challenge for public health. The emergence of the ESCR phenotype is mostly facilitated by plasmid-mediated horizontal extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and AmpC gene transfer within

  8. Genes associated to lactose metabolism illustrate the high diversity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskandar, Christelle F.; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Rahman, Abdur

    2016-01-01

    The dairy population of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is characterized by a high diversity suggesting a high diversity of the genetic traits linked to the dairy process. As lactose is the main carbon source in milk, the genetics of lactose metabolism was investigated in this LAB. Comparative...

  9. Highways block gene flow and cause a rapid decline in genetic diversity of desert bighorn sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epps, CW; Palsboll, PJ; Wehausen, JD; Roderick, GK; Ramey, RR; McCullough, DR

    2005-01-01

    The rapid expansion of road networks has reduced connectivity among populations of flora and fauna. The resulting isolation is assumed to increase population extinction rates, in part because of the loss of genetic diversity. However, there are few cases where loss of genetic diversity has been

  10. Diversity of Integron- and Culture-Associated Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Freshwater Floc

    OpenAIRE

    Drudge, Christopher N.; Elliott, Amy V. C.; Plach, Janina M.; Ejim, Linda J.; Wright, Gerard D.; Droppo, Ian G.; Warren, Lesley A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically important antibiotic resistance genes were detected in culturable bacteria and class 1 integron gene cassettes recovered from suspended floc, a significant aquatic repository for microorganisms and trace elements, across freshwater systems variably impacted by anthropogenic activities. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in floc total community DNA differed appreciably in number and type from genes detected in bacteria cultured from floc. The number of floc antibiotic resistance g...

  11. Transcriptome analysis of a breeding program pedigree examines gene expression diversity and reveals target genes for malting quality improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advanced cycle breeding utilizes crosses among elite lines and is a successful method to develop new inbreds. However, it results in a reduction in genetic diversity within the breeding population. The development of malting barley varieties requires the adherence to a narrow malting quality profile...

  12. Detecting variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segment recombination using a two-colour fluorescence system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gina B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diversity of immunoglobulins and the T cell antigen receptors is achieved via the recombination activating gene (RAG-mediated rearrangement of variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segments, and this underpins the efficient recognition of a seemingly limitless array of antigens. Analysis of V(DJ recombination activity is typically performed using extrachromosomal recombination substrates that are recovered from transfected cells and selected using bacterial transformation. We have developed a two-colour fluorescence-based system that simplifies detection of both deletion and inversion joining events mediated by RAG proteins. Results This system employs two fluorescent reporter genes that differentially mark unrearranged substrates and those that have undergone RAG-mediated deletion or inversion events. The recombination products bear the hallmarks of true V(DJ recombination and activity can be detected using fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Recombination events can be detected without the need for cytotoxic selection of recombination products and the system allows analysis of recombination activity using substrates integrated into the genome. Conclusions This system will be useful in the analysis and exploitation of the V(DJ recombination machinery and suggests that similar approaches could be used to replace expression of one gene with another during lymphocyte development.

  13. Characterization of the poly-T variant in the TOMM40 gene in diverse populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton Linnertz

    Full Text Available We previously discovered that a polymorphic, deoxythymidine-homopolymer (poly-T, rs10524523 in intron 6 of the TOMM40 gene is associated with age-of-onset of Alzheimer's disease and with cognitive performance in elderly. Three allele groups were defined for rs10524523, hereafter '523', based on the number of 'T'-residues: 'Short' (S, T≤19, 'Long' (L, 20≤T≤29 and 'Very Long' (VL, T≥30. Homopolymers, particularly long homopolymers like '523', are difficult to genotype because 'slippage' occurs during PCR-amplification. We initially genotyped this locus by PCR-amplification followed by Sanger-sequencing. However, we recognized the need to develop a higher-throughput genotyping method that is also accurate and reliable. Here we describe a new '523' genotyping assay that is simple and inexpensive to perform in a standard molecular genetics laboratory. The assay is based on the detection of differences in PCR-fragment length using capillary electrophoresis. We discuss technical problems, solutions, and the steps taken for validation. We employed the novel assay to investigate the '523' allele frequencies in different ethnicities. Whites and Hispanics have similar frequencies of S/L/VL alleles (0.45/0.11/0.44 and 0.43/0.09/0.48, respectively. In African-Americans, the frequency of the L-allele (0.10 is similar to Whites and Hispanics; however, the S-allele is more prevalent (0.65 and the VL-allele is concomitantly less frequent (0.25. The allele frequencies determined using the new methodology are compared to previous reports for Ghanaian, Japanese, Korean and Han Chinese cohorts. Finally, we studied the linkage pattern between TOMM40-'523' and APOE alleles. In Whites and Hispanics, consistent with previous reports, the L is primarily linked to ε4, while the majority of the VL and S are linked to ε3. Interestingly, in African-Americans, Ghanaians and Japanese, there is an increased frequency of the '523'S-APOEε4 haplotype. These data may be

  14. Genetic diversity and striatal gene networks: focus on the heterogeneous stock-collaborative cross (HS-CC mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belknap John

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study focused on the extent genetic diversity within a species (Mus musculus affects gene co-expression network structure. To examine this issue, we have created a new mouse resource, a heterogeneous stock (HS formed from the same eight inbred strains that have been used to create the collaborative cross (CC. The eight inbred strains capture > 90% of the genetic diversity available within the species. For contrast with the HS-CC, a C57BL/6J (B6 × DBA/2J (D2 F2 intercross and the HS4, derived from crossing the B6, D2, BALB/cJ and LP/J strains, were used. Brain (striatum gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina Mouse WG 6.1 array, and the data sets were interrogated using a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA. Results Genes reliably detected as expressed were similar in all three data sets as was the variability of expression. As measured by the WGCNA, the modular structure of the transcriptome networks was also preserved both on the basis of module assignment and from the perspective of the topological overlap maps. Details of the HS-CC gene modules are provided; essentially identical results were obtained for the HS4 and F2 modules. Gene ontology annotation of the modules revealed a significant overrepresentation in some modules for neuronal processes, e.g., central nervous system development. Integration with known protein-protein interactions data indicated significant enrichment among co-expressed genes. We also noted significant overlap with markers of central nervous system cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Using the Allen Brain Atlas, we found evidence of spatial co-localization within the striatum for several modules. Finally, for some modules it was possible to detect an enrichment of transcription binding sites. The binding site for Wt1, which is associated with neurodegeneration, was the most significantly overrepresented. Conclusions Despite the marked

  15. Genetic diversity and striatal gene networks: focus on the heterogeneous stock-collaborative cross (HS-CC) mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Ovidiu D; Darakjian, Priscila; Walter, Nicole A R; Malmanger, Barry; Oberbeck, Denesa; Belknap, John; McWeeney, Shannon; Hitzemann, Robert

    2010-10-19

    The current study focused on the extent genetic diversity within a species (Mus musculus) affects gene co-expression network structure. To examine this issue, we have created a new mouse resource, a heterogeneous stock (HS) formed from the same eight inbred strains that have been used to create the collaborative cross (CC). The eight inbred strains capture > 90% of the genetic diversity available within the species. For contrast with the HS-CC, a C57BL/6J (B6) × DBA/2J (D2) F2 intercross and the HS4, derived from crossing the B6, D2, BALB/cJ and LP/J strains, were used. Brain (striatum) gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina Mouse WG 6.1 array, and the data sets were interrogated using a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Genes reliably detected as expressed were similar in all three data sets as was the variability of expression. As measured by the WGCNA, the modular structure of the transcriptome networks was also preserved both on the basis of module assignment and from the perspective of the topological overlap maps. Details of the HS-CC gene modules are provided; essentially identical results were obtained for the HS4 and F2 modules. Gene ontology annotation of the modules revealed a significant overrepresentation in some modules for neuronal processes, e.g., central nervous system development. Integration with known protein-protein interactions data indicated significant enrichment among co-expressed genes. We also noted significant overlap with markers of central nervous system cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes). Using the Allen Brain Atlas, we found evidence of spatial co-localization within the striatum for several modules. Finally, for some modules it was possible to detect an enrichment of transcription binding sites. The binding site for Wt1, which is associated with neurodegeneration, was the most significantly overrepresented. Despite the marked differences in genetic diversity, the transcriptome

  16. KIR genotypic diversity in Portuguese and analysis of KIR gene allocation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeiro, D; Buhler, S; Abecasis, M; Abade, O; Sanchez-Mazas, A; da Silva, M Gomes; Trindade, H

    2016-05-01

    The diversity of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) genes was evaluated in Portuguese and the observed genotypic profiles were found related to the ones reported in European populations. The KIR repertoire after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is determined by these gene frequencies and the KIR group B motifs are the less common. We estimated donor-KIR/recipient-ligand interactions in transplants with related donors and unrelated donors found in a local registry or from abroad. A large fraction of transplants had all three ligands of inhibitory receptors, and therefore, in theory were not prone to natural killer cell (NK) mediated alloreactivity. Furthermore, the distribution of KIR alloreactive interactions was found independent of the donor-recipient genetic proximity, probably because of different gene segregation and comparable KIR frequencies in the donor pools. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Seed-Mediated Gene Flow Promotes Genetic Diversity of Weedy Rice within Populations: Implications for Weed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuoxian; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Ratnasekera, Disna; Grassi, Fabrizio; Perera, Udugahapattuwage; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Increased infestation of weedy rice—a noxious agricultural pest has caused significant reduction of grain yield of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) worldwide. Knowledge on genetic diversity and structure of weedy rice populations will facilitate the design of effective methods to control this weed by tracing its origins and dispersal patterns in a given region. To generate such knowledge, we studied genetic diversity and structure of 21 weedy rice populations from Sri Lanka based on 23 selected microsatellite (SSR) loci. Results indicated an exceptionally high level of within-population genetic diversity (He = 0.62) and limited among-population differentiation (Fst = 0.17) for this predominantly self-pollinating weed. UPGMA analysis showed a loose genetic affinity of the weedy rice populations in relation to their geographical locations, and no obvious genetic structure among populations across the country. This phenomenon was associated with the considerable amount of gene flow between populations. Limited admixture from STRUCTURE analyses suggested a very low level of hybridization (pollen-mediated gene flow) between populations. The abundant within-population genetic diversity coupled with limited population genetic structure and differentiation is likely caused by the considerable seed-mediated gene flow of weedy rice along with the long-distance exchange of farmer-saved rice seeds between weedy-rice contaminated regions in Sri Lanka. In addition to other effective weed management strategies, promoting the application of certified rice seeds with no weedy rice contamination should be the immediate action to significantly reduce the proliferation and infestation of this weed in rice ecosystems in countries with similar rice farming styles as in Sri Lanka. PMID:25436611

  18. Seed-mediated gene flow promotes genetic diversity of weedy rice within populations: implications for weed management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoxian He

    Full Text Available Increased infestation of weedy rice-a noxious agricultural pest has caused significant reduction of grain yield of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa worldwide. Knowledge on genetic diversity and structure of weedy rice populations will facilitate the design of effective methods to control this weed by tracing its origins and dispersal patterns in a given region. To generate such knowledge, we studied genetic diversity and structure of 21 weedy rice populations from Sri Lanka based on 23 selected microsatellite (SSR loci. Results indicated an exceptionally high level of within-population genetic diversity (He = 0.62 and limited among-population differentiation (Fst = 0.17 for this predominantly self-pollinating weed. UPGMA analysis showed a loose genetic affinity of the weedy rice populations in relation to their geographical locations, and no obvious genetic structure among populations across the country. This phenomenon was associated with the considerable amount of gene flow between populations. Limited admixture from STRUCTURE analyses suggested a very low level of hybridization (pollen-mediated gene flow between populations. The abundant within-population genetic diversity coupled with limited population genetic structure and differentiation is likely caused by the considerable seed-mediated gene flow of weedy rice along with the long-distance exchange of farmer-saved rice seeds between weedy-rice contaminated regions in Sri Lanka. In addition to other effective weed management strategies, promoting the application of certified rice seeds with no weedy rice contamination should be the immediate action to significantly reduce the proliferation and infestation of this weed in rice ecosystems in countries with similar rice farming styles as in Sri Lanka.

  19. Historical isolation and contemporary gene flow drive population diversity of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii along the coast of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Jing; Hu, Zi-Min; Sun, Zhong-Min; Yao, Jian-Ting; Liu, Fu-Li; Fresia, Pablo; Duan, De-Lin

    2017-12-07

    Long-term survival in isolated marginal seas of the China coast during the late Pleistocene ice ages is widely believed to be an important historical factor contributing to population genetic structure in coastal marine species. Whether or not contemporary factors (e.g. long-distance dispersal via coastal currents) continue to shape diversity gradients in marine organisms with high dispersal capability remains poorly understood. Our aim was to explore how historical and contemporary factors influenced the genetic diversity and distribution of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii, which can drift on surface water, leading to long-distance dispersal. We used 11 microsatellites and the plastid RuBisCo spacer to evaluate the genetic diversity of 22 Sargassum thunbergii populations sampled along the China coast. Population structure and differentiation was inferred based on genotype clustering and pairwise F ST and allele-frequency analyses. Integrated genetic analyses revealed two genetic clusters in S. thunbergii that dominated in the Yellow-Bohai Sea (YBS) and East China Sea (ECS) respectively. Higher levels of genetic diversity and variation were detected among populations in the YBS than in the ECS. Bayesian coalescent theory was used to estimate contemporary and historical gene flow. High levels of contemporary gene flow were detected from the YBS (north) to the ECS (south), whereas low levels of historical gene flow occurred between the two regions. Our results suggest that the deep genetic divergence in S. thunbergii along the China coast may result from long-term geographic isolation during glacial periods. The dispersal of S. thunbergii driven by coastal currents may facilitate the admixture between southern and northern regimes. Our findings exemplify how both historical and contemporary forces are needed to understand phylogeographical patterns in coastal marine species with long-distance dispersal.

  20. Relating protein functional diversity to cell type number identifies genes that determine dynamic aspects of chromatin organisation as potential contributors to organismal complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Cardoso, Daniela; Sharpe, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Organismal complexity broadly relates to the number of different cell types within an organism and generally increases across a phylogeny. Whilst gene expression will underpin organismal complexity, it has long been clear that a simple count of gene number is not a sufficient explanation. In this paper, we use open-access information from the Ensembl databases to quantify the functional diversity of human genes that are broadly involved in transcription. Functional diversity is described in terms of the numbers of paralogues, protein isoforms and structural domains for each gene. The change in functional diversity is then calculated for up to nine orthologues from the nematode worm to human and correlated to the change in cell-type number. Those with the highest correlation are subject to gene ontology term enrichment and interaction analyses. We found that a range of genes that encode proteins associated with dynamic changes to chromatin are good candidates to contribute to organismal complexity.

  1. Diversity of crude oil-degrading bacteria and alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Haozhi; Wang, Yilin; Chang, Sijing; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo; Huo, Guanghua; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Xiukun; Tai, Xisheng; Sun, Likun; Zhang, Baogui

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the response of the microbial community to crude oil and the diversity of alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes in soil samples from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). The enrichment cultures and clone libraries were used. Finally, 53 isolates and 94 alkB sequences were obtained from 10 pristine soil samples after enrichment at 10 °C with crude oil as sole carbon source. The isolates fell into the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, with the dominance of Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. The composition of degraders was different from polar habitats where Acinetobacter sp. is not a predominant responder of alkane degradative microbial communities. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the alkB genes from isolates and enrichment communities formed eight clusters and mainly related with alkB genes of Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Acinetobacter. The alkB gene diversity in the QTP was lower than marine environments and polar soil samples. In particular, a total of 10 isolates exhibiting vigorous growth with crude oil could detect no crude oil degradation-related gene sequences, such as alkB, P450, almA, ndoB, and xylE genes. The Shannon-Wiener index of the alkB clone libraries from the QTP ranged from 1.00 to 2.24 which is similar with polar pristine soil samples but lower than that of contaminated soils. These results indicated that the Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Rhodococcus genera are the candidate for in situ bioremediation, and the environment of QTP may be still relatively uncontaminated by crude oil.

  2. Size-related bacterial diversity and tetracycline resistance gene abundance in the air of concentrated poultry feeding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Jia, Ruizhi; Qiu, Tianlei; Han, Meilin; Wang, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Concentrated animal-feeding operations (CAFOs) are considered a source of airborne human pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes. Although bacterial abundance and diversity have been well studied, limited information on the size distribution of bioaerosols has prevented a clear understanding of the health effects of exposure to bioaerosols from CAFOs. Here, different sizes of particles were sampled from the inside and outside of atmospheric environments of layer and broiler feeding operations using 8-stage Andersen samplers. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and 16S rDNA-based sequencing were used to analyze the characteristics of biological abundance and diversity, respectively, according to size. The results indicated that size-related differences occurred in terms of airborne bacterial richness, diversity, and concentration at poultry-feeding operations. The richness of biological genera in the urban atmospheric environment was lower than in concentrated poultry-feeding operations. The biological diversity of airborne bacterial genera, including genera associated with potential pathogens, varied according to size. The bacterial lineages of bioaerosols present in the 7 size stages for layers clustered apart from those for broilers, suggesting that the type of poultry house is a more important factor than the particle size in shaping the microbial communities. In most cases, the concentrations of the 16S rDNA, Escherichia coli, tetW, and tetL genes increased as the particle size increased, with the geometric mean diameters varying from 4.7 to 5.8 μm. These results regarding the size-related differences in the diversity and abundance of bioaerosols will facilitate a better understanding of the potential health impact on both poultry and humans working in such environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. GeneGini: Assessment via the Gini Coefficient of Reference "Housekeeping" Genes and Diverse Human Transporter Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Steve; Wright Muelas, Marina; Day, Philip J; Lundberg, Emma; Kell, Douglas B

    2018-02-28

    The expression levels of SLC or ABC membrane transporter transcripts typically differ 100- to 10,000-fold between different tissues. The Gini coefficient characterizes such inequalities and here is used to describe the distribution of the expression of each transporter among different human tissues and cell lines. Many transporters exhibit extremely high Gini coefficients even for common substrates, indicating considerable specialization consistent with divergent evolution. The expression profiles of SLC transporters in different cell lines behave similarly, although Gini coefficients for ABC transporters tend to be larger in cell lines than in tissues, implying selection. Transporter genes are significantly more heterogeneously expressed than the members of most non-transporter gene classes. Transcripts with the stablest expression have a low Gini index and often differ significantly from the "housekeeping" genes commonly used for normalization in transcriptomics/qPCR studies. PCBP1 has a low Gini coefficient, is reasonably expressed, and is an excellent novel reference gene. The approach, referred to as GeneGini, provides rapid and simple characterization of expression-profile distributions and improved normalization of genome-wide expression-profiling data. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Target gene enrichment in the cyclophyllidean cestodes, the most diverse group of tapeworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cyclophyllidea is the most diverse order of tapeworms, encompassing species that infect all classes of terrestrial tetrapods including humans and domesticated animals. Available phylogenetic reconstructions based either on morphology or molecular data lack the resolution to allow scientists to ...

  5. Analyses of the influencing factors of soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest based on GeoChip 5.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Xu, Han; Li, Yide; Deng, Ye; Li, Diqiang; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-09-01

    To examine soil microbial functional gene diversity and causative factors in tropical rainforests, we used a microarray-based metagenomic tool named GeoChip 5.0 to profile it. We found that high microbial functional gene diversity and different soil microbial metabolic potential for biogeochemical processes were considered to exist in tropical rainforest. Soil available nitrogen was the most associated with soil microbial functional gene structure. Here, we mainly describe the experiment design, the data processing, and soil biogeochemical analyses attached to the study in details, which could be published on BMC microbiology Journal in 2015, whose raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE69171).

  6. Genetic Diversity of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) Accession in Kenya Gene Bank Based on Simple Sequence Repeat Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamalwa, Emily N; Muoma, John; Wekesa, Clabe

    2016-01-01

    Increased agricultural production is an urgent issue. Projected global population is 9 million people by mid of this century. Estimation projects death of 1 million people for lack of food quality (micronutrient deficit) and quantity (protein deficit). Majority of these people will be living in developing countries. Other global challenges include shrinking cultivable lands, salinity, and flooding due to climate changes, new emerging pathogens, and pests. These affect crop production. Furthermore, they are major threats to crop genetic resources and food security. Genetic diversity in cultivated crops indicates gene pool richness. It is the greatest resource for plant breeders to select lines that enhance food security. This study was conducted by Masinde Muliro University to evaluate genetic diversity in 19 cowpea accessions from Kenya national gene bank. Accessions clustered into two major groups. High divergence was observed between accessions from Ethiopia and Australia and those from Western Kenya. Upper Volta accessions were closely related to those from Western Kenya. Low variation was observed between accessions from Eastern and Rift Valley than those from Western and Coastal regions of Kenya. Diversity obtained in this study can further be exploited for the improvement of cowpea in Kenya as a measure of food security.

  7. Genetic Diversity of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. Accession in Kenya Gene Bank Based on Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily N. Wamalwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased agricultural production is an urgent issue. Projected global population is 9 million people by mid of this century. Estimation projects death of 1 million people for lack of food quality (micronutrient deficit and quantity (protein deficit. Majority of these people will be living in developing countries. Other global challenges include shrinking cultivable lands, salinity, and flooding due to climate changes, new emerging pathogens, and pests. These affect crop production. Furthermore, they are major threats to crop genetic resources and food security. Genetic diversity in cultivated crops indicates gene pool richness. It is the greatest resource for plant breeders to select lines that enhance food security. This study was conducted by Masinde Muliro University to evaluate genetic diversity in 19 cowpea accessions from Kenya national gene bank. Accessions clustered into two major groups. High divergence was observed between accessions from Ethiopia and Australia and those from Western Kenya. Upper Volta accessions were closely related to those from Western Kenya. Low variation was observed between accessions from Eastern and Rift Valley than those from Western and Coastal regions of Kenya. Diversity obtained in this study can further be exploited for the improvement of cowpea in Kenya as a measure of food security.

  8. Whole-genome resequencing and transcriptomic analysis to identify genes involved in leaf-color diversity in ornamental rice plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Kug Kim

    Full Text Available Rice field art is a large-scale art form in which people design rice fields using various kinds of ornamental rice plants with different leaf colors. Leaf color-related genes play an important role in the study of chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast structure and function, and anthocyanin biosynthesis. Despite the role of different metabolites in the traditional relationship between leaf and color, comprehensive color-specific metabolite studies of ornamental rice have been limited. We performed whole-genome resequencing and transcriptomic analysis of regulatory patterns and genetic diversity among different rice cultivars to discover new genetic mechanisms that promote enhanced levels of various leaf colors. We resequenced the genomes of 10 rice leaf-color accessions to an average of 40× reads depth and >95% coverage and performed 30 RNA-seq experiments using the 10 rice accessions sampled at three developmental stages. The sequencing results yielded a total of 1,814 × 106 reads and identified an average of 713,114 SNPs per rice accession. Based on our analysis of the DNA variation and gene expression, we selected 47 candidate genes. We used an integrated analysis of the whole-genome resequencing data and the RNA-seq data to divide the candidate genes into two groups: genes related to macronutrient (i.e., magnesium and sulfur transport and genes related to flavonoid pathways, including anthocyanidin biosynthesis. We verified the candidate genes with quantitative real-time PCR using transgenic T-DNA insertion mutants. Our study demonstrates the potential of integrated screening methods combined with genetic-variation and transcriptomic data to isolate genes involved in complex biosynthetic networks and pathways.

  9. Diverse Enterotoxin Gene Profiles among Clonal Complexes of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from the Bronx, New York▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Avanish K.; Mediavilla, José R.; Robiou, Natalie; Guh, Alice; Wang, Xiabo; Gialanella, Philip; Levi, Michael H.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Fries, Bettina C.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) can cause toxin-mediated disease, and those that function as superantigens are implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The prevalence of 19 enterotoxin genes was determined by PCR in clinical S. aureus strains derived from wounds (108) and blood (99). We performed spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine clonal origin, and for selected strains staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Strains carried a median of five SE genes. For most SE genes, the prevalence rates among methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates, as well as wound- and blood-derived isolates, did not differ. At least one SE gene was detected in all except two S. aureus isolates (>99%). Complete egc clusters were found in only 11% of S. aureus isolates, whereas the combination of sed, sej, and ser was detected in 24% of clinical strains. S. aureus strains exhibited distinct combinations of SE genes, even if their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and MLST patterns demonstrated clonality. USA300 strains also showed considerable variability in SE content, although they contained a lower number of SE genes (mean, 3). By contrast, SE content was unchanged in five pairs of serial isolates. SEB production by individual strains varied up to 200-fold, and even up to 15-fold in a pair of serial isolates. In conclusion, our results illustrate the genetic diversity of S. aureus strains with respect to enterotoxin genes and suggest that horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements encoding virulence genes occurs frequently. PMID:19749060

  10. PCR-RFLP analyses for studying the diversity of GH and Pit-1 genes in Slovak Simmental cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Trakovická

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluation of growth hormone (GH and specific pituitary transcription factor (Pit-1 genes diversity in population of 353 Slovak Simmental cows. The analyses were based on single nucleotide polymorphisms GH/AluI and Pit-1/HinfI detections. A polymorphic site of GH gene (AluI has been linked to differences in circulating metabolites, metabolic hormones and milk yield. Bovine Pit-1 is responsible for pituitary development and hormone secreting gene expression, including GH gene. The Pit-1/HinfI locus was associated with growth, milk production and reproduction performance in cattle. Samples of genomic DNA were analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. Digestion of GH gene PCR products with restriction enzyme AluI revealed allele L and V with frequency 0.695 and 0.305, respectively. The digested Pit-1 gene PCR products with enzyme HinfI revealed alleles A (0.249 and B (0.751. Dominant genotypes were for GH gene heterozygous LV (0.47 and for Pit-1 gene homozygous BB (0.56 animals. The observed heterozygosity, effective allele numbers and polymorphism information content of GH/AluI and Pit-1/HinfI bovine loci population were 0.42/0.37, 1.73/1.59 and 0.33/0.30, respectively. The median polymorphic information content of loci was also transferred to the higher observed homozygosity in population (0.58/0.63. Keywords: cattle, growth hormone, leptin, PCR, Pit-1, polymorphism.

  11. Genetic testing including targeted gene panel in a diverse clinical population of children with autism spectrum disorder: Findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, Louisa; Twachtman-Bassett, Jennifer; Tokarski, Kristin; Stanley, Christine; Dumont-Mathieu, Thyde; Cotney, Justin; Chamberlain, Stormy

    2017-12-21

    Genetic testing of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is now standard in the clinical setting, with American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMGG) guidelines recommending microarray for all children, fragile X testing for boys and additional gene sequencing, including PTEN and MECP2, in appropriate patients. Increasingly, testing utilizing high throughput sequencing, including gene panels and whole exome sequencing, are offered as well. We performed genetic testing including microarray, fragile X testing and targeted gene panel, consistently sequencing 161 genes associated with ASD risk, in a clinical population of 100 well characterized children with ASD. Frequency of rare variants identified in individual genes was compared with that reported in the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database. We did not diagnose any conditions with complete penetrance for ASD; however, copy number variants believed to contribute to ASD risk were identified in 12%. Eleven children were found to have likely pathogenic variants on gene panel, yet, after careful analysis, none was considered likely causative of disease. KIRREL3 variants were identified in 6.7% of children compared to 2% in ExAC, suggesting a potential role for KIRREL3 variants in ASD risk. Children with KIRREL3 variants more often had minor facial dysmorphism and intellectual disability. We also observed an increase in rare variants in TSC2. However, analysis of variant data from the Simons Simplex Collection indicated that rare variants in TSC2 occur more commonly in specific racial/ethnic groups, which are more prevalent in our population than in the ExAC database. The yield of genetic testing including microarray, fragile X (boys) and targeted gene panel was 12%. Gene panel did not increase diagnostic yield; however, we found an increase in rare variants in KIRREL3. Our findings reinforce the need for racial/ethnic diversity in large-scale genomic databases used to identify variants that

  12. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes or non-ribosomal peptide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPS-like genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. More interestingly, further experiments revealed that the aspulvinone E produced by two different genes accumulates in different fungal compartments. And this spatial control of aspulvinone E production is likely to be regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is inserted in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. The study also identified one trans-prenyltransferase AbpB which is capable of prenylating two different substrates aspulvinones and butyrolactones. In total, our study shows the first example in which the locally distribution of the same natural product could lead to its incorporation into different SM pathways.

  13. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li Shi

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX, which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  14. Genotypic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin Gene (hla) and Its Association with Clonal Background: Implications for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Qi; Fan, Xin; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Li, Dong-Fang; Wang, Xin-Ying; Wu, Hong-Long; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The α-hemolysin, encoded by the hla gene, is a major virulence factor in S. aureus infections. Changes in key amino acid residues of α-hemolysin can result in reduction, or even loss, of toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of the hla gene sequence and the relationship of hla variants to the clonal background of S. aureus isolates. A total of 47 clinical isolates from China were used in this study, supplemented with in silico analysis of 318 well-characterized whole genome sequences from globally distributed isolates. A total of 28 hla genotypes were found, including three unique to isolates from China, 20 found only in the global genomes and five found in both. The hla genotype generally correlated with the clonal background, particularly the multilocus sequence type, but was not related to geographic origin, host source or methicillin-resistance phenotype. In addition, the hla gene showed greater diversity than the seven loci utilized in the MLST scheme for S. aureus. Our investigation has provided genetic data which may be useful for future studies of toxicity, immunogenicity and vaccine development.

  15. A rapid pathway toward a superb gene delivery system: programming structural and functional diversity into a supramolecular nanoparticle library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Kan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Yujie; Wang, Shutao; Lin, Wei-Yu; Guo, Feng; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Chen, Yi-Chun; Ohashi, Minori; Wang, Mingwei; Garcia, Mitch André; Zhao, Xing-Zhong; Shen, Clifton K-F; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2010-10-26

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising transfection reagents for effective and safe delivery of nucleic acids into a specific type of cells or tissues providing an alternative manipulation/therapy strategy to viral gene delivery. However, the current process of searching novel delivery materials is limited due to conventional low-throughput and time-consuming multistep synthetic approaches. Additionally, conventional approaches are frequently accompanied with unpredictability and continual optimization refinements, impeding flexible generation of material diversity creating a major obstacle to achieving high transfection performance. Here we have demonstrated a rapid developmental pathway toward highly efficient gene delivery systems by leveraging the powers of a supramolecular synthetic approach and a custom-designed digital microreactor. Using the digital microreactor, broad structural/functional diversity can be programmed into a library of DNA-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles (DNA⊂SNPs) by systematically altering the mixing ratios of molecular building blocks and a DNA plasmid. In vitro transfection studies with DNA⊂SNPs library identified the DNA⊂SNPs with the highest gene transfection efficiency, which can be attributed to cooperative effects of structures and surface chemistry of DNA⊂SNPs. We envision such a rapid developmental pathway can be adopted for generating nanoparticle-based vectors for delivery of a variety of loads.

  16. Genotypic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin Gene (hla and Its Association with Clonal Background: Implications for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xiao

    Full Text Available The α-hemolysin, encoded by the hla gene, is a major virulence factor in S. aureus infections. Changes in key amino acid residues of α-hemolysin can result in reduction, or even loss, of toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of the hla gene sequence and the relationship of hla variants to the clonal background of S. aureus isolates. A total of 47 clinical isolates from China were used in this study, supplemented with in silico analysis of 318 well-characterized whole genome sequences from globally distributed isolates. A total of 28 hla genotypes were found, including three unique to isolates from China, 20 found only in the global genomes and five found in both. The hla genotype generally correlated with the clonal background, particularly the multilocus sequence type, but was not related to geographic origin, host source or methicillin-resistance phenotype. In addition, the hla gene showed greater diversity than the seven loci utilized in the MLST scheme for S. aureus. Our investigation has provided genetic data which may be useful for future studies of toxicity, immunogenicity and vaccine development.

  17. The Populus ARBORKNOX1 homeodomain transcription factor regulates woody growth through binding to evolutionarily conserved target genes of diverse function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Petzold, H Earl; Beers, Eric P; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1) is a key regulator of vascular cambium maintenance and cell differentiation in Populus. Currently, basic information is lacking concerning the distribution, functional characteristics, and evolution of ARK1 binding in the Populus genome. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) technology to identify ARK1 binding loci genome-wide in Populus. Computational analyses evaluated the distribution of ARK1 binding loci, the function of genes associated with bound loci, the effect of ARK1 binding on transcript levels, and evolutionary conservation of ARK1 binding loci. ARK1 binds to thousands of loci which are highly enriched proximal to the transcriptional start sites of genes of diverse functions. ARK1 target genes are significantly enriched in paralogs derived from the whole-genome salicoid duplication event. Both ARK1 and a maize (Zea mays) homolog, KNOTTED1, preferentially target evolutionarily conserved genes. However, only a small portion of ARK1 target genes are significantly differentially expressed in an ARK1 over-expression mutant. This study describes the functional characteristics and evolution of DNA binding by a transcription factor in an undomesticated tree, revealing complexities similar to those shown for transcription factors in model animal species. No claim to original US Government works. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Java, Kalimantan, Timor and Irian Jaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interactions with specific human leucocyte antigen class I molecules on target cells. Population studies performed over the last several years have established that KIR gene frequencies (GFs) and genotype content vary considerably among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity, some of which have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have determined the frequencies of 16 KIR genes and pseudogenes and genotypes in 193 Indonesian individuals from Java, East Timor, Irian Jaya (western half of the island of New Guinea) and Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all four populations. Variation in GFs between populations was observed, except for KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3, KIR2DP1 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GFs between populations, both principal component analysis and a phylogenetic tree showed close clustering of the Kalimantan and Javanese populations, while Irianese populations were clearly separated from the other three populations. Our results indicate a high level of KIR polymorphism in Indonesian populations that probably reflects the large geographical spread of the Indonesian archipelago and the complex evolutionary history and population migration in this region.

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in minas frescal cheese: evaluation of classic enterotoxin genes, antimicrobial resistance and clonal diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Alice Gonçalves Martins; Marques, Leila Márcia Peres; Gomes, Marcel da Silva Amorim; Beltrão, Jhonathan Campos do Couto; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Esper, Luciana Maria Ramires; Paula, Geraldo Renato de; Teixeira, Lenise Arneiro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio

    2017-12-15

    This study aimed to investigate classical enterotoxin (sea to see) and mecA genes, by polymerase chain reaction and anitimicrobial susceptibility, by disk diffusion test of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from minas frescal cheese (MFC). All methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were investigated for the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and clonal diversity. Thirty-one S. aureus were isolated from four MFC samples. Seven (22.6%) S. aureus carried mecA gene and two of them carried enterotoxin genes seb/sec and sea/seb. Five (16.1%) S. aureus isolates showed induced resistance to clindamycin and nine (29%) were resistant to multiple -antibiotics (MDR), among these, six were MRSA. No MRSA isolates presented the PVL genes. Four MRSA were grouped into three clones and three isolates were not typable by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. MRSA isolates showed, by multilocus sequence typing, sequence types ST1, ST5, ST72 and ST4304 (new ST) and S. aureus protein A (spa type) t127, t568 and t2703. These data suggest that MFC may constitute a risk to the consumer because of its potential for staphylococcal food poisoning; however it might, also, become one of MRSA and MDR strains disseminator, including clones usually found in the hospital environment. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Diversity of a microsatellite locus in the CSN1S1 gene in goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-18

    Apr 18, 2011 ... Berardino D, Masina P (2005). Comparative analysis of gene sequence of goat CSN1S1 F and N allele and characterization of. CSN1S1 transcript variants in mammary gland. Gene, 345: 289-299. Raymond M, Rousset F (1995a). An exact test for population differentiation. Evolution, 49: 1280-1283.

  1. The diversity of leptin gene in Iranian native, Holstein and Brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... This study describes genetic variability in the leptin in Iranian native, Brown Swiss and Holstein cattle. (Bos Indicus and Bos Taurus). This is the first study of genetic polymorphism of the leptin gene in. Iranian native cattle. We examined exon 2 of the leptin gene from 587 individuals in six different.

  2. A Molecular Epidemiological Study of var Gene Diversity to Characterize the Reservoir of Plasmodium falciparum in Humans in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliwa-Sytek, Aleksandra; Smith, Terry-Ann; Peterson, Ingrid; Brown, Stuart M.; Migot-Nabias, Florence; Deloron, Philippe; Kortok, Moses M.; Marsh, Kevin; Daily, Johanna P.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Sarr, Ousmane; Mboup, Souleymane; Day, Karen P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The reservoir of Plasmodium infection in humans has traditionally been defined by blood slide positivity. This study was designed to characterize the local reservoir of infection in relation to the diverse var genes that encode the major surface antigen of Plasmodium falciparum blood stages and underlie the parasite's ability to establish chronic infection and transmit from human to mosquito. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the molecular epidemiology of the var multigene family at local sites in Gabon, Senegal and Kenya which differ in parasite prevalence and transmission intensity. 1839 distinct var gene types were defined by sequencing DBLα domains in the three sites. Only 76 (4.1%) var types were found in more than one population indicating spatial heterogeneity in var types across the African continent. The majority of var types appeared only once in the population sample. Non-parametric statistical estimators predict in each population at minimum five to seven thousand distinct var types. Similar diversity of var types was seen in sites with different parasite prevalences. Conclusions/Significance Var population genomics provides new insights into the epidemiology of P. falciparum in Africa where malaria has never been conquered. In particular, we have described the extensive reservoir of infection in local African sites and discovered a unique var population structure that can facilitate superinfection through minimal overlap in var repertoires among parasite genomes. Our findings show that var typing as a molecular surveillance system defines the extent of genetic complexity in the reservoir of infection to complement measures of malaria prevalence. The observed small scale spatial diversity of var genes suggests that var genetics could greatly inform current malaria mapping approaches and predict complex malaria population dynamics due to the import of var types to areas where no widespread pre-existing immunity in the population

  3. Prevalence, Virulence Genes, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Genetic Diversity of Bacillus cereus Isolated From Pasteurized Milk in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Gao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a common and important food-borne pathogen that can be found in various food products. Due to low-temperature sterilization for a short period of time, pasteurization is not sufficient for complete elimination of B. cereus in milk, thereby cause severe economic loss and food safety problems. It is therefore of paramount importance to perform risk assessment of B. cereus in pasteurized milk. In this study, we isolated B. cereus from pasteurized milk samples in different regions of China, and evaluated the contamination situation, existence of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance profile and genetic polymorphism of B. cereus isolates. Intriguingly, 70 samples (27% were found to be contaminated by B. cereus and the average contamination level was 111 MPN/g. The distribution of virulence genes was assessed toward 10 enterotoxigenic genes (hblA, hblC, hblD, nheA, nheB, nheC, cytK, entFM, bceT, and hlyII and one emetic gene (cesB. Forty five percent strains harbored enterotoxigenic genes hblACD and 93% isolates contained nheABC gene cluster. The positive rate of cytK, entFM, bceT, hlyII, and cesB genes were 73, 96, 75, 54, and 5%, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility assessment showed that most of the isolates were resistant to β-lactam antibiotics and rifampicin, but susceptible to other antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and chloramphenicol. Total multidrug-resistant population was about 34%. In addition, B. cereus isolates in pasteurized milk showed a high genetic diversity. In conclusion, our findings provide the first reference on the prevalence, contamination level and characteristics of B. cereus isolated from pasteurized milk in China, suggesting a potential high risk of B. cereus to public health and dairy industry.

  4. Abundances of Clinically Relevant Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Bacterial Community Diversity in the Weihe River, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The spread of antibiotic resistance genes in river systems is an emerging environmental issue due to their potential threat to aquatic ecosystems and public health. In this study, we used droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR to evaluate pollution with clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs at 13 monitoring sites along the main stream of the Weihe River in China. Six clinically relevant ARGs and a class I integron-integrase (intI1 gene were analyzed using ddPCR, and the bacterial community was evaluated based on the bacterial 16S rRNA V3–V4 regions using MiSeq sequencing. The results indicated Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Bacteroidetes as the dominant phyla in the water samples from the Weihe River. Higher abundances of blaTEM, strB, aadA, and intI1 genes (103 to 105 copies/mL were detected in the surface water samples compared with the relatively low abundances of strA, mecA, and vanA genes (0–1.94 copies/mL. Eight bacterial genera were identified as possible hosts of the intI1 gene and three ARGs (strA, strB, and aadA based on network analysis. The results suggested that the bacterial community structure and horizontal gene transfer were associated with the variations in ARGs.

  5. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  6. Hub connectivity, neuronal diversity, and gene expression in the Caenorhabditis elegans connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Roger; Fornito, Alex

    2018-01-01

    Studies of nervous system connectivity, in a wide variety of species and at different scales of resolution, have identified several highly conserved motifs of network organization. One such motif is a heterogeneous distribution of connectivity across neural elements, such that some elements act as highly connected and functionally important network hubs. These brain network hubs are also densely interconnected, forming a so-called rich club. Recent work in mouse has identified a distinctive transcriptional signature of neural hubs, characterized by tightly coupled expression of oxidative metabolism genes, with similar genes characterizing macroscale inter-modular hub regions of the human cortex. Here, we sought to determine whether hubs of the neuronal C. elegans connectome also show tightly coupled gene expression. Using open data on the chemical and electrical connectivity of 279 C. elegans neurons, and binary gene expression data for each neuron across 948 genes, we computed a correlated gene expression score for each pair of neurons, providing a measure of their gene expression similarity. We demonstrate that connections between hub neurons are the most similar in their gene expression while connections between nonhubs are the least similar. Genes with the greatest contribution to this effect are involved in glutamatergic and cholinergic signaling, and other communication processes. We further show that coupled expression between hub neurons cannot be explained by their neuronal subtype (i.e., sensory, motor, or interneuron), separation distance, chemically secreted neurotransmitter, birth time, pairwise lineage distance, or their topological module affiliation. Instead, this coupling is intrinsically linked to the identity of most hubs as command interneurons, a specific class of interneurons that regulates locomotion. Our results suggest that neural hubs may possess a distinctive transcriptional signature, preserved across scales and species, that is related

  7. Limited inter- and intra-patient sequence diversity of the genetic lineage a human metapneumovirus fusion gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, T.N.; Madsen, C.D.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2005-01-01

    been infected with at least two viruses. Several independent viruses contained premature stop codons in exactly identical positions resulting in truncated fusion proteins. Possibly this is a mechanism for immune system evasion. The F protein is a major antigenic determinant, and the limited sequence....... In this study, the inter- and intra-patient genetic diversity of the lineage A hMPV F gene was investigated. Ten isolates were collected from 10 hMPV infected children. Viral RNA was isolated and amplified, and approximately 10 clones from each isolate were sequenced. Altogether 108 clones were successfully...

  8. Microbial community composition and diversity via 16S rRNA gene amplicons: evaluating the illumina platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Sinclair

    Full Text Available As new sequencing technologies become cheaper and older ones disappear, laboratories switch vendors and platforms. Validating the new setups is a crucial part of conducting rigorous scientific research. Here we report on the reliability and biases of performing bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicon paired-end sequencing on the MiSeq Illumina platform. We designed a protocol using 50 barcode pairs to run samples in parallel and coded a pipeline to process the data. Sequencing the same sediment sample in 248 replicates as well as 70 samples from alkaline soda lakes, we evaluated the performance of the method with regards to estimates of alpha and beta diversity. Using different purification and DNA quantification procedures we always found up to 5-fold differences in the yield of sequences between individually barcodes samples. Using either a one-step or a two-step PCR preparation resulted in significantly different estimates in both alpha and beta diversity. Comparing with a previous method based on 454 pyrosequencing, we found that our Illumina protocol performed in a similar manner - with the exception for evenness estimates where correspondence between the methods was low. We further quantified the data loss at every processing step eventually accumulating to 50% of the raw reads. When evaluating different OTU clustering methods, we observed a stark contrast between the results of QIIME with default settings and the more recent UPARSE algorithm when it comes to the number of OTUs generated. Still, overall trends in alpha and beta diversity corresponded highly using both clustering methods. Our procedure performed well considering the precisions of alpha and beta diversity estimates, with insignificant effects of individual barcodes. Comparative analyses suggest that 454 and Illumina sequence data can be combined if the same PCR protocol and bioinformatic workflows are used for describing patterns in richness, beta-diversity and taxonomic

  9. Genes Left Behind: Climate Change Threatens Cryptic Genetic Diversity in the Canopy-Forming Seaweed Bifurcaria bifurcata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, João; Assis, Jorge; Coelho, Nelson C; Fernandes, Francisco; Pearson, Gareth A; Serrão, Ester A

    2015-01-01

    The global redistribution of biodiversity will intensify in the coming decades of climate change, making projections of species range shifts and of associated genetic losses important components of conservation planning. Highly-structured marine species, notably brown seaweeds, often harbor unique genetic variation at warmer low-latitude rear edges and thus are of particular concern. Here, a combination of Ecological Niche Models (ENMs) and molecular data is used to forecast the potential near-future impacts of climate change for a warm-temperate, canopy forming seaweed, Bifurcaria bifurcata. ENMs for B. bifurcata were developed using marine and terrestrial climatic variables, and its range projected for 2040-50 and 2090-2100 under two greenhouse emission scenarios. Geographical patterns of genetic diversity were assessed by screening 18 populations spawning the entire distribution for two organelle genes and 6 microsatellite markers. The southern limit of B. bifurcata was predicted to shift northwards to central Morocco by the mid-century. By 2090-2100, depending on the emission scenario, it could either retreat further north to western Iberia or be relocated back to Western Sahara. At the opposing margin, B. bifurcata was predicted to expand its range to Scotland or even Norway. Microsatellite diversity and endemism were highest in Morocco, where a unique and very restricted lineage was also identified. Our results imply that B. bifurcata will maintain a relatively broad latitudinal distribution. Although its persistence is not threatened, the predicted extirpation of a unique southern lineage or even the entire Moroccan diversity hotspot will erase a rich evolutionary legacy and shrink global diversity to current (low) European levels. NW Africa and similarly understudied southern regions should receive added attention if expected range changes and diversity loss of warm-temperate species is not to occur unnoticed.

  10. Genes Left Behind: Climate Change Threatens Cryptic Genetic Diversity in the Canopy-Forming Seaweed Bifurcaria bifurcata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Neiva

    Full Text Available The global redistribution of biodiversity will intensify in the coming decades of climate change, making projections of species range shifts and of associated genetic losses important components of conservation planning. Highly-structured marine species, notably brown seaweeds, often harbor unique genetic variation at warmer low-latitude rear edges and thus are of particular concern. Here, a combination of Ecological Niche Models (ENMs and molecular data is used to forecast the potential near-future impacts of climate change for a warm-temperate, canopy forming seaweed, Bifurcaria bifurcata. ENMs for B. bifurcata were developed using marine and terrestrial climatic variables, and its range projected for 2040-50 and 2090-2100 under two greenhouse emission scenarios. Geographical patterns of genetic diversity were assessed by screening 18 populations spawning the entire distribution for two organelle genes and 6 microsatellite markers. The southern limit of B. bifurcata was predicted to shift northwards to central Morocco by the mid-century. By 2090-2100, depending on the emission scenario, it could either retreat further north to western Iberia or be relocated back to Western Sahara. At the opposing margin, B. bifurcata was predicted to expand its range to Scotland or even Norway. Microsatellite diversity and endemism were highest in Morocco, where a unique and very restricted lineage was also identified. Our results imply that B. bifurcata will maintain a relatively broad latitudinal distribution. Although its persistence is not threatened, the predicted extirpation of a unique southern lineage or even the entire Moroccan diversity hotspot will erase a rich evolutionary legacy and shrink global diversity to current (low European levels. NW Africa and similarly understudied southern regions should receive added attention if expected range changes and diversity loss of warm-temperate species is not to occur unnoticed.

  11. Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Enterococcus Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-10-25

    The objective of the study was to answer the question of whether the ready-to-eat meat products can pose indirect hazard for consumer health serving as reservoir of Enterococcus strains harboring tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and macrolides resistance genes. A total of 390 samples of ready-to-eat meat products were investigated. Enterococcus strains were found in 74.1% of the samples. A total of 302 strains were classified as: Enterococcus faecalis (48.7%), Enterococcus faecium (39.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.3%), Enterococcus durans (3.0%), Enterococcus hirae (2.6%), and other Enterococcus spp. (1.7%). A high percentage of isolates were resistant to streptomycin high level (45%) followed by erythromycin (42.7%), fosfomycin (27.2%), rifampicin (19.2%), tetracycline (36.4%), tigecycline (19.9%). The ant(6')-Ia gene was the most frequently found gene (79.6%). Among the other genes that encode aminoglycosides-modifying enzymes, the highest portion of the strains had the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (18.5%) and aph(3'')-IIIa (16.6%), but resistance of isolates from food is also an effect of the presence of aph(2'')-Ib, aph(2'')-Ic, aph(2'')-Id genes. Resistance to tetracyclines was associated with the presence of tetM (43.7%), tetL (32.1%), tetK (14.6%), tetW (0.7%), and tetO (0.3%) genes. The ermB and ermA genes were found in 33.8% and 18.9% of isolates, respectively. Nearly half of the isolates contained a conjugative transposon of the Tn916/Tn1545 family. Enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat meat products. Many isolated strains (including such species as E. casseliflavus, E. durans, E. hirae, and Enterococcus gallinarum) are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Novel variants of major drug-metabolising enzyme genes in diverse African populations and their predicted functional effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matimba Alice

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmacogenetics enables personalised therapy based on genetic profiling and is increasingly applied in drug discovery. Medicines are developed and used together with pharmacodiagnostic tools to achieve desired drug efficacy and safety margins. Genetic polymorphism of drug-metabolising enzymes such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs and N-acetyltransferases (NATs has been widely studied in Caucasian and Asian populations, yet studies on African variants have been less extensive. The aim of the present study was to search for novel variants of CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and NAT2 genes in Africans, with a particular focus on their prevalence in different populations, their relevance to enzyme functionality and their potential for personalised therapy. Blood samples from various ethnic groups were obtained from the AiBST Biobank of African Populations. The nine exons and exon-intron junctions of the CYP genes and exon 2 of NAT2 were analysed by direct DNA sequencing. Computational tools were used for the identification, haplotype analysis and prediction of functional effects of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Novel SNPs were discovered in all four genes, grouped to existing haplotypes or assigned new allele names, if possible. The functional effects of non-synonymous SNPs were predicted and known African-specific variants were confirmed, but no significant differences were found in the frequencies of SNPs between African ethnicities. The low prevalence of our novel variants and most known functional alleles is consistent with the generally high level of diversity in gene loci of African populations. This indicates that profiles of rare variants reflecting interindividual variability might become the most relevant pharmacodiagnostic tools explaining Africans' diversity in drug response.

  13. Genetic diversity of oxytetracycline-resistant bacteria and tet(M) genes in two major coastal areas of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germond, Arno; Kim, Soo-Jin

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to analyse the prevalence and genetic diversity of the tet(M) resistance gene as well as the species composition of oxytetracycline-resistant bacteria in coastal areas of South Korea. Both culturable and non-culturable bacterial communities were sampled in 2010 and 2011 within two coastal areas (Wando and Geoje). tet(M) and 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained by PCR and sequencing and were used for phylogenetic analyses. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to determine the prevalence of tet(M) in sampled areas. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high heterogeneity of tet(M) sequences between Wando and Geoje areas. Sequences found in Wando were highly similar to each other and were similar to sequences found in Japanese aquaculture sites. A larger diversity of tet(M) sequences was obtained from natural assemblage in Geoje. qPCR showed a high prevalence of tet(M) in Wando's aquaculture sites (up to 10 -2 gene copies per 16S rRNA copy) and for industrial sites in Geoje (up to 10 -3 gene copies per 16S rRNA copy). 16 rRNA-based identification showed that Vibrio sp. and Photobacterium sp. were the most representative species in Wando, whereas in Geoje a broader range of species was found, with several isolates identified as pathogenic Acinetobacter, Aeromonas and Klebsiella. Altogether, these results showed a high prevalence of tet(M) in both sites, and different origins of contamination were identified. Because several pathogenic strains of oxytetracycline-resistant bacteria were reported for the first time, these results strongly warrant further analyses and actions to prevent contamination events by antibiotics in South Korea. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MUSTANG is a novel family of domesticated transposase genes found in diverse angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Rebecca K; Hoen, Douglas R; Schoen, Daniel J; Bureau, Thomas E

    2005-10-01

    While transposons have traditionally been viewed as genomic parasites or "junk DNA," the discovery of transposon-derived host genes has fueled an ongoing debate over the evolutionary role of transposons. In particular, while mobility-related open reading frames have been known to acquire host functions, the contribution of these types of events to the evolution of genes is not well understood. Here we report that genome-wide searches for Mutator transposase-derived host genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0) and Oryza sativa ssp. japonica (cv. Nipponbare) (domesticated rice) identified 121 sequences, including the taxonomically conserved MUSTANG1. Syntenic MUSTANG1 orthologs in such varied plant species as rice, poplar, Arabidopsis, and Medicago truncatula appear to be under purifying selection. However, despite the evidence of this pathway of gene evolution, MUSTANG1 belongs to one of only two Mutator-like gene families with members in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants, suggesting that Mutator-like elements seldom evolve into taxonomically widespread host genes.

  15. Diversity of Staphylococcus species and prevalence of enterotoxin genes isolated from milk of healthy cows and cows with subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, V L M; Miranda, E S; Castilho, I G; Camargo, C H; Langoni, H; Guimarães, F F; Araújo Júnior, J P; Fernandes Júnior, A

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the occurrence and diversity of Staphylococcus spp. in milk from healthy cows and cows with subclinical mastitis in Brazil and to examine the profile of enterotoxin genes and some enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus spp. A total of 280 individual mammary quarter milk samples from 70 healthy cows and 292 samples from 73 cows with subclinical mastitis were collected from 11 farms in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Staphylococcus spp. were recovered from 63 (22.5%) samples from healthy cows and from 80 samples (27.4%) from cows with mastitis. The presence of Staphylococcus aureus was significantly different between these 2 groups and was more prevalent in the cows with mastitis. The presence of Staphylococcus saprophyticus was also significantly different between these 2 groups, but this organism was more prevalent in healthy cows. No statistically significant differences were observed in the numbers of other staphylococci in milk samples from the 2 groups. The sea gene was the most prevalent enterotoxin gene in both groups. Eight of 15 (53.3%) Staph. aureus carried this gene and all produced the SEA toxin. In the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) group, 61 of 128 (47.5%) had the same gene and just 1 (1.6%) Staphylococcus epidermidis strain produced the enterotoxin in vitro. Because CNS were isolated from both groups of cows and most CNS contained enterotoxin genes but did not produce toxins, the role of CNS in mastitis should be carefully defined. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-11-11

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome.Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs.Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular

  17. Insights into functional genes and taxonomical/phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities in biological heap leaching system and their correlation with functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yunhua; Liu, Xueduan; Liang, Yili; Niu, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Xian; Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Xiaodong; Gu, Yabin; Yin, Huaqun

    2016-11-01

    Although the taxonomical/phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities in biological heap leaching systems has been investigated, the diversity of functional genes was still unclear, and, especially, the differentiation and the relationships of diversity and functions of microbial communities in leaching heap (LH) and leaching solution (LS) were also still unclear. In our study, a functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0) was employed to investigate the functional gene diversity, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to explore the taxonomical/phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities in LH and LS subsystems of Dexing copper mine (Jiangxi, China). Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) showed that both functional gene structure and taxonomical/phylogenetic structure of microbial communities were significantly different between LH and LS. Signal intensities of genes, including genes for sulfur oxidation (e.g., soxB), metal homeostasis (e.g., arsm), carbon fixation (e.g., rubisco), polyphosphate degradation (e.g., ppk), and organic remediation (e.g., hydrocarbons) were significantly higher in LH, while signal intensities of genes for carbon degradation (e.g., amyA), polyphosphate synthesis (e.g., ppx), and sulfur reduction (e.g., dsrA) were significantly higher in LS. Further inspection revealed that microbial communities in LS and LH were dominated by Acidithiobacillus and Leptospirillum. However, rare species were relatively higher abundant in LH. Additionally, diversity index of functional genes was significantly different in LS (9.915 ± 0.074) and LH (9.781 ± 0.165), and the taxonomical/phylogenetic diversity index was also significantly different in LH (4.398 ± 0.508) and LS (3.014 ± 0.707). Functional tests, including sulfur-oxidizing ability, iron-oxidizing ability, and pyrite bioleaching ability, showed that all abilities of microbial communities were significantly stronger in LH than those in LS. Further studies found that most key genes (e

  18. Detection and Diversity evaluation of tetracycline resistance genes in grassland-based production systems in Colombia, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eSantamaría

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Grassland-based production systems use approximately 26 percent of land surface on earth. However, there are no evaluations of these systems as a source of antibiotic pollution. This study was conducted to evaluate the presence, diversity, and distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in the grasslands of the Colombian Andes, where administration of antibiotics to animals is limited to treat disease and growth promoters are not included in animals’ diet. Animal (ruminal fluid and feces and environmental (soil and water samples were collected from six different dairy cattle farms and evaluated by PCR for the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs tet(M, tet(O, tetB(P, tet(Q tet(W, tet(S, tet(T, tet(A, and tetracycline efflux pumps tet(A, tet(B, tet(D, tet(H, tet(J, tet(Z, and tet(D. A wide distribution and high frequency for genes tet(W and tet(Q were found in both sample types. Other genes encoding RPPs ( tetB(P, tet(O, tet(M, tet(S and tet(T were detected at lower frequencies and more restricted distributions. Genes encoding efflux pumps were not common in this region, and only two of them, tet(B and tet(Z, were detected. DGGE-PCR followed by comparative sequence analysis of tet(W and tet(Q showed that the sequences detected in animals did not differ from those coming from soil and water, suggesting the transmission of tet genes from animal reservoirs to the environment. Additionally, there seems to be a differential flow of tet genes from one reservoir to the other because gene tet(O and tetB(P, detected in high frequencies in feces, were detected in low frequencies or not detected at all in the environment. Finally, the farms sampled in this study showed more than 50% similarity in relation to the tet genes detected and their frequencies. However, farms closer in space and under the influence of the same hydrographic network were significantly more similar to each other.

  19. Comparative genomics of Mycoplasma: analysis of conserved essential genes and diversity of the pan-genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma, the smallest self-replicating organism with a minimal metabolism and little genomic redundancy, is expected to be a close approximation to the minimal set of genes needed to sustain bacterial life. This study employs comparative evolutionary analysis of twenty Mycoplasma genomes to gain an improved understanding of essential genes. By analyzing the core genome of mycoplasmas, we finally revealed the conserved essential genes set for mycoplasma survival. Further analysis showed that the core genome set has many characteristics in common with experimentally identified essential genes. Several key genes, which are related to DNA replication and repair and can be disrupted in transposon mutagenesis studies, may be critical for bacteria survival especially over long period natural selection. Phylogenomic reconstructions based on 3,355 homologous groups allowed robust estimation of phylogenetic relatedness among mycoplasma strains. To obtain deeper insight into the relative roles of molecular evolution in pathogen adaptation to their hosts, we also analyzed the positive selection pressures on particular sites and lineages. There appears to be an approximate correlation between the divergence of species and the level of positive selection detected in corresponding lineages.

  20. Recurrent Gene Duplication Leads to Diverse Repertoires of Centromeric Histones in Drosophila Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursel, Lisa E; Malik, Harmit S

    2017-06-01

    Despite their essential role in the process of chromosome segregation in most eukaryotes, centromeric histones show remarkable evolutionary lability. Not only have they been lost in multiple insect lineages, but they have also undergone gene duplication in multiple plant lineages. Based on detailed study of a handful of model organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, centromeric histone duplication is considered to be rare in animals. Using a detailed phylogenomic study, we find that Cid, the centromeric histone gene, has undergone at least four independent gene duplications during Drosophila evolution. We find duplicate Cid genes in D. eugracilis (Cid2), in the montium species subgroup (Cid3, Cid4) and in the entire Drosophila subgenus (Cid5). We show that Cid3, Cid4, and Cid5 all localize to centromeres in their respective species. Some Cid duplicates are primarily expressed in the male germline. With rare exceptions, Cid duplicates have been strictly retained after birth, suggesting that they perform nonredundant centromeric functions, independent from the ancestral Cid. Indeed, each duplicate encodes a distinct N-terminal tail, which may provide the basis for distinct protein-protein interactions. Finally, we show some Cid duplicates evolve under positive selection whereas others do not. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that Drosophila Cid duplicates have subfunctionalized. Thus, these gene duplications provide an unprecedented opportunity to dissect the multiple roles of centromeric histones. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Diversity of sulfur-cycle prokaryotes in freshwater lake sediments investigated using aprA as the functional marker gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Kojima, Hisaya; Takano, Yoshinori; Fukui, Manabu

    2013-09-01

    The diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes (SOPs) in freshwater lake ecosystems was investigated by cloning and sequencing of the aprA gene, which encodes for a key enzyme in dissimilatory sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation. To understand their diversity better, the spatial distribution of aprA genes was investigated in sediments collected from six geographically distant lakes in Antarctica and Japan, including a hypersaline lake for comparison. The microbial community compositions of freshwater sediments and a hypersaline sediment showed notable differences. The clones affiliated with Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae were frequently detected in all freshwater lake sediments. The SOP community was mainly composed of four major phylogenetic groups. One of them formed a monophyletic cluster with a sulfur-oxidizing betaproteobacterium, Sulfuricella denitrificans, but the others were not assigned to specific genera. In addition, the AprA sequences, which were not clearly affiliated to either SRP or SOP lineages, dominated the libraries from four freshwater lake sediments. The results showed the wide distribution of some sulfur-cycle prokaryotes across geographical distances and supported the idea that metabolic flexibility is an important feature for SRP survival in low-sulfate environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. A horizontally transferred tRNA(Cys) gene in the sugar beet mitochondrial genome: evidence that the gene is present in diverse angiosperms and its transcript is aminoacylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Kubo, Tomohiko; Kagami, Hiroyo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Fujita, Asami; Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2011-10-01

    Of the two tRNA(Cys) (GCA) genes, trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA, previously identified in mitochondrial genome of sugar beet, the former is a native gene and probably a pseudo-copy, whereas the latter, of unknown origin, is transcribed into a tRNA [tRNA(Cys2) (GCA)]. In this study, the trnC2-GCA sequence was mined from various public databases. To evaluate whether or not the trnC2-GCA sequence is located in the mitochondrial genome, the relative copy number of its sequence to nuclear gene was assessed in a number of angiosperm species, using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The trnC2-GCA sequence was found to exist sporadically in the mitochondrial genomes of a wide range of angiosperms. The mitochondrial tRNA(Cys2) (GCA) species from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), spinach (Spinacea oleracea) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) were found to be aminoacylated, indicating that they may participate in translation. We also identified a sugar beet nuclear gene that encodes cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, which is dual-targeted to mitochondria and plastids, and may aminoacylate tRNA(Cys2) (GCA). What is of particular interest is that trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA co-exist in the mitochondrial genomes of eight diverse angiosperms, including spinach, and that the spinach tRNA(Cys1) (GCA) is also aminoacylated. Taken together, our observations lead us to surmise that trnC2-GCA may have been horizontally transferred to a common ancestor of eudicots, followed by co-existence and dual expression of trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA in mitochondria with occasional loss or inactivation of either trnC-GCA gene during evolution. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity Using Parameters Based on Probability of Gene Origin in the Slovak Spotted Bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hazuchová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the diversity based on probability of gene origin in Slovak Spotted bulls. The pedigree information was available from The Breeding Services of the Slovak Republic, s. e. The pedigree file consisted of 752 individuals. The 62 sires born from 1995 to 2009 and registered in Herd book set up the analyzed reference (RP population. Total number of founders in the RP was 308, effective number of founders was 115 and the effective number of ancestors was 37. The number of ancestors explaining 50 % of the diversity was 15 and founder’s genome equivalent was 20.46. The sire GS Malf and Horwein were with 16 offspring’s the most frequently used bulls in the artificial insemination. We found that the genetic conservation index for RP was 16.34 %. Results will be used in genetic management of breeding work in Slovak Spotted and monitoring of parameters characterizing genetic diversity and their development, as well.

  4. Phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and the nifH gene from mangrove rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyin; Peng, Mengjun; Li, Youguo

    2012-04-01

    Nine types of nitrogen-fixing bacterial strains were isolated from 3 rhizosphere soil samples taken from mangrove plants in the Dongzhaigang National Mangrove Nature Reserve of China. Most isolates belonged to Gammaproteobacteria Pseudomonas, showing that these environments constituted favorable niches for such abundant nitrogen-fixing bacteria. New members of the diazotrophs were also found. Using a soil DNA extraction and PCR-cloning-sequencing approach, 135 clones were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and 27 unique nifH sequence phylotypes were identified, most of which were closely related to sequences from uncultured bacteria. The diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria was assessed by constructing nifH phylogenetic trees from sequences of all isolates and clones in this work, together with related nifH sequences from other mangrove ecosystems in GenBank. The nifH diversity varied among soil samples, with distinct biogeochemical properties within a mangrove ecosystem. When comparing different mangrove ecosystems, the nifH gene sequences from a specific site tended to cluster as individual groups. The results provided interesting data and novel information on our understanding of diazotroph community diversity in the mangrove ecosystems.

  5. Diversity of Culturable Thermophilic Actinobacteria in Hot Springs in Tengchong, China and Studies of their Biosynthetic Gene Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan; Salam, Nimaichand; Jiao, Jian-Yu; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhou, En-Min; Yin, Yi-Rui; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The class Actinobacteria has been a goldmine for the discovery of antibiotics and has attracted interest from both academics and industries. However, an absence of novel approaches during the last few decades has limited the discovery of new microbial natural products useful for industries. Scientists are now focusing on the ecological aspects of diverse environments including unexplored or underexplored habitats and extreme environments in the search for new metabolites. This paper reports on the diversity of culturable actinobacteria associated with hot springs located in Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. A total of 58 thermophilic actinobacterial strains were isolated from the samples collected from ten hot springs distributed over three geothermal fields (e.g., Hehua, Rehai, and Ruidian). Phylogenetic positions and their biosynthetic profiles were analyzed by sequencing 16S rRNA gene and three biosynthetic gene clusters (KS domain of PKS-I, KSα domain of PKS-II and A domain of NRPS). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, the 58 strains were affiliated with 12 actinobacterial genera: Actinomadura Micromonospora, Microbispora, Micrococcus, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Promicromonospora, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Thermoactinospora, Thermocatellispora, and Verrucosispora, of which the two novel genera Thermoactinospora and Thermocatellisopora were recently described from among these strains. Considering the biosynthetic potential of these actinobacterial strains, 22 were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, and NRPS). These actinobacteria were further subjected to antimicrobial assay against five opportunistic human pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis). All of the 22 strains that were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the biosynthetic gene domains exhibited

  6. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Diversity of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Termite Gut Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hao; Bodington, Dylan; Zhang, Chong; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori; Hongoh, Yuichi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA) in termite guts was assessed by pyrosequencing PCR amplicons obtained using newly designed primers. Of 8,066 reads, 776 hydA phylotypes, defined with 97% nucleotide sequence identity, were recovered from the gut homogenates of three termite species, Hodotermopsis sjoestedti, Reticulitermes speratus, and Nasutitermes takasagoensis. The phylotype coverage was 92–98%, and the majority shared only low identity with database sequences. It was est...

  7. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  8. ama1 genes of sympatric Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum from Venezuela differ significantly in genetic diversity and recombination frequency.

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    Rosalynn L Ord

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We present the first population genetic analysis of homologous loci from two sympatric human malaria parasite populations sharing the same human hosts, using full-length sequences of ama1 genes from Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum collected in the Venezuelan Amazon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Significant differences between the two species were found in genetic diversity at the ama1 locus, with 18 distinct haplotypes identified among the 73 Pvama1 sequences obtained, compared to 6 unique haplotypes from 30 Pfama1 sequences, giving overall diversity estimates of h = 0.9091, and h = 0.538 respectively. Levels of recombination were also found to differ between the species, with P. falciparum exhibiting very little recombination across the 1.77 kb sequence. In contrast, analysis of patterns of nucleotide substitutions provided evidence that polymorphisms in the ama1 gene of both species are maintained by balancing selection, particularly in domain I. The two distinct population structures observed are unlikely to result from different selective forces acting upon the two species, which share both human and mosquito hosts in this setting. Rather, the highly structured P. falciparum population appears to be the result of a population bottleneck, while the much less structured P. vivax population is likely to be derived from an ancient pool of diversity, as reflected in a larger estimate of effective population size for this species. Greatly reduced mosquito transmission in 1997, due to low rainfall prior to the second survey, was associated with far fewer P. falciparum infections, but an increase in P. vivax infections, probably due to hypnozoite activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The relevance of these findings to putative competitive interactions between these two important human pathogen species is discussed. These results highlight the need for future control interventions to employ strategies targeting each of the parasite

  9. Effects of Intercropping with Potato Onion on the Growth of Tomato and Rhizosphere Alkaline Phosphatase Genes Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Fengzhi; Zhou, Xingang; Fu, Xuepeng; Tao, Yue; Xu, Weihui; Pan, Kai; Liu, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: In China, excessive fertilization has resulted in phosphorus (P) accumulation in most greenhouse soils. Intercropping can improve the efficiency of nutrient utilization in crop production. In this study, pot experiments were performed to investigate the effects of intercropping with potato onion (Allium cepa L. var. aggregatum G. Don) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings growth and P uptake, the diversity of rhizosphere phosphobacteria and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) genes in phosphorus-rich soil. Methods: The experiment included three treatments, namely tomato monoculture (TM), potato onion monoculture (OM), and tomato/potato onion intercropping (TI-tomato intercropping and OI-potato onion intercropping). The growth and P uptake of tomato and potato onion seedlings were evaluated. The dilution plating method was used to determine the population of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and phosphate-mineralizing bacteria (PMB). The genomic DNAs of PSB and PMB in the rhizosphere of tomato and potato onions were extracted and purified, and then, with the primer set of 338f /518r, the PCR amplification of partial bacterial 16S rDNA sequence was performed and sequenced to determine the diversities of PSB and PMB. After extracting the total genomic DNAs from the rhizosphere, the copy numbers and diversities of ALP genes were investigated using real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE, respectively. Results: Intercropping with potato onion promoted the growth and P uptake of tomato seedlings, but inhibited those of potato onion. After 37 days of transplanting, compared to the rhizosphere of TM, the soil pH increased, while the electrolytic conductivity and Olsen P content decreased (p onion promoted the growth and P uptake of tomato in phosphorus-rich soil and affected the community structure and function of phosphobacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Intercropping with potato onion also improved soil quality by lowering levels of soil acidification and

  10. A large and functionally diverse family of Fad2 genes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.

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    Cao Shijiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application and nutritional value of vegetable oil is highly dependent on its fatty acid composition, especially the relative proportion of its two major fatty acids, i.e oleic acid and linoleic acid. Microsomal oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase encoded by FAD2 gene is known to introduce a double bond at the Δ12 position of an oleic acid on phosphatidylcholine and convert it to linoleic acid. The known plant FAD2 enzymes are encoded by small gene families consisting of 1-4 members. In addition to the classic oleate Δ12-desaturation activity, functional variants of FAD2 that are capable of undertaking additional or alternative acyl modifications have also been reported in a limited number of plant species. In this study, our objective was to identify FAD2 genes from safflower and analyse their differential expression profile and potentially diversified functionality. Results We report here the characterization and functional expression of an exceptionally large FAD2 gene family from safflower, and the temporal and spatial expression profiles of these genes as revealed through Real-Time quantitative PCR. The diversified functionalities of some of the safflower FAD2 gene family members were demonstrated by ectopic expression in yeast and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CtFAD2-1 and CtFAD2-10 were demonstrated to be oleate desaturases specifically expressed in developing seeds and flower head, respectively, while CtFAD2-2 appears to have relatively low oleate desaturation activity throughout the plant. CtFAD2-5 and CtFAD2-8 are specifically expressed in root tissues, while CtFAD2-3, 4, 6, 7 are mostly expressed in the cotyledons and hypocotyls in young safflower seedlings. CtFAD2-9 was found to encode a novel desaturase operating on C16:1 substrate. CtFAD2-11 is a tri-functional enzyme able to introduce a carbon double bond in either cis or trans configuration, or a carbon triple (acetylenic bond

  11. Prevalence and diversity of IncX plasmids carrying fluoroquinolone and β-lactam resistance genes in Escherichia coli originating from diverse sources and geographical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiasova, Hana; Dolejska, Monika

    2016-08-01

    To describe the prevalence and diversity of IncX plasmids with antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae and to identify the most disseminated lineages of the plasmid family. IncX plasmids were screened in 1894 Enterobacteriaceae isolates resistant to cefotaxime (2 mg/L) or with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) obtained from various sources in five continents using PCR. IncX plasmid-harbouring isolates were identified using MALDI-TOF or biochemical tests, and screened for antibiotic resistance genes using PCR and sequencing; their clonality was determined by PFGE. Horizontal transfer of plasmids was tested using transformation and conjugation. IncX plasmids were characterized by S1-nuclease and PFGE, RFLP and hybridization. A total of 164 Escherichia coli isolates (8.7%, n = 1894) carried at least one IncX subgroup. Seven isolates harboured two distinct subgroups. IncX1 subgroup was found in 93 isolates, followed by IncX2 (35 isolates), IncX4 (28) and IncX3 (15). IncX4 plasmids were not transferred horizontally as single plasmids and therefore excluded from further analysis. The most disseminated lineages of IncX plasmids included IncX1 harbouring qnrS1 and blaTEM-1,-135 found in 36 E. coli from different sources in Europe and Australia and IncX2 carrying qnrS1 and tet(A) detected in nine E. coli from wildlife in Europe. IncX3 plasmids harboured predominantly blaSHV-12 and qnrS1 or qnrB7. IncX plasmids were widely distributed in E. coli from wildlife in Europe and were predominantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance genes. Plasmids showing indistinguishable restriction profiles were identified in E. coli from different sources and countries suggesting wide dissemination of certain plasmid lineages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A diverse repertoire of human immunoglobulin variable genes in a chicken B cell line is generated by both gene conversion and somatic hypermutation

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    Philip A. Leighton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chicken immune responses to human proteins are often more robust than rodent responses because of the phylogenetic relationship between the different species. For discovery of a diverse panel of unique therapeutic antibody candidates, chickens therefore represent an attractive host for human-derived targets. Recent advances in monoclonal antibody technology, specifically new methods for the molecular cloning of antibody genes directly from primary B cells, has ushered in a new era of generating monoclonal antibodies from non-traditional host animals that were previously inaccessible through hybridoma technology. However, such monoclonals still require post-discovery humanization in order to be developed as therapeutics. To obviate the need for humanization, a modified strain of chickens could be engineered to express a human sequence immunoglobulin variable region repertoire. Here, human variable genes introduced into the chicken immunoglobulin loci through gene targeting were evaluated for their ability to be recognized and diversified by the native chicken recombination machinery that is present in the B-lineage cell line DT40. After expansion in culture the DT40 population accumulated genetic mutants that were detected via deep sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the human targeted constructs are performing as expected in the cell culture system, and provide a measure of confidence that they will be functional in transgenic animals.

  13. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  14. Zooplankton diversity analysis through single-gene sequencing of a community sample

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    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and are critical for the homeostasis of the environment. Among the components of the ocean ecosystem, zooplankton play vital roles in energy and matter transfer through the system. Despite their importance, understanding of zooplankton biodiversity is limited because of their fragile nature, small body size, and the large number of species from various taxonomic phyla. Here we present the results of single-gene zooplankton community analysis using a method that determines a large number of mitochondrial COI gene sequences from a bulk zooplankton sample. This approach will enable us to estimate the species richness of almost the entire zooplankton community. Results A sample was collected from a depth of 721 m to the surface in the western equatorial Pacific off Pohnpei Island, Micronesia, with a plankton net equipped with a 2-m2 mouth opening. A total of 1,336 mitochondrial COI gene sequences were determined from the cDNA library made from the sample. From the determined sequences, the occurrence of 189 species of zooplankton was estimated. BLASTN search results showed high degrees of similarity (>98% between the query and database for 10 species, including holozooplankton and merozooplankton. Conclusion In conjunction with the Census of Marine Zooplankton and Barcode of Life projects, single-gene zooplankton community analysis will be a powerful tool for estimating the species richness of zooplankton communities.

  15. Genetic diversity of selected genes that are potentially economically important in feral sheep of New Zealand

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    Sedcole J Richard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feral sheep are considered to be a source of genetic variation that has been lost from their domestic counterparts through selection. Methods This study investigates variation in the genes KRTAP1-1, KRT33, ADRB3 and DQA2 in Merino-like feral sheep populations from New Zealand and its offshore islands. These genes have previously been shown to influence wool, lamb survival and animal health. Results All the genes were polymorphic, but no new allele was identified in the feral populations. In some of these populations, allele frequencies differed from those observed in commercial Merino sheep and other breeds found in New Zealand. Heterozygosity levels were comparable to those observed in other studies on feral sheep. Our results suggest that some of the feral populations may have been either inbred or outbred over the duration of their apparent isolation. Conclusion The variation described here allows us to draw some conclusions about the likely genetic origin of the populations and selective pressures that may have acted upon them, but they do not appear to be a source of new genetic material, at least for these four genes.

  16. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

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    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  17. The diversity of leptin gene in Iranian native, Holstein and Brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined exon 2 of the leptin gene from 587 individuals in six different populations of Iranian native cattles (86 Sarabi, 66 Taleshi, 94 Sistani, 76 Golpayegani, 104 Brown Swiss and 161 Holstein cattle) using PCR-RFLP method. Analysis of the frequencies of the various alleles in each breed indicated that allele C in ...

  18. Allelic Diversity and Geographical Distribution of the Gene Encoding Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-3 in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaswong, Vorthon; Simpalipan, Phumin; Siripoon, Napaporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2015-04-01

    Merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) of malaria parasites play critical roles during the erythrocyte invasion and so are potential candidates for malaria vaccine development. However, because MSPs are often under strong immune selection, they can exhibit extensive genetic diversity. The gene encoding the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum displays 2 allelic types, K1 and 3D7. In Thailand, the allelic frequency of the P. falciparum msp-3 gene was evaluated in a single P. falciparum population in Tak at the Thailand and Myanmar border. However, no study has yet looked at the extent of genetic diversity of the msp-3 gene in P. falciparum populations in other localities. Here, we genotyped the msp-3 alleles of 63 P. falciparum samples collected from 5 geographical populations along the borders of Thailand with 3 neighboring countries (Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia). Our study indicated that the K1 and 3D7 alleles coexisted, but at different proportions in different Thai P. falciparum populations. K1 was more prevalent in populations at the Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders, whilst 3D7 was more prevalent at the Thailand-Laos border. Global analysis of the msp-3 allele frequencies revealed that proportions of K1 and 3D7 alleles of msp-3 also varied in different continents, suggesting the divergence of malaria parasite populations. In conclusion, the variation in the msp-3 allelic patterns of P. falciparum in Thailand provides fundamental knowledge for inferring the P. falciparum population structure and for the best design of msp-3 based malaria vaccines.

  19. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy products - Genetic diversity and virulence gene profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douëllou, T; Delannoy, S; Ganet, S; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Fach, P; Loukiadis, E; Montel, Mc; Thevenot-Sergentet, D

    2016-09-02

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are widely recognized as pathogens causing food borne disease. Here we evaluate the genetic diversity of 197 strains, mainly STEC, from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8 and O145:28 and compared strains recovered in dairy products against strains from human, meat and environment cases. For this purpose, we characterized a set of reference-collection STEC isolates from dairy products by PFGE DNA fingerprinting and a subset of these by virulence-gene profiling. PFGE profiles of restricted STEC total DNA showed high genomic variability (0.9976 on Simpson's discriminatory index), enabling all dairy isolates to be differentiated. High-throughput real-time PCR screening of STEC virulence genes were applied on the O157:H7 and O26:H11 STEC isolates from dairy products and human cases. The virulence gene profiles of dairy and human STEC strains were similar. Nevertheless, frequency-wise, stx1 was more prevalent among dairy O26:H11 isolates than in human cases ones (87% vs. 44%) while stx2 was more prevalent among O26:H11 human isolates (23% vs. 81%). For O157:H7 isolates, stx1 (0% vs. 39%), nleF (40% vs 94%) and Z6065 (40% vs 100%) were more prevalent among human than dairy strains. Our data point to differences between human and dairy strains but these differences were not sufficient to associate PFGE and virulence gene profiles to a putative lower pathogenicity of dairy strains based on their lower incidence in disease. Further comparison of whole-genome expression and virulence gene profiles should be investigated in cheese and intestinal tract samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for diverse PDGFRA or PDGFRB fusion genes is facilitated by generic quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erben, Philipp; Gosenca, Darko; Müller, Martin C.; Reinhard, Jelena; Score, Joannah; del Valle, Francesco; Walz, Christoph; Mix, Jürgen; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Ernst, Thomas; Haferlach, Claudia; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Hochhaus, Andreas; Reiter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of diverse fusion genes with involvement of PDGFRA or PDGFRB in eosinophilia-associated myeloproliferative neoplasms is essential for adequate clinical management but is complicated by the multitude and heterogeneity of partner genes and breakpoints. Design and Methods We established a generic quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to detect overexpression of the 3′-regions of PDGFRA or PDGFRB as a possible indicator of an underlying fusion. Results At diagnosis, all patients with known fusion genes involving PDGFRA (n=5; 51 patients) or PDGFRB (n=5; 7 patients) showed significantly increased normalized expression levels compared to 191 patients with fusion gene-negative eosinophilia or healthy individuals (PDGFRA/ABL: 0.73 versus 0.0066 versus 0.0064, P<0.0001; PDGFRB/ABL: 196 versus 3.8 versus 5.85, P<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of the activation screening test were, respectively, 100% and 88.4% for PDGFRA and 100% and 94% for PDGFRB. Furthermore, significant overexpression of PDGFRB was found in a patient with an eosinophilia-associated myeloproliferative neoplasm with uninformative cytogenetics and an excellent response to imatinib. Subsequently, a new SART3-PDGFRB fusion gene was identified by 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (5′-RACE-PCR). Conclusions Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis is a simple and useful adjunct to standard diagnostic assays to detect clinically significant overexpression of PDGFRA and PDGFRB in eosinophilia-associated myeloproliferative neoplasms or related disorders. PMID:20107158

  1. Phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence gene profiles of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from pigs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerling, Jessica; Barth, Stefanie A; Schlez, Karen; Willems, Hermann; Herbst, Werner; Ewers, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Swine dysentery (SD) is an economically important diarrheal disease in pigs caused by different strongly hemolytic Brachyspira (B.) species, such as B. hyodysenteriae, B. suanatina and B. hampsonii. Possible associations of epidemiologic data, such as multilocus sequence types (STs) to virulence gene profiles and antimicrobial susceptibility are rather scarce, particularly for B. hyodysenteriae isolates from Germany. In this study, B. hyodysenteriae (n = 116) isolated from diarrheic pigs between 1990 and 2016 in Germany were investigated for their STs, susceptibility to the major drugs used for treatment of SD (tiamulin and valnemulin) and genes that were previously linked with virulence and encode for hemolysins (tlyA, tlyB, tlyC, hlyA, BHWA1_RS02885, BHWA1_RS09085, BHWA1_RS04705, and BHWA1_RS02195), outer membrane proteins (OMPs) (bhlp16, bhlp17.6, bhlp29.7, bhmp39f, and bhmp39h) as well as iron acquisition factors (ftnA and bitC). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed that 79.4% of the isolates belonged to only three STs, namely ST52 (41.4%), ST8 (12.1%), and ST112 (25.9%) which have been observed in other European countries before. Another 24 isolates belonged to twelve new STs (ST113-118, ST120-123, ST131, and ST193). The temporal distribution of STs revealed the presence of new STs as well as the regular presence of ST52 over three decades (1990s-2000s). The proportion of strains that showed resistance to both tiamulin und valnemulin (39.1%) varied considerably among the most frequent STs ranging from 0% (0/14 isolates resistant) in ST8 isolates to 46.7% (14/30), 52.1% (25/48), and 85.7% (6/7) in isolates belonging to ST112, ST52, and ST114, respectively. All hemolysin genes as well as the iron-related gene ftnA and the OMP gene bhlp29.7 were regularly present in the isolates, while the OMP genes bhlp17.6 and bhmp39h could not be detected. Sequence analysis of hemolysin genes of selected isolates revealed co-evolution of tlyB, BHWA1_RS02885, BHWA1_RS

  2. A highly conserved gene island of three genes on chromosome 3B of hexaploid wheat: diverse gene function and genomic structure maintained in a tightly linked block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wujun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of the wheat genome has resulted from waves of retrotransposable element insertions. Gene deletions and disruptions generated by the fast replacement of repetitive elements in wheat have resulted in disruption of colinearity at a micro (sub-megabase level among the cereals. In view of genomic changes that are possible within a given time span, conservation of genes between species tends to imply an important functional or regional constraint that does not permit a change in genomic structure. The ctg1034 contig completed in this paper was initially studied because it was assigned to the Sr2 resistance locus region, but detailed mapping studies subsequently assigned it to the long arm of 3B and revealed its unusual features. Results BAC shotgun sequencing of the hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring genome has been used to assemble a group of 15 wheat BACs from the chromosome 3B physical map FPC contig ctg1034 into a 783,553 bp genomic sequence. This ctg1034 sequence was annotated for biological features such as genes and transposable elements. A three-gene island was identified among >80% repetitive DNA sequence. Using bioinformatics analysis there were no observable similarity in their gene functions. The ctg1034 gene island also displayed complete conservation of gene order and orientation with syntenic gene islands found in publicly available genome sequences of Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays, even though the intergenic space and introns were divergent. Conclusion We propose that ctg1034 is located within the heterochromatic C-band region of deletion bin 3BL7 based on the identification of heterochromatic tandem repeats and presence of significant matches to chromodomain-containing gypsy LTR retrotransposable elements. We also speculate that this location, among other highly repetitive sequences, may account for the relative stability in gene order and

  3. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina A; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Genetic diversity and selection in three Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 7 (Pvmsp-7 genes in a Colombian population.

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    Diego Garzón-Ospina

    Full Text Available A completely effective vaccine for malaria (one of the major infectious diseases worldwide is not yet available; different membrane proteins involved in parasite-host interactions have been proposed as candidates for designing it. It has been found that proteins encoded by the merozoite surface protein (msp-7 multigene family are antibody targets in natural infection; the nucleotide diversity of three Pvmsp-7 genes was thus analyzed in a Colombian parasite population. By contrast with P. falciparum msp-7 loci and ancestral P. vivax msp-7 genes, specie-specific duplicates of the latter specie display high genetic variability, generated by single nucleotide polymorphisms, repeat regions, and recombination. At least three major allele types are present in Pvmsp-7C, Pvmsp-7H and Pvmsp-7I and positive selection seems to be operating on the central region of these msp-7 genes. Although this region has high genetic polymorphism, the C-terminus (Pfam domain ID: PF12948 is conserved and could be an important candidate when designing a subunit-based antimalarial vaccine.

  5. The functional gene diversity in natural populations over postglacial areas: the shaping mechanisms behind genetic composition of longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Philippe; Angers, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    The diversity of functional genes and the related processes are important issues for conservation biology. This is especially relevant for populations that have suffered from demographic reduction as a consequence of the processes of postglacial colonization. In this perspective, the aims of the present study are (1) to quantify the genetic diversity of functional genes and (2) to disentangle the long- and short-term effects of natural selection that shapes genetic diversity from those of drift, mutation, and allopatric fragmentation. This research was conducted using an extensive genetic polymorphism analysis of populations of longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) living over an area once covered by Pleistocene glaciations. The sequence and diversity of one exon of three genes (MHC IIβ, growth hormone, and trypsin) were jointly analyzed with non-coding nuclear loci from 27 populations; these populations were sampled over four major basins of northeastern North America. The survey revealed a surprisingly low allelic richness, especially for the MHC gene, considering the number of individuals and populations sampled. The results suggest that there is a complex mixture of different evolutionary processes shaping the level of polymorphism among longnose dace. While our study underlines the importance of the short-term effects of neutral processes and the major impact of post-glacial colonization on gene diversity, locally dependent balancing selection was detected on MHC. From this perspective, our results support an understanding of the importance of drift on functional gene diversity but also highlight the transient effects of natural selection on allelic composition, even in populations that show drastic reduction of genetic diversity. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  6. Gene flow and genetic diversity of a broadcast-spawning coral in northern peripheral populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Nakajima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, reef-building coral populations have been decreasing worldwide due to various disturbances. Population genetic studies are helpful for estimating the genetic connectivity among populations of marine sessile organisms with metapopulation structures such as corals. Moreover, the relationship between latitude and genetic diversity is informative when evaluating the fragility of populations. In this study, using highly variable markers, we examined the population genetics of the broadcast-spawning coral Acropora digitifera at 19 sites in seven regions along the 1,000 km long island chain of Nansei Islands, Japan. This area includes both subtropical and temperate habitats. Thus, the coral populations around the Nansei Islands in Japan are northern peripheral populations that would be subjected to environmental stresses different from those in tropical areas. The existence of high genetic connectivity across this large geographic area was suggested for all sites (F(ST < or = 0.033 although small but significant genetic differentiation was detected among populations in geographically close sites and regions. In addition, A. digitifera appears to be distributed throughout the Nansei Islands without losing genetic diversity. Therefore, A. digitifera populations in the Nansei Islands may be able to recover relatively rapidly even when high disturbances of coral communities occur locally if populations on other reefs are properly maintained.

  7. Haplotype diversity of VvTFL1A gene and association with cluster traits in grapevine (V. vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Lucie; Le Cunff, Loïc; Tello, Javier; Lacombe, Thierry; Boursiquot, Jean Michel; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Bravo, Gema; Lalet, Sandrine; Torregrosa, Laurent; This, Patrice; Martinez-Zapater, José Miguel

    2014-08-05

    Interaction between TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) and LEAFY (LFY) seem to determine the inflorescence architecture in Arabidopsis. In a parallel way, overexpression of VvTFL1A, a grapevine TFL1 homolog, causes delayed flowering and production of a ramose cluster in the reiterated reproductive meristem (RRM) somatic variant of cultivar Carignan. To analyze the possible contribution of this gene to cluster phenotypic variation in a diversity panel of cultivated grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. subsp. vinifera) its nucleotide diversity was characterized and association analyses among detected sequence polymorphisms and phenology and cluster traits was carried out. A total of 3.6 kb of the VvTFL1A gene, including its promoter, was sequenced in a core collection of 140 individuals designed to maximize phenotypic variation at agronomical relevant traits. Nucleotide variation for VvTFL1A within this collection was higher in the promoter and intron sequences than in the exon regions; where few polymorphisms were located in agreement with a high conservation of coding sequence. Characterization of the VvTFL1A haplotype network identified three major haplogroups, consistent with the geographic origins and the use of the cultivars that could correspond to three major ancestral alleles or evolutionary branches, based on the existence of mutations in linkage disequilibrium. Genetic association studies with cluster traits revealed the presence of major INDEL polymorphisms, explaining 16%, 13% and 25% of flowering time, cluster width and berry weight, respectively, and also structuring the three haplogroups. At least three major VvTFL1A haplogroups are present in cultivated grapevines, which are defined by the presence of three main polymorphism LD blocks and associated to characteristic phenotypic values for flowering time, cluster width and berry size. Phenotypic differences between haplogroups are consistent with differences observed between Eastern and Western grapevine cultivars and

  8. MICB gene diversity and balancing selection on its promoter region in Yao population in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Liu, Xuexiang; Wei, Xiaomou; Meng, Yuming; Liu, Limin; Qin, Shini; Liu, Yanyu; Dai, Shengming

    2016-12-01

    To comprehensively examine the MICB gene polymorphism and identify its differences in Chinese Yao population from other ethnic groups, we investigated the polymorphism in the 5'-upstream regulation region (5'-URR), coding region (exons 2-4), and the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of MICB gene by using PCR-SBT method in 125 healthy unrelated Yao individuals in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Higher polymorphism was observed in the 5'-URR, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a two base pairs deletion at position -139/-138 were found in our study. Only five different variation sites, however, were detected in exons 2-4 and three were observed in the 3'-UTR. The minor allele frequencies of all variants were greater than 5%, except for rs3828916, rs3131639, rs45627734, rs113620316, rs779737471, and the variation at position +11803 in the 3'-UTR. The first nine SNPs of 5'-URR and rs1065075, rs1051788 of the coding region showed significant linkage disequilibrium with each other. Ten different MICB extended haplotypes (EH) encompassing the 5'-URR, exons 2-4, and 3'-UTR were found in this population, and the most frequent was EH1 (23.2%). We provided several evidences for balancing selection effect on the 5'-URR of MICB gene in Yao population. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity of Streptococcus thermophilus in bacteriocin production; inhibitory spectrum and occurrence of thermophilin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Franca; Marzotto, Marta; Cremonese, Silvia; Rizzotti, Lucia; Torriani, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    The bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus thermophilus strains that can dominate in natural dairy ecosystems, may also enhance safety in products obtained from natural cultures. In this study, we sought to identify bacteriocin production and bacteriocin genes in 75 strains of dairy and plant origin. The strains were tested for antimicrobial activity against pathogens or pathogen models, spoiling bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria associated with dairy products. All strains moderately inhibited Staphylococcus aureus P310, none inhibited Listeria innocua LMG 11387(T) or Clostridium tyrobutyricum LMG 1285(T). In addition, 14 were active against one or more indicators in addition to S. aureus P310. Inhibition of other starter bacteria was more common than the inhibition of unwanted microorganisms. The involvement of a proteinaceous compound was ascertained in all cases. Results suggested that the selection of bacteriocinogenic S. thermophilus strains for use in biopreservation must take into account the effects exerted on other lactic acid bacteria. PCR detection of thermophilin genes proved unreliable in predicting antimicrobial activity. For S. thermophilus PRI36 and PRI45, with relevant inhibitory features, the identity of the bacteriocin genes present in the thermophilin 9 cluster was defined, thus revealing novel variants for this genome region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Allelic Diversity of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DRB Gene in Indian Cattle and Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinandan De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the diversity of MHC-DRB3 alleles in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds. Previously reported BoLA-DRB exon 2 alleles of Indian Zebu cattle, Bos taurus cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats were analyzed for the identities and divergence among various allele sequences. Comparison of predicted amino acid residues of DRB3 exon 2 alleles with similar alleles from other ruminants revealed considerable congruence in amino acid substitution pattern. These alleles showed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism at positions forming peptide-binding regions. A higher rate of nonsynonymous substitution was detected at the peptide-binding regions, indicating that BoLA-DRB3 allelic sequence evolution was driven by positive selection.

  11. Genetic subspecies diversity of the chimpanzee CD4 virus-receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Christina; Carlsen, Frands; Siegismund, Hans R

    2008-01-01

    Chimpanzees are naturally and asymptomatically infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Pathogenic properties of SIV/HIV vary and differences in susceptibility and pathogenicity of SIV/HIV depend in part on host-specific factors such as virus-receptor/co-receptor interactions. Since CD4...... plays a primary role in virus binding and since SIVcpz have been found only in two African chimpanzee subspecies, we characterized the genetic diversity of CD4 receptors in all four recognized subspecies of chimpanzees. We found noticeable variation in the first variable region V1 of CD4 and in intron...... six among the subspecies of chimpanzees. We found the CD4 receptor to be conserved in individuals belonging to the P. t. verus subspecies and divergent from the other three subspecies, which harbored highly variable CD4 receptors. The CD4 receptor of chimpanzees differed from that of humans. We...

  12. Molecular diversity in rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta makes it highly effective against dynamic population of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, S; Gupta, Y K; Singh, P K; Rathour, R; Variar, M; Prashanthi, S K; Singh, A K; Singh, U D; Chand, D; Rana, J C; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2013-08-01

    Rice blast is one of the important diseases of rice which can be effectively managed by the deployment of resistance genes. Pi-ta is one of the major blast resistant genes effective against pathogen populations in different parts of India. We analysed allelic variants of Pi-ta from 48 rice lines selected after phenotyping of 529 rice landraces across three eco-geographical blast hot spot regions. Besides, Pi-ta orthologue sequences of 220 rice accessions belonging to wild and cultivated species of rice were also included in the study for a better evo-devo perspective of the diversity present in the gene and the selection pressures acting on this locus. We obtained high nucleotide variations (SNPs and insertion-deletions) in the intronic region. We also identified 64 haplotypes based on nucleotide polymorphism in these alleles. Pi-ta orthologues of Indian landraces were scattered in eight major haplotypes indicating its heterogenous nature. We identified a total of 47 different Pi-ta protein variants on the basis of deduced amino acid residues amongst the orthologues. Five unique and novel Pi-ta variants were identified for the first time in rice landraces exhibiting different reaction types against the Magnaporthe oryzae population. A high value of Pi(non/syn) was observed only in the leucine-rich domain of the alleles cloned from Indian landraces, indicating strong selective forces acting on this region. The detailed molecular analysis of the Pi-ta orthologues provides insights to a high degree of inter- and intraspecific relationships amongst the Oryza species. We identified rice landraces possessing the effective alleles of this resistance gene which can be used in future blast resistance breeding programmes.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity, population structure, and gene flow of tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) across Nepal's Terai Arc Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Kanchan; Manandhar, Sulochana; Bista, Manisha; Shakya, Jivan; Sah, Govind; Dhakal, Maheshwar; Sharma, Netra; Llewellyn, Bronwyn; Wultsch, Claudia; Waits, Lisette P; Kelly, Marcella J; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hughes, Jane; Karmacharya, Dibesh

    2018-01-01

    With fewer than 200 tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) left in Nepal, that are generally confined to five protected areas across the Terai Arc Landscape, genetic studies are needed to provide crucial information on diversity and connectivity for devising an effective country-wide tiger conservation strategy. As part of the Nepal Tiger Genome Project, we studied landscape change, genetic variation, population structure, and gene flow of tigers across the Terai Arc Landscape by conducting Nepal's first comprehensive and systematic scat-based, non-invasive genetic survey. Of the 770 scat samples collected opportunistically from five protected areas and six presumed corridors, 412 were tiger (57%). Out of ten microsatellite loci, we retain eight markers that were used in identifying 78 individual tigers. We used this dataset to examine population structure, genetic variation, contemporary gene flow, and potential population bottlenecks of tigers in Nepal. We detected three genetic clusters consistent with three demographic sub-populations and found moderate levels of genetic variation (He = 0.61, AR = 3.51) and genetic differentiation (FST = 0.14) across the landscape. We detected 3-7 migrants, confirming the potential for dispersal-mediated gene flow across the landscape. We found evidence of a bottleneck signature likely caused by large-scale land-use change documented in the last two centuries in the Terai forest. Securing tiger habitat including functional forest corridors is essential to enhance gene flow across the landscape and ensure long-term tiger survival. This requires cooperation among multiple stakeholders and careful conservation planning to prevent detrimental effects of anthropogenic activities on tigers.

  14. Diverse and Abundant Secondary Metabolism Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in the Genomes of Marine Sponge Derived Streptomyces spp. Isolates

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    Stephen A. Jackson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Streptomyces produces secondary metabolic compounds that are rich in biological activity. Many of these compounds are genetically encoded by large secondary metabolism biosynthetic gene clusters (smBGCs such as polyketide synthases (PKS and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS which are modular and can be highly repetitive. Due to the repeats, these gene clusters can be difficult to resolve using short read next generation datasets and are often quite poorly predicted using standard approaches. We have sequenced the genomes of 13 Streptomyces spp. strains isolated from shallow water and deep-sea sponges that display antimicrobial activities against a number of clinically relevant bacterial and yeast species. Draft genomes have been assembled and smBGCs have been identified using the antiSMASH (antibiotics and Secondary Metabolite Analysis Shell web platform. We have compared the smBGCs amongst strains in the search for novel sequences conferring the potential to produce novel bioactive secondary metabolites. The strains in this study recruit to four distinct clades within the genus Streptomyces. The marine strains host abundant smBGCs which encode polyketides, NRPS, siderophores, bacteriocins and lantipeptides. The deep-sea strains appear to be enriched with gene clusters encoding NRPS. Marine adaptations are evident in the sponge-derived strains which are enriched for genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of compatible solutes and for heat-shock proteins. Streptomyces spp. from marine environments are a promising source of novel bioactive secondary metabolites as the abundance and diversity of smBGCs show high degrees of novelty. Sponge derived Streptomyces spp. isolates appear to display genomic adaptations to marine living when compared to terrestrial strains.

  15. Diversity and abundance of the arsenite oxidase gene aioA in geothermal areas of Tengchong, Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Wu, Geng; Dong, Hailiang; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Bing; Wang, Yanxin; Guo, Qinghai

    2014-01-01

    A total of 12 samples were collected from the Tengchong geothermal areas of Yunnan, China, with the goal to assess the arsenite (AsIII) oxidation potential of the extant microbial communities as inferred by the abundance and diversity of the AsIII oxidase large subunit gene aioA relative to geochemical context. Arsenic concentrations were higher (on average 251.68 μg/L) in neutral or alkaline springs than in acidic springs (on average 30.88 μg/L). aioA abundance ranged from 1.63 × 10(1) to 7.08 × 10(3) per ng of DNA and positively correlated with sulfide and the ratios of arsenate (AsV):total dissolved arsenic (AsTot). Based on qPCR estimates of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundance, aioA-harboring organisms comprised as much as ~15% of the total community. Phylogenetically, the major aioA sequences (270 total) in the acidic hot springs (pH 3.3-4.4) were affiliated with Aquificales and Rhizobiales, while those in neutral or alkaline springs (pH 6.6-9.1) were inferred to be primarily bacteria related to Thermales and Burkholderiales. Interestingly, aioA abundance at one site greatly exceeded bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance, suggesting these aioA genes were archaeal even though phylogenetically these aioA sequences were most similar to the Aquificales. In summary, this study described novel aioA sequences in geothermal features geographically far removed from those in the heavily studied Yellowstone geothermal complex.

  16. Interethnic diversity of the CD209 (rs4804803 gene promoter polymorphism in African but not American sickle cell disease

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    Jenelle A. Noble

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the genomic diversity of CD209 gene promoter polymorphism could assist in clarifying disease pathophysiology as well as contribution to co-morbidities. CD209 gene promoter polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to infection. We hypothesize that CD209 mutant variants occur at a higher frequency among Africans and in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the frequency of the CD209 gene (rs4804803 in healthy control and sickle cell disease (SCD populations and determined association with disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from 145 SCD and 231 control Africans (from Mali, 331 SCD and 379 control African Americans and 159 Caucasians. Comparative analysis among and between groups was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Per ethnic diversification, we found significant disparity in genotypic (23.4% versus 16.9% versus 3.2% and allelic frequencies (48.7% versus 42.1% versus 19.8% of the homozygote mutant variant of the CD209 (snp 309A/G gene promoter between Africans, African Americans and Caucasians respectively. Comparative evaluation between disease and control groups reveal a significant difference in genotypic (10.4% versus 23.4%; p = 0.002 and allelic frequencies (39.7% versus 48.7%; p = 0.02 of the homozygote mutant variant in African SCD and healthy controls respectively, an observation that is completely absent among Americans. Comparing disease groups, we found no difference in the genotypic (p = 0.19 or allelic (p = 0.72 frequencies of CD209 homozygote mutant variant between Africans and Americans with sickle cell disease. The higher frequency of CD209 homozygote mutant variants in the African control group reveals a potential impairment of the capacity to mount an immune response to infectious diseases, and possibly delineate susceptibility to or severity of infectious co-morbidities within and between groups.

  17. Three gene phylogeny of the Thoreales (Rhodophyta) reveals high species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Emily T; Dixon, Kyatt R; West, John A; Buhari, Nurliah; Vis, Morgan L

    2018-04-01

    The freshwater red algal order Thoreales has triphasic life history composed of a diminutive diploid "Chantransia" stage, a distinctive macroscopic gametophyte with multi-axial growth and carposporophytes that develop on the gametophyte thallus. This order is comprised of two genera, Thorea and Nemalionopsis. Thorea has been widely reported with numerous species, whereas Nemalionopsis has been more rarely observed with only a few species described. DNA sequences from three loci (rbcL, cox1, and LSU) were used to examine the phylogenetic affinity of specimens collected from geographically distant locations including North America, South America, Europe, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, China, and India. Sixteen species of Thorea and two species of Nemalionopsis were recognized. Morphological observations confirmed the distinctness of the two genera and also provided some characters to distinguish species. However, many of the collections were in "Chantransia" stage rather than gametophyte stage, meaning that key diagnostic morphological characters were unavailable. Three new species are proposed primarily based on the DNA sequence data generated in this study, Thorea kokosinga-pueschelii, T. mauitukitukii, and T. quisqueyana. In addition to these newly described species, one DNA sequence from GenBank was not closely associated with other Thorea clades and may represent further diversity in the genus. Two species in Nemalionopsis are recognized, N. shawii and N. parkeri nom. et stat. nov. Thorea harbors more diversity than had been recognized by morphological data alone. Distribution data indicated that Nemalionopsis is common in the Pacific region, whereas Thorea is more globally distributed. Most species of Thorea have a regional distribution, but Thorea hispida appears to be cosmopolitan. © 2018 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Intra-Family Inequality and Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    In “The Pecking Order,” Dalton Conley argues that inequalities between siblings are larger than inequalities at the level of the overall society. Our article discusses the normative implications for institutions of this observation. We show that the question of state intervention for curbing intr...

  19. Harnessing diversity towards the reconstructing of large scale gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hase

    Full Text Available Elucidating gene regulatory network (GRN from large scale experimental data remains a central challenge in systems biology. Recently, numerous techniques, particularly consensus driven approaches combining different algorithms, have become a potentially promising strategy to infer accurate GRNs. Here, we develop a novel consensus inference algorithm, TopkNet that can integrate multiple algorithms to infer GRNs. Comprehensive performance benchmarking on a cloud computing framework demonstrated that (i a simple strategy to combine many algorithms does not always lead to performance improvement compared to the cost of consensus and (ii TopkNet integrating only high-performance algorithms provide significant performance improvement compared to the best individual algorithms and community prediction. These results suggest that a priori determination of high-performance algorithms is a key to reconstruct an unknown regulatory network. Similarity among gene-expression datasets can be useful to determine potential optimal algorithms for reconstruction of unknown regulatory networks, i.e., if expression-data associated with known regulatory network is similar to that with unknown regulatory network, optimal algorithms determined for the known regulatory network can be repurposed to infer the unknown regulatory network. Based on this observation, we developed a quantitative measure of similarity among gene-expression datasets and demonstrated that, if similarity between the two expression datasets is high, TopkNet integrating algorithms that are optimal for known dataset perform well on the unknown dataset. The consensus framework, TopkNet, together with the similarity measure proposed in this study provides a powerful strategy towards harnessing the wisdom of the crowds in reconstruction of unknown regulatory networks.

  20. Methicillin resistance gene diversity in staphylococci isolated from captive and free-ranging wallabies

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    Michelle M. S. Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS can be life-threatening in humans and its presence in animals is a cause for public health concern. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of MRS in captive and free-ranging wallabies over a 16-month period in South Australia, Australia. Materials and methods: Eighty-nine purified staphylococcal isolates recovered from 98 captive and free-ranging wallabies' anterior nasal swabs were used in this study. All isolates were tested for the presence of the mecA, mecA1, and mecC genes. Multiplex PCR-directed SCCmec-typing, ccrB-typing, and determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration of oxacillin were performed on mec-positive isolates. Results and discussion: In total, 11 non-Staphylococcus aureus MRS were isolated from 7 out of 98 animals, corresponding to a 7.1% carriage rate. The SCCmec types I, III, and V were identified by multiplex PCR and sequencing of the ccrB gene. This is the first report of MRS carriage in both captive and free-ranging wallabies in Australia. These data demonstrate a low prevalence of MRS and no association between wallaby captivity status and MRS carriage could be assigned. These animals may act as a reservoir for the exchange of genetic elements between staphylococci. Furthermore, the mecA genes of animal isolates were identical to that found in human MRS strains and thus the possibility of zoonotic transfer must be considered.

  1. The Y152X MC1R gene mutation: occurrence in ethnically diverse Jewish malignant melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galore, Gilli; Azizi, Esther; Scope, Alon; Pavlotsky, Felix; Yakobson, Emanuel; Friedman, Eitan

    2007-04-01

    MC1R sequence variants are associated with malignant melanoma risk, and most commonly are missense mutations. Few (n=9) truncating mutations have been described in this gene as predisposing to malignant melanoma. In this study, three Jewish individuals were found to harbor an identical truncating MC1R mutation--Y152X: an Ashkenazi patient with two malignant melanomas, a non-Ashkenazi malignant melanoma patient with familial malignant melanoma and her asymptomatic mother. Both malignant melanoma patients carried additional, seemingly pathogenic MC1R variants. Haplotype analysis revealed that all three mutation carriers shared the same haplotype. This sequence variant was previously described in ethnically diverse, non-Jewish individuals and in all likelihood represents an error-prone domain that, in conjunction with other genetic and environmental factors, increases malignant melanoma risk.

  2. Shallow gene pools in the high intertidal: extreme loss of genetic diversity in viviparous sea stars (Parvulastra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever, Carson C.; Puritz, Jonathan B.; Addison, Jason A.; Byrne, Maria; Grosberg, Richard K.; Toonen, Robert J.; Hart, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    We document an extreme example of reproductive trait evolution that affects population genetic structure in sister species of Parvulastra cushion stars from Australia. Self-fertilization by hermaphroditic adults and brood protection of benthic larvae causes strong inbreeding and range-wide genetic poverty. Most samples were fixed for a single allele at nearly all nuclear loci; heterozygotes were extremely rare (0.18%); mitochondrial DNA sequences were more variable, but few populations shared haplotypes in common. Isolation-with-migration models suggest that these patterns are caused by population bottlenecks (relative to ancestral population size) and low gene flow. Loss of genetic diversity and low potential for dispersal between high-intertidal habitats may have dire consequences for extinction risk and potential for future adaptive evolution in response to climate and other selective agents. PMID:23925835

  3. Genetic diversity, phylogroup distribution and virulence gene profile of pks positive Escherichia coli colonizing human intestinal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Meysam; Scribano, Daniela; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Aprea, Maria Rita; Aleandri, Marta; Pronio, Annamaria; Longhi, Catia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Conte, Maria Pia

    2017-11-01

    Some Escherichia coli strains of phylogroup B2 harbor a (pks) pathogenicity island that encodes a polyketide-peptide genotoxin called colibactin. It causes DNA double-strand breaks and megalocytosis in eukaryotic cells and it may contribute to cancer development. Study of bacterial community that colonizes the adenomatous polyp lesion, defined as precancerous lesions, could be helpful to assess if such pathogenic bacteria possess a role in the polyp progression to cancer. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1500 E. coli isolates were obtained from biopsies of patients presenting adenomatous colon polyps, the normal tissues adjacent to the polyp lesion and patients presenting normal mucosa. pks island frequency, phylogenetic grouping, fingerprint genotyping, and virulence gene features of pks positive (pks + ) E. coli isolates were performed. We found pks + E. coli strongly colonize two patients presenting polypoid lesions and none were identified in patients presenting normal mucosa. Predominant phylogroups among pks + E. coli isolates were B2, followed by D. Clustering based on fragment profiles of composite analysis, typed the pks + isolates into 5 major clusters (I-V) and 17 sub-clusters, demonstrating a high level of genetic diversity among them. The most prevalent virulence genes were fimH and fyuA (100%), followed by vat (92%), hra and papA (69%), ibeA (28%), and hlyA (25%). Our results revealed that pks + E. coli can colonize the precancerous lesions, with a high distribution in both the polyp lesions and in normal tissues adjacent to the lesion. The high differences in fingerprinting patterns obtained indicate that pks + E. coli strains were genetically diverse, possibly allowing them to more easily adapt to environmental variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity of group A rotavirus genes detected in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Ana Carolina Bernardes Dulgheroff

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Group A rotaviruses are the main causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis. The segmented nature of the viral genome allows reassortment of genome segments, which can generate genetic variants. In this study, we characterized the diversity of the VP7, VP4 (VP8*, VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of the rotaviruses that circulated from 2005 to 2011 in the Triângulo Mineiro (TM region of Brazil. Samples with genotypes G2 (sublineages IVa-1 and IVa-3, G1 (sublineage I-A, G9 (lineage III, G12 (lineages II and III, G8 (lineage II, G3 (lineage III, P[4] (sublineages IVa and IVb, P[8] (sublineages P[8]-3.6, P[8]-3.3, and P[8]-3.1, I2 (lineage VII, E2 (lineages VI, XII, and X, and H2 (lineage III were identified. The associations found in the samples were G1, G9, or G12 with P[8]-I1-E1-H1; G2 or G8 with P[4]-I2-E2-H2; G12 with I3-E3-H6; and G3 with P[4]-I2-E3-H3 (previously unreported combination. Reassortment events in G2P[4] strains and an apparent pattern of temporal segregation within the lineages were observed. Five TM samples contained genes that exhibited high nucleotide and amino acid identities with strains of animal origin. The present study includes a period of pre- and post-introduction of rotavirus vaccination in all Brazilian territories, thereby serving as a basis for monitoring changes in the genetic constitution of rotaviruses. The results also contribute to the understanding of the diversity and evolution of rotaviruses in a global context.

  5. Diversity of ankA and msp4 genes of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strašek Smrdel, Katja; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Petrovec, Miroslav; Avšič Županc, Tatjana

    2015-03-01

    Granulocytic anaplasmosis is a tick transmitted emerging disease in Europe and worldwide. The agent, Anaplasma phagocytophilum is transmitted by ticks of the genus Ixodes and causes infections in humans and domestic animals. The analysis of different target genes showed that in nature several genetic variants of A. phagocytophilum were present. The purpose of our study was to genetically characterize A. phagocytophilum strains from eight humans, 16 dogs, 12 wild boars, one bear and 18 tick pools from Slovenia. Therefore, the ankA and msp4 genes of A. phagocytophilum were chosen. The same genetic ankA and msp4 variant of A. phagocytophilum was detected in humans, wild boar and a part of the pooled ticks indicating that it circulates in a zoonotic cycle between wild boar and ticks. In dogs, three ankA variants of A. phagocytophilum were detected. One of them was identical to the one that was found in humans. In contrast, all dogs harboured the same msp4 variant as humans and wild boar. In ticks, numerous ankA and msp4 variants were present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Lack of genomic diversity in the SLC47A1 gene within the indigenous Xhosa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Clifford; Pearce, Brendon; Hoosain, Nisreen; Benjeddou, Mongi

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 (MATE1) is an organic cation/H+ exchanger, localized in the apical membrane of proximal renal tubules, which mediates the cellular elimination of organic cations into the renal lumen. These organic cations include clinically important drugs such as metformin, oxaliplatin and cimetidine. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms of SLC47A1, the pharmacogenetically relevant gene encoding human MATE1, have been implicated in reduced transport or accumulation to cytotoxic levels of these drugs in vitro. However, little or no information is available on the minor allele frequency distribution of known SLC47A1 coding SNPs in the sub-Saharan African populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the baseline minor allele frequency distribution of 20 known coding SNPs in the SLC47A1 gene of 148 Xhosa individuals residing in Cape Town, South Africa. This study did not identify any of these known SLC47A1 coding SNPs in the Xhosa individuals who participated in this study. It is anticipated that whole genome or exome sequencing may reveal novel SNPs in the Xhosa and other sub-Saharan African populations, which may have been missed with the current genotyping strategy.

  7. Diversity of virulence genes in Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus detected from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Golmohammadi, Reza; Mirnejad, Reza; Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Kazemian, Hossein

    2018-03-22

    The presence of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus genomes were investigated in the synovial fluid (SF) samples from 90 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). DNA extraction and PCR assay were performed for simultaneous identification and discrimination of B. melitensis and B. abortus from the SF using three specific primers. After gel electrophoresis, the PCR products were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The cbg, omp31, manA, virB, and znuA virulence genes typing were performed by multiplex-PCR. Of the 90 samples, 14 were positive for B. melitensis (n = 9; 10%) and B. abortus (n = 5; 5.5%). The virulotyping of positive samples revealed the presence of all five virulence genes in B. melitensis. The virB, cbg, and om31 were detected in all five samples of B. abortus. In addition, zhuA and manA were detected in three (60%) and four (80%) samples, respectively, of the B. abortus-positive samples. Moreover, a total of 94.2% and 89.2% of the 14 positive samples were also found positive for manA and znuA, respectively. Our findings revealed that the Brucella spp. genomes can be detected in the SF of RA patients by the PCR-based method. We thus suggest that physicians should consider the Brucella spp. as indicators of potential RA for the timely diagnosis and treatment of RA. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Genes, enzymes and chemicals of terpenoid diversity in the constitutive and induced defence of conifers against insects and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Insects select their hosts, but trees cannot select which herbivores will feed upon them. Thus, as long-lived stationary organisms, conifers must resist the onslaught of varying and multiple attackers over their lifetime. Arguably, the greatest threats to conifers are herbivorous insects and their associated pathogens. Insects such as bark beetles, stem- and wood-boring insects, shoot-feeding weevils, and foliage-feeding budworms and sawflies are among the most devastating pests of conifer forests. Conifer trees produce a great diversity of compounds, such as an enormous array of terpenoids and phenolics, that may impart resistance to a variety of herbivores and microorganisms. Insects have evolved to specialize in resistance to these chemicals -- choosing, feeding upon, and colonizing hosts they perceive to be best suited to reproduction. This review focuses on the plant-insect interactions mediated by conifer-produced terpenoids. To understand the role of terpenoids in conifer-insect interactions, we must understand how conifers produce the wide diversity of terpenoids, as well as understand how these specific compounds affect insect behaviour and physiology. This review examines what chemicals are produced, the genes and proteins involved in their biosynthesis, how they work, and how they are regulated. It also examines how insects and their associated pathogens interact with, elicit, and are affected by conifer-produced terpenoids.

  9. Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase Gene Diversity in the Guts of Higher Termites with Different Diets and Lifestyles ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Elizabeth A.; Leadbetter, Jared R.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examine gene diversity for formyl-tetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS), a key enzyme in homoacetogenesis, recovered from the gut microbiota of six species of higher termites. The “higher” termites (family Termitidae), which represent the majority of extant termite species and genera, engage in a broader diversity of feeding and nesting styles than the “lower” termites. Previous studies of termite gut homoacetogenesis have focused on wood-feeding lower termites, from which the preponderance of FTHFS sequences recovered were related to those from acetogenic treponemes. While sequences belonging to this group were present in the guts of all six higher termites examined, treponeme-like FTHFS sequences represented the majority of recovered sequences in only two species (a wood-feeding Nasutitermes sp. and a palm-feeding Microcerotermes sp.). The remaining four termite species analyzed (a Gnathamitermes sp. and two Amitermes spp. that were recovered from subterranean nests with indeterminate feeding strategies and a litter-feeding Rhynchotermes sp.) yielded novel FTHFS clades not observed in lower termites. These termites yielded two distinct clusters of probable purinolytic Firmicutes and a large group of potential homoacetogens related to sequences previously recovered from the guts of omnivorous cockroaches. These findings suggest that the gut environments of different higher termite species may select for different groups of homoacetogens, with some species hosting treponeme-dominated homoacetogen populations similar to those of wood-feeding, lower termites while others host Firmicutes-dominated communities more similar to those of omnivorous cockroaches. PMID:21441328

  10. The different potential of sponge bacterial symbionts in N₂ release indicated by the phylogenetic diversity and abundance analyses of denitrification genes, nirK and nosZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; He, Liming; Zhang, Fengli; Sun, Wei; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen cycle is a critical biogeochemical process of the oceans. The nitrogen fixation by sponge cyanobacteria was early observed. Until recently, sponges were found to be able to release nitrogen gas. However the gene-level evidence for the role of bacterial symbionts from different species sponges in nitrogen gas release is limited. And meanwhile, the quanitative analysis of nitrogen cycle-related genes of sponge microbial symbionts is relatively lacking. The nirK gene encoding nitrite reductase which catalyzes soluble nitrite into gas NO and nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase which catalyzes N₂O into N₂ are two key functional genes in the complete denitrification pathway. In this study, using nirK and nosZ genes as markers, the potential of bacterial symbionts in six species of sponges in the release of N2 was investigated by phylogenetic analysis and real-time qPCR. As a result, totally, 2 OTUs of nirK and 5 OTUs of nosZ genes were detected by gene library-based saturated sequencing. Difference phylogenetic diversity of nirK and nosZ genes were observed at OTU level in sponges. Meanwhile, real-time qPCR analysis showed that Xestospongia testudinaria had the highest abundance of nosZ gene, while Cinachyrella sp. had the greatest abundance of nirK gene. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the nirK and nosZ genes were probably of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria origin. The results from this study suggest that the denitrification potential of bacteria varies among sponges because of the different phylogenetic diversity and relative abundance of nosZ and nirK genes in sponges. Totally, both the qualitative and quantitative analyses of nirK and nosZ genes indicated the different potential of sponge bacterial symbionts in the release of nitrogen gas.

  11. The different potential of sponge bacterial symbionts in N₂ release indicated by the phylogenetic diversity and abundance analyses of denitrification genes, nirK and nosZ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhang

    Full Text Available Nitrogen cycle is a critical biogeochemical process of the oceans. The nitrogen fixation by sponge cyanobacteria was early observed. Until recently, sponges were found to be able to release nitrogen gas. However the gene-level evidence for the role of bacterial symbionts from different species sponges in nitrogen gas release is limited. And meanwhile, the quanitative analysis of nitrogen cycle-related genes of sponge microbial symbionts is relatively lacking. The nirK gene encoding nitrite reductase which catalyzes soluble nitrite into gas NO and nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase which catalyzes N₂O into N₂ are two key functional genes in the complete denitrification pathway. In this study, using nirK and nosZ genes as markers, the potential of bacterial symbionts in six species of sponges in the release of N2 was investigated by phylogenetic analysis and real-time qPCR. As a result, totally, 2 OTUs of nirK and 5 OTUs of nosZ genes were detected by gene library-based saturated sequencing. Difference phylogenetic diversity of nirK and nosZ genes were observed at OTU level in sponges. Meanwhile, real-time qPCR analysis showed that Xestospongia testudinaria had the highest abundance of nosZ gene, while Cinachyrella sp. had the greatest abundance of nirK gene. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the nirK and nosZ genes were probably of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria origin. The results from this study suggest that the denitrification potential of bacteria varies among sponges because of the different phylogenetic diversity and relative abundance of nosZ and nirK genes in sponges. Totally, both the qualitative and quantitative analyses of nirK and nosZ genes indicated the different potential of sponge bacterial symbionts in the release of nitrogen gas.

  12. Y-chromosomal diversity in Haiti and Jamaica: contrasting levels of sex-biased gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Tanya M; Wright, Marisil R; Hernandez, Michelle; Perez, Omar A; Ramirez, Evelyn C; Martinez, Emanuel; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-08-01

    Although previous studies have characterized the genetic structure of populations from Haiti and Jamaica using classical and autosomal STR polymorphisms, the patrilineal influences that are present in these countries have yet to be explored. To address this lacuna, the current study aims to investigate, for the first time, the potential impact of different ancestral sources, unique colonial histories, and distinct family structures on the paternal profile of both groups. According to previous reports examining populations from the Americas, island-specific demographic histories can greatly impact population structure, including various patterns of sex-biased gene flow. Also, given the contrasting autosomal profiles provided in our earlier study (Simms et al.: Am J Phys Anthropol 142 (2010) 49-66), we hypothesize that the degree and directionality of gene flow from Europeans, Africans, Amerindians, and East Asians are dissimilar in the two countries. To test this premise, 177 high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers and 17 Y-STR loci were typed in Haiti (n = 123) and Jamaica (n = 159) and subsequently utilized for phylogenetic comparisons to available reference collections encompassing Africa, Europe, Asia (East and South), and the New World. Our results reveal that both studied populations exhibit a predominantly South-Saharan paternal component, with haplogroups A1b-V152, A3-M32, B2-M182, E1a-M33, E1b1a-M2, E2b-M98, and R1b2-V88 comprising 77.2% and 66.7% of the Haitian and Jamaican paternal gene pools, respectively. Yet, European derived chromosomes (i.e., haplogroups G2a*-P15, I-M258, R1b1b-M269, and T-M184) were detected at commensurate levels in Haiti (20.3%) and Jamaica (18.9%), whereas Y-haplogroups indicative of Chinese [O-M175 (3.8%)] and Indian [H-M69 (0.6%) and L-M20 (0.6%)] ancestry were restricted to Jamaica. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Heterogenous Distribution of MTHFR Gene Variants among Mestizos and Diverse Amerindian Groups from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Sánchez-Hernández, Beatríz E.; García-Ortiz, Humberto; Martínez-Hernández, Angélica; Barajas-Olmos, Francisco; Cid, Miguel; Mendoza-Caamal, Elvia C.; Centeno-Cruz, Federico; Ortiz-Cruz, Gabriela; Jiménez-López, José Concepción; Córdova, Emilio J.; Salas-Bautista, Eva Gabriela; Saldaña-Alvarez, Yolanda; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M.

    2016-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate metabolism. Folate deficiency has been related to several conditions, including neural tube defects (NTDs) and cardiovascular diseases. Hence, MTHFR genetic variants have been studied worldwide, particularly the C677T and A1298C. We genotyped the C677T and A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms in Mexican Amerindians (MAs), from the largest sample included in a genetic study (n = 2026, from 62 ethnic groups), and in a geographically-matched Mexican Mestizo population (MEZ, n = 638). The 677T allele was most frequent in Mexican individuals, particularly in MAs. The frequency of this allele in both MAs and MEZs was clearly enriched in the South region of the country, followed by the Central East and South East regions. In contrast, the frequency of the 1298C risk allele in Mexicans was one of the lowest in the world. Both in MAs and MEZs the variants 677T and 1298C displayed opposite allele frequency gradients from southern to northern Mexico. Our findings suggest that in Mestizos the 677T allele was derived from Amerindians while the 1298C allele was a European contribution. Some subgroups showed an allele frequency distribution that highlighted their genetic diversity. Notably, the distribution of the frequency of the 677T allele was consistent with that of the high incidence of NTDs reported in MEZ. PMID:27649570

  14. Diversity of 16S rRNA genes from bacteria of sugarcane rhizosphere soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pisa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important agricultural product of Brazil, with a total production of more than 500 million tons. Knowledge of the bacterial community associated with agricultural crops and the soil status is a decisive step towards understanding how microorganisms influence crop productivity. However, most studies aim to isolate endophytic or rhizosphere bacteria associated with the plant by culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent approaches allow a more comprehensive view of entire bacterial communities in the environment. In the present study, we have used this approach to assess the bacterial community in the rhizosphere soil of sugarcane at different times and under different nitrogen fertilization conditions. At the high taxonomic level, few differences between samples were observed, with the phylum Proteobacteria (29.6% predominating, followed by Acidobacteria (23.4%, Bacteroidetes (12.1%, Firmicutes (10.2%, and Actinobacteria (5.6%. The exception was the Verrucomicrobia phylum whose prevalence in N-fertilized soils was approximately 0.7% and increased to 5.2% in the non-fertilized soil, suggesting that this group may be an indicator of nitrogen availability in soils. However, at low taxonomic levels a higher diversity was found associated with plants receiving nitrogen fertilizer. Bacillus was the most predominant genus, accounting for 19.7% of all genera observed. Classically reported nitrogen-fixing and/or plant growth-promoting bacterial genera, such as Azospirillum, Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Burkholderia were also found although at a lower prevalence.

  15. Heterogenous Distribution of MTHFR Gene Variants among Mestizos and Diverse Amerindian Groups from Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Contreras-Cubas

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is a key enzyme in folate metabolism. Folate deficiency has been related to several conditions, including neural tube defects (NTDs and cardiovascular diseases. Hence, MTHFR genetic variants have been studied worldwide, particularly the C677T and A1298C. We genotyped the C677T and A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms in Mexican Amerindians (MAs, from the largest sample included in a genetic study (n = 2026, from 62 ethnic groups, and in a geographically-matched Mexican Mestizo population (MEZ, n = 638. The 677T allele was most frequent in Mexican individuals, particularly in MAs. The frequency of this allele in both MAs and MEZs was clearly enriched in the South region of the country, followed by the Central East and South East regions. In contrast, the frequency of the 1298C risk allele in Mexicans was one of the lowest in the world. Both in MAs and MEZs the variants 677T and 1298C displayed opposite allele frequency gradients from southern to northern Mexico. Our findings suggest that in Mestizos the 677T allele was derived from Amerindians while the 1298C allele was a European contribution. Some subgroups showed an allele frequency distribution that highlighted their genetic diversity. Notably, the distribution of the frequency of the 677T allele was consistent with that of the high incidence of NTDs reported in MEZ.

  16. Nitrogenase genes in non-cyanobacterial plankton: prevalence, diversity, and regulation in marine waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemann, Lasse; Farnelid, H.; Steward, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    productivity. Diazotrophic Cyanobacteria appear to be the major contributors to marine N2 fixation in surface waters, whereas the contribution of heterotrophic or chemoautotrophic diazotrophs to this process is usually regarded inconsequential. Culture-independent studies reveal that non...... suitable for N2 fixation by non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs. Our ignorance about the regulation of N2 fixation by non-Cyanobacteria in their natural marine environments currently prevents an evaluation of their importance in marine N cycling and budgets. A review of the molecular data on distribution...... and expression of nifH genes in non-Cyanobacteria suggests that further study of the role of these Bacteria in N cycling at local, regional and global scales is needed....

  17. TIR-NBS-LRR genes are rare in monocots: evidence from diverse monocot orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, D Ellen K; Alexander, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant resistance (R) gene products recognize pathogen effector molecules. Many R genes code for proteins containing nucleotide binding site (NBS) and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. NBS-LRR proteins can be divided into two groups, TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR, based on the structure of the N-terminal domain. Although both classes are clearly present in gymnosperms and eudicots, only non-TIR sequences have been found consistently in monocots. Since most studies in monocots have been limited to agriculturally important grasses, it is difficult to draw conclusions. The purpose of our study was to look for evidence of these sequences in additional monocot orders. Findings Using degenerate PCR, we amplified NBS sequences from four monocot species (C. blanda, D. marginata, S. trifasciata, and Spathiphyllum sp.), a gymnosperm (C. revoluta) and a eudicot (C. canephora). We successfully amplified TIR-NBS-LRR sequences from dicot and gymnosperm DNA, but not from monocot DNA. Using databases, we obtained NBS sequences from additional monocots, magnoliids and basal angiosperms. TIR-type sequences were not present in monocot or magnoliid sequences, but were present in the basal angiosperms. Phylogenetic analysis supported a single TIR clade and multiple non-TIR clades. Conclusion We were unable to find monocot TIR-NBS-LRR sequences by PCR amplification or database searches. In contrast to previous studies, our results represent five monocot orders (Poales, Zingiberales, Arecales, Asparagales, and Alismatales). Our results establish the presence of TIR-NBS-LRR sequences in basal angiosperms and suggest that although these sequences were present in early land plants, they have been reduced significantly in monocots and magnoliids. PMID:19785756

  18. Genomic survey, gene expression analysis and structural modeling suggest diverse roles of DNA methyltransferases in legumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Garg

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a crucial role in development through inheritable gene silencing. Plants possess three types of DNA methyltransferases (MTases, namely Methyltransferase (MET, Chromomethylase (CMT and Domains Rearranged Methyltransferase (DRM, which maintain methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sites. DNA MTases have not been studied in legumes so far. Here, we report the identification and analysis of putative DNA MTases in five legumes, including chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea, Medicago and Lotus. MTases in legumes could be classified in known MET, CMT, DRM and DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMT2 subfamilies based on their domain organization. First three MTases represent DNA MTases, whereas DNMT2 represents a transfer RNA (tRNA MTase. Structural comparison of all the MTases in plants with known MTases in mammalian and plant systems have been reported to assign structural features in context of biological functions of these proteins. The structure analysis clearly specified regions crucial for protein-protein interactions and regions important for nucleosome binding in various domains of CMT and MET proteins. In addition, structural model of DRM suggested that circular permutation of motifs does not have any effect on overall structure of DNA methyltransferase domain. These results provide valuable insights into role of various domains in molecular recognition and should facilitate mechanistic understanding of their function in mediating specific methylation patterns. Further, the comprehensive gene expression analyses of MTases in legumes provided evidence of their role in various developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle and response to various abiotic stresses. Overall, our study will be very helpful in establishing the specific functions of DNA MTases in legumes.

  19. TIR-NBS-LRR genes are rare in monocots: evidence from diverse monocot orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarr D Ellen K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant resistance (R gene products recognize pathogen effector molecules. Many R genes code for proteins containing nucleotide binding site (NBS and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR domains. NBS-LRR proteins can be divided into two groups, TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR, based on the structure of the N-terminal domain. Although both classes are clearly present in gymnosperms and eudicots, only non-TIR sequences have been found consistently in monocots. Since most studies in monocots have been limited to agriculturally important grasses, it is difficult to draw conclusions. The purpose of our study was to look for evidence of these sequences in additional monocot orders. Findings Using degenerate PCR, we amplified NBS sequences from four monocot species (C. blanda, D. marginata, S. trifasciata, and Spathiphyllum sp., a gymnosperm (C. revoluta and a eudicot (C. canephora. We successfully amplified TIR-NBS-LRR sequences from dicot and gymnosperm DNA, but not from monocot DNA. Using databases, we obtained NBS sequences from additional monocots, magnoliids and basal angiosperms. TIR-type sequences were not present in monocot or magnoliid sequences, but were present in the basal angiosperms. Phylogenetic analysis supported a single TIR clade and multiple non-TIR clades. Conclusion We were unable to find monocot TIR-NBS-LRR sequences by PCR amplification or database searches. In contrast to previous studies, our results represent five monocot orders (Poales, Zingiberales, Arecales, Asparagales, and Alismatales. Our results establish the presence of TIR-NBS-LRR sequences in basal angiosperms and suggest that although these sequences were present in early land plants, they have been reduced significantly in monocots and magnoliids.

  20. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan domestic and Tibetan chicken populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuan; Li, Diyan; Gaur, Uma; Wang, Yan; Wu, Nan; Chen, Binlong; Xu, Zhongxian; Yin, Huadong; Hu, Yaodong; Zhu, Qing

    2016-09-01

    The sense of bitter taste plays a critical role in animals as it can help them to avoid intake of toxic and harmful substances. Previous research had revealed that chicken has only three bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2r1, Tas2r2 and Tas2r7). To better understand the genetic polymorphisms and importance of bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2rs) in chicken, here, we sequenced Tas2rs of 30 Sichuan domestic chickens and 30 Tibetan chickens. Thirteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) including three nonsynonymous mutations (m.359G>C, m.503C>A and m.583A>G) were detected in Tas2r1 (m. is the abbreviation for mutation); three SNPs were detected in Tas2r2, but none of them were missense mutation; eight SNPs were detected in Tas2r7 including six nonsynonymous substitutions (m.178G>A, m.421A>C, m.787C>T, m.832G>T, m.907A>T and m.943G>A). Tajima's D neutral test indicates that there is no population expansion in both populations, and the size of the population is relatively stable. All the three networks indicate that red jungle fowls share haplotypes with domestic chickens. In addition, we found that haplotypes H1 and HE1 were positively associated with high-altitude adaptation, whereas haplotypes H4 and HE4 showed a negative correlation with high-altitude adaptation in Tas2rs. Although, chicken has only three Tas2rs, our results showed that both Sichuan domestic chickens and Tibetan chickens have abundant haplotypes in Tas2rs, especially in Tas2r7, which might help chickens to recognize a wide variety of bitter-tasting compounds.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a diverse repertoire of genes involved in prokaryote-eukaryote interactions within the Pseudovibrio genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eRomano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage.Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus.Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche

  2. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Diverse Repertoire of Genes Involved in Prokaryote-Eukaryote Interactions within the Pseudovibrio Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Stefano; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antonio; Reen, F Jerry; Glöckner, Frank O; Crowley, Susan P; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage. Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus. Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche within its

  3. Mutations in THAP1/DYT6 reveal that diverse dystonia genes disrupt similar neuronal pathways and functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuchra Zakirova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions. Its many forms are genetically, phenotypically and etiologically diverse and it is unknown whether their pathogenesis converges on shared pathways. Mutations in THAP1 [THAP (Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1], a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor with DNA binding and protein-interaction domains, cause dystonia, DYT6. There is a unique, neuronal 50-kDa Thap1-like immunoreactive species, and Thap1 levels are auto-regulated on the mRNA level. However, THAP1 downstream targets in neurons, and the mechanism via which it causes dystonia are largely unknown. We used RNA-Seq to assay the in vivo effect of a heterozygote Thap1 C54Y or ΔExon2 allele on the gene transcription signatures in neonatal mouse striatum and cerebellum. Enriched pathways and gene ontology terms include eIF2α Signaling, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Neuron Projection Development, Axonal Guidance Signaling, and Synaptic LongTerm Depression, which are dysregulated in a genotype and tissue-dependent manner. Electrophysiological and neurite outgrowth assays were consistent with those enrichments, and the plasticity defects were partially corrected by salubrinal. Notably, several of these pathways were recently implicated in other forms of inherited dystonia, including DYT1. We conclude that dysfunction of these pathways may represent a point of convergence in the pathophysiology of several forms of inherited dystonia.

  4. Phylogeny and expression pattern of starch branching enzyme family genes in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) under diverse environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jinli; Wang, Huijun; Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Chen; Chen, Xin; Ma, Pingan; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Wenquan

    2015-08-01

    Starch branching enzyme (SBE) is one of the key enzymes involved in starch biosynthetic metabolism. In this study, six SBE family genes were identified from the cassava genome. Phylogenetic analysis divided the MeSBE family genes into dicot family A, B, C, and the new group. Tissue-specific analysis showed that MeSBE2.2 was strongly expressed in leaves, stems cortex, and root stele, and MeSBE3 had high expression levels in stem cortex and root stele of plants in the rapid growth stage under field condition, whereas the expression levels of MeSBE2.1, MeSBE4, and MeSBE5 were low except for in stems cortex. The transcriptional activity of MeSBE2.2 and MeSBE3 was higher compared with other members and gradually increased in the storage roots during root growth process, while the other MeSBE members normally remained low expression levels. Expression of MeSBE2.2 could be induced by salt, drought, exogenous abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid signals, while MeSBE3 had positive response to drought, salt, exogenous abscisic acid, and salicylic acid in leaves but not in storage root, indicating that they might be more important in starch biosynthesis pathway under diverse environments.

  5. Assessment of anaerobic bacterial diversity and its effects on anaerobic system stability and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the link between anaerobic bacterial diversity and, the biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and assessed how amending antibiotic combination and increasing concentration of antibiotics in a stepwise fashion influences the development of resistance genes in anaerobic reactors. The biodegradation, sorption and occurrence of the known antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of erythromycin and tetracycline were investigated using the processes of UV-HPLC and qPCR analysis respectively. Ion Torrent sequencing was used to detect microbial community changes in response to the addition of antibiotics. The overall results indicated that changes in the structure of a microbial community lead to changes in biodegradation capacity, sorption of antibiotics combinations and occurrence of ARGs. The enhanced biodegradation efficiency appeared to generate variations in the structure of the bacterial community. The results suggested that controlling the ultimate Gram-negative bacterial community, especially Acinetobacter-related populations, may promote the successful biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and reduce the occurrence of ARGs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analyses of the influencing factors of soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest based on GeoChip 5.0

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    Jing Cong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine soil microbial functional gene diversity and causative factors in tropical rainforests, we used a microarray-based metagenomic tool named GeoChip 5.0 to profile it. We found that high microbial functional gene diversity and different soil microbial metabolic potential for biogeochemical processes were considered to exist in tropical rainforest. Soil available nitrogen was the most associated with soil microbial functional gene structure. Here, we mainly describe the experiment design, the data processing, and soil biogeochemical analyses attached to the study in details, which could be published on BMC microbiology Journal in 2015, whose raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE69171.

  7. Molecular diversity of Wolbachia in Lepidoptera: Prevalent allelic content and high recombination of MLST genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinsky, Yury; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia are common endosymbiotic bacteria of Arthropoda and Nematoda that are ordinarily transmitted vertically in host lineages through the egg cytoplasm. Despite the great interest in the Wolbachia symbiont, many issues of its biology remain unclear, including its evolutionary history, routes of transfer among species, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the symbiont's effect on its host. In this report, we present data relating to Wolbachia infection in 120 species of 13 Lepidoptera families, mostly butterflies, from West Siberian localities based on Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and the wsp locus and perform a comprehensive survey of the distribution of Wolbachia and its genetic diversity in Lepidoptera worldwide. We observed a high infection incidence in the studied region; this finding is probably also true for other temperate latitude regions because many studied species have broad Palearctic and even Holarctic distribution. Although 40 new MLST alleles and 31 new STs were described, there was no noticeable difference in the MLST allele content in butterflies and probably also in moths worldwide. A genetic analysis of Wolbachia strains revealed the MLST allele core in lepidopteran hosts worldwide, viz. the ST-41 allele content. The key finding of our study was the detection of rampant recombination among MLST haplotypes. High rates of homologous recombination between Wolbachia strains indicate a substantial contribution of genetic exchanges to the generation of new STs. This finding should be considered when discussing issues related to the reconstruction of Wolbachia evolution, divergence time, and the routes of Wolbachia transmission across arthropod hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of diversity of chromophytic phytoplankton in a mangrove ecosystem using rbcL gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Brajogopal; Bhadury, Punyasloke

    2014-04-01

    Phytoplankton forms the basis of primary production in mangrove environments. The phylogeny and diversity based on the amplification and sequencing of rbcL, the large subunit encoding the key enzyme ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was investigated for improved understanding of the community structure and temporal trends of chromophytic eukaryotic phytoplankton assemblages in Sundarbans, the world's largest continuous mangrove. Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) were by far the most frequently detected group in clone libraries (485 out of 525 clones), consistent with their importance as a major bloom-forming group. Other major chromophytic algal groups including Cryptophyceae, Haptophyceae, Pelagophyceae, Eustigmatophyceae, and Raphidophyceae which are important component of the assemblages were detected for the first time from Sundarbans based on rbcL approach. Many of the sequences from Sundarbans rbcL clone libraries showed identity with key bloom forming diatom genera namely Thalassiosira, Skeletonema and Nitzschia. Similarly, several rbcL sequences which were diatom-like were also detected highlighting the need to explore diatom communities from the study area. Some of the rbcL sequences detected from Sundarbans were ubiquitous in distribution showing 100% identities with uncultured rbcL sequences targeted previously from the Gulf of Mexico and California upwelling system that are geographically separated from study area. Novel rbcL lineages were also detected highlighting the need to culture and sequence phytoplankton from the ecoregion. Principal component analysis revealed that nitrate is an important variable that is associated with observed variation in phytoplankton assemblages (operational taxonomic units). This study applied molecular tools to highlight the ecological significance of diatoms, in addition to other chromophytic algal groups in Sundarbans. © 2014 Phycological Society of America.

  9. Geographic variation and diversity of the cytochrome b gene in wild populations of medaka (Oryzias latipes) from Korea and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehana, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Satoko; Matsuda, Masaru; Jeon, Sang-Rin; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2004-04-01

    We analyzed the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs) of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene in wild populations of medaka from Korea and China. We surveyed 258 wild specimens from 75 different sites, and identified 17 mitotypes. Sequencing analysis of the complete cyt b gene (1141-bp) was subsequently carried out to infer the phylogenetic relationships among these mitotypes. Phylogenetic trees indicated two major clades, D and E, which were different from the Japanese clades (A, B and C). These two clades were completely identical to two clusters previously identified by RFLP analysis of entire mitochondrial DNAs. The geographic distribution of the mitotypes in clades D and E was consistent with the China-West Korean Population and the East Korean Population as defined by allozymic and karyological analyses. This agreement among different analyses suggests long-term isolation between the two groups. In the region where the distributions of two major clades overlapped, a limited extent of gene flow was observed. These results suggested the existence of some reproductive isolation mechanisms between the two clades, or the introgression between them followed by a random drift in each local population. Furthermore, clade D was subdivided into three subclades (D-I to D-III). The phylogenetic relationship and distribution pattern of subclade D-II suggested a dispersal event of medaka from China to southwest Korea. Our results also showed that the East Korean Population has recently expanded its distribution area because little diversity was observed in clade E.

  10. Environmental noise, genetic diversity and the evolution of evolvability and robustness in model gene networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Steiner

    Full Text Available The ability of organisms to adapt and persist in the face of environmental change is accepted as a fundamental feature of natural systems. More contentious is whether the capacity of organisms to adapt (or "evolvability" can itself evolve and the mechanisms underlying such responses. Using model gene networks, I provide evidence that evolvability emerges more readily when populations experience positively autocorrelated environmental noise (red noise compared to populations in stable or randomly varying (white noise environments. Evolvability was correlated with increasing genetic robustness to effects on network viability and decreasing robustness to effects on phenotypic expression; populations whose networks displayed greater viability robustness and lower phenotypic robustness produced more additive genetic variation and adapted more rapidly in novel environments. Patterns of selection for robustness varied antagonistically with epistatic effects of mutations on viability and phenotypic expression, suggesting that trade-offs between these properties may constrain their evolutionary responses. Evolution of evolvability and robustness was stronger in sexual populations compared to asexual populations indicating that enhanced genetic variation under fluctuating selection combined with recombination load is a primary driver of the emergence of evolvability. These results provide insight into the mechanisms potentially underlying rapid adaptation as well as the environmental conditions that drive the evolution of genetic interactions.

  11. Comparative Genetic Diversity of the narG, nosZ, and 16S rRNA Genes in Fluorescent Pseudomonads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Sandrine; Philippot, Laurent; Edel-Hermann, Veronique; Deulvot, Chrystel; Mougel, Christophe; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    The diversity of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (narG) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) genes in fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from soil and rhizosphere environments was characterized together with that of the 16S rRNA gene by a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Fragments of 1,008 bp and 1,433 bp were amplified via PCR with primers specific for the narG and nosZ genes, respectively. The presence of the narG and nosZ genes in the bacterial strains was confirmed by hybridization of the genomic DNA and the PCR products with the corresponding probes. The ability of the strains to either reduce nitrate or totally dissimilate nitrogen was assessed. Overall, there was a good correspondence between the reductase activities and the presence of the corresponding genes. Distribution in the different ribotypes of strains harboring both the narG and nosZ genes and of strains missing both genes suggests that these two groups of strains had different evolutionary histories. Both dissimilatory genes showed high polymorphism, with similarity indexes (Jaccard) of between 0.04 and 0.8, whereas those of the 16S rRNA gene only varied from 0.77 to 0.99. No correlation between the similarity indexes of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory genes was seen, suggesting that the evolution rates of ribosomal and functional genes differ. Pairwise comparison of similarity indexes of the narG and nosZ genes led to the delineation of two types of strains. Within the first type, the similarity indexes of both genes varied in the same range, suggesting that these two genes have followed a similar evolution. Within the second type of strain, the range of variations was higher for the nosZ than for the narG gene, suggesting that these genes have had a different evolutionary rate. PMID:12571023

  12. Soil bacterial diversity screening using single 16S rRNA gene V regions coupled with multi-million read generating sequencing technologies.

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    Sotirios Vasileiadis

    Full Text Available The novel multi-million read generating sequencing technologies are very promising for resolving the immense soil 16S rRNA gene bacterial diversity. Yet they have a limited maximum sequence length screening ability, restricting studies in screening DNA stretches of single 16S rRNA gene hypervariable (V regions. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of properties of four consecutive V regions (V3-6 on commonly applied analytical methodologies in bacterial ecology studies. Using an in silico approach, the performance of each V region was compared with the complete 16S rRNA gene stretch. We assessed related properties of the soil derived bacterial sequence collection of the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP database and concomitantly performed simulations based on published datasets. Results indicate that overall the most prominent V region for soil bacterial diversity studies was V3, even though it was outperformed in some of the tests. Despite its high performance during most tests, V4 was less conserved along flanking sites, thus reducing its ability for bacterial diversity coverage. V5 performed well in the non-redundant RDP database based analysis. However V5 did not resemble the full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence results as well as V3 and V4 did when the natural sequence frequency and occurrence approximation was considered in the virtual experiment. Although, the highly conserved flanking sequence regions of V6 provide the ability to amplify partial 16S rRNA gene sequences from very diverse owners, it was demonstrated that V6 was the least informative compared to the rest examined V regions. Our results indicate that environment specific database exploration and theoretical assessment of the experimental approach are strongly suggested in 16S rRNA gene based bacterial diversity studies.

  13. Prevalence, Virulence Genes, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Genetic Diversity ofStaphylococcus aureusfrom Retail Aquatic Products in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Dongli; Wu, Qingping; Xu, Mingfang; Zhang, Jumei; Yu, Shubo

    2017-01-01

    and were multidrug resistant. Our results showed that aquatic products could be a vehicle for transmission of virulence genes and multidrug-resistant S. aureus , representing a potential public health risk. The STs identified in this study indicated the genetic diversity of S. aureus , thereby providing important basic data for the dissemination of S. aureus in aquatic products.

  14. Prevalence, Virulence Genes, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus from Retail Aquatic Products in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfang Xu

    2017-04-01

    multidrug resistant. Our results showed that aquatic products could be a vehicle for transmission of virulence genes and multidrug-resistant S. aureus, representing a potential public health risk. The STs identified in this study indicated the genetic diversity of S. aureus, thereby providing important basic data for the dissemination of S. aureus in aquatic products.

  15. Genetic diversity and natural selection of Plasmodium vivax multi-drug resistant gene (pvmdr1) in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cerón, Lilia; Montoya, Alberto; Corzo-Gómez, Josselin C; Cerritos, Rene; Santillán, Frida; Sandoval, Marco A

    2017-07-01

    The Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistant 1 gene (pvmdr1) codes for a transmembrane protein of the parasite's digestive vacuole. It is likely that the pvmdr1 gene mutations occur at different sites by convergent evolution. In here, the genetic variation of pvmdr1 at three sites of the Mesoamerican region was studied. Since 1950s, malarious patients of those areas have been treated only with chloroquine and primaquine. Blood samples from patients infected with P. vivax were obtained in southern Mexico (SMX), in the Northwest (NIC-NW) and in the northeast (NIC-NE) of Nicaragua. Genomic DNA was obtained and fragments of pvmdr1 were amplified and sequenced. The nucleotide and amino acid changes as well as the haplotype frequency in pvmdr1 were determined per strain and per geographic site. The sequences of pvmdr1 obtained from the studied regions were compared with homologous sequences from the GenBank database to explore the P. vivax genetic structure. In 141 parasites, eight nucleotide changes (two changes were synonymous and other six were nonsynonymous) were detected in 1536 bp. The PvMDR1 amino acid changes Y976F, F1076FL were predominant in endemic parasites from NIC-NE and outbreak parasites in NIC-NW but absent in SMX. Thirteen haplotypes were resolved, and found to be closely related, but their frequency at each geographic site was different (P = 0.0001). The pvmdr1 codons 925-1083 gene fragment showed higher genetic and haplotype diversity in parasites from NIC-NE than the other areas outside Latin America. The haplotype networks suggested local diversification of pvmdr1 and no significant departure from neutrality. The F ST values were low to moderate regionally, but high between NIC-NE or NIC-NW and other regions inside and outside Latin America. The pvmdr1 gene might have diversified recently at regional level. In the absence of significant natural, genetic drift might have caused differential pvmdr1 haplotype frequencies at different geographic sites

  16. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and phenotypes of two domestication related genes (OsC1 and Wx) in indigenous rice varieties in Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Baharul Islam; Khan, Mohammed Latif; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2014-06-16

    During the domestication of crops, individual plants with traits desirable for human needs have been selected from their wild progenitors. Consequently, genetic and nucleotide diversity of genes associated with these selected traits in crop plants are expected to be lower than their wild progenitors. In the present study, we surveyed the pattern of nucleotide diversity of two selected trait specific genes, Wx and OsC1, which regulate amylose content and apiculus coloration respectively in cultivated rice varieties. The analyzed samples were collected from a wide geographic area in Northeast (NE) India, and included contrasting phenotypes considered to be associated with selected genes, namely glutinous and nonglutinous grains and colored and colorless apiculus. No statistically significant selection signatures were detected in both Wx and OsC1gene sequences. However, low level of selection that varied across the length of each gene was evident. The glutinous type varieties showed higher levels of nucleotide diversity at the Wx locus (πtot = 0.0053) than nonglutinous type varieties (πtot = 0.0043). The OsC1 gene revealed low levels of selection among the colorless apiculus varieties with lower nucleotide diversity (πtot = 0.0010) than in the colored apiculus varieties (πtot = 0.0023). The results revealed that functional mutations at Wx and OsC1genes considered to be associated with specific phenotypes do not necessarily correspond to the phenotypes in indigenous rice varieties in NE India. This suggests that other than previously reported genomic regions may also be involved in determination of these phenotypes.

  17. Patterns of Genome-Wide Nucleotide Diversity in the Gynodioecious Plant Thymus vulgaris Are Compatible with Recent Sweeps of Cytoplasmic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollion, Maeva; Ehlers, Bodil K; Figuet, Emeric; Santoni, Sylvain; Lenormand, Thomas; Maurice, Sandrine; Galtier, Nicolas; Bataillon, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Gynodioecy is a sexual dimorphism where females coexist with hermaphrodite individuals. In most cases, this dimorphism involves the interaction of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes and nuclear restorer genes. Two scenarios can account for how these interactions maintain gynodioecy. Either CMS genes recurrently enter populations at low frequency via mutation or migration and go to fixation unimpeded (successive sweeps), or CMS genes maintain polymorphism over evolutionary time through interactions with a nuclear restorer allele (balanced polymorphism). To distinguish between these scenarios, we used transcriptome sequencing in gynodioecious Thymus vulgaris and surveyed genome-wide diversity in 18 naturally occurring individuals sampled from populations at a local geographic scale. We contrast the amount and patterns of nucleotide diversity in the nuclear and cytoplasmic genome, and find ample diversity at the nuclear level (π = 0.019 at synonymous sites) but reduced genetic diversity and an excess of rare polymorphisms in the cytoplasmic genome relative to the nuclear genome. Our finding is incompatible with the maintenance of gynodioecy via scenarios invoking long-term balancing selection, and instead suggests the recent fixation of CMS lineages in the populations studied. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Genetic diversity in the desert watermelon Citrullus colocynthis and its relationship with Citrullus species as determined by high-frequency oligonucleotides-targeting active gene markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. is a viable source of genes for enhancing disease and pest resistance in the cultivated watermelon. However, there is little information in the literature about genetic diversity within C. colocynthis (CC) or the relationship of specific genotypes of CC to C. lanat...

  19. Cloning and sequencing of wsp encoding gene fragments reveals a diversity of co-infecting Wolbachia strains in Acromyrmex leafcutter ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Borm, S.; Wenseleers, T.; Billen, J.

    2003-01-01

    By sequencing part of the wsp gene of a series of clones, we detected an unusually high diversity of nine Wolbachia strains in queens of three species of leafcutter ants. Up to four strains co-occurred in a single ant. Most strains occurred in two clusters (InvA and InvB), but the social parasite...

  20. High prevalence of type 41 and high sequence diversity of partial hexon gene of human adenoviruses in municipal raw sewage and activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, H-W; Chen, L-Z; Shih, M-H

    2015-10-01

    This study was aimed to assess seasonal/geographical distribution and sequence diversity of partial hexon gene for human adenoviruses (HAdVs) within raw sewages (RS) and activated sludges (AS). Assessments were based on high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 128-bp partial hexon gene fragments and followed by principal coordinate analyses (PCoA) for revealed sequences. Sequencing results showed that the majority of sequences (>90%) for the RS or AS samples were identical to HAdV type 41 of species F, while rest of few sequences belonged to HAdV species-D and -C were only occurred rarely without significant seasonal/geographical variation. The partial hexon genes were highly diverse as many sequence types and operational taxonomic unit groups were noticed among the matched sequences. This study demonstrated that HAdV-41 was constantly appeared in the RS and AS samples from Taiwan throughout the year without significant seasonal or geographical variations; but, had high sequence diverse noticed for the 128-bp partial hexon gene fragments. High-throughput-sequencing results provided better insights of HAdV distribution and genetic diversity for raw sewage and AS samples allowing some probable biases for cloning-sequencing approach to be defeated and further providing public health awareness regarding viral-contaminated sewages or sludges. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Geographic structuring of the Plasmodium falciparum sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (PfSERCA gene diversity.

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    Ronan Jambou

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a thapsigargin-like sesquiterpene has been shown to inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase PfSERCA. To collect baseline pfserca sequence information before field deployment of Artemisinin-based Combination therapies that may select mutant parasites, we conducted a sequence analysis of 100 isolates from multiple sites in Africa, Asia and South America. Coding sequence diversity was large, with 29 mutated codons, including 32 SNPs (average of one SNP/115 bp, of which 19 were novel mutations. Most SNP detected in this study were clustered within a region in the cytosolic head of the protein. The PfSERCA functional domains were very well conserved, with non synonymous mutations located outside the functional domains, except for the S769N mutation associated in French Guiana with elevated IC(50 for artemether. The S769N mutation is located close to the hinge of the headpiece, which in other species modulates calcium affinity and in consequence efficacy of inhibitors, possibly linking calcium homeostasis to drug resistance. Genetic diversity was highest in Senegal, Brazil and French Guiana, and few mutations were identified in Asia. Population genetic analysis was conducted for a partial fragment of the gene encompassing nucleotide coordinates 87-2862 (unambiguous sequence available for 96 isolates. This supported a geographic clustering, with a separation between Old and New World samples and one dominant ancestral haplotype. Genetic drift alone cannot explain the observed polymorphism, suggesting that other evolutionary mechanisms are operating. One possible contributor could be the frequency of haemoglobinopathies that are associated with calcium dysregulation in the erythrocyte.

  2. Analysis of extensive [FeFe] hydrogenase gene diversity within the gut microbiota of insects representing five families of Dictyoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2012-04-01

    We have designed and utilized degenerate primers in the phylogenetic analysis of [FeFe] hydrogenase gene diversity in the gut ecosystems of roaches and lower termites. H(2) is an important free intermediate in the breakdown of wood by termite gut microbial communities, reaching concentrations in some species exceeding those measured for any other biological system. The primers designed target with specificity the largest group of enzymatic H domain proteins previously identified in a termite gut metagenome. "Family 3" hydrogenase sequences were amplified from the guts of lower termites, Incisitermes minor, Zootermopsis nevadensis, and Reticulitermes hesperus, and two roaches, Cryptocercus punctulatus and Periplaneta americana. Subsequent analyses revealed that all termite and Cryptocercus sequences were phylogenetically distinct from non-termite-associated hydrogenases available from public databases. The abundance of unique sequence operational taxonomic units (as many as 21 from each species) underscores the previously demonstrated physiological importance of H(2) to the gut ecosystems of these wood-feeding insects. The diversity of sequences observed might be reflective of multiple niches that the enzymes have been evolved to accommodate. Sequences cloned from Cryptocercus and the lower termite samples, all of which are wood feeding insects, clustered closely with one another in phylogenetic analyses to the exclusion of alleles from P. americana, an omnivorous cockroach, also cloned during this study. We present primers targeting a family of termite gut [FeFe] hydrogenases and provide results that are consistent with a pivotal role for hydrogen in the termite gut ecosystem and point toward unique evolutionary adaptations to the gut ecosystem.

  3. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes Reveals Diversity and Substrate Preferences of Methanogen Communities in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield. PMID:25381241

  4. Quantification and diversity in the black seeds (nigella sativa L.) gene stock of pakistan for their composition of mineral nutrients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.S.; Qureshi, A.S.; Ghafoor, A.

    2009-01-01

    Nigella saliva (L.) a member of family Ranunculaceae is an annual herbaceous plant indigenous to the Mediterranean region that contains more than 100 nutrients and had been used for edible and medicinal purposes in major parts of the world since long. Present study is on the analysis of thirty four accessions with two check genotypes for genetic diversity based on thirteen mineral nutrients. High variation for Fe, Ca, Cu, Mg, Pb, Zn, Co, Mn, Na, P, B, K and N indicated the scope of sample selection for these characters. Coefficient of correlation studies revealed that Cu had significantly positive correlation with Ca, whereas Mg was significantly correlated with Ca and Cu. Linkages of desirable traits are suggested to be broken through novel techniques for maximum exploitation of genomic diversity for valuable phyto-chemicals. Based on principal component analysis, first four factors contributed 62 percent of the variability amongst genotypes for mineral nutrients. Eigen value> I exhibited 23.57 % of variation for component I, 17.28 % for component 2 and 12.43 % of variation for component 3, respectively. Moreover, it also reflects the potential of improvement, through building broad based gene pool by acquiring more samples from diverse geographical areas. These principal components could be selected individually for the improvement of specific mineral nutrients for multipurpose use and applications. Six clusters were observed for 36 genotypes based on mineral nutrients. The genotypes Pk-020877, Pk-020749, Pk-020876, Pk-020545, Pk-020561, Pk-020781 and Pk-020729, Pk-020620, Pk-020561, Pk-020631, Pk-020879, Pk-020868 produced the highest N (5.56), Fe (0.74), Ca (10.83), Mg (11.56), Pb (0.09), Zn (0.09), Na (0.68), P (0.66), B (39.58), and K (0.99), whereas Pk-020873 produced lowest N (1.67), Pk-020766 Fe (0.10), Pk-020576 Ca (7.38), Pk-020585 Mg (9.40), check-2 Pb (0.02), Pk-020872 Zn (0.01), Pk-020781 and Pk-020877 Na (0.17), check-2 P (0.50), Pk-020585 B (13

  5. Extracting samples of high diversity from thematic collections of large gene banks using a genetic-distance based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangel Paulo HN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breeding programs are usually reluctant to evaluate and use germplasm accessions other than the elite materials belonging to their advanced populations. The concept of core collections has been proposed to facilitate the access of potential users to samples of small sizes, representative of the genetic variability contained within the gene pool of a specific crop. The eventual large size of a core collection perpetuates the problem it was originally proposed to solve. The present study suggests that, in addition to the classic core collection concept, thematic core collections should be also developed for a specific crop, composed of a limited number of accessions, with a manageable size. Results The thematic core collection obtained meets the minimum requirements for a core sample - maintenance of at least 80% of the allelic richness of the thematic collection, with, approximately, 15% of its size. The method was compared with other methodologies based on the M strategy, and also with a core collection generated by random sampling. Higher proportions of retained alleles (in a core collection of equal size or similar proportions of retained alleles (in a core collection of smaller size were detected in the two methods based on the M strategy compared to the proposed methodology. Core sub-collections constructed by different methods were compared regarding the increase or maintenance of phenotypic diversity. No change on phenotypic diversity was detected by measuring the trait "Weight of 100 Seeds", for the tested sampling methods. Effects on linkage disequilibrium between unlinked microsatellite loci, due to sampling, are discussed. Conclusions Building of a thematic core collection was here defined by prior selection of accessions which are diverse for the trait of interest, and then by pairwise genetic distances, estimated by DNA polymorphism analysis at molecular marker loci. The resulting thematic core collection

  6. Extracting samples of high diversity from thematic collections of large gene banks using a genetic-distance based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa-Filho, Marco; Rangel, Paulo H N; Ferreira, Marcio E

    2010-06-24

    Breeding programs are usually reluctant to evaluate and use germplasm accessions other than the elite materials belonging to their advanced populations. The concept of core collections has been proposed to facilitate the access of potential users to samples of small sizes, representative of the genetic variability contained within the gene pool of a specific crop. The eventual large size of a core collection perpetuates the problem it was originally proposed to solve. The present study suggests that, in addition to the classic core collection concept, thematic core collections should be also developed for a specific crop, composed of a limited number of accessions, with a manageable size. The thematic core collection obtained meets the minimum requirements for a core sample - maintenance of at least 80% of the allelic richness of the thematic collection, with, approximately, 15% of its size. The method was compared with other methodologies based on the M strategy, and also with a core collection generated by random sampling. Higher proportions of retained alleles (in a core collection of equal size) or similar proportions of retained alleles (in a core collection of smaller size) were detected in the two methods based on the M strategy compared to the proposed methodology. Core sub-collections constructed by different methods were compared regarding the increase or maintenance of phenotypic diversity. No change on phenotypic diversity was detected by measuring the trait "Weight of 100 Seeds", for the tested sampling methods. Effects on linkage disequilibrium between unlinked microsatellite loci, due to sampling, are discussed. Building of a thematic core collection was here defined by prior selection of accessions which are diverse for the trait of interest, and then by pairwise genetic distances, estimated by DNA polymorphism analysis at molecular marker loci. The resulting thematic core collection potentially reflects the maximum allele richness with the smallest

  7. Low genetic diversity and functional constraint of miRNA genes participating pollen-pistil interaction in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Xin; Li, Ming; Shi, Tao; Yang, Pingfang

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we sequenced and analyzed the expression and evolution of rice miRNA genes participating pollen-pistil interaction that is crucial to rice yield. Pollen-pistil interaction is an essential reproductive process for all flowering plants. While microRNAs (miRNAs) are important noncoding small RNAs that regulate mRNA levels in eukaryotic cells, there is little knowledge about which miRNAs involved in the early stages of pollen-pistil interaction in rice and how they evolve under this conserved process. In this study, we sequenced the small RNAs in rice from unpollinated pistil (R0), pistil from 5 min and 15 min after pollination, respectively, to identify known and novel miRNAs that are involved in this process. By comparing the corresponding mRNA-seq dataset, we identified a group of miRNAs with strong negative expression pattern with their target genes. Further investigation of all miRNA loci (MIRNAs) across 1083 public rice accessions revealed significantly reduced genetic diversity in MIRNAs with strong negative expression of their targets when comparing to those with little or no impact on targets during pollen-pistil interaction. Annotation of targets suggested that those MIRNAs with strong impact on targets were pronounced in cell wall related processes such as xylan metabolism. Additionally, plant conserved miRNAs, such as those with functions in gibberellic acid, auxin and nitrate signaling, were also with strong negative expression of their targets. Overall, our analyses identified key miRNAs participating pollen-pistil interaction and their evolutionary patterns in rice, which can facilitate the understanding of molecular mechanisms associated with seed setting.

  8. High levels of nucleotide diversity and fast decline of linkage disequilibrium in rye (Secale cereale L. genes involved in frost response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korzun Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rye (Secale cereale L. is the most frost tolerant cereal species. As an outcrossing species, rye exhibits high levels of intraspecific diversity, which makes it well-suited for allele mining in genes involved in the frost responsive network. For investigating genetic diversity and the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD we analyzed eleven candidate genes and 37 microsatellite markers in 201 lines from five Eastern and Middle European rye populations. Results A total of 147 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and nine insertion-deletion polymorphisms were found within 7,639 bp of DNA sequence from eleven candidate genes, resulting in an average SNP frequency of 1 SNP/52 bp. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity of candidate genes were high with average values π = 5.6 × 10-3 and Hd = 0.59, respectively. According to an analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA, most of the genetic variation was found between individuals within populations. Haplotype frequencies varied markedly between the candidate genes. ScCbf14, ScVrn1, and ScDhn1 were dominated by a single haplotype, while the other 8 genes (ScCbf2, ScCbf6, ScCbf9b, ScCbf11, ScCbf12, ScCbf15, ScIce2, and ScDhn3 had a more balanced haplotype frequency distribution. Intra-genic LD decayed rapidly, within approximately 520 bp on average. Genome-wide LD based on microsatellites was low. Conclusions The Middle European population did not differ substantially from the four Eastern European populations in terms of haplotype frequencies or in the level of nucleotide diversity. The low LD in rye compared to self-pollinating species promises a high resolution in genome-wide association mapping. SNPs discovered in the promoters or coding regions, which attribute to non-synonymous substitutions, are suitable candidates for association mapping.

  9. Clonal diversity of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene in Giardia duodenalis from Thai Isolates: evidence of genetic exchange or Mixed Infections?

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    Saksirisampant Wilai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glutamate dehydrogenase gene (gdh is one of the most popular and useful genetic markers for the genotypic analysis of Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. lamblia, G. intestinalis, the protozoan that widely causes enteric disease in humans. To determine the distribution of genotypes of G. duodenalis in Thai populations and to investigate the extent of sequence variation at this locus, 42 fecal samples were collected from 3 regions of Thailand i.e., Central, Northern, and Eastern regions. All specimens were analyzed using PCR-based genotyping and recombinant subcloning methods. Results The results showed that the prevalence of assemblages A and B among these populations was approximately equal, 20 (47.6% and 22 (52.4%, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that the nucleotide diversity of assemblage B was significantly greater than that in assemblage A. Among all assemblage B positive specimens, the allelic sequence divergence within isolates was detected. Nine isolates showed mixed alleles, ranged from three to nine distinct alleles per isolate. Statistical analysis demonstrated the occurrence of genetic recombination within subassemblages BIII and BIV was likely. Conclusion This study supports increasing evidence that G. duodenalis has the potential for genetic exchange.

  10. Band smearing of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes: dependence on initial PCR target diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrimec, Jan; Kopinč, Rok; Rijavec, Tomaž; Zrimec, Tatjana; Lapanje, Aleš

    2013-11-01

    Band smearing in agarose gels of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes is understood to comprise amplicons of varying sizes arising from PCR errors, and requires elimination. We consider that with amplified heterogeneous DNA, delayed electro-migration is caused not by PCR errors but by dsDNA structures that arise from imperfect strand pairing. The extent of band smearing was found to be proportional to the sequence heterogeneity in 16S rRNA variable regions. Denaturing alkaline gels showed that all amplified DNA was of the correct size. A novel bioinformatic approach was used to reveal that band smearing occurred due to imperfectly paired strands of the amplified DNA. Since the smear is a structural fraction of the correct size PCR product, it carries important information on richness and diversity of the target DNA. For accurate analysis, the origin of the smear must first be identified before it is eliminated by examining the amplified DNA in denaturing alkaline gels. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalencia de diagnósticos de enfermería en escolares desplazados v��ctimas de la violencia social e intrafamiliar Prevalence of nursing diagnoses in school displaced victims of social and intra-family violence

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    Elvinia Pinilla Gómez

    2009-08-01

    that it has it has on children's mental health. Objective: To determine the prevalence of nursing diagnosis in school children displaced victims of social and intra-family violence. Materials and methods: prevalence study. The sample comprised 56 children of school age in the primary grades 1 to 5 selected for convenience. We used a form of valuation validated. We calculated the prevalence of nursing diagnoses, with a confidence interval of 95%. Results: The most prevalent diagnosis were Willingness to improve self with a 100% provision to improve communication with 85.7%, Fear with 75% and Risk of post-traumatic syndrome with 60.7%. The lowest prevalence was: ineffective coping had a prevalence of 37.5%, risk of violence directed at others with 16.1%. Discussion: It was found that children presenting post-traumatic syndrome diagnoses also had fear diagnosis. It requires more attention by health staff is handling the rape trauma syndrome which appears with a 7.1%, corresponding to 2 boys and 2 girls with this diagnosis. Conclusion: School children displaced victims of the social and intra-family violence presents a considerable number of psychological diagnoses that require careful assessment and management to enable them to cope with the trauma experienced, that is not done in an appropriate manner could be considered a population at high risk for disorder mental. Salud UIS 2009; 41: 149-156

  12. Loss of YABBY2-Like Gene Expression May Underlie the Evolution of the Laminar Style in Canna and Contribute to Floral Morphological Diversity in the Zingiberales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Kelsie; Yockteng, Roxana; Almeida, Ana M R; Specht, Chelsea D

    2015-01-01

    The Zingiberales is an order of tropical monocots that exhibits diverse floral morphologies. The evolution of petaloid, laminar stamens, staminodes, and styles contributes to this diversity. The laminar style is a derived trait in the family Cannaceae and plays an important role in pollination as its surface is used for secondary pollen presentation. Previous work in the Zingiberales has implicated YABBY2-like genes, which function in promoting laminar outgrowth, in the evolution of stamen morphology. Here, we investigate the evolution and expression of Zingiberales YABBY2-like genes in order to understand the evolution of the laminar style in Canna. Phylogenetic analyses show that multiple duplication events have occurred in this gene lineage prior to the diversification of the Zingiberales. Reverse transcription-PCR in Canna, Costus, and Musa reveals differential expression across floral organs, taxa, and gene copies, and a role for YABBY2-like genes in the evolution of the laminar style is proposed. Selection tests indicate that almost all sites in conserved domains are under purifying selection, consistent with their functional relevance, and a motif unique to monocot YABBY2-like genes is identified. These results contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of floral morphologies.

  13. Loss of YABBY2-like gene expression may underlie the evolution of the laminar style in Canna and contribute to floral morphological diversity in the Zingiberales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie eMorioka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zingiberales is an order of tropical monocots that exhibits diverse floral morphologies. The evolution of petaloid, laminar stamens, staminodes, and styles contributes to this diversity. The laminar style is a derived trait in the family Cannaceae and plays an important role in pollination as its surface is used for secondary pollen presentation. Previous work in the Zingiberales has implicated YABBY2-like genes, which function in promoting laminar outgrowth, in the evolution of stamen morphology. Here, we investigate the evolution and expression of Zingiberales YABBY2-like genes in order to understand the evolution of the laminar style in Canna. Phylogenetic analyses show that multiple duplication events have occurred in this gene lineage prior to the diversification of the Zingiberales. Reverse transcription-PCR in Canna, Costus, and Musa reveals differential expression across floral organs, taxa, and gene copies, and a role for YABBY2-like genes in the evolution of the laminar style is proposed. Selection tests indicate that almost all sites in conserved domains are under purifying selection, consistent with their functional relevance, and a motif unique to monocot YABBY2-like genes is identified. These results contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of floral morphologies.

  14. Genetic diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Lutzomyia spp., with special reference to Lutzomyia peruensis, a main vector of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kento; Cáceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Korenaga, Masataka; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Katakura, Ken; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Kato, Hirotomo

    2013-05-01

    The genetic divergence caused by genetic drift and/or selection is suggested to affect the vectorial capacity and insecticide susceptibility of sand flies, as well as other arthropods. In the present study, cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences were determined in 13 species circulating in Peru to establish a basis for analysis of the genetic structure, and the intraspecific genetic diversity was assessed in the Lutzomyia (Lu.) peruensis, a main vector species of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in Peruvian Andes. Analysis of intraspecific genetic diversity in the cyt b gene sequences from 36 Lu. peruensis identified 3 highly polymorphic sites in the middle region of the gene. Haplotype and gene network analyses were performed on the cyt b gene sequences of 130 Lu. peruensis in 9 Andean areas from 3 Departments (Ancash, Lima and La Libertad). The results showed that the populations of La Libertad were highly polymorphic and that their haplotypes were distinct from those of Ancash and Lima, where dominant haplotypes were observed, suggesting that a population bottleneck may have occurred in Ancash and Lima, but not in La Libertad. The present study indicated that the middle region of the cyt b gene is useful for the analysis of genetic structure in sand fly populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cowpea and peanut in southern Africa are nodulated by diverse Bradyrhizobium strains harboring nodulation genes that belong to the large pantropical clade common in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Emma T; Stepkowski, Tomasz; Przymusiak, Anna; Botha, Wilhelm J; Law, Ian J

    2008-09-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) in southern Africa are nodulated by a genetically diverse group of Bradyrhizobium strains. To determine the identity of these bacteria, a collection of 22 isolates originating from the root nodules of both hosts in Botswana and South Africa was investigated using the combined sequences for the core genome genes rrs, recA, and glnII. These data separated the majority of the isolates into one of three unique lineages that most likely represent novel Bradyrhizobium species. Some isolates were also conspecific with B. yuanmingense and with B. elkanii, although none grouped with B. japonicum, B. canariense or B. liaoningense. To study the evolution of nodulation genes in these bacteria, the common nodulation gene, nodA, and host-specific nodulation genes, nodZ, noeE, and noeI, were analyzed. The nodA phylogeny showed that the cowpea and peanut Bradyrhizobium isolates represent various locally adapted groups or ecotypes that form part of Clade III of the seven known BradyrhizobiumnodA clades. This large and highly diverse clade comprises all strains from sub-Saharan Africa, as well as some originating from the Americas, Australia, Indonesia, China and Japan. Some similar groupings were supported by the other nodulation genes, although the overall phylogenies for the nodulation genes were incongruent with that inferred from the core genome genes, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer significantly influences the evolution of cowpea and peanut root-nodule bacteria. Furthermore, identification of the nodZ, noeI, and noeE genes in the isolates tested indicates that African Bradyrhizobium species may produce highly decorated nodulation factors, which potentially represent an important adaptation enabling nodulation of a great variety of legumes inhabiting the African continent.

  16. Extreme MHC class I diversity in the sedge warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus); selection patterns and allelic divergence suggest that different genes have different functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; O'Connor, Emily; Sebastian, Alvaro; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek; Zając, Tadeusz; Bielański, Wojciech; Solarz, Wojciech; Ćmiel, Adam; Westerdahl, Helena

    2017-07-05

    Recent work suggests that gene duplications may play an important role in the evolution of immunity genes. Passerine birds, and in particular Sylvioidea warblers, have highly duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which are key in immunity, compared to other vertebrates. However, reasons for this high MHC gene copy number are yet unclear. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) allows MHC genotyping even in individuals with extremely duplicated genes. This HTS data can reveal evidence of selection, which may help to unravel the putative functions of different gene copies, i.e. neofunctionalization. We performed exhaustive genotyping of MHC class I in a Sylvioidea warbler, the sedge warbler, Acrocephalus schoenobaenus, using the Illumina MiSeq technique on individuals from a wild study population. The MHC diversity in 863 genotyped individuals by far exceeds that of any other bird species described to date. A single individual could carry up to 65 different alleles, a large proportion of which are expressed (transcribed). The MHC alleles were of three different lengths differing in evidence of selection, diversity and divergence within our study population. Alleles without any deletions and alleles containing a 6 bp deletion showed characteristics of classical MHC genes, with evidence of multiple sites subject to positive selection and high sequence divergence. In contrast, alleles containing a 3 bp deletion had no sites subject to positive selection and had low divergence. Our results suggest that sedge warbler MHC alleles that either have no deletion, or contain a 6 bp deletion, encode classical antigen presenting MHC molecules. In contrast, MHC alleles containing a 3 bp deletion may encode molecules with a different function. This study demonstrates that highly duplicated MHC genes can be characterised with HTS and that selection patterns can be useful for revealing neofunctionalization. Importantly, our results highlight the need to consider the

  17. Diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with plants in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andria, V.; Yousaf, S.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Smalla, K.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Among twenty-six different plant species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo), and the combination of both plants performed well in a petroleum oil contaminated soil. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Higher numbers of culturable, degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Our results indicated that alkB genes have spread through horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the Italian ryegrass rhizosphere, and suggested mobility of catabolic genes between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We furthermore studied the colonization behaviour of selected hydrocarbon-degrading strains (comprising an endopyhte and a rhizosphere strain) as well as the expression of their alkane monooxygenase genes in association with Italian ryegrass. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior.

  18. De novo assembly and characterization of the carrot transcriptome reveals novel genes, new markers, and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvienko Marta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among next generation sequence technologies, platforms such as Illumina and SOLiD produce short reads but with higher coverage and lower cost per sequenced nucleotide than 454 or Sanger. A challenge now is to develop efficient strategies to use short-read length platforms for de novo assembly and marker development. The scope of this study was to develop a de novo assembly of carrot ESTs from multiple genotypes using the Illumina platform, and to identify polymorphisms. Results A de novo assembly of transcriptome sequence from four genetic backgrounds produced 58,751 contigs and singletons. Over 50% of these assembled sequences were annotated allowing detection of transposable elements and new carrot anthocyanin genes. Presence of multiple genetic backgrounds in our assembly allowed the identification of 114 computationally polymorphic SSRs, and 20,058 SNPs at a depth of coverage of 20× or more. Polymorphisms were predominantly between inbred lines except for the cultivated x wild RIL pool which had high intra-sample polymorphism. About 90% and 88% of tested SSR and SNP primers amplified a product, of which 70% and 46%, respectively, were of the expected size. Out of verified SSR and SNP markers 84% and 82% were polymorphic. About 25% of SNPs genotyped were polymorphic in two diverse mapping populations. Conclusions This study confirmed the potential of short read platforms for de novo EST assembly and identification of genetic polymorphisms in carrot. In addition we produced the first large-scale transcriptome of carrot, a species lacking genomic resources.

  19. Functional genomic analysis supports conservation of function among cellulose synthase-like a gene family members and suggests diverse roles of mannans in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liepman, Aaron H; Nairn, C Joseph; Willats, William G T

    2007-01-01

    in insect cells, and each CslA protein catalyzed mannan and glucomannan synthase reactions in vitro. Microarray mining and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that transcripts of Arabidopsis and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) CslA genes display tissue...... they are prevalent at cell junctions and in buds. Taken together, these results demonstrate that members of the CslA gene family from diverse plant species encode glucomannan synthases and support the hypothesis that mannans function in metabolic networks devoted to other cellular processes in addition to cell wall...

  20. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the endangered frog Odorrana ishikawae (family Ranidae) and unexpected diversity of mt gene arrangements in ranids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Natsuhiko; Sato, Naoki; Hayashi, Yoko; Oumi, Shohei; Fujii, Tamotsu; Sumida, Masayuki

    2010-08-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of an endangered Japanese frog, Odorrana ishikawae (family Ranidae). We also sequenced partial mt genomes of three other Odorrana and six ranid species to survey the diversity of genomic organizations and elucidate the phylogenetic problems remaining in this frog family. The O. ishikawae mt genome contained the 37 mt genes and single control region (CR) typically found in vertebrate mtDNAs, but the region of Light-strand replication origin (OL) was triplicated in this species. Four protein-encoding genes (atp6, nd2, nd3, and nd5) were found to have high sequence divergence and to be usable for population genetics studies on this endangered species. Among the surveyed ranids, only two species (Rana and Lithobates) manifested the typical neobatrachian-type mt gene arrangement. In contrast, relatively large gene rearrangements were found in Amolops, Babina, and Staurois species; and translocations of single tRNA genes (trns) were observed in Glandirana and Odorrana species. Though the inter-generic and interspecific relationships of ranid taxa remain to be elucidated based on 12S and 16S rrn sequence data, some of the derived mt gene orders were found to have synapomorphic features useful for solving problematic ranid phylogenies. The tandem duplication and random loss (TDRL) model, the traditional model for mt gene rearrangement, failed to easily explain several of the mt gene rearrangements observed here. Indeed, the recent recombination-based gene rearrangement models seemed to be more suitable for this purpose. The high frequency of gene translocations involving a specific trn block (trnH-trnS1) and several single tRNA genes suggest that there may be a retrotranslocation in ranid mt genomes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Indian Salmon, Eleutheronema tetradactylum from South Asian Countries Based on Mitochondrial COI Gene Sequences

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    Ramakrishnan THIRUMARAISELVI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleutheronema tetradactylum is an important commercial fish species exposed to intense exploitation both in Southeast Asian countries and Northern parts of Australia. Research on the population structure of E. tetradactylum in these coastal waters is substantial in order to ensure sustainable use and appropriate resource management. In this study, genetic variation, diversity and population structure of E. tetradactylum among four FAO fishing areas, along South Asian countries, were evaluated using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene. Totally 30 sequences of COI gene were collected from four FAO fishing areas. Among these 30 individuals, 18 distinct haplotypes were defined. High levels of haplotype diversity (hd = 0.952 ± 0.096 and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.01536 ± 0.00312 were observed in the population within the Bay of Bengal. No haplotype and nucleotide diversity were observed in South China Sea population. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicated that 0.81% of the genetic variation occurred within the populations, while 7.09% variation occurred among populations. Significant genealogical branches were recognized in North Australian populations (one clade, South China Sea populations (one clade, Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal populations (one clade on the neighbor-joining tree. These results suggested that E. tetradactylum populations in FAO fishing areas 51, 57 and 61 have developed different genetic structures. Tests of neutral evolution and mismatch distribution suggest that a population growth of E. tetradactylum may take place in these fishing areas.

  2. Analysis of the trap gene provides evidence for the role of elevation and vector abundance in the genetic diversity of Plasmodium relictum in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Margaret E M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The avian disease system in Hawaii offers an ideal opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions in a natural setting. Previous studies have recognized only a single mitochondrial lineage of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum in the Hawaiian Islands, but cloning and sequencing of nuclear genes suggest a higher degree of genetic diversity. Methods In order to evaluate genetic diversity of P. relictum at the population level and further understand host-parasite interactions, a modified single-base extension (SBE method was used to explore spatial and temporal distribution patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (trap gene of P. relictum infections from 121 hatch-year amakihi (Hemignathus virens on the east side of Hawaii Island. Results Rare alleles and mixed infections were documented at three of eight SNP loci; this is the first documentation of genetically diverse infections of P. relictum at the population level in Hawaii. Logistic regression revealed that the likelihood of infection with a rare allele increased at low-elevation, but decreased as mosquito capture rates increased. The inverse relationship between vector capture rates and probability of infection with a rare allele is unexpected given current theories of epidemiology developed in human malarias. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that pathogen diversity in Hawaii may be driven by a complex interaction of factors including transmission rates, host immune pressures, and parasite-parasite competition.

  3. Influence of growth on reproductive traits and its effect on fertility and gene diversity in a clonal seed orchard of scots pine, Pinus Sylvestris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkuner, I; Bilir, N; Ulusan, D

    2008-05-01

    This study was carried out in a clonal seed orchard of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), to determine the difference and interaction for reproductive and growth characters among clones and its impact on fertility variation and gene diversity Numbers of female and male strobili, and height and diameter at breast height were studied on six grafts chosen randomly in each of the 27 clones for the purpose. One-way analysis of variance revealed large differences in both reproductive and growth characters among clones. The differences were higher in growth characters than in reproductive traits. There was significant phenotypic correlation among growth and reproductive characters. So, growth characters had a greater effect on male and female fertility Estimates of total fertility variation (Sibling coefficient = 1.012), status number (26.8) and relative gene diversity (0.981) were computed. Fertility variation among clones was low, which caused a high relative population size (99% of census number). The positive phenotypic correlation between growth and reproductive characters showed that enhanced growth rate could be effective in improving fertility and gene diversity of seed orchard crop. The results of the study have implications in breeding and selection of plus tree and populations, establishment and thinning of seed orchards of the species.

  4. Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two hot springs from geothermal regions in Bulgaria as demostrated by 16S rRNA and GH-57 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Katerina; Tomova, Iva; Tomova, Anna; Radchenkova, Nadja; Atanassov, Ivan; Kambourova, Margarita

    2015-12-01

    Archaeal and bacterial diversity in two Bulgarian hot springs, geographically separated with different tectonic origin and different temperature of water was investigated exploring two genes, 16S rRNA and GH-57. Archaeal diversity was significantly higher in the hotter spring Levunovo (LV) (82°C); on the contrary, bacterial diversity was higher in the spring Vetren Dol (VD) (68°C). The analyzed clones from LV library were referred to twenty eight different sequence types belonging to five archaeal groups from Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. A domination of two groups was observed, Candidate Thaumarchaeota and Methanosarcinales. The majority of the clones from VD were referred to HWCG (Hot Water Crenarchaeotic Group). The formation of a group of thermophiles in the order Methanosarcinales was suggested. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high numbers of novel sequences, more than one third of archaeal and half of the bacterial phylotypes displayed similarity lower than 97% with known ones. The retrieved GH-57 gene sequences showed a complex phylogenic distribution. The main part of the retrieved homologous GH-57 sequences affiliated with bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes, Deltaproteobacteria, Candidate Saccharibacteria and affiliation of almost half of the analyzed sequences is not fully resolved. GH-57 gene analysis allows an increased resolution of the biodiversity assessment and in depth analysis of specific taxonomic groups. [Int Microbiol 18(4):217-223 (2015)]. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  5. A method for studying protistan diversity using massively parallel sequencing of V9 hypervariable regions of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A Amaral-Zettler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel pyrosequencing of amplicons from the V6 hypervariable regions of small-subunit (SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes is commonly used to assess diversity and richness in bacterial and archaeal populations. Recent advances in pyrosequencing technology provide read lengths of up to 240 nucleotides. Amplicon pyrosequencing can now be applied to longer variable regions of the SSU rRNA gene including the V9 region in eukaryotes.We present a protocol for the amplicon pyrosequencing of V9 regions for eukaryotic environmental samples for biodiversity inventories and species richness estimation. The International Census of Marine Microbes (ICoMM and the Microbial Inventory Research Across Diverse Aquatic Long Term Ecological Research Sites (MIRADA-LTERs projects are already employing this protocol for tag sequencing of eukaryotic samples in a wide diversity of both marine and freshwater environments.Massively parallel pyrosequencing of eukaryotic V9 hypervariable regions of SSU rRNA genes provides a means of estimating species richness from deeply-sampled populations and for discovering novel species from the environment.

  6. Microbial diversity of a full-scale UASB reactor applied to poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment: integration of 16S rRNA gene amplicon and shotgun metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delforno, Tiago Palladino; Lacerda Júnior, Gileno Vieira; Noronha, Melline F; Sakamoto, Isabel K; Varesche, Maria Bernadete A; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2017-06-01

    The 16S rRNA gene amplicon and whole-genome shotgun metagenomic (WGSM) sequencing approaches were used to investigate wide-spectrum profiles of microbial composition and metabolic diversity from a full-scale UASB reactor applied to poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment. The data were generated by using MiSeq 2 × 250 bp and HiSeq 2 × 150 bp Illumina sequencing platforms for 16S amplicon and WGSM sequencing, respectively. Each approach revealed a distinct microbial community profile, with Pseudomonas and Psychrobacter as predominant genus for the WGSM dataset and Clostridium and Methanosaeta for the 16S rRNA gene amplicon dataset. The virome characterization revealed the presence of two viral families with Bacteria and Archaea as host, Myoviridae, and Siphoviridae. A wide functional diversity was found with predominance of genes involved in the metabolism of acetone, butanol, and ethanol synthesis; and one-carbon metabolism (e.g., methanogenesis). Genes related to the acetotrophic methanogenesis pathways were more abundant than methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic, corroborating the taxonomic results that showed the prevalence of the acetotrophic genus Methanosaeta. Moreover, the dataset indicated a variety of metabolic genes involved in sulfur, nitrogen, iron, and phosphorus cycles, with many genera able to act in all cycles. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) revealed that microbial community contained 43 different types of antibiotic resistance genes, some of them were associated with growth chicken promotion (e.g., bacitracin, tetracycline, and polymyxin). © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Diversity and Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Nitrite Reductase (nirK) Genes in Estuarine Sediments of San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reji, L.; Lee, J. A.; Damashek, J.; Francis, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrification, the microbially-mediated aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an integral component of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation, is carried out by two distinct microbial groups: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Molecular ecological studies targeting the amoA gene have revealed the abundance and ubiquity of AOA in terrestrial as well as aquatic environments. In addition to the ammonia oxidation machinery that includes the amoA gene, AOA also encode a gene for copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK). The distribution patterns and functional role of nirK in AOA remain mostly unknown; proposed functions include the indirect involvement in ammonia oxidation through the production of nitric oxide during nitrite reduction, and (2) nitrite detoxification. In the present study, the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing approaches. In sediment samples collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, two archaeal nirK variants (AnirKa and AnirKb) were amplified using specific primer sets. Overall, AnirKa was observed to be significantly more abundant than AnirKb in the sediment samples, with variation in relative abundance spanning two to three orders of magnitude between sampling sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a number of unique archaeal nirK sequence types, as well as many that clustered with sequences from previous estuarine studies and cultured AOA isolates, such as Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This study yielded new insights into the diversity and abundance of archaeal nirK genes in estuarine sediments, and highlights the importance of further investigating the physiological role of this gene in AOA, as well as its suitability as a marker gene for studying AOA in the environment.

  8. KIR Gene Content Diversity in a Zimbabwean Population: Does KIR2DL2 Have a Role in Protection Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhandire, Kudakwashe; Zijenah, Lynn Sodai; Yindom, Louis-Marie; Duri, Kerina; Mlambo, Tommy; Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mazengera, Lovemore Ronald; Mhandire, Doreen Zvipo; Musarurwa, Cuthbert; Dandara, Collet; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Matarira, Hilda Tendisa; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2016-12-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) mediate natural killer cell function through interaction with their cognate human leukocyte antigen ligands. Thus, KIR gene variants have been implicated in resistance or susceptibility to viral infections. However, research on the role of these variants remains contradictory and inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated KIR gene content diversity and its association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in an adult Black Zimbabwean population. Presence or absence of 15 KIR genes was determined in 189 HIV-infected adults and 97 HIV-uninfected blood donors using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Frequencies of KIR genes, genotypes, and haplotypes were compared between the cases and controls to identify putative associations between KIR gene variants and HIV status. We report in this study the frequencies of 15 KIR genes and 43 KIR genotypes (40 known and 3 novel) among Zimbabweans. Importantly, the frequency of the inhibitory KIR2DL2 gene was significantly higher in the uninfected group (62%) compared to the HIV-infected group (47%) (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.33-0.90, p = 0.019). KIR2DL2/2DL2 homozygosity was also significantly higher in the uninfected group (35%) compared to HIV-infected group (53%) (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.16-0.72, p = 0.005) under a recessive model. We conclude that the KIR2DL2 gene may be involved in protection against HIV infection. It may be possible that inhibitory KIR genes may have an important role to play in HIV acquisition among populations of African origin in whom the activating KIR genes are less frequent compared to among Caucasians.

  9. Molecular characterisation and diversity in Enterobacter cloacae from Edinburgh and Egypt carrying bla(CTX-M-14) and bla(VIM-4) β-lactamase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimude, J U; Amyes, S G B

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the carbapenemases and extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) associated with resistance, the genetic environment of these genes, and their location on plasmids among Enterobacter cloacae isolates from Edinburgh (UK) and Egypt. Nine E. cloacae isolates were obtained from Egypt (n=3) and Edinburgh (n=6). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by agar dilution. Molecular detection of carbapenemase genes, blaCTX-M-14 and the presence of integron structures was done by PCR and sequencing. Genotyping of the strains was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with XbaI restriction. Plasmids were extracted to determine the location of the resistance genes. PCR sequencing revealed that all of the isolates carried the blaCTX-M-14 ESBL gene, whilst two isolates also carried the blaVIM-4 metallo-β-lactamase gene. The blaCTX-M-14 genes in two isolates were associated with the ISEcp1 transposase. Analysis of the integrons found an intI1 integron associated with the complex ISCR1. The blaVIM-4 gene was identified in the form of a gene cassette within the class 1 integron, followed downstream by the resistance genes aacA7, dfrA1 and aadA2. PFGE revealed genetic relatedness among six isolates, whereas the others were diverse although related. Plasmid analysis revealed a single plasmid carrying both blaVIM-4 and blaCTX-M-14. In conclusion, the presence of insertion sequence ISEcp1 upstream of blaCTX-M-14 suggests its involvement in the expression and mobilisation of this gene. Linked carriage of blaVIM-4 and blaCTX-M-14 on the same plasmid in E. cloacae results in resistance to all β-lactams and limits antibiotic treatment options. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Untangling nucleotide diversity and evolution of the H genome in polyploid Hordeum and Elymus species based on the single copy of nuclear gene DMC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfa Sun

    Full Text Available Numerous hybrid and polypoid species are found within the Triticeae. It has been suggested that the H subgenome of allopolyploid Elymus (wheatgrass species originated from diploid Hordeum (barley species, but the role of hybridization between polyploid Elymus and Hordeum has not been studied. It is not clear whether gene flow across polyploid Hordeum and Elymus species has occurred following polyploid speciation. Answering these questions will provide new insights into the formation of these polyploid species, and the potential role of gene flow among polyploid species during polyploid evolution. In order to address these questions, disrupted meiotic cDNA1 (DMC1 data from the allopolyploid StH Elymus are analyzed together with diploid and polyploid Hordeum species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H copies of DMC1 sequence in some Elymus are very close to the H copies of DMC1 sequence in some polyploid Hordeum species, indicating either that the H genome in theses Elymus and polyploid Hordeum species originated from same diploid donor or that gene flow has occurred among them. Our analysis also suggested that the H genomes in Elymus species originated from limited gene pool, while H genomes in Hordeum polyploids have originated from broad gene pools. Nucleotide diversity (π of the DMC1 sequences on H genome from polyploid species (π = 0.02083 in Elymus, π = 0.01680 in polyploid Hordeum is higher than that in diploid Hordeum (π = 0.01488. The estimates of Tajima's D were significantly departure from the equilibrium neutral model at this locus in diploid Hordeum species (P<0.05, suggesting an excess of rare variants in diploid species which may not contribute to the origination of polyploids. Nucleotide diversity (π of the DMC1 sequences in Elymus polyploid species (π = 0.02083 is higher than that in polyploid Hordeum (π = 0.01680, suggesting that the degree of relationships between two parents of a polyploid might be a factor

  11. Asymmetry of gene flow and differential geographical structure of molecular diversity in wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, R; Gepts, P

    2003-01-01

    Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), we analyzed the genetic structure of wild and domesticated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mesoamerica at different geographical levels to test the hypothesis of asymmetric gene flow and investigate the origin of weedy populations. We showed both by phenetic and admixture population analyses that gene flow is about three- to four-fold higher from domesticated to wild populations than in the reverse direction. This result, combined with other work, points to a displacement of genetic diversity in wild populations due to gene flow from the domesticated populations. The weedy populations appear to be genetically intermediate between domesticated and wild populations, suggesting that they originated by hybridization between wild and domesticated types rather than by escape from cultivation. In addition, the domesticated bean races were genetically similar confirming a single domestication event for the Mesoamerican gene pool. Finally, the genetic diversity of the domesticated bean population showed a lower level of geographic structure in comparison to that of the wild populations.

  12. [Distinctive Features of the Microbial Diversity and the Polyketide Synthase GenesSpectrum in the Community of the Endemic Baikal Sponge Swartschewskia papyracea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzhnaya, O V; Itskovich, V B

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of the symbiotic community of the endemic Baikal sponge Swartschewskia papyracea was studied, and an analysis of the polyketide synthases genes spectrum in sponge-associated microorganisms was carried out. Six bacterial phyla were detected in the S. papyracea microbiome, namely, Verrucomicrobia, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Planctomycetes. Unlike the microbial associations of other freshwater sponges, the community under study was dominated by the Verrucomicrobia (42.1%) and Cyanobacteria (17.5%) phyla, while the proportion of the Proteobacteria was unusually low (9.7%). In the S. papyracea community metagenome, there were identified 18 polyketide synthases genes fragments, the closest homologs of which included the polyketide synthases of the microorganisms belonging to the bacterial phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria (Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria classes), and Acidobacteria and to the eukaryotic algae of the Heterokonta phylum (Eustigmatophyceae class). Polyketide synthase sequences from S. papyracea formed three groups on the phylogenetic tree: a group of hybrid NRPS/PKS complexes, a group of cyanobacterial polyketide synthases, and a group of homologs of the eukaryotic alga Nannochloropsis galiana. Notably, the identified polyketide synthase genes fragments showed only a 57-88% similarity to the sequences in the databases, which implies the presence of genes controlling the synthesis of the novel, still unstudied, polyketide compounds in the S. papyracea community. It was proposed that the habitation conditions of S. papyracea affect the taxonomic composition of the microorganisms associated with the sponge, including the diversity of the producers of secondary metabolites.

  13. Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in ethnically diverse high risk families in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitman, Yael; Borsthein, Roni Tsipora; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Dagan, Efrat; Castera, Laurent; Goislard, Maud; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Goldberg, Hadassah; Kaufman, Bella; Ben-Baruch, Noa; Zidan, Jamal; Maray, Taiseer; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Friedman, Eitan

    2011-06-01

    Three mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG, 5382InsC) and BRCA2 (6174delT) predominate among high risk breast ovarian cancer Ashkenazi Jewish families, with few "private" mutations described. Additionally, the spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations among high risk Jewish non Ashkenazi and non Jewish Israelis is undetermined. Genotyping by exon-specific sequencing or heteroduplex analysis using enhanced mismatch mutation analysis was applied to 250 high risk, predominantly cancer affected, unrelated Israeli women of Ashkenazi (n = 72), non Ashkenazi (n = 90), Moslem (n = 45), Christian Arabs (n = 21), Druze (n = 17), and non Jewish Caucasians (n = 5). All Jewish women were prescreened and did not harbor any of the predominant BRCA1 or BRCA2 Jewish mutations. Age at diagnosis of breast cancer (median ± SD) (n = 219) was 40.1 ± 11.7, 45.6 ± 10.7, 38.7 ± 9.2, 45.5 ± 11.4 ± and 40.7 ± 8.1 years for Ashkenazi, non Ashkenazi, Moslem, Christian, and Druze participants, respectively. For ovarian cancer (n = 19) the mean ages were 45.75 ± 8.2, 57.9 ± 10.1, 54 ± 8, 70 ± 0, and 72 ± 0 for these origins, respectively. Overall, 22 (8.8%) participants carried 19 clearly pathogenic mutations-10 BRCA1 and 9 BRCA2 (3 novel): 3 in Ashkenazim, 6 in 8 non-Ashkenazim, 6 in 7 Moslems, 2 in Druze, and 2 in non Jewish Caucasians. Only three mutations (c.1991del4, C61G, A1708E) were detected in 2 seemingly unrelated families of Moslem and non- Ashkenazi origins. There were no inactivating mutations among 55 Ashkenazi high risk breast cancer only families. In conclusion, there are no predominant recurring germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes among ethnically diverse Jewish and non Jewish high risk families in Israel.

  14. [Phototrophic microorganisms in the symbiotic communities of Baikal sponges: Diversity of psbA gene (encoding D1 protein of photosystem II) sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzhnaya, O V; Itskovich, V B

    2017-01-01

    The psbA gene, which encodes a major photosystem II protein (protein II or D1), is a marker for the presence of phototrophic organisms in water communities. We have pioneered the use of this marker for studying the diversity of phototrophic microflora of freshwater invertebrates. The object of the study is the microbial associations accompanying the endemic Baikal sponge Baikalospongia intermedia and the surrounding aquatic microbial community. Analysis of the psbA gene sequences in the examined microbiomes demonstrates the presence of various phototrophic groups, such as Cyanobacteria, Chlorophyta, Heterokonta, Haptophyta, and Ochrophyta algae, as well as cyanophages. A total of 35 unique psbA gene sequences have been distinguished in the microbial communities of the endemic sponge B. intermedia and 32 unique sequences in the water community surrounding the sponge. These data demonstrate the involvement of sponge symbiotic communities in the accumulation of primary production and carbon cycle in the Lake Baikal ecosystem.

  15. Deciphering the fine nucleotide diversity of full HLA class I and class II genes in a well-documented population from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeury, T; Creary, L E; Brunet, L; Galan, M; Pasquier, M; Kervaire, B; Langaney, A; Tiercy, J-M; Fernández-Viña, M A; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2018-01-01

    With the aim to understand how next-generation sequencing (NGS) improves both our assessment of genetic variation within populations and our knowledge on HLA molecular evolution, we sequenced and analysed 8 HLA loci in a well-documented population from sub-Saharan Africa (Mandenka). The results of full-gene NGS-MiSeq sequencing compared with those obtained by traditional typing techniques or limited sequencing strategies showed that segregating sites located outside exon 2 are crucial to describe not only class I but also class II population diversity. A comprehensive analysis of exons 2, 3, 4 and 5 nucleotide diversity at the 8 HLA loci revealed remarkable differences among these gene regions, notably a greater variation concentrated in the antigen recognition sites of class I exons 3 and some class II exons 2, likely associated with their peptide-presentation function, a lower diversity of HLA-C exon 3, possibly related to its role as a KIR ligand, and a peculiar molecular diversity of HLA-A exon 2, revealing demographic signals. Based on full-length HLA sequences, we also propose that the most frequent DRB1 allele in the studied population, DRB1*13:04, emerged from an allelic conversion involving 3 potential alleles as donors and DRB1*11:02:01 as recipient. Finally, our analysis revealed a high occurrence of the DRB1*13:04-DQA1*05:05:01-DQB1*03:19 haplotype, possibly resulting from a selective sweep due to protection to Onchorcerca volvulus, a prevalent pathogen in West Africa. This study unveils highly relevant information on the molecular evolution of HLA genes in relation to their immune function, calling for similar analyses in other populations living in contrasting environments. © 2017 The Authors HLA: Immune Response Genetics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. High gene flow and genetic diversity in three economically important Zanthoxylum Spp. of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of NE India using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhi, K; Sarmah, D K; Deka, M; Bhau, B S

    2014-12-01

    The genetic diversity in Zanthoxylum species viz.  Zanthoxylum nitidum, Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum and Zanthoxylum rhesta collected from the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone of Assam (NE India) was amplified using 13 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 9 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. RAPD markers were able to detect 81.82% polymorphism whereas ISSR detected 98.02% polymorphism. The genetic similarities were analyzed from the dendrogram constructed by RAPD and ISSR fingerprinting methods which divided the 3 species of Zanthoxylum into 3 clear different clusters. The principle component analysis (PCA) was carried out to confirm the clustering pattern of RAPD and ISSR analysis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the presence of significant variability between different Zanthoxylum species and within the species by both RAPD and ISSR markers. Z. nitidum was found to be sharing a high degree of variation with the other two Zanthoxylum species under study. The Nei's gene diversity (h), Shannon's information index (I), observed number of alleles (na) and effective number of alleles (ne) were also found to be higher in ISSR markers (0.3526, 0.5230, 1.9802 and 1.6145) than in RAPD markers (0.3144, 0.4610, 1.8182 and 1.5571). The values for total genotype diversity for among population (HT), within population diversity (Hs) and gene flow (Nm) were more in ISSR (0.3491, 0.2644 and 1.5610) than RAPD (0.3128, 0.2264 and 1.3087) but the mean coefficient of gene differentiation (GST) was more in RAPD (0.2764) than ISSR (0.2426). A comparison of this two finger printing methods was done by calculating MR, EMI and MI. The correlation coefficient between data matrices of RAPD and ISSR based on Mantel test was found to be significant (r = 0.65612).

  17. Shewanella species as the origin of blaOXA-48 genes: insights into gene diversity, associated phenotypes and possible transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacão, Marta; Araújo, Susana; Vendas, Maria; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Chromosome-encoded beta-lactamases of Shewanella spp. have been indicated as probable progenitors of bla OXA-48 -like genes. However, these have been detected in few Shewanella spp. and dissemination mechanisms are unclear. Thus, our main objective was to confirm the role of Shewanella species as progenitors of bla OXA-48 -like genes. In silico analysis of Shewanella genomes was performed to detect bla OXA-48 -like genes and context, and 43 environmental Shewanella spp. were characterised. Clonal relatedness was determined by BOX-PCR. Phylogenetic affiliation was assessed by 16S rDNA and gyrB sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility phenotypes were determined. The bla OXA-48 -like genes and genetic context were inspected by PCR, hybridisation and sequence analysis. Gene variants were cloned in Escherichia coli and MICs were determined. Shewanella isolates were screened for integrons, plasmids and insertion sequences. Analysis of Shewanella spp. genomes showed that putative bla OXA-48 -like is present in the majority and in an identical context. Isolates presenting unique BOX profiles affiliated with 11 Shewanella spp. bla OXA-48 -like genes were detected in 22 isolates from 6 species. Genes encoded enzymes identical to OXA-48, OXA-204, OXA-181, and 7 new variants differing from OXA-48 from 2 to 82 amino acids. IS1999 was detected in 24 isolates, although not in the vicinity of bla OXA-48 genes. Recombinant E. coli strains presented altered MICs. The presence/absence of bla OXA-48 -like genes was species-related. Gene variants encoded enzymes with hydrolytic spectra similar to OXA-48-like from non-shewanellae. From the mobile elements previously described in association with bla OXA-48 -like genes, only the IS1999 was found in Shewanella, which indicates its relevance in bla OXA-48 -like genes transfer to other hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular analysis of the diversity of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes in the environment, using aprA as functional marker gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase is a key enzyme of the microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation processes. Because the alpha- and beta-subunit-encoding genes, aprBA, are highly conserved among sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, they are most suitable for molecular profiling of the microbial community structure of the sulfur cycle in environment. In this study, a new aprA gene-targeting assay using a combination of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is presented. The screening of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing reference strains as well as the analyses of environmental DNA from diverse habitats (e.g., microbial mats, invertebrate tissue, marine and estuarine sediments, and filtered hydrothermal water) by the new primer pair revealed an improved microbial diversity coverage and less-pronounced template-to-PCR product bias in direct comparison to those of the previously published primer set (B. Deplancke, K. R. Hristova, H. A. Oakley, V. J. McCracken, R. Aminov, R. I. Mackie, and H. R. Gaskins, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2166-2174, 2000). The concomitant molecular detection of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes was confirmed. The new assay was applied in comparison with the 16S rRNA gene-based analysis to investigate the microbial diversity of the sulfur cycle in sediment, seawater, and manganese crust samples from four study sites in the area of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, Caribbean Sea (Caribflux project). The aprA gene-based approach revealed putative sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria of chemolithoheterotrophic lifestyle to have been abundant in the nonhydrothermal sediment and water column. In contrast, the sulfur-based microbial community that inhabited the surface of the volcanic manganese crust was more complex, consisting predominantly of putative chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria.

  19. Phylogenetically diverse ureC genes and their expression suggest the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Jin, Liling; Jiang, Qun; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs) in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota.

  20. Phylogenetically diverse ureC genes and their expression suggest the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Su

    Full Text Available Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota.

  1. Phylogenetically Diverse ureC Genes and Their Expression Suggest the Urea Utilization by Bacterial Symbionts in Marine Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Jin, Liling; Jiang, Qun; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Urea is one of the dominant organic nitrogenous compounds in the oligotrophic oceans. Compared to the knowledge of nitrogen transformation of nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidization, nitrate and nitrite reduction mediated by sponge-associated microbes, our knowledge of urea utilization in sponges and the phylogenetic diversity of sponge-associated microbes with urea utilization potential is very limited. In this study, Marinobacter litoralis isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria and the slurry of X. testudinaria were found to have urease activity. Subsequently, phylogenetically diverse bacterial ureC genes were detected in the total genomic DNA and RNA of sponge X. testudinaria, i.e., 19 operative taxonomic units (OTUs) in genomic DNA library and 8 OTUs in cDNA library at 90% stringency. Particularly, 6 OTUs were common to both the genomic DNA library and the cDNA library, which suggested that some ureC genes were expressed in this sponge. BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the ureC sequences were similar with the urease alpha subunit of members from Proteobacteria, which were the predominant component in sponge X. testudinaria, and the remaining ureC sequences were related to those from Magnetococcus, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria. This study is the first assessment of the role of sponge bacterial symbionts in the regenerated utilization of urea by the detection of transcriptional activity of ureC gene, as well as the phylogenetic diversity of ureC gene of sponge bacterial symbionts. The results suggested the urea utilization by bacterial symbionts in marine sponge X. testudinaria, extending our understanding of nitrogen cycling mediated by sponge-associated microbiota. PMID:23741404

  2. Symbiotic Burkholderia Species Show Diverse Arrangements of nif/fix and nod Genes and Lack Typical High-Affinity Cytochrome cbb3 Oxidase Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Briscoe, Leah; Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Agapakis, Christina M; de-Los Santos, Paulina Estrada; Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne; Weinstock, George; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John G; Hirsch, Ann M

    2016-08-01

    Genome analysis of fourteen mimosoid and four papilionoid beta-rhizobia together with fourteen reference alpha-rhizobia for both nodulation (nod) and nitrogen-fixing (nif/fix) genes has shown phylogenetic congruence between 16S rRNA/MLSA (combined 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analysis) and nif/fix genes, indicating a free-living diazotrophic ancestry of the beta-rhizobia. However, deeper genomic analysis revealed a complex symbiosis acquisition history in the beta-rhizobia that clearly separates the mimosoid and papilionoid nodulating groups. Mimosoid-nodulating beta-rhizobia have nod genes tightly clustered in the nodBCIJHASU operon, whereas papilionoid-nodulating Burkholderia have nodUSDABC and nodIJ genes, although their arrangement is not canonical because the nod genes are subdivided by the insertion of nif and other genes. Furthermore, the papilionoid Burkholderia spp. contain duplications of several nod and nif genes. The Burkholderia nifHDKEN and fixABC genes are very closely related to those found in free-living diazotrophs. In contrast, nifA is highly divergent between both groups, but the papilionoid species nifA is more similar to alpha-rhizobia nifA than to other groups. Surprisingly, for all Burkholderia, the fixNOQP and fixGHIS genes required for cbb3 cytochrome oxidase production and assembly are missing. In contrast, symbiotic Cupriavidus strains have fixNOQPGHIS genes, revealing a divergence in the evolution of two distinct electron transport chains required for nitrogen fixation within the beta-rhizobia.

  3. Genetic diversity of plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3alpha (Pvmsp-3alpha) gene in Jhapa District of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Madhav; Ranjitkar, Samir; Schousboe, Mette Leth

    2012-01-01

    In Nepal, Plasmodium vivax accounts for approximately 80-90% of the malaria cases, but limited studies have been conducted on the genetic diversity of this parasite population. This study was carried out to determine the genetic diversity of P. vivax population sampled from subjects living...... into 13 allelic patterns: A1-A9, B1, B2, C1 and C2. These results indicated a high genetic diversity within the studied P. vivax population. As the transmission rate of malaria is low in Nepal, the diversity is most likely due to migration of people between the malaria endemic regions, either within...... the country or between Nepal and India. Similar prevalence of the three genotypes of Pvmsp-3alpha between the two countries likely supports the latter explanation....

  4. Diversity of the 32-kilodalton protein gene may form a basis for species determination of potentially pathogenic mycobacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, H; Viljanen, M K

    1997-03-01

    In this study, partial gene sequences of the mycobacterial 32-kDa protein gene were determined by PCR-based sequencing. A total of 50 strains representing 18 potentially pathogenic mycobacterial species were studied. In 10 cases, all three strains of the species studied were identical, and intraspecies variability was found in 6 cases. Thus, the 32-kDa protein gene may be a good target for identification of mycobacteria by PCR-based sequencing.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis and genetic diversity of 3' region of rtxA gene from geographically diverse strains of Moraxella bovis, Moraxella bovoculi and Moraxella ovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Luana D'Avila; Maboni, Grazieli; Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Scherer, Charles Fernando Capinos; Libardoni, Felipe; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2015-08-05

    The cytotoxin A (MbxA) is one of the main virulence factors of Moraxella bovis involved in the pathogenesis of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Moraxella ovis and Moraxella bovoculi, suspected to be associated with infectious keratitis in sheep and cattle respectively, also have a gene that encodes the cytotoxin A (movA and mbvA, respectively). The aim of this study was to determine the molecular sequence of the 3' region of the cytotoxin gene of Moraxella spp. strains isolated from clinical cases to establish phylogenetic and evolutionary comparisons. PCR amplification, nucleotide sequencing (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequence prediction were performed, followed by the sequences comparison, identity level calculation and selective pressure analysis. The phylogenetic reconstruction based on nt and aa sequences clearly differentiate M. bovis (n=15), M. bovoculi (n=11) and M. ovis (n=7) and their respective reference strains. An alignment of 843nt revealed high similarity within bacterial species (MbxA=99.9% nt and aa; MbvA=99.3% nt and 98.8% aa; MovA=99.5% nt and 99.3% aa). The similarity of partial sequences (nt 1807-2649) of MbxA in relation to MbvA and MovA ranged from 76.3 to 78.5%; similarity between MbvA and MovA ranged from 95.7 to 97.5%. A negative selection on mbvA and movA sequences was revealed by the molecular evolution analysis. The phylogenetic analysis of movA and mbvA allowed different strains of Moraxella spp. to be grouped according to the period of isolation. Sequence analysis of cytotoxin may provide insights into genetic and evolutionary relationships and into the genetic/molecular basis of Moraxella spp. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in five Lolium perenne genes with putative role in shoot branching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazauskas, Gintaras; Pašakinskienė, Izolda; Asp, Torben

    2010-01-01

    detected. On average, one SNP was present every 94 bp between two randomly selected sequences for the five genes. As expected, the number of synonymous substitutions was much higher compared to the number of non-synonymous mutations for most of the genes. However, six non-synonymous and only two synonymous...... substitutions were detected in LpTB1. A negative and significant (P value was detected in the coding region of LpBRI1, suggesting selection and presence of low-frequency alleles for this gene. The number of haplotypes within the 5 genes across the 20 heterozygous genotypes ranged from 9 in Lp...

  7. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidation (amoA) and Nitrogen Fixation (nifH) Genes in Lava Caves of Terceira, Azores, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Jennifer J Marshall; Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Dapkevicius, Maria De Lurdes N E; Northup, Diana E

    Lava caves are an understudied ecosystem in the subterranean world, particularly in regard to nitrogen cycling. The diversity of ammonia oxidation ( amoA ) and nitrogen fixation ( nifH ) genes in bacterial mats collected from lava cave walls on the island of Terceira (Azores, Portugal) was investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A total of 55 samples were collected from 11 lava caves that were selected with regard to surface land use. Land use types above the lava caves were categorized into pasture, forested, and sea/urban, and used to determine if land use influenced the ammonia oxidizing and nitrogen fixing bacterial communities within the lava caves. The soil and water samples from each lava cave were analyzed for total organic carbon, inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate, to determine if land use influences either the nutrient content entering the lava cave or the nitrogen cycling bacteria present within the cave. Nitrosospira -like sequences dominated the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community, and the majority of the diversity was found in lava caves under forested land. The nitrogen fixation community was dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae -like sequences, and diversity was evenly distributed between pasture and forested land, but very little overlap in diversity was observed. The results suggest that land use is impacting both the AOB and the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities.

  8. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  9. Within-population diversity of koala Chlamydophila pecorum at ompA VD1-VD3 and the ORF663 hypothetical gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, D P; Beninati, T; Meek, M; Irish, J; Griffith, J E

    2012-05-04

    Infection of koalas by Chlamydophila pecorum is very common and causes significant morbidity, infertility and mortality. Fundamental to management of the disease is an understanding of the importance of multi-serotype infection or pathogen virulence in pathogenesis; these may need consideration in plans involving koala movement, vaccination, or disease risk assessment. Here we describe diversity of ompA VD1-3, and ORF663 hypothetical gene tandem repeat regions, in a single population of koalas with diverse disease outcomes. We PCR amplified and sequenced 72 partial ompA segments and amplified 25 tandem repeat segments (ORF663 hypothetical gene) from C. pecorum obtained from 62 koalas. Although several ompA genotypes were identified nationally, only one ompA genotype existed within the population studied, indicating that severe chlamydial disease occurs commonly in free-ranging koalas in the absence of infection by multiple MOMP serotypes of C. pecorum. In contrast, variation in tandem repeats within the ORF663 hypothetical gene was very high, approaching the entire range reported for pathogenic and non-pathogenic C. pecorum of European ruminants; providing an impetus for further investigation of this as a potential virulence trait. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of genes specifically or preferentially expressed in maize silk reveals similarity and diversity in transcript abundance of different dry stigmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, pollination is a critical step in reproduction. During pollination, constant communication between male pollen and the female stigma is required for pollen adhesion, germination, and tube growth. The detailed mechanisms of stigma-mediated reproductive processes, however, remain largely unknown. Maize (Zea mays L., one of the world’s most important crops, has been extensively used as a model species to study molecular mechanisms of pollen and stigma interaction. A comprehensive analysis of maize silk transcriptome may provide valuable information for investigating stigma functionality. A comparative analysis of expression profiles between maize silk and dry stigmas of other species might reveal conserved and diverse mechanisms that underlie stigma-mediated reproductive processes in various plant species. Results Transcript abundance profiles of mature silk, mature pollen, mature ovary, and seedling were investigated using RNA-seq. By comparing the transcriptomes of these tissues, we identified 1,427 genes specifically or preferentially expressed in maize silk. Bioinformatic analyses of these genes revealed many genes with known functions in plant reproduction as well as novel candidate genes that encode amino acid transporters, peptide and oligopeptide transporters, and cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. In addition, comparison of gene sets specifically or preferentially expressed in stigmas of maize, rice (Oryza sativa L., and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana [L.] Heynh. identified a number of homologous genes involved either in pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination or in initial growth and penetration of pollen tubes into the stigma surface. The comparison also indicated that maize shares a more similar profile and larger number of conserved genes with rice than with Arabidopsis, and that amino acid and lipid transport-related genes are distinctively overrepresented in maize. Conclusions Many of the

  11. Identification of genes specifically or preferentially expressed in maize silk reveals similarity and diversity in transcript abundance of different dry stigmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao Hui; Chen, Hao; Sang, Ya Lin; Wang, Fang; Ma, Jun Ping; Gao, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2012-07-02

    In plants, pollination is a critical step in reproduction. During pollination, constant communication between male pollen and the female stigma is required for pollen adhesion, germination, and tube growth. The detailed mechanisms of stigma-mediated reproductive processes, however, remain largely unknown. Maize (Zea mays L.), one of the world's most important crops, has been extensively used as a model species to study molecular mechanisms of pollen and stigma interaction. A comprehensive analysis of maize silk transcriptome may provide valuable information for investigating stigma functionality. A comparative analysis of expression profiles between maize silk and dry stigmas of other species might reveal conserved and diverse mechanisms that underlie stigma-mediated reproductive processes in various plant species. Transcript abundance profiles of mature silk, mature pollen, mature ovary, and seedling were investigated using RNA-seq. By comparing the transcriptomes of these tissues, we identified 1,427 genes specifically or preferentially expressed in maize silk. Bioinformatic analyses of these genes revealed many genes with known functions in plant reproduction as well as novel candidate genes that encode amino acid transporters, peptide and oligopeptide transporters, and cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. In addition, comparison of gene sets specifically or preferentially expressed in stigmas of maize, rice (Oryza sativa L.), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana [L.] Heynh.) identified a number of homologous genes involved either in pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination or in initial growth and penetration of pollen tubes into the stigma surface. The comparison also indicated that maize shares a more similar profile and larger number of conserved genes with rice than with Arabidopsis, and that amino acid and lipid transport-related genes are distinctively overrepresented in maize. Many of the novel genes uncovered in this study are potentially involved

  12. Fasciola hepatica demonstrates high levels of genetic diversity, a lack of population structure and high gene flow: possible implications for drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Nicola J; Williams, Diana J L; Paterson, Steve; Hodgkinson, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica, the liver fluke, is a trematode parasite of considerable economic importance to the livestock industry and is a re-emerging zoonosis that poses a risk to human health in F. hepatica-endemic areas worldwide. Drug resistance is a substantial threat to the current and future control of F. hepatica, yet little is known about how the biology of the parasite influences the development and spread of resistance. Given that F. hepatica can self-fertilise and therefore inbreed, there is the potential for greater population differentiation and an increased likelihood of recessive alleles, such as drug resistance genes, coming together. This could be compounded by clonal expansion within the snail intermediate host and aggregation of parasites of the same genotype on pasture. Alternatively, widespread movement of animals that typically occurs in the UK could promote high levels of gene flow and prevent population differentiation. We identified clonal parasites with identical multilocus genotypes in 61% of hosts. Despite this, 84% of 1579 adult parasites had unique multilocus genotypes, which supports high levels of genotypic diversity within F. hepatica populations. Our analyses indicate a selfing rate no greater than 2%, suggesting that this diversity is in part due to the propensity for F. hepatica to cross-fertilise. Finally, although we identified high genetic diversity within a given host, there was little evidence for differentiation between populations from different hosts, indicating a single panmictic population. This implies that, once those emerge, anthelmintic resistance genes have the potential to spread rapidly through liver fluke populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence that the satin hair mutant gene Foxq1 is among multiple and functionally diverse regulatory targets for Hoxc13 during hair follicle differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S; Peterson, Ron L; Barth, Jeremy L; Pruett, Nathanael D; Jacobs, Donna F; Kern, Michael J; Argraves, W Scott; Sundberg, John P; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2006-09-29

    It is increasingly evident that the molecular mechanisms underlying hair follicle differentiation and cycling recapitulate principles of embryonic patterning and organ regeneration. Here we used Hoxc13-overexpressing transgenic mice (also known as GC13 mice), known to develop severe hair growth defects and alopecia, as a tool for defining pathways of hair follicle differentiation. Gene array analysis performed with RNA from postnatal skin revealed differential expression of distinct subsets of genes specific for cells of the three major hair shaft compartments (cuticle, cortex, and medulla) and their precursors. This finding correlates well with the structural defects observed in each of these compartments and implicates Hoxc13 in diverse pathways of hair follicle differentiation. The group of medulla-specific genes was particularly intriguing because this included the developmentally regulated transcription factor-encoding gene Foxq1 that is altered in the medulladefective satin mouse hair mutant. We provide evidence that Foxq1 is a downstream target for Hoxc13 based on DNA binding studies as well as co-transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Expression of additional medulla-specific genes down-regulated upon overexpression of Hoxc13 requires functional Foxq1 as their expression is ablated in hair follicles of satin mice. Combined, these results demonstrate that Hoxc13 and Foxq1 control medulla differentiation through a common regulatory pathway. The apparent regulatory interactions between members of the mammalian Hox and Fox gene families shown here may establish a paradigm for "cross-talk" between these two conserved regulatory gene families in different developmental contexts including embryonic patterning as well as organ development and renewal.

  14. Molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli hemolysin gene (EHEC-hlyA)-harboring isolates from cattle reveals a diverse origin and hybrid diarrheagenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari Badouei, Mahdi; Morabito, Stefano; Najafifar, Arash; Mazandarani, Emad

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the occurrence of Escherichia coli strains harboring the gene encoding enterohemorrhagic E. coli hemolysin (EHEC-HlyA) in cattle and the association of this gene with various diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes. First, the bovine E. coli isolates were screened for EHEC-hlyA gene by PCR, and then they were characterized for the phylogenetic groups and the presence of the major virulence genes of different DEC pathotypes. In total, 25 virulence gene profiles were observed in 54 EHEC-hlyA+ isolates that reflect a considerable heterogeneity. The EHEC-hlyA+ strains were mostly associated with EHEC (72%), while only 7.4% were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We also showed the presence of estA gene of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in 6 isolates (11.1%). Interestingly, two of the estA+ strains showed hybrid pathotypes with one carrying eae/estA (EPEC/ETEC), and the other one stx2/astA/estA (EHEC/ETEC). None of the isolates were related to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC). The EHEC-plasmid encoded genes occurred in seven different combinations with EHEC-hlyA/saa/subA/espP being the most prevalent (46.3%). All stx-/eae+ strains carried O island 57 (OI-57) molecular marker(s) that may indicate these to be the progenitors of EHEC or strains losing stx. The most prevalent phylogroup was B1 (61.1%), but the most heterogeneous strains including the hybrid strains belonged to A phylogroup. Overall, our results indicate that cattle EHEC-hlyA encoding E. coli isolates consist of diverse diarrheagenic strains with the possible existence of hybrid pathotypes. Future studies are required to clarify the evolutionary aspects and clinical significance of these strains in humans and domestic animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Amplification and diversity analysis of keto synthase domains of putative polyketide synthase genes in Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus carbonarius producers of ochratoxin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoui, A.; Phong Dao, H.; Mathieu, F.; Lebrihi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The diversity of polyketide synthase (PKS) genes in Aspergillus ochraceus NRRL 3174 and Aspergil- lus carbonarius 2Mu134 has been investigated using different primer pairs previously developed for the ketosynthase (KS) domain of fungal PKSs. Nine different KS domain sequences in A. ochraceus NRRL 3174 as well as five different KS domain sequences in A. carbonarius 2Mu134 have been identified. The identified KS fragments were distributed in five different clusters on the phylogenetic tree, indicating that they most probably represent PKSs responsible for different functions. (author)

  16. Genetic variation in Danish populations of Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei: estimation of gene diversity and effective population size using RFLP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, C.; Giese, Nanna Henriette

    1996-01-01

    . The average gene diversity, (H) over cap was estimated as 0.84. The effective population size was estimated as: log(10) ((N) over cap(e)) = 0.64 - log(10)(mu), or 4.4 x 10(9), assuming a nucleotide mutation rate (mu) of 10(-9) per base per generation. There was no significant genetic differentiation between......Genetic variation of the barley powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei) was estimated in three Danish local populations. Genetic variation was estimated from the variation amongst clones of Egh, and was therefore an estimate of the maximum genetic variation in the local populations...

  17. Long-term nutrient addition differentially alters community composition and diversity of genes that control nitrous oxide flux from salt marsh sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Patrick J.; Angell, John H.; Feinman, Sarah G.; Bowen, Jennifer L.

    2015-03-01

    Enrichment of natural waters, soils, and sediments by inorganic nutrients, including nitrogen, is occurring at an increasing rate and has fundamentally altered global biogeochemical cycles. Salt marshes are critical for the removal of land-derived nitrogen before it enters coastal waters. This is accomplished via multiple microbially mediated pathways, including denitrification. Many of these pathways, however, are also a source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). We used clone libraries and quantative PCR (qPCR) to examine the effect of fertilization on the diversity and abundance of two functional genes associated with denitrification and N2O production (norB and nosZ) in experimental plots at the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh (Falmouth, MA, USA) that have been enriched with nutrients for over 40 years. Our data showed distinct nosZ and norB community structures at different nitrogen loads, especially at the highest level of fertilization. Furthermore, calculations of the Shannon Diversity Index and Chao1 Richness Estimator indicated that nosZ gene diversity and richness increased with increased nitrogen supply, however no such relationship existed with regard to richness and diversity of the norB gene. Results from qPCR demonstrated that nosZ gene abundance was an order of magnitude lower in the extra-highly fertilized plots compared to the other plots, but the abundance of norB was not affected by fertilization. The majority of sequences obtained from the marsh plots had no close cultured relatives and they were divergent from previously sequenced norB and nosZ fragments. Despite their divergence from any cultured representatives, most of the norB and nosZ sequences appeared to be from members of the Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that these classes are particularly important in salt marsh nitrogen cycling. Our results suggest that both norB and nosZ containing microbes are affected by fertilization and that the Great Sippewissett Marsh may

  18. Genetic diversity and gene exchange in Pinus oocarpa, a Mesoamerican pine with resistance to the pitch canker fungus (Fusarium circinatum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.S. Dvorak; K.M. Potter

    2009-01-01

    Eleven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to determine the genetic structure and levels of diversity in 51 natural populations of Pinus oocarpa across its geographic range of 3000 km in Mesoamerica. The study also included 17 populations of Pinus patula and Pinus tecunumanii chosen for their resistance or susceptibility to the pitch canker fungus based...

  19. Identification and genetic diversity analysis of Memecylon species using ISSR, RAPD and Gene-based DNA barcoding tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathi Tumkur Ramasetty

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Data from the present study reveals that chloroplast psbA-trnH region could be used as a potential candidate region for identifying Memecylon species, and ISSR marker system could be used for estimating genetic diversity since it has high percent polymorphism compared to RAPD marker.

  20. From genes to ecosystems: Measuring evolutionary diversity and community structure with Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter

    2009-01-01

    Forest genetic sustainability is an important component of forest health because genetic diversity and evolutionary processes allow for the adaptation of species and for the maintenance of ecosystem functionality and resilience. Phylogenetic community analyses, a set of new statistical methods for describing the evolutionary relationships among species, offer an...

  1. A Nonsynonymous/Synonymous Substitution Analysis of the B56 Gene Family Aids in Understanding B56 Isoform Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Qureshi

    Full Text Available Gene duplication leads to the formation of gene families, wherein purifying or neutral selection maintains the original gene function, while diversifying selection confers new functions onto duplicated genes. The B56 gene family is highly conserved; it is encoded by one gene in protists and fungi, and five genes in vertebrates. B56 regulates protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, an abundant heterotrimeric serine/threonine phosphatase that functions as a tumor suppressor and consists of a scaffolding "A" and catalytic "C" subunit heterodimer bound to a regulatory "B" subunit. Individual regulatory B56 subunits confer disparate functions onto PP2A in various cell-cell signaling pathways. B56 proteins share a conserved central core domain, but have divergent N- and C-termini which play a role in isoform specificity. We carried out a nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution analysis to better understand the divergence of vertebrate B56 genes. When five B56 paralogs from ten vertebrate species were analyzed, the gene family displayed purifying selection; stronger purifying selection was revealed when individual B56 isoforms were analyzed separately. The B56 core experienced stronger purifying selection than the N- and C-termini, which correlates with the presence of several contacts between the core and the AC heterodimer. Indeed, the majority of the contact points that we analyzed between B56 and the AC heterodimer experienced strong purifying selection. B56 subfamilies showed distinct patterns of selection in their N- and C-termini. The C-terminus of the B56-1 subfamily and the N-terminus of the B56-2 subfamily exhibited strong purifying selection, suggesting that these termini carry out subfamily-specific functions, while the opposite termini exhibited diversifying selection and likely carry out isoform-specific functions. We also found reduced synonymous substitutions at the N- and C-termini when grouping B56 genes by species but not by isoform, suggesting

  2. Diversity, distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces and meat products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Lavilla Lerma

    Full Text Available The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated 'hot spots.' The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR, cutting room (CR and commercial meat products (MP. Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4 and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination.

  3. Diversity, Distribution and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces and Meat Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W.; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated ‘hot spots.’ The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  4. Theobroma cacao L. pathogenesis-related gene tandem array members show diverse expression dynamics in response to pathogen colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Andrew S; Mejia, Luis C; Zhang, Yufan; Herre, Edward Allen; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-05-17

    The pathogenesis-related (PR) group of proteins are operationally defined as polypeptides that increase in concentration in plant tissues upon contact with a pathogen. To date, 17 classes of highly divergent proteins have been described that act through multiple mechanisms of pathogen resistance. Characterizing these families in cacao, an economically important tree crop, and comparing the families to those in other species, is an important step in understanding cacao's immune response. Using publically available resources, all members of the 17 recognized pathogenesis-related gene families in the genome of Theobroma cacao were identified and annotated resulting in a set of ~350 members in both published cacao genomes. Approximately 50 % of these genes are organized in tandem arrays scattered throughout the genome. This feature was observed in five additional plant taxa (three dicots and two monocots), suggesting that tandem duplication has played an important role in the evolution of the PR genes in higher plants. Expression profiling captured the dynamics and complexity of PR genes expression at basal levels and after induction by two cacao pathogens (the oomycete, Phytophthora palmivora, and the fungus, Colletotrichum theobromicola), identifying specific genes within families that are more responsive to pathogen challenge. Subsequent qRT-PCR validated the induction of several PR-1, PR-3, PR-4, and PR-10 family members, with greater than 1000 fold induction detected for specific genes. We describe candidate genes that are likely to be involved in cacao's defense against Phytophthora and Colletotrichum infection and could be potentially useful for marker-assisted selection for breeding of disease resistant cacao varieties. The data presented here, along with existing cacao-omics resources, will enable targeted functional genetic screening of defense genes likely to play critical functions in cacao's defense against its pathogens.

  5. Functional characterization of diverse ring-hydroxylating oxygenases and induction of complex aromatic catabolic gene clusters in Sphingobium sp. PNB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratick Khara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingobium sp. PNB, like other sphingomonads, has multiple ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (RHO genes. Three different fosmid clones have been sequenced to identify the putative genes responsible for the degradation of various aromatics in this bacterial strain. Comparison of the map of the catabolic genes with that of different sphingomonads revealed a similar arrangement of gene clusters that harbors seven sets of RHO terminal components and a sole set of electron transport (ET proteins. The presence of distinctly conserved amino acid residues in ferredoxin and in silico molecular docking analyses of ferredoxin with the well characterized terminal oxygenase components indicated the structural uniqueness of the ET component in sphingomonads. The predicted substrate specificities, derived from the phylogenetic relationship of each of the RHOs, were examined based on transformation of putative substrates and their structural homologs by the recombinant strains expressing each of the oxygenases and the sole set of available ET proteins. The RHO AhdA1bA2b was functionally characterized for the first time and was found to be capable of transforming ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, cumene, p-cymene and biphenyl, in addition to a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Overexpression of aromatic catabolic genes in strain PNB, revealed by real-time PCR analyses, is a way forward to understand the complex regulation of degradative genes in sphingomonads.

  6. Copy number variation leads to considerable diversity for B but not A haplotypes of the human KIR genes encoding NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Johnson, Chris; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Simecek, Nikol; Noble, Janelle; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O; Trowsdale, John; Traherne, James A

    2012-10-01

    The KIR complex appears to be evolving rapidly in humans, and more than 50 different haplotypes have been described, ranging from four to 14 KIR loci. Previously it has been suggested that most KIR haplotypes consist of framework genes, present in all individuals, which bracket a variable number of other genes. We used a new technique to type 793 families from the United Kingdom and United States for both the presence/absence of all individual KIR genes as well as copy number and found that KIR haplotypes are even more complex. It is striking that all KIR loci are subject to copy number variation (CNV), including the so-called framework genes, but CNV is much more frequent in KIR B haplotypes than KIR A haplotypes. These two basic KIR haplotype groups, A and B, appear to be following different evolutionary trajectories. Despite the great diversity, there are 11 common haplotypes, derived by reciprocal recombination near KIR2DL4, which collectively account for 94% of KIR haplotypes determined in Caucasian samples. These haplotypes could be derived from combinations of just three centromeic and two telomeric motifs, simplifying disease analysis for these haplotypes. The remaining 6% of haplotypes displayed novel examples of expansion and contraction of numbers of loci. Conventional KIR typing misses much of this additional complexity, with important implications for studying the genetics of disease association with KIR that can now be explored by CNV analysis.

  7. Composting-Like Conditions Are More Efficient for Enrichment and Diversity of Organisms Containing Cellulase-Encoding Genes than Submerged Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senta Heiss-Blanquet

    Full Text Available Cost-effective biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass depends on efficient degradation of the plant cell wall. One of the major obstacles for the development of a cost-efficient process is the lack of resistance of currently used fungal enzymes to harsh conditions such as high temperature. Adapted, thermophilic microbial communities provide a huge reservoir of potentially interesting lignocellulose-degrading enzymes for improvement of the cellulose hydrolysis step. In order to identify such enzymes, a leaf and wood chip compost was enriched on a mixture of thermo-chemically pretreated wheat straw, poplar and Miscanthus under thermophile conditions, but in two different set-ups. Unexpectedly, metagenome sequencing revealed that incubation of the lignocellulosic substrate with compost as inoculum in a suspension culture resulted in an impoverishment of putative cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes. However, mimicking composting conditions without liquid phase yielded a high number and diversity of glycoside hydrolase genes and an enrichment of genes encoding cellulose binding domains. These identified genes were most closely related to species from Actinobacteria, which seem to constitute important players of lignocellulose degradation under the applied conditions. The study highlights that subtle changes in an enrichment set-up can have an important impact on composition and functions of the microcosm. Composting-like conditions were found to be the most successful method for enrichment in species with high biomass degrading capacity.

  8. Origin of the diversity in DNA recognition domains in phasevarion associated modA genes of pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Beatson, Scott A; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jennings, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Phase variable restriction-modification (R-M) systems have been identified in a range of pathogenic bacteria. In some it has been demonstrated that the random switching of the mod (DNA methyltransferase) gene mediates the coordinated expression of multiple genes and constitutes a phasevarion (phase variable regulon). ModA of Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae contain a highly variable, DNA recognition domain (DRD) that defines the target sequence that is modified by methylation and is used to define modA alleles. 18 distinct modA alleles have been identified in H. influenzae and the pathogenic Neisseria. To determine the origin of DRD variability, the 18 modA DRDs were used to search the available databases for similar sequences. Significant matches were identified between several modA alleles and mod gene from distinct bacterial species, indicating one source of the DRD variability was via horizontal gene transfer. Comparison of DRD sequences revealed significant mosaicism, indicating exchange between the Neisseria and H. influenzae modA alleles. Regions of high inter- and intra-allele similarity indicate that some modA alleles had undergone recombination more frequently than others, generating further diversity. Furthermore, the DRD from some modA alleles, such as modA12, have been transferred en bloc to replace the DRD from different modA alleles.

  9. Positive selection and intragenic recombination contribute to high allelic diversity in effector genes of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of the black leaf streak disease of banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Cordovez, Viviane; Okmen, Bilal; Beenen, Henriek G; Kema, Gert H J; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we have determined the nonhost-mediated recognition of the MfAvr4 and MfEcp2 effector proteins from the banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in tomato, by the cognate Cf-4 and Cf-Ecp2 resistance proteins, respectively. These two resistance proteins could thus mediate resistance against M. fijiensis if genetically transformed into banana (Musa spp.). However, disease resistance controlled by single dominant genes can be overcome by mutated effector alleles, whose products are not recognized by the cognate resistance proteins. Here, we surveyed the allelic variation within the MfAvr4, MfEcp2, MfEcp2-2 and MfEcp2-3 effector genes of M. fijiensis in a global population of the pathogen, and assayed its impact on recognition by the tomato Cf-4 and Cf-Ecp2 resistance proteins, respectively. We identified a large number of polymorphisms that could reflect a co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. The analysis of nucleotide substitution patterns suggests that both positive selection and intragenic recombination have shaped the evolution of M. fijiensis effectors. Clear differences in allelic diversity were observed between strains originating from South-East Asia relative to strains from other banana-producing continents, consistent with the hypothesis that M. fijiensis originated in the Asian-Pacific region. Furthermore, transient co-expression of the MfAvr4 effector alleles and the tomato Cf-4 resistance gene, as well as of MfEcp2, MfEcp2-2 and MfEcp2-3 and the putative Cf-Ecp2 resistance gene, indicated that effector alleles able to overcome these resistance genes are already present in natural populations of the pathogen, thus questioning the durability of resistance that can be provided by these genes in the field. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Diversity of 16S rRNA and dioxygenase genes detected in coal-tar-contaminated site undergoing active bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Khanna, S

    2010-04-01

    In order to develop effective bioremediation strategies for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation, the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities need to be better understood, especially in highly PAH contaminated sites in which little information on the cultivation-independent communities is available. Coal-tar-contaminated soil was collected, which consisted of 122.5 mg g(-1) total extractable PAH compounds. Biodegradation studies with this soil indicated the presence of microbial community that is capable of degrading the model PAH compounds viz naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene at 50 ppm each. PCR clone libraries were established from the DNA of the coal-tar-contaminated soil, targeting the 16S rRNA to characterize (i) the microbial communities, (ii) partial gene fragment encoding the Rieske iron sulfur center (alpha-subunit) common to all PAH dioxygenase enzymes and (iii) beta-subunit of dioxygenase. Phylotypes related to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria), Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococci were detected in 16S rRNA derived clone libraries. Many of the gene fragment sequences of alpha-subunit and beta-subunit of dioxygenase obtained from the respective clone libraries fell into clades that are distinct from the reference dioxygenase gene sequences. Presence of consensus sequence of the Rieske type [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site suggested that these gene fragments encode for alpha-subunit of dioxygenase gene. Sequencing of the cloned libraries representing alpha-subunit gene fragments (Rf1) and beta-subunit of dioxygenase showed the presence of hitherto unidentified dioxygenase in coal-tar-contaminated soil. The combination of the Rieske primers and bacterial community profiling represents a powerful tool for both assessing bioremediation potential and the exploration of novel dioxygenase genes in a contaminated environment.

  11. Diversity in KIR gene repertoire in HIV-1 exposed infected and uninfected infants: A study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Vijay R; Ahir, Swati; Ansari, Zakiya; Samant-Mawani, Padmaja; Nanavati, Ruchi; Mehta, Preeti; Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti

    2016-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have antiviral activity mediated through killer immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs). Studies have shown the importance of KIR receptors in HIV infection. However reports on association of KIR genes in HIV infection from Indian population are limited, not a single study is reported in HIV exposed uninfected (EU) and infected infants. This study compared the KIR gene repertoire of HIV-1 positive (n = 29) with EU (n = 76) infants to elucidate its association with transmission. KIR genotyping was analysed using the PCR-SSP method. Viral load of mothers, CD4 count of both mothers and infected infants were done using commercial kits. The data was analysed using SPSS software. Results revealed presence of significantly high frequencies of activating gene KIR 2DS5 (P = 0.040) and inhibitory gene KIR 2DL3 (P = 0.013) in EU infants as compared to HIV-1 positive infants, confirmed with multivariable linear regression modelling. Fifty-nine KIR genotypes were identified in these 105 infants. Nine genotypes were unique, reported for the first time. Twenty six genotypes were shared with the World populations. Twenty four genotypes were reported for the first time from India. Specific KIR genotype combinations (GIDs) were exclusively present either in HIV-1 positive (n = 19) or in EU infants (n = 30). The Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis shows a strong linkage between four pairs of genes in HIV-1 positive and three pairs of genes in EU infants. In conclusion, this study revealed that, besides maternal confounding factors such as ART and viral load, specific KIR genes are associated independently with perinatal HIV infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Distribution of genes for virulence and ecological fitness among diverse Vibrio cholerae population in a cholera endemic area: tracking the evolution of pathogenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Hasibur; Biswas, Kuntal; Hossain, M Anwar; Sack, R Bradley; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2008-07-01

    The pathogenic strains of Vibrio cholerae that cause acute enteric infections in humans are derived from environmental nonpathogenic strains. To track the evolution of pathogenic V. cholerae and identify potential precursors of new pathogenic strains, we analyzed 324 environmental or clinical V. cholerae isolates for the presence of diverse genes involved in virulence or ecological fitness. Of 251 environmental non-O1, non-O139 strains tested, 10 (3.9%) carried the toxin coregulated pilus (TCP) pathogenicity island encoding TCPs, and the CTX prophage encoding cholera toxin, whereas another 10 isolates carried the TCP island alone, and were susceptible to transduction with CTX phage. Most V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains carried these two major virulence determinants, as well as the Vibrio seventh pandemic islands (VSP-1 and VSP-2), whereas 23 (9.1%) non-O1, non-O139 strains carried several VSP island genes, but none carried a complete VSP island. Conversely, 30 (11.9%) non-O1, non-O139 strains carried type III secretion system (TTSS) genes, but none of 63 V. cholerae O1 or O139 strains tested were positive for TTSS. Thus, the distribution of major virulence genes in the non-O1, non-O139 serogroups of V. cholerae is largely different from that of the O1 or O139 serogroups. However, the prevalence of putative accessory virulence genes (mshA, hlyA, and RTX) was similar in all strains, with the mshA being most prevalent (98.8%) followed by RTX genes (96.2%) and hlyA (94.6%), supporting more recent assumptions that these genes imparts increased environmental fitness. Since all pathogenic strains retain these genes, the epidemiological success of the strains presumably depends on their environmental persistence in addition to the ability to produce major virulence factors. Potential precursors of new pathogenic strains would thus require to assemble a combination of genes for both ecological fitness and virulence to attain epidemiological predominance.

  13. In Silico Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Gut Microflora of Individuals from Diverse Geographies and Age-Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Gupta, Sourav Sen; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2013-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistance, originating from the rampant and unrestrictive use of antibiotics in humans and livestock over the past few decades has emerged as a global health problem. This problem has been further compounded by recent reports implicating the gut microbial communities to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance. We have profiled the presence of probable antibiotic resistance genes in the gut flora of 275 individuals from eight different nationalities. For this purpose, available metagenomic data sets corresponding to 275 gut microbiomes were analyzed. Sequence similarity searches of the genomic fragments constituting each of these metagenomes were performed against genes conferring resistance to around 240 antibiotics. Potential antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance against 53 different antibiotics were detected in the human gut microflora analysed in this study. In addition to several geography/country-specific patterns, four distinct clusters of gut microbiomes, referred to as ‘Resistotypes’, exhibiting similarities in their antibiotic resistance profiles, were identified. Groups of antibiotics having similarities in their resistance patterns within each of these clusters were also detected. Apart from this, mobile multi-drug resistance gene operons were detected in certain gut microbiomes. The study highlighted an alarmingly high abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in two infant gut microbiomes. The results obtained in the present study presents a holistic ‘big picture’ on the spectra of antibiotic resistance within our gut microbiota across different geographies. Such insights may help in implementation of new regulations and stringency on the existing ones. PMID:24391833

  14. [Diversity of diazotrophs in the sediments of hypersaline salt and soda lakes analyzed with the use of the nifH gene as a molecular marker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turova, T P; Slobodova, N V; Bumazhkin, B K; Sukhacheva, M V; Sorokin, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH genes, encoding the Fe protein of the nitrogenas enzymatic complex, was carried out for pure cultures of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria of diverse origin, as well as for heterotrophic alkaliphilic sulfate reducers isolated from saline and soda lakes. Topology of the nitrogenase tree correlated with that of the 16S rRNAgene tree to a considerable degree; which niade it possible to use the nifH gene as a molecular marker for investigation of diazotrophic bacterialcommunities in silty sediments of saline and sodalakes. Although diazotrophs were revealed in all environmentalsamples, their phylogenetic diversity was relatively low. Sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria and photo- and chemotrophicgammaproteobacteria were predominant in samples integrated over sediment thickness. Analysis of samples fromthe upper sediment layers revealed predominance of phototrophic diazotrophs of various phyla, including purple sulfur and nonsulfur proteobacteria, green nonsulfur bacteria, heliobacteria; and cyanobacteria. Some phylotypes could not be identified, probably indicating the presence of bacterial groups which have not yet been studied by conventional microbiological techniques.

  15. Genetic Diversity of African and Worldwide Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum as Determined by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of the hrp Gene Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussier, Stephane; Vandewalle, Peggy; Luisetti, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The genetic diversity among a worldwide collection of 120 strains of Ralstonia solanacearum was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of amplified fragments from the hrp gene region. Five amplified fragments appeared to be specific to R. solanacearum. Fifteen different profiles were identified among the 120 bacterial strains, and a hierarchical cluster analysis distributed them into eight clusters. Each cluster included strains belonging to a single biovar, except for strains of biovars 3 and 4, which could not be separated. However, the biovar 1 strains showed rather extensive diversity since they were distributed into five clusters whereas the biovar 2 and the biovar 3 and 4 strains were gathered into one and two clusters, respectively. PCR-RFLP analysis of the hrp gene region confirmed the results of previous studies which split the species into an “Americanum” division including biovar 1 and 2 strains and an “Asiaticum” division including biovar 3 and 4 strains. However, the present study showed that most of the biovar 1 strains, originating from African countries (Reunion Island, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, and Angola) and being included in a separate cluster, belong to the “Asiaticum” rather than to the “Americanum” division. These African strains could thus have evolved separately from other biovar 1 strains originating from the Americas. PMID:10224018

  16. Uncovering genes and ploidy involved in the high diversity in root hair density, length and response to local scarce phosphate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus G Stetter

    Full Text Available Plant root hairs increase the root surface to enhance the uptake of sparingly soluble and immobile nutrients, such as the essential nutrient phosphorus, from the soil. Here, root hair traits and the response to scarce local phosphorus concentration were studied in 166 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana using split plates. Root hair density and length were correlated, but highly variable among accessions. Surprisingly, the well-known increase in root hair density under low phosphorus was mostly restricted to genotypes that had less and shorter root hairs under P sufficient conditions. By contrast, several accessions with dense and long root hairs even had lower hair density or shorter hairs in local scarce phosphorus. Furthermore, accessions with whole-genome duplications developed more dense but phosphorus-insensitive root hairs. The impact of genome duplication on root hair density was confirmed by comparing tetraploid accessions with their diploid ancestors. Genome-wide association mapping identified candidate genes potentially involved in root hair responses tp scarce local phosphate. Knock-out mutants in identified candidate genes (CYR1, At1g32360 and RLP48 were isolated and differences in root hair traits in the mutants were confirmed. The large diversity in root hair traits among accessions and the diverse response when local phosphorus is scarce is a rich resource for further functional analyses.

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of culturable endophytic fungi in Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff), detection of polyketide synthase gene and their antagonistic activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Gao, Bo Liang; Li, Xi Xi; Zhang, Zhi Bin; Yan, Ri Ming; Yang, Hui Lin; Zhu, Du

    2015-11-01

    The biodiversity of plant endophytic fungi is enormous, numerous competent endophytic fungi are capable of providing different forms of fitness benefits to host plants and also could produce a wide array of bioactive natural products, which make them a largely unexplored source of novel compounds with potential bioactivity. In this study, we provided a first insights into revealing the diversity of culturable endophytic fungi in Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) from China using rDNA-ITS phylogenetic analysis. Here, the potential of fungi in producing bioactive natural products was estimated based on the beta-ketosynthase detected in the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster and on the bioassay of antagonistic activity against two rice phytopathogens Thanatephorus cucumeris and Xanthomonas oryzae. A total of 229 endophytic fungal strains were validated in 19 genera. Among the 24 representative strains, 13 strains displayedantagonistic activity against the phytopathogens. Furthermore, PKS genes were detected in 9 strains, indicating their potential for synthesising PKS compounds. Our study confirms the phylogenetic diversity of endophytic fungi in O. rufipogon G. and highlights that endophytic fungi are not only promising resources of biocontrol agents against phytopathogens of rice plants, but also of bioactive natural products and defensive secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing the diversity of the g23 gene of T4-like bacteriophages from Lake Baikal with high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Sergey; Belykh, Olga; Krasnopeev, Andrey; Gladkikh, Anna; Kabilov, Marsel; Tupikin, Aleksey; Butina, Tatyana

    2018-02-01

    Based on second generation sequencing (MiSeq platform, Illumina), we determined the genetic diversity of T4-like bacteriophages of the family Myoviridae by analysing fragments of the major capsid protein gene g23 in the plankton of Lake Baikal. The sampling depth in our study was significantly higher than in those obtained by the Sanger method before. We obtained 33 701 sequences of the g23 gene fragments, 141 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of which were identified. 86 OTUs (60.9%) had the closest relatives from lakes Bourget and Annecy, and 28 OTUs (19.8%) had the highest identity with the Baikal g23 clones, which had been previously identified in the northern and southern basins of the lake by the Sanger method. The remaining OTUs were similar to the clones from other ecosystems. We showed a high genetic diversity of T4-type bacteriophages and a genetic difference with the phage communities from other ecosystems. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Aquaporins in the wild: natural genetic diversity and selective pressure in the PIP gene family in five neotropical tree species

    OpenAIRE

    Audigeos, Delphine; Buonamici, Anna; Belkadi, Laurent; Rymer, Paul; Boshier, David; Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Vendramini, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Tropical trees undergo severe stress through seasonal drought and flooding, and the ability of these species to respond may be a major factor in their survival in tropical ecosystems, particularly in relation to global climate change. Aquaporins are involved in the regulation of water flow and have been shown to be involved in drought response; they may therefore play a major adaptive role in these species. We describe genetic diversity in the PIP sub-family of the widespr...

  20. Gene Expression Factor Analysis to Differentiate Pathways Linked to Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Depression in a Diverse Patient Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R; Donaldson, Gary W; Okifuji, Akiko; Hughen, Ronald W; White, Andrea T; Light, Kathleen C

    2016-01-01

    To determine if independent candidate genes can be grouped into meaningful biologic factors, and whether these factors are associated with the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), while controlling for comorbid depression, sex, and age. We included leukocyte messenger RNA gene expression from a total of 261 individuals, including healthy controls (n = 61), patients with FMS only (n = 15), with CFS only (n = 33), with comorbid CFS and FMS (n = 79), and with medication-resistant (n = 42) or medication-responsive (n = 31) depression. We used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) on 34 candidate genes to determine factor scores and regression analysis to examine whether these factors were associated with specific diagnoses. EFA resulted in 4 independent factors with minimal overlap of genes between factors, explaining 51% of the variance. We labeled these factors by function as 1) purinergic and cellular modulators, 2) neuronal growth and immune function, 3) nociception and stress mediators, and 4) energy and mitochondrial function. Regression analysis predicting these biologic factors using FMS, CFS, depression severity, age, and sex revealed that greater expression in factors 1 and 3 was positively associated with CFS and negatively associated with depression severity (Quick Inventory for Depression Symptomatology score), but not associated with FMS. Expression of candidate genes can be grouped into meaningful clusters, and CFS and depression are associated with the same 2 clusters, but in opposite directions, when controlling for comorbid FMS. Given high comorbid disease and interrelationships between biomarkers, EFA may help determine patient subgroups in this population based on gene expression. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. High-Throughput Genetic Screens Identify a Large and Diverse Collection of New Sporulation Genes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Jacqueline; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Bernhardt, Thomas G.; Rudner, David Z.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis into a dormant spore is among the most well-characterized developmental pathways in biology. Classical genetic screens performed over the past half century identified scores of factors involved in every step of this morphological process. More recently, transcriptional profiling uncovered additional sporulation-induced genes required for successful spore development. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-seq) to assess whether there were any sporulation genes left to be discovered. Our screen identified 133 out of the 148 genes with known sporulation defects. Surprisingly, we discovered 24 additional genes that had not been previously implicated in spore formation. To investigate their functions, we used fluorescence microscopy to survey early, middle, and late stages of differentiation of null mutants from the B. subtilis ordered knockout collection. This analysis identified mutants that are delayed in the initiation of sporulation, defective in membrane remodeling, and impaired in spore maturation. Several mutants had novel sporulation phenotypes. We performed in-depth characterization of two new factors that participate in cell–cell signaling pathways during sporulation. One (SpoIIT) functions in the activation of σE in the mother cell; the other (SpoIIIL) is required for σG activity in the forespore. Our analysis also revealed that as many as 36 sporulation-induced genes with no previously reported mutant phenotypes are required for timely spore maturation. Finally, we discovered a large set of transposon insertions that trigger premature initiation of sporulation. Our results highlight the power of Tn-seq for the discovery of new genes and novel pathways in sporulation and, combined with the recently completed null mutant collection, open the door for similar screens in other, less well-characterized processes. PMID:26735940

  2. Extensive 16S rRNA gene sequence diversity in Campylobacter hyointestinalis strains: taxonomic and applied implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, C.S.; On, Stephen L.W.

    1999-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subspecies were examined by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Sequence similarities among C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strains exceeded 99.0 %, but values among C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis strains ranged from 96...... of the genus Campylobacter, emphasizing the need for multiple strain analysis when using 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons for taxonomic investigations........4 to 100 %. Sequence similarites between strains representing the two different subspecies ranged from 95.7 to 99.0 %. An intervening sequence was identified in certain of the C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strains. C. hyointestinalis strains occupied two distinct branches in a phylogenetic analysis...

  3. Distribution, genetic diversity and potential spatiotemporal scale of alien gene flow in crop wild relatives of rice (Oryza spp.) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evert; Tovar, Eduardo; Villafañe, Carolina; Bocanegra, José Leonardo; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2017-12-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWRs) of rice hold important traits that can contribute to enhancing the ability of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima) to produce higher yields, cope with the effects of climate change, and resist attacks of pests and diseases, among others. However, the genetic resources of these species remain dramatically understudied, putting at risk their future availability from in situ and ex situ sources. Here we assess the distribution of genetic diversity of the four rice CWRs known to occur in Colombia (O. glumaepatula, O. alta, O. grandiglumis, and O. latifolia). Furthermore, we estimated the degree of overlap between areas with suitable habitat for cultivated and wild rice, both under current and predicted future climate conditions to assess the potential spatiotemporal scale of potential gene flow from GM rice to its CWRs. Our findings suggest that part of the observed genetic diversity and structure, at least of the most exhaustively sampled species, may be explained by their glacial and post-glacial range dynamics. Furthermore, in assessing the expected impact of climate change and the potential spatiotemporal scale of gene flow between populations of CWRs and GM rice we find significant overlap between present and future suitable areas for cultivated rice and its four CWRs. Climate change is expected to have relatively limited negative effects on the rice CWRs, with three species showing opportunities to expand their distribution ranges in the future. Given (i) the sparse presence of CWR populations in protected areas (ii) the strong suitability overlap between cultivated rice and its four CWRs; and (iii) the complexity of managing and regulating areas to prevent alien gene flow, the first priority should be to establish representative ex situ collections for all CWR species, which currently do not exist. In the absence of studies under field conditions on the scale and extent of gene flow between cultivated rice and its Colombian

  4. Global analysis of somatic structural genomic alterations and their impact on gene expression in diverse human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Bhadury, Joydeep; Karlsson, Joakim W; Nilsson, Jonas A; Larsson, Erik

    2016-11-29

    Tumor genomes are mosaics of somatic structural variants (SVs) that may contribute to the activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressors, for example, by altering gene copy number amplitude. However, there are multiple other ways in which SVs can modulate transcription, but the general impact of such events on tumor transcriptional output has not been systematically determined. Here we use whole-genome sequencing data to map SVs across 600 tumors and 18 cancers, and investigate the relationship between SVs, copy number alterations (CNAs), and mRNA expression. We find that 34% of CNA breakpoints can be clarified structurally and that most amplifications are due to tandem duplications. We observe frequent swapping of strong and weak promoters in the context of gene fusions, and find that this has a measurable global impact on mRNA levels. Interestingly, several long noncoding RNAs were strongly activated by this mechanism. Additionally, SVs were confirmed in telomere reverse transcriptase (TERT) upstream regions in several cancers, associated with elevated TERT mRNA levels. We also highlight high-confidence gene fusions supported by both genomic and transcriptomic evidence, including a previously undescribed paired box 8 (PAX8)-nuclear factor, erythroid 2 like 2 (NFE2L2) fusion in thyroid carcinoma. In summary, we combine SV, CNA, and expression data to provide insights into the structural basis of CNAs as well as the impact of SVs on gene expression in tumors.

  5. Diversity of β-lactamase-encoding genes among Gram-negative isolates from water samples in Northern Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Figueira, Vânia; Manaia, Célia M.; Caniça, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Water has been recognized as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), where the presence of mobile genetic elements, including plasmids, favors their dissemination. It is noteworthy that non- pathogenic environmental organisms, where plasmids encoding multiple ARG are prevalent, can provide resistance to most classes of antimicrobials including :-lactams, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, streptomycin, fosfomycin, q...

  6. AF10 Regulates Progressive H3K79 Methylation and HOX Gene Expression in Diverse AML Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Aniruddha J.; Deshpande, Anagha; Sinha, Amit U.; Chen, Liying; Chang, Jenny; Cihan, Ali; Fazio, Maurizio; Chen, Chun-wei; Zhu, Nan; Koche, Richard; Dzhekieva, Liuda; Ibáñez, Gloria; Dias, Stuart; Banka, Deepti; Krivtsov, Andrei; Luo, Minkui; Roeder, Robert G.; Bradner, James E.; Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Homeotic (HOX) genes are dysregulated in multiple malignancies including several AML subtypes. We demonstrate that H3K79 dimethylation (H3K79me2) is converted to mono-methylation (H3K79me1) at HOX loci as hematopoietic cells mature thus coinciding with a decrease in HOX gene expression. We show that H3K79 methyltransferase activity as well as H3K79me1 to H3K79me2 conversion is regulated by the DOT1L co-factor AF10. AF10 inactivation reverses leukemia-associated epigenetic profiles, precludes abnormal HOXA gene expression and impairs the transforming ability of MLL-AF9, MLL-AF6 or NUP98-NSD1 fusions – mechanistically distinct HOX-activating oncogenes. Furthermore, NUP98-NSD1 transformed cells are sensitive to small-molecule inhibition of DOT1L. Our findings demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of the DOT1L/AF10 complex may provide therapeutic benefit in an array of malignancies with abnormal HOXA gene expression. PMID:25464900

  7. The evolutionary history and diverse physiological roles of the grapevine calcium-dependent protein kinase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    Full Text Available Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs are molecular switches that bind Ca(2+, ATP, and protein substrates, acting as sensor relays and responders that convert Ca(2+ signals, created by developmental processes and environmental stresses, into phosphorylation events. The precise functions of the CDPKs in grapevine (Vitis vinifera are largely unknown. We therefore investigated the phylogenetic relationships and expression profiles of the 17 CDPK genes identified in the 12x grapevine genome sequence, resolving them into four subfamilies based on phylogenetic tree topology and gene structures. The origins of the CDPKs during grapevine evolution were characterized, involving 13 expansion events. Transcriptomic analysis using 54 tissues and developmental stages revealed three types of CDPK gene expression profiles: constitutive (housekeeping CDPKs, partitioned functions, and prevalent in pollen/stamen. We identified two duplicated CDPK genes that had evolved from housekeeping to pollen-prevalent functions and whose origin correlated with that of seed plants, suggesting neofunctionalization with an important role in pollen development and also potential value in the breeding of seedless varieties. We also found that CDPKs were involved in three abiotic stress signaling pathways and could therefore be used to investigate the crosstalk between stress responses.

  8. PCR-DGGE method to assess the diversity of BTEX mono-oxygenase genes at contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, B; Dejonghe, W; Faber, F; Boenne, W; Bastiaens, L; Verstraete, W; Top, EM; Springael, D

    tmoA and related genes encode the alpha-subunit of the hydroxylase component of the major group (subgroup 1 of subfamily 2) of bacterial multicomponent mono-oxygenase enzyme complexes involved in aerobic benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) degradation. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel

  9. PVYNTN elicits a diverse gene expression response in different potato genotypes in the first 12 h after inoculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baebler, S.; Krecic-Stres, H.; Rotter, A.; Kogovsek, P.; Cankar, K.; Kok, E.J.; Gruden, K.; Kovac, M.; Zel, J.; Pompe-Novak, M.; Ravnikar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Host gene expression changes in the early response to potato virus Y-NTN interaction were compared in two differently sensitive potato cultivars: the resistant cultivar SantE and the sensitive cultivar Igor. Hybridization of potato TIGR cDNA microarrays allowed us to monitor the expression of

  10. Genetic Diversity of Toxoplasma gondii Strains from Different Hosts and Geographical Regions by Sequence Analysis of GRA20 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ho