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Sample records for intra hippocampal infusion

  1. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

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    Jena B. Hales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP. However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF. In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion.

  2. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Jena B.; Ocampo, Amber C.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF). In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion. PMID:26380123

  3. Intra-hippocampal injection of lipopolysaccharide inhibits kindled seizures and retards kindling rate in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Amin; Sayyah, Mohammad; Khoshkholgh-Sima, Baharak; Choopani, Samira; Kazemi, Jafar; Sadegh, Mehdi; Moradpour, Farshad; Nahrevanian, Hossein

    2013-04-01

    Neuroinflammation facilitates seizure acquisition and epileptogenesis in developing brain. Yet, the studies on impact of neuroinflammation on mature brain epileptogenesis have led to inconsistent results. Hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to damage caused by ischemia, hypoxia and trauma, and the consequent neuroinflammation, which can lead in turn to epilepsy. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is extensively used in experimental studies to induce neuroinflammation. In this study, effect of acute and chronic intra-CA1 infusion of LPS on amygdala-kindled seizures and epileptogenesis was examined in mature rats. LPS (5 μg/rat) inhibited evoked amygdala afterdischarges and behavioral seizures. Anticonvulsant effect of LPS was observed 0.5 h after administration and continued up to 24 h. This effect was accompanied by intra-hippocampal elevation of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin1-β, and tumor necrosis factor-α and was prevented by microglia inhibitor, naloxone, NO synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, cyclooxygenase inhibitor, piroxicam, and interleukin1-β receptor antagonist, interleukin1-ra. Moreover, daily intra-hippocampal injection of LPS significantly retarded kindling rate. In order to further elucidate the effect of LPS on synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity, changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials and population spikes were measured in stratum radiatum and stratum pyramidale of LPS-treated kindled rats. LPS impaired baseline synaptic transmission in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse and reduced the magnitude of paired-pulse facilitation. Our results suggest that direct suppression of presynaptic mechanisms in Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, as well as the inflammatory mediators released by LPS in the hippocampus, is involved in antiepileptic effect of LPS.

  4. CT angiography by means of intra-arterial contrast infusion

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    Okada, Junichiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shiogai, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yoshifumi; Hara, Mitsuhiro (Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-10-01

    CT angiography (CT-AG) by means of intra-arterial contrast infusion was carried out, and its clinical usefulness was evaluated in various intracranial lesions. The practical and diagnostic merits of CT-AG are as follows: a selective enhancement of the cerebral vessels by an extremely small amount of the contrast substance, accompanied by a satisfactory resolution of fine arterioles and arteries. The excellent ability of the CT to detect differences in the X-ray absorption coefficients surpasses that of cerebral angiography. An intracranial aneurysm which was not visualized by the angiography appeared between arterial branches upon CT-AG. The three-dimensional configuration of the aneurysmal body and its related artery, the pointing direction of the aneurysm, and the angle between the aneurysmal axis and the afferent artery were clearly shown. The fine structure of arteriovenous malformation could be shown concurrently with the cerebral tissue and the ventricle. The axial view of the circle of Willis gives important information for surgical intervention. Concerning brain tumors, the structural correlation between the tumor and the cerebral arteries became apparent when the CT-AG was carried out immediately after a conventional contrast-enhancement. Such a ''double contrast'' allows safe surgical access to the intracranial tumor. CT-AG in the case of ''Moyamoya'' disease visualized fine moyamoya vessels extending all over the cerebral hemisphere; those vessels were less prominent in the ordinary angiograms. The vascular networks of the arteriovenous malformation, which were not evident in the ordinary angiograms, were also revealed by the CT-AG. For the patient with poor prospects, CT-AG will be were valid as a screening study than ordinary angiography because of its less invasive procedure using a small amount of the contrast substance. CT-AG on a dynamic scan mode possible optimal timing in the visualization of the

  5. Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intra-partum labor analgesic

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Patil; Vivek Rayadurg

    2016-01-01

    We read with interest the article and ldquo;Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intra-partum labor analgesic and rdquo; by Mohan H et al published in November - December 2015, volume 4 issue 6 of International Journal of Reproduction, Contraception, Obstetrics and Gynecology.1 As we read it, we realized that the article is quite similar to another article and ldquo;Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intra-partum labor analge...

  6. Clinical significance of preoperative regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Wu Zhang; Shou-Chun Zou; Dun Shi; Da-Jian Zhao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy could increase the radical resection rate of advanced gastric cancer, but its effect on the long-term survival has not been assessed. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical significance of preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.METHODS: Clinicopathological data of 91 patients who underwent curative resection for advanced gastric cancer were collected. Among them, 37 patients undertaken preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy were used as the interventional chemotherapy group, and the remaining 54 patients as the control group. Eleven factors including clinicopathological variables, treatment procedures and molecular biological makers that might contribute to the long-term survival rate were analyzed using Cox multivariate regression analysis.RESULTS: The 5-year survival rate was 52.5% and 39.8%,respectively, for the interventional group and the control group (P<0.05). Cox multivariate regression analysis revealed that the TNM stage (P<0.001), preoperative intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (P = 0.029) and growth pattern (P = 0.042) were the independent factors for the long-term survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer.CONCLUSION: Preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy plays an important role in improving the prognosis of advanced gastric cancer.

  7. Chemotherapy using new superselective intra-arterial infusion for advanced oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iwai Tohnai; Kenji Mitsudo; Takefumi Fukui; Toshinori Iwai; Kei Watanuki; Yoshiro Matsui

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: We developed a new method of superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery (HFT method: Hattori, Fuwa and Tohnai reported) and preoperatively performed daily concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP) using this method for 46 patients with stage Ⅲ, Ⅳ oral cancer.

  8. Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intra-partum labor analgesic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Patil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We read with interest the article and ldquo;Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intra-partum labor analgesic and rdquo; by Mohan H et al published in November - December 2015, volume 4 issue 6 of International Journal of Reproduction, Contraception, Obstetrics and Gynecology.1 As we read it, we realized that the article is quite similar to another article and ldquo;Intravenous paracetamol infusion versus intramuscular tramadol as an intra-partum labor analgesic and rdquo; by Lallar M et al.2 Although the authors quote this article as their reference, the degree of similarity between the two articles is beyond our acceptance. Hence we would like to bring it to your notice. We know that any original research should be encouraged to be published, but the authenticity in style of writing the same should be maintained and plagiarism to such a high extent is not acceptable. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(9.000: 3268-3268

  9. Intra-Arterial Prostaglandin E1 Infusion in Patients with Rest Pain: Short-Term Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chatziioannou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present our results after short-term (1 month intra-arterial infusion therapy of PGE1-alprostadil via a port system implanted in the ipsilateral external iliac artery (EIA in patients with severe rest pain. Methods. Ten patients with severe rest pain were included. All patients showed extensive peripheral vascular disease below the knee. The tip of the catheter was introduced via a retrograde puncture in the ipsilateral external iliac artery (EIA. The patients received intraarterial infusion of PGE1, 20 mgr alprostadil daily, via the port catheter for 1 month. Results. Clinical success was evaluated according to subjective grading of pain (group A significant decrease, group B moderate decrease and group C no response. A significant decrease of rest pain was observed in 8 (group A, 80% patients, a moderate decrease in 2 (Group B, 20%, whereas no patients demonstrated any significant response. Both patients of group B had Buergers' disease and continue to smoke during therapy. No peripheral thrombosis or clinical deterioration was noticed. Conclusion. Intraarterial infusion of PGE1 alprostadil on a daily basis, using a port catheter into the ipsilateral EIA, in selected patients with severe rest pain, seems to be very effective, without any serious complications.

  10. Radiation dose reduction in intra-arterial chemotherapy infusion for intraocular retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Daniel L; Stout, Charles E; Kim, Warren T; Hetts, Steven W; Higashida, Randall T; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Gould, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare malignancy affecting the pediatric population. Intravenous chemotherapy is the longstanding delivery method, although intra-arterial (IA) chemotherapy is gaining popularity given the reduced side effects compared with systemic chemotherapy administration. Given the sensitivity of the target organ, patient age, and secondary tumor susceptibility, a premium has been placed on minimizing procedural related radiation exposure. To reduce patient x-ray dose during the IA infusion procedure, customized surgical methods and fluoroscopic techniques were employed. The routine fluoroscopic settings were changed from the standard 7.5 pulses/s and dose level to the detector of 36 nGy/pulse, to a pulse rate of 4 pulses/s and detector dose to 23 nGy/pulse. The angiographic dose indicators (reference point air kerma (Ka) and fluoroscopy time) for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients (12 eyes, 30 infusions) were analyzed. An additional four cases (five eyes, five infusions) were analyzed using dosimeters placed at anatomic locations to reflect scalp, eye, and thyroid dose. The mean Ka per treated eye was 20.1±11.9 mGy with a mean fluoroscopic time of 8.5±4.6 min. Dosimetric measurements demonstrated minimal dose to the lens (0.18±0.10 mGy). Measured entrance skin doses varied from 0.7 to 7.0 mGy and were 73.4±19.7% less than the indicated Ka value. Ophthalmic arterial melphalan infusion is a safe and effective means to treat RB. Modification to contemporary fluoroscopic systems combined with parsimonious fluoroscopy can minimize radiation exposure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Intra-arterial tirofiban infusion for thromboembolic complication during coil embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms

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    Cho, Young Dae, E-mail: aronnn@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 425 Sindaebang-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Young, E-mail: gen78@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jung Hwa, E-mail: jhseo34@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun-Seung, E-mail: hsk4428@yahoo.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Eun, E-mail: eunkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Keun Hwa, E-mail: jungkh@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee, E-mail: hanmh@snuh.org [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: Intra-arterial (IA) thrombolytic intervention for acute thrombosis has been challenged due to the risk of bleeding during the endovascular treatment of ruptured aneurysms. We present the results of IA tirofiban infusion for thromboembolic complications during coil embolization in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Thromboembolic events requiring thrombolytic intervention occurred in 39 (10.5%) cases during coil embolization of 372 consecutive ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Maximal aneurysm diameters of 39 patients (mean age, 54.7 ± 13.2 years; 23 female, 16 male) ranged from 2.1 to 13.1 mm (mean, 6.6 ± 3.0 mm). The anterior communicating artery was the most common site (n = 13), followed by the middle cerebral artery (n = 9) and the posterior communicating artery (n = 7). In this series, we used intracranial stents in 10 patients during the procedure. Superselective IA tirofiban infusion through a microcatheter was performed to resolve thrombi and emboli. We assessed the efficacy and safety of IA tirofiban infusion in patients with ruptured aneurysms. Results: Intraarterially administered tirofiban doses ranged from 0.25 to 1.25 mg (mean, 0.71 ± 0.26 mg). Effective thrombolysis or recanalization was achieved in 34 patients (87.2%), and three patients (7.7%) suffered distal migration of clots with partial recanalization. The rest (5.1%) had no recanalization. Nonconsequent intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in two patients (5.1%) after the procedure. Thromboemboli-related cerebral infarction developed in eight patients, and only two patients remained infarction related disabilities. Conclusion: IA tirofiban infusion seems to be efficacious and safe for thrombolysis during coil embolization in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

  12. A Mouse Intra-Intestinal Infusion Model and its Application to the Study of Nanoparticle Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadio, Ana; Amaral, Ana L.; Nunes, Rute; Ricardo, Sara; Sarmento, Bruno; Almeida, Raquel; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; das Neves, José

    2016-01-01

    The oral route is the most preferable one when it comes to drug administration. Different animal models have been used to characterize the fate of potential medicines upon oral delivery but fail to clarify specific events occurring at localized sites of the gastrointestinal tract, particularly at the small intestine. We developed a new mouse intra-intestinal infusion model that enabled the direct administration of substances (such as drugs or nanoparticle drug carriers) in the small intestine through an implanted catheter, which can be maintained for prolonged periods of time. The location of catheter insertion can be previously determined as more proximal or distal, allowing to test specific portions of the intestine. Since the model is presumably able to maintain normal physiological characteristics, namely the mucus coating of the intestinal wall, it allowed studying the distribution of different nanoparticles upon localized intra-intestinal administration. The hereby proposed mouse model has the potential to be useful in other types of studies, namely in clarifying localized processes occurring at specific sites of the intestine. PMID:27965585

  13. Convulsion during intra-arterial infusion of fasudil hydrochloride for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Iwama, Toru

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of convulsion and associated factors were retrospectively analyzed in 23 patients with symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who underwent a total of 31 intra-arterial infusion of fasudil hydrochloride (IAFH) procedures in 49 vessels. Fasudil hydrochloride was administered by superselective infusion via a microcatheter positioned at the proximal portion of the affected artery. Thirteen procedures were performed by manually controlled infusion of 30-75 mg fasudil hydrochloride (1.2-3.75 mg/ml) for approximately 10 minutes. Eighteen procedures were performed by continuous infusion of 60 mg fasudil hydrochloride (1.2 mg/ml) by infusion pump at a constant rate of 3 mg/min. Neurological improvement was observed after 18 of 22 procedures in patients with neurological deterioration due to vasospasm. Convulsion during IAFH developed in 4 patients, all treated by manual infusion (p convulsion during IAFH. IAFH was effective for treating cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH. IAFH at a constant rate of 3 mg/min delivered by infusion pump improved the symptoms of cerebral vasospasm and prevented convulsions during IAFH.

  14. [Maxillary Cancer with Metastasis to the Rouviere Nodes -- Complete Response to Chemoradiotherapy Using a Selective Intra-Arterial Infusion Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Keita; Heianna, Joichi; Azama, Kimei; Iraha, Yuko; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Kinoshita, Ryo; Toita, Takafumi; Toyama, Masatomo; Agena, Shinya; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mikio; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of advanced maxillary cancer with multiple lymph node metastases, including metastasis to the Rouviere nodes, which were successfully treated with chemoradiotherapy using a selective intra-arterial infusion technique.A 71-yearold man presented to our hospital with complaints of a staggering gait and epistaxis.He was diagnosed with maxillary cancer (squamous cell carcinoma)classified as T4a disease.Because multiple lymph node metastases were detected, including metastasis to the Rouviere nodes, radical surgical treatment was considered inadequate.Thus, the patient was treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with selective intra-arterial infusion of nedaplatin and docetaxel.After chemoradiotherapy, the maxillary cancer and lymph metastasis nearly resolved and the patient achieved a complete response.No additional surgery was needed, and the patient was discharged.We suggest that chemoradiotherapy using a selective intra-arterial infusion technique is a highly effective treatment option for patients with maxillary cancer and metastasis to the Rouviere nodes.

  15. Treatment of malignant digestive tract obstruction by combined intraluminal stent installation and intra-arterial drug infusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Wu Mao; Zhong-Du Gao; Jia-Yu Xu; Ren-Jie Yancg; Xiang-Seng Xiao; Ting-Hui Jiang; Wei-Jun Jiang

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study the palliative treatment of malignant obstrution of digestive tract with placement of intraluminal stent combined with intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapeutic drugs. METHODS A total of 281 cases of digestive tract malignant obstruction were given per oral (esophagus,stomach, duodenum and jejunum), per anal (colon and rectum ) and percutaneous transhepatic ( biliary )installation of metallic stent. Among them, 205 cases received drug infusion by cannulation of tumor supplying artery with Seldingers technique. RESULTS Altogether 350 stents were installed in 281 cases, obstructive symptoms were relieved or ameliorated after installation. Occurrence of restenotic obstruction was 8 - 43 weeks among those with intraarterial drug infusion, which was later than 4 - 26 weeks in the group with only stent installation. The average survival time of the former group was 43 (3 - 105) weeks,which was significantly longer than 15 (3- 24) weeks of the latter group. CONCLUSION Intraluminal placement of stent combined with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy is one of the effective palliative therapies for malignant obstruction of the digestive tract with symptomatic as well as etiological treatment.

  16. Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Takeshi, E-mail: kamitani@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi, E-mail: kawanami-01@mac.com [Kyushu University, Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Asayama, Yoshiki, E-mail: asayama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsuo, Yoshio, E-mail: yymatsuo@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Yonezawa, Masato, E-mail: ymasato@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Yamasaki, Yuzo, E-mail: yyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu, E-mail: minagao@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Yamanouchi, Torahiko, E-mail: tora0228@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake, E-mail: h-yabu@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa, E-mail: nakam@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Nakashima, Torahiko, E-mail: nakatora@qent.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer.Materials and MethodsWe retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings.ResultsThe main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01).ConclusionA careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

  17. The intra-hippocampal leucine administration impairs memory consolidation and LTP generation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Viviane; Carlini, Valeria P; Gabach, Laura; Ghersi, Marisa; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Ramirez, Oscar A; Perez, Mariela F; Latini, Alexandra

    2010-10-01

    Leucine accumulates in fluids and tissues of patients affected by maple syrup urine disease, an inherited metabolic disorder, predominantly characterized by neurological dysfunction. Although, a variable degree of cognition/psychomotor delay/mental retardation is found in a considerable number of individuals affected by this deficiency, the mechanisms underlying the neuropathology of these alterations are still not defined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute intra-hippocampal leucine administration in the step-down test in rats. In addition, the leucine effects on the electrophysiological parameter, long-term potentiation generation, and on the activities of the respiratory chain were also investigated. Male Wistar rats were bilaterally administrated with leucine (80 nmol/hippocampus; 160 nmol/rat) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (controls) into the hippocampus immediately post-training in the behavioral task. Twenty-four hours after training in the step-down test, the latency time was evaluated and afterwards animals were sacrificed for assessing the ex vivo biochemical measurements. Leucine-treated animals showed impairment in memory consolidation and a complete inhibition of long-term potentiation generation at supramaximal stimulation. In addition, a significant increment in complex IV activity was observed in hippocampus from leucine-administered rats. These data strongly indicate that leucine compromise memory consolidation, and that impairment of long-term potentiation generation and unbalance of the respiratory chain may be plausible mechanisms underlying the deleterious leucine effect on cognition.

  18. Intra-arterial tert-Butyl-hydroperoxide infusion induces an exacerbated sensory response in the rat hind limb and is associated with an impaired tissue oxygen uptake.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Goor, H. van; Bahrami, S.; Kozlov, A.V.; Leixnering, M.; Redl, H.; Goris, R.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative stress and oxygen extraction mechanisms in an animal model of continuous intra-arterial infusion of a free radical donor and in an in vitro model using isolated mitochondria. tert-Butyl-hydroperoxide (tert-BuOOH, 25 mM) was infused for 24 h in

  19. [The intra-arterial infusion. II. Its use in the treatment of septic gangrene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugeneck, J; Gottlob, R

    1982-11-15

    The local toxicity of Cefazolin was evaluated for the arterial endothelium. 37 patients with septic gangrena were treated by intraarterial infusions of standardized Cefazolin infusions into the arteries of the involved legs. In the average 11.6 infusions were applied for one leg. The bacteriology of the infected gangrenous legs is discussed as well as the sensitivity of antibiotics of the germs found. A progression of the gangrena could be prevented in 78% of the cases, only minor surgical measures, such as borderline amputations or plastic interventions were necessary. No side effects due to the local application of the drug were observed. The intraarterial continuous infusion of broad band antibiotics for septic gangrena is recommended.

  20. Influence of mating and intra-uterine oestradiol infusion on peripheral oxytocin concentrations in the sow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R; Schams, D

    1990-09-01

    Oxytocin concentrations were measured radioimmunologically in sows on the day of standing oestrus over a 6-h period (controls, n = 6) or 1 h before and 5 h after mating (n = 5) or transcervical infusion of either 100 ml saline (0.9% (w/v) NaCl, n = 7) or saline plus 10 micrograms oestradiol (simulation of seminal oestrogens, n = 5). In the controls, oxytocin was low, at around 1.0 pmol/l, throughout the investigation period. Similarly, saline infusion did not lead to a noticeable change in oxytocin concentrations in six out of seven sows. In one sow, however, infusion led to a maximum of 86 pmol/l at 1 min after infusion. Oestradiol led to no immediate increase in oxytocin concentrations. Later in the post-treatment period (2-5 h) they were only slightly increased (1 pmol/l vs 3 pmol/l). All mated sows reacted with a rapid and clear increase in oxytocin. Maximal concentrations (42.0 +/- 5.1 pmol/l; mean +/- S.E.M.) appeared 2 min after the onset of ejaculation. Clearly increased concentrations were found for 40 min. It was concluded that mating specifically leads to a rise in oxytocin, probably due to both mechanical and pheromonal stimuli provided by the boar.

  1. Analysis of the Curative Effect of Preoperative Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemoembolization on Stage,IB2-IIB Uterine Cervix Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huashu Li; Fuxiang Liu; Guohe Zhou; Zhaoxia Mo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the short-term and long-term therapeutic efficacy of preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemo-embolization on stage IB2-IIB Uterine cervix cancer (UCC). METHODS A total of 143 patients with Stage IB2-lIB UCC were divided into a clinical trial group and a control group. The patients in the clinical trial group (n/=86) were treated with a combined therapy, i.e. preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemo-embolization, surgical therapy and postoperative radiotherapy, and those in the control group(n=57)were given surgical therapy and post-operative radiotherapy. The adverse effects, changes in local lesion and pathological examinations of the cancer, and the state during the surgery were observed after the intra-arterial infusion chemo-embolization. The survival rate and recurrence rate between the two groups were compared. RESUITS The total effective rate of the intra- arterial infusion chemo-embolization on Stage IB2-IIB UCC was 93.02%. The treatment could reduce tumor size, bring about retro-conversions of the clinical stage of the tumors and pathological grade of the cancer cells, and decrease the quantity, of intra-operative blood loss as well as the operating time. It could significantly improve the 5-year survival rate (P<0.05), and reduce the 2 and 5-yeartumor recurrence rates(P<0.05). Moreover, its side effects were little. CONCLUSIOAN Preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemo-embolization can create conditions for radical operation, lower the postoperative recurrence rate, and improve the prognosis in the patients with UCC. It is an effctive therapy in treating UCC.

  2. Effects of intra-uterine and early extra-uterine malnutrition on seizure threshold and hippocampal morphometry of pup rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Mariana Lorenzet; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2010-12-01

    We evaluate the influence of different malnutrition paradigms (intra-uterine × extra-uterine) in body and brain weight, in seizure threshold and in hippocampus morphometry, in developing rats. Intra-uterine malnutrition model consisted in reduction by half of the ration offered to pregnant female; extra-uterine malnutrition consisted of progressive limitation of lactation, from P2 to P15. Seizure induction was accomplished by exposure to flurothyl, at P15. At the same day animals were sacrificed. Morphometric analysis was based on hippocampal pyramidal and granular cells estimate number, through volume calculation and cellular density. Extra-uterine malnutrition significantly reduced pups body and brain weight, seizure threshold and neuronal number in CA4 region only. Intra-uterine malnutrition reduced neuronal number in CA2, CA4 and DG regions regarding well-nourished and extra-uterine malnourished animals. In CA3, CA4 and dentate gyrus, a significant cell increase was observed in groups exposed to seizures, regarding similar control groups.

  3. Intra-arterial infusion of Solcoseryl: a clinical trial of a method of treatment for pre-gangrene of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, D; Harris, P L; Palmer, M K

    1975-05-01

    A randomized double blind trial of the drug Solcoseryl given by intra-arterial infusion was carried out on 57 patients with pre-gangrene of the lower limb. A sequential analysis was carried out and the trial stopped when the results showed a statistically significant result in favour of the active drug.

  4. Systemic or Intra-Amygdala Infusion of the Benzodiazepine, Midazolam, Impairs Learning, but Facilitates Re-Learning to Inhibit Fear Responses in Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Genevra; Harris, Justin A.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    A series of experiments used rats to study the effect of a systemic or intra-amygdala infusion of the benzodiazepine, midazolam, on learning and re-learning to inhibit context conditioned fear (freezing) responses. Rats were subjected to two context-conditioning episodes followed by extinction under drug or vehicle, or to two cycles of context…

  5. Systemic or Intra-Amygdala Infusion of the Benzodiazepine, Midazolam, Impairs Learning, but Facilitates Re-Learning to Inhibit Fear Responses in Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Genevra; Harris, Justin A.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    A series of experiments used rats to study the effect of a systemic or intra-amygdala infusion of the benzodiazepine, midazolam, on learning and re-learning to inhibit context conditioned fear (freezing) responses. Rats were subjected to two context-conditioning episodes followed by extinction under drug or vehicle, or to two cycles of context…

  6. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Witkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG and intermittent infusion group (IIG. The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22 months, and 77 (55% were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031].

  7. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  8. Intra-cerebellar infusion of the protein kinase Mzeta (PKMζ) inhibitor ZIP disrupts eyeblink classical conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihabi, Kutibh; Morielli, Anthony D.; Green, John T.

    2016-01-01

    PKM-ζ, a constitutively active N-terminal truncated form of PKC-ζ, has long been implicated in a cellular correlate of learning, long-term potentiation (LTP). Inhibition of PKM-ζ with Zeta-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) has been shown in many brain structures to disrupt maintenance of AMPA receptors, irreversibly disrupting numerous forms of learning and memory that have been maintained for weeks. Delay eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is an established model for the assessment of cerebellar learning; here, we show that PKC-ζ and PKM-ζ are highly expressed in the cerebellar cortex, with highest expression found in Purkinje cell (PC) nuclei. Despite being highly expressed in the cerebellar cortex, no studies have examined how regulation of cerebellar PKM-ζ may affect cerebellar-dependent learning and memory. Given its disruption of learning in other brain structures, we hypothesized that ZIP would also disrupt delay EBC. We have shown that infusion of ZIP into the lobulus simplex of the rat cerebellar cortex can indeed significantly disrupt delay EBC. PMID:26949968

  9. Clinical evaluation of intra-arterial infusion chemoradiotherapy for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Fukuhara, Noboru; Karasawa, Kumiko; Isobe, Madoka; Himei, Kengo; Kojima, Nahoko; Toda, Jo; Okawa, Tomohiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan); Kita, Midori

    1999-01-01

    Fifty two patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer were treated by intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC{+-}ADR (30 patients) and group II consisted of CDDP+MMC{+-}5-FU (22 patients). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 patients). Overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71% for all patients, 87% in patients who received radiotherapy, 50% in those not receiving radiotherapy, and 100% in primary patients. Five-year survival rate was 20% in primary patients, 14% in recurrent patients, 3% in group I and 38% in group II (p=0.00182) by chemotherapy regimen, 30% in CR patients, and 13% in non-CR patients (p=0.00436), respectively. Acute hematological side effects of grade III-IV was 48% for all patients, but recovered from by interruption of drugs. Among the 7 patients which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases, and severe leg or gluteal region pain, for which narcotics were needed in 2 patients. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy was not particularly effective treatment for advanced cervical cancer, but it might be one of the effective treatment for residual cervical cancer after surgery and recurrent cervical cancer once the patient has obtained CR. One should check the blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. In order to improve prognosis of these patients, one should furthermore consider a combination of IAIC and systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  10. Intra-articular infusion: a direct approach to treatment of infected total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, L A; Roy, M E; Nayfeh, T A

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal levels of antibiotics are difficult to achieve in infected total joint arthroplasty when intravenous antibiotics or antibiotic-loaded cement spacers are used, but intra-articular (IA) delivery of antibiotics has been effective in several studies. This paper describes a protocol for IA delivery of antibiotics in infected knee arthroplasty, and summarises the results of a pharmacokinetic study and two clinical follow-up studies of especially difficult groups: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and failed two-stage revision. In the pharmacokinetic study, the mean synovial vancomycin peak level was 9242 (3956 to 32 150; sd 7608 μg/mL) among the 11 patients studied. Serum trough level ranged from 4.2 to 25.2 μg/mL (mean, 12.3 μg/mL; average of 9.6% of the joint trough value), which exceeded minimal inhibitory concentration. The success rate exceeded 95% in the two clinical groups. IA delivery of antibiotics is shown to be safe and effective, and is now the first option for treatment of infected total joint arthroplasty in our institution.

  11. Increased training prevents the impairing effect of intra-amygdala infusion of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX on inhibitory avoidance expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roesler R.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-amygdala infusion of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX prior to testing impairs inhibitory avoidance retention test performance. Increased training attenuates the impairing effects of amygdala lesions and intra-amygdala infusions of CNQX. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of additional training on the impairing effects of intra-amygdala CNQX on expression of the inhibitory avoidance task. Adult female Wistar rats bilaterally implanted with cannulae into the border between the central and the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala were submitted to a single session or to three training sessions (0.2 mA, 24-h interval between sessions in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. A retention test session was held 48 h after the last training. Ten minutes prior to the retention test session, the animals received a 0.5-µl infusion of CNQX (0.5 µg or its vehicle (25% dimethylsulfoxide in saline. The CNQX infusion impaired, but did not block, retention test performance in animals submitted to a single training session. Additional training prevented the impairing effect of CNQX. The results suggest that amygdaloid non-NMDA receptors may not be critical for memory expression in animals given increased training.

  12. Intra-arterial Infusion of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Stem Cells in Subacute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Azza Abass; Yousef, Mohamed Khalil; Ragab, Osama AbdAllah; ElZamarany, Enas Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Based on many preclinical and small clinical trials, stem cells can help stroke patient with the possibility of replacing the cells and supporting the remaining cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of bone marrow mononuclear (BMMN) stem cell transplantation in subacute ischemic stroke patients. Thirty-nine (n = 39) patients with subacute ischemic cerebral infarct due to large artery occlusion in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory were recruited. They were distributed into two groups: first group (n = 21) served as an experimental group, which received intra-arterial (IA) mononuclear stem cells (bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell), while the other group (n = 18) served as a control group. All the patients were evaluated clinically by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index, modified and standardized Arabic version of the Comprehensive Aphasia Test, and radiological for 12 months. The stem cell-treated group showed better improvement, but it was not significant when compared with the non-treated group. The volume of infarction changes at the end of the study was non-significant between both the groups. There was no, or minimal, adverse reactions in stem cell-treated group. The study results suggest that autologous BMMN stem cell IA transplantation in subacute MCA ischemic stroke patients is safe with very minimal hazards, but no significant improvement of motor, language disturbance, or infarction volume was detected in stem cell-treated group compared with the non-treated group.

  13. Clinical evaluation of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer with or without radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita-Okawa, Midori; Kokubo, Nahoko; Karasawa, Kumiko; Fukuhara, Noboru; Toda, Jo; Okawa, Tomohiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cancer of the cervix treated by intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: Group I consisted of 5-FU + MMC {+-} ADR (30 cases) and Group II of CDDP + MMC {+-} 5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 71%, 87% in patients given radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in Group I and 38% in Group II (p=0.00182) by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effect was 48% for all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region requiring narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer. But we should check the blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. (author)

  14. Memory-enhancing intra-basolateral amygdala infusions of clenbuterol increase Arc and CaMKII-alpha protein expression in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Holloway-Erickson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation of β-adrenoceptors in the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA modulates memory through interactions with multiple memory systems. The cellular mechanisms for this interaction remain unresolved. Memory-modulating BLA manipulations influence expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc in the dorsal hippocampus, and hippocampal expression of Arc protein is critically involved in memory consolidation and long-term potentiation. The present studies examined whether this influence of the BLA is specific to the hippocampus and to Arc protein. Like the hippocampus, the rostral portion of the anterior cingulate cortex (rACC is involved in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance (IA memory, and IA training increases Arc protein in the rACC. Because the BLA interacts with the rACC in the consolidation of IA memory, the rACC is a potential candidate for further studies of BLA modulation of synaptic plasticity. The alpha isoform of the Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα and the immediate early gene c-Fos are involved in long-term potentiation and memory. Both Arc and CaMKIIα proteins can be translated in isolated synapses, where the mRNA is localized, but c-Fos protein remains in the soma. To examine the influence of memory-modulating manipulations of the BLA on expression of these memory and plasticity-associated proteins in the rACC, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on an IA task and given intra-BLA infusions of either clenbuterol or lidocaine immediately after training. Findings suggest that noradrenergic stimulation of the BLA may modulate memory consolidation through effects on both synaptic proteins Arc and CaMKIIα, but not the somatic protein c-Fos. Furthermore, protein changes observed in the rACC following BLA manipulations suggest that the influence of the BLA on synaptic proteins is not limited to those in the dorsal

  15. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase in dorsal hippocampus drives improvement in spatial working memory after intra-VTA nicotine infusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hui; Zheng, Guo-qing; Wang, Xiaona; Sun, Yanyun; Liu, Yushan; Weaver, John Michael; Shen, Xianzhi; Liu, Wenlan; Jin, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra. These inputs appear to provide a modulatory signal that influences hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Enhancements in working memory performance have been previously reported following acute smoking/nicotine exposure. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of nicotine on spatial working memory (SWM) and the mechanisms involved. Delayed alternation T-maze task was used to assess SWM. In situ and gel gelatin zymography were used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in SWM. Systemic or local (intra-VTA) administration of nicotine significantly improves SWM, which was accompanied by increased MMP-9 activity in dorsal hippocampus (dHPC). Intra-dHPC administration of MMP inhibitor FN-439 abolished the memory enhancement induced by intra-VTA nicotine infusion. FN-439 had no effect on locomotor behavior. Our data suggest that intra-VTA nicotine infusion activates MMP-9 in dHPC to improve SWM in rats.

  16. Intra-lateral septal infusions of folic acid alone or combined with various antidepressant drugs produce antidepressant-like actions in male Wistar rats forced to swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Hernández, Miguel; Téllez-Alcántara, N Patricia; Olivera-López, Jorge I; Jaramillo, M Teresa

    2012-01-10

    Intra-cerebral administrations of folic acid produce antidepressant-like effects; either alone or combined with several antidepressant drugs. However, the specific limbic structures implied in the antidepressant-like actions of folic acid are un-known. Thus, intra-lateral septal infusions of folic acid (5.0 nmol, Pimmobility by increasing swimming behavior in the forced swimming test (FST) of male Wistar rats. Conversely, desipramine (10.0 mg/kg, Pimmobility by increasing climbing behavior. Subthreshold doses of folic acid (2.5 nmol/intra-LSN) combined with subthreshold doses of folic acid (25.0 mg/kg, p.o., Pimmobility in the FST. These antidepressant-like actions, probably, were due to modifications of the serotonergic system since swimming behavior was increased and these effects were canceled by ketanserin.

  17. Effect of multiple-phase regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy on patients with resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Chen; YAO Lie; LONG Jiang; FU De-liang; YU Xian-jun; XU Jin; YANG Feng; NI Quan-xing

    2009-01-01

    Background Regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (RIAC) has been more valuable to improve prognosis and quality of life of patients with inoperable pancreatic adenocarcinomas, and adjuvant RIAC plays an important role in prolonging survival and reducing risk of liver metastasis after radical resection of pancreatic cancer, but the effect of preoperative or multiple-phase RIAC (preoperative combined with postoperative RIAC) for resectable pancreatic cancers has not been investigated. In this prospective study, the effect of multiple-phase RIAC for patients with resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma was evaluated, and its safety and validity comparing with postoperative RIAC were also assessed.Methods Patients with resectable pancreatic head cancer were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients in group A (n=50) were treated with new therapeutic mode of extended pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with multiple-phase RIAC, and those in group B (n=50) were treated with extended pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with postoperative RIAC in the same period. The feasibility, compliance and efficiency of the new therapeutic mode were evaluated by tumor size, serum tumor markers, clinical benefit response (CBR), surgical complications, mortality and toxicity of RIAC. The disease-free survival time, median survival time, incidence of liver metastasis, survival rate at 1, 2, 3 and 5 years were also observed. Life curves were generated by the Kaplan-Meier method.Results The pain relief rate and CBR in group A was 80% and 84% respectively. Serum tumor markers decreased obviously and tumors size decreased in 26% of patients after preoperative RIAC in group A. No more surgical complications, mortality or severe systemic side effects were observed in group A compared with group B. The incidence of liver metastasis in group A was 34% which was lower than 50% in group B. The disease-free survival time and median survival time in group A were 15.5 months and 18 months

  18. The Fate and Distribution of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Intra-Arterial Infusion in Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongting Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate if autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs could treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH and what the fate and distribution of the cells are in dogs. Twelve Beagle dogs were randomly divided into two groups: MSCs group and SHAM operated group. After three weeks, dogs in MSCs group and SHAM operated group were intra-arterially injected with autologous MSCs and 0.9% normal saline, respectively. Eight weeks after treatment, the necrotic volume of the femoral heads was significantly reduced in MSCs group. Moreover, the trabecular bone volume was increased and the empty lacunae rate was decreased in MSCs group. In addition, the BrdU-positive MSCs were unevenly distributed in femoral heads and various vital organs. But no obvious abnormalities were observed. Furthermore, most of BrdU-positive MSCs in necrotic region expressed osteocalcin in MSCs group and a few expressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ. Taken together, these data indicated that intra-arterially infused MSCs could migrate into the necrotic field of femoral heads and differentiate into osteoblasts, thus improving the necrosis of femoral heads. It suggests that intra-arterial infusion of autologous MSCs might be a feasible and relatively safe method for the treatment of femoral head necrosis.

  19. Thermochemoradiation Therapy Using Superselective Intra-arterial Infusion via Superficial Temporal and Occipital Arteries for Oral Cancer With N3 Cervical Lymph Node Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsudo, Kenji, E-mail: mitsudo@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Oguri, Senri [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Yamamoto, Noriyuki [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Tohnai, Iwai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and histopathological effects of treatment with thermochemoradiation therapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal and occipital arteries for N3 cervical lymph node metastases of advanced oral cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2005 and September 2010, 9 patients with N3 cervical lymph node metastases of oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent thermochemoradiation therapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP). Treatment consisted of hyperthermia (2-8 sessions), superselective intra-arterial infusions (DOC, total 40-60 mg/m{sup 2}; CDDP, total 100-150 mg/m{sup 2}) and daily concurrent radiation therapy (total, 40-60 Gy) for 4-6 weeks. Results: Six of 9 patients underwent neck dissection 5-8 weeks after treatment. In four of these 6 patients, all metastatic lymph nodes, including those at N3, were grade 3 (non-viable tumor cells present) or grade 4 (no tumor cells present) tumors, as classified by the system by Shimosato et al (Shimosato et al Jpn J Clin Oncol 1971;1:19-35). In 2 of these 6 patients, the metastatic lymph nodes were grade 2b (destruction of tumor structures with a small amount of residual viable tumor cells). The other 3 patients did not undergo neck dissection due to distant metastasis after completion of thermochemoradiation therapy (n=2) and refusal (n=1). The patient who refused neck dissection underwent biopsy of the N3 lymph node and primary sites and showed grade 3 cancer. During follow-up, 5 patients were alive without disease, and 4 patients died due to pulmonary metastasis (n=3) and noncancer-related causes (n=1). Five-year survival and locoregional control rates were 51% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions: Thermochemoradiation therapy using intra-arterial infusion provided good histopathologic effects and locoregional control rates in patients with N3 metastatic lymph nodes. However, patients with N3

  20. Duplex/colour Doppler sonography: measurement of changes in hepatic arterial haemodynamics following intra-arterial angiotensin II infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, E; Angerson, W J; Warren, H W; Goldberg, J A; Sutherland, G R; Cooke, T G; McArdle, C S

    1993-06-01

    Angiotensin II (AT-II) has been used to target regionally-administered cytotoxic microspheres in patients with intrahepatic tumours. The optimisation of vasoconstrictor targeting requires a knowledge of the blood flow changes induced by agents such as AT-II. We therefore assessed duplex/colour Doppler sonography (DCDS) as a means of evaluating the effects of AT-II infusion on hepatic arterial blood flow (HABF) and arterial resistance in patients with intrahepatic tumours. HABF was measured continuously in nine patients using DCDS before, during and after an infusion of AT-II (15 micrograms in 3 ml of saline over 90 s) via a hepatic artery catheter. In seven patients with less than 30% hepatic replacement by tumour, the baseline level of HABF was 331 +/- 85 ml min-1 (mean +/- s.d.), and this was reduced by 75-80% within 30 s of the start of AT-II infusion. HABF recovered rapidly from the end of the infusion, and increased by up to 20% above the baseline for approximately 2 min. In two patients with greater than 50% hepatic replacement, HABF showed no reduction but rose continuously from the start of AT-II infusion, increasing by a factor of 2-2.5 after 3-4 min. Arterial resistance showed reciprocal changes in all cases. We conclude that DCDS is effective in assessing the temporal changes in hepatic arterial blood flow caused by AT-II. In order to optimise tumour targeting, the injection of microspheres loaded with cytotoxic drugs should be completed before the end of the AT-II infusion. The targeting advantage of AT-II in patients with a high percentage hepatic replacement by tumour should be re-assessed.

  1. Transcatheter intra-arterial infusion of doxorubicin loaded porous magnetic nano-clusters with iodinated oil for the treatment of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Min Jeong; Gordon, Andrew C; Larson, Andrew C; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy for liver cancer treatment is to deliver chemotherapeutic agents with multifunctional carriers into the tumor tissue via intra-arterial (IA) transcatheter infusion. These carriers should release drugs within the target tissue for prolonged periods and permit intra-procedural multi-modal imaging of selective tumor delivery. This targeted transcatheter delivery approach is enabled via the arterial blood supply to liver tumors and utilized in current clinical practice which is called chemoembolization or radioembolization. During our study, we developed Doxorubicin (Dox) loaded porous magnetic nano-clusters (Dox-pMNCs). The porous structure and carboxylic groups on the MNCs achieved high-drug loading efficiency and sustained drug release, along with magnetic properties resulting in high MRI T2-weighted image contrast. Dox-pMNC within iodinated oil, Dox-pMNCs, and Dox within iodinated oil were infused via hepatic arteries to target liver tumors in a rabbit model. MRI and histological evaluations revealed that the long-term drug release and retention of Dox-pMNCs within iodinated oil induced significantly enhanced liver cancer cell death.

  2. Intra-arterial infusion of prostaglandin E1 in normal subjects and patients with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Nielsen, S L; Holstein, P;

    1976-01-01

    Acute vasodilatation was produced by infusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in the femoral artery in 6 patients with occlusive arterial disease of the legs and in 3 normal subjects. The effect on blood flow and on blood pressure was measured at different segments of the leg with the strain gauge...

  3. INTRA-ARTERIAL INFUSIONS AND DOPLEROGRAPIC CONTROL FOR COMPLEX TREATMENT OF UPPER AND MIDDLE FACIAL ZONES, CONCOMITANT WITH TRAUMATIC CRANIOCEREBRAL INJURIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagvilava, G; Gvenetadze, Z; Gibradze, E; Danelia, T; Gvenetadze, G

    2016-02-01

    Maxillofacial traumatic injuries concomitant with craniocerebral trauma are still considered as an actual problem in emergency medicine. For this category of patients one of the dangerous and severe complications is development of inflammatory process in the injured areas. Fracture lines of upper and middle facial zones pass through the accessory sinuses of the nose, maxillary/upper dental arch area and are considered to be open and infected fractures. Combination of these fractures with craniocerebral injuries and especially, with open traumas creates predisposition for development of inflammatory processes in CNS that can result in heavy outcome. 29 patients (among them 5-females and 24 -males) with severe and open craniofacial fractures were observed by the authors. For prevention of inflammatory complications in complex treatment of the patients, intra-arterial infusions of therapeutic agents (wide spectrum of antibiotics, Heparin) were used for stimulation of reparative regeneration in fractured fragments of facial bones. After the main surgical interventions (neurosurgery, surgery of facial bones) sanitation of infected centers (accessory sinuses of the nose, oral cavity) and catheterization of external carotid arteries through the temporal arteries were performed. According to the severity of the trauma and its preferential localization, catheterization of carotid arteries was conducted unilaterally (12 cases) or bilaterally (17 cases). Insertion depth through femoral artery was 6-8 cm. Catheter was stayed in the artery for 7-8 days. Intra-arterial infusions were carried out in the morning and evening. Therapeutic agents for arterial infusion included: antibiotic (Rocephin and its analogues), Heparin. To determine the effectiveness of vascular therapy dopplerography of external carotid artery, its branches and supratrochlear artery was performed. Dopplerography of supratrochlear artery, which is the branch of internal carotid artery, was conducted to detect

  4. Intra-erythrocyte infusion of dexamethasone reduces neurological symptoms in ataxia teleangiectasia patients: results of a phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessa, Luciana; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Plebani, Alessandro; Soresina, Annarosa; Micheli, Roberto; D'Agnano, Daniela; Venturi, Tullia; Molinaro, Anna; Fazzi, Elisa; Marini, Mirella; Ferremi Leali, Pierino; Quinti, Isabella; Cavaliere, Filomena Monica; Girelli, Gabriella; Pietrogrande, Maria Cristina; Finocchi, Andrea; Tabolli, Stefano; Abeni, Damiano; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-01-09

    Ataxia Teleangiectasia [AT] is a rare neurodegenerative disease characterized by early onset ataxia, oculocutaneous teleangiectasias, immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, radiosensitivity and proneness to cancer. No therapies are available for this devastating disease. Recent observational studies in few patients showed beneficial effects of short term treatment with betamethasone. To avoid the characteristic side effects of long-term administration of steroids we developed a method for encapsulation of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) into autologous erythrocytes (EryDex) allowing slow release of dexamethasone for up to one month after dosing. Aims of the study were: the assessment of the effect of EryDex in improving neurological symptoms and adaptive behaviour of AT patients; the safety and tolerability of the therapy. Twenty two patients (F:M=1; mean age 11.2 ± 3.5) with a confirmed diagnosis of AT and a preserved or partially supported gait were enrolled for the study. The subjects underwent for six months a monthly infusion of EryDex. Ataxia was assessed by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and the adaptive behavior by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months. An improvement in ICARS (reduction of the score) was detected in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population (n=22; p=0.02) as well as in patients completing the study (per protocol PP) (n=18; p=0.01), with a mean reduction of 4 points (ITT) or 5.2 points (PP). When compared to baseline, a significant improvement were also found in VABS (increase of the score) (p<0.0001, ITT, RMANOVA), with statistically significant increases at 3 and 6 months (p<0.0001). A large inter-patient variability in the incorporation of DSP into erythrocytes was observed, with an evident positive effect of higher infusion dose on ICARS score decline. Moreover a more marked improvement was found in less neurologically impaired

  5. Hepatic intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis Rivera; Huan Giap; William Miller; Jonathan Fisher; Donald J Hillebrand; Christopher Marsh; Randolph L Schaffer

    2006-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurs with a reported frequency of 12%-18% after liver transplantation.Recurrence is associated witha mortality rate exceeding 75%. Approximately one-third of recurrences develop in the transplanted liver and are therefore amenable to local therapy. A variety of treatment modalities have been reported including resection, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), radiofrequency ablation (RFA),ethanol ablation, cryoablation, and external beam irradiation. Goals of treatment are tumor control and the minimization of toxic effect to functional parenchyma.Efficacy of treatment is mitigated by the need for ongoing immunosuppression. Yttrium-90 microspheres have been used as a treatment modality both for primary HCC and for pre-transplant management of HCC with promising results. Twenty-two months after liver transplantation for hepatitis C cirrhosis complicated by HCC, a 42-year old man developed recurrence of HCC in his transplant allograft. Treatment of multiple right lobe lesions with anatomic resection and adjuvant chemotherapy was unsuccessful. Multifocal recurrence in the remaining liver allograft was treated with hepatic intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 microspheres (SIR-Spheres, Sirtex Medical Inc., Lake Forest, IL, USA). Efficacy was demonstrated by tumor necrosis on imaging and a decrease in alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level. There were no adverse consequences of initial treatment.

  6. Early pulmonary response is critical for extra-pulmonary carbon nanoparticle mediated effects: comparison of inhalation versus intra-arterial infusion exposures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Koustav; Ettehadieh, Dariusch; Upadhyay, Swapna; Takenaka, Shinji; Adler, Thure; Karg, Erwin; Krombach, Fritz; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Schulz, Holger; Schmid, Otmar; Stoeger, Tobias

    2017-06-20

    The death toll associated with inhaled ambient particulate matter (PM) is attributed mainly to cardio-vascular rather than pulmonary effects. However, it is unclear whether the key event for cardiovascular impairment is particle translocation from lung to circulation (direct effect) or indirect effects due to pulmonary particle-cell interactions. In this work, we addressed this issue by exposing healthy mice via inhalation and intra-arterial infusion (IAI) to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) as surrogate for soot, a major constituent of (ultrafine) urban PM. Equivalent surface area CNP doses in the blood (30mm(2) per animal) were applied by IAI or inhalation (lung-deposited dose 10,000mm(2); accounting for 0.3% of lung-to-blood CNP translocation). Mice were analyzed for changes in hematology and molecular markers of endothelial/epithelial dysfunction, pro-inflammatory reactions, oxidative stress, and coagulation in lungs and extra-pulmonary organs after CNP inhalation (4 h and 24 h) and CNP infusion (4 h). For methodological reasons, we used two different CNP types (spark-discharge and Printex90), with very similar physicochemical properties [≥98 and ≥95% elemental carbon; 10 and 14 nm primary particle diameter; and 800 and 300 m(2)/g specific surface area] for inhalation and IAI respectively. Mild pulmonary inflammatory responses and significant systemic effects were observed following 4 h and 24 h CNP inhalation. Increased retention of activated leukocytes, secondary thrombocytosis, and pro-inflammatory responses in secondary organs were detected following 4 h and 24 h of CNP inhalation only. Interestingly, among the investigated extra-pulmonary tissues (i.e. aorta, heart, and liver); aorta revealed as the most susceptible extra-pulmonary target following inhalation exposure. Bypassing the lungs by IAI however did not induce any extra-pulmonary effects at 4 h as compared to inhalation. Our findings indicate that extra-pulmonary effects due to CNP

  7. Salicylic acid analogues as chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast agents for the assessment of brain perfusion territory and blood-brain barrier opening after intra-arterial infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolei; Walczak, Piotr; He, Xiaowei; Yang, Xing; Pearl, Monica; Bulte, Jeff Wm; Pomper, Martin G; McMahon, Michael T; Janowski, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. Predicted, focal opening of the BBB through intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol is feasible, but there is a need to facilitate imaging techniques (e.g. MRI) to guide interventional procedures and assess the outcomes. Here, we show that salicylic acid analogues (SAA) can depict the brain territory supplied by the catheter and detect the BBB opening, through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI. Hyperosmolar SAA solutions themselves are also capable of opening the BBB, and, when multiple SAA agents were co-injected, their locoregional perfusion could be differentiated.

  8. Optimization of health-care organization and perceived improvement of patient comfort by switching from intra-venous BU four-times-daily infusions to a once-daily administration scheme in adult hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaard, A; Rzepecki, P; Valcarcel, D; Santarone, S; Fürst, S; Serrano, D; De Angelis, G; Krüger, W; Scheid, C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown an equivalent pharmacokinetic profile between four-times-daily (4QD) and once-daily (QD) administration of intra-venous (IV) BU, without increased toxicity. We assess the impact of a switch in IV BU from a 4QD to a QD schedule, in terms of health-care organization, staff working conditions, quality of care dispensed and perceived patient comfort. Clinicians, nurses and pharmacists from nine allogeneic transplantation units in five European countries were interviewed face to face. Overall perception of QD versus 4QD BU was very positive. Both administration schemes were evaluated to be equally efficaciousZ. QD BU was perceived to be safer and more convenient. Clinicians and nurses perceived that patient comfort was improved, due to fewer complications associated with repeated infusions, and avoiding night infusions associated with stress, anxiety and decreased quality of sleep. Switching from 4QD to QD BU had a significant impact on health-care organization, with a better integration in the overall management and usual timelines in the pharmacies and transplantation units. Time spent to prepare and administer BU was significantly reduced, leading to potential financial savings that merit further assessment and would be of particular interest in the current economic climate.

  9. Quantitative analysis of the nanoscale intra-nuclear structural alterations in hippocampal cells in chronic alcoholism via transmission electron microscopy study

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Peeyush; Ghimire, Hemendra M; Almabadi, Huda; Tripathi, Vibha; Mohanty, Samarendra K; Rao, Radhakrishna; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is known to alter morphology of hippocampal, an important region of cognitive function in the brain. We performed quantification of nanoscale structural alterations in nuclei of hippocampal neuron cells due to chronic alcoholism, in mice model. Transmission electron microscopy images of the neuron cells were obtained and the degrees of structural alteration, in terms of mass density fluctuations, were determined using the recently developed light localization analysis technique. The results, obtained at the length scales ranging from 33 to 195 nm, show that the 4-week alcohol fed mice have higher degree of structural alteration in comparison to the control mice. The degree of structural alterations starts becoming significantly distinguishable around 100 nm sample length, which is the typical length scale of the building blocks of cells, such as DNA, RNA, etc. Different degrees of structural alterations at such length scales suggest possible structural rearrangement of chromatin inside the ...

  10. Proinflammatory cytokines differentially influence adult hippocampal cell proliferation depending upon the route and chronicity of administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Anne Seguin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Julie Anne Seguin, Jordan Brennan, Emily Mangano, Shawn HayleyInstitute of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Disturbances of hippocampal plasticity, including impaired dendritic branching and reductions of neurogenesis, are provoked by stressful insults and may occur in depression. Although corticoids likely contribute to stressor-induced reductions of neurogenesis, other signaling messengers, including pro-inflammatory cytokines might also be involved. Accordingly, the present investigation assessed whether three proinflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α (associated with depression influenced cellular proliferation within the hippocampus. In this regard, systemic administration of TNF-α reduced 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU labeling within the hippocampus, whereas IL-1β and IL-6 had no such effect. However, repeated but not a single intra-hippocampal infusion of IL-6 and IL-1β actually increased cellular proliferation and IL-6 infusion also enhanced microglial staining within the hippocampus. Yet, no changes in doublecortin expression were apparent, suggesting that the cytokine did not influence the birth of cells destined to become neurons. Essentially, the route of administration and chronicity of cytokine administration had a marked influence upon the nature of hippocampal alterations provoked, suggesting that cytokines may differentially regulate hippocampal plasticity in neuropsychiatric conditions.Keywords: cytokine, depression, neuroplasticity, hippocampus, stressor

  11. Proinflammatory cytokines differentially influence adult hippocampal cell proliferation depending upon the route and chronicity of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Julie Anne; Brennan, Jordan; Mangano, Emily; Hayley, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances of hippocampal plasticity, including impaired dendritic branching and reductions of neurogenesis, are provoked by stressful insults and may occur in depression. Although corticoids likely contribute to stressor-induced reductions of neurogenesis, other signaling messengers, including pro-inflammatory cytokines might also be involved. Accordingly, the present investigation assessed whether three proinflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) (associated with depression) influenced cellular proliferation within the hippocampus. In this regard, systemic administration of TNF-alpha reduced 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling within the hippocampus, whereas IL-1beta and IL-6 had no such effect. However, repeated but not a single intra-hippocampal infusion of IL-6 and IL-1beta actually increased cellular proliferation and IL-6 infusion also enhanced microglial staining within the hippocampus. Yet, no changes in doublecortin expression were apparent, suggesting that the cytokine did not influence the birth of cells destined to become neurons. Essentially, the route of administration and chronicity of cytokine administration had a marked influence upon the nature of hippocampal alterations provoked, suggesting that cytokines may differentially regulate hippocampal plasticity in neuropsychiatric conditions.

  12. Infusion Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  13. Systemic or intra-amygdala infusion of an endocannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 blocked propofol-induced anterograde amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y; Wang, J; Xu, P B; Xu, Y J; Miao, C H

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is well-known for its anterograde amnesic actions. However, a recent experiment showed that propofol can also produce retrograde memory enhancement effects via an interaction with the endocannabinoid CB1 system. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that the regulating effect of propofol on the endocannabinoid CB1 system might also decrease the anterograde amnesic effect of propofol under some conditions, which might be a risk factor for intraoperative awareness. Since, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) has been confirmed to mediate propofol-induced anterograde amnesia and the BLA contains a high concentration of CB1 receptors, the authors investigated whether and how the endocannabinoid system, particularly the CB1 receptor within BLA, influences propofol-induced anterograde amnesia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats trained with inhibitory avoidance (IA) were systematically pre-trained using a memory-impairing dose of propofol (25 mg/kg). Before propofol administration, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of a CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (1 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) or a bilateral intra-BLA injection of AM251 (0.6 ng or 6 ng per 0.5 μl). Twenty-four hours after IA training, the IA retention latency was tested. It was found that systemic or intra-BLA injection of a non-regulating dose of AM251 (2 mg/kg or 6 ng per 0.5 μl, respectively) blocked the memory-impairing effect of propofol. These results indicate that the anterograde amnesic effect of propofol is mediated, in part, by activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the BLA.

  14. Contribution of Hippocampal 5-HT3 Receptors in Hippocampal Autophagy and Extinction of Conditioned Fear Responses after a Single Prolonged Stress Exposure in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhong-Min; Yang, Li-Hua; Cui, Rong; Ni, Gui-Lian; Wu, Feng-Tian; Liang, Yong

    2017-05-01

    One of the hypotheses about the pathogenesis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the dysfunction of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. While certain 5-HT receptor subtypes are likely critical for the symptoms of PTSD, few studies have examined the role of 5-HT3 receptor in the development of PTSD, even though 5-HT3 receptor is critical for contextual fear extinction and anxiety-like behavior. Therefore, we hypothesized that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptor in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) could prevent hippocampal autophagy and the development of PTSD-like behavior in animals. To this end, we infused SR57227, selective 5-HT3 agonist, into the DH after a single prolonged stress (SPS) treatment in rats. Three weeks later, we evaluated the effects of this pharmacological treatment on anxiety-related behaviors and extinction of contextual fear memory. We also accessed hippocampal autophagy and the expression of 5-HT3A subunit, Beclin-1, LC3-I, and LC3-II in the DH. We found that SPS treatment did not alter anxiety-related behaviors but prolonged the extinction of contextual fear memory, and such a behavioral phenomenon was correlated with increased hippocampal autophagy, decreased 5-HT3A expression, and increased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in the DH. Furthermore, intraDH infusions of SR57227 dose-dependently promoted the extinction of contextual fear memory, prevented hippocampal autophagy, and decreased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in the DH. These results indicated that 5-HT3 receptor in the hippocampus may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of hippocampal autophagy, and is likely involved in the pathophysiology of PTSD.

  15. Hippocampal interleukin-1 mediates stress-enhanced fear learning: A potential role for astrocyte-derived interleukin-1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meghan E; Lebonville, Christina L; Paniccia, Jacqueline E; Balentine, Megan E; Reissner, Kathryn J; Lysle, Donald T

    2017-09-26

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with immune dysregulation. We have previously shown that severe stress exposure in a preclinical animal model of the disorder, stress-enhanced fear learning (SEFL), is associated with an increase in hippocampal interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and that blocking central IL-1 after the severe stress prevents the development of SEFL. Here, we tested whether blocking hippocampal IL-1 signaling is sufficient to prevent enhanced fear learning and identified the cellular source of stress-induced IL-1β in this region. Experiment 1 tested whether intra-dorsal hippocampal (DH) infusions of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA, 1.25µg per hemisphere) 24 and 48 hours after stress exposure prevents the development of enhanced fear learning. Experiment 2 used triple fluorescence immunohistochemistry to examine hippocampal alterations in IL-1β, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an astrocyte-specific marker, and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule -1 (Iba-1), a microglial-specific marker, 48 hours after exposure to the severe stressor of the SEFL paradigm. Intra-DH IL-1RA prevented SEFL and stress-induced IL-1β was primarily colocalized with astrocytes in the hippocampus. Further, hippocampal GFAP immunoreactivity was not altered, whereas hippocampal Iba-1 immunoreactivity was significantly attenuated following severe stress. These data suggest that hippocampal IL-1 signaling is critical to the development of SEFL and that astrocytes are a predominant source of stress-induced IL-1β. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Exercise in the Early Stage after Stroke Enhances Hippocampal Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression and Memory Function Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himi, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Hisashi; Okabe, Naohiko; Nakamura, Emi; Shiromoto, Takashi; Narita, Kazuhiko; Koga, Tomoshige; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Exercise in the early stage after stroke onset has been shown to facilitate the recovery from physical dysfunction. However, the mechanism of recovery has not been clarified. In this study, the effect of exercise on spatial memory function recovery in the early stage was shown, and the mechanism of recovery was discussed using a rat model of brain embolism. Intra-arterial microsphere (MS) injection induced small emboli in the rat brain. Treadmill exercise was started at 24 hours (early group) or 8 days (late group) after MS injection. The non-exercise (NE) and sham-operated groups were included as controls. Memory function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test, and hippocampal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To further investigate the effect of BDNF on memory function, BDNF was continuously infused into the hippocampus via implantable osmotic pumps in the early or late stage after stroke. Memory function significantly improved only in the early group compared with the late and the NE groups, although hippocampal BDNF concentrations were temporarily elevated after exercise in both the early and the late groups. Rats infused with BDNF in the early stage exhibited significant memory function recovery; however, rats that received BDNF infusion in the late stage showed no improvement. Exercise elevates hippocampal BDNF levels in the early stage after cerebral embolism, and this event facilitates memory function recovery. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efeitos da infusão contínua de cetamina sobre a pressão intra-ocular em cães hipovolêmicos anestesiados com desflurano Effects of continuous infusion of ketamine on intraocular pressure in hypovolemic dogs during desflurane anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Honsho

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Compararam-se os efeitos de duas doses de cetamina, administradas em infusão contínua, sobre a pressão intra-ocular (PIO de 18 cães submetidos à hipovolemia e à anestesia com desflurano. Promoveu-se a hipovolemia em todos os cães, retirando-se 40 ml de sangue/kg de peso. A anestesia foi induzida com desflurano, através de máscara facial, até que a intubação orotraqueal fosse permitida. Decorridos 30 minutos, para estabilização dos parâmetros, iniciou-se a infusão contínua de cetamina. Os cães foram distribuídos, aleatoriamente, em três grupos (n= 6. O grupo I (controle recebeu solução salina estéril; o grupo II (GII recebeu cetamina, na dose de 100mig/kg/min, e o grupo III (GIII, cetamina na dose de 200mig/kg/min. A PIO foi medida por tonometria de aplanação. Foram mensurados freqüência cardíaca (FC, ritmo cardíaco, pressão arterial média (PAM, débito cardíaco (DC, pressão venosa central (PVC e pressão parcial de CO2 no final da expiração (ETCO2. O desflurano não influenciou os resultados da PIO, porém observou-se discreta ação da cetamina em todos os grupos. Foi possível estabelecer relação direta entre os valores de PIO e de ETCO2. A PIO apresentou relação direta somente com a ETCO2.Effects of two dosages of continuous infusion of ketamine on the intraocular pressure (IOP of 18 dogs, subjected to hypovolemia and anesthesia with desflurane were studied. Hypovolemia was induced in all dogs by withdrawal of 40ml of blood/kg of body weight. Initially, anesthesia was induced through face mask and then by tracheal intubation. After a delay of 30 minutes, for parameters stabilization, continuous infusion of ketamine was initiated. Dogs were randomly allotted in three groups (n =6: group I (control group received continuous infusion of saline solution, group II received 100mug/kg/min of ketamine and group III received 200mug/kg/min of ketamine. IOP was measured by applanation tonometry. It was not possible

  18. Effects of intra-hippocampal microinjection of vitamin B12 on the orofacial pain and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and orofacial pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Nemati, Shaghayegh

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of microinjection of vitamin B12 into the hippocampus on the orofacial pain and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and orofacial pain. In ketamine-xylazine anesthetized rats, the right and left sides of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) were implanted with two guide cannulas. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin (1.5%, 50μl) into the right vibrissa pad, and the durations of face rubbing were recorded at 3-min blocks for 45min. Morris water maze (MWM) was used for evaluation of learning and memory. Finally, locomotor activity was assessed using an open-field test. Vitamin B12 attenuated both phases of formalin-induced orofacial pain. Prior administration of naloxone and naloxonazine, but not naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, prevented this effect. Vitamin B12 and physostigmine decreased latency time as well as traveled distance in Morris water maze. In addition, these chemicals improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment. The memory impairment induced by orofacial pain was improved by vitamin B12 and physostigmine used alone. Naloxone prevented, whereas physostigmine enhanced the memory improving effect of vitamin B12 in the pain-induced memory impairment. All the above-mentioned chemicals did not alter locomotor activity. The results of the present study showed that at the level of the dorsal hippocampus, vitamin B12 modulated orofacial pain through a mu-opioid receptor mechanism. In addition, vitamin B12 contributed to hippocampal cholinergic system in processing of memory. Moreover, cholinergic and opioid systems may be involved in improving effect of vitamin B12 on pain-induced memory impairment.

  19. INFUSION LOUNGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Infusion Lounge——颇具亚洲风情的的夜店——坐落于旧金山市区大受追捧的联合广场之上,福森酒店之下。此夜店兼具了酒吧与餐厅的功能,它将提供加州与亚洲风味融为一体的佳肴及优雅的环境和一流的服务。Infusion Lounge不仅为旧金山当地,也将为整个行业重新定义高消费夜生活的概念。

  20. The Antidepressant-Like Effect of Fish Oil: Possible Role of Ventral Hippocampal 5-HT1A Post-synaptic Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, Bruno; Delattre, Ana Marcia; Pudell, Claudia; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Suchecki, Deborah; Machado, Ricardo B; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Piazzetta, Sílvia Regina; Hammerschmidt, Ivilim; Zanata, Sílvio M; Lima, Marcelo M S; Zanoveli, Janaína Menezes; Ferraz, Anete Curte

    2015-08-01

    The pathophysiology of depression is not completely understood; nonetheless, numerous studies point to serotonergic dysfunction as a possible cause. Supplementation with fish oil rich docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) during critical periods of development produces antidepressant effects by increasing serotonergic neurotransmission, particularly in the hippocampus. In a previous study, the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors was demonstrated and we hypothesized that fish oil supplementation (from conception to weaning) alters the function of post-synaptic hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors. To test this hypothesis, female rats were supplemented with fish oil during habituation, mating, gestation, and lactation. The adult male offspring was maintained without supplementation until 3 months of age, when they were subjected to the modified forced swimming test (MFST) after infusion of vehicle or the selective 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY100635, and frequency of swimming, immobility, and climbing was recorded for 5 min. After the behavioral test, the hippocampi were obtained for quantification of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and for 5-HT1A receptor expression by Western blotting analysis. Fish oil-supplemented offspring displayed less depressive-like behaviors in the MFST reflected by decreased immobility and increased swimming and higher 5-HT hippocampal levels. Although there was no difference in the expression of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors, intra-hippocampal infusion of a sub-effective dose of 8-OH-DPAT enhanced the antidepressant effect of fish oil in supplemented animals. In summary, the present findings suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of fish oil supplementation are likely related to increased hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission and sensitization of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors.

  1. Automated segmentation tool for brain infusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Hammond Rosenbluth

    Full Text Available This study presents a computational tool for auto-segmenting the distribution of brain infusions observed by magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical usage of direct infusion is increasing as physicians recognize the need to attain high drug concentrations in the target structure with minimal off-target exposure. By co-infusing a Gadolinium-based contrast agent and visualizing the distribution using real-time using magnetic resonance imaging, physicians can make informed decisions about when to stop or adjust the infusion. However, manual segmentation of the images is tedious and affected by subjective preferences for window levels, image interpolation and personal biases about where to delineate the edge of the sloped shoulder of the infusion. This study presents a computational technique that uses a Gaussian Mixture Model to efficiently classify pixels as belonging to either the high-intensity infusate or low-intensity background. The algorithm was implemented as a distributable plug-in for the widely used imaging platform OsiriX®. Four independent operators segmented fourteen anonymized datasets to validate the tool's performance. The datasets were intra-operative magnetic resonance images of infusions into the thalamus or putamen of non-human primates. The tool effectively reproduced the manual segmentation volumes, while significantly reducing intra-operator variability by 67±18%. The tool will be used to increase efficiency and reduce variability in upcoming clinical trials in neuro-oncology and gene therapy.

  2. Hippocampal formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; van Strien, N.M.; Witter, M.P.; Paxinos, G.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal formation and parahippocampal region are prominent components of the rat nervous system and play a crucial role in learning, memory, and spatial navigation. Many new details regarding the entorhinal cortex have been discovered since the previous edition, and the growing interest in t

  3. Effects of intra-arterial infusion of 3-bromopyruvate on metastases and survival benefit of hepatic VX2 tumor in rabbits%3-溴丙酮酸对兔VX2肝肿瘤转移及兔生存时间的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江雄鹰; 张小萍; 黄金华; 罗荣光; 苗碧建; 王琰

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨3-溴丙酮酸(3-BrPA)经肝动脉灌注对兔VX2肝肿瘤转移及荷瘤兔生存时间的影响.方法 18只新西兰大白兔肝左叶种植VX2肿瘤,随机分成3组,每组6只.PBS灌注组:在肿瘤种植14 d后行肝动脉PBS溶液灌注.3-BrPA 7和14 d灌注组:在肿瘤种植7/14 d后行肝动脉3-BrPA溶液灌注.在肿瘤种植28 d后每组处死3只兔,解剖探查有无肝内转移、肾转移、肺转移及腹腔转移.每组剩余的3只兔观察其生存时间并进行比较.结果 肿瘤种植28 d后,PBS灌注组均发现肝内及腹腔转移(3/3),肾转移2只(2/3),肺转移2只(2/3).3-BrPA 7 d灌注组实验兔肝内和肺转移各有1只(1/3),未发现有腹腔和肾转移(0/3).3-BrPA14 d灌注组实验兔有2只发现肝内转移(2/3),肺和腹腔转移各有1只(1/3),未发现肾转移(0/3).生存时间比较显示3-BrPA 14 d灌注组实验兔生存时间[(27±5)d]显著长于PBS溶液灌注组[(17±3)d](P=0.041).而3-BrPA 7 d灌注组实验兔生存时间[(42±6)d]显著长于3-BrPA 14 d灌注组实验兔[(27±5)d](P=0.007).结论 经肝动脉灌3-BrPA能够有效减少兔VX2肝肿瘤的转移,并可延长移植VX2肝肿瘤兔的生存时间,且灌注时间越早,治疗效果越好.%Objective To evaluate the metastasis and survival of an intra-arterial infusion of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) on hepatic VX2 tumor in rabbits.Methods VX2 tumor was implanted in left lateral lobe of liver of 18 white New Zealand rabbits.The animals were randomized into 3 groups (n =6 each) and underwent an intra-arterial infusion of phosphate-buffered saline or 3-BrPA via hepatic artery at 14 days post-implantation.At 28 days post-implantation,3 rabbits in each group were sacrificed.The abdomen of these rabbits was opened and inspected for metastases.Then the survival of the remaining rabbits was observed.Results At 28 days post-implantation,in PBS group,there were intrahepatic metastasis and abdominal cavity dissemination (n =3),renal metastases (n =2

  4. Amelioration of apoptotic events in the skeletal muscle of intra-nigrally rotenone-infused Parkinsonian rats by Morinda citrifolia--up-regulation of Bcl-2 and blockage of cytochrome c release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kishore Kumar S; Paul, Liya; Sathyamoorthy, Yogesh Kanna; Srinivasan, Ashokkumar; Chakrapani, Lakshmi Narasimhan; Singh, Abhilasha; Ravi, Divya Bhavani; Krishnan, Thulasi Raman; Velusamy, Prema; Kaliappan, Kathiravan; Radhakrishnan, Rameshkumar; Periandavan, Kalaiselvi

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with the cardinal symptoms of bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability, which lead to abnormal movements and lack of activity, which in turn cause muscular damage. Even though studies have been carried out to elucidate the causative factors that lead to muscular damage in Parkinson's disease, apoptotic events that occur in the skeletal muscle and a therapeutical approach to culminate the muscular damage have not been extensively studied. Thus, this study evaluates the impact of rotenone-induced SNPc lesions on skeletal muscle apoptosis and the efficacy of an ethyl acetate extract of Morinda citrifolia in safeguarding the myocytes. Biochemical assays along with apoptotic markers studied by immunoblot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in the current study revealed that the supplementation of Morinda citrifolia significantly reverted alterations in both biochemical and histological parameters in rotenone-infused PD rats. Treatment with Morinda citrifolia also reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9 and blocked the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria induced by rotenone. In addition, it augmented the expression of Bcl2 both transcriptionally and translationally. Thus, this preliminary study paves a way to show that the antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activities of Morinda citrifolia can be exploited to alleviate skeletal muscle damage induced by Parkinsonism.

  5. Method of infusion extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  6. [Hippocampal stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollnik, J D; Traitel, B; Dietrich, B; Lenz, O

    2015-02-01

    Unilateral cerebral ischemia of the hippocampus is very rare. This paper reviews the literature and presents the case of a 59-year-old woman with an amnestic syndrome due to a left hippocampal stroke. The patient suffered from retrograde amnesia which was most severe over the 2 days prior to presenting and a slight anterograde amnesia. In addition, a verbal memory disorder was confirmed 1 week after admission by neurological tests. As risk factors, arterial hypertension and a relative hyper-beta lipoproteinemia were found. This case shows that unilateral amnestic stroke, e.g. in the hippocampus region, may be the cause of an amnestic syndrome and should be included in the differential diagnostics.

  7. The Therapeutic Efficacy of Continous Regional Intra-arterial Infusion(CRI) of Sandostatin and Antibiotics in Patients of Severe Acute Pancreatitis%区域灌注及早期中药治疗重症急性胰腺炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建国

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of continous regional intra -arterial infusion(CRI) of sandostatin and Antibi-otics in patients of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).Methods:Twenty nine cases of SAP patients were randomly divided in -to two groups. Group of CRI,13 cases and control group,16 cases.Seldingers method was used in brief, placing a catheter in the pancreatic regional artery such as gastropyloric artery , irrigating the inflamed area of the pancreas , and infusing sandostatin and antibiotics to control inflammation and prevent secondary infection by continuous pumping for 24h.Results:Abdominal sings and pain were apparently relieved after 24h of treat-ment, disappeared in 7-12days.Twelve cases were cured .Clinical Manifestations in control group lasted much longer compared with CRI group, after 5-7days of the treatment , abdominal signs Began subsiding .Conclusion:Continous regional intra -arterial infusion for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis can prevent The development of pancreatic infection and big cut the course of treatment .%目的:评价经胰血管留置导管持续区域灌注生长抑素和抗生素治疗重症急性胰腺炎( SAP)的疗效。方法:将29例SAP患者分为区域灌注及早期中药治疗组(13例)和常规给药组(16例)。区域灌注及早期中药治疗组经股动脉超选择插管至胰腺坏死的供血动脉留置导管,用微泵持续24小时灌注生长抑素及抗生素,症状体征消失后拔管。常规给药组用静脉输注药物,药物用量及剂量完全同区域灌注组。结果:灌注组治疗后48小时腹部体征明显改善,腹痛减轻,7~12天症状全部消失,病情无复发,疗程平均20天,均痊愈出院。常规给药组治疗后5~7天见腹部体征改善,病情有反复,疗程45天~4个月,平均57天。常规给药组出现严重并发症13例次,死亡4例。结论:经胰血管置管持续区域灌注生长抑素及

  8. 局部晚期膀胱癌术前动脉灌注新辅助化疗的安全性与疗效分析%Safety and efficacy of intra-arterial infusion neoadjuvant chemotherapy for local advanced bladder cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛亦农; 闫勇; 张军晖; 康宁; 王建文; 田溪泉; 王学科; 邢念增

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intra-arterial infusion neoadiuvant chemotherapy in local advanced bladder cancer. Methods Nineteen cases with T2-T4a bladder cancer were enrolled in this study.Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with Gemcitabine and Cisplatin (GC)were performed for 1 to 3 cycles before radical cystectomy.Postoperative values of hematological parameters,maximum diameter of tumors,TNM(tumor,node and metastasis)stages and pathological grades were compared with preoperative parameters of the same case. Results Compared to the values before GC chemotherapy,WBC count showed no significant change post-operative,(6.63±2.58)×109/L vs(5.12±2.91)×109/L(P=0.13);RBC(4.41+0.52)×1012/L vs(3.92±0.42)×1012/L(P=0.00)and platelet count(220.50±59.86)×109/L vs(157.05±56.72)×109/L(P=0.001)showed significant decrease;ALT did not show significant decrease(20.00±8.31 vs 26.88±17.04 U/L,P=0.08);Creatltme also showed no significant change(95.82±14.57 vs 88.04±17.76μmol/L,P=0.06);Maximum diameter of tumors decreased significantly(3.72±1.23 vs 2.80±1.29 cm,P=0.02).Compared with clinical TNM stages,pathological TNM stages demonstrated significant decrease in 9 cases;While cell differentiation did not show decrease. Conclusions Intra-arterial infusion with GC regimen can reduce tumor size,decrease TNM stages,while not causing significant adverse impact to radical cystectomy.Bladder-spare treatment is an option for chemotherapy-sensitive cases.%目的 探讨根治性膀胱切除术前动脉灌注化疗治疗局部晚期膀胱癌的安全性与疗效.方法 局部晚期膀胱癌患者(T2~T4a)19例,采用2-脱氧-2,2-盐酸二氟脱氧胞苷(β-异构体)与(顺)二氨二氯铂(GC)方案髂内动脉灌注化疗1~3次,随后行膀胱根治性切除术或经尿道膀胱肿瘤电切术,2例肿瘤缩小者拒绝手术治疗,2例经术前评价不能承受手术治疗.统计学分析比较化疗前后患者血白细胞、红细胞、血小板水

  9. HIPPOCAMPAL MESSY FIBER DISTRIBUTIONS IN MICE SELECTED FOR AGGRESSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLUYTER, F; JAMOT, L; VANOORTMERSSEN, GA; CRUSIO, WE

    1994-01-01

    The sizes of the hippocampal intra- and infrapyramidal messy fiber terminal fields (IIPMF) of mice from two lines bidirectionally selected for attack latency were measured. Aggressive males possess smaller IIPMF than do non-aggressive ones. We hypothesize that both differences in aggression and size

  10. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Couillard-Després, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Although significant inconsistencies remain to be clarified, a role for neurogenesis in hippocampal functions, such as cognition, has been suggested by several reports. Yet, investigation in various species of mammals, including humans, revealed that rates of hippocampal neurogenesis are steadily declining with age. The very low levels of hippocampal neurogenesis persisting in the aged brain have been suspected to underlie the cognitive deficits observed in elderly. However, current evidence ...

  11. CT associated with clinical indexes to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of continuous regional intra-arterial infusion of somatostatin for treatment of severe acute pancreatitis%持续性区域动脉介入灌注生长抑素治疗重症急性胰腺炎疗效的CT与临床联合评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢嘉翰; 康振朝; 鲁福文; 张万甲; 齐钧; 庞永亮; 王伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to adopt CT associated with clinical indexes to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of continuous regional intra-arterial infusion(CRI) of somatostatin and antibiotics in patients of severe acute pancreatitis(SAP).Methods One hundred and twenty-one cases of SAP patients were randomly divided into two groups,CRI group with 60 cases and conventional treating group with 61 cases.In CRI group,antibiotics and somatostatins were pumped into the catheters in the bad flood supplying artery of pancreas from the catheter of femoral artery by a micro pump for 24 hours,and after the symptoms and signs of SPA patients disappeared,the catheters were moved out.In the conventional treating group, the same dose of antibiotics and somatostatins were given by intravenous infusion method.Results In SAP patients through the treatment, CRI group as compared with conventional group showed better effect,shortened the time for abdominal pain (4.9±2.3) d vs (6.3±2.1) d,abdominal tenderness (6.3± 2.1) d vs (8.8±2.9) d,hemodiastase to normal (8.7±1.9) d vs (9.5±1.6) d,and average hospitalization days (25.0± 5.3) d vs (36.0±4.2) d,and Balthazar CT grade obviously decreased.Conclusion CRI of somatostatin for the treatment of SAP confirms the therapeutic efficacy as an ideal treatment.%目的 CT联合临床指标评价持续性区域动脉介入灌注生长抑素治疗重症急性胰腺炎(SAP)的疗效.方法 121例患者随机分为持续性区域灌注(CRI)组(60例)和常规给药组(61例),区域灌注组经股动脉超选择插管至胰腺坏死的供血动脉留置导管,用微泵持续24小时灌注生长抑素及抗生紊,症状体征消失后拔管.常规给药组用静脉输注药物,药物剂量完全同区域灌注组.结果 SAP患者经过治疗,CRI组与常规给药组比较疗效显著,临床指标恢复时间缩短,腹痛症状消失时间(4.9±2.3)d vs (6.3±2.1)d、腹压痛消失时间(6.3±2.1) dvs(8.8±2.9)d、

  12. Understanding Infusion Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jeff E

    2017-08-30

    Infusion systems are complicated electromechanical systems that are used to deliver anesthetic drugs with moderate precision. Four types of systems are described-gravity feed, in-line piston, peristaltic, and syringe. These systems are subject to a number of failure modes-occlusion, disconnection, siphoning, infiltration, and air bubbles. The relative advantages of the various systems and some of the monitoring capabilities are discussed. A brief example of the use of an infusion system during anesthetic induction is presented. With understanding of the functioning of these systems, users may develop greater comfort.

  13. Hippocampal Sclerosis After Febrile Status Epilepticus: The FEBSTAT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Darrell V.; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Bagiella, Emilia; Bello, Jacqueline A.; Chan, Stephen; Xu, Yuan; MacFall, James; Gomes, William A.; Moshé, Solomon L.; Mathern, Gary W.; Pellock, John M.; Nordli, Douglas R.; Frank, L. Matthew; Provenzale, James; Shinnar, Ruth C.; Epstein, Leon G.; Masur, David; Litherland, Claire; Sun, Shumei

    2014-01-01

    Objective Whether febrile status epilepticus (FSE) produces hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has long been debated. Our objective is to determine if FSE produces acute hippocampal injury that evolves to HS. Methods FEBSTAT and two affiliated studies prospectively recruited 226 children aged 1 month to 6 years with FSE and controls with simple febrile seizures. All had acute MRIs and follow-up MRIs were obtained at approximately 1 year later in the majority. Visual interpretation by two neuroradiologists informed only of subject age was augmented by hippocampal volumetrics, analysis of the intra-hippocampal distribution of T2 signal, and apparent diffusion coefficients. Results Hippocampal T2 hyperintensity, maximum in Sommer's sector, occurred acutely after FSE in 22 of 226 children in association with increased volume. Follow-up MRIs obtained on 14 of the 22 with acute T2 hyperintensity showed HS in 10 and reduced hippocampal volume in 12. In contrast, follow-up of 116 children without acute hyperintensity showed abnormal T2 signal in only 1 (following another episode of FSE). Furthermore, compared to controls with simple febrile seizures, FSE subjects with normal acute MRIs had abnormally low right to left hippocampal volume ratios, smaller hippocampi initially and reduced hippocampal growth. Interpretation Hippocampal T2 hyperintensity after FSE represents acute injury often evolving to a radiological appearance of HS after one year. Furthermore, impaired growth of normal appearing hippocampi after FSE suggests subtle injury even in the absence of T2 hyperintensity. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the relationship of these findings to TLE. PMID:24318290

  14. INTRA-ARTERIAL PREOPERATIVE CHEMOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Zikiryakhodzhaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The article is devoted to studying the prospects of the use of selective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer IIIA, B, C stages. A review of literature on the methods of targent intra-arterial infusion of cytostatics and tumor embolization is performed, also it shows the results of treatment with different chemotherapeutic agents — epirubicin, doxorubicin, taxotere, cisplatin, 5‑fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide.

  15. Influence of intra-colonic infusion of acetic acid irritation combined with chronic external bondage stress on the visceral sensitivity and mast cell state in the colon of rats%乙酸联合束缚应激对大鼠内脏敏感性及肠道肥大细胞状态的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄肇朦; 王霄腾; 吕宾

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore the establishment method of an animal model of irritable bowel syndrome ( IBS) and the evaluation of this animal model.Methods 30 adult SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: acetic acid irritation and bondage stress group ( n=10 ) , bondage stress group ( n =10 ) , and normal control group ( n=10 ) .The rats of the intervention group received an intra-colonic infusion of 0.4% acetic acid irritation combined with bondage stress to establish an animal model of IBS.The colonic sensitivity of the intervention group rats was assessed by stool test and colorectal distension ( CRD) test.Hydrochloric acid toluidine blue staining was used to observe the number degranulation phenomenon of mast cells in the ileocecum.Results On the 7th day, the number of soft feces was 8 and loose stool was 4 in the model group, significantly higher than that in the bondage stress group(0 and 0) (P<0.05),and normal control group (1 and 0) (P<0.05).On the 10th day, when the AWR=2, the average rectal distension volume was 1.2 mL, significantly lower than that in the bondage stress group(1.37mL) (P <0.05),also significantly lower than in the normal control group (1.49 mL) (P<0.05), and when the AWR=4, the average rectal distension volume was 1.49 mL, significantly lower than that in the bondage stress group(1.74mL) (P<0.05),and the normal control group (1.77 mL) (P<0.05).These results indicated that the visceral sensitivity of the model group was significantly higher than that in the bondage stress group and normal control group.Histological analysis showed that the rats of all groups had no obvious inflammatory changes.Conclusions Chronic bondage stress combined with intra-colonic infusion of 0.4%acetic acid irritation can be used to increase the visceral sensitivity and amount and degranulation of mast cells in the intestinal tissue in rats.This established rat model shows pathogenetic changes resembling the pathogenesis of human

  16. Anisomycin infusions in the parabrachial nucleus and taste neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-You; Amodeo, Leslie Renee; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2012-11-01

    To investigate whether de novo protein synthesis in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is required for recovery from taste neophobia, anisomycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor) was infused immediately after consumption of a novel saccharin solution (Experiment 1). Unexpectedly, this PBN treatment caused a reduction in saccharin intake. In addition, we found that the anisomycin-induced suppression of tastant intake was attenuated by prior intra-PBN infusions of lidocaine (Experiment 2). This pattern of results raises concerns about using anisomycin to investigate memory consolidation processes in the PBN. Thus, a different manipulation may be needed to examine the nature of the neuroplastic changes that occur in the PBN during taste memory formation.

  17. Empathy in hippocampal amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle, J N; Tranel, D; Cohen, N J; Duff, M C

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. The scientific investigation of empathy has focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, and has pointed to the importance of a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity) make it well-suited to meet some of the crucial demands of empathy, and a careful investigation of this possibility could make a significant contribution to the neuroscientific understanding of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female) with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC) damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. Unlike healthy comparison participants, in response to the empathy inductions hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior. The results provide preliminary evidence for a role for hippocampal declarative memory in empathy.

  18. 经动脉灌注脂肪乳剂顺铂混合液行犬胰腺癌局部化疗的研究%Regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer of dogs with the mixture of lipid emulsion-cisplatin:an experimental study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 王茂强; 段留新; 宋鹏; 敖国昆; 廖洪波; 宋晶莹

    2009-01-01

    P值均<0.01));B组的AUC、C0明显低于A组(t值分别为7.57、5.48,P值均<0.01),t1/2长于A组(t值为3.22,P<0.05)。 B组的胰左叶、胰腺角中顺铂含量较A组增高[B组分别为0.18、0.18 mg/L,A组分别为0.05、0.05 mg/L],差异有统计学意义( t值分别为2.52、2.73,P值均<0.05);胰腺右叶和脾脏组织中的顺铂浓度两组比较差异无统计学意义[B组分别为0.11、0.29 mg/L,A组分别为0.07、0.24 mg/L,P值均>0.05]。病理检查所见:A、B组犬胰腺、胰周淋巴结、肝脏、脾脏有少量炎细胞浸润及血管扩张充血,血管内可见脂肪乳颗粒。其余组织及C、D组病理检查未见异常。结论脂肪乳作为溶剂可使顺铂在胰腺的浓度显著增高、进入血循环的药物总量减少。进入组织的药物量与脂肪乳内所含顺铂的浓度有关,浓度越高,进入组织内的药物越多。%Objective To approach the mechanism and efficacy of regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with the mixture of lipid emulsion-CDDP ( LE-CDDP ) for treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.Methods Twenty-four health dogs were divided into four groups ( group A,B,C, and D).The dosage of CDDP was used in 4 mg/kg/body weight for each animal.The 20%LE, as a solvent, was used in the experimental animals with 2 ml/kg/body weight ( group A ) and 1 ml/kg/body weight ( group B) , respectively.Normal sodium ( NS) as a solvent was used as control with 2 ml/kg/body weight (group C) and 1 ml/kg/body weight (group D), respectively.The LE-CDDP mixture and the NS-CDDP mixture were infused into the proximal segment of splenic artery under the DSA, with transfemoral arterial approach.Blood samples were collected after infusion at 0,3,5,10,20,30,40,50,60 min and the tissues were obtained after the 60 min′s blood sample was collected.Blood samples, absorbent gland in peripancreas, liver, spleen, kidney

  19. Superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Akihiro; Suzuki, Fumiyuki; Inuyama, Yukio; Fukuda, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-05-01

    Superselective arterial infusion for patients with advanced head and neck cancer has been increasingly applied in Japan. We analyzed our experiences and evaluated the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Through October 1999 to March 2002, 29 patients, ranging in age between 33 and 71 years (median 52 years), received superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy of cisplatin (100-120 mg/m{sup 2}/week) with simultaneous intravenous infusion of thiosulfate for neutralizing cisplatin toxicity, and conventional concomitant extrabeam radiotherapy (65 Gy/26 f/6.5 weeks). Four patients were diagnosed with stage III and 25 with stage IV. Thirteen patients were considered contraindicated for surgery, and the other 16 patients rejected radical surgery. Primary tumor sites included paranasal sinus (11 patients), hypopharynx (7), oropharynx (6), oral cavity (4), and parotid gland (1). During the median follow-up period of 20 months, there was no apparent recurrence in 14 (48.3%) of 29 patients. Eleven (37.9%) patients died of disease, and three (10.3%) were alive with disease. In twenty-one patients (72.4%) the primary lesions were well-controlled. Acute toxic effects were moderate, and severe toxic events occurred in four cases, namely, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia, sepsis, tetraplasia, and osteoradionecrosis. We confirmed the effectiveness and safety of superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy. Furthermore, we must establish the optimal procedures and schedule, as well as the indications for this treatment. This treatment protocol may improve the prognosis of patients with unresectable disease and patients rejecting surgical treatment. Further study in this particular area is needed. (author)

  20. Retrospective study on glucose metabolism disorders induced by preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with EOF regimen in patients with gastric cancer%EOF 方案术前动脉介入化疗对胃癌患者血糖影响的回顾性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆京; 陈彻; 陈志伟; 姚学权; 刘福坤

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨胃癌患者接受EOF方案术前动脉介入化疗前后血糖水平的变化,并分析相关因素对血糖变化的影响。方法:收集2012年至2014年间92例接受EOF方案术前动脉介入化疗的胃癌患者在介入化疗前及介入化疗后24 h的空腹血糖检验结果及相关临床资料,进行回顾性分析。结果:EOF方案动脉介入化疗后患者血糖平均水平增加,与介入化疗前相比差异有统计学意义( P<0.01)。患者年龄、性别、肿瘤部位、肿瘤分期等相关因素对血糖升高的影响差异无统计学意义( P>0.05)。合并糖尿病的胃癌患者动脉介入化疗后血糖升高水平明显高于非糖尿病患者,差异有统计学意义( P<0.001)。结论:EOF方案动脉介入化疗可使胃癌患者的血糖升高,尤其是合并糖尿病的胃癌患者血糖升高尤为明显,在积极治疗原发病的同时应注意监测患者血糖并及时处理。%Objective:To explore the effects of the preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy( PAIC) with EOF regimen on blood glucose of gastric cancer patients and to find the influencing factors.Methods:92 patients with gastric cancer participated in the study; they had received PAIC from 2012 to 2014 in our hospital.The regimen consisted of EPI 50 mg · m-2 , OXA 130 mg · m-2 , and 5-FU 750 mg · m-2 .Their blood glucose was detected on schedule before and after chemotherapy; clinical factors were collected.Some changed regularity on blood glucose and the influential factors were found after chemotherapy.Results: After PAIC, patients'blood glucose was higher than before the treatment ( P0.05 ) .Gastric cancer patients with diabetes were more vulnerable to induce blood glucose rose after PAIC( P<0.001) .Conclusion:PAIC could enhance blood glucose level in gastric cancer patients, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus.In order to complete tumor chemotherapy safely and successfully, strict

  1. Estradiol enhances object recognition memory in Swiss female mice by activating hippocampal estrogen receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luciana M; Bastos, Cristiane P; de Souza, Jéssica M; Ribeiro, Fabíola M; Pereira, Grace S

    2014-10-01

    In rodents, 17β-estradiol (E2) enhances hippocampal function and improves performance in several memory tasks. Regarding the object recognition paradigm, E2 commonly act as a cognitive enhancer. However, the types of estrogen receptor (ER) involved, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are still under investigation. In the present study, we asked whether E2 enhances object recognition memory by activating ERα and/or ERβ in the hippocampus of Swiss female mice. First, we showed that immediately post-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of E2 (0.2 mg/kg) allowed object recognition memory to persist 48 h in ovariectomized (OVX) Swiss female mice. This result indicates that Swiss female mice are sensitive to the promnesic effects of E2 and is in accordance with other studies, which used C57/BL6 female mice. To verify if the activation of hippocampal ERα or ERβ would be sufficient to improve object memory, we used PPT and DPN, which are selective ERα and ERβ agonists, respectively. We found that PPT, but not DPN, improved object memory in Swiss female mice. However, DPN was able to improve memory in C57/BL6 female mice, which is in accordance with other studies. Next, we tested if the E2 effect on improving object memory depends on ER activation in the hippocampus. Thus, we tested if the infusion of intra-hippocampal TPBM and PHTPP, selective antagonists of ERα and ERβ, respectively, would block the memory enhancement effect of E2. Our results showed that TPBM, but not PHTPP, blunted the promnesic effect of E2, strongly suggesting that in Swiss female mice, the ERα and not the ERβ is the receptor involved in the promnesic effect of E2. It was already demonstrated that E2, as well as PPT and DPN, increase the phospho-ERK2 level in the dorsal hippocampus of C57/BL6 mice. Here we observed that PPT increased phospho-ERK1, while DPN decreased phospho-ERK2 in the dorsal hippocampus of Swiss female mice subjected to the object recognition sample phase

  2. Neuropeptides and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaben, M J; Gray, W P

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is important for modulating the behavioural responses to stress and for certain forms of learning and memory. The mechanisms underlying the necessary coupling of neuronal activity to neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) function remain poorly understood. Within the dentate subgranular stem cell niche, local interneurons appear to play an important part in this excitation-neurogenesis coupling via GABAergic transmission, which promotes neuronal differentiation and integration. Neuropeptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and galanin have emerged as important mediators for signalling local and extrinsic interneuronal activity to subgranular zone precursors. Here we review the distribution of these neuropeptides and their receptors in the neurogenic area of the hippocampus and their precise effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. We also discuss neuropeptides' potential involvement in functional aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis particularly their involvement in the modulation of learning and memory and behavior responses.

  3. Empathy in hippocampal amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle N Beadle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The scientific investigation of empathy has become a cornerstone in the field of social cognition. Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. Scientific investigations of empathy have focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, pointing to a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate. While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, we propose that there are compelling reasons to inquire about the contribution of the hippocampus to social cognition. We propose that the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity make it well-suited to meet the demands of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. In response to the empathy inductions, unlike healthy comparison participants, hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior from the control condition. Taken together, these results provide preliminary evidence for a role of hippocampal declarative memory in empathy.

  4. α-Calcium calmodulin kinase II modulates the temporal structure of hippocampal bursting patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeiwon Cho

    Full Text Available The alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (α-CaMKII is known to play a key role in CA1/CA3 synaptic plasticity, hippocampal place cell stability and spatial learning. Additionally, there is evidence from hippocampal electrophysiological slice studies that this kinase has a role in regulating ion channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, we report in vivo single unit studies, with α-CaMKII mutant mice, in which threonine 305 was replaced with an aspartate (α-CaMKII(T305D mutants, that indicate that this kinase modulates spike patterns in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Previous studies showed that α-CaMKII(T305D mutants have abnormalities in both hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent learning. We found that besides decreased place cell stability, which could be caused by their LTP impairments, the hippocampal CA1 spike patterns of α-CaMKII(T305D mutants were profoundly abnormal. Although overall firing rate, and overall burst frequency were not significantly altered in these mutants, inter-burst intervals, mean number of intra-burst spikes, ratio of intra-burst spikes to total spikes, and mean intra-burst intervals were significantly altered. In particular, the intra burst intervals of place cells in α-CaMKII(T305D mutants showed higher variability than controls. These results provide in vivo evidence that besides its well-known function in synaptic plasticity, α-CaMKII, and in particular its inhibitory phosphorylation at threonine 305, also have a role in shaping the temporal structure of hippocampal burst patterns. These results suggest that some of the molecular processes involved in acquiring information may also shape the patterns used to encode this information.

  5. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  6. [Continuous-infusion ketamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, P G; Caggese, G; Di Fabio, A; Di Nino, G F; Cocchi, V

    1980-08-01

    An investigation was made of the employment of ketamin as the sole anaesthetic in general surgery, using continuous infusion of a 1% solution for both induction and maintenance in 118 cases. ECG was monitored and arterial pressure was measured invasively. Central venous pressure was also determined in 10 cases. Changes in serum enzyme values during and after surgery were examined in 35 patients. Blood samples were withdrawn before induction, after the return to consciousness, and 24 hr after the operation. Side-effects were common, but slight. Five patients suffered from nightmares, but these were persons with marked imaginative activity and a melancholic nature. Cardiocirculatory function was satisfactory. In particular, peripheral perfusion was excellent in all cases.

  7. Intra-industry trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntra-industry trade arises if a country simultaneously imports and exports similar types of goods or services. Similarity is identified here by the goods or services being classified in the same “sector”. Suppose, for the sake of argument, that we focus on the sector “cars”. Intra-indus

  8. Infusion's greenfield subsidiary in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, C.; van Eerde, W.; The, D.

    2012-01-01

    The president of Infusion Development Corporation was reviewing the progress of the new subsidiary the company had set up 15 months earlier in Krakow, Poland. The purpose of the subsidiary was to work with other Infusion offices around the world to provide innovative software development services to

  9. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apkarian, A Vania; Mutso, Amelia A; Centeno, Maria V; Kan, Lixin; Wu, Melody; Levinstein, Marjorie; Banisadr, Ghazal; Gobeske, Kevin T; Miller, Richard J; Radulovic, Jelena; Hen, René; Kessler, John A

    2016-02-01

    The full role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) remains to be determined, yet it is implicated in learning and emotional functions, and is disrupted in negative mood disorders. Recent evidence indicates that AHN is decreased in persistent pain consistent with the idea that chronic pain is a major stressor, associated with negative moods and abnormal memories. Yet, the role of AHN in development of persistent pain has remained unexplored. In this study, we test the influence of AHN in postinjury inflammatory and neuropathic persistent pain-like behaviors by manipulating neurogenesis: pharmacologically through intracerebroventricular infusion of the antimitotic AraC; ablation of AHN by x-irradiation; and using transgenic mice with increased or decreased AHN. Downregulating neurogenesis reversibly diminished or blocked persistent pain; oppositely, upregulating neurogenesis led to prolonged persistent pain. Moreover, we could dissociate negative mood from persistent pain. These results suggest that AHN-mediated hippocampal learning mechanisms are involved in the emergence of persistent pain.

  10. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  11. Hippocampal sclerosis dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyike, Chiadi U.; Pletnikova, Olga; Sloane, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Campbell; Troncoso, Juan C.; Rabins, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe characteristics of hippocampal sclerosis dementia. Methods Convenience sample of Hippocampal sclerosis dementia (HSD) recruited from the Johns Hopkins University Brain Resource Center. Twenty-four cases with post-mortem pathological diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis dementia were reviewed for clinical characterization. Results The cases showed atrophy and neuronal loss localized to the hippocampus, amygdala and entorrhinal cortex. The majority (79.2%) had amnesia at illness onset, and many (54.2%) showed abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. Nearly 42% presented with an amnesic state, and 37.5% presented with amnesia plus abnormal conduct and psychiatric disorder. All eventually developed a behavioral or psychiatric disorder. Disorientation, executive dysfunction, aphasia, agnosia and apraxia were uncommon at onset. Alzheimer disease (AD) was the initial clinical diagnosis in 89% and the final clinical diagnosis in 75%. Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) was uncommon (seen in 8%). Conclusion HSD shows pathological characteristics of FTD and clinical features that mimic AD and overlap with FTD. The findings, placed in the context of earlier work, support the proposition that HSD belongs to the FTD family, where it may be identified as an amnesic variant. PMID:24363834

  12. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  13. Prolonged fever after Infliximab infusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer; Katz; Michael; Frank

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacologic management for ulcerative colitis (UC) has recently been expanded to include antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for severe disease. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed again TNF α was first tested in patients with Crohn’s disease. In addition to serious infections, malignancy, drug induced lupus and other autoimmune diseases, serum sickness-like reactions, neurological disease, and infusion reactions further complicate the use of Infliximab. We report a case of prolonged fever after Infliximab infusion to treat steroid refractory UC.

  14. Noradrenergic mechanism involved in the nociceptive modulation of hippocampal CA3 region of normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Teng, Yueqiu; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Chunxiao; Xu, Manying; Yang, Lizhuang

    2014-06-27

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and regulates antinociception. However, the mechanism of action of NE on pain-related neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region is not clear. This study examines the effects of NE, phentolamine on the electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal CA3 region of rats. Trains of electric impulses applied to the right sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation. The electrical activities of PENs or PINs in the hippocampal CA3 region were recorded by using a glass microelectrode. Our results revealed that, in the hippocampal CA3 region, the intra-CA3 region microinjection of NE decreased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and prolonged the discharged latency of PEN, and increased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and shortened discharged inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN, exhibiting the specific analgesic effect of NE. While intra-CA3 region microinjection of phentolamine produced the opposite response. It implies that phentolamine can block the effect of endogenous NE to cause the enhanced response of PEN and PIN to noxious stimulation. On the basis of above findings we can deduce that NE, phentolamine and alpha-adrenoceptor are involved in the modulation of nociceptive information transmission in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  15. Intra-operative colloid administration increases the clearance of a post-operative fluid load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Tine; Hahn, Robert; Holte, K;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether an intra-operative colloid infusion alters the dynamics of a crystalloid load administered post-operatively. METHODS: Ten patients received 12.5 ml/kg of Ringer's lactate over 30 min 1-3 days before and 4 h after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, during which 10 ml....../kg of a colloid solution, hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4), was infused. The total body clearance of the pre- and post-operative test infusions was taken as the ratio between the urinary excretion and the Hb-derived dilution of venous plasma over 150 min. The plasma clearance of the infused fluid was calculated...... using volume kinetics based on the plasma dilution alone. The pre-operative plasma clearance was compared with the post-operative plasma clearance and patients served as their own control. RESULTS: The urinary excretion averaged 350 ml for the pre-operative infusion and 612 ml post-operatively, which...

  16. [The intraosseous infusion in adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancade, D; Rüttimann, M; Wagnon, G; Landy, C; Schaeffer, E; Gagnon, N; Nadaud, J; Favier, J-C

    2013-05-01

    Intraosseous infusion is an old knowledge, abandoned in the 1950s in favor of the peripheral vein, and it was essentially described in pediatrics and military medicine. Since 2005, this way is experiencing a resurgence of interest in emergency medicine particularly in adults after the failure's installation of a peripheral vein in order not to waste the time of care and administration of treatment. New devices that allow intraosseous infusion are currently used in humans. We propose to review the different kind of catheters used, to know the main technical characteristics, indications, contraindications and potential complications. We propose a comparison with the peripheral vein and a comparison between the different catheters.

  17. Intracerebroventricular administration of okadaic acid induces hippocampal glucose uptake dysfunction and tau phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetto, Núbia; Hansen, Fernanda; Brolese, Giovana; Batassini, Cristiane; Lirio, Franciane; Galland, Fabiana; Dos Santos, João Paulo Almeida; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Intraneuronal aggregates of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), together with beta-amyloid plaques and astrogliosis, are histological markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanism of sporadic AD remains poorly understood, but abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau protein is suggested to have a role in NFTs genesis, which leads to neuronal dysfunction and death. Okadaic acid (OKA), a strong inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, has been used to induce dementia similar to AD in rats. We herein investigated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of OKA (100 and 200ng) on hippocampal tau phosphorylation at Ser396, which is considered an important fibrillogenic tau protein site, and on glucose uptake, which is reduced early in AD. ICV infusion of OKA (at 200ng) induced a spatial cognitive deficit, hippocampal astrogliosis (based on GFAP increment) and increase in tau phosphorylation at site 396 in this model. Moreover, we observed a decreased glucose uptake in the hippocampal slices of OKA-treated rats. In vitro exposure of hippocampal slices to OKA altered tau phosphorylation at site 396, without any associated change in glucose uptake activity. Taken together, these findings further our understanding of OKA neurotoxicity, in vivo and vitro, particularly with regard to the role of tau phosphorylation, and reinforce the importance of the OKA dementia model for studying the neurochemical alterations that may occur in AD, such as NFTs and glucose hypometabolism.

  18. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  19. Differences in work values : understanding the role of intra- versus inter-country variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, A.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature emphasizes the need for studies taking a contingency perspective to international HRM to move beyond mean country differences in work values and begin considering intra-country variation (ICV). We use individual-level data on Hofstedeian values—not hitherto available—to infuse

  20. Terapia trombolítica intra-arterial intra-operatória

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Terezinha Guillaumon

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar um tratamento coadjuvante à desobstrução mecânica, nas oclusões arteriais agudas de membros. MÉTODO: A impossibilidade de desobstrução mecânica cirúrgica completa dos vasos tem levado a altas taxas de amputações. Utilizamos como coadjuvante desta a aplicação de agente trombolítico intra-operatório, intra-arterial regional, seguida da infusão de solução de diálise peritoneal à baixa temperatura. RESULTADO: Neste pequeno grupo de doentes, verificamos que o uso de fibrinolítico seguido da lavagem da árvore arterial com solução preservadora, à baixa temperatura, aumenta a taxa de sucesso cirúrgico com preservação do membro e sua função. CONCLUSÃO: A terapia trombolítica intra-arterial regional, associada ao uso de solução de diálise peritoneal heparinizada, apresentou um percentual de sucesso de 88,88% dos casos tratados com este método.

  1. Intra oceanic subduction systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.D.Larter; P.T.Leat; Dr.JohnCobbing

    2004-01-01

    The book is the result of a joint meeting ofthe Tectonic Studies Group, the Marine Studies Group and the Volcanic and Magmatic Studies Group hosted by the Geological Society of London in September 2001. It is 382 pages in length and consists of sixteen articles, most of which describe a different example of intra oceanic subduction. All the contributions to this volume are clearly presented and have benefitted from peer review and careful editing.

  2. [Intra-articular injections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  3. MRI visible drug eluting magnetic microspheres for transcatheter intra-arterial delivery to liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chen, Jeane; Omary, Reed A; Larson, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible amonafide-eluting alginate microspheres were developed for targeted arterial-infusion chemotherapy. These alginate microspheres were synthesized using a highly efficient microfluidic gelation process. The microspheres included magnetic clusters formed by USPIO nanoparticles to permit MRI and a sustained drug-release profile. The biocompatibility, MR imaging properties and amonafide release kinetics of these microspheres were investigated during in vitro studies. A xenograft rodent model was used to demonstrate the feasibility to deliver these microspheres to liver tumors using hepatic transcatheter intra-arterial infusions and potential to visualize the intra-hepatic delivery of these microspheres to both liver tumor and normal tissues with MRI immediately after infusion. This approach offer the potential for catheter-directed drug delivery to liver tumors for reduced systemic toxicity and superior therapeutic outcomes.

  4. Role of dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors in associating morphine reward with contextual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Esmail; Khodagholi, Fariba; Haghparast, Abbas

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of orexin receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) in the development of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and modification of hippocampal c-Fos and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) levels. Orexin-A (0.5, 5, and 50 pmol) and the orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB334867 (10, 20, and 40 nmol), were bilaterally infused into the dHPC immediately before conditioning with morphine (0.5 or 7.5 mg/kg) using the CPP task. Western blotting was then used to measure the protein levels of c-Fos, total CREB, and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) in the hippocampus. Orexin did not enhance the rewarding efficacy of morphine (0.5 mg/kg), but caused a reduction in hippocampal c-Fos. Successful conditioning with morphine (7.5 mg/kg) was associated with increased levels of hippocampal c-Fos and CREB, but with decreased CREB phosphorylation. Intrahippocampal administration of SB334867 before conditioning sessions disrupted the rewarding effect of morphine (7.5 mg/kg) and blocked morphine-induced increases in hippocampal CREB protein levels. The results suggest that orexin signaling within the dHPC is necessary for the development of morphine CPP. Morphine reward is related to altered levels of hippocampal c-Fos and CREB. Inhibition of morphine-induced increases in CREB levels might be the underlying mechanism for the disruption of morphine CPP.

  5. MONITORING TETESAN INFUS BERBASIS MIKROKONTROLER ATMEGA16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiyanto Iqbal Nugroho

    2015-09-01

    Penelitian ini menghasilkan suatu alat monitoring tetesan infus yang dapat memberikan informasi mengenai laju kecepatan tetesan dan kondisi cairan pada infus. Sistem yang secara realtime dimonitoring oleh perawat ini dapat mengurangi permasalahan yang timbul karena kelalaian petugas. Sehingga perawat tidak secara manual dalam mengatur kecepatan tetesan infus dan meningkatkan pelayanan kepada pasien.

  6. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand...

  7. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 2/3 Supports the Involvement of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway on Contextual Fear Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumas, Stephanie; Ceccom, Johnatan; Halley, Helene; Frances, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Elucidating the functional properties of the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 areas is critical for understanding the role of the dorsal hippocampus in contextual fear memory processing. In order to specifically disrupt various hippocampal inputs, we used region-specific infusions of DCG-IV, the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, which…

  8. [Inadvertent epidural infusion of paracetamol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sánchez, V E; del Pino Moreno, A L

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was accidentally administered an epidural infusion of paracetamol instead of levobupivacaine for postoperative pain therapy during the postoperative period of abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia. The patient had no neurological symptoms at any time, although a slight tendency to arterial hypotension that did not require treatment was observed. No rescue analgesia was necessary until 8h after the start of epidural infusion. The incidence of these types of errors is probably underestimated, although there are several cases reported with various drugs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Combination of retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and Seldinger method in locally advanced oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsurgical strategies for locally advanced oral cancer are desirable. Superselective intra-arterial infusion with radiotherapy was utilized for this purpose, and there are two types of superselective intra-arterial infusion methods: The Seldinger method and the retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (HFT method. In one case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced tongue cancer, and the Seldinger method was used for additional administration of cisplatin (CDDP to compensate for a lack of drug flow in the HFT method. In another case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced lower gingival cancer. The Seldinger method was applied to metastatic lymph nodes. In both cases, additional administration of CDDP using the Seldinger method resulted in a complete response. The combination of the HFT and Seldinger methods was useful to eradicate locally advanced oral cancer because each method compensated for the defects of the other.

  10. Combination of retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and Seldinger method in locally advanced oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Masataka; Ohya, Ryouichi; Kodama, Masaaki; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Asahina, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The nonsurgical strategies for locally advanced oral cancer are desirable. Superselective intra-arterial infusion with radiotherapy was utilized for this purpose, and there are two types of superselective intra-arterial infusion methods: The Seldinger method and the retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (HFT method). In one case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced tongue cancer, and the Seldinger method was used for additional administration of cisplatin (CDDP) to compensate for a lack of drug flow in the HFT method. In another case, the HFT method was applied to locally advanced lower gingival cancer. The Seldinger method was applied to metastatic lymph nodes. In both cases, additional administration of CDDP using the Seldinger method resulted in a complete response. The combination of the HFT and Seldinger methods was useful to eradicate locally advanced oral cancer because each method compensated for the defects of the other.

  11. Antibacterial activity of epidural infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, M W; Davies, M J; Hoyt, C; Joyce, L; Kilner, R; Waters, M J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation appears to be increasing, being recently reported as one in 1000 among surgical patients. This study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of various local anaesthetics and additives, used in epidural infusions, against a range of micro-organisms associated with epidural abscess. The aim was to determine which, if any, epidural infusion solution has the greatest antibacterial activity. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine crystals were dissolved and added to Mueller-Hinton Agar in concentrations of 0.06%, 0.125%, 0.2%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine were also mixed with agar in isolation and in combination with the local anaesthetics. Using a reference agar dilution method, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for a range of bacteria. Bupivacaine showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentrations between 0.125% and 0.25%. It did not inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at any of the concentrations tested. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine showed no activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even at the highest concentrations tested, and minimal activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations 0.5% and 1% respectively). The presence of fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine had no additional effect on the antibacterial activity of any of the local anaesthetic agents. The low concentrations of local anaesthetic usually used in epidural infusions have minimal antibacterial activity. While the clinical implications of this in vitro study are not known, consideration should be given to increasing the concentration of bupivacaine in an epidural infusion or to administering a daily bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine to reduce the risk of epidural bacterial growth.

  12. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); J.L. Stein; E. Hofer (Edith); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); Ikram, M.K. (M. Kamran); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); L. Abramovic; S. Alhusaini (Saud); N. Amin (Najaf); M. Andersson (Micael); K. Arfanakis (Konstantinos); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); T. Axelsson (Tomas); A.H. Beecham (Ashley); A. Beiser (Alexa); M. Bernard (Manon); S.H. Blanton (Susan H.); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.M. Brickman (Adam M.); Carmichael, O. (Owen); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); V. Chouraki (Vincent); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); F. Crivello (Fabrice); A. den Braber (Anouk); Doan, N.T. (Nhat Trung); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); O. Grimm (Oliver); M.D. Griswold (Michael); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); Gutman, B.A. (Boris A.); J. Hass (Johanna); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); D. Hoehn (David); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); Jørgensen, K.N. (Kjetil N.); N. Karbalai (Nazanin); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); Marquand, A.F. (Andre F.); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); McKay, D.R. (David R.); Milaneschi, Y. (Yuri); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); K. Nho (Kwangsik); A.C. Nugent (Allison); P. Nyquist (Paul); Loohuis, L.M.O. (Loes M. Olde); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); M. Papmeyer (Martina); Pirpamer, L. (Lukas); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); Richards, J.S. (Jennifer S.); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Rommelse (Nanda); S. Ropele (Stefan); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); T. Rundek (Tatjana); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); Saremi, A. (Arvin); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); Shen, L. (Li); J. Shin (Jean); Shumskaya, E. (Elena); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R. Sprooten (Roy); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); R. Toro (Roberto); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trompet (Stella); D. Vaidya (Dhananjay); J. van der Grond (Jeroen); S. van der Lee (Sven); Van Der Meer, D. (Dennis); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); Van Rooij, D. (Daan); E. Walton (Esther); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); Wolfers, T. (Thomas); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); Yang, J. (Jingyun); A.P. Zijdenbos; M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); I. Agartz (Ingrid); L. Almasy (Laura); D. Ames (David); Amouyel, P. (Philippe); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; S. Barral (Sandra); M.E. Bastin (Mark); Becker, D.M. (Diane M.); J.T. Becker; D.A. Bennett (David A.); J. Blangero (John); H. van Bokhoven (Hans); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H. Brodaty (Henry); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); D.M. Cannon (Dara); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); Cheng, C.-Y. (Ching-Yu); S. Cichon (Sven); M.R. Cookson (Mark); A. Corvin (Aiden); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); A.J. de Craen (Anton); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P.L. de Jager (Philip); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S. Debette (Stéphanie); C. DeCarli (Charles); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); A. Dillman (Allissa); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); Duggirala, R. (Ravi); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); C. Enzinger (Christian); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); Fedko, I.O. (Iryna O.); Fernández, G. (Guillén); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); S.E. Fisher (Simon); D. Fleischman (Debra); I. Ford (Ian); M. Fornage (Myriam); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); Fukunaga, M. (Masaki); Gibbs, J.R. (J. Raphael); D.C. Glahn (David); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); O. Gruber (Oliver); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); Håberg, A.K. (Asta K.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (C.); Hashimoto, R. (Ryota); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); Ho, B.-C. (Beng-Choon); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Holsboer (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M.J. Huentelman (Matthew); H.H. Pol; Ikeda, M. (Masashi); Jack, C.R. (Clifford R.); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); Jönsson, E.G. (Erik G.); J.W. Jukema; R. Kahn; Kanai, R. (Ryota); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); Knopman, D.S. (David S.); P. Kochunov (Peter); Kwok, J.B. (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); H. Lemaître (Herve); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); O.L. Lopez (Oscar L.); S. Lovestone (Simon); Martinez, O. (Oliver); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); McDonald, C. (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); McMahon, F.J. (Francis J.); McMahon, K.L. (Katie L.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); I. Melle (Ingrid); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. (Andreas); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); Montgomery, G.W. (Grant W.); D.W. Morris (Derek W); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); M. Nauck (Matthias); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Nyberg (Lars); Ohi, K. (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); Pike, G.B. (G. Bruce); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (M.); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); N. Seiferth (Nina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); M. Ryten (Mina); Sacco, R.L. (Ralph L.); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); Schmidt, H. (Helena); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); Sigursson, S. (Sigurdur); Simmons, A. (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); Smith, C. (Colin); J.W. Smoller; H. Soininen (H.); V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); M. Tsolaki (Magda); C. Tzourio (Christophe); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Hernández, M.C.V. (Maria C. Valdés); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); A. van der Lugt (Aad); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); B.N. Vardarajan (Badri); B. Vellas (Bruno); D.J. Veltman (Dick); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); J. Wardlaw (Joanna); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); M.E. Weale (Michael); Weinberger, D.R. (Daniel R.); Weiner, M.W. (Michael W.); Wen, W. (Wei); E. Westman (Eric); T.J.H. White (Tonya); Wong, T.Y. (Tien Y.); Wright, C.B. (Clinton B.); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman; N.G. Martin (Nicholas); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M.J. Wright (Margaret); W.T. Longstreth Jr; G. Schumann (Gunter); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); B. Franke (Barbara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); S. Seshadri (Sudha); P.M. Thompson (Paul); M.K. Ikram (Kamran)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpi

  13. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Adams, Hieab H H; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E; Bis, Joshua C; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W; Abramovic, Lucija|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34549072X; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/286852071; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344497569; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304811432; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250566370; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Craen, Anton J M; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; De Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/142348228; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073778532; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Haren, Neeltje E M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/271562161; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Martin, Nicholas G; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wright, Margaret J; Longstreth, W T; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J; Medland, Sarah E; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hi

  14. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); J.L. Stein; E. Hofer (Edith); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); Ikram, M.K. (M. Kamran); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); L. Abramovic; S. Alhusaini (Saud); N. Amin (Najaf); M. Andersson (Micael); K. Arfanakis (Konstantinos); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); T. Axelsson (Tomas); A.H. Beecham (Ashley); A. Beiser (Alexa); M. Bernard (Manon); S.H. Blanton (Susan H.); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.M. Brickman (Adam M.); Carmichael, O. (Owen); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); V. Chouraki (Vincent); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); F. Crivello (Fabrice); A. den Braber (Anouk); Doan, N.T. (Nhat Trung); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); O. Grimm (Oliver); M.D. Griswold (Michael); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); Gutman, B.A. (Boris A.); J. Hass (Johanna); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); D. Hoehn (David); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); Jørgensen, K.N. (Kjetil N.); N. Karbalai (Nazanin); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); Marquand, A.F. (Andre F.); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); McKay, D.R. (David R.); Milaneschi, Y. (Yuri); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); K. Nho (Kwangsik); A.C. Nugent (Allison); P. Nyquist (Paul); Loohuis, L.M.O. (Loes M. Olde); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); M. Papmeyer (Martina); Pirpamer, L. (Lukas); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); Richards, J.S. (Jennifer S.); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Rommelse (Nanda); S. Ropele (Stefan); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); T. Rundek (Tatjana); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); Saremi, A. (Arvin); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); Shen, L. (Li); J. Shin (Jean); Shumskaya, E. (Elena); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R. Sprooten (Roy); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); R. Toro (Roberto); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trompet (Stella); D. Vaidya (Dhananjay); J. van der Grond (Jeroen); S. van der Lee (Sven); Van Der Meer, D. (Dennis); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); Van Rooij, D. (Daan); E. Walton (Esther); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); Wolfers, T. (Thomas); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); Yang, J. (Jingyun); A.P. Zijdenbos; M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); I. Agartz (Ingrid); L. Almasy (Laura); D. Ames (David); Amouyel, P. (Philippe); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; S. Barral (Sandra); M.E. Bastin (Mark); Becker, D.M. (Diane M.); J.T. Becker; D.A. Bennett (David A.); J. Blangero (John); H. van Bokhoven (Hans); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H. Brodaty (Henry); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); D.M. Cannon (Dara); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); Cheng, C.-Y. (Ching-Yu); S. Cichon (Sven); M.R. Cookson (Mark); A. Corvin (Aiden); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); A.J. de Craen (Anton); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P.L. de Jager (Philip); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S. Debette (Stéphanie); C. DeCarli (Charles); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); A. Dillman (Allissa); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); Duggirala, R. (Ravi); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); C. Enzinger (Christian); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); Fedko, I.O. (Iryna O.); Fernández, G. (Guillén); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); S.E. Fisher (Simon); D. Fleischman (Debra); I. Ford (Ian); M. Fornage (Myriam); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); Fukunaga, M. (Masaki); Gibbs, J.R. (J. Raphael); D.C. Glahn (David); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); O. Gruber (Oliver); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); Håberg, A.K. (Asta K.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (C.); Hashimoto, R. (Ryota); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); Ho, B.-C. (Beng-Choon); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Holsboer (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M.J. Huentelman (Matthew); H.H. Pol; Ikeda, M. (Masashi); Jack, C.R. (Clifford R.); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); Jönsson, E.G. (Erik G.); J.W. Jukema; R. Kahn; Kanai, R. (Ryota); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); Knopman, D.S. (David S.); P. Kochunov (Peter); Kwok, J.B. (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); H. Lemaître (Herve); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); O.L. Lopez (Oscar L.); S. Lovestone (Simon); Martinez, O. (Oliver); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); McDonald, C. (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); McMahon, F.J. (Francis J.); McMahon, K.L. (Katie L.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); I. Melle (Ingrid); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. (Andreas); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); Montgomery, G.W. (Grant W.); D.W. Morris (Derek W); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); M. Nauck (Matthias); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Nyberg (Lars); Ohi, K. (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); Pike, G.B. (G. Bruce); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (M.); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); N. Seiferth (Nina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); M. Ryten (Mina); Sacco, R.L. (Ralph L.); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); Schmidt, H. (Helena); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); Sigursson, S. (Sigurdur); Simmons, A. (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); Smith, C. (Colin); J.W. Smoller; H. Soininen (H.); V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); M. Tsolaki (Magda); C. Tzourio (Christophe); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Hernández, M.C.V. (Maria C. Valdés); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); A. van der Lugt (Aad); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); B.N. Vardarajan (Badri); B. Vellas (Bruno); D.J. Veltman (Dick); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); J. Wardlaw (Joanna); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); M.E. Weale (Michael); Weinberger, D.R. (Daniel R.); Weiner, M.W. (Michael W.); Wen, W. (Wei); E. Westman (Eric); T.J.H. White (Tonya); Wong, T.Y. (Tien Y.); Wright, C.B. (Clinton B.); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman; N.G. Martin (Nicholas); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M.J. Wright (Margaret); W.T. Longstreth Jr; G. Schumann (Gunter); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); B. Franke (Barbara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); S. Seshadri (Sudha); P.M. Thompson (Paul); M.K. Ikram (Kamran)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpi

  15. Experimental intraperitoneal infusion of OK-432 in rats: Evaluation of peritoneal complications and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook [Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Jin, E-mail: hakjink@pusan.ac.k [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University College of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Woo [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University College of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: OK-432 is known to be a potent sclerosant of cystic lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both its safety and pathologic effects after the infusion of OK-432 into the peritoneal cavity of rats. Materials and methods: Twenty male rats were used in this study. Twelve rats were infused intraperitoneally with 0.2 Klinishe Einheit of OK-432 melted in 2 mL of normal saline (group 1: the treated group); four rats each were infused intraperitoneally with 0.5 mL of 99% ethanol (group 2) and normal saline (group 3), and served as the control groups. An abdominal ultrasonographic examination was performed both before and after the infusions in all rats. Three rats in group 1 and one rat in each of groups 2 and 3 were sacrificed each week following the infusion. Gross and microscopic evaluations of the peritoneum and abdominal cavity were performed on each rat. Results: In group 1, the abdomen was clear on gross inspection and the peritoneum was unremarkable on microscopic examination. In group 2, mild-to-moderate peritoneal adhesions were revealed grossly, and inflammation and fibrosis of the peritoneum were demonstrated microscopically. In group 3, no specific abnormalities were noted on gross or microscopic examinations. Conclusion: Leakage or abnormal infusion of OK-432 solution into the peritoneal cavity during sclerotherapy of intra-abdominal or retroperitoneal cystic lesions does not result in any significant complications.

  16. [Intra-arterial thrombolysis of acute mesenteric ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, N; Wintringer, P; Bregeon, Y; Cassat, C; Le Blanche, A; Boulanger, J P; Feiss, P

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with pre-existing cardiac failure, coronary artery and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was presented for an acute mesenteric ischaemia, resulting from an embolic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery. An intra-arterial fibrinolysis with a bolus of 250 000 units of streptokinase, followed by an infusion of 150 mg rtPA with adequate heparin dosage was performed 10 hours after the first symptoms. An abdominal guarding occurred 24 hours later, despite radiological improvement, justifying emergency surgery which confirmed the partial efficiency of the medical therapy. Unfortunately, a cardiogenic shock occurred preoperatively and the patient died five days later from intractable cardiovascular failure.

  17. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Proctor, Lester T.; Sebranek, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To account for group differences in blood pressure and forearm size, and to assess vasodilation, forearm vascular conductance (FVC = FBF/mean arterial blood pressure/lean forearm mass) was calculated. We examined the time to achieve steady-state FVC (mean response time, MRT) and the rise in FVC from rest to steady-state exercise (Δ, exercise − rest) before and during acute AA infusion. The MRT (P = 0.26) and steady-state vasodilator responses to exercise (ΔFVC, P = 0.31) were not different between groups. Intra-arterial infusion of AA resulted in a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (174 ± 37%). AA infusion did not alter MRT or steady-state FVC in any group (P = 0.90 and P = 0.85, respectively). Interestingly, higher levels of C-reactive protein predicted longer MRT (r = 0.52, P < 0.01) and a greater reduction in MRT with AA infusion (r = −0.43, P = 0.02). We concluded that AA infusion during moderate-intensity, rhythmic forearm exercise does not alter the time course or magnitude of exercise-mediated vasodilation in groups of young lean, obese, or MetSyn adults. However, systemic inflammation may limit the MRT to exercise, which can be improved with AA. PMID:25038148

  18. Why trace and delay conditioning are sometimes (but not always) hippocampal dependent: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ahmed A; Wufong, Ella; Servatius, Richard J; Pang, Kevin C H; Gluck, Mark A; Myers, Catherine E

    2013-02-01

    A recurrent-network model provides a unified account of the hippocampal region in mediating the representation of temporal information in classical eyeblink conditioning. Much empirical research is consistent with a general conclusion that delay conditioning (in which the conditioned stimulus CS and unconditioned stimulus US overlap and co-terminate) is independent of the hippocampal system, while trace conditioning (in which the CS terminates before US onset) depends on the hippocampus. However, recent studies show that, under some circumstances, delay conditioning can be hippocampal-dependent and trace conditioning can be spared following hippocampal lesion. Here, we present an extension of our prior trial-level models of hippocampal function and stimulus representation that can explain these findings within a unified framework. Specifically, the current model includes adaptive recurrent collateral connections that aid in the representation of intra-trial temporal information. With this model, as in our prior models, we argue that the hippocampus is not specialized for conditioned response timing, but rather is a general-purpose system that learns to predict the next state of all stimuli given the current state of variables encoded by activity in recurrent collaterals. As such, the model correctly predicts that hippocampal involvement in classical conditioning should be critical not only when there is an intervening trace interval, but also when there is a long delay between CS onset and US onset. Our model simulates empirical data from many variants of classical conditioning, including delay and trace paradigms in which the length of the CS, the inter-stimulus interval, or the trace interval is varied. Finally, we discuss model limitations, future directions, and several novel empirical predictions of this temporal processing model of hippocampal function and learning.

  19. NMDA receptors in the midbrain play a critical role in dopamine-mediated hippocampal synaptic potentiation caused by morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ling; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Cui, Cai-Lian; Xing, Guo-Gang; Zhu, Bing

    2014-05-01

    A single exposure to drugs of abuse produces an NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor)-dependent synaptic potentiation at excitatory synapses of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain. All addictive drugs can increase DA concentrations in projection areas of the midbrain, including the hippocampus. Hippocampal DA release subsequently modulates hippocampal plasticity and drug-associated memories. Using in vivo electrophysiological recording techniques in anesthetized rats, we show that systemic injection of morphine induced hippocampal synaptic potentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Intra-VTA but not intra-hippocampus injection of morphine evoked this potentiation. Local hippocampal dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) are required in the morphine-induced synaptic potentiation and conditioned place preference (CPP). Moreover, both NMDAR activation in the VTA and VTA/hippocampus dopaminergic connections are essential for the morphine-evoked potentiation and CPP. These findings suggest that NMDAR signalings in the midbrain play a key role in regulating dopamine-mediated hippocampal synaptic plasticity underlying drug-induced associative memory.

  20. Investigating the Role of Hippocampal BDNF in Anxiety Vulnerability Using Classical Eyeblink Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Kellie L; Cominski, Tara P; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Servatius, Richard J; Pang, Kevin C H

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), behavioral inhibition temperament (BI), and small hippocampal volume have been linked to anxiety disorders. Individuals with BI show facilitated acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response (CCER) as compared to non-BI individuals, and a similar pattern is seen in an animal model of BI, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. The present study examined the role of hippocampal BDNF in the facilitated delay CCER of WKY rats. Consistent with earlier work, acquisition was facilitated in WKY rats compared to the Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Facilitated acquisition was associated with increased BDNF, TrkB, and Arc mRNA in the dentate gyrus of SD rats, but learning-induced increases in BDNF and Arc mRNA were significantly smaller in WKY rats. To determine whether reduced hippocampal BDNF in WKY rats was a contributing factor for their facilitated CCER, BDNF or saline infusions were given bilaterally into the dentate gyrus region 1 h prior to training. BDNF infusion did not alter the acquisition of SD rats, but significantly dampened the acquisition of CCER in the WKY rats, such that acquisition was similar to SD rats. Together, these results suggest that inherent differences in the BDNF system play a critical role in the facilitated associative learning exhibited by WKY rats, and potentially individuals with BI. Facilitated associative learning may represent a vulnerability factor in the development of anxiety disorders.

  1. Investigating the role of hippocampal BDNF in anxiety vulnerability using classical eyeblink conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie L Janke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, behavioral inhibition temperament (BI and small hippocampal volume have been linked to anxiety disorders. Individuals with BI show facilitated acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response (CCER as compared to non-BI individuals, and a similar pattern is seen in an animal model of BI, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat. The present study examined the role of hippocampal BDNF in the facilitated delay CCER of WKY rats. Consistent with earlier work, acquisition was facilitated in WKY rats compared to the SD rats. Facilitated acquisition was associated with increased BDNF, TrkB, and Arc mRNA in the dentate gyrus of SD rats, but learning-induced increases in BDNF and Arc mRNA were significantly smaller in WKY rats. To determine if reduced hippocampal BDNF in WKY rats was a contributing factor for their facilitated CCER, BDNF or saline infusions were given bilaterally into the dentate gyrus region one hour prior to training. BDNF infusion did not alter the acquisition of SD rats, but significantly dampened the acquisition of CCER in the WKY rats, such that acquisition was similar to SD rats. Together, these results suggest that inherent differences in the BDNF system play a critical role in the facilitated associative learning exhibited by WKY rats, and potentially individuals with BI. Facilitated associative learning may represent a vulnerability factor in the development of anxiety disorders.

  2. Analgesic effect of intra-amygdala infusion of U0126 on fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats%杏仁核注射 U0126对芬太尼诱发大鼠痛觉过敏的镇痛效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗放; 尹平平; 李珍

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)in central nucleus of amygdala (CeA)in the mechanism of fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia (OIH)in rats. Methods Step 1:12 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 60-100 g,were randomly divided into OIH and Control group.The mechanical paw withdrawal threshold (PWT)and the thermal paw withdrawal latency (PWL)were tested at pre-and post-OIH induction.Then the level of p-ERK in the CeA was analyzed by Western blotting.Step 2:After successful induction of OIH and catheterization in CeA,another 30 SD male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 6 each):Group OIH;Group OIH+U0124;Group OIH+U0126(0.1 5 nmol);Group OIH+U0126(0.45 nmol)and Group OIH+U0126 (1.5 nmol),then 0.3 μl of DMSO,U0124 (1.5 nmol),U0126 (0.1 5 nmol,0.45 nmol,1.5 nmol)was given through the catheter separately.PWT and PWL were tested before cathe-terization,at pre-OIH induction,post-OIH induction and 0.5 h after CeA drug administration.After the last test of pain threshold,the rats were sacrificed and CeA tissues were sampled for analyzing the expression of p-ERK by western blot.Results In step 1 compared with control group,PWT and PWL of OIH group were sharply decreased post-OIH induction (P <0.05),concomitant increase of the expression of p-ERK in CeA in OIH group was also observed.In step 2,both PWT and PWL were sharply decreased post-OIH induction (P <0.05).Intra-CeA U0126 injection,but not U0124, reversed both behavioral hyperalgesia and molecular activation of ERK in CeA in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05).Conclusion ERK plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of fentanyl-induced hy-peralgesia.Targeting inhibition of ERK activation in CeA can alleviate fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia.%目的:探讨杏仁核中央核(CeA)细胞外信号调节蛋白激酶(ERK)在芬太尼诱发痛觉过敏(OIH)发病机制中的作用。方法实验一:雄性 SD 大鼠12只,随机分为实验组(OIH 模型组)和对照组,OIH

  3. Hippocampal Abnormalities and Seizure Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry were performed on 84 consecutive patients (adolescents and adults with partial epilepsy submitted to antiepileptic drug (AED withdrawal after at least 2 years of seizure control, in a study at State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil.

  4. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, J. Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E.; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á.; Olvera-Cortés, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  5. Intra-Firm Adoption Decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. van Everdingen (Yvonne); B. Wierenga (Berend)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe subject of this paper is intra-firm adoption decisions, a relatively unexplored research area in the marketing literature. In particular, we investigate which factors influence the intra-firm adoption decisions regarding the common European currency of the treasury, purchasing and sa

  6. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  7. Intravenous infusion of hyperosmotic NaCl solution induces acute cor pulmonale in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Chikara; Tsuru, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Chihiro; Ogihara, Ryosuke; Morita, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous hyperosmotic NaCl infusion is an effective treatment for circulatory shock. However, a fast infusion rate (2 mL/kg at the rate of 1 mL/s) induces transient hypotension. This response has been reported to be due to decreased total peripheral resistance and/or decreased cardiac performance. Although the hypotension is transient and recovers within 2 min without detrimental consequences, it is important to understand the associated hemodynamics and mechanisms. We found that the hypotensive effect was larger with intravenous NaCl infusion than with intra-aortic infusion, indicating that change in cardiac performance played a more significant role than change in peripheral resistance. NaCl infusion induced an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and central venous pressure and a decrease in right ventricular dP/dt max, suggesting acute cor pulmonale. Diastolic ventricular crosstalk-induced left ventricular failure was also observed. Hyperosmotic NaCl-induced hypotension was therefore mainly due to a combination of acute cor pulmonale and left ventricular failure.

  8. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey L; Forster, Gina L; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2014-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In this study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A : NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. A behaviorally sensitizing regimen of cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip 7 days) also sensitized ventral hippocampus (hipp)-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the nucleus accumbens (Nac) to NMDA stimulation (bolts). This was associated with reduced ventral hippocampal NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio, suggesting that repeated exposure to cocaine produces changes in hippocampal NMDA receptor composition that lead to enhanced ventral hippocampus-nucleus accumbens communication.

  9. White matter disruption at the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease: Relationships with hippocampal atrophy and episodic memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available White matter tract alterations have been consistently described in Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, limbic fronto-temporal connections, which are critical to episodic memory function, may degenerate early in the course of the disease. However the relation between white matter tract degeneration, hippocampal atrophy and episodic memory impairment at the earliest stages of AD is still unclear. In this magnetic resonance imaging study, white matter integrity and hippocampal volumes were evaluated in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment due to AD (Albert et al., 2011 (n = 22 and healthy controls (n = 15. Performance in various episodic memory tasks was also evaluated in each participant. Relative to controls, patients showed a significant reduction of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA and increase of radial diffusivity (RD in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus, parahippocampal cingulum and fornix. Within the patient group, significant intra-hemispheric correlations were notably found between hippocampal grey matter volume and FA in the uncinate fasciculus, suggesting a relationship between atrophy and disconnection of the hippocampus. Moreover, episodic recognition scores were related with uncinate fasciculus FA across patients. These results indicate that fronto-hippocampal connectivity is reduced from the earliest pre-demential stages of AD. Disruption of fronto-hippocampal connections may occur progressively, in parallel with hippocampal atrophy, and may specifically contribute to early initial impairment in episodic memory.

  10. Restoration of hippocampal growth hormone reverses stress-induced hippocampal impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin M. Vander Weele

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Though growth hormone (GH is synthesized by hippocampal neurons, where its expression is influenced by stress exposure, its function is poorly characterized. Here, we show that a regimen of chronic stress that impairs hippocampal function in rats also leads to a profound decrease in hippocampal GH levels. Restoration of hippocampal GH in the dorsal hippocampus via viral-mediated gene transfer completely reversed stress-related impairment of two hippocampus-dependent behavioral tasks, auditory trace fear conditioning and contextual fear conditioning, without affecting hippocampal function in unstressed control rats. GH overexpression reversed stress-induced decrements in both fear acquisition and long-term fear memory. These results suggest that loss of hippocampal GH contributes to hippocampal dysfunction following prolonged stress and demonstrate that restoring hippocampal GH levels following stress can promote stress resilience.

  11. INFLUENCE OF NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL INFUSION CHEMOTHERAPY ON APOPTOSIS AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED GENES OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 张颖; 惠京; 王德华

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Through investigating the influence of neoadjuvant intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (NIAC) on the timing changes of apoptosis, PCNA and multiple drug resistance associated genes of endometrial cancer, to study the mechanism of chemotherapy and to define the best operation time. Methods: Twenty patients were subjected to neoadjuvant consecutive uterine arterial infusion with CDDP 100 mg and ADM 50 mg. The biopsy of endometrial tumor tissues was performed before, immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy. Apoptosis index (AI) was estimated by a combination of histologic and TUNEL assays. Proliferative index (PI) was examined by SABC immunohistochemical staining. Expressions of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: The AI of endometrial cancer cells immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, after chemotherapy were 3.03%, 3.47% and 5.04%, respectively, much higher than that before chemotherapy which was 2.31%. After chemotherapy, AI/PI gradually increased. It was highest in 2-2+3 w, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy the AI and AI/PI were both significantly lower than that before chemotherapy. The expression of MDR1, MRP and LRP all decreased temporarily after chemotherapy, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy they all increased to levels higher than that before chemotherapy, but the difference were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant consecutive intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via uterine artery can inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis effectively. To evaluate the response of intra-arterial chemotherapy the change of apoptosis index and cell proliferation should be analyzed. The most suitable time for the operation is 3 weeks after intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  12. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struys, Michel M. R. F.; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John (Iain) B.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Schnider, Thomas W.

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted (target) drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical

  13. Blockade of dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors impaired morphine-induced state-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Kadivar, Mehdi; Rastipisheh, Sareh

    2016-12-01

    Behavioral abnormalities associated with opiate addiction include memory and learning deficits, which are the result of some alterations in the neuromodulatory systems. Recently, orexin has shown to influence drug addiction neural circuitry, specifically in mediating reward-related perception and memory. To explore the possible interaction of orexinergic and opioidergic system on modulation of learning and memory, we have investigated the effects of intra-dorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) administration of orexin-1 receptor agonist and the competitive orexin-1 antagonist, SB-334867, on morphine-induced memory impairment by using step-down passive avoidance task in mice. Pre-training injection of morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) impaired memory, which was restored when 24h later the same dose of the drug was administered. Pre-test administration of orexin-1 (0.5, 5 and 50pmol, intra-CA1) had not a significant effect on the retention latency compared to the saline-treated animals, but it restored the memory impairment induced by pre-training morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-test administration of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol, intra-CA1) by itself decreased the retention latencies of passive avoidance task. Co-administration of orexin-1 (0.5, 5 and 50pmol, intra-CA1) and morphine (1mg/kg, i.p.) on the test day induced morphine state-dependent memory. Conversely, pre-test injection of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol, intra-CA1) inhibited the orexin-1-induced potentiation of morphine state-dependent learning on the test day. It is concluded that dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors may be involved, at least in part, in morphine state-dependent learning in mice.

  14. A grading system for hippocampal sclerosis based on the degree of hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Proper, E.A.; Jansen, G.H.; Veelen, C.W. van; Rijen, P.C. van; Graan, P.N.E. de

    2001-01-01

    Abstract. In patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) a highly variable degree of hippocampal sclerosis (HS) can be observed. For standard neuropathological evaluation after hippocampal resection, neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal subareas is assessed (Wyler score 0-4) [Wyler et al.

  15. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, O.; Karaca, U.; Andrade, P.; Nijs, L. de; Kusters, B.; Peeters, A.; Dings, J.; Pannek, H.; Ebner, A.; Rijkers, K.; Hoogland, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). METHODS: Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and GABA-transpor

  16. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Melissa C; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the torrance tests of creative thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition.

  17. Disseminated Intra-Abdominal Hydatidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Fátima; Maguiña, Ciro; Seas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 26-year-old male Peruvian patient who presented with disseminated intra-abdominal hydatidosis. The patient was treated with surgical removal of the cysts and prolonged medical treatment with albendazole. PMID:24006293

  18. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  19. The hippocampal laminin matrix is dynamic and critical for neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Indyk, Justin A; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-07-01

    Laminins are extracellular matrix proteins that participate in neuronal development, survival, and regeneration. During excitotoxin challenge in the mouse hippocampus, neuron interaction with laminin-10 (alpha5,beta1,gamma1) protects against neuronal death. To investigate how laminin is involved in neuronal viability, we infused laminin-1 (alpha1,beta1,gamma1) into the mouse hippocampus. This infusion specifically disrupted the endogenous laminin layer. This disruption was at least partially due to the interaction of the laminin-1 gamma1 chain with endogenous laminin-10, because infusion of anti-laminin gamma1 antibody had the same effect. The disruption of the laminin layer by laminin-1 1) did not require the intact protein because infusion of plasmin-digested laminin-1 gave similar results; 2) was posttranscriptional, because there was no effect on laminin mRNA expression; and 3) occurred in both tPA(-/-) and plasminogen(-/-) mice, indicating that increased plasmin activity was not responsible. Finally, although tPA(-/-) mice are normally resistant to excitotoxin-induced neurodegeneration, disruption of the endogenous laminin layer by laminin-1 or anti-laminin gamma1 antibody renders the tPA(-/-) hippocampal neurons sensitive to kainate. These results demonstrate that neuron interactions with the deposited matrix are not necessarily recapitulated by interactions with soluble components and that the laminin matrix is a dynamic structure amenable to modification by exogenous molecules.

  20. Role of hippocampal β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors in the novelty-induced enhancement of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Chang; Deng, Jia-Hui; Yan, Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Shi, Hai-Shui; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Chai, Bai-Sheng; Fang, Qin; Chai, Ning; Xue, Yan-Xue; Sun, Jia; Chen, Chen; Wang, Xue-Yi; Wang, Ji-Shi; Lu, Lin

    2015-05-27

    Fear extinction forms a new memory but does not erase the original fear memory. Exposure to novelty facilitates transfer of short-term extinction memory to long-lasting memory. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Using a classical contextual fear-conditioning model, we investigated the effect of novelty on long-lasting extinction memory in rats. We found that exposure to a novel environment but not familiar environment 1 h before or after extinction enhanced extinction long-term memory (LTM) and reduced fear reinstatement. However, exploring novelty 6 h before or after extinction had no such effect. Infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) inhibitor propranolol and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) inhibitor RU486 into the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus before novelty exposure blocked the effect of novelty on extinction memory. Propranolol prevented activation of the hippocampal PKA-CREB pathway, and RU486 prevented activation of the hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)-CREB pathway induced by novelty exposure. These results indicate that the hippocampal βAR-PKA-CREB and GR-Erk1/2-CREB pathways mediate the extinction-enhancing effect of novelty exposure. Infusion of RU486 or the Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126, but not propranolol or the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS, into the CA1 before extinction disrupted the formation of extinction LTM, suggesting that hippocampal GR and Erk1/2 but not βAR or PKA play critical roles in this process. These results indicate that novelty promotes extinction memory via hippocampal βAR- and GR-dependent pathways, and Erk1/2 may serve as a behavioral tag of extinction.

  1. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Harrell, John W; Johansson, Rebecca E; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Proctor, Lester T; Sebranek, Joshua J; Schrage, William G

    2014-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To account for group differences in blood pressure and forearm size, and to assess vasodilation, forearm vascular conductance (FVC = FBF/mean arterial blood pressure/lean forearm mass) was calculated. We examined the time to achieve steady-state FVC (mean response time, MRT) and the rise in FVC from rest to steady-state exercise (Δ, exercise - rest) before and during acute AA infusion. The MRT (P = 0.26) and steady-state vasodilator responses to exercise (ΔFVC, P = 0.31) were not different between groups. Intra-arterial infusion of AA resulted in a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (174 ± 37%). AA infusion did not alter MRT or steady-state FVC in any group (P = 0.90 and P = 0.85, respectively). Interestingly, higher levels of C-reactive protein predicted longer MRT (r = 0.52, P exercise does not alter the time course or magnitude of exercise-mediated vasodilation in groups of young lean, obese, or MetSyn adults. However, systemic inflammation may limit the MRT to exercise, which can be improved with AA. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES AFTER SEIZURE PRECONDITIONING IN THE THREE MAJOR HIPPOCAMPAL CELL LAYERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Karin; Shaw, Renee; Dingledine, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Rodents experience hippocampal damage after status epilepticus (SE) mainly in pyramidal cells while sparing the dentate granule cell layer (DGCL). Hippocampal damage was prevented in rats that had been preconditioned by brief seizures on two consecutive days before SE. To identify neuroprotective genes and biochemical pathways changed after preconditioning we compared the effect of preconditioning on gene expression in the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and DGCLs, harvested by laser capture microscopy. In the DGCL the expression of 632 genes was altered, compared to only 151 and 58 genes in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers. Most of the differentially expressed genes regulate tissue structure and intra- and extracellular signaling, including neurotransmission. A selective upregulation of energy metabolism transcripts occurred in CA1 pyramidal cells relative to the DGCL. These results reveal a broad transcriptional response of the DGCL to preconditioning, and suggest several mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of preconditioning seizures. PMID:17239605

  3. Avoiding crystallization of lorazepam during infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellema, J; Hunfeld, N G M; Van den Akker, H E A; ter Horst, J H

    2011-12-18

    Lorazepam is a strong sedative for intensive care patients and a commonly used method of administering it to the patient is by infusion of a freshly prepared lorazepam solution. During lorazepam infusion often unwanted lorazepam crystallization occurs, resulting in line obstruction and reduced lorazepam concentrations. With the aid of solubility measurements a solid-liquid phase diagram for lorazepam in mixtures of a commercially available lorazepam solution and an aqueous glucose solution was determined. This confirmed that the glucose solution acts as an anti-solvent, greatly reducing the lorazepam solubility in the infusion solution. Three approaches are proposed to obtain stable lorazepam solutions upon mixing both solutions and thus to prevent crystallization during infusion: (1) using a high lorazepam concentration, and thus a lower glucose solution volume fraction, in the mixed solution; (2) using an elevated temperature during solution preparation and administration; (3) reducing the lorazepam concentration in the commercial lorazepam solution.

  4. Infusions of muscimol into the lateral septum do not reduce rats' defensive behaviors toward a cat odor stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, San-San A; Patel, Ronak; Menard, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    The lateral septum (LS) is implicated in behavioral defense. We tested whether bilateral infusions of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into the LS suppress rats' defensive responses to cat odor. Rats received intra-LS infusions of either saline or muscimol (40 ng/rat) and were exposed to either a piece of a cat collar that had been previously worn by a cat or to a control (cat odor free) collar. Rats exposed to the cat odor collar displayed more head-out postures, while intra-LS application of muscimol reduced the number of head-out postures. However, this reduction was also present in rats exposed to a control (cat odor free) collar. This latter finding suggests that despite its involvement in other defensive behaviors (e.g., open arm avoidance in the elevated plus maze), the LS does not selectively regulate rats' receptor defensive responding to the olfactory cues present in our cat odor stimulus.

  5. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, Michel M R F; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John Iain B; Vereecke, Hugo E M; Absalom, Anthony R; Schnider, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted ("target") drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical and regulatory issues addressed in prototype development. We also describe the launch of the current clinically available systems.

  6. Infusion Antihypoxants in Children with Critical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia and mitochondrial damage are a key component of the pathogenesis and tanatogenesis of a critical condition, suggesting the need for its prevention and maximally rapid elimination. Objective: to analyze the efficacy and safety of infusion antihypoxants used in critically ill children from the results of researches. Materials and methods. Available investigations dealing with infusion therapy in children and papers on the use of infusion antihypoxants in adults in 2005 to 2013 were sought in the medical databases PubMed and Cochrane Library with their free availability and analyzed. Results. The analysis included 70 trials. The pathophysiology and pathobiochemistry of hypoxia in critically ill children are given; the current principles of its correction by infusion therapy are considered in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of succinic acid solutions in children. Main indications for and contraindications to their use are demonstrated. Conclusion. The use of Krebs cycle substrate-based infusion antihypoxants (malate, succinate is an effective and promising procedure for the intensive therapy and correction of hypoxia in both adults and children with critical conditions. Considering the fact that papers on the use of infusion antihypoxants in children are scanty, there is a need for further investigations. 

  7. Myrtus communis L. infusions: the effect of infusion time on phytochemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoud, Chokri; Laabidi, Abdelmonoem; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2012-09-01

    In traditional medicine, myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) is frequently consumed as an infusion and decoction. In this study, we investigate the phenolic and volatile compositions and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of leaf infusions prepared during 3 different times. The total phenolics contents (146.74 to 179.55 mg GAE/g DM) varied significantly between infusions. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Phenolic acids (7.64 to 14.28 μmol/g DM) and flavonol glycosides (7.05 to 12.11 μmol/g DM) were the major phenolic fractions of infusions. Significant quantitative variation in 6 phenolic components was observed between infusions. Sixteen volatile components were identified by gas chromatography (GC) and GC mass spectrometry analyses. The main constituents were 1,8-cineole (42.58% to 51.39%), α-terpineol (9.45% to 9.72%), methyl eugenol (6.69% to 7.11%), and linalool (5.91% to 6.06%). Quantitative variations of the volatile components of the analyzed oils in relation to the infusion time were observed. The antioxidant properties of infusions, assayed through DPPH (2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method, β-carotene bleaching test, chelating effect on ferrous ions, and ferric reducing power method, were considerable and varied according to the infusion time. Myrtle infusions exhibited a substantial antimicrobial activity against 6 tested bacteria.

  8. Experimental intra-arterial administration of SR-2508 in the rabbit V2 carcinoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coldwell, D.M.; Huff, J.; Marcellus, H.; Coldwell, S.G.

    1989-03-01

    The use of the nitroimidazole radiation sensitizers, misonidazole and SR-2508, has been limited by a variety of side-effects, principally peripheral neuropathies. To increase the effectiveness of radiosensitization and reduce the administered dose of the sensitizers, intra-arterial delivery of SR-2508 was performed and followed with 10Gy of 4 MeV photon beam radiotherapy in the rabbit V2 carcinoma tumour model. Comparison was made with rabbits treated with an identical dose of SR-2508 given intravenously prior to photon beam radiotherapy. Control animals were treated with radiation therapy only, intra-arterial SR-2508 only, or had no treatment. Neither radiation therapy alone nor SR-2508 alone had any effect on tumour growth. In the intra-arterial group, tumour growth was slower and size was significantly smaller than all other groups. Results suggest that the intra-arterial infusion of radiation sensitizer produces greater tumour response than intravenous infusion when each is combined with radiation therapy.

  9. Yuzu extract prevents cognitive decline and impaired glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-infused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Jin Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Park, Sunmin

    2013-07-01

    Our preliminary study revealed that dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis (unpublished). We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) extract improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-induced rats. Male rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) [plaque forming β-amyloid; Alzheimer disease (AD)] or β-amyloid (35-25) [non-plaque forming β-amyloid; C (non-Alzheimer disease control)] at a rate of 3.6 nmol/d for 14 d. AD rats were divided into 2 dietary groups that received either 3% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of yuzu (AD-Y) or 3% dextrin (AD-C) in high-fat diets (43% energy as fat). The AD-C group exhibited greater hippocampal β-amyloid deposition, which was not detected in the C group, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling. Yuzu treatment prevented β-amyloid accumulation, increased tau phosphorylation, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling observed in AD-C rats. Consistent with β-amyloid accumulation, the AD-C rats experienced cognitive dysfunction, which was prevented by yuzu. AD-C rats gained less weight than did C rats due to decreased feed consumption, and yuzu treatment prevented the decrease in feed consumption. Serum glucose concentrations were higher in AD-C than in C rats at 40-120 min after glucose loading during an oral-glucose-tolerance test, but not at 0-40 min. Serum insulin concentrations were highly elevated in AD-C rats but not enough to lower serum glucose to normal concentrations, indicating that rats in the AD-C group had insulin resistance and a borderline diabetic state. Although AD-C rats were profoundly insulin resistant, AD-Y rats exhibited normal first and second phases of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and secretion. In conclusion, yuzu treatment prevented the cognitive dysfunction and impaired energy and glucose homeostasis induced by β-amyloid infusion.

  10. A remote drip infusion monitoring system employing Bluetooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Hikaru; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Maki, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Sosuke; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a remote drip infusion monitoring system for use in hospitals. The system consists of several infusion monitoring devices and a central monitor. The infusion monitoring device employing a Bluetooth module can detect the drip infusion rate and an empty infusion solution bag, and then these data are sent to the central monitor placed at the nurses' station via the Bluetooth. The central monitor receives the data from several infusion monitoring devices and then displays graphically them. Therefore, the developed system can monitor intensively the drip infusion situation of the several patients at the nurses' station.

  11. Intra-arterial adenoviral mediated tumor transfection in a novel model of cancer gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemionow Maria

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize a novel in vivo cancer gene therapy model in which intra-arterial adenoviral gene delivery can be characterized. In this model, the rat cremaster muscle serves as the site for tumor growth and provides convenient and isolated access to the tumor parenchyma with discrete control of arterial and venous access for delivery of agents. Results Utilizing adenovirus encoding the green fluorescent protein we demonstrated broad tumor transfection. We also observed a dose dependant increment in luciferase activity at the tumor site using an adenovirus encoding the luciferase reporter gene. Finally, we tested the intra-arterial adenovirus dwelling time required to achieve optimal tumor transfection and observed a minimum time of 30 minutes. Conclusion We conclude that adenovirus mediated tumor transfection grown in the cremaster muscle of athymic nude rats via an intra-arterial route could be achieved. This model allows definition of the variables that affect intra-arterial tumor transfection. This particular study suggests that allowing a defined intra-tumor dwelling time by controlling the blood flow of the affected organ during vector infusion can optimize intra-arterial adenoviral delivery.

  12. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H.; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M.; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E.; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A.; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F.; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G.; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V.; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J.; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; Van Eijk, Kristel R.; Van Erp, Theo G. M.; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Windham, Beverly G.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, James T.; Bennett, David A.; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R.; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; De Geus, Eco J. C.; De Jager, Philip L.; De Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C.; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O.; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E.; Fleischman, Debra A.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Glahn, David C.; Gollub, Randy L.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahn, René S.; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A.; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R.; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M.; Stott, David J.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hernández, Maria C. Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Clinton B.; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Longstreth, W. T.; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J.; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=−0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:28098162

  13. Efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hyun Baek; Kyoung Tae Kim; Sung Wook Lee; Jin Sook Jeong; Byeong Ho Park; Kyung Jin Nam; Jin Han Cho

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using floxuridine (FUDR)in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) confined to the liver.METHODS:Thirty-four patients who had advanced HCC with unresectability or unsuccessful previous therapy in the absence of extrahepatic metastasis were treated with intra-arterial FUDR chemotherapy at our hospital between March 2005 and May 2008.Among the 34 patients,9 patients were classified as Child class C,and 18 patients had portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT).One course of chemotherapy consisted of continuous infusion of FUDR (0.3 mg/kg during day 1-14) and dexamethasone (10 mg on day 1,4,7 and 11),and this treatment was repeated every 28 d.RESULTS:Two patients (5.9%) displayed a complete response,and 12 patients (35.3%) had a partial response.The tumor control rate was 61.8%.The median overall survival times were 15.3 mo,12.4 mo and 4.3 mo for the patients who were classified as Child class A,Child class B and Child class C,respectively (P =0.0392).The progression-free survival was 12.9mo,7.7 mo and 2.6 mo for the patients who were classified as Child class A,Child class B and Child class C,respectively (P =0.0443).The cumulative survival differed significantly according to the Child-Pugh classification and the presence of PVTT.In addition to hepatic reserve capacity and PVTT,the extent of HCC was an independent factor in determining a poor prognosis.The most common adverse reactions to HAIC were mucositis,diarrhea and peptic ulcer disease,but most of these complications were improved by medical treatment and/or a delay of HAIC.CONCLUSION:The present study demonstrates that intra-arterial FUDR chemotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for advanced HCC that is recalcitrant to other therapeutic modalities,even in patients with advanced cirrhosis.

  14. Hippocampal subfield volumes in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, B; Passos, I C; Mwangi, B; Amaral-Silva, H; Tannous, J; Wu, M-J; Zunta-Soares, G B; Soares, J C

    2017-01-24

    Volume reduction and shape abnormality of the hippocampus have been associated with mood disorders. However, the hippocampus is not a uniform structure and consists of several subfields, such as the cornu ammonis (CA) subfields CA1-4, the dentate gyrus (DG) including a granule cell layer (GCL) and a molecular layer (ML) that continuously crosses adjacent subiculum (Sub) and CA fields. It is known that cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with mood disorders may be localized to specific hippocampal subfields. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the link between the in vivo hippocampal subfield volumes and specific mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). In the present study, we used a state-of-the-art hippocampal segmentation approach, and we found that patients with BD had reduced volumes of hippocampal subfields, specifically in the left CA4, GCL, ML and both sides of the hippocampal tail, compared with healthy subjects and patients with MDD. The volume reduction was especially severe in patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I). We also demonstrated that hippocampal subfield volume reduction was associated with the progression of the illness. For patients with BD-I, the volumes of the right CA1, ML and Sub decreased as the illness duration increased, and the volumes of both sides of the CA2/3, CA4 and hippocampal tail had negative correlations with the number of manic episodes. These results indicated that among the mood disorders the hippocampal subfields were more affected in BD-I compared with BD-II and MDD, and manic episodes had focused progressive effect on the CA2/3 and CA4 and hippocampal tail.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 24 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.262.

  15. Biopersistence of PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Promotes a Delayed Antioxidant Response after Infusion into the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Bosco, Lidiane; Weber, Gisele E; Parfitt, Gustavo M; Cordeiro, Arthur P; Sahoo, Sangram K; Fantini, Cristiano; Klosterhoff, Marta C; Romano, Luis Alberto; Furtado, Clascídia A; Santos, Adelina P; Monserrat, José M; Barros, Daniela M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are promising nanomaterials for the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. However, the ability of these nanomaterials to cross cell membranes and interact with neural cells brings the need for the assessment of their potential adverse effects on the nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the biopersistence of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) directly infused into the rat hippocampus. Contextual fear conditioning, Y-maze and open field tasks were performed to evaluate the effects of SWCNT-PEG on memory and locomotor activity. The effects of SWCNT-PEG on oxidative stress and morphology of the hippocampus were assessed 1 and 7 days after infusion of the dispersions at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.1 mg/mL. Raman analysis of the hippocampal homogenates indicates the biopersistence of SWCNT-PEG in the hippocampus 7 days post-injection. The infusion of the dispersions had no effect on the acquisition or persistence of the contextual fear memory; likewise, the spatial recognition memory and locomotor activity were not affected by SWCNT-PEG. Histological examination revealed no remarkable morphological alterations after nanomaterial exposure. One day after the infusion, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL were able to decrease total antioxidant capacity without modifying the levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid hydroperoxides in the hippocampus. Moreover, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at all concentrations induced antioxidant defenses and reduced reactive oxygen species production in the hippocampus at 7 days post-injection. In this work, we found a time-dependent change in antioxidant defenses after the exposure to SWCNT-PEG. We hypothesized that the persistence of the nanomaterial in the tissue can induce an antioxidant response that might have provided resistance to an initial insult. Such antioxidant delayed response may constitute an adaptive response to the biopersistence of SWCNT-PEG in the

  16. Biopersistence of PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Promotes a Delayed Antioxidant Response after Infusion into the Rat Hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Dal Bosco

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are promising nanomaterials for the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. However, the ability of these nanomaterials to cross cell membranes and interact with neural cells brings the need for the assessment of their potential adverse effects on the nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the biopersistence of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG directly infused into the rat hippocampus. Contextual fear conditioning, Y-maze and open field tasks were performed to evaluate the effects of SWCNT-PEG on memory and locomotor activity. The effects of SWCNT-PEG on oxidative stress and morphology of the hippocampus were assessed 1 and 7 days after infusion of the dispersions at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.1 mg/mL. Raman analysis of the hippocampal homogenates indicates the biopersistence of SWCNT-PEG in the hippocampus 7 days post-injection. The infusion of the dispersions had no effect on the acquisition or persistence of the contextual fear memory; likewise, the spatial recognition memory and locomotor activity were not affected by SWCNT-PEG. Histological examination revealed no remarkable morphological alterations after nanomaterial exposure. One day after the infusion, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL were able to decrease total antioxidant capacity without modifying the levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid hydroperoxides in the hippocampus. Moreover, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at all concentrations induced antioxidant defenses and reduced reactive oxygen species production in the hippocampus at 7 days post-injection. In this work, we found a time-dependent change in antioxidant defenses after the exposure to SWCNT-PEG. We hypothesized that the persistence of the nanomaterial in the tissue can induce an antioxidant response that might have provided resistance to an initial insult. Such antioxidant delayed response may constitute an adaptive response to the biopersistence of

  17. BMP signaling mediates effects of exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin T Gobeske

    Full Text Available Exposure to exercise or to environmental enrichment increases the generation of new neurons in the adult hippocampus and promotes certain kinds of learning and memory. While the precise role of neurogenesis in cognition has been debated intensely, comparatively few studies have addressed the mechanisms linking environmental exposures to cellular and behavioral outcomes. Here we show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling mediates the effects of exercise on neurogenesis and cognition in the adult hippocampus. Elective exercise reduces levels of hippocampal BMP signaling before and during its promotion of neurogenesis and learning. Transgenic mice with decreased BMP signaling or wild type mice infused with a BMP inhibitor both exhibit remarkable gains in hippocampal cognitive performance and neurogenesis, mirroring the effects of exercise. Conversely, transgenic mice with increased BMP signaling have diminished hippocampal neurogenesis and impaired cognition. Exercise exposure does not rescue these deficits, suggesting that reduced BMP signaling is required for environmental effects on neurogenesis and learning. Together, these observations show that BMP signaling is a fundamental mechanism linking environmental exposure with changes in cognitive function and cellular properties in the hippocampus.

  18. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  19. Hippocampal NMDA receptors are involved in rats' spontaneous object recognition only under high memory load condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Manami; Yamada, Kazuo; Iguchi, Natsumi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2015-10-22

    The possible involvement of hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in spontaneous object recognition was investigated in rats under different memory load conditions. We first estimated rats' object memory span using 3-5 objects in "Different Objects Task (DOT)" in order to confirm the highest memory load condition in object recognition memory. Rats were allowed to explore a field in which 3 (3-DOT), 4 (4-DOT), or 5 (5-DOT) different objects were presented. After a delay period, they were placed again in the same field in which one of the sample objects was replaced by another object, and their object exploration behavior was analyzed. Rats could differentiate the novel object from the familiar ones in 3-DOT and 4-DOT but not in 5-DOT, suggesting that rats' object memory span was about 4. Then, we examined the effects of hippocampal AP5 infusion on performance in both 2-DOT (2 different objects were used) and 4-DOT. The drug treatment before the sample phase impaired performance only in 4-DOT. These results suggest that hippocampal NMDA receptors play a critical role in spontaneous object recognition only when the memory load is high.

  20. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such...

  1. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Dendritic Plasticity Support Running-Improved Spatial Learning and Depression-Like Behaviour in Stressed Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jian-Bin; Wong, Richard; Ching, Yick-Pang; Qiu, Guang; Tang, Siu-Wa; Lee, Tatia M. C.; So, Kwok-Fai

    2011-01-01

    Exercise promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity while stress shows the opposite effects, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise to counteract stress. Changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic modification occur simultaneously in rats with stress or exercise; however, it is unclear whether neurogenesis or dendritic remodeling has a greater impact on mediating the effect of exercise on stress since they have been separately examined. Here we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in runners treated with different doses (low: 30 mg/kg; moderate: 40 mg/kg; high: 50 mg/kg) of corticosterone (CORT) for 14 days. Water maze task and forced swim tests were applied to assess hippocampal-dependent learning and depression-like behaviour respectively the day after the treatment. Repeated CORT treatment resulted in a graded increase in depression-like behaviour and impaired spatial learning that is associated with decreased hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Running reversed these effects in rats treated with low or moderate, but not high doses of CORT. Using 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats, we further studied the role of neurogenesis and dendritic remodeling in mediating the effects of exercise on stress. Co-labelling with BrdU (thymidine analog) /doublecortin (immature neuronal marker) showed that running increased neuronal differentiation in vehicle- and CORT-treated rats. Running also increased dendritic length and spine density in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats. Ablation of neurogenesis with Ara-c infusion diminished the effect of running on restoring spatial learning and decreasing depression-like behaviour in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated animals in spite of dendritic and spine enhancement. but not normal runners with enhanced dendritic length. The results indicate that both restored hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic remodelling within the hippocampus are essential for running to counteract stress. PMID:21935393

  2. Hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity support running-improved spatial learning and depression-like behaviour in stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Yu Yau

    Full Text Available Exercise promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity while stress shows the opposite effects, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise to counteract stress. Changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic modification occur simultaneously in rats with stress or exercise; however, it is unclear whether neurogenesis or dendritic remodeling has a greater impact on mediating the effect of exercise on stress since they have been separately examined. Here we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in runners treated with different doses (low: 30 mg/kg; moderate: 40 mg/kg; high: 50 mg/kg of corticosterone (CORT for 14 days. Water maze task and forced swim tests were applied to assess hippocampal-dependent learning and depression-like behaviour respectively the day after the treatment. Repeated CORT treatment resulted in a graded increase in depression-like behaviour and impaired spatial learning that is associated with decreased hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Running reversed these effects in rats treated with low or moderate, but not high doses of CORT. Using 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats, we further studied the role of neurogenesis and dendritic remodeling in mediating the effects of exercise on stress. Co-labelling with BrdU (thymidine analog /doublecortin (immature neuronal marker showed that running increased neuronal differentiation in vehicle- and CORT-treated rats. Running also increased dendritic length and spine density in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats. Ablation of neurogenesis with Ara-c infusion diminished the effect of running on restoring spatial learning and decreasing depression-like behaviour in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated animals in spite of dendritic and spine enhancement. but not normal runners with enhanced dendritic length. The results indicate that both restored hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic remodelling within the hippocampus are essential for running to counteract

  3. Exogenous FGF2 reverses depressive-like behaviors and restores the suppressed FGF2-ERK1/2 signaling and the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis induced by neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-Ming; Lin, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Jun-Tao; Zhao, Ya-Wei; Li, Ying-Cong

    2017-05-18

    Our previous work demonstrated that neuroinflammation evoked by triple repeated central LPS challenges inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis that were correlated with the depressive-like behavioral symptoms induced by neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that hippocampal neurogenesis might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by neuroinflammation and targeting neurogenesis might lead to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of depression. In this study, we manipulated adult hippocampal neurogenesis using fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), one crucial molecule modulating cell proliferation and survival in central nervous system, and investigate the involvement and the potential therapeutic effects of FGF2 on neuroinflammation-induced depression. Central lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenges were used as previously to evoke the neuroinflammatory state in the brain of rat. Exogenous FGF2 was infused into lateral ventricle during the neuroinflammatory state. It was found that the protein expression of FGF2 in hippocampus was inhibited by neuroinflammation. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the downstream molecule of FGF2, was also inhibited by neuroinflammation. Exogenous FGF2 infusions prevented the decrease in phosphorylation of ERK1/2 under neuroinflammation state. Exogenous FGF2 reversed depressive-like behaviors and the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis induced by neuroinflammation. These findings provide evidence that the FGF2-ERK1/2 pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of depressive-like behaviors, and manipulating the neurogenesis pathway is a viable therapeutic approach to inflammation-associated depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Leg edema from intrathecal opiate infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrete, J A; Couto da Silva JM

    2000-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of intrathecal infusions to treat patients with long-term non-cancer-related pain, this therapy is not without serious side-effects. Five out of 23 patients who had intrathecal infusions of opiates for longer than 24 months developed leg and feet edema. As predisposing factors, cardiovascular disease, deep venous thrombosis, peripheral vascular disease, and venous stasis of the lower extremities were considered. Every patient who developed pedal and leg edema after the implantation of an infusion pump was also found to have leg edema and venous stasis prior to the time when the pump was inserted. This complication was severe enough to limit their physical activity, and to produce lymphedema, ulcerations and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Reduction of the edema occurred when the dose of the opiate was decreased, and in two cases in which the infusion was discontinued, there was almost complete resolution of the syndrome. It appears that the pre-existence of pedal edema and of venous stasis is a relative contraindication to the long-term intrathecal infusion of opiates in patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Copyright 2000 European Federation of Chapters of the International Association for the Study of Pain.

  5. Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Chronic Amyloid-beta Oligomer Infusion Is Counteracted by Antibody Treatment Infused with Osmotic Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Ahmadali; Provost, Chloé; Pham, Brendon; Brouillette, Jonathan

    2016-08-14

    Decline in hippocampal-dependent explicit memory (memory for facts and events) is one of the earliest clinical symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is well established that synapse loss and ensuing neurodegeneration are the best predictors for memory impairments in AD. Latest studies have emphasized the neurotoxic role of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (Aβo) that begin to accumulate in the human brain approximately 10 to 15 yr before the clinical symptoms become apparent. Many reports indicate that soluble Aβo correlate with memory deficits in AD models and humans. The Aβo-induced neurodegeneration observed in neuronal and brain slice cultures has been more challenging to reproduce in many animal models. The model of repeated Aβo infusions shown here overcome this issue and allow addressing two key domains for developing new disease modifying therapies: identify biological markers to diagnose early AD, and determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning Aβo-induced memory deficits at the onset of AD. Since soluble Aβo aggregate relatively fast into insoluble Aβ fibrils that correlate poorly with the clinical state of patients, soluble Aβo are prepared freshly and injected once per day during six days to produce marked cell death in the hippocampus. We used cannula specially design for simultaneous infusions of Aβo and continuous infusion of Aβo antibody (6E10) in the hippocampus using osmotic pumps. This innovative in vivo method can now be used in preclinical studies to validate the efficiency of new AD therapies that might prevent the deposition and neurotoxicity of Aβo in pre-dementia patients.

  6. Forearm metabolism during infusion of adrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Stefl, B; Bülow, J

    2000-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle metabolism is often investigated by measurements of substrate fluxes across the forearm. To evaluate whether the two forearms give the same metabolic information, nine healthy subjects were studied in the fasted state and during infusion of adrenaline. Both arms were...... catheterized in a cubital vein in the retrograde direction. A femoral artery was catheterized for blood sampling, and a femoral vein for infusion of adrenaline. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion strain-gauge plethysmography. Forearm subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow was measured...... by the local 133Xe washout method. Metabolic fluxes were calculated as the product of forearm blood flow and a-v differences of metabolite concentrations. After baseline measurements, adrenaline was infused at a rate of 0.3 nmol kg-1 min-1. No difference in the metabolic information obtained in the fasting...

  7. Hippocampal Abnormalities in Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC measurements were used to characterize hippocampal edema within 5 days of a prolonged febrile seizure (PFS in a study at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK.

  8. Updating the Lamellar Hypothesis of Hippocampal Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Robert S Sloviter; Terje eLømo

    2012-01-01

    In 1971, Andersen and colleagues proposed that excitatory activity in the entorhinal cortex propagates topographically to the dentate gyrus, and on through a trisynaptic circuit lying within transverse hippocampal slices or lamellae [Andersen, Bliss, and Skrede. 1971. Lamellar organization of hippocampal pathways. Exp Brain Res 13, 222-238]. In this way, a relatively simple structure might mediate complex functions in a manner analogous to the way independent piano keys can produce a nearly i...

  9. Fluctuations in endogenous kynurenic acid control hippocampal glutamate and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocivavsek, Ana; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Potter, Michelle C; Elmer, Greg I; Pellicciari, Roberto; Schwarcz, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), an astrocyte-derived metabolite, antagonizes the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) and, possibly, the glycine co-agonist site of the NMDA receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. As both receptors are involved in cognitive processes, KYNA elevations may aggravate, whereas reductions may improve, cognitive functions. We tested this hypothesis in rats by examining the effects of acute up- or downregulation of endogenous KYNA on extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus and on performance in the Morris water maze (MWM). Applied directly by reverse dialysis, KYNA (30-300 nM) reduced, whereas the specific kynurenine aminotransferase-II inhibitor (S)-4-(ethylsulfonyl)benzoylalanine (ESBA; 0.3-3 mM) raised, extracellular glutamate levels in the hippocampus. Co-application of KYNA (100 nM) with ESBA (1 mM) prevented the ESBA-induced glutamate increase. Comparable effects on hippocampal glutamate levels were seen after intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) application of the KYNA precursor kynurenine (1 mM, 10 μl) or ESBA (10 mM, 10 μl), respectively. In separate animals, i.c.v. treatment with kynurenine impaired, whereas i.c.v. ESBA improved, performance in the MWM. I.c.v. co-application of KYNA (10 μM) eliminated the pro-cognitive effects of ESBA. Collectively, these studies show that KYNA serves as an endogenous modulator of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus and regulates hippocampus-related cognitive function. Our results suggest that pharmacological interventions leading to acute reductions in hippocampal KYNA constitute an effective strategy for cognitive improvement. This approach might be especially useful in the treatment of cognitive deficits in neurological and psychiatric diseases that are associated with increased brain KYNA levels.

  10. Hippocampal neuroplasticity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhin, N V; Coupland, N J

    2015-11-19

    One of the most replicated findings has been that hippocampus volume is decreased in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that localized differences in hippocampal volume may be more prominent than global differences. Preclinical and post-mortem studies in MDD indicated that different subfields of the hippocampus may respond differently to stress and may also have differential levels of plasticity in response to antidepressant treatment. Advances in high-field MRI allowed researchers to visualize and measure hippocampal subfield volumes in MDD patients in vivo. The results of these studies provide the first in vivo evidence that hippocampal volume reductions in MDD are specific to the cornu ammonis and dentate gyrus hippocampal subfields, findings that appear, on the surface, consistent with preclinical evidence for localized mechanisms of hippocampal neuroplasticity. In this review we discuss how recent advances in neuroimaging allow researchers to further understand hippocampal neuroplasticity in MDD and how it is related to antidepressant treatment, memory function, and disease progression.

  11. Leptin-induced downregulation of the rat hippocampal somatostatinergic system may potentiate its anorexigenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perianes-Cachero, Arancha; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Puebla-Jiménez, Lilian; Canelles, Sandra; Viveros, María Paz; Mela, Virginia; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo; Barrios, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    The learning and memory mechanisms in the hippocampus translate hormonal signals of energy balance into behavioral outcomes involved in the regulation of food intake. As leptin and its receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and somatostatin (SRIF), an orexigenic neuropeptide, may inhibit leptin-mediated suppression of food intake in other brain areas, we asked whether chronic leptin infusion induces changes in the hippocampal somatostatinergic system and whether these modifications are involved in leptin-mediated effects. We studied 18 male Wistar rats divided into three groups: controls (C), treated intracerebroventricularly (icv) with leptin (12 μg/day) for 14 days (L) and a pair-fed group (PF) that received the same amount of food consumed by the L group. Food restriction increased whereas leptin decreased the hippocampal SRIF receptor density, due to changes in SRIF receptor 2 protein levels. These changes in the PF group were concurrent with an increase of hippocampal G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 protein levels and activation of Akt and cyclic AMP response element binding protein. The inhibitory effect of SRIF on adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, however, was decreased in L rats, coincident with lower G inhibitory α3 and higher AC-I levels as well as signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 activation. In addition, 20 male Wistar rats were included to analyze whether the leptin antagonist L39A/D40A/F41A and the SRIF receptor agonist SMS 201-995 modify SRIF signaling and food intake, respectively. Administration of L39A/D40A/F41A reversed changes in SRIF signaling, whereas SMS 201-995 ameliorated food consumption in L. Altogether, these results suggest that increased somatostatinergic tone in PF rats may be a mechanism to improve the hippocampal orexigenic effects in a situation of metabolic demand, whereas down-regulation of this system in L rats may represent a mechanism to enhance the anorexigenic effects of leptin.

  12. Relationship between hippocampal dopamine activities and P300-like potentials in rats%大鼠海马多巴胺递质活动与类P300关系的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华; 郑健

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To observe the relation between hippocampal dopamineacivities and P300-like potentials in rats.Methods:The electrodes with stainless steel guide cannulae were implanted into the right ventral hippocampuses of rats by means of stereotaxic technique.Changes of ventral hippocampal P300-like potentials were observed by local infusion of D2 antagonist sulpiride into the ventral hippocampuses.Results:The peak latencies of ventral hippocampal P300-like potentials were significantly prolonged one half an hour after infusion than that before infusion and recovered to normal level in two hours after infusion.Conclusion:Ventral hippocampal dopamine activities play an important role in generating the ventral hippocampal P300-like potentials in rats.%目的:探讨海马多巴按递质活动与事件相关电位类P300的关系。方法:应用立体定位技术将绝缘电极植入大鼠海马腹侧记录类P300,观察局部给予多巴胺D2受体拮抗剂sulpiride对类P300的影响。结果:海马腹侧局部注射Sulpiride30 min后类P300潜伏期明显延长,2h后基本恢复正常。结论:海马腹侧多巴胺递质活动在类P300形成中起重要作用。

  13. Dexmedetomidine infusion during middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia to provide oligaemic surgical field: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Middle ear surgery requires bloodless surgical field for better operating conditions, deep level of anaesthesia and rapid emergence. Recent studies suggest that α2 agonists could provide desired surgical field, sedation and analgesia. The present study was aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine infusion as anaesthetic adjuvant during middle ear surgery using operating microscope. Methods: Sixty four adult patients aged 18-58 years, American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grades I and II, of both gender were randomised into two comparable equal groups of 32 patients each for middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia with standard anaesthetic technique. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients of Group I were given dexmedetomidine infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h and patients of Group II were given placebo infusion of normal saline. Isoflurane concentration was titrated to achieve a systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline value. All patients were assessed intra-operatively for bleeding at surgical field, haemodynamic changes, awakening time and post-operative recovery. Results: Statistically significant reduction was observed in the required percentage of isoflurane (0.8 ± 0.6% to maintain the systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline values in patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion when compared to those receiving placebo infusion (1.6 ± 0.7%. Patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion had statistically significant lesser bleeding at surgical field (P < 0.05. The mean awakening time and recovery from anaesthesia did not show any significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine infusion can be safely used to provide oligaemic surgical field for better visualization using operating microscope for middle ear surgery.

  14. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...... flow (ATBF) was measured in SCAAT continuously. RESULTS: A significant increase in ATBF was observed with wear time for Teflon but not for steel catheters. Mean infusion pressure during the bolus phase increased significantly from 0 to 48 h for Teflon but not for steel catheters. ATBF and infusion...

  15. Hippocampal EEG and behaviour in dog. II. Hippocampal EEG correlates with elementary motor acts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolds, D.E.A.T.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Aitink, J.W.; Kamp, A.

    1979-01-01

    A positive correlation has been shown between the speed of forced stepping on a conveyor belt and the amplitude and frequency of the concomitant hippocampal EEG. Significant modulation in the spectral properties of the dog's hippocampal EEG has been found in relation to 3 elementary motor acts: ste

  16. Hippocampal atrophy rates in Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, W J.P.; Sluimer, J D.; Barnes, J; van der Flier, W M.; Sluimer, I C.; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Vrenken, H; Barkhof, F

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the added value of hippocampal atrophy rates over whole brain volume measurements on MRI in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls. Methods: We included 64 patients with AD (67 ± 9 years; F/M 38/26), 44 patients with MCI (71 ± 6 years; 21/23), and 34 controls (67 ± 9 years; 16/18). Two MR scans were performed (scan interval: 1.8 ± 0.7 years; 1.0 T), using a coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. At follow-up, 3 controls and 23 patients with MCI had progressed to AD. Hippocampi were manually delineated at baseline. Hippocampal atrophy rates were calculated using regional, nonlinear fluid registration. Whole brain baseline volumes and atrophy rates were determined using automated segmentation and registration tools. Results: All MRI measures differed between groups (p < 0.005). For the distinction of MCI from controls, larger effect sizes of hippocampal measures were found compared to whole brain measures. Between MCI and AD, only whole brain atrophy rate differed significantly. Cox proportional hazards models (variables dichotomized by median) showed that within all patients without dementia, hippocampal baseline volume (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.7 [95% confidence interval: 1.5–22.2]), hippocampal atrophy rate (5.2 [1.9–14.3]), and whole brain atrophy rate (2.8 [1.1–7.2]) independently predicted progression to AD; the combination of low hippocampal volume and high atrophy rate yielded a HR of 61.1 (6.1–606.8). Within patients with MCI, only hippocampal baseline volume and atrophy rate predicted progression. Conclusion: Hippocampal measures, especially hippocampal atrophy rate, best discriminate mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from controls. Whole brain atrophy rate discriminates Alzheimer disease (AD) from MCI. Regional measures of hippocampal atrophy are the strongest predictors of progression to AD. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; BET = brain

  17. The effects of beta-endorphin infusions into the amygdala on visual and olfactory sensory processing during sexual behaviour in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, A; Herbert, J

    1992-01-01

    Sexually experienced male rats infused bilaterally into the amygdala with 60 pmol beta-endorphin show decreased rate of precopulatory investigation of the female and delayed intromission latency, but copulation is left unaltered. Such males are still able to discriminate between the odours of bedding from receptive and unreceptive females, demonstrating that beta-endorphin does not impair the ability to detect sexually relevant odours. Preventing visual cues emitted by females during proceptive behaviour (by treating them with haloperidol) delayed intromission latency but had no effect on preintromission investigation. Intra-amygdaloid beta-endorphin exacerbated the effects of this treatment on the intromission latency. Inducing anosmia in males (by applying zinc sulphate solution to the olfactory mucosa) decreased their anogenital investigation and delayed their intromission latency. These effects were not enhanced by intra-amygdaloid beta-endorphin. Allowing males to investigate and initiate the first intromission prior to intra-amygdaloid infusion had no effects on subsequent intromissions. However, if following an intromission with one female and an infusion of beta-endorphin, the male was presented with an unfamiliar female then the effects of intra-amygdaloid beta-endorphin on investigation and intromission returned. These results suggest that beta-endorphin in the amygdala interferes with the processing of female-specific olfactory information. Without this processed information, classification of the female as a sexual stimulus may be impeded and thus sexual arousal delayed.

  18. Infusing interprofessional education into the nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Joan Sistrunk; Bates, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Education for interprofessional collaboration should begin early in the nursing program with a gradual infusion of interprofessional competencies into the curriculum. The faculty developed an interprofessional education program for students in nursing, physical therapy, nutrition, and respiratory care, which focused on sharing knowledge about each discipline, developing respect and value for each other's disciplines, and emphasizing techniques to improve communication and teamwork.

  19. Propofol Infusion Syndrome Heralded by ECG Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijzen, Elsbeth J.; Jacobs, Bram; Aslan, Adnan; Rodgers, Michael G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is well known, often associated with, lethal complication of sedation with propofol. PRIS seems to be associated with young age, traumatic brain injury (TBI), higher cumulative doses of propofol, and the concomitant use of catecholamines. Known manifestations of

  20. Liquid infused surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Matthew; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang; Wang, Karen; Lee, Kevin; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow facility is used to measure the drag reduction capabilities and dynamic behavior of liquid-infused micro-patterned surfaces. Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushion-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The mobile liquid lubricant creates a surface slip with the outer turbulent shear flow as well as an energetic sink to dampen turbulent fluctuations. Micro-manufactured surfaces can be mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. Two configurations are possible, both capable of producing laminar and turbulent flows. The first configuration allows detailed investigation of the infused liquid layer and the other allows well resolved pressure gradient measurements. Both of the configurations have high aspect ratios 15-45:1. Drag reduction for a variety of liquid-infused surface architectures is quantified by measuring pressure drop in the channel. Flow in the oil film is simultaneously visualized using fluorescent dye. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion of Autologous CD133+ Cells for Diabetic Peripheral Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microvascular lesion in diabetic peripheral arterial disease (PAD still cannot be resolved by current surgical and interventional technique. Endothelial cells have the therapeutic potential to cure microvascular lesion. To evaluate the efficacy and immune-regulatory impact of intra-arterial infusion of autologous CD133+ cells, we recruited 53 patients with diabetic PAD (27 of CD133+ group and 26 of control group. CD133+ cells enriched from patients’ PB-MNCs were reinfused intra-arterially. The ulcer healing followed up till 18 months was 100% (3/3 in CD133+ group and 60% (3/5 in control group. The amputation rate was 0 (0/27 in CD133+ group and 11.54% (3/26 in control group. Compared with the control group, TcPO2 and ABI showed obvious improvement at 18 months and significant increasing VEGF and decreasing IL-6 level in the CD133+ group within 4 weeks. A reducing trend of proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory regulation function at 4 weeks after the cells infusion was also found. These results indicated that autologous CD133+ cell treatment can effectively improve the perfusion of morbid limb and exert proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory immune-regulatory impacts by paracrine on tissue microenvironment. The CD133+ progenitor cell therapy may be repeated at a fixed interval according to cell life span and immune-regulatory function.

  2. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence.

  3. Propofol infusion syndrome in refractory status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Woo Sub; Gwak, Hye Min; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-06-01

    Propofol is used for treating refractory status epilepticus, which has high rate of mortality. Propofol infusion syndrome is a rare but often fatal syndrome, characterized by lactic acidosis, lipidemia, and cardiac failure, associated with propofol infusion over prolonged periods of time. We investigated the clinical factors that characterize propofol infusion syndrome to know the risk of them in refractory status epilepticus. This retrospective observation study was conducted in Samsung medical center from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2009. Thirty two patients (19 males, 13 females, aged between 16 and 64 years), with refractory status epilepsy were included. Their clinical findings and treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. We divided our patients into established status epilepticus (ESE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). And then the patients with RSE was further subdivided into propofol treatment group (RSE-P) and the other anesthetics treatment group (RSE-O). We analyzed the clinical characteristics by comparison of the groups. There were significant differences of hypotension and lipid change between ESE and RSE (pRSE-P and RSE-O groups. The hospital days were longer in RSE than in ESE (p=0.012) and treatment outcome was also worse in RSE than in ESE (p=0.007) but there were no significant differences of hospital stays and treatment outcome between RSE-P and RSE-O. RSE is very critical disease with high mortality, which may show as many clinical changes as propofol infusion syndrome. Therefore propofol infusion syndrome might be considered as one of the clinical manifestations of RSE.

  4. Marrow Stromal Cell Infusion Rescues Hematopoiesis in Lethally Irradiated Mice despite Rapid Clearance after Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stromal cells (MSCs, also termed mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed as a promising cellular therapy for tissue injury including radiation-induced marrow failure, but evidence for a direct effect is lacking. To assess the effects of MSCs on survival after lethal irradiation, we infused syngeneic MSCs (either as immortalized MSCs clones or primary MSCs intravenously into wild-type C57/Bl6 mice within 24 hours of lethal total body irradiation (TBI. Mice receiving either of the MSC preparations had significantly improved survival when compared to controls. In vivo imaging, immune histochemistry, and RT-PCR employed to detect MSCs indicated that the infused MSCs were predominantly localized to the lungs and rapidly cleared following infusion. Our results suggest that a single infusion of MSCs can improve survival after otherwise lethal TBI but the effect is not due to a direct interaction with, or contribution to, the damaged marrow by MSCs.

  5. Hippocampal hyperactivation in presymptomatic familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Budson, Andrew E; Celone, Kim; Ruiz, Adriana; Newmark, Randall; Castrillón, Gabriel; Lopera, Francisco; Stern, Chantal E

    2010-12-01

    The examination of individuals who carry fully penetrant genetic alterations that result in familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) provides a unique model for studying the early presymptomatic disease stages. In AD, deficits in episodic and associative memory have been linked to structural and functional changes within the hippocampal system. This study used functional MRI (fMRI) to examine hippocampal function in a group of healthy, young, cognitively-intact presymptomatic individuals (average age 33.7 years) who carry the E280A presenilin-1 (PS1) genetic mutation for FAD. These PS1 subjects will go on to develop the first symptoms of the disease around the age of 45 years. Our objective was to examine hippocampal function years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Twenty carriers of the Alzheimer's-associated E280A PS1 mutation and 19 PS1-negative control subjects participated. Both groups were matched for age, sex, education level, and neuropsychological test performance. All participants performed a face-name associative encoding task while in a Phillips 1.5T fMRI scanner. Analysis focused on the hippocampal system. Despite identical behavioral performance, presymptomatic PS1 mutation carriers exhibited increased activation of the right anterior hippocampus during encoding of novel face-name associations compared to matched controls. Our results demonstrate that functional changes within the hippocampal memory system occur years before cognitive decline in FAD. These presymptomatic changes in hippocampal physiology in FAD suggest that hippocampal fMRI patterns during associative encoding may also provide a preclinical biomarker in sporadic AD.

  6. Hippocampal place cells, context, and episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M; Mizumori, Sheri J Y

    2006-01-01

    Although most observers agree that the hippocampus has a critical role in learning and memory, there remains considerable debate about the precise functional contribution of the hippocampus to these processes. Two of the most influential accounts hold that the primary function of the hippocampus is to generate cognitive maps and to mediate episodic memory processes. The well-documented spatial firing patterns (place fields) of hippocampal neurons in rodents, along with the spatial learning impairments observed with hippocampal damage support the cognitive mapping hypothesis. The amnesia for personally experienced events seen in humans with hippocampal damage and the data of animal models, which show severe memory deficits associated with hippocampal lesions, support the episodic memory account. Although an extensive literature supports each of these hypotheses, a specific contribution of place cells to episodic memory has not been clearly demonstrated. Recent data from our laboratory, together with previous findings, indicate that hippocampal place fields and neuronal responses to task-relevant stimuli are highly sensitive to the context, even when the contexts are defined by abstract task demands rather than the spatial geometry of the environment. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that place fields reflect a more general context processing function of the hippocampus. Hippocampal context representations could serve to differentiate contexts and prime the relevant memories and behaviors. Since episodic memories, by definition, include information about the time and place where the episode occurred, contextual information is a necessary prerequisite for any episodic memory. Thus, place fields contribute importantly to episodic memory as part of the needed context representations. Additionally, recent findings indicate that hippocampal neurons differentiate contexts at progressively finer levels of detail, suggesting a hierarchical coding scheme which

  7. Hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine during intra-operative electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dexmedetomidine, a predominant alpha-2-adrenergic agonist has been used in anesthetic practice to provide good sedation. The drug is being recently used in neuroanesthesia during awake surgery for brain tumors and in functional neurosurgery. Materials and Methods: This prospective study analyzed the hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during electrocorticography in patients undergoing surgery for mesial temporal sclerosis. Dexmedetomidine infusion was administered during intra-operative electrocorticography recording, 15 minutes after the end tidal MAC of N 2 O and isoflurane were decreased to zero. Anesthesia was maintained with O 2 :air mixture = 50:50, vecuronium and fentanyl. Heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP and end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO 2 were recorded across at induction, 2 min prior to dexmedetomidine (PreDEX, 5 min during dexmedetomidine infusion (DEX; 1 μg/kg, 5 min after stopping dexmedetomidine and 10 minutes after stopping dexmedetomidine. Results: Forty patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (M: F = 27:13, mean age = 28.15 ± 10.9 years; duration of epilepsy = 12.0 ± 7.9 years underwent anterior temporal lobe resection with amygdalohippocampectomy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Infusion of dexmedetomidine caused a transient fall in HR in 87.5% of patients and an increase in MAP in 62.5% of patients, which showed a tendency to revert back towards PreDEX values within 10 min after stopping the infusion. Sixty-five percent of the patients showed ≤25% reduction and 10% of them showed >25% reduction in HR. 47.5% of the patients showed ≤25% increase and 15% of them showed >25% increase in MAP. These changes were over a narrow range and within physiological limits. Conclusion: The infusion of dexmedetomidine for a short period causes reduction of HR and increase in MAP in patients, however the variations are within acceptable range.

  8. Hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine during intra-operative electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, G; Arivazhagan, A; Sinha, Sanjib; Madhusudan Reddy, K R; Thennarasu, K; Bharath, R D; Rao, M Bhaskara; Chandramouli, B A; Satishchandra, P

    2014-11-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a predominant alpha-2-adrenergic agonist has been used in anesthetic practice to provide good sedation. The drug is being recently used in neuroanesthesia during awake surgery for brain tumors and in functional neurosurgery. This prospective study analyzed the hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during electrocorticography in patients undergoing surgery for mesial temporal sclerosis. Dexmedetomidine infusion was administered during intra-operative electrocorticography recording, 15 minutes after the end tidal MAC of N2O and isoflurane were decreased to zero. Anesthesia was maintained with O2 : air mixture = 50:50, vecuronium and fentanyl. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) were recorded across at induction, 2 min prior to dexmedetomidine (PreDEX), 5 min during dexmedetomidine infusion (DEX; 1 μg/kg), 5 min after stopping dexmedetomidine and 10 minutes after stopping dexmedetomidine. Forty patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (M: F = 27:13, mean age = 28.15 ± 10.9 years; duration of epilepsy = 12.0 ± 7.9 years) underwent anterior temporal lobe resection with amygdalohippocampectomy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Infusion of dexmedetomidine caused a transient fall in HR in 87.5% of patients and an increase in MAP in 62.5% of patients, which showed a tendency to revert back towards PreDEX values within 10 min after stopping the infusion. Sixty-five percent of the patients showed ≤25% reduction and 10% of them showed >25% reduction in HR. 47.5% of the patients showed ≤25% increase and 15% of them showed >25% increase in MAP. These changes were over a narrow range and within physiological limits. The infusion of dexmedetomidine for a short period causes reduction of HR and increase in MAP in patients, however the variations are within acceptable range.

  9. Long-Lasting Effects of GABA Infusion Into the Cerebral Cortex of the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Teresa; Almeida, Daniel; Arango, Iván; Calixto, Eduardo; Casasola, César; Brailowsky, Simón

    2000-01-01

    In electrophysiological terms, experimental models of durable information storage in the brain include long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression, and kindling. Protein synthesis correlates with these enduring processes. We propose a fourth example of long-lasting information storage in the brain, which we call the GABA-withdrawal syndrome (GWS). In rats, withdrawal of a chronic intracortical infusion of GABA, a ubiquitous inhibitory neurotransmitter, induced epileptogenesis at the infusion site. This overt GWS lasted for days. Anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, prevented the appearance of GWS in vivo. Hippocampal and neocortical slices showed a similar post-GABA hyperexcitability in vitro and an enhanced susceptibility to LTP induction. One to four months after the epileptic behavior disappeared, systemic administration of a subconvulsant dose of pentylenetetrazol produced the reappearance of paroxysmal activity. The long-lasting effects of tonic GABAA receptor stimulation may be involved in long-term information storage processes at the cortical level, whereas the cessation of GABAA receptor stimulation may be involved in chronic pathological conditions, such as epilepsy. Furthermore, we propose that GWS may represent a common key factor in the addiction to GABAergic agents (for example, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and ethanol). GWS represents a novel form of neurono-glial plasticity. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. PMID:10709209

  10. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4 and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin.

  11. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yi; Li Qi; Ji Li; Jing-jing Le; Lei Shao; Xin Du; Jing-cheng Dong

    2016-01-01

    In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely un-known. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupointsGuanyuan (CV4) and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral) were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open ifeld test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosor-bent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These ifndings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin.

  12. Continuous regional arterial infusion and laparotomic decompression for severe acute pancreatitis with abdominal compartment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Deng; Jian-Yin Zhou; Zhen-Yu Yin; You-Yuan Peng; Fu-Qiang Wang; Xiao-Min Wang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of abdominal decompression plus continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) via a drug delivery system (DDS) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients with abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS).METHODS: We presented our recent experience in 8 patients with SAP. The patients developed clinical ACS, which required abdominal decompression. During the operation, a DDS was inserted into the peripancreatic artery (the catheter was inserted from the right gastroepiploic artery until it reached the junction between the pancreaticoduodenal and gastroduodenal artery). Through this DDS, a protease inhibitor, antibiotics and octreotide were infused continuously. The duration of the regional artery infusion ranged from 8 to 41 d. The outcomes and the changes in the APACHE Ⅱ score, computed tomography (CT) severity index and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) of the patients were retrospectively evaluated.RESULTS: Eight patients with an initial APACHE Ⅱscore of 18.9 (range, 13-27) and a Balthazar CT severity index of 9.1 (range, 7-10) developed severe local and systemic complications. These patients underwent subsequent surgical decompression and CRAI therapy because of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). After a mean interval of 131.9 ± 72.3 d hospitalization, 7 patients recovered with decreased APACHE Ⅱ scores, CT severity indexes and IAP. The mean APACHE Ⅱ score was 5.4 (range, 4-8), the CT severity index was 2.3 (range, 1-3), and IAP decreased to 7.7 mmHg (range,6-11 mmHg) 60 d after operation. One patient died of multiple organ failure 1 wk after surgery.CONCLUSION: CRAI and laparotomic decompression might be a therapeutic option for SAP patients with ACS.

  13. Supraselective intra-arterial chemotherapy: evaluation of treatment-related complications in advanced retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Mutapcic Vajzovic

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lejla Mutapcic Vajzovic1, Timothy G Murray1, Mohammad A Aziz-Sultan2, Amy C Schefler1, Stacey Quintero Wolfe2, Ditte Hess1, Cristina E Fernandes3, Sander R Dubovy1,41Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 4Florida Lions Oculopathology Laboratory, Miami, FL, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study is to report the complication profile and safety evaluation of supraselective intra-arterial melphalan chemotherapy in children undergoing treatment with advanced retinoblastoma.Methods: Twelve eyes of 10 children with advanced retinoblastoma (Reese-Ellsworth Group Vb or International Classification Group D were treated with supraselective intra-ophthalmic artery infusion of melphalan. Eleven eyes of nine children had previously failed traditional management with systemic chemotherapy and laser ablation and underwent intra-ophthalmic artery infusion of melphalan as an alternative to enucleation. Serial ophthalmic examinations, retinal photography, and ultrasonographic imaging were used to evaluate treatment regime.Results: Ophthalmic artery cannulation was successfully performed in 12 eyes of 10 patients (total 16 times. Striking regression of tumor, subretinal and vitreous seeds were seen early in each case. No severe systemic side effects occurred. Grade III neutropenia was seen in one patient. No transfusions were required. Three patients developed a vitreous hemorrhage obscuring tumor visualization. One patient developed periocular edema associated with inferior rectus muscle inflammation per orbital MRI. This same patient had scattered intraretinal hemorrhages and peripapillary cotton wool spots consistent with a Purtscher’s-like retinopathy that resolved spontaneously. At the 6-month follow-up examination

  14. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  15. Developmental changes in hippocampal associative coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsberry, Mary E; Kim, Jangjin; Freeman, John H

    2015-03-11

    Behavioral analyses of the ontogeny of memory have shown that hippocampus-dependent learning emerges relatively late in postnatal development compared with simple associative learning. Maturation of hippocampal mnemonic mechanisms has been hypothesized to underlie the development of the later emerging learning processes. However, the role of hippocampal maturation in learning has not been examined directly. The goal of the present study was to examine developmental changes in hippocampal neuronal coding during acquisition of a hippocampus-dependent learning task. We recorded activity from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat pups while they were trained on trace eyeblink conditioning. Trace eyeblink conditioning is a Pavlovian conditioning task that involves the association of a conditioned stimulus (CS) with an unconditioned stimulus over a stimulus-free trace interval. The inclusion of the trace interval is what makes the task hippocampus dependent. In the present study, rats were trained at 21-23, 24-26, and 31-33 d of age. Previous research from our laboratory and others shows that trace conditioning begins to emerge during the third postnatal week. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons show a substantial increase in responsiveness to task-relevant events during development. Moreover, there is an age-related increase in the proportion of neurons that respond to a combination of trial events (e.g., CS and trace). Our findings indicate that the developmental emergence of hippocampally mediated learning is related to increases in the strength and complexity of CA1 associative coding.

  16. 75 FR 21641 - Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting regarding external infusion pumps... infusion pump use, to help the agency identify quality assurance strategies to mitigate these problems,...

  17. Growth hormone rescues hippocampal synaptic function after sleep deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, EunYoung; Grover, Lawrence M; Bertolotti, Don; Green, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is required for, and sleep loss impairs, normal hippocampal synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor function and expression, hippocampal NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity, and hippocampal-dependent memory function. Although sleep is essential, the signals linking sleep to hippocampal function are not known. One potential signal is growth hormone. Growth hormone is released during sleep, and its release is suppressed during sleep deprivation. If growth hormone l...

  18. An audit of hospital based outpatient infusions and a pilot program of community-based monoclonal antibody infusions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doran, J-P

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor alpha, is administered as an intravenous infusion requiring a costly hospital day case or inpatient admission. METHODS: An audit of all current therapies given by intravenous infusions in an outpatient setting in St Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH) was undertaken. Furthermore, in conjunction with TCP homecare, we established in a general practise health clinic, the first Irish community infusion centre for the administration of infliximab in August 2006. RESULTS: All outpatient departments indicated that they would favour a centralized hospital infusion unit. There were no adverse events and the mean global satisfaction improved in the community infliximab infusion pilot programme of seven patients. CONCLUSION: This study suggests efficiencies in providing centralized infusion facilities, while the community based infusion of infliximab is feasible and safe in this small cohort and identifies the community infusion unit as a viable and cost efficient alternative for administration of infliximab.

  19. The Development of Recurrent Seizures after Continuous Intrahippocampal Infusion of Methionine Sulfoximine in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is deficient in astrocytes in the epileptogenic hippocampus in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). To explore the role of this deficiency in the pathophysiology of MTLE, rats were continuously infused with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO, 0.625 µg/h) or 0.9% NaCl (saline control) unilaterally into the hippocampus. The seizures caused by MSO were assessed by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. All (28 of 28) of the MSO-treated animals and none (0 of 12) of the saline-treated animals developed recurrent seizures. Most recurrent seizures appeared in clusters of 2 days’ duration (median; range, 1 to 12 days). The first cluster was characterized by frequent, predominantly Stage I seizures, which presented after the first 9.5 h of infusion (median; range, 5.5 to 31.7 h). Subsequent clusters of less-frequent, mainly partial seizures occurred after a clinically silent interval of 7.1 days (median; range, 1.8 to 16.2 days). The ictal intracranial EEGs shared several characteristics with recordings of partial seizures in humans, such as a distinct evolution of the amplitude and frequency of the EEG signal. The neuropathology caused by MSO had similarities to hippocampal sclerosis in 23.1% of cases, whereas 26.9% of the animals had minimal neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Moderate to severe diffuse neuronal loss was observed in 50% of the animals. In conclusion, the model of intrahippocampal MSO infusion replicates key features of human MTLE and may represent a useful tool for further studies of the cellular, molecular and electrophysiological mechanisms of this disorder. PMID:19747915

  20. Preliminary evaluation of intravenous infusion and intrapancreatic injection of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Kim Phan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells, which leads to insulin insufficiency, hyperglycemia, and reduced metabolic glucose level. Insulin replacement is the current standard therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus but has several limitations. Pancreatic islet transplantation can result in the production of exogenous insulin, but its use is limited by immune-rejection and donor availability. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs, which could be utilized for diabetes mellitus treatment. Previously published reports have demonstrated that MSC or IPC transplantation could produce significant improvement in mouse models of diabetes mellitus. This study was aimed at determining the effects of two different methods of MSC transplantation on the efficacy of diabetes mellitus treatment in mouse models. The MSCs were isolated from umbilical cord blood and were proliferated following a previously published procedure. Diabetes mellitus was induced in mice by streptozotocin (STZ injection. Thirty days after transplantation, the weight of the mice treated by intra-venous infusion and intra-pancreatic injection was found to be 22% and 14% higher than that of the un-treated mice. The blood glucose concentrations in both intra-venous infusion and intra-pancreatic injection groups decreased and remained more stable than those in the control group. Moreover, insulin was detected in the serum of the treated mice, and the pancreas also showed gradual recovery. Based on the results of this preliminary investigation, intra-venous infusion seems more suitable than intra-pancreatic injection for MSC transplantation for diabetes mellitus treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(3.000: 98-105

  1. Childhood maltreatment modifies the relationship of depression with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, L.; van Velzen, L.; Schmaal, L.; van der Graaf, Y.; van der Wee, N.; van Tol, M. -J.; Penninx, B.; Geerlings, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Childhood maltreatment (CM) may modify the relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and hippocampal volume reduction. To disentangle the impact of MDD and CM on hippocampal volume we investigated the association between MDD and hippocampal volume in persons with and without a

  2. Hippocampal histone acetylation regulates object recognition and the estradiol-induced enhancement of object recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zaorui; Fan, Lu; Fortress, Ashley M; Boulware, Marissa I; Frick, Karyn M

    2012-02-15

    Histone acetylation has recently been implicated in learning and memory processes, yet necessity of histone acetylation for such processes has not been demonstrated using pharmacological inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As such, the present study tested whether garcinol, a potent HAT inhibitor in vitro, could impair hippocampal memory consolidation and block the memory-enhancing effects of the modulatory hormone 17β-estradiol E2. We first showed that bilateral infusion of garcinol (0.1, 1, or 10 μg/side) into the dorsal hippocampus (DH) immediately after training impaired object recognition memory consolidation in ovariectomized female mice. A behaviorally effective dose of garcinol (10 μg/side) also significantly decreased DH HAT activity. We next examined whether DH infusion of a behaviorally subeffective dose of garcinol (1 ng/side) could block the effects of DH E2 infusion on object recognition and epigenetic processes. Immediately after training, ovariectomized female mice received bilateral DH infusions of vehicle, E2 (5 μg/side), garcinol (1 ng/side), or E2 plus garcinol. Forty-eight hours later, garcinol blocked the memory-enhancing effects of E2. Garcinol also reversed the E2-induced increase in DH histone H3 acetylation, HAT activity, and levels of the de novo methyltransferase DNMT3B, as well as the E2-induced decrease in levels of the memory repressor protein histone deacetylase 2. Collectively, these findings suggest that histone acetylation is critical for object recognition memory consolidation and the beneficial effects of E2 on object recognition. Importantly, this work demonstrates that the role of histone acetylation in memory processes can be studied using a HAT inhibitor.

  3. Involvement of hippocampal NMDA receptors in retention of shuttle avoidance conditioning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roesler R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to evaluate the role of hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors in acquisition and consolidation of memory during shuttle avoidance conditioning in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were surgically implanted with cannulae aimed at the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus. After recovery from surgery, animals were trained and tested in a shuttle avoidance apparatus (30 trials, 0.5-mA footshock, 24-h training-test interval. Immediately before or immediately after training, animals received a bilateral intrahippocampal 0.5-µl infusion containing 5.0 µg of the NMDA competitive receptor antagonist aminophosphonopentanoic acid (AP5 or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4. Infusion duration was 2 min per side. Pre-training infusion of AP5 impaired retention test performance (mean ± SEM number of conditioned responses (CRs during retention test session was 16.47 ± 1.78 in the vehicle group and 9.93 ± 1.59 in the AP5 group; P<0.05. Post-training infusion of AP5 did not affect retention (mean ± SEM number of conditioned responses during retention test session was 18.46 ± 1.94 in the vehicle group and 20.42 ± 2.38 in the AP5 group; P>0.10. This impairment could not be attributed to an effect on acquisition, motor activity or footshock sensitivity since AP5 affected neither training session performance measured by the number of CRs nor the number of intertrial crossings during the training session. These data suggest that NMDA receptors in the hippocampus are critical for retention of shuttle avoidance conditioning, in agreement with previous evidence showing a role of NMDA receptors in fear memory.

  4. Hemorrhage exacerbates bacterial translocation at low levels of intra-abdominal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, N J; Simon, R J; Leon, W; Machiedo, G W

    1998-12-01

    It has been shown previously that the adverse cardiopulmonary sequelae of increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) are worsened by hemorrhage and resuscitation. Bacterial translocation (BT) to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), liver, and spleen has also been shown to occur with increased IAP. To investigate the hypothesis that BT associated with elevated IAP would be significantly increased after hemorrhage and resuscitation. Anesthetized adult male rats had femoral artery and vein catheters placed, and an intra-abdominal catheter placed to measure IAP. Group 1 underwent surgery only and served as controls. Group 2 had IAP raised to 10 mm Hg by infused lactated Ringer's solution for 40 minutes. Group 3 had a 25% hemorrhage, followed by resuscitation by infused lactated Ringer's solution and shed blood. Group 4 first had a 25% hemorrhage, resuscitated using infused lactated Ringer's solution and shed blood, and then had IAP raised to 10 mm Hg by infused lactated Ringer's solution for 40 minutes. All groups were killed after 2 hours, and had MLNs, liver, and spleen harvested for quantitative cultures. Hemorrhage and resuscitation alone did not increase BT to the MLNs, liver, or spleen. An increase in IAP to 10 mm Hg resulted in a significant level of BT to the MLNs and liver on MacConkey II agar (PBT only to the liver on trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep's blood (PBT to the liver and spleen when IAP was increased to 10 mm Hg (PBT to the MLNs, liver, or spleen. However, hemorrhage and resuscitation increased BT to the liver and spleen when IAP was increased to 10 mm Hg. This supports the concept that prior hemorrhage and resuscitation exacerbates the effects of increased IAP.

  5. Software Engineering Technology Infusion Within NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this paper, several software engineering technologies used within NASA are studied, and the mechanisms, schedules, and efforts at transferring these technologies are investigated. The goals of this study are: 1) to understand the difference between technology transfer (the adoption of a new method by large segments of an industry) as an industry-wide phenomenon and the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization (called technology infusion); and 2) to see if software engineering technology transfer differs from other engineering disciplines. While there is great interest today in developing technology transfer models for industry, it is the technology infusion process that actually causes changes in the current state of the practice.

  6. Software Engineering Technology Infusion Within NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this paper, several software engineering technologies used within NASA are studied, and the mechanisms, schedules, and efforts at transferring these technologies are investigated. The goals of this study are: 1) to understand the difference between technology transfer (the adoption of a new method by large segments of an industry) as an industry-wide phenomenon and the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization (called technology infusion); and 2) to see if software engineering technology transfer differs from other engineering disciplines. While there is great interest today in developing technology transfer models for industry, it is the technology infusion process that actually causes changes in the current state of the practice.

  7. Neuromorphic VLSI realization of the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anu

    2016-05-01

    The medial entorhinal cortex grid cells, aided by the subicular head direction cells, are thought to provide a matrix which is utilized by the hippocampal place cells for calculation of position of an animal during spatial navigation. The place cells are thought to function as an internal GPS for the brain and provide a spatiotemporal stamp on episodic memories. Several computational neuroscience models have been proposed to explain the place specific firing patterns of the cells of the hippocampal formation - including the GRIDSmap model for grid cells and Bayesian integration for place cells. In this work, we present design and measurement results from a first ever system of silicon circuits which successfully realize the function of the hippocampal formation of brain based on these models.

  8. Taurine increases hippocampal neurogenesis in aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gebara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with increased inflammation and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis, which may in turn contribute to cognitive impairment. Taurine is a free amino acid found in numerous diets, with anti-inflammatory properties. Although abundant in the young brain, the decrease in taurine concentration with age may underlie reduced neurogenesis. Here, we assessed the effect of taurine on hippocampal neurogenesis in middle-aged mice. We found that taurine increased cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus through the activation of quiescent stem cells, resulting in increased number of stem cells and intermediate neural progenitors. Taurine had a direct effect on stem/progenitor cells proliferation, as observed in vitro, and also reduced activated microglia. Furthermore, taurine increased the survival of newborn neurons, resulting in a net increase in adult neurogenesis. Together, these results show that taurine increases several steps of adult neurogenesis and support a beneficial role of taurine on hippocampal neurogenesis in the context of brain aging.

  9. Localized gene transfer into organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and acute hippocampal slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Shen, H;

    1993-01-01

    Viral vectors derived from herpes simplex virus, type-1 (HSV), can transfer and express genes into fully differentiated, post-mitotic neurons. These vectors also transduce cells effectively in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Nanoliter quantities of a virus stock of HSVlac, an HSV vector...... or hippocampal slices. The rapid expression of beta-gal by HSVlac allowed efficient transduction of acute hippocampal slices. Many genes have been transduced and expressed using HSV vectors; therefore, this microapplication method can be applied to many neurobiological questions....

  10. Vacuum infusion equipment design and the influence of reinforcement layers addition to the resin infusion time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, A. H.; Setyarso, G.

    2016-11-01

    The characteristic of composite material is greatly influenced by the manufacture method of composite. The conventional method that has been used such as hand lay-up and spray up are simple and easy to apply but the composite tend to have a void in it because of the air trapped during the manufacture process. Vacuum infusion is one of the modern composite manufacture process which can replace the conventional method. The problem of this method happens when the resin infusion time become longer due to the addition of reinforcement layers. When the resin infusion time is longer than the resin's gel time, the resin will become gel and not able to flow into the mold. In order to overcome this problem, a study that observe the influence of reinforcement layers addition to the resin infusion time is needed. In this study, vacuum infusion equipment for composite materials manufacturing process that are designed consists of: 1×1m glass as the mold, 1L PVC tube for the resin container, 1L glass tube for the resin trap, and ‘A HP vacuum pump with 7 CFM vacuum speed. The resin that is used in this study is unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) and the fiber used as reinforcement is fiber glass. It is observed that the more number of reinforcement layers the longer resin infusion time will be. The resin infusion time (in seconds) from two until six layers respectively for the area of 15×20cm are: 88, 115, 145, 174, 196; for the area of 15×25cm are: 119, 142, 168, 198, 235; and for the area of 15×35cm are: 181, 203, 235, 263, 303. The maximum reinforcement layers that can be accommodated for each 15×20cm, 15×25cm, and 15×35cm area are respectively 31 layers, 29 layers, and 25 layers.

  11. Analysis of the vacuum infusion moulding process

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Nuno André Curado Mateus

    2004-01-01

    This thesis focuses on flow through compliant porous media with applications to the manufacturing of composites by vacuum infusion (VI). The context of this work is the need for reliability in environmentally friendly composite processing methods for composite materials. Commercial reality and the prospective application to low cost structures for the transportation industry dictate that appropriate emphasis should be put on obtaining robust simulations, ensuring reliability and progressing t...

  12. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ling; Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karine;

    2016-01-01

    for bolus infusion (BI) or programmed infusion (PI) experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [(11)C]Flumazenil (FMZ) was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [(11)C......]FMZ-PET scans were conducted, based on which population-based PI and BI schemes were designed and tested in five additional healthy subjects. The design of a PI was assisted by an offline feedback controller. Results. The system could reproduce the measurements in blood and brain. With PI, [(11)C]FMZ steady...... state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min). Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [(11)C]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous...

  13. Propionate uptake by rumen microorganisms: the effect of ruminal infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Nozière, P; Gachon, S.; DOREAU, M.

    2003-01-01

    International audience; We assessed the ability of rumen microbes to significantly incorporate propionate when they are subjected in vivo to no infusion, long-term infusion of minerals, and short- and long-term infusion of high amounts of propionate. Four ruminally cannulated sheep fed 1000 g hay (8 meals per d) were used in a $4 \\times 4$ Latin square design. The treatments consisted of no infusion (C), ruminal infusion of propionate (86 g$\\cdot$d$^{-1}$) for 1 (P1) and 7 d (P7), and of mine...

  14. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors mediate the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and MDMA/ecstasy on memory retrieval in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Marzieh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-03

    A combination of cannabis and ecstasy may change the cognitive functions more than either drug alone. The present study was designed to investigate the possible involvement of dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) and ecstasy/MDMA on memory retrieval. Adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and memory retrieval was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor agonist, ACPA (0.5-4ng/rat) immediately before the testing phase (pre-test), but not after the training phase (post-training), impaired memory retrieval. In addition, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.5-1μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an amnesic effect of the drug by itself. Interestingly, pre-test microinjection of a higher dose of MDMA into the CA1 regions significantly improved ACPA-induced memory impairment. Moreover, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (1 and 2μg/rat) inhibited the reversal effect of MDMA on the impairment of memory retrieval induced by ACPA. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 had no effect on memory retrieval alone. These findings suggest that ACPA or MDMA consumption can induce memory retrieval impairment, while their co-administration improves this amnesic effect through interacting with hippocampal glutamatergic-NMDA receptor mechanism. Thus, it seems that the tendency to abuse cannabis with ecstasy may be for avoiding cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Neuromodulatory effects of the dorsal hippocampal endocannabinoid system in dextromethorphan/morphine-induced amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2017-01-05

    Dextromethorphan which is an active ingredient in many cough medicines has been previously shown to potentiate amnesic effect of morphine in rats. However, the effect of dextromethorphan, that is also a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, in combination with morphine on hippocampus-based long term memory has not been well characterized. The aim of the present study was to assess the possible role of endocannabinoid system of the dorsal hippocampus in dextromethorphan /morphine-induced amnesia. Our results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of morphine (5mg/kg) or dextromethorphan (5-15mg/kg) before testing the passive avoidance learning induced amnesia. Combination of ineffective doses of dextromethorphan (7.5mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (2mg/kg, i.p.) also produced amnesia, suggesting the enhancing effects of the drugs. To assess the effect of the activation or inhibition of the dorsal hippocampal cannabinoid CB1 receptors on this amnesia, ACPA or AM251 as selective receptor agonists or antagonists were respectively injected into the CA1 regions before systemic injection of dextromethorphan and morphine. Interestingly, intra-CA1 microinjection of ACPA (0.5-1ng/rat) improved the amnesic effect of dextromethorphan /morphine combination. The microinjection of AM251 into the CA1 region enhanced the response of the combination of dextromethorphan /morphine in inducing amnesia. Moreover, Intra-CA1 microinjection of AM251 inhibited the improving effect of ACPA on dextromethorphan /morphine-induced amnesia. It is important to note that intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of the agonist or antagonist by itself had no effects on memory formation. Thus, it can be concluded that the dorsal hippocampal endocannabinoid system, via CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism, may be involved in morphine/dextromethorphan -induced amnesia.

  16. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Darío Moreno Fernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a normal developmental process associated with neurobiological changes leading to cognitive alterations with preserved, impaired, and enhanced functions. Evidence from animal and human studies is reviewed to explore the potential role of hippocampal plasticity on age-related cognitive changes with special attention to adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Results from lesion and stimulation strategies, as well as correlation data, support either a direct or modulatory role for adult newborn neurons in cognition at advanced ages. Further research on this topic may help to develop new treatments and to improve the quality of life of older people.

  17. Clinical Studies of Postoperative Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy in Patients with Pathologic T3 Esophageal Squamous Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baodong Liu; Zongjun Dong; Xiuyi Zhi; Qingsheng Xu

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate how arterial infusion chemotherapy after radical surgery influences long-term survival of patients with pathologic T3 (pT3) esophageal squamous carcinoma.METHODS We divided 190 patients with pathologic pT3 esophageal squamous carcinoma, confirmed by consecutive radical surgery, into an experimental group (surgery + intra-arterial infusion, 56 T3N0M0 and 52 T3N1M0 cases), and the remaining patients into a control group (surgery alone, 48 T3N0M0 and 34 T3N1M0 cases). The experimental group was sub-grouped into 56 cases (26 T3N0M0 and 30 T3N1M0 cases) receiving 1 or 2 periods of chemotherapy, while 52 cases (30 T3N0M0 and 22 T3N1M0 cases) underwent 3 or more than 3 periods of chemotherapy. We used one to seven courses of selected arterial infusion chemotherapy of cisplatin (80 mg/m2 of body-surface area) and fluorouracil (800 mg/m2) with or without epirubicin at 3~4 weeks post operation. The interval between each period was 3~4 weeks. All cases were followed-up for more than 5 years. Survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier methods and survival differences between patients with and without selected arterial infusion chemotherapy were compared with the Log-rank test. Prognostic variables were entered into a Cox regression analysis model controlling for age, site, lymph node status, and treatment received.RESULTS The overall survival rates were not significantly different between the experimental group and the control group, but there was better survival for patients who received 3 or more than 3 courses of chemotherapy. Lymph node status (N) was an important factor in the prognosis.CONCLUSION Trans-catheter arterial infusion chemotherapy is a safe and effective method of therapy. Postoperative selective arterial infusion chemotherapy can improve the survival rate in patients with esophageal squamous carcinoma who were previously treated by radical surgery.However, this modality of therapy needs further investigation.

  18. Effect of Insulin Infusion on Liver Protein Synthesis during Hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Jespersen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure that may contribute to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients receiving maintenance HD. The present study investigated the additional effect of glucose and glucose-insulin infusion on liver protein synthesis during HD...... compared with a meal alone. Methods In a randomized cross-over study with three arms, 11 non-diabetic HD patients were assigned to receive a conventional HD session with either: • no treatment (NT) • IV infusion of glucose (G) • IV infusion of glucose-insulin (GI) During infusions blood glucose levels were...... maintained at 8.0-10.0 mmol/L by additional glucose infusion. Glucose and glucose-insulin infusions were commenced 2 h prior to HD and continued throughout the HD session. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline before infusion and followed by the only meal allowed during the study. Results Blood...

  19. Oil-Infused Superhydrophobic Silicone Material for Low Ice Adhesion with Long-Term Infusion Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Yong Han; Wang, Chenyu; Wynne, Kenneth J; Gupta, Mool C

    2016-11-23

    A new approach for anti-icing materials was created to combat the effects of ice accretion and adhesion. The concept combines the strengths of individual characteristics for low ice adhesion based on elasticity, superhydrophobicity, and slippery liquid infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) for an optimal combination of high water repellency and ice-phobicity. This was achieved by replicating microtextures from a laser-irradiated aluminum substrate to an oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer, the result of which is a flexible, superhydrophobic, and lubricated material. This design provides multiple strategies of icing protection through high water repellency to retard ice accretion and with elasticity and oil infusion for low ice adhesion in a single material. Studies showed that an infusion of silicone oils with viscosity at 100 cSt and below 8 wt % in PDMS solution is sufficient to reduce the ice shear strength to an average of 38 kPa while maintaining contact angles and roll-off angles of above 150° and below 10°, respectively. This ice-adhesion value is a ∼95% reduction from a bare aluminum surface and ∼30% reduction from a microtextured, superhydrophobic PDMS material without oil infusion. In addition, three-month aging studies showed that the wetting and ice-adhesion performance of this material did not significantly degrade.

  20. [Intra-articular injection of cortisone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M; Schwarz, T; Ganser, G

    2015-11-01

    Intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids are standard procedures according to therapy guidelines in many rheumatic conditions. There is increasing evidence from clinical trials on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that more patients will attain the target of remission using a combination of systemic medication and intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids compared to systemic medication alone. Intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids play an important role in the therapeutic management of pediatric rheumatic diseases. In many countries competency in performing intra-articular injections is among the important skills necessary for certification as a specialist in rheumatology.

  1. Intra-abdominal tuberculous peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, G.; Ahlhelm, F.; Altmeyer, K.; Kramann, B. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Hennes, P. [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Pueschel, W. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany); Karadiakos, N. [Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital, Homburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy suffering from progressive dyspnea on exertion and painful abdominal protrusion. Final diagnosis of intra-abdominal tuberculosis (TB), including lymphadenopathy and abdominal abscess formation, was made following elective laparotomy. This type of disease is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The imaging findings in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI and laparoscopic images are presented. Differential diagnosis of abdominal abscess formation and other fungal or bacteriological infections, as well as the imaging findings of this type of lesion, are discussed. This case demonstrates that atypical manifestation of TB may remain unrecognized; thus, awareness of this kind of manifestation of tuberculosis may prevent patients from being subjected to inappropriate therapies. (orig.)

  2. Role of ventral hippocampal NMDA receptors in anxiolytic-like effect of morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevasseli, Tahmineh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Nayer-Nouri, Touraj

    2010-12-02

    The possible role of ventral hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior in an elevated plus maze (EPM) task was investigated in the present study. Adult male mice (7 per group) with cannulas aimed at the ventral hippocampus (VH) received NMDA or a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 with or without morphine and 30min later were subjected to an EPM task. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of morphine (3-9mg/kg) increased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT) and open arm entries (%OAE), which suggested an anxiolytic-like effect. Intra-VH microinjection of NMDA (0.5-1μg/mouse) with an ineffective dose of morphine (3mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased %OAT and %OAE. However, microinjections of the same doses of NMDA into the VH in the absence of morphine had no effect on %OAT and %OAE. Intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 (0.5-2μg/mouse) decreased the anxiolytic-like effect of morphine, while intra-VH microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 alone increased %OAT and %OAE, which indicated an anxiolytic response. Furthermore, intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 reversed the effect of NMDA response to the administration of a lower morphine dose as seen in the EPM task. It should be noted that intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 plus NMDA, 5min before morphine increased locomotor activity, while other treatments had no effect on this parameter. The results suggest that VH-NMDA receptors participate in the mediation of morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior.

  3. Intra-amygdala inhibition of ERK(1/2) potentiates the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besheer, Joyce; Fisher, Kristen R; Cannady, Reginald; Grondin, Julie J M; Hodge, Clyde W

    2012-03-17

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK(1/2)) has been implicated in modulating drug seeking behavior and is a target of alcohol and other drugs of abuse. Given that the discriminative stimulus (subjective/interoceptive) effects of drugs are determinants of abuse liability and can influence drug seeking behavior, we examined the role of ERK(1/2) in modulating the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol. Using drug discrimination procedures, rats were trained to discriminate a moderate intragastric (IG) alcohol dose (1g/kg) versus water (IG). Following an alcohol (1g/kg) discrimination session phosphorylated ERK(1/2) (pERK(1/2)) immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly elevated in the amygdala, but not the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, we hypothesized that intra-amygdala inhibition of ERK(1/2) would disrupt expression of the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol. However, intra-amygdala or accumbens administration of the MEK/ERK(1/2) inhibitor U0126 (1 and 3μg) had no effect on the discriminative stimulus effects of the training dose of alcohol (1g/kg). Contrary to our hypothesis, intra-amygdala infusion of U0126 (3μg) potentiated the discriminative stimulus effects of a low alcohol dose (0.5g/kg) and had no effect following nucleus accumbens infusion. Importantly, site-specific inhibition of pERK(1/2) in each brain region was confirmed. Therefore, the increase in pERK(1/2) IR in the amygdala following systemic alcohol administration may be reflective of the widespread effects of alcohol on the brain (activation/inhibition of brain circuits), whereas the site specific microinjection studies confirmed functional involvement of intra-amygdala ERK(1/2). These findings show that activity of the ERK signaling pathway in the amygdala can influence the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol.

  4. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  5. Rapid effects of dorsal hippocampal G-protein coupled estrogen receptor on learning in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymer, Jennifer; Robinson, Alana; Winters, Boyer D; Choleris, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Through rapid mechanisms of action, estrogens affect learning and memory processes. It has been shown that 17β-estradiol and an Estrogen Receptor (ER) α agonist enhances performance in social recognition, object recognition, and object placement tasks when administered systemically or infused in the dorsal hippocampus. In contrast, systemic and dorsal hippocampal ERβ activation only promote spatial learning. In addition, 17β-estradiol, the ERα and the G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) agonists increase dendritic spine density in the CA1 hippocampus. Recently, we have shown that selective systemic activation of the GPER also rapidly facilitated social recognition, object recognition, and object placement learning in female mice. Whether activation the GPER specifically in the dorsal hippocampus can also rapidly improve learning and memory prior to acquisition is unknown. Here, we investigated the rapid effects of infusion of the GPER agonist, G-1 (dose: 50nM, 100nM, 200nM), in the dorsal hippocampus on social recognition, object recognition, and object placement learning tasks in home cage. These paradigms were completed within 40min, which is within the range of rapid estrogenic effects. Dorsal hippocampal administration of G-1 improved social (doses: 50nM, 200nM G-1) and object (dose: 200nM G-1) recognition with no effect on object placement. Additionally, when spatial cues were minimized by testing in a Y-apparatus, G-1 administration promoted social (doses: 100nM, 200nM G-1) and object (doses: 50nM, 100nM, 200nM G-1) recognition. Therefore, like ERα, the GPER in the hippocampus appears to be sufficient for the rapid facilitation of social and object recognition in female mice, but not for the rapid facilitation of object placement learning. Thus, the GPER in the dorsal hippocampus is involved in estrogenic mediation of learning and memory and these effects likely occur through rapid signalling mechanisms.

  6. Evaluation of Talbot's Safety Zone of Infusion Volume and Osmolality in Infusion Therapy for Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuasa,Shiro

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems with infusion therapy for correcting fluid and sodium imbalance in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC were investigated by establishing the safety zone of Talbot et al. for parenteral fluid therapy in 4 DLC patients infused with over 900 ml of fluid each day for at least 9 days. The safety zone was different in each case. The safe infusion volume decreased and the safe electrolyte concentration shifted to a lower osmolality when there was ascites with renal failure than ascites without renal failure. Infusion therapy was performed without deterioration of the water and sodium balance in those patients whose infusion volume and fluid osmolality were in the safety zone. In contrast, ascites retention increased and peripheral edema appeared in patients whose infusion volume and osmolality were out of the safety zone. Therefore, the safety zone should be determined repeatedly during infusion therapy.

  7. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity.

  8. Relationships between hippocampal activity and breathing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, R M; Poe, G R; Rector, D M;

    1998-01-01

    Single cell discharge, EEG activity, and optical changes accompanying alterations in breathing patterns, as well as the knowledge that respiratory musculature is heavily involved in movement and other behavioral acts, implicate hippocampal regions in some aspects of breathing control. The control...

  9. Nocturnal Mnemonics: Sleep and Hippocampal Memory Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M. Saletin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available As critical as waking brain function is to learning and memory, an established literature now describes an equally important yet complementary role for sleep in information processing. This overview examines the specific contribution of sleep to human hippocampal memory processing; both the detriments caused by a lack of sleep, and conversely, the proactive benefits that develop following the presence of sleep. First, a role for sleep before learning is discussed, preparing the hippocampus for initial memory encoding. Second, a role for sleep after learning is considered, modulating the post-encoding consolidation of hippocampal-dependent memory. Third, a model is outlined in which these encoding and consolidation operations are symbiotically accomplished, associated with specific NREM sleep physiological oscillations. As a result, the optimal network outcome is achieved, increasing hippocampal independence and hence overnight consolidation, while restoring next-day sparse hippocampal encoding capacity for renewed learning ability upon awakening. Finally, emerging evidence is considered suggesting that, unlike previous conceptions, sleep does not universally consolidate all information equally. Instead, and based on explicit as well as motivational cues during initial encoding, sleep executes the discriminatory offline consolidation only of select information. Consequently, sleep promotes the targeted strengthening of some memories while actively forgetting others; a proposal with significant theoretical and clinical ramifications.

  10. Hippocampal kindling: corticosterone modulation of induced seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R. de; Cottrell, G.A.; Nyakas, C.; Bohus, B.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone replacement was studied on seizures induced by hippocampal kindling. A complex series of changes occurred in after-discharge (AD) and behavioural depression (BD) during the immediate hours after ADX, culminating at day 1 in markedly decreased AD a

  11. Stimulus Configuration, Classical Conditioning, and Hippocampal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmajuk, Nestor A.; DiCarlo, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of the hippocampus in classical conditioning is described in terms of a multilayer network portraying stimulus configuration. A model of hippocampal function is presented, and computer simulations are used to study neural activity in the various brain areas mapped according to the model. (SLD)

  12. Hippocampal gamma oscillations increase with memory load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vugt, Marieke K.; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Litt, Brian; Brandt, Armin; Kahana, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Although the hippocampus plays a crucial role in encoding and retrieval of contextually mediated episodic memories, considerable controversy surrounds the role of the hippocampus in short-term or working memory. To examine both hippocampal and neocortical contributions to working memory function, we

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown and adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijdonk, Leonarda Wilhelmina Antonia van

    2010-01-01

    The research in this thesis is aimed at the elucidation of the role of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in hippocampal neuroplasticity and functioning. To achieve this, we have developed a novel method to specifically knockdown GR in a discrete cell population of the mouse brain. In this thesis I r

  14. Hippocampal theta frequency shifts and operant behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Kamp, A.

    1. 1. A shift of hippocampal dominant theta frequency to 6 c/sec has been demonstrated in the post-reward period in two dogs, which occurs consistently related in time to a well defined behavioural pattern in the course of an operant conditioning paradigm. 2. 2. The frequency shift was detected and

  15. Effects on vessel measurement accuracy and subsequent occlusion after calcium channel blocker infusion during treatment of cerebral aneurysms with the Pipeline embolization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M D; Nicholson, A D; Darflinger, R J; Settecase, F; Cooke, D L; Dowd, C F; Amans, M R; Higashida, R T; Hetts, S W; Halbach, V V

    2017-02-01

    Introduction/Purpose To achieve aneurysm occlusion, flow diverters (FDs) must be accurately sized to maximize coverage over the neck and induce thrombosis. Catheterization for diagnostic angiography can cause vasospasm that may affect vessel measurements. This study evaluates impacts of intra-arterial infusion of a calcium channel blocker (CCB) on angiographic measurements in patients treated with FDs to determine effects on final diameter of the FD and subsequent occlusion. Materials and methods Pre-treatment measurements were recorded for diameter of the distal and proximal landing zones and maximum and minimum diameters between these segments. Post-treatment measurements of the stent following deployment were recorded at these locations. When CCB was infused, post-infusion pre-treatment measurements were recorded. Rates of occlusion were noted for all patients. T-tests were performed to assess for differences in pre- and post-treatment measurements and rates of occlusion between groups with and without CCB infusion. Results Twenty-eight FDs were deployed to treat 25 aneurysms in 24 patients. CCB infusion was performed prior to deployment of 12 (42.9%) devices. No significant difference was noted between groups for pre- and post-treatment measurement changes. Confirmed aneurysm occlusion was more likely to occur in the CCB infusion group (88.9% vs. 36.4%, p = 0.009). Conclusion Optimization of device sizing is important to increase FD density over the aneurysm neck and promote thrombosis. To improve measurement accuracy, CCB infusion can reduce effects of mild vasospasm. Subsequent aneurysm occlusion was more likely to occur following FD treatment when device size selection was based on measurements performed following CCB infusion.

  16. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular insulin administration in rats on the peripheral glucose metabolism and synaptic plasticity of CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Amer; Ramakers, Geert M J; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2012-01-30

    In this study we examined the effects of sustained intracerebroventricular insulin infusion on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats. Insulin was infused intracerebroventricularly in male Wistar rats (n=12) for 3 months using osmotic minipumps. A control group (n=12) received a sham operation. Insulin infusion led to an initial reduction in food intake and body weight gain, but these differences attenuated over 12 weeks. Insulin infusion did not affect fasting or non-fasting blood glucose levels. Field synaptic potentials recording from the hippocampus demonstrated a defect in the expression of long-term potentiation. Sharp electrode current-clamp recording showed that CA1 pyramidal cells fire action potentials in response to prolonged depolarizing current injection and those action potentials showed progressive broadening. The action potential broadening in the insulin-perfused animals were significantly longer than the control. The amplitude of slow after hyperpolarization (sAHP) was measured after manually "clamping" the cells at -65 mV and injecting currents to evoke a train of four APs. The sAHP amplitude was significantly longer than in the control animals. We conclude that local insulin infusion into the brain of rats had significant effects on synaptic plasticity in the absence of marked effects on systemic glucose levels. These results indicate that long-term elevation of insulin levels can have adverse effects directly on the brain.

  17. Time course of dorsal and ventral hippocampal involvement in the expression of trace fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David; Czerniawski, Jennifer; Ree, Fredrick; Otto, Tim

    2013-11-01

    While a number of early studies demonstrated that hippocampal damage attenuates the expression of recent, but not remotely trained tasks, an emerging body of evidence has shown that damage to, or inactivation of, the hippocampus often impairs recall across a wide range of training-testing intervals. Collectively, these data suggest that the time course of hippocampal involvement in the storage or recall of previously-acquired memories may differ according to hippocampal subregion and the particular learning task under consideration. The present study examined the contributions of dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus to the expression of previously-acquired trace fear conditioning, a form of Pavlovian conditioning in which the offset of an initially neutral cue or cues and the onset of an aversive stimulus is separated by a temporal (trace) interval. Specifically, either saline or the GABA-A agonist muscimol was infused into DH or VH prior to testing either 1, 7, 28, or 42 days after trace fear conditioning. The results revealed a marked dissociation: pre-testing inactivation of DH failed to impair performance at any time-point, while pre-testing inactivation of VH impaired performance at all time-points. Importantly, pre-testing inactivation of VH had no effect on the performance of previously-acquired delay conditioning, suggesting that the deficits observed in trace conditioning cannot be attributed to a deficit in performance of the freezing response. Collectively, these data suggest that VH, but not DH, remains a neuroanatomical locus critical to the recall or expression of trace fear conditioning over an extended period of time.

  18. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions.

  19. Updating the lamellar hypothesis of hippocampal organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Sloviter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1971, Andersen and colleagues proposed that excitatory activity in the entorhinal cortex propagates topographically to the dentate gyrus, and on through a trisynaptic circuit lying within transverse hippocampal slices or lamellae [Andersen, Bliss, and Skrede. 1971. Lamellar organization of hippocampal pathways. Exp Brain Res 13, 222-238]. In this way, a relatively simple structure might mediate complex functions in a manner analogous to the way independent piano keys can produce a nearly infinite variety of unique outputs. The lamellar hypothesis derives primary support from the lamellar distribution of dentate granule cell axons (the mossy fibers, which innervate dentate hilar neurons and area CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons within the confines of a thin transverse hippocampal segment. Following the initial formulation of the lamellar hypothesis, anatomical studies revealed that unlike granule cells, hilar mossy cells, CA3 pyramidal cells, and Layer II entorhinal cells all form axonal projections that are more divergent along the longitudinal axis than the clearly lamellar mossy fiber pathway. The existence of pathways with translamellar distribution patterns has been interpreted, incorrectly in our view, as justifying outright rejection of the lamellar hypothesis [Amaral and Witter. 1989. The three-dimensional organization of the hippocampal formation: a review of anatomical data. Neuroscience 31, 571-591]. We suggest that the functional implications of longitudinally-projecting axons depend not on whether they exist, but on what they do. The observation that focal granule cell layer discharges normally inhibit, rather than excite, distant granule cells suggests that longitudinal axons in the dentate gyrus may mediate "lateral" inhibition and define lamellar function, rather than undermine it. In this review, we attempt a reconsideration of the evidence that most directly impacts the physiological concept of hippocampal lamellar

  20. Systemic and intra-rhinal-cortical 17-β estradiol administration modulate object-recognition memory in ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Nicole J; Jacob, Sofia; Brake, Wayne G; Mumby, Dave G

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies using the novel-object-preference (NOP) test suggest that estrogen (E) replacement in ovariectomized rodents can lead to enhanced novelty preference. The present study aimed to determine: 1) whether the effect of E on NOP performance is the result of enhanced preference for novelty, per se, or facilitated object-recognition memory, and 2) whether E affects NOP performance through actions it has within the perirhinal cortex/entorhinal cortex region (PRh/EC). Ovariectomized rats received either systemic chronic low 17-β estradiol (E2; ~20 pg/ml serum) replacement alone or in combination with systemic acute high administration of estradiol benzoate (EB; 10 μg), or in combination with intracranial infusions of E2 (244.8 pg/μl) or vehicle into the PRh/EC. For one of the intracranial experiments, E2 was infused either immediately before, immediately after, or 2 h following the familiarization (i.e., learning) phase of the NOP test. In light of recent evidence that raises questions about the internal validity of the NOP test as a method of indexing object-recognition memory, we also tested rats on a delayed nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) task of object recognition following systemic and intra-PRh/EC infusions of E2. Both systemic acute and intra-PRh/EC infusions of E enhanced novelty preference, but only when administered either before or immediately following familiarization. In contrast, high E (both systemic acute and intra-PRh/EC) impaired performance on the DNMS task. The findings suggest that while E2 in the PRh/EC can enhance novelty preference, this effect is probably not due to an improvement in object-recognition abilities.

  1. Intra-abdominal pressure during swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, S; Ogita, F; Huang, Z; Kurobe, K; Nagira, A; Tanaka, T; Takahashi, H; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the intra-abdominal pressure during front crawl swimming at different velocities in competitive swimmers and to clarify the relationships between stroke indices and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. The subjects were 7 highly trained competitive collegiate male swimmers. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured during front crawl swimming at 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4 m · s(-1) and during the Valsalva maneuver. Intra-abdominal pressure was taken as the difference between minimum and maximum values, and the mean of 6 stable front crawl stroke cycles was used. Stroke rate and stroke length were also measured as stroke indices. There were significant differences in stroke rate among all velocities (P swimming velocity. These findings do not appear to support the effectiveness of trunk training performed by competitive swimmers aimed at increasing intra-abdominal pressure. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Chronic administration of docosahexaenoic acid ameliorates the impairment of spatial cognition learning ability in amyloid beta-infused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Tanabe, Yoko; Fujii, Yoshimi; Kikuta, Toshihiko; Shibata, Hitoshi; Shido, Osamu

    2005-03-01

    We investigated whether administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a major (n-3) fatty acid of the brain, ameliorates the impairment of learning ability in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), rats infused with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide (1-40) into the cerebral ventricle. Inbred 3rd generation male rats (20 wk old) fed a fish oil-deficient diet were randomly divided into 4 groups: a vehicle group, an Abeta peptide-infused group (Abeta group), a DHA group, and an Abeta + DHA group. A mini-osmotic pump filled with Abeta peptide or vehicle was implanted in the rats, and they were tested for learning ability-related reference and working memory in an 8-arm radial maze. The rats were then orally fed DHA dissolved in 5% gum Arabic solution at 300 mg/(kg . d) (DHA and Abeta + DHA groups) or vehicle alone (vehicle and Abeta groups) and tested again for learning ability. DHA administered for 12 wk significantly reduced the increase in the number of reference and working memory errors in the Abeta-infused rats, and increased both the cortico-hippocampal level of DHA and the molar ratio of DHA/arachidonic acid, suggesting an amelioration of the impaired spatial cognition learning ability. Furthermore, DHA suppressed the increases in the levels of lipid peroxide and reactive oxygen species in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus of Abeta-infused rats, suggesting that DHA increases antioxidative defenses. DHA is thus a possible therapeutic agent for ameliorating learning deficiencies due to Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Developing a System for Integraded Automatic Control of Mutiple Infusion Pumps : The Multiplex infusion system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Most errors in ICUs are related to intravenous (IV) therapy. Previous studies suggested that hard to operate infusion pumps and the high cognitive workload for ICU nurses contribute to these errors. Conventional IV therapy requires separate lumens for incompatible IV drugs. This often requires the p

  4. Software Infusion: Using Computers to Enhance Instruction. Part One: What Does Software Infusion Look Like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Shirl S.

    1986-01-01

    This first of two articles presents eight examples of what software infusion (SI) looks like in actual practice in elementary, middle, and high school classrooms and learning laboratories. An analysis of SI characteristics demonstrated in the examples is presented to bring the definition of SI into focus. (MBR)

  5. Continuous infusion of enzyme replacement therapy is inferior to weekly infusions in MPS I dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passage, M B; Krieger, A W; Peinovich, M C; Lester, T; Le, S Q; Dickson, P I; Kakkis, E D

    2009-12-01

    Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human α-L-iduronidase (rhIDU) is used weekly to treat mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) I. We tested continuous administration of rhIDU at two dosing levels (0.58 mg/kg per week and 2 mg/kg per week) in MPS I dogs, and compared the efficacy of continuous infusion with the clinically used 0.58 mg/kg weekly three-hour infusion. Peak plasma concentrations of rhIDU were much higher in weekly-treated dogs (mean 256 units/ml) than steady-state concentrations in dogs treated with continuous infusion (mean 1.97 units/ml at 0.58 mg/kg per week; 8.44 units/ml at 2 mg/kg per week). Dogs receiving continuous IV rhIDU, even at a higher (2 mg/kg per week) dose, had consistently lower iduronidase levels in tissues than dogs receiving a weekly (0.58 mg/kg per week) dose. GAG storage was also less improved by continuous intravenous infusion. Adverse events were similar in all dosing groups. We found that continuous administration of 2 mg/kg per week rhIDU to MPS I dogs was insufficient to achieve GAG storage reduction comparable to 0.58 mg/kg weekly dosing.

  6. Liquid Infused Surfaces in Turbulent Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Matthew; Liu, Ying; Stone, Howard; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust method for turbulent drag reduction. These surfaces consist of functionalized roughness elements wetted with a liquid lubricant that is immiscible with external fluids. The presence of the lubricant creates mobile, fluid-fluid interfaces, each of which can support a localized slip. Collectively, these interfaces yield a finite slip velocity at the effective surface, which has been demonstrated to reduce skin friction drag in turbulent flows. Retention of the lubricant layer is critical to maintaining the drag reduction effect. A turbulent channel-flow facility is used to characterize the drag reduction and robustness of various liquid infused surfaces. Micro-manufactured surfaces are mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. The retention of fluorescent lubricants and pressure drop are monitored to characterize the effects of surface geometry and lubricant properties. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim) and by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  7. Patient-controlled analgesic infusion pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Patient-controlled analgesic (PCA) infusion devices allow patients to self-administer narcotic analgesics within the limits prescribed by the physician. PCA therapy is typically used for postoperative, obstetric, terminally ill, and trauma patients. PCA pumps deliver solutions intravenously, subcutaneously, or epidurally and allow patient activation by means of a pendant button on a cord connected to the pump or a button directly on the pump. We evaluated nine PCA pumps from six suppliers. Three of these pumps are syringe-type, while the others use cassette-based fluid delivery. Because PCA pumps have often been cited as examples of devices that contribute to medical error (the most significant risk connected with PCA infusion is overmedication), the accident resistance of each device weighed heavily in our testing. The pumps we tested exhibit varying levels of performance, resistance to accidents and tampering, and ease of use. We rate six of them Acceptable. While none of the six units stands out as ideal, they meet most of our criteria, and we consider them somewhat better choices than the rest. We rate one other pump Acceptable (with Conditions) because, in one of its operating modes, it has a drawback that could be dangerous to patients; we consider its use acceptable only if the hospital doesn't employ the operating mode in question. Finally, we rate two pumps Not Recommended because they both have a significant number of disadvantages.

  8. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  9. MRI evaluation of frequent complications after intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namestnikova, D.; Gubskiy, I.; Gabashvili, A.; Sukhinich, K.; Melnikov, P.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Soloveva, A.; Vitushev, E.; Chekhonin, V.; Gubsky, L.; Yarygin, K.

    2017-08-01

    Intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an effective delivery route for treatment of ischemic brain injury. Despite significant therapeutic effects and targeted cells delivery to the brain infraction, serious adverse events such as cerebral embolism have been reported and may restrict potential clinical applications of this method. In current study, we evaluate potential complications of intra-arterial MSCs administration and determine the optimum parameters for cell transplantation. We injected SPIO-labeled human MSCs via internal carotid artery with different infusion parameters and cell dose in intact rats and in rats with the middle cerebral occlusion stroke model. Cerebrovascular complications and labeled cells were visualized in vivo using MRI. We have shown that the incidence of cerebral embolic events depends on such parameters as cell dose, infusion rate and maintenance of blood flow in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Optimal parameters were considered to be 5×105 hMSC in 1 ml of PBS by syringe pump with velocity 100 μ/min and maintenance of blood flow in the ICA. Obtained data should be considered before planning experiments in rats and, potentially, can help in planning clinical trials in stroke patients.

  10. Use of an oil-hydraulic microinjection pump for subretinal infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Judith; Valtink, Monika; Engelmann, Katrin; Richard, Gisbert

    2002-01-01

    The injection of cell suspensions or drugs into the subretinal space is a new promising option of vitreoretinal surgery for the treatment of degenerative retinal disorders. We used a manual oil-hydraulic microinjection pump to subretinally inject suspensions of retinal pigment epithelial cells in Royal College of Surgeons rats and in patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration with geographic atrophy. The histological examination of the treated rat eyes showed that cell suspensions could be placed precisely in the subretinal space. Intra- and postoperative outcome of the patients in the clinical trial revealed no retinal complications during 6 months of follow up. We suggest the oil-hydraulic microinjection pump to be a valuable instrument for controlled and precisely dosed atraumatic infusion or aspiration of small volumes of cell suspensions, fluids or drugs in vitreoretinal surgery.

  11. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of wolfberry infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Rukeya, Japaer; Tao, Wenyang; Sun, Peilong; Ye, Xingqian

    2017-01-01

    An infusion of the wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.) is a traditional Asian herbal tea. This is the most commonly consumed form of dried wolfberry worldwide, yet little scientific information on wolfberry infusions is available. We investigated the effects of making infusions with hot water on the color, the content of bioactive compounds (polysaccharides, polyphenols, flavonoids and carotenoids) and the antioxidant ability of wolfberry infusions. The contents of bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activity of a wolfberry infusion increased with increased infusion temperature and time. Total polysaccharides content (TPOC), total polyphenols (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC) and total carotenoids contents (TCC) were important for determining the antioxidant capacity of wolfberry infusions with the contribution to antioxidant activity in the order TPC > TFC > TCC > TPOC. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated preparation conditions of 100 °C for 1~3 h, 90 °C for 2~3 h and 80 °C for 2.5~3 h were equivalent as regards the value of TPC, TPOC, TFC, TCC, FRAP, DPPH and ABTS. The results of this study suggest the length of time of making a wolfberry infusion in actual real life practice is too short and different dietary habits associated with the intake of wolfberry infusion might provide the same bioactive nutrients. PMID:28102295

  12. Smart syringe pumps for drug infusion during dental intravenous sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kwang-Suk; Lee, Kiyoung

    2016-09-01

    Dentists often sedate patients in order to reduce their dental phobia and stress during dental treatment. Sedatives are administered through various routes such as oral, inhalation, and intravenous routes. Intravenous administration has the advantage of rapid onset of action, predictable duration of action, and easy titration. Typically, midazolam, propofol or dexmedetomidine are used as intravenous sedatives. Administration of these sedatives via infusion by using a syringe pump is more effective and successful than infusing them as a bolus. However, during intravenous infusion of sedatives or opioids using a syringe pump, fatal accidents may occur due to the clinician's carelessness. To prevent such risks, smart syringe pumps have been introduced clinically. They allow clinicians to perform effective sedation by using a computer to control the dose of the drug being infused. To ensure patient safety, various alarm features along with a drug library, which provides drug information and prevents excessive infusion by limiting the dose, have been added to smart pumps. In addition, programmed infusion systems and target-controlled infusion systems have also been developed to enable effective administration of sedatives. Patient-controlled infusion, which allows a patient to control his/her level of sedation through self-infusion, has also been developed. Safer and more successful sedation may be achieved by fully utilizing these new features of the smart pump.

  13. Rapid Infusion Rituximab for Maintenance Therapy: Is It Feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody used in the management of lymphoproliferative disorders. The use of maintenance rituximab has improved progression free survival and overall survival in follicular lymphomas. Although rapid rituximab infusions have been studied extensively, there is little data on the use of rapid infusions during maintenance therapy for low grade lymphomas. The primary objective of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the incidence of Grade 3 and 4 toxicities with maintenance rapid infusion rituximab according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 (CTC v. 4. Secondary objectives included evaluating all grade infusion related adverse events and correlation of adverse events with varying schedules of rituximab maintenance therapy. All patients who received rapid infusion rituximab as maintenance therapy for low grade lymphoma between December 2007 and November 2011 were included. Rapid rituximab infusions were administered over 90 minutes. Demographic, laboratory and clinical data were collected. A total of 109 patients received 647 rapid rituximab infusions. Three patients experienced an adverse reaction which resulted in one grade 1 infusion reaction and three grade 3 infusion reactions. No patients required hospitalization. All 3 patients received pharmacological and/or supportive care to relieve symptoms associated with the reaction.

  14. Determination of 24-hour insulin infusion pattern by an artificial endocrine pancreas for intravenous insulin infusion with a miniature pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølendorf, K; Christiansen, J S; Bojsen, J;

    1981-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intravenous insulin infusion with a glucose controlled insulin infusion system (GCIIS) is known to restore glucose homeostasis. A simpler approach to improve blood glucose regulation is preprogrammed intravenous insulin infusion with portable pumps without sensor-mediated feedback. We...... report a study designed to evaluate whether the preprogrammed insulin infusion pattern to be used in the miniature insulin infusion pump (MIIP) could be optimized by concomitant employment of the GCIIS for blood glucose control. Six juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetics (mean age 31 yrs) were...... studied. Mean blood glucose (MBG) was 6.2 mmol/l +/- 0.5 (SD) during glucose controlled infusion and 5.3 +/- 0.6 during the combined MIIP + GCIIS-day. The insulin requirements calculated from the s.c. regimen (56 U +/- 10 SD) were identical to the GCIIS-measured (51 U +/- 14) and to the amounts delivered...

  15. Acute in vivo regulation of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity by insulin and intralipid infusions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Deborah J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R

    2006-11-01

    Extraadrenal regeneration of cortisol by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11HSD1) is increased after a mixed meal. It is unknown which tissue is responsible and whether this reflects the complex transcriptional control of 11HSD1 or posttranscriptional control exerted by supply of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate from hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The objective of this study was to test whether hyperinsulinemia and/or increased serum free fatty acids increase whole-body and intraadipose 11HSD1, and whether adipose 11HSD1 switches from dehydrogenase to reductase activity. In nine healthy men, we measured whole-body cortisol regeneration (by iv infusion of 9,11,12,12-[2H]4 -cortisol) and intra-adipose interconversion of cortisol and cortisone (by sc microdialysis infusion of [3H]4 -cortisol and [3H]2 -cortisone in separate cannulae) during: 1) a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; 2) iv lipid infusion (Intralipid 20% fat emulsion); and 3) saline infusion, each for 3.5 h. Hyperinsulinemia increased rate of appearance of 9,12,12-[2H]3 -cortisol (19.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 16.7 +/- 1.1 nmol/min with saline, P adipose, the predominant reaction was reductase conversion of cortisone to cortisol (after 3.5 h of saline infusion, reaching 11.0 +/- 2.7% per hour reductase vs. 5.2 +/- 1.3 dehydrogenase, P effects on whole-body deuterated cortisol metabolism, but increased both dehydrogenase and reductase (reaching 16.7 +/- 1.8, P adipose. Hyperinsulinemia and increased free fatty acids induce acute increases in 11HSD1 activity in adipose tissue that are not attributable to a switch from dehydrogenase to reductase. Hyperinsulinemia also increases systemic cortisol regeneration. These effects may enhance intracellular cortisol concentrations after a meal.

  16. Accelerated maternal responding following intra-VTA pertussis toxin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, John J; Gleason, Erin D; Schoen, Matthew K; Schoen, Mathew T; Lovelock, Dennis F; Carini, Lindsay M; Byrnes, Elizabeth M; Bridges, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    Prior studies have supported a role for mesolimbic dopaminergic mechanisms in the regulation of maternal behavior. Accordingly, the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and its dopaminergic projections to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in both the onset and maintenance of normal maternal behavior. To date, studies of direct manipulation of VTA neurochemistry at the onset of maternal behavior have been limited. The current study was undertaken to directly test the hypothesis that enhancement of dopaminergic transmission in the mesolimbic dopamine system can stimulate maternal activity using a pup-induced virgin model. Nulliparous female rats were stereotaxically infused with pertussis toxin (PTX 0, 0.1, or 0.3 μg/hemisphere) into the VTA to chronically stimulate the activity of dopaminergic projection neurons. After 3 days of recovery, maternal responding to donor pups was tested daily, and latency (in days) to full maternal behavior was recorded. Intra-VTA PTX treatment produced a robust dose-dependent decrease in maternal behavior latency, and a long-lasting increase in locomotor activity. These effects were associated with significantly decreased dopamine D1 receptor mRNA expression in the NAc. No effects of PTX treatment on mesolimbic dopamine utilization or mPFC receptor expression were observed. The findings indicate that chronic neural activation in the VTA accelerates the onset of maternal behavior in virgin female rats via modification of the NAc dopamine D1 receptor.

  17. Hippocampal internal architecture and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkommos, Samia; Weber, Bernd; Niehusmann, Pitt; Volmering, Elisa; Richardson, Mark P; Goh, Yen Y; Marson, Anthony G; Elger, Christian; Keller, Simon S

    2016-02-01

    Semi-quantitative analysis of hippocampal internal architecture (HIA) on MRI has been shown to be a reliable predictor of the side of seizure onset in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postoperative seizure outcome and preoperative semi-quantitative measures of HIA. We determined HIA on high in-plane resolution preoperative T2 short tau inversion recovery MR images in 79 patients with presumed unilateral mesial TLE (mTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who underwent amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative follow up. HIA was investigated with respect to postoperative seizure freedom, neuronal density determined from resected hippocampal specimens, and conventionally acquired hippocampal volume. HIA ratings were significantly related to some neuropathological features of the resected hippocampus (e.g. neuronal density of selective CA regions, Wyler grades), and bilaterally with preoperative hippocampal volume. However, there were no significant differences in HIA ratings of the to-be-resected or contralateral hippocampus between patients rendered seizure free (ILAE 1) compared to those continuing to experience seizures (ILAE 2-5). This work indicates that semi-quantitative assessment of HIA on high-resolution MRI provides a surrogate marker of underlying histopathology, but cannot prospectively distinguish between patients who will continue to experience postoperative seizures and those who will be rendered seizure free. The predictive power of HIA for postoperative seizure outcome in non-lesional patients with TLE should be explored. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective intra-S checkpoint responses to UVC in primary human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro-Stone, Marila; McNulty, John J; Sproul, Christopher D; Chastain, Paul D; Gibbs-Flournoy, Eugene; Zhou, Yingchun; Carson, Craig; Rao, Shangbang; Mitchell, David L; Simpson, Dennis A; Thomas, Nancy E; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Kaufmann, William K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess potential functional attenuation or inactivation of the intra-S checkpoint during melanoma development. Proliferating cultures of skin melanocytes, fibroblasts, and melanoma cell lines were exposed to increasing fluences of UVC and intra-S checkpoint responses were quantified. Melanocytes displayed stereotypic intra-S checkpoint responses to UVC qualitatively and quantitatively equivalent to those previously demonstrated in skin fibroblasts. In comparison with fibroblasts, primary melanocytes displayed reduced UVC-induced inhibition of DNA strand growth and enhanced degradation of p21Waf1 after UVC, suggestive of enhanced bypass of UVC-induced DNA photoproducts. All nine melanoma cell lines examined, including those with activating mutations in BRAF or NRAS oncogenes, also displayed proficiency in activation of the intra-S checkpoint in response to UVC irradiation. The results indicate that bypass of oncogene-induced senescence during melanoma development was not associated with inactivation of the intra-S checkpoint response to UVC-induced DNA replication stress.

  19. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  20. Hippocampal Processing of Ambiguity Enhances Fear Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi, Ugwechi; Lim, Seh Hong; Liu, Elizabeth; Baratta, Michael V; Goosens, Ki A

    2017-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of Pavlovian fear conditioning as a model for fear learning, the highly predictable conditions used in the laboratory do not resemble real-world conditions, in which dangerous situations can lead to unpleasant outcomes in unpredictable ways. In the current experiments, we varied the timing of aversive events after predictive cues in rodents and discovered that temporal ambiguity of aversive events greatly enhances fear. During fear conditioning with unpredictably timed aversive events, pharmacological inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus or optogenetic silencing of cornu ammonis 1 cells during aversive negative prediction errors prevented this enhancement of fear without affecting fear learning for predictable events. Dorsal hippocampal inactivation also prevented ambiguity-related enhancement of fear during auditory fear conditioning under a partial-reinforcement schedule. These results reveal that information about the timing and occurrence of aversive events is rapidly acquired and that unexpectedly timed or omitted aversive events generate hippocampal signals to enhance fear learning.

  1. Inhibitory microcircuit modules in hippocampal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico

    2015-12-01

    It has recently become possible to investigate connectivities and roles of identified hippocampal GABAergic interneurons (INs) in behaving rodents. INs targeting distinct pyramidal neuron subcompartments are recruited dynamically at defined phases of behavior and learning. They include Parvalbumin Axo-axonic and perisomatic Basket cells, and Somatostatin radiatum-oriens and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells. Each IN is in turn either activated or inhibited upon specific behavioral and network state requirements through specific inputs and neuromodulators. Subpopulations of these principal neurons and INs interconnect selectively, suggesting selective processing and routing of alternate information streams. First canonical functional modules have emerged, which will have to be further defined and linked to identified afferents and efferents towards a circuit understanding of how hippocampal networks support behavior.

  2. A Compressed Sensing Perspective of Hippocampal Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis ePetrantonakis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampus is one of the most important information processing units in the brain. Input from the cortex passes through convergent axon pathways to the downstream hippocampal subregions and, after being appropriately processed, is fanned out back to the cortex. Here, we review evidence of the hypothesis that information flow and processing in the hippocampus complies with the principles of Compressed Sensing (CS. The CS theory comprises a mathematical framework that describes how and under which conditions, restricted sampling of information (data set can lead to condensed, yet concise, forms of the initial, subsampled information entity (i.e. of the original data set. In this work, hippocampus related regions and their respective circuitry are presented as a CS-based system whose different components collaborate to realize efficient memory encoding and decoding processes. This proposition introduces a unifying mathematical framework for hippocampal function and opens new avenues for exploring coding and decoding strategies in the brain.

  3. Prediction of dementia by hippocampal shape analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achterberg, Hakim C.; van der Lijn, Fedde; den Heijer, Tom;

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility of predicting future onset of dementia in subjects who are cognitively normal, using hippocampal shape and volume information extracted from MRI scans. A group of 47 subjects who were non-demented normal at the time of the MRI acquisition, but were diagnosed...... and, if necessary, manually corrected by a trained observer. From this data a statistical model of hippocampal shape was constructed, using an entropy-based particle system. This shape model provided the input for a Support Vector Machine classifier to predict dementia. Cross validation experiments...... showed that shape information can predict future onset of dementia in this dataset with an accuracy of 70%. By incorporating both shape and volume information into the classifier, the accuracy increased to 74%....

  4. Effects of intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide and maternal betamethasone on brain inflammation in fetal sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Kuypers

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Chorioamnionitis and antenatal glucocorticoids are common exposures for preterm infants and can affect the fetal brain, contributing to cognitive and motor deficits in preterm infants. The effects of antenatal glucocorticoids on the brain in the setting of chorioamnionitis are unknown. We hypothesized that antenatal glucocorticoids would modulate inflammation in the brain and prevent hippocampal and white matter injury after intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS exposure. METHODS: Time-mated ewes received saline (control, an intra-amniotic injection of 10 mg LPS at 106d GA or 113d GA, maternal intra-muscular betamethasone (0.5 mg/kg maternal weight alone at 113d GA, betamethasone at 106d GA before LPS or betamethasone at 113d GA after LPS. Animals were delivered at 120d GA (term=150d. Brain structure volumes were measured on T2-weighted MRI images. The subcortical white matter (SCWM, periventricular white matter (PVWM and hippocampus were analyzed for microglia, astrocytes, apoptosis, proliferation, myelin and pre-synaptic vesicles. RESULTS: LPS and/or betamethasone exposure at different time-points during gestation did not alter brain structure volumes on MRI. Betamethasone alone did not alter any of the measurements. Intra-amniotic LPS at 106d or 113d GA induced inflammation as indicated by increased microglial and astrocyte recruitment which was paralleled by increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in the SCWM and decreased synaptophysin density in the hippocampus. Betamethasone before the LPS exposure at 113d GA prevented microglial activation and the decrease in synaptophysin. Betamethasone after LPS exposure increased microglial infiltration and apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Intra-uterine LPS exposure for 7d or 14d before delivery induced inflammation and injury in the fetal white matter and hippocampus. Antenatal glucocorticoids aggravated the inflammatory changes in the brain caused by pre-existing intra-amniotic inflammation

  5. Effects of Intra-Amniotic Lipopolysaccharide and Maternal Betamethasone on Brain Inflammation in Fetal Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophelders, Daan R. M. G.; Dudink, Jeroen; Nikiforou, Maria; Wolfs, Tim G. A. M.; Nitsos, Ilias; Pillow, J. Jane; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Kramer, Boris W.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Chorioamnionitis and antenatal glucocorticoids are common exposures for preterm infants and can affect the fetal brain, contributing to cognitive and motor deficits in preterm infants. The effects of antenatal glucocorticoids on the brain in the setting of chorioamnionitis are unknown. We hypothesized that antenatal glucocorticoids would modulate inflammation in the brain and prevent hippocampal and white matter injury after intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. Methods Time-mated ewes received saline (control), an intra-amniotic injection of 10 mg LPS at 106d GA or 113d GA, maternal intra-muscular betamethasone (0.5 mg/kg maternal weight) alone at 113d GA, betamethasone at 106d GA before LPS or betamethasone at 113d GA after LPS. Animals were delivered at 120d GA (term=150d). Brain structure volumes were measured on T2-weighted MRI images. The subcortical white matter (SCWM), periventricular white matter (PVWM) and hippocampus were analyzed for microglia, astrocytes, apoptosis, proliferation, myelin and pre-synaptic vesicles. Results LPS and/or betamethasone exposure at different time-points during gestation did not alter brain structure volumes on MRI. Betamethasone alone did not alter any of the measurements. Intra-amniotic LPS at 106d or 113d GA induced inflammation as indicated by increased microglial and astrocyte recruitment which was paralleled by increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in the SCWM and decreased synaptophysin density in the hippocampus. Betamethasone before the LPS exposure at 113d GA prevented microglial activation and the decrease in synaptophysin. Betamethasone after LPS exposure increased microglial infiltration and apoptosis. Conclusion Intra-uterine LPS exposure for 7d or 14d before delivery induced inflammation and injury in the fetal white matter and hippocampus. Antenatal glucocorticoids aggravated the inflammatory changes in the brain caused by pre-existing intra-amniotic inflammation. Antenatal

  6. Compositional analysis and in vivo anti-diabetic activity of wild Algerian Marrubium vulgare L. infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, Amel; Henchiri, Cherifa; Siracusa, Laura; Sari, Madani; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae) is a plant traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Algeria. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusion revealed the presence of fifteen metabolites, all belonging to the class of polyphenols. Particularly, seven flavonoids have been detected, together with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid in small amounts; the extract is dominated by the presence of a series of complex molecules, characterized as verbascoside (acteoside) derivatives. Concerning the anti-diabetic effectiveness a series of in vivo experiments were carried out on albinos Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced in the animals by intra-peritoneal injection of alloxane; they were treated twice a day with aqueous extract from aerial part infusion (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight) and glibenclamide (5mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Oral administration of 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight of aqueous extract the Marrubium vulgare induced an significant effect antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic (dose-dependent effect). A decrease in blood glucose by 50% for the dose 100 mg/kg and more than 60% for doses 200 and 300 mg/kg, as well as a significant lowering of total lipids, triglycerides, and total cholesterol levels in treated animals, compared with diabetic controls group (p<0.001), have been observed. Glibenclamide was used as reference and showed similar effects.

  7. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Zhang; Loh, Horace H.; Ping-Yee Law

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opia...

  8. The correlation of hippocampal T2-mapping with neuropsychology test in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuren Luo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: 1 To deduce T2, the inverse of the transverse relaxation rate (R2, in the hippocampus of healthy adults; 2 to investigate the brain iron deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients and age-matched healthy controls using T2-values. METHODS: T2-weighted data from the bilateral-hippocampi of ten AD patients and sixty healthy controls were collected at six echo time points using multi-slice multi-echo turbo spin echo (MSME-TSE imaging on a 3.0 T MR-scanner, followed by the neuropsychological testing. The correlations between T2-values and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores were investigated on group-wise basis (covariates in the group-wise analyses: gender, age, side and healthy/AD. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in hippocampal T2-values on intra-gender and inter-gender basis (P > 0.05. Hippocampal T2-values of both sides were similar (right: 85.2±2.4 milliseconds; left: 85.3±2.5 milliseconds. The bilateral hippocampal T2 values correlated moderately with age (right: r = -0.59; left: -0.58; P < 0.001. The AD-group had significantly lower T2-values in the hippocampus when compared to normal controls (P < 0.001 and such low T2-values had a strong positive correlation with the MMSE score (R (2 = 0.97; P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Patients with AD showed significantly lower T2 values, which can be attributed to the increased iron depositions in the hippocampus. A positive correlation between T2-values and cognition scores suggests that quantitative T2 can be used in the early diagnosis of AD and in the monitoring of the treatment response.

  9. The Opioid-sparing Effect of Perioperative Dexmedetomidine plus Sufentanil Infusion during Neurosurgery: a Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Su

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 60% of patients experience moderate-to-severe pain after neurosurgery, which primarily occurs in the first 24–72 h. Despite this, improved postoperative analgesia solutions after neurosurgery have not yet been devised. This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the effect of intra- and postoperative infusions of dexmedetomidine (DEX plus sufentanil on the quality of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing neurosurgery.Methods: One hundred and sixty-three post-neurosurgery patients were divided into two groups: Group D (DEX infusion at 0.5 μg·kg–1 for 10 min, then adjusted to 0.3 μg·kg–1·h–1 until incision suturing and Group ND (no DEX infusion during surgery. Patient-controlled analgesia was administered for 72 h after surgery (Group D: sufentanil 0.02 μg·kg–1·h–1 plus DEX 0.02 μg·kg–1·h–1, Group ND: sufentanil 0.02 μg·kg–1·h–1 in this retrospective study. The primary outcome measure was postoperative sufentanil consumption. Hemodynamics, requirement of narcotic and vasoactive drugs, recovery time and the incidence of concerning adverse effects were recorded. Pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS], Ramsay sedation scale (RSS and Bruggemann comfort scale (BCS were also evaluated at 1, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery.Results: Postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Group D during the first 72 h after surgery (P0.05.Conclusions: DEX (0.02 μg·kg–1·h–1 plus sufentanil (0.02 μg·kg–1·h–1 could reduce postoperative opioid consumption and concerning

  10. Active sulforhodamine 101 uptake into hippocampal astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schnell

    Full Text Available Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101 is widely used as a marker of astrocytes. In this study we investigated labeling of astrocytes by SR101 in acute slices from the ventrolateral medulla and the hippocampus of transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of the astrocyte-specific human GFAP promoter. While SR101 efficiently and specifically labeled EGFP-expressing astrocytes in hippocampus, we found that the same staining procedure failed to label astrocytes efficiently in the ventrolateral medulla. Although carbenoxolone is able to decrease the SR101-labeling of astrocytes in the hippocampus, it is unlikely that SR101 is taken up via gap-junction hemichannels because mefloquine, a blocker for pannexin and connexin hemichannels, was unable to prevent SR101-labeling of hippocampal astrocytes. However, SR101-labeling of the hippocampal astrocytes was significantly reduced by substrates of organic anion transport polypeptides, including estron-3-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, suggesting that SR101 is actively transported into hippocampal astrocytes.

  11. Updating the lamellar hypothesis of hippocampal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloviter, Robert S; Lømo, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Andersen et al. (1971) proposed that excitatory activity in the entorhinal cortex propagates topographically to the dentate gyrus, and on through a "trisynaptic circuit" lying within transverse hippocampal "slices" or "lamellae." In this way, a relatively simple structure might mediate complex functions in a manner analogous to the way independent piano keys can produce a nearly infinite variety of unique outputs. The lamellar hypothesis derives primary support from the "lamellar" distribution of dentate granule cell axons (the mossy fibers), which innervate dentate hilar neurons and area CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons within the confines of a thin transverse hippocampal segment. Following the initial formulation of the lamellar hypothesis, anatomical studies revealed that unlike granule cells, hilar mossy cells, CA3 pyramidal cells, and Layer II entorhinal cells all form axonal projections that are more divergent along the longitudinal axis than the clearly "lamellar" mossy fiber pathway. The existence of pathways with "translamellar" distribution patterns has been interpreted, incorrectly in our view, as justifying outright rejection of the lamellar hypothesis (Amaral and Witter, 1989). We suggest that the functional implications of longitudinally projecting axons depend not on whether they exist, but on what they do. The observation that focal granule cell layer discharges normally inhibit, rather than excite, distant granule cells suggests that longitudinal axons in the dentate gyrus may mediate "lateral" inhibition and define lamellar function, rather than undermine it. In this review, we attempt a reconsideration of the evidence that most directly impacts the physiological concept of hippocampal lamellar organization.

  12. Tuberous sclerosis complex coexistent with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Min; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis are both well-defined entities associated with medically intractable epilepsy. To our knowledge, there has been only one prior case of these two pathologies being co-existent. We report a 7-month-old boy who presented with intractable seizures at 2 months of age. MRI studies showed diffuse volume loss in the brain with bilateral, multiple cortical tubers and subcortical migration abnormalities. Subependymal nodules were noted without subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Genetic testing revealed TSC2 and PRD gene deletions. Histopathology of the hippocampus showed CA1 sclerosis marked by loss of neurons in the CA1 region. Sections from the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes showed multiple cortical tubers characterized by cortical architectural disorganization, gliosis, calcifications and increased number of large balloon cells. Focal white matter balloon cells and spongiform changes were also present. The patient underwent resection of the right fronto-parietal lobe and a subsequent resection of the right temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient is free of seizures on anti-epileptic medication 69 months after surgery. Although hippocampal sclerosis is well documented to be associated with coexistent focal cortical dysplasia, the specific co-existence of cortical tubers and hippocampal sclerosis appears to be rare.

  13. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  14. Ketamine Infusions for Treatment Refractory Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Jared L; Marmura, Michael J; Nahas, Stephanie J; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2017-02-01

    Management of chronic migraine (CM) or new daily persistent headache (NDPH) in those who require aggressive outpatient and inpatient treatment is challenging. Ketamine has been suggested as a new treatment for this intractable population. This is a retrospective review of 77 patients who underwent administration of intravenous, subanesthetic ketamine for CM or NDPH. All patients had previously failed aggressive outpatient and inpatient treatments. Records were reviewed for patients treated between January 2006 and December 2014. The mean headache pain rating using a 0-10 pain scale was an average of 7.1 at admission and 3.8 on discharge (P ketamine well. A number of adverse events were observed, but very few were serious. Subanesthetic ketamine infusions may be beneficial in individuals with CM or NDPH who have failed other aggressive treatments. Controlled trials may confirm this, and further studies may be useful in elucidating more robust benefit in a less refractory patient population. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  15. Repetitive noxious neonatal stimuli increases dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, J M; Lima, M; Avanzi, R D T; Gomes da Silva, S; Suchecki, D; Guinsburg, R; Covolan, L

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal noxious stimulation has been proposed to model pain triggered by diagnostic/therapeutic invasive procedures in premature infants. Previous studies have shown that hippocampal neurogenesis rate and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats may be altered by neonatal noxious stimuli. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether noxious stimulation during neonatal period alters the nociceptive response and dentate gyrus neurogenesis when compared to rats subjected to a single noxious stimulus in late infancy. Plasma corticosterone and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were measured. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in adolescent rats (postnatal day 40; P40) exposed twice to intra-plantar injections of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) on P1 and P21 (group P1P21) or P8 and P21 (P8P21) or exposed once on P21 (pubertal). On P21, one subset of animals received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and was euthanized on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. Another subset was sampled for thermal response or plasma corticosterone measurement and hippocampal BDNF levels. Proliferative cell rate in dentate gyrus was the highest in all re-exposed groups (P dentate granule cells in the hippocampus may have a role in the long-term behavioral responses to neonatal nociceptive stimulation. Noxious stimulation in the neonatal period results in sex-dependent neurogenic response. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Changes in hippocampal orexin 1 receptor expression involved in tooth pain-induced learning and memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Ramin; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Raoof, Maryam; Sheibani, Vahid; Kooshki, Razieh; Amirkhosravi, Ladan; Rafie, Foroozan

    2015-04-01

    Orexin 1 receptor signaling plays a significant role in pain as well as learning and memory processes. This study was conducted to assess the changes in orexin 1 receptor expression levels in hippocampus following learning and memory impairment induced by tooth inflammatory pulpal pain. Adult male Wistar rats received intradental injection of 100 µg capsaicin to induce pulpal pain. After recording the pain scores, spatial learning and memory were assessed using Morris Water Maze test. The hippocampal levels of orexin 1 receptor mRNA and protein were determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting respectively. The data showed that capsaicin-induced tooth inflammatory pulpal pain was correlated with learning and memory impairment. Intra-hippocampal injection of orexin A inhibited pain-induced learning and memory impairment. However, orexin 1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867, had no effect on learning and memory impairment. Moreover, capsaicin-induced pain significantly decreased hippocampal orexin 1 receptor mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, reversed changes took place in the ibuprofen-pretreated group (p tooth pain-induced learning and memory impairment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Apolipoprotein E4 impairs in vivo hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity by reducing the phosphorylation of CaMKIIα and CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Feng; Gao, Xiu-Ping; Yuan, Li; Cai, Hong-Yan; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Inheritance of the apolipoprotein E genotype ε4 (APOE4) is a powerful risk factor for most cases of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the effects of ApoE4 on the long-term synaptic plasticity and its underlying mechanism have not clearly investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of ApoE4 on the hippocampal late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and investigated its probable molecular mechanisms by using in vivo field potential recording, immunohistochemistry, and western blotting. The results showed that: (1) intra-hippocampal injection of 0.2 μg ApoE4, but not ApoE2, before high frequency stimulations (HFSs) attenuated the induction of hippocampal L-LTP in the CA1 region, while injection of the same concentration of ApoE4 after HFSs, even at a higher concentration (2 μg), did not affect the long term synaptic plasticity; (2) ApoE4 injection did not affect the paired pulse facilitation in the hippocampal CA1 region; (3) ApoE4 injection before, not after, HFSs significantly decreased the levels of phosphorylated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (p-CaMKIIα) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the hippocampus. These results demonstrated for the first time that ApoE4 could impair hippocampal L-LTP by reducing p-CaMKIIα and p-CREB, suggesting that the ApoE4-induced suppression of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity may contribute to the cognitive impairments in genetic AD; and both CaMKIIα and CREB are important intracellular targets of the neurotoxic ApoE4.

  18. Intra-molecular refrigeration in enzymes

    CERN Document Server

    Briegel, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple mechanism for intra-molecular refrigeration, where parts of a molecule are actively cooled below the environmental temperature. We discuss the potential role and applications of such a mechanism in biology, in particular in enzymatic reactions.

  19. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change...... in hippocampal volume. We tested the hypothesis that hippocampal texture has association to early cognitive loss beyond that of volumetric changes. The texture marker was trained and evaluated using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and subsequently...

  20. Agmatine increases proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis in chronically stressed mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-feng LI; Hong-xia CHEN; Ying LIU; You-zhi ZHANG; Yan-qin LIU; Jin LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To explore the mechanism of agmatine's antidepressant action.Methods: Male mice were subjected to a variety of unpredictable stressors on a daily basis over a 24-d period.The open-field behaviors of the mice were displayed and recorded using a Videomex-V image analytic system automatically.For bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU;thymidine analog as a marker for dividing cells) labeling,the mice were injected with BrdU (100 mg/kg,ip,twice per d for 2 d),and the hippocampal neurogenesis in stressed mice was measured by immunohistochemistry.The proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells from neonatal rats was determined by colorimetric assay (cell counting kit-8) and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay.Results:After the onset of chronic stress,the locomotor activity of the mice in the open field significantly decreased,while coadministration of agmatine 10 mg/kg (po) blocked it.Furthermore,the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus significantly decreased in chronically stressed mice, which was also blocked by chronic coadministration with agmatine 10 mg/kg (po). Four weeks after the BrdU injection, some of the new born cells matured and became neurons, as determined by double labeling for BrdU and neuron specific enolase (NSE), a marker for mature neurons.In vitro treatment with agmatine 0.1-10 μmo1/L for 3 d significantly increased the proliferation of the cultured hippocampal progenitor cells in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion:We have found that agmatine increases proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro and the hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo in chronically stressed mice.This may be one of the important mechanisms involved in agmatine's antidepressant action.

  1. A focus on intra-abdominal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartelli Massimo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complicated intra-abdominal infections are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in higher risk patients. Well defined evidence-based recommendations for intra-abdominal infections treatment are partially lacking because of the limited number of randomized-controlled trials. Factors consistently associated with poor outcomes in patients with intra-abdominal infections include increased illness severity, failed source control, inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy and healthcare-acquired infection. Early prognostic evaluation of complicated intra-abdominal infections is important to select high-risk patients for more aggressive therapeutic procedures. The cornerstones in the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections are both source control and antibiotic therapy. The timing and the adequacy of source control are the most important issues in the management of intra-abdominal infections, because inadequate and late control of septic source may have a negative effect on the outcomes. Recent advances in interventional and more aggressive techniques could significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality of physiologically severe complicated intra-abdominal infections, even if these are still being debated and are yet not validated by limited prospective trials. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is nevertheless important in the overall management of intra-abdominal infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may result in poor patient outcomes and in the appearance of bacterial resistance. Antimicrobial management is generally standardised and many regimens, either with monotherapy or combination therapy, have proven their efficacy. Routine coverage especially against Enterococci and candida spp is not always recommended, but can be useful in particular clinical conditions. A de escalation approach may be recommended in patients with specific risk factors for multidrug

  2. Intra cranial complications of tuberculous otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections in the world. It is seen that tuberculous otitis media (TOM is almost secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review we have tried to deal with all the aspects of the intra cranial complications of TOM such as tuberculoma, otitic hydrocephalus, brain abscess and tuberculous meningitis. The aspects covered in this review are the pathology, clinical features, and investigations of the intra cranial manifestations.

  3. Imaging of intra-articular osteoid osteoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, S.D.; Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2003-11-01

    Intra-articular osteoid osteoma accounts for approximately 13% of all osteoid osteomas and presents as a monoarthropathy. Radiographs commonly do not identify the nidus, and in this event, MRI is likely to be the next imaging investigation. MRI may show a variety of appearances depending upon the age of the lesion. This article illustrates the imaging features of intra-articular osteoid osteoma, with emphasis on MRI. CT remains the investigation of choice for identifying the nidus.

  4. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57 and transgenic AD (APP/PS1 mice through the intra-arterial (IA route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1 or 5 minutes (experiment 2 after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD.

  5. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD.

  6. Effect of perioperative insulin infusion on surgical morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, Gunjan Y; Murad, M Hassan; Flynn, Errol David;

    2008-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients.......To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of perioperative insulin infusion on outcomes important to patients....

  7. Silos to Symphonies? Hopes and Challenges Implementing Multicultural Programme Infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura B.; Milman, Natalie B.

    2013-01-01

    The need to infuse multicultural education (ME) across teacher preparation programmes is well documented by research, yet institutions are at very different stages in this endeavour. While most programmes demonstrate a segregated approach to ME, confining diversity to specialty courses, ME programme infusion places diversity, equity and social…

  8. Perisciatic infusion of ropivacaine and analgesia after hallux valgus repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, D; Jørgensen, B G; Laigaard, F;

    2010-01-01

    Moderate to severe pain after hallux valgus repair can be successfully treated with a continuous popliteal sciatic nerve block in ambulatory patients. Different anesthesiologists use various infusion rates for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of two infusion...

  9. ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Lynn C.; Pinciotti, Patricia; Gorton, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of twenty-first century, global learners can be challenging, yet a growing body of research points to the proved successes of arts-infused and integrated curricula, especially for building capacity for learning and motivation. This article presents the ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion framework, a…

  10. Inhibition of endogenous lactate turnover with lactate infusion in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searle, G.L.; Feingold, K.R.; Hsu, F.S.; Clark, O.H.; Gertz, E.W.; Stanley, W.C. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The extent to which lactate infusion may inhibit endogenous lactate production, though previously considered, has never been critically assessed. To examine this proposition, single injection tracer methodology (U-{sup 14}C Lactate) has been used for the estimation of lactate kinetics in 12 human subjects under basal conditions and with the infusion of sodium lactate. The basal rate of lactate turnover was measured on a day before the study with lactate infusion, and averaged 63.7 + 5.5 mg/kg/h. Six of these individuals received a stable lactate infusion at an approximate rate of 160 mg/kg/h, while the remaining six individuals were infused at the approximate rate of 100 mg/kg/h. It has been found that stable lactate infused at rates approximating 160 mg/kg/h consistently produced a complete inhibition of endogenous lactate production. Infusion of lactate at 100 mg/kg/h caused a lesser and more variable inhibition of endogenous lactate production (12% to 64%). In conclusion, lactate infusion significantly inhibits endogenous lactate production.

  11. ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Lynn C.; Pinciotti, Patricia; Gorton, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of twenty-first century, global learners can be challenging, yet a growing body of research points to the proved successes of arts-infused and integrated curricula, especially for building capacity for learning and motivation. This article presents the ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion framework, a…

  12. Amyloid Beta-peptide (25-35) changes (Ca2+) in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, Diane; Morris, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat......neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat...

  13. Accelerated infliximab infusions for inflammatory bowel disease improve effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; McConnell; Simona; Parvulescu-Codrea; Brian; Behm; Beth; Hill; Elizabeth; Dunkle; Karen; Finke; Kathryn; Snyder; Anne; Tuskey; Debbie; Cox; Beth; Woodward

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the safety and effectiveness associated with accelerated infliximab infusion protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD).METHODS:Original protocols and infusion rates were developed for the administration of infliximab over 90-min and 60-min.Then the IBD patients on stable maintenance infliximab therapy were offered accelerated infusions.To be eligible for the study,patients needed a minimum of four prior infusions.An initial infusion of 90-min was given to each patient;those tolerating the accelerated infusion were transitioned to a 60-min infusion protocol at their next and all subsequent visits.Any patient having significant infusion reactions would be reverted to the standard 120-min protocol.A change in a patient’s dose mandated a single 120-min infusion before accelerated infusions could be administered again.RESULTS:The University of Virginia Medical Center’s Institutional Review Board approved this study.Fifty IBD patients treated with infliximab 5mg/kg,7.5mg/kg and 10mg/kg were offered accelerated infusions.Forty-six patients consented to participate in the study.Nineteen(41.3%) were female,five(10.9%) were African American and nine(19.6%) had ulcerative colitis.The mean age was 42.6 years old.Patients under age 18 were excluded.Ten patients used immunosuppressive drugs concurrently out of which six were taking azathioprine,three were taking 6-mercaptopurine and one was taking methotrexate.One of the 46 study patients used corticosteroid therapy for his IBD.Seventeen of the patients used prophylactic medications prior to receiving infusions;six patients received corticosteroids as pre-medication.Four patients had a history of distant transfusion reactions to infliximab.These reactions included shortness of breath,chest tightness,flushing,pruritus and urticaria.These patients all took prophylactic medications before receiving infusions.46 patients(27 males and 19 females) received a total of fifty 90-min infusions and ninety

  14. Isolated limb infusion chemotherapy for melanoma: an overview of early experience at the Adelaide Melanoma Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles MH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell H Giles,1 Brendon J Coventry2 1Adelaide Melanoma Unit, 2Discipline of Surgery, The University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Isolated limb infusion (ILI using cytotoxic agents has been demonstrated to be an effective and less invasive alternative modality than isolated limb perfusion for the treatment of melanoma localized to a limb. Percutaneous catheters were inserted into the axial artery and vein of the affected limb while using a pneumatic cuff to restrict limb vascular flow proximally to "isolate" the limb from the body and enable delivery of high-dose intra-arterial chemotherapy selectively to the limb. The ILI technique was developed at the Sydney Melanoma Unit (now renamed the Melanoma Institute Australia, and only a few other centers have reported separate results. We report our early results using the ILI technique for management of locally recurrent surgically nonresectable melanoma. Methods and results: Twenty-eight ILI procedures were performed in 20 patients treated with one or more procedures between 1997 and 2007. Patient parameters and clinical responses were evaluated. The median follow-up duration was 15.9 months after the first ILI, with an overall response rate after one or more infusions of 70%, of which 35% were complete responders and 35% were partial responders, with a further 20% showing stable disease, giving a "clinically significant" response rate of 90%. After one ILI (n = 20, the overall response rate was 70%, with 20% complete responders and 50% partial responders, and 20% with stable disease. Low limb toxicities were generally observed, and no amputations were required. Conclusion: ILI chemotherapy is a useful technique, which can be readily repeated for control of melanoma in the limb. It is generally well tolerated, and is capable of achieving a cure, delayed progression, or effective palliation in selected cases. The longest survivors in this series were 8

  15. Continual Low-Dose Infusion of Sulfamidase Is Superior to Intermittent High-Dose Delivery in Ameliorating Neuropathology in the MPS IIIA Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Luck, Amanda J; Rozaklis, Tina; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPS IIIA) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder characterised by progressive loss of learned skills, sleep disturbance and behavioural problems. Reduced activity of lysosomal sulfamidase results in accumulation of heparan sulfate and secondary storage of glycolipids in the brain. Intra-cisternal sulfamidase infusions reduce disease-related neuropathology; however, repeated injections may subject patients to the risk of infection and tissue damage so alternative approaches are required. We undertook a proof-of-principle study comparing the ability of slow/continual or repeat/bolus infusion to ameliorate neuropathology in MPS IIIA mouse brain. Six-week-old MPS IIIA mice were implanted with subcutaneously located mini-osmotic pumps filled with recombinant human sulfamidase (rhSGSH) or vehicle, connected to lateral ventricle-directed cannulae. Pumps were replaced at 8 weeks of age. Additional MPS IIIA mice received intra-cisternal bolus infusions of the same amount of rhSGSH (or vehicle), at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Unaffected mice received vehicle via each strategy. All mice were euthanised at 10 weeks of age and the brain was harvested to assess the effect of treatment on neuropathology. Mice receiving pump-delivered rhSGSH exhibited highly significant reductions in lysosomal storage markers (lysosomal integral membrane protein-2, GM3 ganglioside and filipin-positive lipids) and neuroinflammation (isolectin B4-positive microglia, glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astroglia). MPS IIIA mice receiving rhSGSH via bolus infusion displayed reductions in these markers, but the effectiveness of the strategy was inferior to that seen with slow/pump-based delivery. Continual low-dose infusion may therefore be a more effective strategy for enzyme delivery in MPS IIIA.

  16. Evaluation of maternal infusion therapy during pregnancy for fetal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this project was to study the possible association between maternal infusion treatments during pregnancy and variables of fetal development as well as the occurrence of congenital abnormalities (CA in a case-control design. The large population-based data set of the Hungarian Case‑Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (HCCSCA was evaluated based on the medically recorded infusion treatment during pregnancy. Of 22,843 case pregnant women who had newborns or fetuses with congenital abnormalities, 112 (0.5%, while of 38,151 control pregnant women who had newborn infants without any defects, 262 (0.7%, had infusion treatment during pregnancy. Infusion treatment was more frequent in the control group than in the case group with congenital abnormalities (adjusted POR with 945 95% CI: 0.7, 0.6-0.9 and there was no higher rate of maternal infusion treatments in any congenital abnormality group. Mean gestational age was shorter and mean birth weight was smaller in control newborn infants without CA born to mothers with infusion treatment during pregnancy than in the babies of mothers without infusion treatment. The prevalence of mild intrauterine growth retardation was more frequent in the fetuses of pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum treated with infusion. The results of the study suggest that infusion treatment of pregnant women did not associate with a higher risk of congenital abnormalities. In addition, the intravenous infusion of drugs has some, but limited efficacy to prevent the adverse effects of hyperemesis gravidarum and threatened preterm delivery.

  17. Infusion of methylphenidate into the basolateral nucleus of amygdala or anterior cingulate cortex enhances fear memory consolidation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPD; also called Ritalin) is a blocker of dopamine and norepi-nephrine transporter. It has been clinically used for treatment of Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). There have been inconsistent reports regarding the effects of systemically adminis-tered MPD on learning and memory, either in animals or humans. In the present study, we investigated the effect of direct infusion of MPD into the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) or the anterior cin-gulate cortex (ACC) on conditioned fear memory. Rats were trained on a one-trial step-through inhibi-tory avoidance task. MPD was infused bilaterally into the BLA or the ACC, either at ‘0’ or 6 h post-training. Saline was administered as control. Memory retention was tested 48 h post-training. In-tra-BLA or intra-ACC infusion of MPD ‘0’ h but not 6 h post-training significantly improved 48-h memory retention: the MPD-treated rats had significant longer step-through latency than controls. The present results indicate that action of MPD in the BLA or the ACC produces a beneficial effect on the consoli-dation of inhibitory avoidance memory.

  18. Infusion of methylphenidate into the basolateral nucleus of amygdala or anterior cingulate cortex enhances fear memory consolidation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XinLing; LIU Fang; WU XingWen; LI BaoMing

    2008-01-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPD; also called Ritalin) is a blocker of dopamine and norepi-nephrine transporter. It has been clinically used for treatment of Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). There have been inconsistent reports regarding the effects of systemically adminis-tered MPD on learning and memory, either in animals or humans. In the present study, we investigated the effect of direct infusion of MPD into the basolaterel nucleus of amygdala (BLA) or the anterior cin-gulate cortex (ACC) on conditioned fear memory. Rats were trained on a one-trial step-through inhibi-tory avoidance task. MPD was infused bilaterally into the BLA or the ACC, either at '0' or 6 h post-treining. Saline was administered as control. Memory retention was tested 48 h poet-training. In-tra-BLA or intra-ACC infusion of MPD '0' h but not 6 h post-training significantly improved 48-h memory retention: the MPD-treated rats had significant longer step-through latency than controls. The present results indicate that action of MPD in the BLA or the ACC produces a beneficial effect on the consoli-dation of inhibitory avoidance memory.

  19. Effects of Intra-Amygdala Infusion of CB1 Receptor Agonists on the Reconsolidation of Fear-Potentiated Startle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Mao, Sheng-Chun; Gean, Po-Wu

    2006-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor has been shown to be critically involved in the extinction of fear memory. Systemic injection of a CB1 receptor antagonist prior to extinction training blocked extinction. Conversely, administration of the cannabinoid uptake inhibitor AM404 facilitated extinction in a dose-dependent manner. Here we show that bilateral…

  20. Intracerebral adenosine infusion improves neurological outcome after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Hisashi; Mori, Atsushi; Shimada, Jun; Mitsumoto, Yasuhide; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    Second Institute of New Drug Research, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokushima, Japan In order to elucidate the role of adenosine in brain ischemia, the possible protective effects of adenosine on ischemic brain injury were investigated in a rat model of brain ischemia both in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous adenosine dose-dependently rescued cortical neuronal cells from injury after glucose deprivation in vitro. Adenosine (1 mM) also significantly reduced hypoglycemia/hypoxia-induced glutamate release from the hippocampal slice. In a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), extracellular adenosine concentration was increased immediately after occlusion, and then returned to the baseline by 30 min after reperfusion. Adenosine infusion through a microdialysis probe into the ipsilateral striatum (1 mM adenosine, 2 microl min(-1), total 4.5 h from the occlusion to 3 h after reperfusion) showed a significant improvement in the neurological outcome, and about 25% reduction of infarct volume, although the effect did not reach statistical significance, compared with the vehicle-treated group at 20 h after 90 min of MCAO. These results demonstrated the neuroprotective effect of adenosine against ischemic brain injury both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the possible therapeutic application of adenosine regulating agents, which inhibit adenosine uptake or metabolism to enhance or maintain extracellular endogenous adenosine levels, for stroke treatment.

  1. Patient preferences and satisfaction in a multispecialty infusion center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrov BE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Barbara E Ostrov,1 Kristine Reynolds,2 Lisabeth V Scalzi11Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, 2Department of Nursing, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USAPurpose: Direct feedback from patients about their preferred modes of medication ­administration has been increasingly sought by providers to develop care programs that best match patient goals. Multispecialty infusion centers generally provide care to hematology–oncology (HO and non-HO patients in one unit, with the same nursing staff. Our staff perceived that this was dissatisfying to our non-HO patients. We assessed patient satisfaction, as well as nursing and physician perceptions of patient preference/satisfaction with our infusion center, to determine whether a separate unit should be recommended when designing our new Cancer Institute Infusion Center.Patients and methods: A seven-question Likert scale satisfaction survey for patients, and a separate survey to assess nurses’ and physicians’ perception of patient satisfaction, were developed. The survey was administered to non-HO patients receiving infusions, doctors prescribing infusions, and nurses administering infusions. Results of the survey were compared between groups to assess differences in responses.Results: Responses were received from 52 non-HO patients, 18 physicians, and 13 nurses. Patients had more satisfaction, on all survey items, with the multispecialty infusion center than had been realized by physicians and nurses. Analysis demonstrated that patients were satisfied with care in a multispecialty infusion unit and were in favor of continuing their care in this combined center. Total scores of patient surveys were significantly different (P<0.001 from those of physicians and nurses, who had assumed patients would prefer to have their care in a non-HO infusion setting.Conclusion: Understanding patient preferences is an important step in deciding the structure of infusion centers. Based on these

  2. Hippocampal EEG and behaviour in dog. I. Hippocampal EEG correlates of gross motor behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolds, D.E.A.T.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Aitink, J.W.; Kamp, A.

    It was shown that rewarding spectral shifts (i.e. increase in amplitude or peak frequency of the hippocampal EEG) causes a solitary dog to show increased motor behaviour. Rewarded spectral shifts concurred with a variety of behavioural transitions. It was found that statistically significant

  3. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers and hippocampal subfield volumes in behaviorally characterized aged tree shrews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuker, J.I.H.; de Biurrun, G.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Fuchs, E.

    2004-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decreased ability to store and retrieve information. The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in such memory processes, and its integrity is affected during normal aging. We used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) as an animal model of aging, because in many characteris

  4. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  5. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis after limbic kindling: Relationship to BDNF and hippocampal-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterill, J J; Brymer, K J; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-06-01

    Seizures dramatically increase the number of adult generated neurons in the hippocampus. However, it is not known whether this effect depends on seizures that originate in specific brain regions or whether it is nonspecific to seizure activity regardless of origin. We used kindling of different brain sites to address this question. Rats received 99 kindling stimulations of the basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, or caudate nucleus over a 6-week period. After kindling, we counted the number of adult generated hippocampal neurons that were birth-dated with the proliferative marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to evaluate cell proliferation and survival under conditions of repeated seizures. Next, we counted the number of doublecortin immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells and evaluated their dendritic complexity to determine if limbic and nonlimbic seizures have differential effects on neuronal maturation. We also quantified hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) protein levels using an ELISA kit and assessed memory performance using a hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning paradigm. We found that limbic, but not nonlimbic, seizures dramatically increased hippocampal cell proliferation and the number of hilar-CA3 ectopic granule cells. Further, limbic kindling promoted dendritic outgrowth of DCX-ir cells and the number of DCX-ir cells containing basal dendrites. Limbic kindling also enhanced BDNF protein levels throughout the entire hippocampus and impaired the retrieval of fear memories. Collectively, our results suggest a relationship between limbic seizures, neurogenesis, BDNF protein, and cognition.

  6. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers and hippocampal subfield volumes in behaviorally characterized aged tree shrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuker, Jeanine I H; de Biurrun, Gabriel; Luiten, Paul G M; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2004-01-19

    Aging is associated with a decreased ability to store and retrieve information. The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in such memory processes, and its integrity is affected during normal aging. We used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) as an animal model of aging, because in many characteristics, tree shrews are closer to primates than they are to rodents. Young and aged male tree shrews performed a holeboard spatial memory task, which permits assessment of reference and working memory. Upon completion of the behavioral measurements, we carried out modified stereological analyses of neuronal numbers in various subdivisions of the hippocampus and used the Cavalieri method to calculate the volumes of these subfields. Results showed that the working memory of aged tree shrews was significantly impaired compared with that of young animals, whereas the hippocampus-dependent reference memory remained unchanged by aging. Estimation of the number of neurons revealed preserved neuron numbers in the subiculum, in the subregions CA1, CA2, CA3, and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Volume measurements showed no aging-related changes in the volume of any of these hippocampal subregions, or in the molecular and granule cell layers of the dentate gyrus of tree shrews. We conclude that the observed changes in memory performance in aging tree shrews are not accompanied by observable reductions of hippocampal neuron numbers or hippocampal volume, rather, the changes in memory performance are more likely the result of modified subcellular mechanisms that are affected by the aging process.

  7. Rata-rata Lama Hari Pemasangan Infus dalam Terjadinya Flebitis pada Pasien yang Dipasang Infus di RSUP Haji Adam Malik Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Mardiah, Lia

    2012-01-01

    Lama hari pemasangan infus pada pasien yang dipasang infus memiliki resiko tinggi terjadi flebitis dan kejadiannya tergantung pada kondisi kesehatan secara keseluruhan dan lamanya pemasangan infus. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan rata-rata lama hari pemasangan infus dalam terjadinya flebitis pada pasien yang dipasang infus di RSUP Haji Adam Malik Medan. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain deskriptif dengan jumlah sampel sebanyak 60 orang responden yang diambil dengan teknik purpos...

  8. The Impact of Sleep Loss on Hippocampal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cellular and molecular processes critical for memory consolidation are affected by the amount and quality of sleep attained. Questions remain with regard to how sleep enhances memory, what parameters of sleep after learning are optimal for memory consolidation, and what underlying hippocampal molecular players are targeted by sleep…

  9. The Impact of Sleep Loss on Hippocampal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cellular and molecular processes critical for memory consolidation are affected by the amount and quality of sleep attained. Questions remain with regard to how sleep enhances memory, what parameters of sleep after learning are optimal for memory consolidation, and what underlying hippocampal molecular players are targeted by sleep…

  10. Novel anticonvulsive effects of progesterone in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, M; Lang, M; Gane, J; Chow, E; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-01-17

    Progesterone is a known anticonvulsant, with its inhibitory effects generally attributed to its secondary metabolite, 5α,3α-tetrahydroprogesterone (THP), and THP's enhancement of GABAA receptor activity. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that progesterone may have non-genomic actions independent of the GABAA receptor. In this study, we explored THP/GABAA-independent anticonvulsive actions of progesterone in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling and in mouse entorhinal slices in vitro. Specifically, we examined the effects of progesterone in kindled mice with or without pretreatments with finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor known to block the metabolism of progesterone to THP. In addition, we examined the effects of progesterone on entorhinal epileptiform potentials in the presence of a GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin and finasteride. Adult male mice were kindled via a daily stimulation protocol. Electroencephalographic (EEG) discharges were recorded from the hippocampus or cortex to assess "focal" or "generalized" seizure activity. Kindled mice were treated with intra-peritoneal injections of progesterone (10, 35, 100 and 160mg/kg) with or without finasteride pretreatment (50 or 100mg/kg), THP (1, 3.5, 10 and 30mg/kg), midazolam (2mg/kg) and carbamazepine (50mg/kg). Entorhinal cortical slices were prepared from naïve young mice, and repetitive epileptiform potentials were induced by 4-aminopyridine (100μM), picrotoxin (100μM) and finasteride (1μM). Pretreatment with finasteride did not abolish the anticonvulsant effects of progesterone. In finasteride-pretreated mice, progesterone at 100 and 160mg/kg decreased cortical but not hippocampal afterdischarges (ADs). Carbamazepine mimicked the effects of progesterone with finasteride pretreatments in decreasing cortical discharges and motor seizures, whereas midazolam produced effects similar to progesterone alone or THP in decreasing hippocampal ADs and motor seizures. In brain slices, progesterone

  11. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yasuaki; Kido, Choichiro

    1987-12-01

    Some techniques of the most recent interventional radiology are very useful for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer and changing the style of hepatic infusion chemotherapy. This report shows our latest results and methods of hepatic infusion chemotherapy for metastatic liver cancer. 1. For the catheter placement, a new catheterization route via the left subclavian artery into the hepatic artery was developed and performed in 132 cases. Superselective catheterization succeeded in 123 cases (93.2%). This procedure is less invasive than laparotomy and less troublesome than other percutaneous routes. 2. For useful infusion system, an implantable injection port ''Reservoir'' was developed and it was used in 87 cases. This method makes arterial infusion chemotherapy easy, and imploves their quality of life. 3. To acquire adequate drug delivery, arterial redistribution by steel coils was done, and 109 arteries in 80 cases were occluded. This method is very useful to make multiple hepatic artery single and it is important to avoid gasroduodenal complications. 4. Now, using these techniques, the phase II study of 5FU, ADM, MMC combined hepatic infusion in patients with non-resectable metastatic liver cancer is done. Up to this time, such a phase study on arterial infusion chemotherapy was difficult because of technical problems, but these new techniques make it possible. In conclusion, these new methods change the style and conception of hepatic infusion, and these make much progress on the treatment of patients with metastatic liver cancer.

  12. The development of recurrent seizures after continuous intrahippocampal infusion of methionine sulfoximine in rats: a video-intracranial electroencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore

    2009-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase is deficient in astrocytes in the epileptogenic hippocampus in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). To explore the role of this deficiency in the pathophysiology of MTLE, rats were continuously infused with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO, 0.625 microg/h) or 0.9% NaCl (saline control) unilaterally into the hippocampus. The seizures caused by MSO were assessed by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. All (28 of 28) of the MSO-treated animals and none (0 of 12) of the saline-treated animals developed recurrent seizures. Most recurrent seizures appeared in clusters of 2 days' duration (median; range, 1 to 12 days). The first cluster was characterized by frequent, predominantly stage I seizures, which presented after the first 9.5 h of infusion (median; range, 5.5 to 31.7 h). Subsequent clusters of less-frequent, mainly partial seizures occurred after a clinically silent interval of 7.1 days (median; range, 1.8 to 16.2 days). The ictal intracranial EEGs shared several characteristics with recordings of partial seizures in humans, such as a distinct evolution of the amplitude and frequency of the EEG signal. The neuropathology caused by MSO had similarities to hippocampal sclerosis in 23.1% of cases, whereas 26.9% of the animals had minimal neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Moderate to severe diffuse neuronal loss was observed in 50% of the animals. In conclusion, the model of intrahippocampal MSO infusion replicates key features of human MTLE and may represent a useful tool for further studies of the cellular, molecular and electrophysiological mechanisms of this disorder.

  13. Prenatal exposure to alcohol does not affect radial maze learning and hippocampal mossy fiber sizes in three inbred strains of mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertholet Jean-Yves

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on radial-maze learning and hippocampal neuroanatomy, particularly the sizes of the intra- and infrapyramidal mossy fiber (IIPMF terminal fields, in three inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, and DBA/2J. Results Although we anticipated a modification of both learning and IIPMF sizes, no such effects were detected. Prenatal alcohol exposure did, however, interfere with reproduction in C57BL/6J animals and decrease body and brain weight (in interaction with the genotype at adult age. Conclusion Prenatal alcohol exposure influenced neither radial maze performance nor the sizes of the IIPMF terminal fields. We believe that future research should be pointed either at different targets when using mouse models for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (e.g. more complicated behavioral paradigms, different hippocampal substructures, or other brain structures or involve different animal models.

  14. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed.

  15. Chemotherapy, cognitive impairment and hippocampal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, J; Prust, M; Kaiser, J

    2015-11-19

    Cancer therapies can be associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. While radiation-induced brain damage has been long recognized both in pediatric and adult cancer patients, CNS toxicity from chemotherapy has only recently been acknowledged. Clinical studies suggest that the most frequent neurotoxic adverse effects associated with chemotherapy include memory and learning deficits, alterations of attention, concentration, processing speed and executive function. Preclinical studies have started to shed light on how chemotherapy targets the CNS both on cellular and molecular levels to disrupt neural function and brain plasticity. Potential mechanisms include direct cellular toxicity, alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and induction of pro-inflammatory processes with subsequent disruption of normal cellular and neurological function. Damage to neural progenitor cell populations within germinal zones of the adult CNS has been identified as one of the key mechanisms by which chemotherapy might exert long-lasting and progressive neurotoxic effects. Based on the important role of the hippocampus for maintenance of brain plasticity throughout life, several experimental studies have focused on the study of chemotherapy effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and associated learning and memory. An increasing body of literature from both animal studies and neuroimaging studies in cancer patients suggests a possible relationship between chemotherapy induced hippocampal damage and the spectrum of neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations observed in cancer patients. This review aims to briefly summarize current preclinical and neuroimaging studies that are providing a potential link between the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy and hippocampal dysfunction, highlighting challenges and future directions in this field of investigation.

  16. Blood doping : infusions, erythropoietin and artificial blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, E Randy

    2007-01-01

    As science marches on, athletes and coaches march close behind. Researchers have long been interested in how red cell mass and blood volume affect exercise capacity. Interest in blood doping soared after the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Studies in the 1970s and 1980s suggested that transfusing red cells could speed endurance performance. Diverse athletes of the time were accused of blood doping. In the late 1980s, recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) began to supplant transfusion for doping. EPO use is a suspect in nearly 20 deaths in 4 years in European cyclists. In the 1998 Tour de France, a team was ejected for using EPO and six other teams quit the race. The beat goes on; in recent years, diverse endurance and sprint athletes have been caught or accused of using EPO. Tests to detect EPO are improving but are not yet foolproof. As EPO tests improve, blood transfusion is back in vogue and some athletes may have infused artificial blood. Tests for detecting artificial blood also exist, but it seems it will take widespread, year-round, unannounced, out-of-competition testing and stern penalties to deter blood doping.

  17. Control of noradrenaline release from hippocampal synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, D.P.; Fillenz, M.

    1981-10-01

    Potassium-evoked tritiated noradrenaline (NA) release from hippocampal synaptosomes was measured with a superfusion method. A single 2-min high-K+ pulse released 39% of the vesicular NA by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism: the Ca2+-independent release was negligible. After changing the vesicular NA store size by pretreating rats with either alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, 500 mg/kg, or tranylcypromine, 10 mg/kg, a single K+ pulse released a constant percentage of the vesicular NA. With two K+ pulses, however, there was a reduction in the percentage of vesicular NA released in response to the second pulse.

  18. Access to the ophthalmic artery by retrograde approach through the posterior communicating artery for intra-arterial chemotherapy of retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Chi-Tuan; Blanc, Raphael; Pistocchi, Silvia; Bartolini, Bruno; Piotin, Michel [Fondation Rothschild Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Livia [Institut Curie, Department of Ocular Oncology, Paris (France)

    2012-08-15

    Intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapy into the ophthalmic artery for treatment of retinoblastoma has been realized after catheterization of the internal carotid and temporary balloon occlusion beyond the orifice of the ophthalmic artery, or more recently after superselective canulation of the ophthalmic artery by a microcatheter. The superselective catheterization of the ophthalmic artery could be cumbersome because of the implantation of the ostium on the carotid siphon or because of the tortuosity of the carotid siphon. We report our experience of using a retrograde approach through the posterior communicating artery that allows a more direct angle of access to the origin of the ophthalmic artery. (orig.)

  19. Counter-current chromatography of black tea infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedzicha, B L; Lo, M F; Donovan, T J

    1990-05-04

    Counter-current chromatography using a multilayer coil planet centrifuge, with solvent system ethyl acetate-butanol-water, permits the separation of black tea infusions into fractions which include pure SII and a mixture of SI and SIa thearubigins. Good resolution of several components of the infusion may be achieved in elution times of 1 to 2 h. The appearance of chromatograms is altered on decaffeinating the infusion. The effect of stationary phase composition is considered. Resolution of the peaks improves with butanol content.

  20. Severe infusion reaction induced by trastuzumab: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Keiichiro; Ito, Yoshinori; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Okudaira, Taeko; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Arakawa, Masahiro; Miyazato, Masayo; Irie, Tetsuya; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Syunji; Aiba, Keisuke; Horikoshi, Noboru; Kasumi, Fujio

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of a severe infusion reaction caused by trastuzumab. A 59-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer was treated with trastuzumab. During the first infusion, initial symptoms such as severe headache and general fatigue developed. Blood pressure fell 90 minutes after these initial symptoms. A collapsed lung was demonstrated by chest X-ray and computed tomography. Steroid therapy was successfully used for these reactions. Careful monitoring of vital signs, examination of the respiratory system, and the use of steroids are recommended for severe infusion reaction.

  1. Field comparison of Bermuda-hay infusion to infusions of emergent aquatic vegetation for collecting female mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Mullen, Gary R

    2007-06-01

    Field experiments were conducted in east-central Alabama in 2003 and 2004 to compare the attractiveness of selected gravid-trap infusions to ovipositing female mosquitoes. Comparisons were made among infusions of the following plants: Bermuda hay, Cynodon dactylon, and 3 species of emergent aquatic plants typical of Culex larval habitats, i.e., soft rush, Juncus effusus; a common sedge, Rhynchospora corniculata; and broad-leaf cattail, Typha latifolia. Experiments were conducted at a site in Lee County, AL, with an abundance of common nuisance mosquitoes, including Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes albopictus. Carbon dioxide-baited miniature light traps were operated concurrently with gravid traps to provide an activity index of mosquito species at the site. Gravid traps with hay infusion collected the greatest numbers of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Culex restuans females (2003). The results indicate that hay infusion is highly attractive to Cx. quinquefasciatus and is the infusion of choice for collecting females of this species in gravid traps. In the case of Ae. albopictus, infusions were not determined to be significantly different from one another in their attractiveness to gravid females. In general, females of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. restuans demonstrated selectivity when choosing an oviposition site, whereas Ae. albopictus females did not. Factors associated with the oviposition biology of the latter species most likely account for their lack of preference for any single infusion type.

  2. Effect of exercise training on in vivo insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in intra-abdominal adipose tissue in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, L H; Stallknecht, B; Fluckey, J D

    2000-01-01

    Intra-abdominal obesity may be crucial in the pathogenesis of the insulin-resistance syndrome, and training may alleviate this condition. We compared insulin-mediated glucose uptake in vivo in three intra-abdominal adipose tissues (ATs; retroperitoneal, parametrial, and mesenteric......]glucose and microdialysis techniques. Blood flow was measured by microspheres. Upon insulin stimulation, blood flow generally decreased in AT. Flow was higher in mesenteric tissue than in other ATs, whereas insulin-mediated glucose uptake did not differ between ATs. Training doubled the glucose infusion rate during...... hyperinsulinemia, in part, reflecting an effect in muscle. During hyperinsulinemia, interstitial glucose concentrations were lower, glucose uptake per 100 g of tissue was higher in AT in trained compared with sedentary rats, and training influenced glucose uptake identically in all ATs. In conclusion, differences...

  3. Clinical signs and symptoms of acute reflex sympathetic dystrophy in one hindlimb of the rat, induced by infusion of a free-radical donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Kapitein, P; Verhofstad, A; Hendriks, T; Goris, R J

    1998-06-01

    The acute phase of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is characterized by the classical signs and symptoms of inflammation (rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and impaired function). As free radicals are involved in acute inflammation, we studied the effects of free radicals in an animal model, especially as to signs and symptoms found in acute RSD. Awake rats were given continuous intra-arterial infusion (1 ml/h) in the left hindlimb, with saline (n = 6) or the free-radical donor tert-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BuOOH, 25 mM, n = 6). During a 24-h infusion period the skin temperature, volume, skin color, function and pain reactions of the paws were observed. After 24 h the rats were killed and both gastrocnemius muscles were histologically analyzed. Infusion with tert-BuOOH induced in the left paw an increased skin temperature, increased volume, redness of the plantar skin, impaired function and increased pain sensation, while these acute RSD signs and symptoms were absent in the saline infused animals. The alterations in pain sensation (spontaneous, mechanical and thermal pain) were similar to findings in the neuropathic animal model. The gastrocnemius muscles of the saline infused rats and the contralateral gastrocnemius muscle of the tert-BuOOH infused rats showed no histological tissue damage. In the left gastrocnemius muscle free-radical-related damage was visible. Induction of free-radical formation in one hindlimb of awake rats mimics the acute signs and symptoms of acute RSD, with alterations in pain sensation as found in the classical neuropathic animal model of RSD, as well as in acute RSD patients.

  4. Intravitreal methotrexate infusion for proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaka A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ama Sadaka,1 Robert A Sisk,1–3 James M Osher,1,3 Okan Toygar,4 Melinda K Duncan,5 Christopher D Riemann1,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 2Department of Opthalmology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3Cincinnati Eye Institute, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Bahcesehir University Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intravitreal methotrexate infusion (IMI during pars plana vitrectomy (PPV for retinal detachment in patients with high risk for the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR.Methods: Patients presenting with severe recurrent PVR with tractional retinal detachment and/or a history of severe ocular inflammation were treated with IMI. Clinical outcomes were determined from a retrospective medical chart review.Results: Twenty-nine eyes presenting with either tractional retinal detachment and recurrent PVR (n=22 or a history of severe inflammation associated with high PVR risk (n=7 received IMI during PPV. Best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months was ≥20/200 in 19 of 29 eyes (66% and remained stable or improved compared with initial presentation in 24 of 29 eyes (83%. At the last follow-up examination, the retinas of 26 of 29 eyes (90% remained attached after IMI while three eyes required another reattachment procedure. Three additional eyes (10% developed recurrent limited PVR without recurrent RD and were observed. No complications attributable to IMI occurred during a mean follow-up of 27 months.Conclusion: Eyes at high risk for PVR development due to a history of prior PVR or intraocular inflammation had a low incidence of PVR following IMI at the time of PPV for RD repair. No significant safety issues from IMI were observed in this series. Keywords: tractional retinal detachment, recurrent retinal detachment, pars

  5. Herbal infusions used for induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciganda, Carmen; Laborde, Amalia

    2003-01-01

    Plants and herbs have been used to induce abortions but there is very little published information describing the commonly used ones. The purpose of this report is to describe the herbal products used to induce abortions, and to enhance awareness and understanding of their toxic effects. A descriptive retrospective survey was conducted on the calls received by the Montevideo Poison Centre between 1986 and 1999 concerning the ingestion of herbal infusions with abortive intent. A total of 86 cases involving 30 different plant species were identified. The species most frequently involved were ruda (Ruta chalepensis/graveolens), cola de quirquincho (Lycopodium saururus), parsley (Petroselinum hortense), and an over-the-counter herbal product named Carachipita. The components of Carachipita are pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium), yerba de la perdiz (Margiricarpus pinnatus), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and guaycuri (Statice brasiliensis). Abortion occurred in 23 cases after the ingestion of parsley, ruda, Carachipita, celery, Cedron, francisco alvarez, floripon, espina colorada. Out of the 23 cases, 15 involved the only the ingestion of plants, 4 cases used injected drugs (presumably hormones), and in 4 cases there was associated self-inflicted instrumental manipulation. Multiple organ system failure occurred in those patients who had ingested ruda (alone or in combination with parsley or fennel), Carachipita, arnica, or bardana. Deaths occurred in one case of Carachipita ingestion and in 4 cases of ruda ingestion (2 cases of ruda alone, 2 cases of ruda with parsley and fennel). Self-inflicted instrumental manipulations were found in 4 of the patients with multiple organ system failure and in one of those who died. The results of this report are not conclusive, but it appears that the ingestion of plants to induce abortion involves the risk of severe morbidity and mortality.

  6. Melissa officinalis and Passiflora caerulea infusion as physiological stress decreaser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feliú-Hemmelmann, Karina; Monsalve, Francisco; Rivera, César

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a Melissa officinalis and Passiflora caerulea infusion on the severity of physiological chronic stress induced by movement restriction in CF-1 mice...

  7. Infusing Social Responsibility into the Curriculum and Cocurriculum: Campus Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter highlights good practices and lessons learned for infusing social responsibility--contributing to the larger community and taking seriously the perspectives of others--as outcomes of college.

  8. Antioxidant and astroprotective effects of a Pulicaria incisa infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmann, Anat; Telerman, Alona; Mordechay, Sharon; Erlank, Hilla; Ofir, Rivka

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the brain, protect neurons from reactive oxygen species (ROS) and provide them with trophic support, such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Thus, any damage to astrocytes will affect neuronal survival. In the present study, an infusion prepared from the desert plant Pulicaria incisa (Pi) was tested for its protective and antioxidant effects on astrocytes subjected to oxidative stress. The Pi infusion attenuated the intracellular accumulation of ROS following treatment with hydrogen peroxide and zinc and prevented the H(2)O(2)-induced death of astrocytes. The Pi infusion also exhibited an antioxidant effect in vitro and induced GDNF transcription in astrocytes. It is proposed that this Pi infusion be further evaluated for use as a functional beverage for the prevention and/or treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases in which oxidative stress plays a role.

  9. Attribute based selection of thermoplastic resin for vacuum infusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhakaran, R.T. Durai; Lystrup, Aage; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The composite industry looks toward a new material system (resins) based on thermoplastic polymers for the vacuum infusion process, similar to the infusion process using thermosetting polymers. A large number of thermoplastics are available in the market with a variety of properties suitable...... for different engineering applications, and few of those are available in a not yet polymerised form suitable for resin infusion. The proper selection of a new resin system among these thermoplastic polymers is a concern for manufactures in the current scenario and a special mathematical tool would...... be beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a new decision making tool for resin selection based on significant attributes. This article provides a broad overview of suitable thermoplastic material systems for vacuum infusion process available in today’s market. An illustrative example—resin selection...

  10. Resin Infusion Rigidized Inflatable Concept Development and Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing resin infusion to rigidize an inflatable structure and form fiber-reinforced composites on-orbit is a novel concept that builds on current NASA technology...

  11. Infusing Social Responsibility into the Curriculum and Cocurriculum: Campus Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter highlights good practices and lessons learned for infusing social responsibility--contributing to the larger community and taking seriously the perspectives of others--as outcomes of college.

  12. Metabolic and antioxidant profiles of herbal infusions and decoctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakis, Charalambos; Tsigrimani, Diamantina; Tsiaka, Thalia; Lantzouraki, Dimitra Z; Strati, Irini F; Makris, Constantinos; Tagkouli, Dimitra; Proestos, Charalampos; Sinanoglou, Vassilia J; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis

    2016-11-15

    This study implements NMR metabolomics and spectrophotometric studies (Folin-Ciocalteu, FRAP, ABTS) to infusions and decoctions of ten plant species in order to assess and compare the metabolic and antioxidant profiles for each botanical family. Multivariate and univariate data analyses highlighted the differences among the samples and pinpointed specific classes of compounds for each plant species as well as infusions and decoctions. The identified phenolic compounds by NMR, as well as the antioxidant profile, framed a trend of increased values in infusions compared to the decoctions. Moreover, the infusion procedure positively affected the extractability of the phenolic compounds compared to decoctions. The highest total phenolic content was found in Mentha spicata, while the lowest in Matricaria chamomilla preparations, irrespective of the preparation method. The preparation time for the decoctions was examined showing that the 15min preparations were generally found richer in phenolics and of higher antioxidant capacity.

  13. A Framework for Infusing Multicultural Curriculum into Gifted Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Donna Y.; Harris, J. John, III

    2000-01-01

    This article offers a framework for infusing multicultural curriculum into gifted education that integrates two, heretofore, parallel models in education, Benjamin Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives (1956) and Banks and Banks' (1993) model of multicultural education. (Contains 15 references.) (DB)

  14. Infusing Software Engineering Technology into Practice at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressburger, Thomas; Feather, Martin S.; Hinchey, Michael; Markosia, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    We present an ongoing effort of the NASA Software Engineering Initiative to encourage the use of advanced software engineering technology on NASA projects. Technology infusion is in general a difficult process yet this effort seems to have found a modest approach that is successful for some types of technologies. We outline the process and describe the experience of the technology infusions that occurred over a two year period. We also present some lessons from the experiences.

  15. Infusion of iloprost without a peristaltic pump: Safety and tolerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Faggioli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iloprost is a potent prostacyclin (PGI2 analogue that is effective in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, vasculitis, pulmonary hypertension, and secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon. Intravenous infusions are generally administered with the aid of a peristaltic pump to reduce the risk of adverse reactions caused by unintentional increases in the infusion rate. This increases the cost of care in terms of equipment and personnel and may limit the use of this drug. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 18,432 iloprost infusions administered between 1999 and 2009 to 272 patients with systemic sclerosis (n = 253 and 19 with peripheral arterial disease (n = 19. All infusions were administered in the day hospital over 6 h with a normal IV set-up with a roller flow regulator. Flow rates were set to deliver iloprost at 1-2 ng/kg/min. Rates were verified by direct drop counts during the first 15-20 minutes of the infusion and at each subsequent check. Results: There were no adverse events that were fatal, life-threatening, or associated with prolongation of hospitalization and very few events requiring intensive care or continuous monitoring. The latter included 4 cases of tachycardia/arrhythmia (extrasystoles in most cases, 3 cases of hypotension (systolic pressure < 80 mmHg, and 2 cases of hypertension (BP > 170/100 mmHg. All other adverse reactions were mild, reversible, and similar to those seen with iloprost infusion with peristaltic pump. Only one patient had to be switched to another prostanoid (due to intolerance. Discussion: Iloprost infusion administered with a normal IV flow regulator appears to be as safe, well tolerated, and effective as traditional infusion with a peristaltic pump.

  16. [Radiotherapy and implantable medical device: example of infusion pumps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrous-Anane, S; Benhassine, S; Lopez, S; Cristina, K; Mazeron, J-J

    2013-12-01

    Indication for radiotherapy is often questioned for patients equipped with implantable medical devices like infusion pumps as the radiation tolerance is poor or not known. We report here on the case of a patient who we treated with pelvic radiotherapy for cervical cancer and who had an infusion pump in iliac fossa. We conducted a series of tests on five identical pumps that insured that the treatment protocol is harmless to the implanted device.

  17. Overview and tips for successful grant writing for infusion nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L

    2014-01-01

    Grant writing is an important step to building evidence for infusion nursing practice. This paper describes the role of the infusion nurse in developing a research proposal, identifying appropriate sources of funding, and preparing to write the grant application; identifies typical sections of a grant application and information necessary in each; and provides tips for writing an application that will contribute to a positive review.

  18. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for gingival carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Y.; Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Mitsudo, K.; Koizumi, T.; Oguri, S.; Kioi, M.; Tohnai, I. [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, M. [Shonankamakura General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kamakura, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. In all, 34 patients (21 men and 13 women) with squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva underwent radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of daily external irradiation and concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion with cisplatin and docetaxel. A median total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was delivered to tumors. Of the 34 patients, 29 (85 %) achieved a complete response (CR) and 5 had residual tumors. Of the 29 patients with a CR, 2 had local recurrences and 1 had distant metastasis 1-15 months after treatment. Twenty-six of the 36 patients had survived at a median follow-up time of 36 months (range 12-79 months); 4 died of cancer and 4 died of non-cancer-related causes. At both 3 and 5 years after treatment, the overall survival rates were 79 % and the cause-specific survival rates were 85 %. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandibular bone only developed in 1 patient after treatment. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy was effective and safe in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. This treatment may be a promising curative and organ-preserving treatment option for gingival carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war die Ueberpruefung der Effizienz und Toxizitaet einer Strahlenbehandlung des Gingivakarzinoms mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Chemotherapie. Insgesamt 34 Patienten (21 Maenner und 13 Frauen) mit Zahnfleischplattenzellkarzinom erhielten eine Strahlenbehandlung mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Chemotherapie. Die Behandlung umfasste eine taegliche externe Bestrahlung mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Infusion von Cisplatin und

  19. Does intrauterine saline infusion by intrauterine insemination (IUI) catheter as endometrial injury during IVF cycles improve pregnancy outcomes among patients with recurrent implantation failure?: An RCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Saghar; Zamaniyan, Marzieh; Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Zadeh modares, Shahrzad; Hosieni, Sedighe; Seif, Samira; Malih, Narges; Rezapoor, Parinaz; Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recurrent implantation failure is one of the most issues in IVF cycles. Some researchers found that beneficial effects of endometrial Scratching in women with recurrent implantation failure, while some authors demonstrated contrary results Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of intrauterine. Saline infusion as a form of endometrial injury, during fresh in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycle, among patients with recurrent implantation failure. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 63 women undergoing assisted reproductive technology were divided into two groups either local endometrial injury by intrauterine saline infusion during day 3-5 of the ongoing controlled ovarian stimulation cycle, or IVF protocol performed without any other intervention in Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, Iran. The main outcome measure was clinical pregnancy rates. Results: Patients who received intra uterine saline infusion (n=20), had significantly lower clinical pregnancy numbers (1 vs. 9, p0.05) and multiple pregnancy numbers (1 vs. 3, p>0.05) between groups. Conclusion: When intrauterine saline infusion as a form of endometrial injury is performed during the ongoing IVF cycles it has negative effect on reproductive outcomes among patients with recurrent implantation failure. PMID:27738660

  20. Cortisol, Cytokines, and Hippocampal Volume in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Daniel Sudheimer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Separate bodies of literature report that elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol negatively affect hippocampal structure and cognitive functioning, particularly in older adults. Although interactions between cytokines and cortisol occur through a variety of known mechanisms, few studies consider how their interactions affect brain structure. In this preliminary study, we assess the impact of interactions between circulating levels of IL-1Beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha, and waking cortisol on hippocampal volume. Twenty-eight community-dwelling older adults underwent blood draws for quantification of circulating cytokines and saliva collections to quantify the cortisol awakening response. Hippocampal volume measurements were made using structural magnetic resonance imaging. Elevated levels of waking cortisol in conjunction with higher concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-alpha were associated with smaller hippocampal volumes. In addition, independent of cortisol, higher levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were also associated with smaller hippocampal volumes. These data provide preliminary evidence that higher cortisol, in conjunction with higher IL-6 and TNF-alpha, are associated with smaller hippocampal volume in older adults. We suggest that the dynamic balance between the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and inflammation processes may explain hippocampal volume reductions in older adults better than either set of measures do in isolation.

  1. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Emily N.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Cash, David M.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sudre, Carole H.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T.; Fox, Nick C.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5‐T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27933676

  2. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiford, Cassidy M; Manning, Emily N; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Cash, David M; Malone, Ian B; Ridgway, Gerard R; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K; Sudre, Carole H; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T; Fox, Nick C; Cardoso, M Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Intra-arterial administration improves temozolomide delivery and efficacy in a model of intracerebral metastasis, but has unexpected brain toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Leslie L; Pagel, Michael A; Netto, Joao Prola; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that intra-arterial (IA) infusion of temozolomide into the internal carotid artery would safely improve drug delivery to brain and enhance chemotherapy efficacy in a chemosensitive rat brain tumor model. Quantitative autoradiography after 25 µCi (14)C-temozolomide was given by oral, intravenous, or IA route of administration, or IA with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) (n = 5-7 per group) showed that both IA and IA/BBBD administration increased drug delivery in tumor by over threefold compared to normal brain (P Temozolomide (20 mg/kg; ~150 mg/m(2)) increased median survival when given by oral (25.5 days), intravenous (25.5 days), or IA (33 days) route of administration, compared to 17.5 days in untreated controls (n = 8 per group; overall P temozolomide was significantly longer than all other groups (P temozolomide was toxic in the efficacy study, but there was no evidence of symptomatic neurotoxicity in rats given IA temozolomide. After these promising animal results, a 49 year old male with glioblastoma multiforme who failed all standard therapy received temozolomide 100 mg/m(2) IA. Upon initiation of the second course of IA infusion the patient had increased heart rate, blood pressure, and rash, and the procedure was terminated without sequelae. Follow up IA infusion of temozolomide diluent in normal rats showed damaged cerebrovasculature as determined by dye leakage. These results demonstrate that IA infusion of temozolomide was toxic, with or without BBBD. We conclude that under the current formulation temozolomide is not safe for IA infusion in patients.

  4. Impact of infusion method on amikacin serum levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N; Décaudin, B; Lannoy, D; Odou, M F; De Broucker, M; Barthélémy, C; Poret, E; Dubreuil, L; Odou, P

    2010-08-01

    Aminoglycosides are broad-spectrum antibiotics with peak-dependent bactericidal activity, administered by gravity infusion or for more accuracy by electronic pump infusion. The aim of this study was to assess the difference between the two systems and its pharmacokinetic impact. Twenty-four patients hospitalised for community-acquired pulmonary infections received amikacin by IV route over 1 h with a targeted peak concentration of 35 mg/L. They were randomly distributed into two groups, one receiving infusion through a pump system, the other by gravity. Amikacin serum levels were determined at the end of infusion and 24 h later. C(max) values were significantly lower with gravity than pump (40.2 +/- 12.3 vs. 50.6 +/- 17.6 mg/L, respectively; p = 0.04). Elimination half-life time, volume of distribution and clearance did not differ significantly from one group to the other. The percentage of patients who failed to achieve the targeted peak concentration was significantly higher with gravity than pump (41.7% vs. 16.7%, respectively; p infusion flow-rate provides better control over amikacin C(max). This study underlines the fact that infusion device characteristics should be added to the physiopathological information of a patient if we are to make a better estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters.

  5. Propofol Infusion Syndrome in Adults: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aibek E. Mirrakhimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propofol infusion syndrome is a rare but extremely dangerous complication of propofol administration. Certain risk factors for the development of propofol infusion syndrome are described, such as appropriate propofol doses and durations of administration, carbohydrate depletion, severe illness, and concomitant administration of catecholamines and glucocorticosteroids. The pathophysiology of this condition includes impairment of mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids, disruption of the electron transport chain, and blockage of beta-adrenoreceptors and cardiac calcium channels. The disease commonly presents as an otherwise unexplained high anion gap metabolic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, hyperkalemia, acute kidney injury, elevated liver enzymes, and cardiac dysfunction. Management of overt propofol infusion syndrome requires immediate discontinuation of propofol infusion and supportive management, including hemodialysis, hemodynamic support, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in refractory cases. However, we must emphasize that given the high mortality of propofol infusion syndrome, the best management is prevention. Clinicians should consider alternative sedative regimes to prolonged propofol infusions and remain within recommended maximal dose limits.

  6. A psychology of religious plurality: from intra-religious dialogue to intra-psychic reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Joseph M

    2012-09-01

    Panikkar's (The intra-religious dialogue, 1978) classic, re-issued by Paulist Press in 1999, grapples with the theological challenges in the disciplines of comparative theology and the theology of religions through what he terms, "intra-religious dialogue." In this psychology of religious plurality, I use works from a variety of disciplines to highlight the achievements of Panikkar's intra-religious dialogue, as well as to critique his work in the hope of finding categories of understanding that can be profitably used to face the inter-personal crises of the contemporary world, namely religious terrorism.

  7. abdominal pressure monitoring in varying intra- abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TV measurements were achieved using a manual manometer system with a Foley ... relatedness. As the test subjects were organised into related groups, we used intra- .... air before instillation of fluid, contractility of the muscular stomach wall, an exit ... TV techniques both have utility in the clinical setting, with TG pressure.

  8. Intra-uterine insemination for unexplained subfertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, S. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Hughes, E.; Te Velde, E.; Heineman, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background Intra-uterine insemination (IUI) is a widely used fertility treatment for couples with unexplained subfertility. Although IUI is less invasive and less expensive than in vitro fertilisation (IVF), the safety of IUI in combination with ovarian hyperstimulation (OH) is debated. The main con

  9. Intra-uterine hematoma in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S; Nielsen, P H

    1991-01-01

    In 60 patients with a live fetus and an intra-uterine hematoma (IUH) proven by ultrasonic scanning the outcome of pregnancy was spontaneous abortion in 12% and premature delivery in 10%. No correlation between the outcome of the pregnancy and the maximum size of the hematoma or the week...

  10. [Intra-cystic renal calcium milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, B; Médart, L; Massart, J P; Collignon, L

    2015-02-01

    Intra-cystic renal calcium milk is a rare entity. The authors report a clinical case, and describe the radiographic and tomodensitometric appearances. This 50 year old patient has been followed up for more than ten years for urinary lithiasis with recurrent pain.

  11. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2011-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  12. Intra-uterine hematoma in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S; Nielsen, P H

    1991-01-01

    In 60 patients with a live fetus and an intra-uterine hematoma (IUH) proven by ultrasonic scanning the outcome of pregnancy was spontaneous abortion in 12% and premature delivery in 10%. No correlation between the outcome of the pregnancy and the maximum size of the hematoma or the week of detect...

  13. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2012-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  14. Differential role of entorhinal and hippocampal nerve growth factor in short- and long-term memory modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Reinke, A; Martins, M R; Quevedo, J; Izquierdo, I

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of infusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of male Wistar rats (250-300 g, N = 11-13 per group) on inhibitory avoidance retention. In order to evaluate the modulation of entorhinal and hippocampal NGF in short- and long-term memory, animals were implanted with cannulae in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex and trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance (foot shock, 0.4 mA). Retention tests were carried out 1.5 h or 24 h after training to measure short- and long-term memory, respectively. Immediately after training, rats received 5 microl NGF (0.05, 0.5 or 5.0 ng) or saline per side into the CA1 area and entorhinal cortex. The correct position of the cannulae was confirmed by histological analysis. The highest dose of NGF (5.0 ng) into the hippocampus blocked short-term memory (P long-term memory. NGF administration into the entorhinal cortex improved long-term memory at the dose of 5.0 ng (P short-term memory. Taken as a whole, our results suggest a differential modulation by entorhinal and hippocampal NGF of short- and long-term memory.

  15. Assessment of implantable infusion pumps for continuous infusion of human insulin in rats: potential for group housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Molck, Anne-Marie; Martensson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    compound in these studies, and a comparator model of persistent exposure by HI infusion from external pumps has recently been developed to support toxicological evaluation of long-acting insulin analogues. However, this model requires single housing of the animals. Developing an insulin-infusion model......Group housing is considered to be important for rats, which are highly sociable animals. Single housing may impact behaviour and levels of circulating stress hormones. Rats are typically used in the toxicological evaluation of insulin analogues. Human insulin (HI) is frequently used as a reference...... which allows group housing would therefore greatly improve animal welfare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of implantable infusion pumps for HI infusion in group-housed rats. Group housing of rats implanted with a battery-driven pump proved to be possible. Intravenous...

  16. Hippocampal changes produced by overexpression of the human CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster may underlie cognitive deficits rescued by nicotine in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molas, Susanna; Gener, Thomas; Güell, Jofre; Martín, Mairena; Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Dierssen, Mara

    2014-11-11

    Addiction involves long-lasting maladaptive changes including development of disruptive drug-stimuli associations. Nicotine-induced neuroplasticity underlies the development of tobacco addiction but also, in regions such as the hippocampus, the ability of this drug to enhance cognitive capabilities. Here, we propose that the genetic locus of susceptibility to nicotine addiction, the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster, encoding the α5, α3 and β4 subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), may influence nicotine-induced neuroadaptations. We have used transgenic mice overexpressing the human cluster (TgCHRNA5/A3/B4) to investigate hippocampal structure and function in genetically susceptible individuals. TgCHRNA5/A3/B4 mice presented a marked reduction in the dendrite complexity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons along with an increased dendritic spine density. In addition, TgCHRNA5/A3/B4 exhibited increased VGLUT1/VGAT ratio in the CA1 region, suggesting an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance. These hippocampal alterations were accompanied by a significant impairment in short-term novelty recognition memory. Interestingly, chronic infusion of nicotine (3.25 mg/kg/d for 7 d) was able to rescue the reduced dendritic complexity, the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance and the cognitive impairment in TgCHRNA5/A3/B4. Our results suggest that chronic nicotine treatment may represent a compensatory strategy in individuals with altered expression of the CHRNA5/A3/B4 region.

  17. Isoflurane Use in the Treatment of Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus is Associated with Hippocampal Changes on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kristin M; Connors, Robert; Lee, Donald H; Khandji, Alexander G; Claassen, Jan; Young, G Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Experts recommend aggressive management with continuous intravenous infusions or inhaled anesthetics such as isoflurane. However, there is concern that MRI changes in RSE reflect isoflurane neurotoxicity. We performed a case-control study to determine whether isoflurane is neurotoxic, based on MRI signal changes. We performed a retrospective case-control study of the incidence of MRI changes in RSE treated with and without isoflurane. Charts were reviewed for demographic and treatment information. T1, T2, and FLAIR sequences of MRIs were reviewed independently by two neuroradiologists blinded to treatment group for presence or absence of signal change or atrophy in the meninges, cortex, white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, and cerebellum. Eight cases of RSE receiving treatment with isoflurane were identified and double-matched with 15 controls who received only intravenous anesthetics. Baseline characteristics were similar. Hippocampal signal change was observed more frequently in cases receiving isoflurane (p = 0.026). Hippocampal signal changes were associated with isoflurane use in patients with RSE. They were also associated with number of seizure days prior to MRI and the use of multiple anesthetic agents. Similar changes have been seen as a result of RSE itself, and one cannot rule out the possibility these changes represent seizure-related effects. If isoflurane-related, these hippocampal signal changes may be the result of a direct neurotoxic effect of prolonged isoflurane use or failure of isoflurane to protect the hippocampus from seizure-induced injury despite achieving electrographic burst-suppression.

  18. Mitochondrial and nuclear changes in hippocampal neurons in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhai Tang; Li Zhang; Jianying Sun; Xiaojun Pan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial damage plays a key role in neuronal damage.OBJECTIVE: To observe ultrastructural damage to mitochondria and nuclei, as well as caspase-3 expression, in hippocampal CA3 neurons of lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neuropathological, randomized, controlled study was performed at the Animal Experimental Center, Shandong University, China in May 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 75 healthy, adult, male, Wistar rats were randomly assigned into model (n = 45) and control (n = 30) groups. Lithium-pilocarpine (Sigma, USA) was used in this study.METHODS: Rats in the model group were intraperitoneally injected with lithium chloride (3 mEq/kg),and 24 hours later with pilocarpine (45 mg/kg), to induce seizures for 2 hours. Rats in the control group were intraperitoneally infused with the same volume of saline. Rat hippocampal CA3 tissue was obtained at 3, 12, and 24 hours following status epilepticus.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neuronal changes were observed under an optical microscope. Ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and nuclei were observed using an electron microscope.caspase-3 mRNA levels were quantified by semiquantitative RT-PCR.RESULTS: After 3 hours of status epilepticus, mitochondria with swollen cristae and ruptured membranes were observed by electron microscopy. Nuclei with marginated chromatin were observed after 24 hours status epilepticus. RT-PCR results demonstrated increased caspase-3 expression at 12 hours, and significantly increased expression at 24 hours following termination of status epilepticus. This was in accordance with acidophilia occurrence, as indicated by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and time of ultrastructural damage to nuclei.CONCLUSION: In lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat models, ultrastructural damage to mitochondria in hippocampal neurons occurred during early stages, followed by increased caspase-3 expression and nuclear changes. These results suggested

  19. Long-term effects of amygdala GABA receptor blockade on specific subpopulations of hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Sabina; Lange, Nicholas; Bhattacharyya, Sujoy; Sebro, Ronnie; Garces, Jessica; Benes, Francine M

    2004-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the amygdala modulates hippocampal functions. To test the hypothesis that this modulation may involve long-lasting effects on interneuronal networks in the hippocampus, changes in the expression of neurochemical markers specific for different interneuronal subpopulations were assessed in adult rats 96 h following acute infusion of low doses of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin into the amygdala. The numerical density (Nd) of somata showing immunoreactivity (IR) for parvalbumin (PVB) was decreased in dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA4-2 region, while that of calretinin (CR)-IR was decreased in DG and CA2. The Nd of calbindin D28k (CB)-IR somata was decreased in CA3-2. The densities of axon terminals arising from PVB-IR and cholecystokinin (CCK)-IR basket neurons were also altered, with those of CCK-IR terminals increased across all sectors, while PVB-IR terminals were decreased only in the CA region. Increases in CCK-IR terminals were paralleled by increases of terminals with IR for the 65-kD isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65). Mixed-effects statistical models, adapted specifically for these analyses, indicated that perturbations of amygdalar inputs to the hippocampus significantly alter the drive that hippocampal PVB-, CR-, and CB-IR neurons within the dentate gyrus/CA4 region exercise on CCK-IR terminals within the same region as well as in CA3-1. These results suggest that amygdalar modulation of specific neuronal subpopulations may induce lasting and far-reaching changes in the hippocampus during normal functioning, as well as in diseases involving a disruption of amygdalar activity. In particular, changes in specific interneuronal markers within selective hippocampal sectors detected in the present results are strikingly similar to those reported in this region in schizophrenia. These similarities suggest that, in this disease, a disruption of GABAergic transmission within the amygdala may play a significant role in

  20. Biosynthesis and metabolism of native and oxidized neuropeptide Y in the hippocampal mossy fiber system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, J B; Walker, M; Pierce, J; Camp, P; White, J D

    1998-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression is known to be modulated in the mossy fiber projection of hippocampal granule cells following seizure. We investigated NPY biosynthesis and metabolism in an attempt to characterize NPY biochemically as a neurotransmitter in the granule cell mossy fiber projection. NPY biosynthesis was compared in normal control animals and in animals that had experienced a single pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure. In situ hybridization analysis established the postseizure time course of preproNPY mRNA expression in the hippocampal formation, localizing the majority of increased preproNPY mRNA content to the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Radioimmunoassay analysis of the CA3/mossy fiber terminal subfield confirmed a subsequent increase in NPY peptide content. Biosynthesis of NPY peptide by granule cells and transport to the CA3/mossy fiber subfield was demonstrated by in vivo radiolabel infusion to the dentate gyrus/hilus followed by sequential HPLC purification of identified radiolabeled peptide from the CA3/mossy fiber terminal subfield. Additional in vivo radiolabeling studies revealed a postseizure increase in an unidentified NPY-like immunoreactive (NPY-LI) species. HPLC/radioimmunoassay analyses of CA3 subfield tissue extracts comparing normal control animals and pentylenetetrazole-treated animals confirmed the increased total NPY-LI, and demonstrated that the increased NPY-LI was comprised of a minor increase in native NPY and a major increase in the unknown NPY-LI. Data from subsequent and separate analyses incorporating immunoprecipitation with anti-C-terminal flanking peptide of NPY, further HPLC purification, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry support the conclusion that the unknown NPY-LI is methionine sulfoxide NPY. NPY and NPY-sulfoxide displayed differential calcium sensitivity for release from mossy fiber synaptosomes. Similar to NPY, NPY sulfoxide displayed high-affinity binding to each of the cloned

  1. Infusion of hypertonic saline before elective hysterectomy: effects on cytokines and stress hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsen-Petersen, J A; Bendtzen, K; Tonnesen, E

    2008-01-01

    Infusion of hypertonic saline provides early haemodynamic benefits and may affect the immune system. It is unknown if infusion of hypertonic saline affects plasma cytokines and stress hormones after surgery.......Infusion of hypertonic saline provides early haemodynamic benefits and may affect the immune system. It is unknown if infusion of hypertonic saline affects plasma cytokines and stress hormones after surgery....

  2. Hippocampal neurogenesis enhancers promote forgetting of remote fear memory after hippocampal reactivation by retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Rie; Fukushima, Hotaka; Frankland, Paul W; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Forgetting of recent fear memory is promoted by treatment with memantine (MEM), which increases hippocampal neurogenesis. The approaches for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using rodent models have focused on the extinction and reconsolidation of recent, but not remote, memories. Here we show that, following prolonged re-exposure to the conditioning context, enhancers of hippocampal neurogenesis, including MEM, promote forgetting of remote contextual fear memory. However, these interventions are ineffective following shorter re-exposures. Importantly, we find that long, but not short re-exposures activate gene expression in the hippocampus and induce hippocampus-dependent reconsolidation of remote contextual fear memory. Furthermore, remote memory retrieval becomes hippocampus-dependent after the long-time recall, suggesting that remote fear memory returns to a hippocampus dependent state after the long-time recall, thereby allowing enhanced forgetting by increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Forgetting of traumatic memory may contribute to the development of PTSD treatment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17464.001 PMID:27669409

  3. ROPIVACAINE CONTINUOUS WOUND INFUSION VERSUS CONTINUOUS EPIDURAL VERSUS SYSTEMIC ANALGESIA FOR POST CAESAREAN DELIVERY UNDER SPINAL ANAESTHESIA: A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioid based analgesic regimens have been the gold standard for post caesarean analgesia until recently. Regional techniques like local intra-wound infusion techniques are becoming popular now. Our aim is to evaluate the efficacy of 0.2% Ropivacaine continuous wound infusion versus continuous epidural versus conventional systemic analgesia for post caesarean delivery. METHODOLOGY: 60 healthy parturients of ASA I/II were randomized after elective caesarean section into 3 groups of 20 each. Group-A: Received 0.2% Ropivacaine via an epidural catheter placed into subcutaneous tissue and fascia before skin closure at the rate of 5ml/hr. through infusion pump. Group-B: Received 0.2% Ropivacaine continuous epidural infusion via an epidural catheter at the rate of 8ml/hr. An initial bolus of 10ml was given in groups A&B. Group-C: Received standard systemic analgesia with diclofenac sodium and rescue opioid. Post operatively parturients were assessed for VAS scores for pain at rest and during movement, total Ropivacaine consumption, Tramadol consumption and side effects. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the mean VAS scores at rest and at movement between groups A or B and C. The consumption of Tramadol was significantly greater in Group C (p value AC=0.025, BC=0.0000 than A or B. Mean Ropivacaine consumption is significantly higher in Group B (p=0.000 than Group A. CONCLUSION: Continuous local intra-wound analgesia with Ropivacaine produced comparable analgesia to that of continuous epidural and superior analgesia compared to standard systemic analgesia.

  4. Hippocampal atrophy on MRI is predictive of histopathological patterns and surgical prognosis in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Corso, Jeana Torres; Garcia, Maria Teresa Fernandes Castilho; Gaça, Larissa Botelho; Comper, Sandra Mara; Lancellotti, Carmen Lúcia Penteado; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2016-12-01

    To correlate hippocampal volumes obtained from brain structural imaging with histopathological patterns of hippocampal sclerosis (HS), in order to predict surgical outcome. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with HS were selected. Clinical data were assessed pre-operatively and surgical outcome in the first year post surgery. One block of mid hippocampal body was selected for HS classification according to ILAE criteria. NeuN-immunoreactive cell bodies were counted within hippocampal subfields, in four randomly visual fields, and cell densities were transformed into z-score values. FreeSurfer processing of 1.5T brain structural images was used for subcortical and cortical volumetric estimation of the ipsilateral hippocampus. Univariate analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation test were applied for statistical analyses. Sixty-two cases (31 female, 32 right HS) were included. ILAE type 1 HS was identified in 48 patients, type 2 in eight, type 3 in two, and four had no-HS. Better results regarding seizure control, i.e. ILAE 1, were achieved by patients with type 1 HS (58.3%). Patients with types 1 and 2 had smaller hippocampal volumes compared to those with no-HS (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Positive correlation was encountered between hippocampal volumes and CA1, CA3, CA4, and total estimated neuronal densities. CA2 was the only sector which did not correlate its neuronal density with hippocampal volume (p=0.390). This is the first study correlating hippocampal volume on MRI submitted to FreeSurfer processing with ILAE patterns of HS and neuronal loss within each hippocampal subfield, a fundamental finding to anticipate surgical prognosis for patients with drug-resistant MTLE and HS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of the perioperative infusion of dexmedetomidine on chronic pain after breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Jain

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This prospective double-blind trial was undertaken to analyze the role of perioperatively administered dexmedetomidine on the occurrence of chronic pain in cases undergoing surgery for breast cancer. Subjects and Methods: Eighty-six cases were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either dexmedetomidine (2 μg/ml in group D or saline in group C, in a loading dose of 0.5 ml/kg, intravenous (IV, 30 min prior to induction, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25 ml/kg/h IV till the completion of surgery, and then the dose tapered to 0.1 ml/kg/h for up to 24 h. The standardized questionnaires that measured chronic pain (Brief Pain Inventory, BPI; Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, SF-MPQ2 and quality of life (Quality of Life Scale, QOLS were gathered after 3 months of surgery as a primary outcome. Pain (verbal numerical score, VNS, sedation scores (Ramsay scoring, and analgesic requirements were also assessed for 72 h postoperatively. Results: In total, 84 cases (n=42 were analyzed for acute pain and 69 (34 in group D and 35 in group C for chronic pain. The consumption of isoflurane/fentanyl intra-operatively and paracetamol postoperatively was significantly lower in Group D. The sedation scores were non-significant between the groups. The VNS at rest and after movement was significantly lower in group D at corresponding times (except at 60 min throughout the assessment period. The BPI and SF-MPQ2 scores were significantly lower in group D in most of the factors. The QOLS score was significantly better in group D in all items except for relationships, friends, and learning. Conclusion: The perioperative infusion of dexmedetomidine has a pivotal role in attenuating the incidence and severity of chronic pain and improving the quality of life in cases undergoing breast cancer surgery.

  6. Complementary roles of hysteroscopy and saline infusion hysterosonography in uterine cavity assessment beforein vitro fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim A Abdelazim; Amro Abo Elezz

    2012-01-01

    Objective:This comparative study was designed to assess the role of saline infusion hysterosonography in refining the diagnosis of uterine cavity abnormalities diagnosed by hysteroscopy in infertile, asymptomatic women beforein vitro fertilization/intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) treatment.Methods:One hundred and twenty four asymptomatic infertile women were included in this study before IVF/ICSI treatment. Hysteroscopy was done as routine procedure for uterine cavity assessment before the first attempt of IVF/ICSI treatment. Patients agreed to have an ultrasound assessment of uterine cavity with the use of saline as the contrast medium (Saline infusion hysterosonography, SIHS) beside the hysteroscopic assessment. Both hysteroscopy & SIHS procedures were scheduled post menstrual period in the early-mid follicular phase of a cycle of the same menstrual cycle, 1-3 months before starting the IVF/ICSI treatment.Results:The uterine cavity abnormalities were detected in 40.3% of the patients included in this study before IVF/ICSI treatment (17.7% endometrial polyps, 10.5% sub-mucous fibroid, 4.8% uterine septum, 3.2% uterine adhesions, 2.4% endometrial hyperplasia and 1.6% thin or atrophic endometrium). In this study, the hysteroscopy was more sensitive (98.0% versus 96.2%), more specific (100.0% versus 98.7%) and more accurate (99.2% versus 97.6%) than SIHS, and the hysteroscopy also had higher predictive values (100% versus 98% positive predictive value; 98.7% versus 97.4% negative predictive value) than SIHS during uterine cavity assessment before IVF/ICSI treatment.Conclusions: Infertile asymptomatic women should be screened for possible uterine cavity abnormalities before IVF/ICSI; SIHS is a simple, well tolerated procedure that can be used as a complementary tool to confirm the diagnosis of uterine cavity abnormalities detected by hysteroscopy.

  7. Preoperative balloon occluded arterial infusion chemotherapy for locally invasive bladder cancer. Accurate staging for bladder preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Norio; Arima, Kiminobu; Kawamura, Juichi [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine; Tochigi, Hiromi

    1999-02-01

    The possibility of bladder preservation by preoperative balloon occluded arterial infusion (BOAI) chemotherapy was studied in 111 patients with locally invasive bladder cancer. BOAI was performed by blocking the blood flow of the internal iliac artery and by performing intra-arterial infusion of adriamycin (50 mg/body) and cisplatin (100 mg/body). Before BOAI the clinical diagnosis was T2 in 36, T3a in 29, T3b in 27, T4 in 11 and after BOAI it was T0 in 1, T1 in 27, T2 in 25, T3a in 20, T3b in 20, and T4 in 10. Down staging was observed on diagnostic images in 46.6%. Thirty patients (27.0%) received transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-Bt) and their bladder could be preserved. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 100% in pT0 (n=9), 97.5% in pT1 (n=47), 79.9% in pT2 (n=21), 80.0% in pT3a (n=6), 39.9% in pT3b (n=18) and 51.9% in pT4 cases (n=9). For the bladder preservation, accurate staging diagnosis is required. Since 1992, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in addition to imaging diagnosis for improving the accuracy of staging diagnosis. The accuracies of staging diagnosis with and without endorectal MRI were 62.5% and 44.0%, respectively. BOAI as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the possibility of bladder-preserving therapy in locally invasive bladder cancer. Also, the endorectal MRI can improve the accuracy of staging diagnosis, which is important for the bladder preservation. (author)

  8. Spatial relational memory requires hippocampal adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dupret

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few regions of the mammalian brain where new neurons are generated throughout adulthood. This adult neurogenesis has been proposed as a novel mechanism that mediates spatial memory. However, data showing a causal relationship between neurogenesis and spatial memory are controversial. Here, we developed an inducible transgenic strategy allowing specific ablation of adult-born hippocampal neurons. This resulted in an impairment of spatial relational memory, which supports a capacity for flexible, inferential memory expression. In contrast, less complex forms of spatial knowledge were unaltered. These findings demonstrate that adult-born neurons are necessary for complex forms of hippocampus-mediated learning.

  9. Staining protocol for organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; DePaola, Vincenzo; Caroni, Pico

    2006-01-01

    This protocol details a method to immunostain organotypic slice cultures from mouse hippocampus. The cultures are based on the interface method, which does not require special equipment, is easy to execute and yields slice cultures that can be imaged repeatedly, from the time of isolation at postnatal day 6-9 up to 6 months in vitro. The preserved tissue architecture facilitates the analysis of defined hippocampal synapses, cells and entire projections. Time-lapse imaging is based on transgenes expressed in the mice or on constructs introduced through transfection or viral vectors; it can reveal processes that develop over periods ranging from seconds to months. Subsequent to imaging, the slices can be processed for immunocytochemistry to collect further information about the imaged structures. This protocol can be completed in 3 d.

  10. Cocaine depresses GABAA current of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J H; Liu, P L; Wu, W H; McArdle, J J

    1997-10-01

    Although blockade of dopamine re-uptake and the resulting elevation of excitatory agonists is commonly thought the primary mechanism of cocaine-induced seizures, it is possible that other neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are involved. To examine this possibility, the effects of cocaine on the whole cell GABA current (IGABA) of freshly isolated rat hippocampal neurons were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. Preincubation or acute application of cocaine reversibly suppressed IGABA. The IC50 was 127 microM when cocaine was applied before the application of GABA. The concentration-response relations of cocaine in various GABA concentrations revealed that cocaine inhibited IGABA non-competitively. This effect of cocaine appeared to be independent of voltage. The present study suggests that the GABA receptor/channel complex is also a target for cocaine's action. The suppression of IGABA may contribute to cocaine-induced seizures.

  11. Planetary Science Technology Infusion Study: Findings and Recommendations Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Vento, Daniel M.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2014-01-01

    The Planetary Science Division (PSD) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters sought to understand how to better realize a scientific return on spacecraft system technology investments currently being funded. In order to achieve this objective, a team at NASA Glenn Research Center was tasked with surveying the science and mission communities to collect their insight on technology infusion and additionally sought inputs from industry, universities, and other organizations involved with proposing for future PSD missions. This survey was undertaken by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) activity that requested input from the proposing community on present technology infusion efforts. The Technology Infusion Study was initiated in March 2013 with the release of the RFI request. The evaluation team compiled and assessed this input in order to provide PSD with recommendations on how to effectively infuse new spacecraft systems technologies that it develops into future competed missions enabling increased scientific discoveries, lower mission cost, or both. This team is comprised of personnel from the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program and the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program staff.The RFI survey covered two aspects of technology infusion: 1) General Insight, including: their assessment of barriers to technology infusion as related to infusion approach; technology readiness; information and documentation products; communication; integration considerations; interaction with technology development areas; cost-capped mission areas; risk considerations; system level impacts and implementation; and mission pull. 2) Specific technologies from the most recent PSD Announcements of Opportunities (AOs): The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), aerocapture and aeroshell hardware technologies, the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, and the

  12. Glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlatter, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Following subcutaneous injection of rats with 5 mg corticosterone, hippocampal slices in vitro show increased ({sup 35}S)-methionine labeling of a cytosolic protein with an apparent molecular weight (M{sub r}) of 35,000 and an isoelectric point (IEP) of 6.6. This labeling is temporally consistent with a transcriptional event, and is steroid- and tissue-specific. The pear serum concentration of steroid occurs one hour or less following the injection. Maximal labeling of this protein is reached whenever serum corticosterone values are approximately 100 ng/ml. When endogenous corticosterone levels are elevated to 100 ng/ml through stressors or exogenous ACTH injections the same maximal increase in synthesis of the 35,000 M{sub r} protein is observed. Adrenalectomy prevents the observed response from occurring following stressor application or ACTH injections. Comparison of the increases observed after administration of the type 2 receptor agonist RU 28362 and aldosterone, which has a higher affinity for the type 1 receptor, shows a 50-fold greater sensitivity of the response to the type 2 receptor agonist. Synthesis of this protein following serum increases of steroid possibly correlates to the theorized function of the type 2 receptor feedback regulation. The similar protein in the liver has an IEP of 6.8 and a slightly higher M{sub r}. A second hippocampal protein with an M{sub r} of 46,000 and an IEP of 6.2 is also increased in labeling. Two additional liver proteins, one of Mr 53,000 (IEP of 6.2) and the other with an M{sub r} of 45,000 (IEP of 8.7-7.8) are increased in the liver following glucocorticoid administration.

  13. Hippocampal sharp waves: their origin and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzsáki, G

    1986-11-29

    This study investigated the spatial distribution and cellular-synaptic generation of hippocampal sharp waves (SPW) in the dorsal hippocampus of the awake rat. Depth analyses of SPWs were performed by stepping the recording electrode in 82.5 microns increments. SPWs were present during slow wave sleep, awake immobility, drinking, grooming and eating (0.01-2/s). The largest negative SPWs were recorded from the middle part of the stratum radiatum of CA1, the stratum lucidum of CA3, the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and from layer I of the subiculum, in that order. The polarity of the SPWs was positive in layers II-IV of the subiculum, in stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale of CA1 and CA3, and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. The electrical gradients across the null zones of the field SPWs were as large as 8-14 mV/mm. SPWs were associated with population bursts of pyramidal cells and increased discharges of interneurons and granule cells. During the SPW the excitability of granule cells and pyramidal cells to afferent volleys increased considerably. Picrotoxin and atropine and aspiration lesion of the fimbria-fornix increased either the amplitude or the frequency of SPWs. Diazepam and Nembutal could completely abolish SPWs. It is suggested that: hippocampal SPWs are triggered by a population burst of CA3 pyramidal cells as a result of temporary disinhibition from afferent control; and field SPWs represent summed extracellular PSPs of CA1 and subicular pyramidal cells, and dentate granular cells induced by the Schaffer collaterals and the associational fibers of hilar cells, respectively. The relevance of the physiological SPWs to epileptic interictal spikes and long-term potentiation is discussed.

  14. Intra-abdominal pressure: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Rafaela; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing request for measuring intra-abdominal pressure in critically ill patients with acute abdominal pain to be clarified. Summarizing the research results on measurement of vesical intra-abdominal pressure and analyzing the level of evidence were the purposes of this integrative literature review, carried out based on the databases LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed, from 2005 to July 2012. Twenty articles were identified, in that, 12 literature reviews, 4 descriptive and exploratory studies, 2 expert opinions, one prospective cohort study and one was an experience report. The vesical intra-abdominal pressure measurement was considered gold standard. There are variations in the technique however, but some common points were identified: complete supine position, in absence of abdominal contracture, in the end of expiration and expressed in mmHg. Most research results indicate keeping the transducer zeroed at the level of the mid-axillary line at the iliac crest level, and instill 25mL of sterile saline. Strong evidence must be developed. RESUMO Em pacientes críticos com quadros abdominais agudos a esclarecer é crescente a solicitação da aferição da pressão intra-abdominal. Sintetizar resultados de pesquisas sobre a mensuração da pressão intra-abdominal pela via vesical e analisar o nível de evidência foram os objetivos desta revisão integrativa da literatura, realizada nas bases LILACS, MEDLINE e PubMed, no período de 2005 a julho de 2012. Identificaram-se 20 artigos, sendo 12 revisões de literatura, 4 estudos exploratório-descritivos, 2 opiniões de especialistas, 1 estudo de coorte prospectivo e 1 relato de experiência. O método vesical para mensuração da pressão intra-abdominal foi considerado padrão-ouro. Existem variações na técnica, entretanto pontos em comum foram identificados: posição supina completa, na ausência de contratura abdominal, ao final da expiração e expressa em mmHg. A maioria indica posicionar o ponto zero do

  15. Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach - Third edition Alexander Mary Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach - Third edition 625pp Elsevier 9781416064107 1416064109 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    This book considers all aspects of infusion therapy and provides a solid evidence base. Its 30 chapters are well organised into six sections covering physiological considerations, infusion therapies and nursing practice.

  16. Metabolomics reveals increased isoleukotoxin diol (12,13-DHOME) in human plasma after acute Intralipid infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Lindsay M.; Lawler, Nathan G.; Nikolic, Sonja B.; Peters, James M.; Horne, James; Wilson, Richard,; Davies, Noel W.; Sharman, James E

    2012-01-01

    Intralipid is a fat emulsion that is regularly infused into humans and animals. Despite its routine use, Intralipid infusion can cause serious adverse reactions, including immunosuppression. Intralipid is a complex mix of proteins, lipids, and other small molecules, and the effect of its infusion on the human plasma metabolome is unknown. We hypothesized that untargeted metabolomics of human plasma after an Intralipid infusion would reveal novel insights into its effects. We infused Intralipi...

  17. Continuous Selective Intra-Arterial Application of Nimodipine in Refractory Cerebral Vasospasm due to Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral vasospasm is one of the leading courses for disability in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Effective treatment of vasospasm is therefore one of the main priorities for these patients. We report about a case series of continuous intra-arterial infusion of the calcium channel antagonist nimodipine for 1–5 days on the intensive care unit. Methods. In thirty patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and refractory vasospasm continuous infusion of nimodipine was started on the neurosurgical intensive care unit. The effect of nimodipine on brain perfusion, cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygenation, and blood flow velocity in cerebral arteries was monitored. Results. Based on Hunt & Hess grades on admission, 83% survived in a good clinical condition and 23% recovered without an apparent neurological deficit. Persistent ischemic areas were seen in 100% of patients with GOS 1–3 and in 69% of GOS 4-5 patients. Regional cerebral blood flow and computed tomography perfusion scanning showed adequate correlation with nimodipine application and angiographic vasospasm. Transcranial Doppler turned out to be unreliable with interexaminer variance and failure of detecting vasospasm or missing the improvement. Conclusion. Local continuous intra-arterial nimodipine treatment for refractory cerebral vasospasm after aSAH can be recommended as a low-risk treatment in addition to established endovascular therapies.

  18. Acute changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local clearance of /sup 125/I from the periodontal ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwall, B.; Berg, J.O.; Gazelius, B.; Edwall L.; Aars, H.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local /sup 125/I clearance from the periodontal ligament (PDL) were monitored simultaneously in cats. Axial tooth movements, reflecting periodontal ligament volume changes, were measured with an ultrasonic transit time technique. Local blood flow changes in the PDL were studied indirectly by measuring the local clearance of /sup 125/I. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk caused an intrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant reduction of the /sup 125/I-clearance. Infusion of noradrenaline induced a similar respone. Stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve during systemic treatment with phentolamine caused an extrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant increase in the clearance of the tracer from the PDL. Intra-arterial infusion of the vasodilator substance P mimicked that response. Fization of the tooth to the jaw bone, thus preventing an intrusive movement, did not change the reductions in clearance seen on sympathetic stimulation, indicating that this blood flow reduction was not dependent on tooth movement. A qualitative relation between PDL blood flow (as measured by local /sup 125/I clearance) and PDL volume (as measured by tooth position) in shown. The two variables measured are suggested to reflect two aspects of blood flow in the PDL. 22 refs.

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD (PB) CHANGES AND IN HIPPOCAMPAL FUNCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood lead (Pb) exposure has long been associated with reduced IQ, impaired cognitive function, and more recently increases in violence and aggression. We have studied the disruptive effects of developmental Pb exposure on an electrophysiological model of memory, hippocampal...

  20. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: promiscuous drug, wanton effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geil, Chelsea R; Hayes, Dayna M; McClain, Justin A; Liput, Daniel J; Marshall, S Alex; Chen, Kevin Y; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-10-03

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche.

  1. Segmentation of the mouse hippocampal formation in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kay; Watson, Charles; Buckley, Rachel F; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Yang, Zhengyi; Keller, Marianne D; Beare, Richard; Bartlett, Perry F; Egan, Gary F; Galloway, Graham J; Paxinos, George; Petrou, Steven; Reutens, David C

    2011-10-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in cognition, spatial navigation, learning, and memory. High resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging makes it possible to study in vivo changes in the hippocampus over time and is useful for comparing hippocampal volume and structure in wild type and mutant mice. Such comparisons demand a reliable way to segment the hippocampal formation. We have developed a method for the systematic segmentation of the hippocampal formation using the perfusion-fixed C57BL/6 mouse brain for application in longitudinal and comparative studies. Our aim was to develop a guide for segmenting over 40 structures in an adult mouse brain using 30 μm isotropic resolution images acquired with a 16.4 T MR imaging system and combined using super-resolution reconstruction.

  2. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiford, Cassidy M.; Manning, Emily N.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Cash, David M.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sudre, Carole H.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T.; Fox, Nick C.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial

  3. Rhinal-hippocampal EEG coherence is reduced during human sleep.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fell, J.; Staedtgen, M.; Burr, W.; Kockelmann, E.; Helmstaedter, C.; Schaller, C.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2003-01-01

    The deficiency of declarative memory compared with waking state is an often overlooked characteristic of sleep. Here, we investigated whether rhinal-hippocampal coherence, an electrophysiological correlate of declarative memory formation, is significantly altered during sleep as compared with waking

  4. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: Promiscuous drug, wanton effects

    OpenAIRE

    Geil, Chelsea R.; Hayes, Dayna M.; McClain, Justin A.; Liput, Daniel J.; Marshall, S. Alex; Chen, Kevin Y.; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may...

  5. Hippocampal Theta Dysfunction after Lateral Fluid Percussion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Chronic memory deficits are a major cause of morbidity following traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the rat, the hippocampal theta rhythm is a well-studied correlate of memory function. This study sought to investigate disturbances in hippocampal theta rhythm following lateral fluid percussion injury in the rat. A total of 13 control rats and 12 TBI rats were used. Electrodes were implanted in bilateral hippocampi and an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while the rats explored a new envi...

  6. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis of mammals: evolution and life history

    OpenAIRE

    Amrein, I.; Lipp, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial production of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is restricted to the olfactory system and the hippocampal formation. Its physiological and behavioural role is still debated. By comparing adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) across many mammalian species, one might recognize a common function. AHN is most prominent in rodents, but shows considerable variability across species, being lowest or missing in primates and bats. The latter finding argues against a critical role of ...

  7. Intra-articular angiolipoma of the knee: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimori Makoto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of intra-articular angiolipoma of the knee. This case report describes our experience in excising an intra-articular angiolipoma of the knee joint. Complete resection under arthroscopy was performed in a 30-year-old man. Two years after the surgery, no evidence of recurrence was seen. Intra-articular angiolipomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intra-articular masses in adolescents with recurrent hemarthrosis without trauma.

  8. Intra-firm Horizontal Knowledge Transfer Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yaowu; WANG Yanhang

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge transfer is widely emphasized as a strategic issue for firm competition. A model for intra-firm horizontal knowledge transfer is proposed to model horizontal knowledge transfer to solve some demerits in current knowledge transfer researches. The concept model of intra-firm horizontal knowledge transfer was described and a framework was provided to define the main components of thetransfer process. Horizontal knowledge transfer is that knowledge is transferred from the source to the same hierarchical level recipients as the target. Horizontal knowledge transfer constitutes a strategic area of knowledge management research. However, little is known about the circumstances under which one particular mechanism is the most appropriate. To address these issues, some significant conclusions are drawn concerning knowledge transfer mechanisms in a real-world setting.

  9. Correlation between intra- and extracranial background EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Scalp EEG is the most widely used modality to record the electrical signals of the brain. It is well known that the volume conduction of these brain waves through the brain, cerebrospinal fluid, skull and scalp reduces the spatial resolution and the signal amplitude. So far the volume conduction...... has primarily been investigated by realistic head models or interictal spike analysis. We have set up a novel and more realistic experiment that made it possible to compare the information in the intra- and extracranial EEG. We found that intracranial EEG channels contained correlated patterns when...... placed less than 30 mm apart, that intra- and extracranial channels were partly correlated when placed less than 40 mm apart, and that extracranial channels probably were correlated over larger distances. The underlying cortical area that influences the extracranial EEG is found to be up to 45 cm2...

  10. Target-controlled infusion (Propofol versus inhaled anaesthetic (Sevoflurane in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thrivikrama Padur Tantry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the challenges of anaesthesia for shoulder arthroscopic procedures is the need for controlled hypotension to lessen intra-articular haemorrhage and thereby provide adequate visualisation to the surgeon. Achievement of optimal conditions necessitates several interventions and manipulations by the anaesthesiologist and the surgeon, most of which directly or indirectly involve maintaining intra-operative blood pressure (BP control. Aim: This study aimed to compare the efficacy and convenience of target controlled infusion (TCI of propofol and inhalational agent sevoflurane in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopic surgery after preliminary inter-scalene blockade. Methods: Of thirty four patients studied, seventeen received TCI propofol (target plasma concentration of 3 μg/ml and an equal number, sevoflurane (1.2-1.5 Minimum Alveolar Concentration. N 2 O was used in both groups. Systolic, diastolic, mean blood pressures and heart rate were recorded regularly throughout the procedure. All interventions to control BP by the anaesthesiologist and pump manipulation requested by the surgeon were recorded. The volume of saline irrigant used and the haemoglobin (Hb content of the return fluid were measured. Results: TCI propofol could achieve lower systolic, mean BP levels and the number of interventions required was also lower as compared to the sevoflurane group. The number of patients with measurable Hb was lower in the TCI propofol group and this translated into better visualisation of the joint space. A higher volume of saline irrigant was required in the sevoflurane group. No immediate peri-operative anaesthetic complications were noted in either category. Conclusion: TCI propofol appears to be superior to and more convenient than sevoflurane anaesthesia in inter-scalene blocked patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy.

  11. Effects of magnesium infusion on renal calcium excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafik, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of acute I.V. infusion of Mg on Ca excretion was investigated. Mg infusion resulted in a significantly increased urinary Ca excretion compared to the control group. The hypercalciuric effect of Mg was not accompanied by diuresis or natriuresis but was associated with significantly increased urinary Ca concentration suggesting a specific effect of Mg on urinary Ca excretion. The effect of 4mM MgCl/sub 2/ infusion on plasma Ca concentrations was also investigated. A comparable calciuric effect was again observed in the Mg infused group and was found to be associated with a significantly reduced whole kidney filtered load and absolute and fractional reabsorption of Ca. Intratubular microinjection experiments were performed to investigate the direct effects of raising Mg concentration on the unidirectional reabsorptive flux of (/sup 45/Ca). The unidirectional reabsorption of Ca injected into PCT was measured during four experimental conditions; with an d without Mg in the injectate solution during either saline or Mg infusion. Raising the intraluminal Mg significantly decreased unidirectional reabsorption of (/sup 45/Ca).

  12. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  13. Continuous infusion of factor VIII for surgery and major bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, C R; Doughty, H I; Savidge, G F

    1996-03-01

    In a clinical trial, 24 patients with haemophilia A who needed surgery or had suffered severe bleeding were treated by continuous infusion of Monoclate P, a factor VIII concentrate that is immunopurified by monoclonal antibodies. Continuous infusion of Monoclate P began with a dose of 2 U/kg per h that was adjusted according to the results of factor VIII assays to achieve a factor VIII target level of 100 IU/dl for 2 days and then 80 IU/dl for 5 days. The safety, efficacy, and economics of this approach were assessed. No haemorrhagic episodes were observed. The continuous infusion was convenient and had the advantage of producing steady-state levels of factor VIII. With a single-compartment model, we found median factor VIII clearance values of 3.11 (range 1.79-7.78) x 10(3) litres/kg per h, elimination rates of 5.0-19.4 x 10(-2)/h and a median half-life of 9.9 h (range 4.8-20.0 h). Clearance and the elimination rate appeared to decline over the infusion period, as judged by the decreasing infusion rate required to maintain the target concentration of factor VIII. An economic comparison with bolus therapy, using theoretically derived bolus dosages, indicated that the potential saving was related inversely to the factor VIII half-life. Potential savings of 75% were predicted on the first postoperative day, averaging 35% over the full course of therapy.

  14. Intra-articular chondroma of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talwalkar, S.C.; Kambhampati, S.B.S.; Lang Stevenson, A.I. [Oldchurch Hospital, Romford, Essex (United Kingdom); Whitehouse, R. [Manchester University, Department of Radiology, Manchester (United Kingdom); Freemont, A. [University of Manchester, Department of Osteoarticular Pathology, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Chondromas are tumours that develop in relation to the periosteum and, although they are common around the knee, most reports deal with soft tissue chondromas in para-articular locations or intracortical tumours in extra-articular regions. We report a rare case of an intra-articular chondroma in a 16-year-old boy of Asian origin developing in the region of the medial femoral condyle of the femur and extending into the femoral sulcus and the patellofemoral joint. (orig.)

  15. Intra-abdominal gout mimicking pelvic abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh, Lee-Ren; Pan, Huay-Ban; Yang, Chien-Fang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2005-04-01

    Gout is the most common crystal-induced arthritis. Gouty tophi typically deposit in the extremities, especially toes and fingers. We present an unusual case of intrapelvic tophaceous gout in a patient suffering from chronic gouty arthritis. CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvic cavity disclosed calcified gouty tophi around both hips, and a cystic lesion with peripheral enhancement in the pelvic cavity along the course of the iliopsoas muscle. The intra-abdominal tophus mimicked pelvic abscess. (orig.)

  16. Autophagy in intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jing Li; Hezel, Aram F.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) is a primary cancer of the liver that shares histological features with the hepatic bile ducts from which it is thought to arise. The incidence of this disease is increasing, possibly related to increased inflammatory liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis (commonly called “fatty liver”), induced by obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic derangements. Its prognosis is generally poor with early metastasis and presently there are limit...

  17. Financial Satisfaction from Intra-Household Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Namkee Ahn; Victoria Ateca; Arantza Ugidos

    2007-01-01

    We address individuals’ financial satisfaction from the intra-household perspective. Our purpose is twofold. First, we want to contrast the hypothesis of relative income within the household. Does the income level of one individual relative to that of other members of the same household matter in his/her income satisfaction? Second, we want to test procedural utility hypothesis in that different sources of income may contribute differentially to individuals’ income satisfaction. In particular...

  18. Double dissociation of amygdala and hippocampal contributions to trace and delay fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybuck, Jonathan D; Lattal, K Matthew

    2011-01-19

    A key finding in studies of the neurobiology of learning memory is that the amygdala is critically involved in Pavlovian fear conditioning. This is well established in delay-cued and contextual fear conditioning; however, surprisingly little is known of the role of the amygdala in trace conditioning. Trace fear conditioning, in which the CS and US are separated in time by a trace interval, requires the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. It is possible that recruitment of cortical structures by trace conditioning alters the role of the amygdala compared to delay fear conditioning, where the CS and US overlap. To investigate this, we inactivated the amygdala of male C57BL/6 mice with GABA (A) agonist muscimol prior to 2-pairing trace or delay fear conditioning. Amygdala inactivation produced deficits in contextual and delay conditioning, but had no effect on trace conditioning. As controls, we demonstrate that dorsal hippocampal inactivation produced deficits in trace and contextual, but not delay fear conditioning. Further, pre- and post-training amygdala inactivation disrupted the contextual but the not cued component of trace conditioning, as did muscimol infusion prior to 1- or 4-pairing trace conditioning. These findings demonstrate that insertion of a temporal gap between the CS and US can generate amygdala-independent fear conditioning. We discuss the implications of this surprising finding for current models of the neural circuitry involved in fear conditioning.

  19. Effects of intra-amygdala R(+) 7-OH-DPAT on intra-accumbens d-amphetamine-associated learning. I. Pavlovian conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcott, P K; Phillips, G D

    1998-12-01

    We have previously obtained evidence that the mesoamygdaloid dopamine projection modulates the acquisition of a conditioned response (CR) elicited by presentation of a conditioned stimulus (CS) predicting the availability of a natural (sucrose) reward. This property was found to be dependent upon D3, but not D1 or D2, dopamine receptor activation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the mesoamygdaloid dopamine projection is similarly involved in the acquisition of a drug-associated CR. Thus, two groups of rats with guide cannulae aimed at the nucleus accumbens and amygdala were trained using a Pavlovian conditioning procedure in which an initially neutral CS was paired with a computer-controlled, bilateral intraaccumbens infusion of d-amphetamine (the unconditioned stimulus: US). Conditioning sessions were conducted in standard operant chambers, with each session consisting of a single CS-US trial. For one group of rats, CS presentation was positively correlated with the drug US (Paired group), while for the second group CS and US presentations were negatively correlated (Unpaired group). During training, locomotor activity was recorded and was utilised as the measure both of the unconditioned (UR) and conditioned response (CR). A within-subjects design was utilised to investigate the effect of post-session bilateral intraamygdala administration of R(+) 7-OH-DPAT on the development of the drug-associated CR. Hence, both Paired and Unpaired groups were exposed to two different CSs which were presented on alternate sessions. Post-session bilateral intra-amygdala administration of R(+) 7-OH-DPAT (10 nmol) followed sessions in which one CS was presented, while intra-amygdala vehicle followed sessions in which the alternate CS was presented. The development of a CR occurred only in the presence of a CS that had been positively correlated with presentation of the drug US. Post-session, intra-amygdala administration of R(+) 7-OH-DPAT enhanced the

  20. Unwanted intra-operative penile erection during pediatric hypospadiasis repair. Comparison of propofol and halothane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Ben Razavi, Seyed Soheil; Hajiesmaeili, Mohammad Reza; Behdad, Shekoufeh; Ghiamat, Mohammad Mehdi; Eghbali, Ahmad

    2013-09-26

    To compare the erectile effect of propofol and halothane on unwanted intraoperative penile erection (UIOPE) during pediatric hypospadiasis repair. One hundred and seventeen boys who were in the age range of 6 months to 6 years and referred for hypospadiasis repair to our referral teaching hospital were included in this randomized clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups before anesthesia induction. Anesthesia was maintained with a continuous intravenous infusion of propofol and inhalational halothane in the propofol (P) and halothane (H) groups, respectively. Data regarding the patients’ age, weight, pre- and intra-operative chordee, UIOPE, anesthesia time, surgery time, hematoma formation, and wound infection were collected. The Chi-Square and Fisher’s exact tests were used for comparison. No statistically significant differences were noted regarding age, weight, and pre and intra-operative chordee between the two groups. The incidence of UIOPE (10.34% versus 57.63%; P = .000), anesthesia time (174.15 +/- 15.02 versus 181.26 +/- 15.19; P =.012), and surgery time (162.34 +/- 12.99 versus 167.69 +/- 13.90 +/- 13.90; P = .034) were significantly lower in group P compared with group H. The use of propofol during hypospadiasis surgical repair is more safe and effective than halothane in preventing UIOPE and reducing surgery and anesthesia time.

  1. Intra-abdominal Hypertension: An Important Consideration for Diuretic Resistance in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh Q; Gadiraju, Taraka V; Patel, Hiren; Park, Minnsun; Le Jemtel, Thierry H; Jaiswal, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Fluid accumulation is the hallmark of heart failure decompensation. Fluid overload and congestion are associated with recurrent hospitalizations, poor quality of life, and increased mortality in heart failure. Despite the use of high-dose intravenous loop diuretic therapy, acutely decompensated heart failure patients may develop diuretic resistance. Diuretic refractoriness can be a result of elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in acutely decompensated heart failure. Increased renal venous and interstitial pressures in patients with elevated IAP may lead to renal impairment and diuretic resistance. Routine approaches such as sequential nephron blockade with a combination of loop and thiazide or thiazide-like diuretics, continuous diuretic infusion, and ultrafiltration may not be sufficient. Presented here is a case illustrating the importance of recognizing intra-abdominal hypertension in patients with diuretic resistance. Lowering IAP improves renal perfusion, renal filtration, and diuresis. When elevated, IAP is an easily reversible cause of diuretic resistance. Additionally, abdominal perfusion pressure can be used to guide therapy to reverse end-organ damage and avoid permanent renal replacement therapy.

  2. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery. PMID:27405824

  3. Belmont Hyperthermia Pump in the conduct of intra-operative heated chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, W

    2009-03-01

    Intra-operative heated chemotherapy (IOHC) has been performed in the Thoracic surgical department of Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH, Boston, MA, USA) for over a decade. A "home-grown" system was developed for this purpose with limited improvements made to it through the years. This technology is used for neo-adjuvant therapy in the conduct of extra-pleural pneumonectomy and pleurectomy for treatment of mesothelioma. Improvements to the traditional BWH system were sought due to the hazardous nature of the chemotherapy solution and the relative complexity of the IOHC circuit. Belmont Instrument (Belmont Instrument Corporation, Billerica, MA, USA) applied their proprietary infusion/warming technology to develop the Belmont Hyperthermia Pump. The Hyperthermia Pump was designed to recirculate large volumes of fluid while maintaining perfusate temperatures up to 46oC at a flow rate of up to 750 ml/min. Approval from the FDA for clinical use of this device was granted June 2007. Parameters were defined and investigated to determine if the Hyperthermia Pump would meet or exceed the performance characteristics of the traditional BWH system. Our investigation resulted in the replacement of the traditional BWH circuit. The Belmont Hyperthermia Pump is a compact, easy to use, extremely safe means to deliver intra-operative hyperthermic chemotherapy in the conduct of surgical treatment of mesothelioma.

  4. Effect of intra-abdominal hypertension on left ventricular relaxation: a preliminary animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Y; Lorne, E; Maizel, J; Plantefève, G; Massy, Z A; Dupont, H; Slama, M

    2012-02-01

    In the intensive care unit, intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is a frequently encountered, life-threatening condition. The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the effect of IAH on left ventricular (LV) relaxation (i.e. the active phase of diastole). Seven male rabbits were anaesthetized before mechanical ventilation. A 20 mm Hg increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was then induced by intraperitoneal infusion of 1.5% glycine solution. Haemodynamic parameters were recorded and the relaxation time constant tau (considered to be the best index of left ventricle relaxation) was calculated. All haemodynamic measurements were recorded at baseline and then after induction of IAH. A 20 mm Hg increase in IAP was not followed by a significant change in arterial pressure, but was associated with increases in central venous pressure (from 2 [-2 to 6] to 7 [-2 to 12] mm Hg, P= 0.03), LV end-diastolic pressure (from 7 [6-8] to 15 [11-19] mm Hg, P= 0.04) and the relaxation time constant tau (from 16 [14-18] to 43 [34-52] ms, P= 0.048). In this animal study, a 20 mm Hg increase in IAP impaired LV relaxation. Further studies are necessary to identify the causes of this impairment.

  5. Behavioural and neurotoxic effects of ayahuasca infusion (Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis) in female Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pic-Taylor, Aline; da Motta, Luciana Gueiros; de Morais, Juliana Alves; Junior, Willian Melo; Santos, Alana de Fátima Andrade; Campos, Leandro Ambrósio; Mortari, Marcia Renata; von Zuben, Marcus Vinicius; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2015-09-01

    Ayahuasca, a psychoactive beverage used by indigenous and religious groups, is generally prepared by the coction of Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caapi plants containing N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and β-carboline alkaloids, respectively. To investigate the acute toxicity of ayahuasca, the infusion was administered by gavage to female Wistar rats at doses of 30X and 50X the dose taken during a religious ritual, and the animals observed for 14 days. Behavioural functions were investigated one hour after dosing at 15X and 30X using the open field, elevated plus maze, and forced swimming tests. Neuronal activation (c-fos marked neurons) and toxicity (Fluoro-Jade B and Nissl/Cresyl staining) were investigated in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN), amygdaloid nucleus, and hippocampal formation brain areas of rats treated with a 30X ayahuasca dose. The actual lethal oral dose in female Wistar rats could not be determined in this study, but was shown to be higher than the 50X (which corresponds to 15.1mg/kg bw DMT). The ayahuasca and fluoxetine treated groups showed a significant decrease in locomotion in the open field and elevated plus-maze tests compared to controls. In the forced swimming test, ayahuasca treated animals swam more than controls, a behaviour that was not significant in the fluoxetine group. Treated animals showed higher neuronal activation in all brain areas involved in serotoninergic neurotransmission. Although this led to some brain injury, no permanent damage was detected. These results suggest that ayahuasca has antidepressant properties in Wistar female at high doses, an effect that should be further investigated.

  6. Intracranial hemodynamics during intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, H.K.; Holm, S.; Friberg, L.;

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-induced headache are not fully elucidated. In this study we administered GTN 0.5 microg/kg/min i.v. for 20 min in six healthy volunteers. Before, during and 60 min after the infusion, we investigated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral blood...... volume (CBV), both estimated with SPECT, and blood flow velocity (BFV) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), measured with transcranial Doppler. Headache was scored on a numerical verbal rating (0-10) scale. rCBF was unchanged, CBV was slightly increased (13%) during GTN infusion, whereas BFV decreased...... both during (20%) and 60 min (15%) after GTN. Headache was short-lived and maximal during infusion. This discrepancy of time-effect curves for the effect of GTN on headache and dilatation of MCA indicates that MCA is most likely not the primary source of pain in GTN-induced headache. The time...

  7. [Modeling 5-FU clearance during a chronomodulated infusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, F; Chevalier, V; Chevrier, R; Richard, D; Cure, H; Chollet, P

    2003-06-01

    Drugs pharmacokinetic control is a usual practice in case of flat continuous infusions. It enables among others, to modulate delivered doses when drug concentrations in blood appear too high. With chronotherapy, this possibility becomes more difficult because of sinusoidal outflows of infusion. We propose here a method that enables this follow-up, established through the study of 21 metastatic colorectal cancer patients, treated with a chronomodulated infusion of high dose 5-fluoro-uracil (5-FU) and folinic acid. This pharmacokinetic follow-up permitted the modelisation of 5-FU clearance and the calculation of an index, which was, in our study, correlated to the treatment response and also to main encountered toxicities.

  8. Radioprotection of the digestive tract by intravenous infusion of vasopressin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juillard, G.J.F.; Peter, H.H.; Weisenburger, T.H.; Tesler, A.S.; Langdon, E.A.; Barenfus, M.; Lagasse, L.D.; Watring, W.E.; Smith, M.L.

    1975-09-01

    The effect of venous infusions of vasopressin during fractionated abdominal radiation exposures was evaluated in four pairs of dogs. In each pair, the control dog was given venous infusion of saline during irradiation. The results were analyzed from clinical observation, autopsy findings, and pathological examination. It appears that venous infusion of vasopressin has a definite and reproducible effect of radioprotection on the gastrointestinal tract, the dose modifying factor (DMF) being 1.5. Radiation therapy of the gynecologic malignancies would be one major application since the radiosensitivity of the intestinal tract is often a limiting factor in delivering high doses to the tumor, and further investigations are being done to study the effects of vasopressin on the radiosensitivity of malignant tumors.

  9. Determination of selected microelements in polish herbs and their infusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalny, Piotr [Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Drugs Analysis, Banacha 1, 02-091 Warsaw (Poland); Fijalek, Zbigniew [Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Drugs Analysis, Banacha 1, 02-091 Warsaw (Poland); National Medicines Institute, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Chelmska 30/34, 00-725 Warsaw (Poland); Daszczuk, Anna [Medical University of Warsaw, Department of Drugs Analysis, Banacha 1, 02-091 Warsaw (Poland); Ostapczuk, Peter [Research Center of Juelich, Department of Safety and Radiation Protection, Leo-Brand Str. 1, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: p.ostapczuk@fz-juelich.de

    2007-08-01

    Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in birch leaves (Folium Betulae), dandelion roots (Radix Taraxacae), hawthorn blossom (Inflorescentia Crataegi) and their infusions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave digestion of plant samples. Infusions were made from herbs according to prescription for patients, provided by the producer of medicine on the package. The results obtained were compared with daily requirements for each element. Results show high content of cadmium in the medicinal plants analyzed. The highest level in infusions was observed for Ni and Zn (over 90% of the total element concentration for Ni and in most cases over 50% for Zn), and the lowest for Cd and Pb. The calculated daily intake of majority of the analyzed elements was very low (under 1% of daily requirements)

  10. Determination of selected microelements in polish herbs and their infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalny, Piotr; Fijałek, Zbigniew; Daszczuk, Anna; Ostapczuk, Peter

    2007-08-01

    Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in birch leaves (Folium Betulae), dandelion roots (Radix Taraxacae), hawthorn blossom (Inflorescentia Crataegi) and their infusions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave digestion of plant samples. Infusions were made from herbs according to prescription for patients, provided by the producer of medicine on the package. The results obtained were compared with daily requirements for each element. Results show high content of cadmium in the medicinal plants analyzed. The highest level in infusions was observed for Ni and Zn (over 90% of the total element concentration for Ni and in most cases over 50% for Zn), and the lowest for Cd and Pb. The calculated daily intake of majority of the analyzed elements was very low (under 1% of daily requirements).

  11. Intraperitoneal insulin infusion: on the way to the artificial pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Aleksandrovich Karpel'ev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Creating an "artificial pancreas" (a "closed loop" insulin pump, with self-adjusting insulin abilities, based on real time continuous glucose monitoring data – is one of the most actual medical challenges of modern engineering and cybernetics.Artificial pancreas (AP prototypes based on wearable insulin pump with subcutaneous insulin delivery are still problematic, mainly because of slow insulin pharmacokinetics. Intravenous insulin infusion via AP allows effectively maintain euglycaemia for inpatients, due to insulin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics advantages. Unfortunately, it can’t be used for outpatients. Intraperitoneal insulin infusion is still relatively infrequently used in the world, but it is a promising alternative, compared to both previous methods due to a physiological action profile, fast insulin pharmacokinetics, relatively better safety and availability for outpatient usage.The purpose of this review is to describe the intraperitoneal insulin infusion features for diabetes patients at a point of AP creation perspectives. 

  12. Inhibition of histamine release by local and intracerebroventricular infusion of galanin in hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of awake rat: A microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Shimako; Ijiri, Soichiro; Kehr, Jan; Yoshitake, Takashi

    2013-02-08

    The neuropeptide galanin is co-localized with histamine in subpopulations of neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus suggesting its involvement in modulating histaminergic neurotransmission. The purpose of the present study was to investigate, by use of microdialysis, the effects of local intraparenchymal (combined infusion and microdialysis probe), and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions of galanin on extracellular levels of histamine in its major projecting areas, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus ventrolateral part (VMHVL), CA3 area of ventral hippocampus (vHipp) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in separate groups (n=5 rats/each) of freely moving rats. Galanin (0.5nmol and 1.5nmol) dose-dependently decreased the basal histamine levels in the VMHVL to 77.1% (i.c.v.) at 40min and to 82.1% (intra-VMHVL infusion) already at 20min, of the control group (32.6±3.5fmol/10μl), whereas only 1.5nmol i.c.v. galanin and not the local infusions deceased the histamine levels in the vHipp (8.4±0.6fmol/10μl) to 82.8% and in mPFC (9.8±0.9fmol/10μl) to 87.5%. It is concluded that central administration of galanin decreased the basal extracellular histamine levels in major histamine projecting areas, however, these effects were less prominent than those observed for 5-HT (Kehr et al., 2002 [12]) and ACh (Yoshitake et al., 2011 [38]) in the ventral hippocampus following i.c.v. and/or local galanin infusions.

  13. The role of leptin and its short-form receptor in inflammation in db/db mice infused with peritoneal dialysis fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joseph C K; Chan, Loretta Y Y; Lam, Man Fai; Tang, Sydney C W; Chow, Chui Wa; Lim, Ai Ing; Lai, Kar Neng

    2012-08-01

    In peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane exhibits structural and functional changes following continuous exposure to the non-physiological peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF). In this study, we examined the effect of PDF on peritoneal adipose tissue in a diabetic milieu. Six-week-old db/db mice and their non-diabetic littermates (db/m) were subjected to uninephrectomy. All animals then received intra-abdominal infusion of lactated Ringer's solution (Ringer) or 1.5% glucose-containing PDF (Dianeal) twice daily. Mice were sacrificed 4 weeks later. Parietal and visceral adipose tissues were harvested for examining gene and protein expression of adiponectin, leptin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor beta and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Expression of TNF-α and F4/80+ macrophage accumulation in adipose tissues was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Modulation of leptin synthesis and leptin receptors expression and the relevant signaling pathways were also determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared to Ringer infusion, Dianeal infusion significantly increased serum leptin but decreased adiponectin in db/db mice. Increased expression of leptin, TNF-α and IL-6 was observed in visceral but not in parietal adipose tissue. Dianeal infusion also increased F4/80+ macrophage accumulation and enhanced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α in the visceral adipose tissue. Compared to db/m mice, infusion with Dianeal exhibited a more deleterious effect on db/db mice, characterized by an upregulation of short-form leptin receptor ObRa and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In conclusion, PD-induced hyperleptinemia amplifies the inflammatory response of adipose tissue through short-form leptin receptor when the long

  14. Impaired hippocampal neuroligin-2 function by chronic stress or synthetic peptide treatment is linked to social deficits and increased aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Michael A; Fantin, Martina; Kraev, Igor; Korshunova, Irina; Grosse, Jocelyn; Zanoletti, Olivia; Guirado, Ramon; Garcia-Mompó, Clara; Nacher, Juan; Stewart, Michael G; Berezin, Vladimir; Sandi, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are cell adhesion molecules that are important for proper synaptic formation and functioning, and are critical regulators of the balance between neural excitation/inhibition (E/I). Mutations in NLGNs have been linked to psychiatric disorders in humans involving social dysfunction and are related to similar abnormalities in animal models. Chronic stress increases the likelihood for affective disorders and has been shown to induce changes in neural structure and function in different brain regions, with the hippocampus being highly vulnerable to stress. Previous studies have shown evidence of chronic stress-induced changes in the neural E/I balance in the hippocampus. Therefore, we hypothesized that chronic restraint stress would lead to reduced hippocampal NLGN-2 levels, in association with alterations in social behavior. We found that rats submitted to chronic restraint stress in adulthood display reduced sociability and increased aggression. This occurs along with a reduction of NLGN-2, but not NLGN-1 expression (as shown with western blot, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses), throughout the hippocampus and detectable in different layers of the CA1, CA3, and DG subfields. Furthermore, using synthetic peptides that comprise sequences in either NLGN-1 (neurolide-1) or NLGN-2 (neurolide-2) involved in the interaction with their presynaptic partner neurexin (NRXN)-1, intra-hippocampal administration of neurolide-2 led also to reduced sociability and increased aggression. These results highlight hippocampal NLGN-2 as a key molecular substrate regulating social behaviors and underscore NLGNs as promising targets for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of dysfunctional social behaviors.

  15. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time.

  16. Correction of hypovolemia with crystalloid fluids: Individualizing infusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2015-05-01

    Many situations in clinical practice involving patients with hypovolemia or acutely ill patients usually require the administration of intravenous fluids. Current evidence shows that the use of crystalloids should be considered, since most colloids and human albumin are usually associated with increased adverse effects and high cost, respectively. Among crystalloids, the use of normal saline is implicated with the development of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and renal vasoconstriction. These observations have led many authors to propose balanced solutions, mainly Lactated Ringer's, as the infusate of choice. However, although the restoration of volume status is the primary target in hypovolemic state, the correction of any associated acid-base or electrolyte disorders that frequently coexist is also of vital importance. This review presents specific situations that are common in daily clinical practice and require targeted infusate therapy in patients with reduced volume status. Furthermore, the review presents an algorithm aiming to help clinicians to make the best choice between normal or hypotonic saline and lactated Ringer's infusates. Lactated Ringer's infusate should not be given in patients with severe metabolic alkalosis, lactic acidosis with decreased lactate clearance, or severe hyperkalemia, and in patients with traumatic brain injury or at risk of increased intracranial pressure. The optimal choice of infusate should be guided by the cause of hypovolemia, the cardiovascular state of the patient, the renal function, as well as the serum osmolality and the coexisting acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Clinicians should be aware of any coexisting disorders in patients with hypovolemia and guide their choice of infusate treatment based on the overall picture of their patients.

  17. Radiation resistance of microorganisms on unsterilized infusion sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E. Ahrensburg; Kristensen, H.; Hoborn, J.;

    1991-01-01

    Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor in a steriliza......Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor...

  18. Pharmacogenomics: Overview of Applications and Relation to Infusion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisor, David F; Bright, David R; Manion, Chelsea R; Smith, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) describes the relationship between an individual's genes and his or her response to drug therapy. Data are accumulating that indicate that PGx has application in the clinical setting for drugs across therapeutic categories, including drugs that are administered intravenously and are of greater familiarity to infusion nurses. This article provides an overview of the science and presents common examples of PGx as it relates to drug and/or drug dose selection. Additionally, there are brief summaries of the role infusion nurses can play relative to toxicity monitoring, patient education, and other aspects of PGx.

  19. Designing a home infusion therapy service at Scott and White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, C; Sweeden, D

    1994-01-01

    A quality planning team at Scott and White used Juran planning techniques to design a coordinated, cost-effective method for providing home infusion therapy to patients. The team translated customer needs into important product and process features and then designed a home infusion program to meet those features. The program was implemented in late June and is expected to increase customer satisfaction, contain costs, and provide improved coordination of care by all providers. Quantitative results are being tracked. Based on this team's apparent success, two other planning teams have been formed and are nearing completion.

  20. Effects of methacholine infusion on desflurane pharmacokinetics in piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Kozian

    2015-12-01

    We measured airway pressures, pulmonary resistance, and mean paO2 as well as hemodynamic variables in all pigs before desflurane application and at plateau in both healthy state and during methacholine administration by infusion. By MIGET, fractional alveolar ventilation and pulmonary perfusion in relation to the V.A/Q. compartments, data of logSDQ̇ and logSDV̇ (the second moments describing global dispersion, i.e. heterogeneity of distribution were estimated prior to and after MCh infusion. The uptake and elimination of desflurane was determined by MMIMS.

  1. Professional ethics. A case study of infusion nurse consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J

    2000-01-01

    As the healthcare system continues to reform, opportunities exist for infusion nurses to expand their practice into the business world. Traditionally, biomedical ethics have been used in nursing education as a framework for identifying and responding to ethical dilemmas. However, in the business world, professional ethics may be more subtle and insidious. A case study of ten infusion nurse consultants and their experiences with professional ethical issues is presented. Data were obtained using interviews, and content analysis revealed emergent themes of integrity and intuitive knowing with related categories.

  2. Hippocampal sclerosis in dementia, epilepsy, and ischemic injury: differential vulnerability of hippocampal subfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack M; Herndon, Emily; Burns, Dennis K; Foong, Chan; Habib, Amyn A; White, Charles L

    2014-02-01

    Severe neuronal loss in the hippocampus, that is, hippocampal sclerosis (HS), can be seen in 3 main clinical contexts: dementia (particularly frontotemporal lobar degeneration [FTLD]), temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and hippocampal ischemic injury (H-I). It has been suggested that shared pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie selective vulnerability of the hippocampal subfields such as the CA1 in these conditions. We determined the extent of neuronal loss in cases of HS-FTLD (n=14), HS-TLE (n=35), and H-I (n=20). Immunohistochemistry for zinc transporter 3 was used to help define the CA3/CA2 border in the routinely processed human autopsy tissue samples. The subiculum was involved in 57% of HS-FTLD, 10% of H-I, and 0% of HS-TLE cases (p<0.0001). The CA regions other than CA1 were involved in 57% of HS-TLE, 30% of H-I, and 0% of HS-FTLD cases (p=0.0003). The distal third of CA1 was involved in 79% of HS-FTLD, 35% of H-I, and 37% of HS-TLE cases (p=0.02). The distal third of CA1 was the only area involved in 29% of HS-FTLD, 3% of HS-TLE, and 0% of H-I cases (p=0.019). The proximal-middle CA1 was the only area affected in 50% of H-I, 29% of HS-TLE, and 0% of HS-FTLD cases (p=0.004). These findings support heterogeneity in the pathogenesis of HS.

  3. HIPPOCAMPAL SCLEROSIS, HIPPOCAMPAL NEURON LOSS PATTERNS AND TDP-43 IN THE AGED POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkanen, Suvi R K; Hunter, Sally; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Keage, Hannah A D; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol

    2017-08-18

    Hippocampal neuron loss is a common neuropathological feature in old age with various underlying aetiologies. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is neuropathologically characterized by severe CA1 neuronal loss and frequent presence of transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) aggregations. Its aetiology is unclear and currently no standardized approaches to measure HS-Aging exist. We developed a semi-quantitative protocol, which captures various hippocampal neuron loss patterns, and compared their occurrence in the context of HS-Aging, TDP-43, vascular and tau pathology in 672 brains (TDP-43 staining n=642/672, 96%) donated for the population-based Cambridge City over-75s Cohort and the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. HS-Aging was first evaluated independently from the protocol using the most common criteria defined in literature, and then described in detail through examination of neuron loss patterns and associated pathologies. 34 (5%) cases were identified, with a maximum of five pyramidal neurons in each of over half CA1 fields-of-view (x200 magnification), no vascular damage, no neuron loss in CA2-CA4, but consistent TDP-43 neuronal solid inclusions and neurites. We also report focal CA1 neuron loss with vascular pathology to affect predominantly CA1 bordering CA2 (Fisher's exact, p=0.009), whereas neuron loss in the subicular end of CA1 was associated with TDP-43 inclusions (Fisher's exact, pTDP-43. We conclude that hippocampal neuron loss patterns are associated with different aetiologies within CA1, and propose that these patterns can be used to form objective criteria for HS-Aging diagnosis. Finally, based on our results we hypothesize that neuron loss leading to HS-Aging starts from the subicular end of CA1 when it is associated with TDP-43 pathology, and that this neurodegenerative process is likely to be significantly more common than "end-stage" HS-Aging only. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Infusions of bicuculline to the ventral tegmental area attenuates sexual, exploratory, and anti-anxiety behavior of proestrous rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Paris, Jason J

    2009-10-01

    Actions of 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP), in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) modulate sexual receptivity of female rats. Actions of 3alpha,5alpha-THP at GABAergic substrates in the VTA are known to modulate consummatory aspects of sexual behavior among rodents, such as lordosis. However, the extent to which GABA(A) receptors in the VTA are important for appetitive (exploratory, anti-anxiety, social) aspects of sexual receptivity is not well-understood. Proestrous rats were bilaterally-infused with saline or bicuculline (100 ng), a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, to the VTA or missed control sites. Rats were assessed for exploratory/anti-anxiety (open field/elevated plus maze), social (social interaction), and sexual (paced-mating) behavior. Compared to saline or missed site controls, intra-VTA bicuculline significantly reduced the number of central entries in an open field, time spent on the open arms of an elevated plus maze, frequency and intensity of lordosis, anti-aggression towards a male, pacing of sexual contacts, and 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentrations in midbrain and hippocampus. Bicuculline-infused rats also displayed less affiliation with a novel conspecific, fewer sexual solicitations, and had lower 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentrations in diencephalon and cortex, albeit these were not significant differences. Thus, actions at GABA(A) receptors in the midbrain VTA are essential for appetitive and consummatory aspects of sexual receptivity among rats.

  5. Intra-Arterially Delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Not Detected in the Brain Parenchyma in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Kyung; Yang, Jehoon; Chang, Eun Hyuk; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Jeongmin; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Na, Duk L.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a promising role as a therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Prior studies suggested that intra-arterially administered MSCs are engrafted into the brain in stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal models. However, a controversial standpoint exists in terms of the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in transgenic AD mice. The primary goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of delivering human umbilical cord-blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) into the brains of non-transgenic WT (C3H/C57) and transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice through the intra-arterial (IA) route. Through two experiments, mice were infused with hUCB-MSCs via the right internal carotid artery and were sacrificed at two different time points: 6 hours (experiment 1) or 5 minutes (experiment 2) after infusion. In both experiments, no cells were detected in the brain parenchyma while MSCs were detected in the cerebrovasculature in experiment 2. The results from this study highlight that intra-arterial delivery of MSCs is not the most favorable route to be implemented as a potential therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27203695

  6. Inhibition of brain cell excitability by lidocaine, QX314, and tetrodotoxin: a mechanism for analgesia from infused local anesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, J; Cole, L; Marlow, G

    1993-07-01

    Local anesthetic infusions have been used to provide analgesia in a variety of painful conditions. The mechanism for this drug effect remains unknown. To better define the electrical effects of lidocaine concentrations comparable to those obtained during analgesic infusions, lidocaine (0.05-3 mmol.l-1), QX314 (an obligatorily charged, quaternary lidocaine derivative applied within the cells), and tetrodotoxin (10 mmol.l-1) were applied to rat hippocampal pyramidal cells. The three drugs, which inhibit Na+ currents by varying mechanisms, produced tonic increases in (firing) current threshold, and decreases in the amplitude of action potentials measured using an intracellular microelectrode technique. Lidocaine inhibited action potential spikes and increased current threshold in a concentration-dependent fashion. Lidocaine 50 and 100 mumol.l-1 did not inhibit action potentials, but increased firing threshold by nearly 100%. Lidocaine 1-3 mmol.l-1 significantly inhibited action potential amplitude and increased threshold by as much as 800%. Similarly, QX314 and tetrodotoxin produced greater increases in current threshold than in action potential amplitude. QX314 produced phasic (or frequency-dependent) block during trains of stimuli at 1 Hz, even when almost no tonic block was present. Lidocaine produced less phasic block than QX314, and required both greater tonic block and more frequent stimulation to produce the phenomenon. Tetrodotoxin demonstrated no phasic block. Increases in current threshold occurred in lidocaine concentrations associated with analgesia and toxicity; inhibition of action potentials occurred scarcely at all at these concentrations. Thus, tonic increases in current threshold may underlie analgesia and supplementation of general anesthesia by intravenous lidocaine.

  7. HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL INTRA-INDUSTRY TRADE OF TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEVZAT ŞİMŞEK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Crucial improvement have taken place in intra-industry trade literature since intra-industry trade phenomenon was empirically determined. Nowadays economists discuss on the necessity of distinguishing between horizontal and vertical intra-industry trade especially relating to product differentiation in each industry. As standard Grubel-Lloyd index does not determine the time when two way trade is taken into consideration, in this paper first of all Two-Way Trade index is used and then horizontal intra-industry trade and low-high quality vertical intra-industry trade are distinguished from each other regarding unit value differential. As a result of the analysis the findings show that low quality vertical intra-industry trade dominate in Turkey's intra-industry trade.

  8. Direct infusion mass spectrometry metabolomics dataset: a benchmark for data processing and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Jennifer A; Weber, Ralf J M; Broadhurst, David I; Viant, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics is an important approach for characterising molecular responses of organisms to disease, drugs and the environment. Increasingly large-scale metabolomics studies are being conducted, necessitating improvements in both bioanalytical and computational workflows to maintain data quality. This dataset represents a systematic evaluation of the reproducibility of a multi-batch DIMS metabolomics study of cardiac tissue extracts. It comprises of twenty biological samples (cow vs. sheep) that were analysed repeatedly, in 8 batches across 7 days, together with a concurrent set of quality control (QC) samples. Data are presented from each step of the workflow and are available in MetaboLights. The strength of the dataset is that intra- and inter-batch variation can be corrected using QC spectra and the quality of this correction assessed independently using the repeatedly-measured biological samples. Originally designed to test the efficacy of a batch-correction algorithm, it will enable others to evaluate novel data processing algorithms. Furthermore, this dataset serves as a benchmark for DIMS metabolomics, derived using best-practice workflows and rigorous quality assessment.

  9. Hippocampal Hyperactivation in Presymptomatic Familial Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Budson, Andrew E.; Celone, Kim; Ruiz, Adriana; Newmark, Randall; Castrillón, Gabriel; Lopera, Francisco; Stern, Chantal E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The examination of individuals who carry fully penetrant genetic alterations that result in familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) provides a unique model for studying the early presymptomatic disease stages. In AD, deficits in episodic and associative memory have been linked to structural and functional changes within the hippocampal system. This study used functional MRI (fMRI) to examine hippocampal function in a group of healthy, young, cognitively-intact presymptomatic individuals (average age 33.7 years) who carry the E280A presenilin-1 (PS1) genetic mutation for FAD. These PS1 subjects will go on to develop the first symptoms of the disease around the age of 45 years. Our objective was to examine hippocampal function years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Methods Twenty carriers of the Alzheimer’s-associated E280A PS1 mutation and 19 PS1-negative control subjects participated. Both groups were matched for age, sex, education level, and neuropsychological test performance. All participants performed a face-name associative encoding task while in a Philips 1.5T fMRI scanner. Analysis focused on the hippocampal system. Results Despite identical behavioral performance, presymptomatic PS1 mutation carriers exhibited increased activation of the right anterior hippocampus during encoding of novel face-name associations compared to matched controls. Interpretation Our results demonstrate that functional changes within the hippocampal memory system occur years before cognitive decline in FAD. These presymptomatic changes in hippocampal physiology in FAD suggest that hippocampal fMRI patterns during associative encoding may also provide a preclinical biomarker in sporadic AD. PMID:21194156

  10. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in stress resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunno R. Levone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional and cognitive processes related to psychiatric disorders. Although many studies have investigated the effects of stress on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, most have not focused on whether stress-induced changes in neurogenesis occur specifically in animals that are more resilient or more susceptible to the behavioural and neuroendocrine effects of stress. Thus, in the present review we explore whether there is a clear relationship between stress-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, stress resilience and antidepressant-induced recovery from stress-induced changes in behaviour. Exposure to different stressors is known to reduce adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but some stressors have also been shown to exert opposite effects. Ablation of neurogenesis does not lead to a depressive phenotype, but it can enhance responsiveness to stress and affect stress susceptibility. Monoaminergic-targeted antidepressants, environmental enrichment and adrenalectomy are beneficial for reversing stress-induced changes in behaviour and have been shown to do so in a neurogenesis-dependant manner. In addition, stress and antidepressants can affect hippocampal neurogenesis, preferentially in the ventral hippocampus. Together, these data show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may play a role in the neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress, although it is not yet fully clear under which circumstances neurogenesis promotes resilience or susceptibility to stress. It will be important that future studies carefully examine how adult hippocampal neurogenesis can contribute to stress resilience/susceptibility so that it may be appropriately exploited for the development of new and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  11. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in stress resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levone, Brunno R.; Cryan, John F.; O'Leary, Olivia F.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional and cognitive processes related to psychiatric disorders. Although many studies have investigated the effects of stress on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, most have not focused on whether stress-induced changes in neurogenesis occur specifically in animals that are more resilient or more susceptible to the behavioural and neuroendocrine effects of stress. Thus, in the present review we explore whether there is a clear relationship between stress-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, stress resilience and antidepressant-induced recovery from stress-induced changes in behaviour. Exposure to different stressors is known to reduce adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but some stressors have also been shown to exert opposite effects. Ablation of neurogenesis does not lead to a depressive phenotype, but it can enhance responsiveness to stress and affect stress susceptibility. Monoaminergic-targeted antidepressants, environmental enrichment and adrenalectomy are beneficial for reversing stress-induced changes in behaviour and have been shown to do so in a neurogenesis-dependant manner. In addition, stress and antidepressants can affect hippocampal neurogenesis, preferentially in the ventral hippocampus. Together, these data show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may play a role in the neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress, although it is not yet fully clear under which circumstances neurogenesis promotes resilience or susceptibility to stress. It will be important that future studies carefully examine how adult hippocampal neurogenesis can contribute to stress resilience/susceptibility so that it may be appropriately exploited for the development of new and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27589664

  12. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of carbachol induced hippocampal oscillations in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Metin AKAY; Kui WANG; Yasemin M AKAY; Andrei DRAGOMIR; Jie WU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Hippocampal neuronal network and synaptic impairment underlie learning and memory deficit in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and animal models. In this paper, we analyzed the dynamics and complexity of hippocampal neuronal network synchronization induced by acute exposure to carbachol, a nicotinic and muscarinic receptor co-agonist, using the nonlinear dynamical model based on the Lempel-Ziv estimator. We compared the dynamics of hippocampal oscillations between wild-type (WT) and triple-transgenic (3xTg) mice, as an AD animal model. We also compared these dynamic alterations between different age groups (5 and 10 months). We hypothesize that there is an impairment of complexity of CCh-induced hippocampal oscillations in 3xTg AD mice compared to WT mice, and that this impairment is age-dependent. Methods: To test this hypothesis, we used electrophysiological recordings (field potential) in hippocampal slices. Results: Acute exposure to 100 nmol/L CCh induced field potential oscillations in hippocampal CA1 region, which exhibited three distinct patterns: (1) continuous neural firing, (2) repeated burst neural firing and (3) the mixed (continuous and burst) pattern in both WT and 3xTg AD mice. Based on Lempel-Ziv estimator, pattern (2) was significantly lower than patterns (1) and (3) in 3xTg AD mice compared to WT mice (P<0.001), and also in 10-month old WT mice compared to those in 5-month old WT mice (P<0.01).Conclusion: These results suggest that the burst pattern (theta oscillation) of hippocampal network is selectively impaired in 3xTg AD mouse model, which may reflect a learning and memory deficit in the AD patients.

  13. Associative reinstatement memory measures hippocampal function in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Melanie; Giannoylis, Irene; De Belder, Maya; Saint-Cyr, Jean A; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2016-09-01

    In Parkinson's Disease (PD), hippocampal atrophy is associated with rapid cognitive decline. Hippocampal function is typically assessed using memory tests but current clinical tools (e.g., free recall) also rely on executive functions or use material that is not optimally engaging hippocampal memory networks. Because of the ubiquity of executive dysfunction in PD, our ability to detect true memory deficits is suboptimal. Our previous behavioural and neuroimaging work in other populations suggests that an experimental memory task - Associative Reinstatement Memory (ARM) - may prove useful in investigating hippocampal function in PD. In this study, we investigated whether ARM is compromised in PD and we assessed its convergent and divergent validity by comparing it to standardized measures of memory and of attention and executive functioning in PD, respectively. Using fMRI, we also investigated whether performance in PD relates to degree of hippocampal engagement. Fifteen participants with PD and 13 age-matched healthy controls completed neuropsychological testing as well as an ARM fMRI recognition paradigm in which they were instructed to identify word pairs comprised of two studied words (intact or rearranged pairs) and those containing at least one new word (new or half new pairs). ARM is measured by the differences in hit rates between intact and rearranged pairs. Behaviourally, ARM was poorer in PD relative to controls and was correlated with verbal memory measures, but not with attention or executive functioning in the PD group. Hippocampal activation associated with ARM was reduced in PD relative to controls and covaried with ARM scores in both groups. To conclude, ARM is a sensitive measure of hippocampal memory function that is unaffected by attention or executive dysfunction in PD. Our study highlights the benefit of integrating cognitive neuroscience frameworks and novel experimental tasks to improve the practice of clinical neuropsychology in PD.

  14. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs’ effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal’s opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse.

  15. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  16. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal's opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse.

  17. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Malerba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  18. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Paola; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  19. Ultrafast endocytosis at mouse hippocampal synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Rost, Benjamin R.; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Davis, M. Wayne; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2013-12-01

    To sustain neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles and their associated proteins must be recycled locally at synapses. Synaptic vesicles are thought to be regenerated approximately 20s after fusion by the assembly of clathrin scaffolds or in approximately 1s by the reversal of fusion pores via `kiss-and-run' endocytosis. Here we use optogenetics to stimulate cultured hippocampal neurons with a single stimulus, rapidly freeze them after fixed intervals and examine the ultrastructure using electron microscopy--`flash-and-freeze' electron microscopy. Docked vesicles fuse and collapse into the membrane within 30ms of the stimulus. Compensatory endocytosis occurs within 50 to 100ms at sites flanking the active zone. Invagination is blocked by inhibition of actin polymerization, and scission is blocked by inhibiting dynamin. Because intact synaptic vesicles are not recovered, this form of recycling is not compatible with kiss-and-run endocytosis; moreover, it is 200-fold faster than clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It is likely that `ultrafast endocytosis' is specialized to restore the surface area of the membrane rapidly.

  20. Neuroprotection against diisopropylfluorophosphate in acute hippocampal slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchmin, P. A.; Pérez, Dinely; Cuadrado, Brenda L.; Carrasco, Marimée; Martins, Antonio H.; Eterović, Vesna A.

    2015-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and a surrogate of the organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent sarin. The neurotoxicity of DFP was assessed as a reduction of population spike (PS) area elicited by synaptic stimulation in acute hippocampal slices. Two classical antidotes, atropine, and pralidoxime, and two novel antidotes, 4R-cembranotriene-diol (4R) and a caspase 9 inhibitor, were tested. Atropine, pralidoxime, and 4R significantly protected when applied 30 min after DFP. The caspase inhibitor was neuroprotective when applied 5–10 min before or after DFP, suggesting that early synaptic apoptosis is responsible for the loss of PSs. It is likely that apoptosis starts at the synapses and, if antidotes are not applied, descends to the cell bodies, causing death. The acute slice is a reliable tool for mechanistic studies, and the assessment of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection with PS areas is, in general, pharmacologically congruent with in vivo results and predicts the effect of drugs in vivo. 4R was first found to be neuroprotective in slices and later we demonstrated that 4R is neuroprotective in vivo. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of OPs is not well understood, and there is a need for novel antidotes that could be discovered using acute slices. PMID:26438150

  1. Enzymuria in neonates receiving continuous intravenous infusion of gentamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Brygge, K; Brendstrup, L;

    1992-01-01

    with non-treatment periods in the same newborn infant (33 infants). The same tendency applied to AAP. Newborn infants receiving continuous intravenous infusion of gentamicin were not found to be at greater risk of nephrotoxicity than those receiving intermittent gentamicin treatment, using NAG and AAP...

  2. Continuous infusion of vancomycin : Effective, efficient and safe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Maarseveen, E.; Touw, D.; Bouma, A.; Van Zanten, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Vancomycin is an antibiotic which is used in (suspected or proven) bacteriaemia, peritonitis or osteomyelitis with grampositive micro-organisms. Currently in most Dutch hospitals vancomycin is administered as an intermittent infusion. As the killing of vancomycin is dependent of the AUC/MIC ra

  3. Doing Business with China: Curriculum Internationalisation through an Infusion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byoungho; Swinney, Jane; Cao, Huantian; Muske, Glenn; Nam, Jinhee; Kang, Ji Hye

    2011-01-01

    The US apparel and textiles industry operates within an interdependent global system, necessitating workforces competent for day-to-day operations. The US workforce lacks preparedness in working globally; this study tests an infusion method of curriculum internationalisation to enhance students' global understanding. Four cognitive and…

  4. Online feedback-controlled renal constant infusion clearances in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock-Kusch, Daniel; Shulhevich, Yury; Xie, Qing; Hesser, Juergen; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Neudecker, Sabine; Friedemann, Jochen; Koenig, Stefan; Heinrich, Ralf; Hoecklin, Friederike; Pill, Johannes; Gretz, Norbert

    2012-08-01

    Constant infusion clearance techniques using exogenous renal markers are considered the gold standard for assessing the glomerular filtration rate. Here we describe a constant infusion clearance method in rats allowing the real-time monitoring of steady-state conditions using an automated closed-loop approach based on the transcutaneous measurement of the renal marker FITC-sinistrin. In order to optimize parameters to reach steady-state conditions as fast as possible, a Matlab-based simulation tool was established. Based on this, a real-time feedback-regulated approach for constant infusion clearance monitoring was developed. This was validated by determining hourly FITC-sinistrin plasma concentrations and the glomerular filtration rate in healthy and unilaterally nephrectomized rats. The transcutaneously assessed FITC-sinistrin fluorescence signal was found to reflect the plasma concentration. Our method allows the precise determination of the onset of steady-state marker concentration. Moreover, the steady state can be monitored and controlled in real time for several hours. This procedure is simple to perform since no urine samples and only one blood sample are required. Thus, we developed a real-time feedback-based system for optimal regulation and monitoring of a constant infusion clearance technique.

  5. Melissa officinalis and Passiflora caerulea infusion as physiological stress decreaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliú-Hemmelmann, Karina; Monsalve, Francisco; Rivera, César

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a Melissa officinalis and Passiflora caerulea infusion on the severity of physiological chronic stress induced by movement restriction in CF-1 mice. 40 CF-1 male mice, six weeks of age, were divided into 4 groups (n = 10 for each group): (1) Group RS/MP received two treatments, induced stress through movement restriction and a infusion of Melissa officinalis and Passiflora caerulea in a dose of 200 mg/kg, (2) RS group with induced stress using movement restriction, (3) MP group, which received only a infusion, and (4) a CONTROL group that received no treatment. The severity of the stress was obtained by analysis of the physical parameters of body weight, thymus and spleen, and associated biomarkers with stress, corticosterone, and glucose. Animals that consumed Melissa officinalis and Passiflora caerulea infusion had lower plasma corticosterone levels (Student's t test, Welch, p = 0.05), which is the most important biomarker associated with physiological stress, demonstrating a phytotherapy effect.

  6. Evaluation of Service-Learning-Infused Courses with Refugee Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of service-learning-infused courses on multicultural competence and social justice advocacy skills among counseling students. The project, in which students acted as job coaches for refugee families, was integrated into 1st- and 2nd-year counseling courses. Results indicated an increase in multicultural knowledge…

  7. Assessing Infusion of Social Justice in Rehabilitation Counselor Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengli; Ethridge, Glacia; Rodgers-Bonaccorsy, Roe; Oire, Spalatin N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which rehabilitation counselor educators understand and are committed to infusing social justice in the rehabilitation counseling curricula. Method: The authors used a quantitative descriptive research design to examine the level and extent of integrating social justice into rehabilitation counseling curricular.…

  8. Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion for advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu CAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of chemotherapy via arterial infusion in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods Forty-seven patients with advanced gastric cancer were given chemotherapy via arterial infusion.Chemotherapy plan was as follows: 5-Fluorouracil(Fu 500mg/m2,cyclophosphamide(MMX 10mg/m2,Hydroxycamptothecin(HPT 20mg/m2,once per week,2 weeks as a course,a total of 2-3 courses.Results After chemotherapy via arterial infusion,complete remission(CR was achieved in 1 case,partial remission(PR in 28 cases,stabilization of disease(SD in 16 cases,progression of disease(PD was found in 2 cases,and rate with response(CR+PR was 61.7%.Four of 28 PR patients underwent tumorectomy,the pathology revealed the presence of cancer cells around the vascular vessels,manifesting karyopyknosis,karyorrhexis,coagulation and necrosis of cytoplasm,intercellular edema,hyperplasia of fibroblasts,inflammatory cell infiltration,thickening of endothelium,and thrombosis.One,two and three-year survival rates were 70.2%,14.9% and 2.1%,respectively.The average survival period was 17.2 months.Conclusion Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion,as a part of the combined treatment,is beneficial to the patients with unresectable advanced gastric cancer.

  9. The Development of Symbol-Infused Joint Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-six children were observed longitudinally from 18 to 30 months of age interacting with their mothers during a Communication Play that contained 8 scenes designed to encourage interacting, requesting, commenting, and narrating. Of primary concern was how often symbols infused the child's states of engagement with people and objects and how…

  10. Infusing Commodity Marketing into the Agriculture Curriculum. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northeast Arkansas Educational Cooperative, Strawberry.

    A project was conducted in Arkansas to infuse commodity marketing content into the agriculture curriculum. Thirty-three schools were selected to participate in the program; teachers from those schools attended a 2-day inservice program presented by a state coordinator for the project. The state coordinator also provided supervision and technical…

  11. Jumping off the Couch: Infusing Creativity into Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study infused key elements of creativity into the process of counselor education, exposing students in a counseling skills and techniques course to a curriculum designed to promote tolerance for ambiguity, appropriate risk-taking behaviors, and improvisational skills. Employing a phenomenological strategy of inquiry, the researcher sought to…

  12. Assessing Infusion of Social Justice in Rehabilitation Counselor Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengli; Ethridge, Glacia; Rodgers-Bonaccorsy, Roe; Oire, Spalatin N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which rehabilitation counselor educators understand and are committed to infusing social justice in the rehabilitation counseling curricula. Method: The authors used a quantitative descriptive research design to examine the level and extent of integrating social justice into rehabilitation counseling curricular.…

  13. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  14. Infusing Quantitative Approaches throughout the Biological Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Cooke, Todd J.; Fagan, William F.; Gulick, Denny; Levy, Doron; Nelson, Kären C.; Redish, Edward F.; Smith, Robert F.; Presson, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    A major curriculum redesign effort at the University of Maryland is infusing all levels of our undergraduate biological sciences curriculum with increased emphasis on interdisciplinary connections and quantitative approaches. The curriculum development efforts have largely been guided by recommendations in the National Research Council's "Bio…

  15. Evaluation of Service-Learning-Infused Courses with Refugee Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of service-learning-infused courses on multicultural competence and social justice advocacy skills among counseling students. The project, in which students acted as job coaches for refugee families, was integrated into 1st- and 2nd-year counseling courses. Results indicated an increase in multicultural knowledge…

  16. Antioxidant and Astroprotective Effects of a Pulicaria incisa Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Elmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the brain, protect neurons from reactive oxygen species (ROS and provide them with trophic support, such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. Thus, any damage to astrocytes will affect neuronal survival. In the present study, an infusion prepared from the desert plant Pulicaria incisa (Pi was tested for its protective and antioxidant effects on astrocytes subjected to oxidative stress. The Pi infusion attenuated the intracellular accumulation of ROS following treatment with hydrogen peroxide and zinc and prevented the H2O2-induced death of astrocytes. The Pi infusion also exhibited an antioxidant effect in vitro and induced GDNF transcription in astrocytes. It is proposed that this Pi infusion be further evaluated for use as a functional beverage for the prevention and/or treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases in which oxidative stress plays a role.

  17. A small swivel joint for infusion of free moving animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, J.H.

    1974-01-01

    The construction and application of a small, light, inexpensive swivel joint suitable for infusions of small laboratory animals is described. Commercially available tubes and needles are used in the construction of the swivel thus making it easy to repare and essentially disposable. This swivel is e

  18. Using Cross-Curricular Ideas to Infuse Paralympic Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfer, Amanda T. S.; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2012-01-01

    The Paralympic Games are the second largest sport event in the world. They occur two weeks after the Olympic Games in the same geographic location and sport venues. Despite the Paralympic Games' longevity, many Americans do not even know they exist. One way to meaningfully share information about this event with people of all ages is to infuse a…

  19. Acute propranolol infusion stimulates protein synthesis in rabbit skin wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Meng, Chengyue; Chinkes, David L; Finnerty, Celeste C; Aarsland, Asle; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N

    2009-05-01

    Propranolol administration has been demonstrated to improve cardiac work, decrease energy expenditure, and attenuate lipolysis in burned patients; however, its effect on wound healing has not been reported. In rabbits, a partial-thickness skin donor site wound was created on the back, and catheters were placed in the carotid artery and jugular vein. A nasogastric feeding tube was placed for enteral feeding. On day 5 after injury, stable isotope tracers were infused to determine protein and DNA kinetics in the wound. Propranolol hydrochloride was injected in 1 group during the tracer infusion to decrease heart rate, and the other group without propranolol injection served as a control. The propranolol infusion decreased heart rate by 21%. The protein fractional synthetic rate in the wound was greater in the propranolol group (8.6 +/- 0.9 vs 6.1 +/- 0.5%/day, P synthesis - breakdown) was increased in the propranolol group (5.0 +/- 1.2 vs 2.8 +/- 0.7%/day, P = .07). Wound DNA fractional synthetic rates were comparable. The protein fractional synthetic rate was correlated with percent decrease in heart rate, but expression of the beta-adrenergic receptors and downstream signaling cascades in local wounds were not affected after propranolol treatment. Propranolol infusion increased wound protein synthetic rate and tended to increase wound protein deposition rate, which might be beneficial to wound healing. These changes might reflect a systemic response to the beta-adrenergic blockade.

  20. Infusing Social Emotional Learning into the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waajid, Badiyyah; Garner, Pamela W.; Owen, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Research supports the importance of policies and interventions to infuse social emotional curricula in schools. The role of teachers in supporting young children's social and emotional readiness for classroom learning has been recognized, but instruction in children's well-being and social emotional competence is a low priority in teacher…

  1. Cultural Diversity Infusion: Is It a Reality or Illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mahboub E.

    This paper discusses how Fort Hays State University (FHSU) in Hays, Kansas, is attempting to infuse elements of cultural diversity into its curriculum in order to increase students' sensitivities to and knowledge of other cultures. It reviews research and writings on cultural diversity in American society and in American higher education in…

  2. Infusing Quantitative Approaches throughout the Biological Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Cooke, Todd J.; Fagan, William F.; Gulick, Denny; Levy, Doron; Nelson, Kären C.; Redish, Edward F.; Smith, Robert F.; Presson, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    A major curriculum redesign effort at the University of Maryland is infusing all levels of our undergraduate biological sciences curriculum with increased emphasis on interdisciplinary connections and quantitative approaches. The curriculum development efforts have largely been guided by recommendations in the National Research Council's…

  3. Effect of Insulin Infusion on Liver Protein Synthesis during Hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Jespersen, Bente;

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure that may contribute to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients receiving maintenance HD. The present study investigated the additional effect of glucose and glucose-insulin infusion on liver protein synthesis during HD...

  4. Curriculum Infusion as College Student Mental Health Promotion Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Darrow, Sherri A.; Haggerty, Melinda; Neill, Thomas; Carvalho, Amana; Uschold, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    This article describes efforts to increase faculty involvement in suicide prevention and mental health promotion via curriculum infusion. The participants were faculty, staff, and 659 students enrolled in classes of a large eastern university from Fall 2007-Spring 2011. Counselors, health educators, and medical providers recruited faculty from a…

  5. A theoretical alternative intraosseous infusion site in severely hypovolemic children

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    Nkhensani Mogale

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that the venous system tends to collapse during hypovolemic shock. The use of the bone marrow space for infusions is an effective alternative, with the tibial insertion site being the norm.Objectives: This study was conducted to determine a quick intraosseous infusion method that could be an alternative to the tibial route in neonates during emergency situations.Method: A sample of 30 neonatal cadavers was dissected to explore a possible alternative to the tibial insertion site. The needle was inserted in the superolateral aspect of the humerus. The needle infusion site was then dissected to determine possible muscular and neurovascular damage that might occur during the administration of this procedure, with the greatest concern being the posterior circumflex humeral artery and axillary nerve exiting the quadrangular space. The distance of the needle insertion site was measured in relation to the soft tissue aswell as to bony landmarks.Results: The calculated 95% confidence interval shows that the needle can be safely inserted into the intraosseous tissue at the greater tubercle of the humerus 9.5 mm – 11.1 mm from the acromion. This is about a little finger’s width from the acromioclavicular joint.Conclusion: Anatomically, the described site is suggested to offer a safe alternative access point for emergency infusion in severely hypovolemic newborns and infants, without the risk of damage to any anatomical structures.

  6. Doing Business with China: Curriculum Internationalisation through an Infusion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byoungho; Swinney, Jane; Cao, Huantian; Muske, Glenn; Nam, Jinhee; Kang, Ji Hye

    2011-01-01

    The US apparel and textiles industry operates within an interdependent global system, necessitating workforces competent for day-to-day operations. The US workforce lacks preparedness in working globally; this study tests an infusion method of curriculum internationalisation to enhance students' global understanding. Four cognitive and…

  7. [Research and application of microcontroller system for target controlled infusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuke; Dou, Jianhong; Zhang, Xingan; Wang, Ruosong

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents a microcontroller system for target controlled infusion according to pharmacodynamic parameters of intravenous anesthetics. It can control the depth of anesthesia by adjusting the level of plasma concentrations. The system has the advantages of high precision, extending power and easy manipulation. It has been used in the clinical anesthesia.

  8. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in patients with 'brittle' diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVries, J H; Eskes, S A; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) using implantable pumps on glycaemic control and duration of hospital stay in poorly controlled 'brittle' Dutch diabetes patients, and to assess their current quality of life. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  9. Evaluation of oviposition substrates and organic infusions on collection of Culex in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Sandra A; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kline, Daniel L

    2005-09-01

    Gravid mosquito traps are commonly used for both arbovirus surveillance and population surveillance of mosquitoes of the genus Culex. Oviposition substrates, used as baits in these traps, were tested against Culex under laboratory and field conditions. In the laboratory all substrates tested as 1% and 10% dilutions in 2-choice bioassays against female Cx. quinquefasciatus were significantly more effective than well water controls in eliciting oviposition. Strongest responses were to dilutions of dairy effluent, followed by larval water and infusions of alfalfa hay, alfalfa pellets, Bermuda hay, oak leaves, and Typha leaves, with lowest responses to cow manure infusion. In the field, few significant differences in collections were obtained between traps baited with different infusions. Significantly more Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. nigripalpus were collected in traps baited with cow manure infusion (highest) compared to alfalfa hay infusion (lowest). Responses of Cx. quinquefasciatus to dairy effluent and infusions of Bermuda hay, oak leaves, and Typha leaves were not significantly different from either cow manure infusion or alfalfa hay infusion. Responses of Cx. nigripalpus were highest to cow manure infusion and equally low to infusions of alfalfa hay and Typha leaves; moderate responses were observed to dairy effluent and infusions of Bermuda hay and oak leaves. Gravid females comprised 66.7-81.9% of the collections for each infusion type, with no significant difference among infusions in the proportion of gravid females collected.

  10. Intravenous Ketamine Infusions for Neuropathic Pain Management: A Promising Therapy in Need of Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Dermot P; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2017-02-01

    Intravenous ketamine infusions have been used extensively to treat often-intractable neuropathic pain conditions. Because there are many widely divergent ketamine infusion protocols described in the literature, the variation in these protocols presents a challenge for direct comparison of one protocol with another and in discerning an optimal protocol. Careful examination of the published literature suggests that ketamine infusions can be useful to treat neuropathic pain and that certain characteristics of ketamine infusions may be associated with better clinical outcomes. Increased duration of relief from neuropathic pain is associated with (1) higher total infused doses of ketamine; (2) prolonged infusion durations, although the rate of infusion does not appear to be a factor; and (3) coadministration of adjunct medications such as midazolam and/or clonidine that mitigate some of the unpleasant psychomimetic side effects. However, there are few studies designed to optimize ketamine infusion protocols by defining what an effective infusion protocol entails with regard to a respective neuropathic pain condition. Therefore, despite common clinical practice, the current state of the literature leaves the use of ketamine infusions without meaningful guidance from high-quality comparative evidence. The objectives of this topical review are to (1) analyze the available clinical evidence related to ketamine infusion protocols and (2) call for clinical studies to identify optimal ketamine infusion protocols tailored for individual neuropathic pain conditions. The Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine classification for levels of evidence was used to stratify the grades of clinical recommendation for each infusion variable studied.

  11. Hippocampal-neocortical functional reorganization underlies children's cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shaozheng; Cho, Soohyun; Chen, Tianwen; Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Geary, David C; Menon, Vinod

    2014-09-01

    The importance of the hippocampal system for rapid learning and memory is well recognized, but its contributions to a cardinal feature of children's cognitive development-the transition from procedure-based to memory-based problem-solving strategies-are unknown. Here we show that the hippocampal system is pivotal to this strategic transition. Longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 7-9-year-old children revealed that the transition from use of counting to memory-based retrieval parallels increased hippocampal and decreased prefrontal-parietal engagement during arithmetic problem solving. Longitudinal improvements in retrieval-strategy use were predicted by increased hippocampal-neocortical functional connectivity. Beyond childhood, retrieval-strategy use continued to improve through adolescence into adulthood and was associated with decreased activation but more stable interproblem representations in the hippocampus. Our findings provide insights into the dynamic role of the hippocampus in the maturation of memory-based problem solving and establish a critical link between hippocampal-neocortical reorganization and children's cognitive development.

  12. Hippocampal functional connectivity and episodic memory in early childhood

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    Tracy Riggins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory relies on a distributed network of brain regions, with the hippocampus playing a critical and irreplaceable role. Few studies have examined how changes in this network contribute to episodic memory development early in life. The present addressed this gap by examining relations between hippocampal functional connectivity and episodic memory in 4- and 6-year-old children (n = 40. Results revealed similar hippocampal functional connectivity between age groups, which included lateral temporal regions, precuneus, and multiple parietal and prefrontal regions, and functional specialization along the longitudinal axis. Despite these similarities, developmental differences were also observed. Specifically, 3 (of 4 regions within the hippocampal memory network were positively associated with episodic memory in 6-year-old children, but negatively associated with episodic memory in 4-year-old children. In contrast, all 3 regions outside the hippocampal memory network were negatively associated with episodic memory in older children, but positively associated with episodic memory in younger children. These interactions are interpreted within an interactive specialization framework and suggest the hippocampus becomes functionally integrated with cortical regions that are part of the hippocampal memory network in adults and functionally segregated from regions unrelated to memory in adults, both of which are associated with age-related improvements in episodic memory ability.

  13. The Form and Function of Hippocampal Context Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David M.; Bulkin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Context is an essential component of learning and memory processes, and the hippocampus is critical for encoding contextual information. However, connecting hippocampal physiology with its role in context and memory has only recently become possible. It is now clear that contexts are represented by coherent ensembles of hippocampal neurons and new optogenetic stimulation studies indicate that activity in these ensembles can trigger the retrieval of context appropriate memories. We interpret these findings in light of recent evidence that the hippocampus is critically involved in using contextual information to prevent interference, and propose a theoretical framework for understanding contextual influence of memory retrieval. When a new context is encountered, a unique hippocampal ensemble is recruited to represent it. Memories for events that occur in the context become associated with the hippocampal representation. Revisiting the context causes the hippocampal context code to be re-expressed and the relevant memories are primed. As a result, retrieval of appropriate memories is enhanced and interference from memories belonging to other contexts is minimized. PMID:24462752

  14. Altered hippocampal morphology in unmedicated patients with major depressive illness

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    Carrie E Bearden

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite converging evidence that major depressive illness is associated with both memory impairment and hippocampal pathology, findings vary widely across studies and it is not known whether these changes are regionally specific. In the present study we acquired brain MRIs (magnetic resonance images from 31 unmedicated patients with MDD (major depressive disorder; mean age 39.2±11.9 years; 77% female and 31 demographically comparable controls. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models were created to examine localized alterations of hippocampal morphology. Although global volumes did not differ between groups, statistical mapping results revealed that in MDD patients, more severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater left hippocampal atrophy, particularly in CA1 (cornu ammonis 1 subfields and the subiculum. However, previous treatment with atypical antipsychotics was associated with a trend towards larger left hippocampal volume. Our findings suggest effects of illness severity on hippocampal size, as well as a possible effect of past history of atypical antipsychotic treatment, which may reflect prolonged neuroprotective effects. This possibility awaits confirmation in longitudinal studies.

  15. Reducing central serotonin in adulthood promotes hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ning-Ning; Jia, Yun-Fang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhen; Hu, Ling; Lan, Wei; Chen, Ling; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yu-Qiang

    2016-02-03

    Chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which up-regulates central serotonin (5-HT) system function, enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the relationship between central 5-HT system and adult neurogenesis has not fully been understood. Here, we report that lowering 5-HT level in adulthood is also able to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We used tamoxifen (TM)-induced Cre in Pet1-CreER(T2) mice to either deplete central serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons or inactivate 5-HT synthesis in adulthood and explore the role of central 5-HT in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. A dramatic increase in hippocampal neurogenesis is present in these two central 5-HT-deficient mice and it is largely prevented by administration of agonist for 5-HTR2c receptor. In addition, the survival of new-born neurons in the hippocampus is enhanced. Furthermore, the adult 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced depression-like behaviors but enhanced contextual fear memory. These findings demonstrate that lowering central 5-HT function in adulthood can also enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis, thus revealing a new aspect of central 5-HT in regulating adult neurogenesis.

  16. Impaired cognitive performance and hippocampal atrophy in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Demet; Erer, Sevda; Zarifoğlu, Mehmet; Hakyemez, Bahattin; Bakar, Mustafa; Karli, Necdet; Varlibaş, Zeynep Nigar; Tufan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is common in Parkinson disease (PD). Since magnetic resonance imaging has been used, hippocampal atrophy has been shown in PD patients with or without dementia. In this study we sought the correlation of cognitive decline with bilateral hippocampal volume in PD patients. Thirty-three patients with diagnosis of idiopathic PD and 16 healthy subjects were included in this study. PD patients were divided into two groups as normal cognitive function and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The Mini-Mental State Examination and detailed cognitive assessment tests were performed for all patients for cognitive analyses. Depression was excluded by the Geriatric Depression Scale. The mean onset age of disease was 55 years for PD patients without dementia and 59 for PD patients with MCI. According to the Hoehn-Yahr scales, 24% of patients had grade 1, 58% had grade 2, and 18% had grade 3 disease. Right and left hippocampal volumes decreased along with cognitive test scores in PD patients. Increased right hippocampal volume was correlated with forward number test in the MCI-PD group. These findings suggest that memory deficit is associated with hippocampal atrophy in PD patients.

  17. Amyloid Beta Peptide Slows Down Sensory-Induced Hippocampal Oscillations

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    Fernando Peña-Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD progresses with a deterioration of hippocampal function that is likely induced by amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers. Hippocampal function is strongly dependent on theta rhythm, and disruptions in this rhythm have been related to the reduction of cognitive performance in AD. Accordingly, both AD patients and AD-transgenic mice show an increase in theta rhythm at rest but a reduction in cognitive-induced theta rhythm. We have previously found that monomers of the short sequence of Aβ (peptide 25–35 reduce sensory-induced theta oscillations. However, considering on the one hand that different Aβ sequences differentially affect hippocampal oscillations and on the other hand that Aβ oligomers seem to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD, here we aimed to explore the effect of Aβ oligomers on sensory-induced theta rhythm. Our results show that intracisternal injection of Aβ1–42 oligomers, which has no significant effect on spontaneous hippocampal activity, disrupts the induction of theta rhythm upon sensory stimulation. Instead of increasing the power in the theta band, the hippocampus of Aβ-treated animals responds to sensory stimulation (tail pinch with an increase in lower frequencies. These findings demonstrate that Aβ alters induced theta rhythm, providing an in vivo model to test for therapeutic approaches to overcome Aβ-induced hippocampal and cognitive dysfunctions.

  18. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Cognitive Deficits and Affective Disorder in Huntington's Disease

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    Mark I. Ransome

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a tandem repeat expansion encoding a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. HD involves progressive psychiatric, cognitive, and motor symptoms, the selective pathogenesis of which remains to be mechanistically elucidated. There are a range of different brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and striatum, known to be affected in HD, with evidence for hippocampal dysfunction accumulating in recent years. In this review we will focus on hippocampal abnormalities, in particular, deficits of adult neurogenesis. We will discuss potential molecular mechanisms mediating disrupted hippocampal neurogenesis, and how this deficit of cellular plasticity may in turn contribute to specific cognitive and affective symptoms that are prominent in HD. The generation of transgenic animal models of HD has greatly facilitated our understanding of disease mechanisms at molecular, cellular, and systems levels. Transgenic HD mice have been found to show progressive behavioral changes, including affective, cognitive, and motor abnormalities. The discovery, in multiple transgenic lines of HD mice, that adult hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity is disrupted, may help explain specific aspects of cognitive and affective dysfunction. Furthermore, these mouse models have provided insight into potential molecular mediators of adult neurogenesis deficits, such as disrupted serotonergic and neurotrophin signaling. Finally, a number of environmental and pharmacological interventions which are known to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been found to have beneficial affective and cognitive effects in mouse models, suggesting common molecular targets which may have therapeutic utility for HD and related diseases.

  19. Maternal anxiety and infants' hippocampal development: timing matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, A; Rifkin-Graboi, A; Chen, H; Chong, Y-S; Kwek, K; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Meaney, M J

    2013-09-24

    Exposure to maternal anxiety predicts offspring brain development. However, because children's brains are commonly assessed years after birth, the timing of such maternal influences in humans is unclear. This study aimed to examine the consequences of antenatal and postnatal exposure to maternal anxiety upon early infant development of the hippocampus, a key structure for stress regulation. A total of 175 neonates underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at birth and among them 35 had repeated scans at 6 months of age. Maternal anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at week 26 of pregnancy and 3 months after delivery. Regression analyses showed that antenatal maternal anxiety did not influence bilateral hippocampal volume at birth. However, children of mothers reporting increased anxiety during pregnancy showed slower growth of both the left and right hippocampus over the first 6 months of life. This effect of antenatal maternal anxiety upon right hippocampal growth became statistically stronger when controlling for postnatal maternal anxiety. Furthermore, a strong positive association between postnatal maternal anxiety and right hippocampal growth was detected, whereas a strong negative association between postnatal maternal anxiety and the left hippocampal volume at 6 months of life was found. Hence, the postnatal growth of bilateral hippocampi shows distinct responses to postnatal maternal anxiety. The size of the left hippocampus during early development is likely to reflect the influence of the exposure to perinatal maternal anxiety, whereas right hippocampal growth is constrained by antenatal maternal anxiety, but enhanced in response to increased postnatal maternal anxiety.

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Hippocampal MRI Assessments in Intractable Epilepsy

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    Paramdeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To acquire normative data of hippocampal volumes and T2 relaxation times, to evaluate and compare qualitative and quantitative assessments in evaluating hippocampi in patients with different durations of intractable epilepsy, and to propose an imaging protocol based on performance of these techniques. Methods. MRI analysis was done in 50 nonepileptic controls and 30 patients with intractable epilepsy on 1.5T scanner. Visual assessment and hippocampal volumetry were done on oblique coronal IR/T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images, respectively. T2 relaxation times were measured using 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. Volumetric data was normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Patients were divided into temporal ( and extratemporal ( groups based on clinical and EEG localization. Results. In controls, right hippocampal volume was slightly more than the left with no effect of age or gender. In TLE patients, hippocampal volumetry provided maximum concordance with EEG. Visual assessment of unilateral pathology concurred well with measured quantitative values but poorly in cases with bilateral pathologies. There were no significant differences of mean values between extratemporal group and controls group. Quantitative techniques detected mild abnormalities, undetected on visual assessment. Conclusions. Quantitative techniques are more sensitive to diagnose bilateral and mild unilateral hippocampal abnormalities.

  1. Can infusion tests be recommended for patients with giant hydrocephalus?

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    Cieslicki Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The problem of adequate diagnosis of hydrocephalus followed by administration of an effective treatment has not yet been properly solved. Specifically, this pertains to the decision about the surgical insertion of a flow diverting device. Aims : A lumbar infusion test was used to examine the compensatory parameters of intracranial space in giant hydrocephalus. The early and late results of shunt implantation were analyzed together with complications after surgery. Settings and Design : In-house software was used offline to adjust the dynamic intracranial pressure (ICP response to infusion. Materials and Methods : Nine patients with giant hydrocephalus were the subjects for the study. We analyzed recordings of the response in ICP to the 2 ml/min infusion of saline. We performed computerized identification of outflow resistance and intracranial compliance based on the truncated (30- 100% ICP response and assessed the stability of estimates over time. Eight out of nine patients were shunted. Monitoring of patients was followed for a period of up to 9 months. Results : Five out of eight shunted patients improved within a few days of surgery. During follow-up five patients developed various complications. A definite improvement was noted in four patients. The improvement rate did not correlate with any of the compensatory parameters. Most of the patients studied exhibited a lack of intracranial space reserve, a significantly reduced rate of CSF secretion, and a slightly elevated value of outflow resistance. Conclusions : The infusion test showed itself to be more useful as a way of revealing the compensatory parameters of the intracranial space than as a prognostic tool. The outcome of shunted patients with giant hydrocephalus was uncertain, owing to the relatively high rate of complications. We may therefore suggest that the diagnosis of giant hydrocephalus is a relative contraindication to implantation, as well as to the performance of

  2. [Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tea and tea infusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciemniak, Artur; Mocek, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    Tea is the one of most widely consumed beverage in the world. It is generally believed that tea consumption might have health promoting properties. But residues of certain chemical compounds might impose a health threat on tea drinkers. The main contaminants are heavy metals, fluoride, pesticides and even dioxins. Tea lives which possess a high surface area can be contaminated with atmospheric PAHs. The manufacturing processes may also introduce PAHs into tea lives. The aim of his study was to determine the contamination of black, green, red and white teas by PAHs. In this investigation, content of 23 PAH, i.e 16 EPA PAH and 15 EU PAH were determined in 18 brands of tea and its infusions. The analytical procedure was based on ultrasonic extraction for dried tea and liquid-liquid extraction for infusions. All samples were cleaned up by florisil cartridge. The total content of 23 PAH varied between 22.9 microg/kg to 2945.5 microg/kg and 2.7 microg/kg to 63,1 microg/kg microg/kg for BaP. The analysed tea samples showed an increasing presence of PAH in the following order (mean value): black tea tea green tea tea. However the highest content of PAH was found in the one brand of black tea bag both in sum of PAH and BaP content. During tea infusion 1.6% of total PAHs contained in tea was released into the beverage. The dominant PAHs in tea infusion were 2, 3 and 4 rings PAH, while the most toxic compounds were found at trace amounts. The concentrations of total 23 PAHs and BaP in tea infusions ranged from 332.5 ng/dm3 to 2245.9 ng/dm3 and 0.35 ng/dm3 to 18.7 ng/dm3 respectively.

  3. Laparoscopy and Intra-Abdominal Sepsis

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    Coyne

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Intra-abdominal sepsis has significant morbidity and mortality. In the developed world, there are many common causes originating from the lower gastrointestinal tract including diverticular disease, appendicitis, perforated cancers, and inflammatory bowel disease. It has a high cost and is associated with high levels of significant morbidity and mortality. Management options include radiologic drainage and surgical options include resection for more widespread sepsis. Laparoscopic surgery has increased and has been useful in elective setting. Its use in the emergency setting is less evaluated. Evidence Acquisition Evidence was acquired by searching online medical databases including Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Results Laparoscopic surgery has been shown to have a role in the acute setting. Studies show it has become the gold standard in the appendicitis. High quality Randomized controlled trials are in short supply but observational and cohort studies have shown equivalence and with increasing experience complication rates are reduced. Evidence is also increasing in the management of diverticular disease, crohn’s and ulcerative colitis as well as post-operative complication management and acute presentations of colorectal cancer. Conclusions Laparoscopic surgery is feasible in the management of intra-abdominal sepsis. It has become the new accepted standard in the management of appendicitis, and is safe, feasible and increasing in the management of complex diverticular disease, acute IBD and colorectal cancer in the emergency and post-operative setting.

  4. Intra-EU Direct Investment and Enlargement

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    Festa Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the determinants of the intra-EU direct investment (IDI into the New Member States (NMS using a panel dataset of bilateral capital flows for the period 1993-2013. It is found out by using a simple gravity model that EU membership is the most important determinant. Unlike previous studies including non-EU countries, the distance is insignificant, which is caused by proximity of these countries to one another. A separate analysis focused on subgroups of accession countries gives some evidence that even when size of their economy, distance, institutional quality and EU accession are taken into account, Central European countries receive more IDI than the Baltic and the Balkan states. On the contrary to that, the analysis restricted to the Balkan countries which have joined the EU shows the inexistence of a negative Balkans effect in attracting foreign investment. This finding is relevant because previous studies demonstrate a persistent negative Balkans effect for non-EU Balkan countries and suggests a crucial impact of the EU accession in determining the intra-EU capital flows.

  5. A comparison of three different target-controlled remifentanil infusion rates during target-controlled propofol infusion for oocyte retrieval

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    Demet Coskun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of three different target-controlled remifentanil infusion rates during target-controlled propofol infusion on hemodynamic parameters, pain, sedation, and recovery score during oocyte retrieval. METHODS: Sixty-nine women were scheduled for oocyte retrieval. Target-controlled propofol infusion at an effectsite concentration of 1.5 μg/mL was instituted. The patients were randomly allocated to receive remifentanil at an effect-site concentration of either 1.5 (group I, n = 23, 2 (group II, n = 23 or 2.5 ng/mL (group III, n = 23. Hemodynamic variables, sedation, pain, the Aldrete recovery score, and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: Hemodynamic variables, sedation and pain scores and the number of patients with the maximum Aldrete recovery score 10 min after the procedure were comparable among the groups. The number of patients in group III with the maximum Aldrete recovery score 5 min after the procedure was significantly lower than that in groups I and II. One patient in group II and one patient in group III suffered from nausea. CONCLUSION: Similar pain-free conscious sedation conditions without significant changes in hemodynamic parameters were provided by all three protocols. However, target controlled infusion of remifentanil at 1.5 or 2 ng/mL proved superior at providing early recovery compared to 2.5 ng/mL.

  6. A comparison of three different target-controlled remifentanil infusion rates during target-controlled propofol infusion for oocyte retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Demet; Gunaydin, Berrin; Tas, Ayca; Inan, Gozde; Celebi, Hulya; Kaya, Kadir

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of three different target-controlled remifentanil infusion rates during target-controlled propofol infusion on hemodynamic parameters, pain, sedation, and recovery score during oocyte retrieval. Sixty-nine women were scheduled for oocyte retrieval. Target-controlled propofol infusion at an effect-site concentration of 1.5 μg/mL was instituted. The patients were randomly allocated to receive remifentanil at an effect-site concentration of either 1.5 (group I, n = 23), 2 (group II, n = 23) or 2.5 ng/mL (group III, n = 23). Hemodynamic variables, sedation, pain, the Aldrete recovery score, and side effects were recorded. Hemodynamic variables, sedation and pain scores and the number of patients with the maximum Aldrete recovery score 10 min after the procedure were comparable among the groups. The number of patients in group III with the maximum Aldrete recovery score 5 min after the procedure was significantly lower than that in groups I and II. One patient in group II and one patient in group III suffered from nausea. Similar pain-free conscious sedation conditions without significant changes in hemodynamic parameters were provided by all three protocols. However, target controlled infusion of remifentanil at 1.5 or 2 ng/mL proved superior at providing early recovery compared to 2.5 ng/mL.

  7. Software Infusion: Using Computers to Enhance Instruction. Part Two: What Kind of Training Does Software Infusion Require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Shirl S.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a four-step conceptual framework for designing workshops to teach educators software infusion (SI), i.e., the use of computer software to enhance instructional effectiveness in school academic areas. Suggestions for implementation and sample worksheets accompany the discussions of each step. (MBR)

  8. A novel versatile Hybrid Infusion-MultiElectrode recording (HIME system for acute drug delivery and multisite acquisition of neuronal activity in freely moving mice

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    Oleg eSenkov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To characterize information transfer in defined brain circuits involving multiple brain regions and to evaluate underlying molecular mechanisms and their dysregulation in major brain diseases, a simple and reliable system is ultimately required for electrophysiologically recording of local field potentials (LFPs, or local EEG in combination with local delivery of drugs, enzymes and gene expression-controlling viruses near the place of recording. Here we provide a new design of a versatile reusable hybrid infusion-recording (HIME system which can be utilized in freely moving mice performing cognitive tasks. The HIME system allows monitoring neuronal activity in multiple layers in several brain structures. Here, we provide examples of bilateral injection and recordings of full spectrum of learning and memory related oscillations, i.e. theta (4-12 Hz, gamma (40-100 and ripple activity (130-150 Hz, in five hippocampal layers as well as in the CA1 and CA2 regions. Furthermore, the system is designed to be used for parallel recordings in the amygdala, cortex and other brain areas, before and after infusion of reagents of interest, either in or off a cognitive test. We anticipate that the HIME system can be particularly convenient to advance functional neuroglycobiological studies and molecular deciphering of mechanisms governing long-term memory consolidation.

  9. Hippocampal neuron populations are reduced in vervet monkeys with fetal alcohol exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally...... late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume....

  10. MR-determined hippocampal asymmetry in full-term and preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Deanne K; Wood, Stephen J; Doyle, Lex W; Warfield, Simon K; Egan, Gary F; Inder, Terrie E

    2009-02-01

    Hippocampi are asymmetrical in children and adults, where the right hippocampus is larger. To date, no literature has confirmed that hippocampal asymmetry is evident at birth. Furthermore, gender differences have been observed in normal hippocampal asymmetry, but this has not been examined in neonates. Stress, injury, and lower IQ have been associated with alterations to hippocampal asymmetry. These same factors often accompany preterm birth. Therefore, prematurity is possibly associated with altered hippocampal asymmetry. There were three aims of this study: First, we assessed whether hippocampi were asymmetrical at birth, second whether there was a gender effect on hippocampal asymmetry, and third whether the stress of preterm birth altered hippocampal asymmetry. This study utilized volumetric magnetic resonance imaging to compare left and right hippocampal volumes in 32 full-term and 184 preterm infants at term. Full-term infants demonstrated rightward hippocampal asymmetry, as did preterm infants. In the case of preterm infants, hippocampal asymmetry was proportional to total hemispheric asymmetry. This study is the first to demonstrate that the normal pattern of hippocampal asymmetry is present this early in development. We did not find gender differences in hippocampal asymmetry at term. Preterm infants tended to have less asymmetrical hippocampi than full-term infants, a difference which became significant after correcting for hemispheric brain tissue volumes. This study may suggest that hippocampal asymmetry develops in utero and is maintained into adulthood in infants with a normal neurological course.

  11. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: Infusion Therapy - Getting the Most Out of Your Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Healthcare Medical Devices: Infusion Therapy - Getting the Most Out of Your Pump Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... and accessories schedule routine maintenance What are the most common problems with an infusion pump and how ...

  12. Isoproterenol infusion increases level of consciousness during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Daniel K; Aizer, Anthony; Linton, Patrick; Bloom, Marc; Rose, Emily; Chinitz, Larry

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of isoproterenol infusion on level of consciousness during ablation using total intravenous anesthesia. Seven patients undergoing total intravenous anesthesia for atrial fibrillation ablation were monitored for level of consciousness using bispectral EEG levels (BIS). Isoproterenol infusion was performed after the ablation during anesthesia. BIS levels prior to, during, and post-isoproterenol infusion were recorded and correlated to isoproterenol infusion doses. In all patients, BIS levels significantly increased during isoproterenol infusion (median BIS prior to infusion, 46; during infusion, 64 (p levels could again be reduced. Isoproterenol infusion alters consciousness level during total intravenous anesthesia for atrial fibrillation ablation. BIS monitoring is a novel way to modulate anesthesia during ablation to potentially optimize patient comfort and ablation success.

  13. The direct cost of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Scott, Anne; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    The cost of intravenous insulin infusion to the NHS is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct cost of insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales in the first 24-hour period of infusion. Data from the National Inpatient Diabetes Audit 2013 in the UK were used to estimate the number of insulin infusions in use across England and Wales. Costs were calculated for six models for setting up and maintenance of insulin infusions, depending on the extent of involvement of different healthcare professionals in the UK. In this study, the direct costs of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales have been estimated to vary from £6.4-8.5 million in the first 24-hour period on infusion. More appropriate use of these infusions could result in substantial cost savings.

  14. Study of Cisatracurium and Sufentanil Consumption Using a Closed Loop Computer Control Infusion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    The Intraoperative Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Cisatracurium Infusion Consumption and Its Recovery Index.; Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Sufentanil Consumption.; Quantitative Analysis of Cisatracurium Infusion Requirements, Sufentanil Consumption and Recovery Index in Different Age Groups.

  15. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  16. Cutting of living hippocampal slices by a highly pressurised water jet (macromingotome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingmann, D; Wiemann, M; Speckmann, E J; Köhling, R; Straub, H; Dunze, K; Wittkowski, W

    2000-10-15

    Living brain slices are usually cut with razor blades, which compress a ca. 50-microm-thick layer of tissue. This results in cell debris and lesioned cells which, e.g. form diffusion barriers between t