WorldWideScience

Sample records for intonation-based speech therapy

  1. Evidence for Plasticity in White Matter Tracts of Chronic Aphasic Patients Undergoing Intense Intonation-based Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaug, Gottfried; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Recovery from aphasia can be achieved through recruitment of either peri-lesional brain regions in the affected hemisphere or homologous language regions in the non-lesional hemisphere. For patients with large left-hemisphere lesions, recovery through the right hemisphere may be the only possible path. The right hemisphere regions most likely to play a role in this recovery process are the superior temporal lobe (important for auditory feedback control), premotor regions/posterior inferior frontal gyrus (important for planning and sequencing of motor actions and for auditory-motor mapping) and the primary motor cortex (important for execution of vocal motor actions). These regions are connected reciprocally via a major fiber tract called the arcuate fasciculus (AF), but this tract is usually not as well developed in the non-dominant right hemisphere. We tested whether an intonation-based speech therapy (i.e., Melodic Intonation Therapy) which is typically administered in an intense fashion with 75–80 daily therapy sessions, would lead to changes in white matter tracts, particularly the AF. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we found a significant increase in the number of AF fibers and AF volume comparing post with pre-treatment assessments in 6 patients that could not be attributed to scan-to-scan variability. This suggests that intense, long-term Melodic Intonation Therapy leads to remodeling of the right AF and may provide an explanation for the sustained therapy effects that were seen in these 6 patients. PMID:19673813

  2. Evidence for plasticity in white-matter tracts of patients with chronic Broca's aphasia undergoing intense intonation-based speech therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaug, Gottfried; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea

    2009-07-01

    Recovery from aphasia can be achieved through recruitment of either perilesional brain regions in the affected hemisphere or homologous language regions in the nonlesional hemisphere. For patients with large left-hemisphere lesions, recovery through the right hemisphere may be the only possible path. The right-hemisphere regions most likely to play a role in this recovery process are the superior temporal lobe (important for auditory feedback control), premotor regions/posterior inferior frontal gyrus (important for planning and sequencing of motor actions and for auditory-motor mapping), and the primary motor cortex (important for execution of vocal motor actions). These regions are connected reciprocally via a major fiber tract called the arcuate fasciculus (AF), however, this tract is not as well developed in the right hemisphere as it is in the dominant left. We tested whether an intonation-based speech therapy (i.e., melodic intonation therapy [MIT]), which is typically administered in an intense fashion with 75-80 daily therapy sessions, would lead to changes in white-matter tracts, particularly the AF. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we found a significant increase in the number of AF fibers and AF volume comparing post- with pretreatment assessments in six patients that could not be attributed to scan-to-scan variability. This suggests that intense, long-term MIT leads to remodeling of the right AF and may provide an explanation for the sustained therapy effects that were seen in these six patients.

  3. Evidence for Plasticity in White Matter Tracts of Chronic Aphasic Patients Undergoing Intense Intonation-based Speech Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schlaug, Gottfried; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Recovery from aphasia can be achieved through recruitment of either peri-lesional brain regions in the affected hemisphere or homologous language regions in the non-lesional hemisphere. For patients with large left-hemisphere lesions, recovery through the right hemisphere may be the only possible path. The right hemisphere regions most likely to play a role in this recovery process are the superior temporal lobe (important for auditory feedback control), premotor regions/posterior inferior fr...

  4. Why Go to Speech Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Language Pathologists Physicians Employers Tweet Why Go To Speech Therapy? Parents of Preschoolers Parents of School-Age ... amount of success to be expected. Choosing a Speech-Language Pathologist The key to success with any ...

  5. Computer-based speech therapy for childhood speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Lisa; Erickson, Shane; Morris, Meg E

    2017-07-01

    With the current worldwide workforce shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists, new and innovative ways of delivering therapy to children with speech sound disorders are needed. Computer-based speech therapy may be an effective and viable means of addressing service access issues for children with speech sound disorders. To evaluate the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs for children with speech sound disorders. Studies reporting the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs were identified via a systematic, computerised database search. Key study characteristics, results, main findings and details of computer-based speech therapy programs were extracted. The methodological quality was evaluated using a structured critical appraisal tool. 14 studies were identified and a total of 11 computer-based speech therapy programs were evaluated. The results showed that computer-based speech therapy is associated with positive clinical changes for some children with speech sound disorders. There is a need for collaborative research between computer engineers and clinicians, particularly during the design and development of computer-based speech therapy programs. Evaluation using rigorous experimental designs is required to understand the benefits of computer-based speech therapy. The reader will be able to 1) discuss how computerbased speech therapy has the potential to improve service access for children with speech sound disorders, 2) explain the ways in which computer-based speech therapy programs may enhance traditional tabletop therapy and 3) compare the features of computer-based speech therapy programs designed for different client populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Physics and Speech Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, M.; Lowe, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development and content of a speech science course taught to speech therapists for two years, modified by feedback from those two classes. Presents basic topics and concepts covered. Evaluates a team teaching approach as well as the efficacy of teaching physics relevant to vocational interests. (JM)

  7. Speech-Language Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Speech-Language Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Speech-Language Therapy What's in ... coughing, gagging, and refusing foods. Specialists in Speech-Language Therapy Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), often informally known as ...

  8. The treatment of apraxia of speech : Speech and music therapy, an innovative joint effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Josephus Johannes Stephanus

    2016-01-01

    Apraxia of Speech (AoS) is a neurogenic speech disorder. A wide variety of behavioural methods have been developed to treat AoS. Various therapy programmes use musical elements to improve speech production. A unique therapy programme combining elements of speech therapy and music therapy is called

  9. Comparison of speech and language therapy techniques for speech problems in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Herd, CP; Tomlinson, CL; Deane, KHO; Brady, MC; Smith, CH; Sackley, CM; Clarke, CE

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease commonly suffer from speech and voice difficulties such as impaired articulation and reduced loudness. Speech and language therapy (SLT) aims to improve the intelligibility of speech with behavioural treatment techniques or instrumental aids.

  10. 42 CFR 409.17 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., physical therapy, occupational therapy, or speech-language pathology services must be furnished by.... (2) Physical therapy, occupational therapy or speech-language pathology services must be furnished... therapist furnishing the physical therapy services. (4) A speech-language pathologist furnishing the speech...

  11. Automatic speech recognition (ASR) based approach for speech therapy of aphasic patients: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Norezmi; Shanta, Shahnoor; Mahmud, Farhanahani; Sha'abani, MNAH

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art an automatic speech recognition (ASR) based approach for speech therapy of aphasic patients. Aphasia is a condition in which the affected person suffers from speech and language disorder resulting from a stroke or brain injury. Since there is a growing body of evidence indicating the possibility of improving the symptoms at an early stage, ASR based solutions are increasingly being researched for speech and language therapy. ASR is a technology that transfers human speech into transcript text by matching with the system's library. This is particularly useful in speech rehabilitation therapies as they provide accurate, real-time evaluation for speech input from an individual with speech disorder. ASR based approaches for speech therapy recognize the speech input from the aphasic patient and provide real-time feedback response to their mistakes. However, the accuracy of ASR is dependent on many factors such as, phoneme recognition, speech continuity, speaker and environmental differences as well as our depth of knowledge on human language understanding. Hence, the review examines recent development of ASR technologies and its performance for individuals with speech and language disorders.

  12. E-learning-based speech therapy: a web application for speech training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijer, L.J.; Rietveld, T.C.; Beers, M.M. van; Slangen, R.M.; Heuvel, H. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In The Netherlands, a web application for speech training, E-learning-based speech therapy (EST), has been developed for patients with dysarthria, a speech disorder resulting from acquired neurological impairments such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. In this report, the EST infrastructure

  13. 42 CFR 409.23 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... § 409.23 Physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology. Medicare pays for... therapy or speech-language pathology services must be furnished— (1) By qualified physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants or speech-language...

  14. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  15. The effectiveness of Speech-Music Therapy for Aphasia (SMTA) in five speakers with Apraxia of Speech and aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; de Bruijn, Madeleen; Boonstra, Anne M.; Hartman, Paul P.; Arendzen, Hans; Reinders - Messelink, Heelen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies using musical elements in the treatment of neurological language and speech disorders have reported improvement of speech production. One such programme, Speech-Music Therapy for Aphasia (SMTA), integrates speech therapy and music therapy (MT) to treat the individual with

  16. Speech and language therapy for aphasia following subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Engin; Çam, Pınar; Altınok, Nermin; Çallı, Duygu Ekinci; Duman, Tuba Yarbay; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke but without previous history of speech and language therapy. Sixteen sessions of impairment-based speech and language therapy were applied to the patients, 30-60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks. Aphasia assessment in stroke patients was performed with Gülhane Aphasia Test-2 before and after treatment. Compared with before treatment, fluency of speech, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, oral motor evaluation, automatic speech, repetition and naming were improved after treatment. This suggests that 16 seesions of speech and language therapy, 30-60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks, are effective in the treatment of aphasic patients with subacute stroke.

  17. Community-based model for speech therapy in Thailand: implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathanee, Benjamas; Lorwatanapongsa, Preeya; Makarabhirom, Kalyanee; Suphawatjariyakul, Ratchanee; Thinnaithorn, Rattana; Thanwiratananich, Panida

    2010-10-01

    To establish a Community-Based Model for Speech Therapy in Thailand and to implement it. The development of a Community-Based Model for Speech Therapy was based on the principles of primary healthcare, community-based rehabilitation and institutional sharing. Workshops for speech and language pathologists (SLPs), including "Training for Trainers" and six "Smart Smile & Speech" workshops were held. We held 1) a workshop for training SLPs in how to manage speech and language problems in cleft lip and palate (CLP); 2) a workshop for training healthcare providers who are not speech and language pathologists (para-speech and language pathologists: para-SLPs) how to identify speech, language and hearing problems in CLP and undertake early intervention; and, 3) four speech camps for continuing education via life demonstration and practice. Standard guidelines were produced for SLPs to remedy speech and language disorders in children with CLP in Thailand and para-SLP manuals for speech and language intervention for CLP were developed. Para-SLPs will be better equipped to identify and then provide early intervention for individuals with CLP, as well as to refer children with CLP and complicated speech and language disorders to speech clinics for the further management. Percentage of agreement among SLP, audiologists and para-SLPs ranged 50-93.33 while the Kappa coefficients ranged -0.07 to 0.86. The Community-Based Model for Speech Therapy for Children with CLP was an appropriate approach for coming up with solutions for the lack of speech services for children with CLP in Thailand.

  18. A Virtual Therapist for Speech and Language Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, Sarel; Cherney, Leora R

    2014-01-01

    A virtual therapist (VT) capable of modeling visible speech and directing speech and language therapy is presented. Three perspectives of practical and clinical use are described. The first is a description of treatment and typical roles that the VT performs in directing participation, practice and performance. The second is a description of techniques for modeling visible speech and implementing tele-rehabilitation. The third is an analysis of performance of a system ( AphasiaRx ™) for delivering speech and language therapy to people with aphasia, with results presented from a randomized controlled cross-over study in which the VT provided two levels of cuing. Compared to low cue treatment, high cue treatment resulted in 2.3 times faster learning. The paper concludes with a discussion of the benefits of speech and language therapy delivered by the VT.

  19. Effectiveness of speech therapy in adults with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, Hayo; Coppens-Hofman, Marjolein C; Reffeltrath, Maaike; Maassen, Ben A M

    BackgroundThis study investigated the effect of speech therapy in a heterogeneous group of adults with intellectual disability. MethodThirty-six adults with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities (IQs 40-70; age 18-40years) with reported poor speech intelligibility received tailored training in

  20. Bilateral, posterior parietal polymicrogyria as part of speech therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    parietal polymicrogyria in a child with speech pathology. Introduction. Polymicrogyria is an abnormality in the ... Academic Hospital Speech Therapy and Audiology Department. The parents' main concern was the child's ... A clinical diagnosis of oral apraxia was made. During the video fluoroscopy it was very difficult to ...

  1. Effectiveness of Speech Therapy in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terband, Hayo; Coppens-Hofman, Marjolein C.; Reffeltrath, Maaike; Maassen, Ben A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the effect of speech therapy in a heterogeneous group of adults with intellectual disability. Method: Thirty-six adults with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities (IQs 40-70; age 18-40 years) with reported poor speech intelligibility received tailored training in articulation and listening skills delivered…

  2. Speech therapy in peripheral facial palsy: an orofacial myofunctional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipólito Virgílio Magalhães Júnior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To delineate the contributions of speech therapy in the rehabilitation of peripheral facial palsy, describing the role of orofacial myofunctional approach in this process. Methods: A literature review of published articles since 1995, held from March to December 2008, based on the characterization of peripheral facial palsy and its relation with speechlanguage disorders related to orofacial disorders in mobility, speech and chewing, among others. The review prioritized scientific journal articles and specific chapters from the studied period. As inclusion criteria, the literature should contain data on peripheral facial palsy, quotes on the changes in the stomatognathic system and on orofacial miofunctional approach. We excluded studies that addressed central paralysis, congenital palsy and those of non idiopathic causes. Results: The literature has addressed the contribution of speech therapy in the rehabilitation of facial symmetry, with improvement in the retention of liquids and soft foods during chewing and swallowing. The orofacial myofunctional approach contextualized the role of speech therapy in the improvement of the coordination of speech articulation and in the gain of oral control during chewing and swallowing Conclusion: Speech therapy in peripheral facial palsy contributed and was outlined by applying the orofacial myofunctional approach in the reestablishment of facial symmetry, from the work directed to the functions of the stomatognathic system, including oralfacial exercises and training of chewing in association with the training of the joint. There is a need for a greater number of publications in this specific area for speech therapy professional.

  3. Speech & Language Therapy for Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... preparing this piece. Speech & Language Therapy for Children & Adolescents with Down Syndrome Children with Down syndrome have ... What Are the Language Characteristics of Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome? Research and clinical experience demonstrate ...

  4. TIMLOGORO - AN INTERACTIVE PLATFORM DESIGN FOR SPEECH THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta PÂNIȘOARĂ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some tehnical and pedagogical features of an interactive platforme used for language therapy. Timlogoro project demonstrates that technology is an effective tool in learning and, in particular, a viable solution for improving speech disorders present in different stages of age. A digital platform for different categories of users with speech impairments (children and adults has a good support in pedagogical principles. In speech therapy, the computer was originally used to assess deficiencies. Nowadays it has become a useful tool in language rehabilitation. A few Romanian speech therapists create digital applications that will be used in therapy for recovery.This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific UEFISCDI.

  5. 42 CFR 418.72 - Condition of participation: Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. 418.72 Section 418.72 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. Physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, and speech-language pathology services must be available, and when provided, offered in...

  6. 42 CFR 418.74 - Waiver of requirement-Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling. 418.74 Section 418.74 Public Health... requirement—Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling. (a) A... providing physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling services...

  7. Social Robotics in Therapy of Apraxia of Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Castillo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Apraxia of speech is a motor speech disorder in which messages from the brain to the mouth are disrupted, resulting in an inability for moving lips or tongue to the right place to pronounce sounds correctly. Current therapies for this condition involve a therapist that in one-on-one sessions conducts the exercises. Our aim is to work in the line of robotic therapies in which a robot is able to perform partially or autonomously a therapy session, endowing a social robot with the ability of assisting therapists in apraxia of speech rehabilitation exercises. Therefore, we integrate computer vision and machine learning techniques to detect the mouth pose of the user and, on top of that, our social robot performs autonomously the different steps of the therapy using multimodal interaction.

  8. ANALYSIS OF RANGE CONDITIONS OF CHILDREN WITH SPEECH DIFFICULTIES WITH SPEECH THERAPY TREATMENT AT PRE-SCHOOL PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. MIRAKOVSKA

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis for range of children with speech difficulties in their development with speech therapy treatment is made for a period of 3 years ( 1993-1996 in the Institute for hearing, speech and voice in Skopje. The obtained results from the analysis show that “ for the time the children have to go to school, parent’s interest in their children’s speech is increased. About 90 % of the children ranged with speech therapy treatment, in that period they were at 5-7 years of age, and that shows that a part of the utmost period for development of the speech is missed.Also a great number of children with speech difficulties in their development were not ranged with speech therapy treatment. The reasons for that are the late directing of children, the social and cultural factor, economic condition of the family.

  9. Parent-child interaction in motor speech therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aravind Kumar; Jethava, Vibhuti; Pukonen, Margit; Huynh, Anna; Goshulak, Debra; Kroll, Robert; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    This study measures the reliability and sensitivity of a modified Parent-Child Interaction Observation scale (PCIOs) used to monitor the quality of parent-child interaction. The scale is part of a home-training program employed with direct motor speech intervention for children with speech sound disorders. Eighty-four preschool age children with speech sound disorders were provided either high- (2×/week/10 weeks) or low-intensity (1×/week/10 weeks) motor speech intervention. Clinicians completed the PCIOs at the beginning, middle, and end of treatment. Inter-rater reliability (Kappa scores) was determined by an independent speech-language pathologist who assessed videotaped sessions at the midpoint of the treatment block. Intervention sensitivity of the scale was evaluated using a Friedman test for each item and then followed up with Wilcoxon pairwise comparisons where appropriate. We obtained fair-to-good inter-rater reliability (Kappa = 0.33-0.64) for the PCIOs using only video-based scoring. Child-related items were more strongly influenced by differences in treatment intensity than parent-related items, where a greater number of sessions positively influenced parent learning of treatment skills and child behaviors. The adapted PCIOs is reliable and sensitive to monitor the quality of parent-child interactions in a 10-week block of motor speech intervention with adjunct home therapy. Implications for rehabilitation Parent-centered therapy is considered a cost effective method of speech and language service delivery. However, parent-centered models may be difficult to implement for treatments such as developmental motor speech interventions that require a high degree of skill and training. For children with speech sound disorders and motor speech difficulties, a translated and adapted version of the parent-child observation scale was found to be sufficiently reliable and sensitive to assess changes in the quality of the parent-child interactions during

  10. Speech therapy in peripheral facial palsy: an orofacial myofunctional approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hipólito Virgílio Magalhães Júnior

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the contributions of speech therapy in the rehabilitation of peripheral facial palsy, describing the role of orofacial myofunctional approach in this process. Methods: A literature review of published articles since 1995, held from March to December 2008, based on the characterization of peripheral facial palsy and its relation with speechlanguage disorders related to orofacial disorders in mobility, speech and chewing, among others. The review prioritized scientific j...

  11. Speech and language therapy versus placebo or no intervention for speech problems in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Clare P; Tomlinson, Claire L; Deane, Katherine H O; Brady, Marian C; Smith, Christina H; Sackley, Catherine M; Clarke, Carl E

    2012-08-15

    Parkinson's disease patients commonly suffer from speech and vocal problems including dysarthric speech, reduced loudness and loss of articulation. These symptoms increase in frequency and intensity with progression of the disease). Speech and language therapy (SLT) aims to improve the intelligibility of speech with behavioural treatment techniques or instrumental aids. To compare the efficacy of speech and language therapy versus placebo or no intervention for speech and voice problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. Relevant trials were identified by electronic searches of numerous literature databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL, as well as handsearching of relevant conference abstracts and examination of reference lists in identified studies and other reviews. The literature search included trials published prior to 11(th) April 2011. Only randomised controlled trials (RCT) of speech and language therapy versus placebo or no intervention were included. Data were abstracted independently by CH and CT and differences settled by discussion. Three randomised controlled trials with a total of 63 participants were found comparing SLT with placebo for speech disorders in Parkinson's disease. Data were available from 41 participants in two trials. Vocal loudness for reading a passage increased by 6.3 dB (P = 0.0007) in one trial, and 11.0 dB (P = 0.0002) in another trial. An increase was also seen in both of these trials for monologue speaking of 5.4 dB (P = 0.002) and 11.0 dB (P = 0.0002), respectively. It is likely that these are clinically significant improvements. After six months, patients from the first trial were still showing a statistically significant increase of 4.5 dB (P = 0.0007) for reading and 3.5 dB for monologue speaking. Some measures of speech monotoni city and articulation were investigated; however, all these results were non-significant. Although improvements in speech impairments were noted in these studies, due to the small

  12. Longitudinal Study of Speech Perception, Speech, and Language for Children with Hearing Loss in an Auditory-Verbal Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Dimity; Hickson, Louise; Murdoch, Bruce; Houston, Todd

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the speech perception, speech, and language developmental progress of 25 children with hearing loss (mean Pure-Tone Average [PTA] 79.37 dB HL) in an auditory verbal therapy program. Children were tested initially and then 21 months later on a battery of assessments. The speech and language results over time were compared with…

  13. Speech and Language Therapy for Aphasia following Subacute Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyuncu, E.; Çam, P.; Altinok, N.; Çalli, D.E.; Yarbay Duman, T.; Özgirgin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke

  14. Speech therapy procedures in high-risk newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipólito Virgílio Magalhães Júnior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the speech therapy procedures performed in a neonatal ICU. Methods: A documental research based on registration records, comprised by a total of 34 newborns that required early stimulation by the speech therapy service in a neonatal ICU of a hospital with tertiary level of care. The study was held in the period between August, 2005 and January, 2006. From the sample, 14 children were female (41.2% and 20 were male (58.8%. The age of the newborns ranged from 3 to 57 life days. The studied variables included: risk conditions of the newborn, clinical assessment procedures, the intervention performed and the results obtained regarding weight. Results: The risk condition of preterm newborn (PTNB associated with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS was present in 25 (73.5% children. The initial weight of 15 (44.11% children ranged from 1170 to 1742 grams. The most widely discussed speech therapy procedures were the assessment of oral functions with identification of changes in sucking and swallowing in 25 (73.5% newborns and intervention by means of non-nutritive sucking in 18 (53% children. At the end of speech therapy, 19 (55.9% children weighed between 1742 to 2314 grams. Conclusions:The benefits of speech therapy performance were related to the identification of high-risk children who required intervention in oral functions and organization of the baby for feeding. It is assumed that the introduction of oral administration as quickly and safely as possible favored the improvement of the nutritional status of children and their clinical evolution

  15. Individual speech therapy in school for children with auditory impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Livečková, Miluše

    2016-01-01

    The subject of thesis was to investigate and compare the communication skills of pupils of the first class with a different type, degree of hearing loss and different living conditions. The methodology of work was based on principles of qualitative research; it is a case study of three students from the first grade class for children with hearing impairments; speech therapy of these three pupils who have different hearing loss and variable compensation of hearing loss was compared. Firstly, a...

  16. Intensive therapy induces contralateral white matter changes in chronic stroke patients with Broca's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Catherine Y; Zheng, Xin; Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2014-09-01

    Using a pre-post design, eleven chronic stroke patients with large left hemisphere lesions and nonfluent aphasia underwent diffusion tensor imaging and language testing before and after receiving 15 weeks of an intensive intonation-based speech therapy. This treated patient group was compared to an untreated patient group (n=9) scanned twice over a similar time period. Our results showed that the treated group, but not the untreated group, had reductions in fractional anisotropy in the white matter underlying the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, pars opercularis and pars triangularis), the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the right posterior cingulum. Furthermore, we found that greater improvements in speech production were associated with greater reductions in FA in the right IFG (pars opercularis). Thus, our findings showed that an intensive rehabilitation program for patients with nonfluent aphasia led to structural changes in the right hemisphere, which correlated with improvements in speech production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intensive therapy induces contralateral white matter changes in chronic stroke patients with Broca’s aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchina, Sarah; Norton, Andrea; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Using a pre-post design, eleven chronic stroke patients with large left hemisphere lesions and nonfluent aphasia underwent diffusion tensor imaging and language testing before and after receiving 15 weeks of an intensive intonation-based speech therapy. This treated patient group was compared to an untreated patient group (n=9) scanned twice over a similar time period. Our results showed that the treated group, but not the untreated group, had reductions in fractional anisotropy in the white matter underlying the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, pars opercularis and pars triangularis), the right posterior superior temporal gyrus, and in the right posterior cingulum. Furthermore, we found that greater improvements in speech production were associated with greater reductions in FA in the right IFG (pars opercularis). Thus, our findings showed that an intensive rehabilitation program for patients with non-fluent aphasia led to structural changes in the right hemisphere, which correlated with improvements in speech production. PMID:25041868

  18. 42 CFR 440.110 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and language disorders. (a) Physical... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and language disorders. 440.110 Section 440.110 Public...

  19. Modern Tools in Patient-Centred Speech Therapy for Romanian Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Danubianu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common way to communicate with those around us is speech. Suffering from a speech disorder can have negative social effects: from leaving the individuals with low confidence and moral to problems with social interaction and the ability to live independently like adults. The speech therapy intervention is a complex process having particular objectives such as: discovery and identification of speech disorder and directing the therapy to correction, recovery, compensation, adaptation and social integration of patients. Computer-based Speech Therapy systems are a real help for therapists by creating a special learning environment. The Romanian language is a phonetic one, with special linguistic particularities. This paper aims to present a few computer-based speech therapy systems developed for the treatment of various speech disorders specific to Romanian language.

  20. Evaluating UK research in speech and language therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewison, Grant; Carding, Paul

    2003-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in recent years in British higher-degree training in speech and language therapy. But what is the standing of UK research in the subject and its component areas which should underpin and inform such training? How can such research be evaluated? The intention was to compare UK publications relevant to speech and language therapy with those of other countries, both quantitatively and qualitatively. We sought then to examine the UK papers in more detail to analyse their sources of funding, their geographical distribution and the ways in which they could appropriately be evaluated. Papers were selectively retrieved from the Science Citation Index and the Social Sciences Citation Index for 1991-2000 by means of a filter based on journal names and paper title words. They were subsequently checked to remove many false positives. The papers were classified into one of seven subject areas and by their research level (from clinical to basic). Their importance was estimated through their potential impact on other researchers, as determined by the citation score of their journals, by the numbers of citations they actually received and by the subjective esteem in which the various journals were held by UK speech and language researchers. World output of speech and language therapy papers has averaged 1000 papers per year during the 1990s, and has grown by half over the period. UK output has been about 12% of the total, compared with 10% in biomedicine, and is published in high impact journals relative to the norm for the field, which is quite a low rate compared with biomedicine overall. Almost half the UK papers had no funding acknowledgements, with the private-non-profit and industrial sectors playing less of a role than in other biomedical areas. Papers in seven subject areas showed substantial differences in their performance on the four criteria selected. The state of British speech and language research appears to be satisfactory, with an

  1. The Importance of Production Frequency in Therapy for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeal, Denice Michelle; Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina Elke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores the importance of production frequency during speech therapy to determine whether more practice of speech targets leads to increased performance within a treatment session, as well as to motor learning, in the form of generalization to untrained words. Method: Two children with childhood apraxia of speech were treated…

  2. Adherence of the dysphonic teachers in speech therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lívia Rodrigues; Almeida, Letícia; Teixeira, Letícia Caldas; Bassi, Iara; Assunção, Ada Ávila; Gama, Ana Cristina Côrtes

    2013-01-01

    To study the possible factors associated with adherence to the speech-language pathology treatment of dysphonia in female teachers of municipal schools of Belo Horizonte. This was a retrospective study that analyzed the medical records of 251 teachers treated at the Voice Ambulatory Speech Language Pathology Service, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (AV-UFMG) from August 2007 to December 2009. The collected data included age, number of scheduled sessions, number of absences, number of children, type of dysphonia, degree of dysphonia, monthly family income, and education. We calculated the distance, in kilometers, of the residence to the place of treatment and the workplace to place of treatment. We also analyzed the social vulnerability index of the workplace. The results of this research indicated that of the 135 records that were included in the study, 89 (65.93%) corresponded to the discharged group and 46 (34.07%) corresponded to the abandonment group. In comparison with all the variables studied, only the number of faults and the type of dysphonia were associated with poor adherence to voice therapy. Results showed that the number of absences in sessions, treatment-related factor, organofuncional dysphonia type, and clinical-related factor were all associated with the abandonment of voice therapy.

  3. Reflections on Clinical Learning in Novice Speech-Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice…

  4. Occupational, speech and emotional therapy with students attending booster classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Dafna; Reiter, Shunit

    2011-01-01

    The current study reviews the work being carried out in the Naomi Therapeutic Center in Kiryat Yam, Israel. The staff in this Center decided to provide a holistic response (which includes occupational therapy, speech therapy and art therapy) to 50 elementary school special education students in five booster classes. The goal of the study was to enable these students to improve their self-image, demonstrate fewer classroom adaptive behavioral problems and bring them to function better in class by the end of the school year. Findings demonstrate that in the study group, students' self-image scores were significantly higher at the end of the intervention program than they were prior to the intervention (p = 0.040). In addition, the study group demonstrated a significant difference in adaptive behavior scores before and after the intervention, indicating fewer adaptive classroom behavior problems towards the end of the intervention (p = 0.034). Finally, findings indicate that there was a significant improvement in students' functioning on all of the occupational therapy categories.

  5. Speech language pathologists' opinions of constraint-induced language therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephen J; Wallace, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Constraint-induced language therapy (CILT) has received recent attention as a possible intervention to improve expressive language in people with nonfluent aphasia. Difficulties have been reported with the practical implementation of constraint-induced movement therapy due to its intensive treatment parameters. It remains unknown whether similar challenges may exist with CILT. To determine the opinions of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) about CILT for people with nonfluent aphasia. One hundred sixty-seven SLPs completed an electronic survey assessing their opinions of various aspects of CILT. Over 60% of participants felt that people with aphasia would be very unlikely or somewhat unlikely to adhere to CILT. The majority felt that people with aphasia would hold high or moderate concerns with the number of hours spent in therapy (high, 41.8%; moderate, 31.4%), the number of days spent in therapy (high, 44.4%; moderate, 24.8%), likelihood for managed care reimbursement (high, 74.8%; moderate, 15.2%), and other logistical issues (high, 39.2%; moderate, 30.7%). With respect to providing CILT, participants cited the number of hours of therapy (high, 37.3%; moderate, 21.6%) and the number of consecutive days of therapy (high, 29.4%; moderate, 20.3%) as concerns. There were 70.6% who indicated that their facilities lacked resources to provide CILT, and 90.9% felt that most facilitates do not have the resources to provide CILT. Some SLPs hold significant concerns with the administration of CILT, particularly related to its dosing and reimbursement parameters. Additional work is needed to investigate the issues that were identified in this survey using qualitative methods with SLPs and people with aphasia and to examine modified CILT protocols.

  6. 42 CFR 484.38 - Condition of participation: Qualifying to furnish outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology services. 484.38 Section 484.38 Public Health CENTERS FOR... furnish outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology services. An HHA that wishes to furnish outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology services must meet all the pertinent conditions of this part and also...

  7. [Transsexuality: speech therapy supporting the "voice" of transformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, P; Isoard-Nectoux, S; Matoso, B; Matthieu-Bourdeau, L; Schneider, F; Schweizer, V

    2012-01-01

    These past years, the Unité de Phoniatrie & Logopédie du CHUV, in Lausanne, has been increasingly requested to provide care to transsexual patients. If the sex change from female to male does not generally entail vocal problems as a result of hormonotherapy, such is not the case the other way around. Thus, our patients are mostly men converting into women. Since the male larynx cannot be modified on an organic level, speech therapy is of the utmost importance in ensuring vocal adaptation. In this article, we briefly describe the complete gender transformation program, and detail the therapeutic approach supported by our unit. In addition to raising the fundamental frequency, we also focus on various factors such as articulation, intonation, vocabulary, and phrase structure, keeping in mind that the female voice is not only high pitched....

  8. THE MEANING OF THE PREVENTION WITH SPEECH THERAPY AS A IMPORTANT FAC-TOR FOR THE PROPER DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILDREN SPEECH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. FILIPOVA

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presented some conscientious and results from the finished research which showing the meaning of the prevention with speech therapy in the development of the speech. The research was done at Negotino and with that are shown the most frequent speech deficiency of the children at preschool age.

  9. Predicting couple therapy outcomes based on speech acoustic features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Nasir

    Full Text Available Automated assessment and prediction of marital outcome in couples therapy is a challenging task but promises to be a potentially useful tool for clinical psychologists. Computational approaches for inferring therapy outcomes using observable behavioral information obtained from conversations between spouses offer objective means for understanding relationship dynamics. In this work, we explore whether the acoustics of the spoken interactions of clinically distressed spouses provide information towards assessment of therapy outcomes. The therapy outcome prediction task in this work includes detecting whether there was a relationship improvement or not (posed as a binary classification as well as discerning varying levels of improvement or decline in the relationship status (posed as a multiclass recognition task. We use each interlocutor's acoustic speech signal characteristics such as vocal intonation and intensity, both independently and in relation to one another, as cues for predicting the therapy outcome. We also compare prediction performance with one obtained via standardized behavioral codes characterizing the relationship dynamics provided by human experts as features for automated classification. Our experiments, using data from a longitudinal clinical study of couples in distressed relations, showed that predictions of relationship outcomes obtained directly from vocal acoustics are comparable or superior to those obtained using human-rated behavioral codes as prediction features. In addition, combining direct signal-derived features with manually coded behavioral features improved the prediction performance in most cases, indicating the complementarity of relevant information captured by humans and machine algorithms. Additionally, considering the vocal properties of the interlocutors in relation to one another, rather than in isolation, showed to be important for improving the automatic prediction. This finding supports the notion

  10. Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Marian C; Kelly, Helen; Godwin, Jon; Enderby, Pam; Campbell, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    Aphasia is an acquired language impairment following brain damage that affects some or all language modalities: expression and understanding of speech, reading, and writing. Approximately one third of people who have a stroke experience aphasia. To assess the effects of speech and language therapy (SLT) for aphasia following stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 9 September 2015), CENTRAL (2015, Issue 5) and other Cochrane Library Databases (CDSR, DARE, HTA, to 22 September 2015), MEDLINE (1946 to September 2015), EMBASE (1980 to September 2015), CINAHL (1982 to September 2015), AMED (1985 to September 2015), LLBA (1973 to September 2015), and SpeechBITE (2008 to September 2015). We also searched major trials registers for ongoing trials including ClinicalTrials.gov (to 21 September 2015), the Stroke Trials Registry (to 21 September 2015), Current Controlled Trials (to 22 September 2015), and WHO ICTRP (to 22 September 2015). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing trials we also handsearched the International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders (1969 to 2005) and reference lists of relevant articles, and we contacted academic institutions and other researchers. There were no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing SLT (a formal intervention that aims to improve language and communication abilities, activity and participation) versus no SLT; social support or stimulation (an intervention that provides social support and communication stimulation but does not include targeted therapeutic interventions); or another SLT intervention (differing in duration, intensity, frequency, intervention methodology or theoretical approach). We independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of included trials. We sought missing data from investigators. We included 57 RCTs (74 randomised comparisons) involving 3002 participants in this review (some appearing in

  11. Speech and Language Therapy Intervention in Schizophrenia: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Judy; Brumfitt, Shelagh; Parks, Randolph W.; Woodruff, Peter W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is a significant body of evidence documenting the speech and language abnormalities found in adult psychiatric disorders. These speech and language impairments can create additional social barriers for the individual and may hinder effective communication in psychiatric treatment and management. However, the role of speech and…

  12. Efficiency and types of musical activities in speech and language communication disorders therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rupnik, Mojca

    2011-01-01

    This thesis highlights the use of music in speech-language communication disorder therapy. The connection between the field of music, speech and language is explored. The common elements are presented as well as similarities in processing and the course of development. In the research, we analyse the impact of music on speech-language development and reach the conclusion that music has a significant influence especially on increasing of verbal memory, improvement of listening skills, building...

  13. Task-Setting at Home and in Speech and Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykkylainen, Tuula

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse and describe task-setting in game-like interactions. The task-setting is studied in two contexts: in everyday interaction and in speech and language therapy. The data comprises task interaction between mothers and 5-year-old typically developing children (6 pairs) and task interaction between speech and…

  14. Perceptions of Speech and Language Therapy Amongst UK School and College Students: Implications for Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Nan; Wright, Jannet A.; Bithell, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Background: Communication disorders affect both sexes and people from all ethnic groups, but members of minority ethnic groups and males in the UK are underrepresented in the speech and language therapy profession. Research in the area of recruitment is limited, but a possible explanation is poor awareness and understanding of speech and language…

  15. Speech therapy for children with dysarthria acquired before three years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Parker, Naomi K; Kelly, Helen; Miller, Nick

    2016-07-18

    Children with motor impairments often have the motor speech disorder dysarthria, a condition which effects the tone, strength and co-ordination of any or all of the muscles used for speech. Resulting speech difficulties can range from mild, with slightly slurred articulation and breathy voice, to profound, with an inability to produce any recognisable words. Children with dysarthria are often prescribed communication aids to supplement their natural forms of communication. However, there is variation in practice regarding the provision of therapy focusing on voice and speech production. Descriptive studies have suggested that therapy may improve speech, but its effectiveness has not been evaluated. To assess whether any speech and language therapy intervention aimed at improving the speech of children with dysarthria is more effective in increasing children's speech intelligibility or communicative participation than no intervention at all , and to compare the efficacy of individual types of speech language therapy in improving the speech intelligibility or communicative participation of children with dysarthria. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015 , Issue 7 ), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL , LLBA, ERIC, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Scopus, UK National Research Register and Dissertation Abstracts up to July 2015, handsearched relevant journals published between 1980 and July 2015, and searched proceedings of relevant conferences between 1996 to 2015. We placed no restrictions on the language or setting of the studies. A previous version of this review considered studies published up to April 2009. In this update we searched for studies published from April 2009 to July 2015. We considered randomised controlled trials and studies using quasi-experimental designs in which children were allocated to groups using non-random methods. One author (LP) conducted searches of all databases, journals and conference reports. All searches

  16. A Longitudinal Assessment of Early Childhood Education with Integrated Speech Therapy for Children with Significant Language Impairment in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Dieter; Ullrich, Katja; Marten, Magret

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Lower Saxony, Germany, pre-school children with language- and speech-deficits have the opportunity to access kindergartens with integrated language-/speech therapy prior to attending primary school, both regular or with integrated speech therapy. It is unknown whether these early childhood education treatments are helpful and…

  17. A novel speech prosthesis for mandibular guidance therapy in hemimandibulectomy patient: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Adaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treating diverse maxillofacial patients poses a challenge to the maxillofacial prosthodontist. Rehabilitation of hemimandibulectomy patients must aim at restoring mastication and other functions such as intelligible speech, swallowing, and esthetics. Prosthetic methods such as palatal ramp and mandibular guiding flange reposition the deviated mandible. Such prosthesis can also be used to restore speech in case of patients with debilitating speech following surgical resection. This clinical report gives detail of a hemimandibulectomy patient provided with an interim removable dental speech prosthesis with composite resin flange for mandibular guidance therapy.

  18. Determining the effect of laser acupuncture in treating stutterers in comparison with speech therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Shafiei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigation of strategies and methods of therapy in stutterers regarding to its characteristics, length of treatment, and relapse of stuttering is very important. Acupuncture has been introduced as a therapeutic method for the treatment of stuttering. The aim of the present research was the identification of the results of intervention of laser acupuncture in comparison with speech therapy in stutterers. Materials and Methods: This clinical - trial and case control research was conducted on 20 stutterers and 20 non-stutterers. In the present study, speech therapy and laser acupuncture were used on 10 persons who had developmental stuttering from childhood. Results: The results were compared with the data of speech therapy and placebo laser in 10 control subjects. All of the subjects were followed up for 12 weeks after the intervention. The obtained data showed that accompanying of speech therapy with laser acupuncture resulted the increasing of maintenance and therapeutic effects of stuttering treatment and decreasing of relapsing. The speech rate and percent of stuttered words before and after the intervention in both groups (A and B were decreased. Following the results after 12 weeks showed that the results were stable in laser group more than the other group and there was a significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that using of laser acupuncture therapy accompanying by speech therapy has many effects on the treatment of stuttering and prevents the relapsing of stuttering that is very common.

  19. THE MEANING OF THE TEAM WORK DURING THE MAKING OF THE DIAGNOSIS FOR THE SPEECH THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. FILIPOVA

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work the authors emphasized the meaning and some tasks of the teamwork during the making of the diagnosis for the speech therapy because of the meaning of the professionalism and responsibilities are very important.

  20. Computer-based Programs in Speech Therapy of Dyslalia and Dyslexia- Dysgraphia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Danubianu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, the researchers and therapists in speech therapy have been more and more concerned with the elaboration and use of computer programs in speech disorders therapy. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of computer-based programs for the Romanian language in speech therapy. Along the study, we will present the experimental research through assessing the effectiveness of computer programs in the speech therapy for speech disorders: dyslalia, dyslexia and dysgraphia. Methodologically, the use of the computer in the therapeutic phases was carried out with the help of some computer-based programs (Logomon, Dislex-Test etc. that we elaborated and we experimented with during several years of therapeutic activity. The sample used in our experiments was composed of 120 subjects; two groups of 60 children with speech disorders were selected for both speech disorders: 30 for the experimental ('computer-based' group and 30 for the control ('classical method' group. The study hypotheses verified whether the results, obtained by the subjects within the experimental group, improved significantly after using the computer-based program, compared to the subjects within the control group, who did not use this program but got a classical therapy. The hypotheses were confirmed for the speech disorders included in this research; the conclusions of the study confirm the advantages of using computer-based programs within speech therapy by correcting these disorders, as well as due to the positive influence these programs have on the development of children’s personality.

  1. Some issues of Japanese speech-language-hearing therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iitaka, Kyoko; Otomo, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Recent trends in Japanese speech-language-hearing (SLH) therapy education are reported. The rapid growth of educational institutions has continued since our last report. The educational curriculum was established by the 1997 certification of Japanese SLH therapists, and is strictly applied to educating both college/university and vocational school students. Over 1,000 students annually become registered SLH therapists, of whom nearly 70% are under the age of 39 years. More therapists are employed full time to serve the adult population, while a limited number of therapists are fully employed to provide services to children. As a member of the economically more advanced nations, Japan receives assistance from foreign workers coming from economically less developed nations. Their children face the difficult tasks of learning both their mother tongue and Japanese. There is a strong need for our profession to assist the early language acquisition of these children because their cognitive and personal development will be greatly influenced by adequate language acquisition. An appeal is made to our colleagues for sharing the mutual tasks of bringing about better linguistic and communicative development in those educationally disadvantaged children. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Auditory evoked potentials: predicting speech therapy outcomes in children with phonological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Aparecida Leite

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether neurophysiologic responses (auditory evoked potentials differ between typically developed children and children with phonological disorders and whether these responses are modified in children with phonological disorders after speech therapy. METHODS: The participants included 24 typically developing children (Control Group, mean age: eight years and ten months and 23 children clinically diagnosed with phonological disorders (Study Group, mean age: eight years and eleven months. Additionally, 12 study group children were enrolled in speech therapy (Study Group 1, and 11 were not enrolled in speech therapy (Study Group 2. The subjects were submitted to the following procedures: conventional audiological, auditory brainstem response, auditory middle-latency response, and P300 assessments. All participants presented with normal hearing thresholds. The study group 1 subjects were reassessed after 12 speech therapy sessions, and the study group 2 subjects were reassessed 3 months after the initial assessment. Electrophysiological results were compared between the groups. RESULTS: Latency differences were observed between the groups (the control and study groups regarding the auditory brainstem response and the P300 tests. Additionally, the P300 responses improved in the study group 1 children after speech therapy. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that children with phonological disorders have impaired auditory brainstem and cortical region pathways that may benefit from speech therapy.

  3. PRACTICING SPEECH THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR SOCIAL INTEGRATION OF CHILDREN WITH SPEECH DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ofelia POPESCU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a concise speech correction intervention program in of dyslalia in conjunction with capacity development of intra, interpersonal and social integration of children with speech disorders. The program main objectives represent: the potential increasing of individual social integration by correcting speech disorders in conjunction with intra- and interpersonal capacity, the potential growth of children and community groups for social integration by optimizing the socio-relational context of children with speech disorder. In the program were included 60 children / students with dyslalia speech disorders (monomorphic and polymorphic dyslalia, from 11 educational institutions - 6 kindergartens and 5 schools / secondary schools, joined with inter-school logopedic centre (CLI from Targu Jiu city and areas of Gorj district. The program was implemented under the assumption that therapeutic-formative intervention to correct speech disorders and facilitate the social integration will lead, in combination with correct pronunciation disorders, to social integration optimization of children with speech disorders. The results conirm the hypothesis and gives facts about the intervention program eficiency.

  4. Language disorders in young children : when is speech therapy recommended?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorhuis-Brouwer, SM; Knijff, WA

    Objective: Analysis of treatment recommendation given by speech therapists. Evaluation of the language abilities in the examined children and re-examination of those abilities after 12 months. Materials and methods: Thirty-four children, aged between 2.0 and 5.3 years, referred to speech therapists

  5. Effect of speech therapy and pharmacological treatment in prosody of parkinsonians

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    Luciana Lemos de Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Parkinsonian patients usually present speech impairment. The aim of this study was to verify the influence of levodopa and of the adapted Lee Silverman Vocal Treatment® method on prosodic parameters employed by parkinsonian patients. Method Ten patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease using levodopa underwent recording of utterances produced in four stages: expressing attitudes of certainty and doubt and declarative and interrogative modalities. The sentences were recorded under the effect of levodopa (on, without the effect of levodopa (off; before and after speech therapy during the on and off periods. Results The speech therapy and its association with drug treatment promoted the improvement of prosodic parameters: increase of fundamental frequency measures, reduction of measures of duration and greater intensity. Conclusion The association of speech therapy to medication treatment is of great value in improving the communication of parkinsonian patients.

  6. Perceptions of speech and language therapy amongst UK school and college students: implications for recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Nan; Wright, Jannet A; Bithell, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Communication disorders affect both sexes and people from all ethnic groups, but members of minority ethnic groups and males in the UK are underrepresented in the speech and language therapy profession. Research in the area of recruitment is limited, but a possible explanation is poor awareness and understanding of speech and language therapy as a profession. To investigate factors influencing attitudes to a career in speech and language therapy amongst UK school and college students focusing on the similarities and differences between males and females, and between minority ethnic and white students. A total of 651 male and female school and college students from a range of ethnic groups and all close to selecting degree courses completed a questionnaire designed to examine the attitudes and awareness of speech and language therapy. Eleven semi-structured follow-up interviews were conducted to help understand the questionnaire findings. Quantitative and qualitative analyses examined differences in attitudes and the awareness of speech and language therapy amongst these groups. Overall, one-third of participants said they knew nothing about speech and language therapy, and males were significantly less familiar with it. Less than half the participants were aware that speech and language therapy is a degree course, and minority ethnic participants were significantly less likely to know this. Compared with males, females were almost five times as likely to say they would consider a career in speech and language therapy. Participants with relatives in health-related jobs were significantly more likely to consider speech and language therapy than those without such relatives. Compared with white participants, minority ethnic participants said they placed greater importance on studying for a degree, a profession and a scientific career, and were more influenced by a career's prestige and a high salary. In order to increase the ethnic and gender diversity of speech and

  7. The knowledge and attitudes of occupational therapy, physiotherapy and speech-language therapy students, regarding the speech-language therapist's role in the hospital stroke rehabilitation team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsher, L; Ross, E

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to survey and compare the knowledge and attitudes of final year occupational therapy, physiotherapy and speech-language therapy students, concerning the role of the speech-language therapist as a member of the stroke rehabilitation team in the hospital setting. In order to achieve this aim, a questionnaire was administered to final year students in these three disciplines, and included questions on most areas of stroke rehabilitation with which the speech-language therapist might be involved, as well as the concepts of rehabilitation and teamwork in relation to stroke rehabilitation. Results suggested a fairly good understanding of the concepts of rehabilitation and teamwork. Students appeared to have a greater understanding of those disorders following a stroke, with which the speech-language therapist is commonly involved, such as Aphasia, Dysarthria, Verbal Apraxia and Dysphagia. However, students appeared to show less understanding of those disorders post-stroke, for which the speech-language therapist's role is less well defined, such as Agraphia, Alexia and Amnesia. In addition, a high percentage of role duplication/overlapping in several aspects of stroke rehabilitation, such as family and social support, was found. Several implications for facilitating communication, collaboration and understanding between paramedical professions, as well as for further research are also provided.

  8. A multimedia PDA/PC speech and language therapy tool for patients with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Nina; Jefferies, Laura; Cunningham, Sally-Jo; Harris, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Aphasia is a speech disorder usually caused by stroke or head injury and may involve a variety of communication difficulties. As 30% of stroke sufferers have a persisting speech and language disorder and therapy resources are low, there is clear scope for the development of technology to support patients between therapy sessions. This paper reports on an empirical study which evaluated SoundHelper, a multimedia application to demonstrate how to pronounce target speech sounds. Two prototypes, involving either video or animation, were developed and evaluated with 20 Speech and Language Therapists. Participants responded positively to both, with the video being preferred because of the perceived extra information provided. The potential for the use on portable devices, since internet access is limited in hospitals, is explored in the light of opinions of Augmented and Alternative Communication (AAC) device users in the UK nd Europe who have expressed a strong desire for more use of internet services.

  9. Speech and language therapies to improve pragmatics and discourse skills in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyal, Marilyne; Bonneau, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley

    2016-06-30

    Individuals with schizophrenia display speech and language impairments that greatly impact their integration to the society. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the importance of speech and language therapy (SLT) as part of rehabilitation curriculums for patients with schizophrenia emphasizing on the speech and language abilities assessed, the therapy setting and the therapeutic approach. This article reviewed 18 studies testing the effects of language therapy or training in 433 adults diagnosed with schizophrenia. Results showed that 14 studies out of 18 lead to improvements in language and/or speech abilities. Most of these studies comprised pragmatic or expressive discursive skills being the only aim of the therapy or part of it. The therapy settings vary widely ranging from twice daily individual therapy to once weekly group therapy. The therapeutic approach was mainly operant conditioning. Although the evidence tends to show that certain areas of language are treatable through therapy, it remains difficult to state the type of approach that should be favoured and implemented to treat language impairments in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in N400 Topography Following Intensive Speech Language Therapy for Individuals with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. Ryan; O'Rourke, Heather; Wozniak, Linda A.; Kostopoulos, Ellina; Marchand, Yannick; Newman, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to characterize the effects of intensive aphasia therapy on the N400, an electrophysiological index of lexical-semantic processing. Immediately before and after 4 weeks of intensive speech-language therapy, people with aphasia performed a task in which they had to determine whether spoken words were a "match" or a "mismatch" to…

  11. Sensory integration dysfunction affects efficacy of speech therapy on children with functional articulation disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung LC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chen Tung,1,# Chin-Kai Lin,2,# Ching-Lin Hsieh,3,4 Ching-Chi Chen,1 Chin-Tsan Huang,1 Chun-Hou Wang5,6 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, 2Program of Early Intervention, Department of Early Childhood Education, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung, 3School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, 5School of Physical Therapy, College of Medical Science and Technology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 6Physical Therapy Room, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan#These authors contributed equally Background: Articulation disorders in young children are due to defects occurring at a certain stage in sensory and motor development. Some children with functional articulation disorders may also have sensory integration dysfunction (SID. We hypothesized that speech therapy would be less efficacious in children with SID than in those without SID. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of speech therapy in two groups of children with functional articulation disorders: those without and those with SID.Method: A total of 30 young children with functional articulation disorders were divided into two groups, the no-SID group (15 children and the SID group (15 children. The number of pronunciation mistakes was evaluated before and after speech therapy.Results: There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex, sibling order, education of parents, and pretest number of mistakes in pronunciation between the two groups (P > 0.05. The mean and standard deviation in the pre- and posttest number of mistakes in pronunciation were 10.5 ± 3.2 and 3.3 ± 3.3 in the no-SID group, and 10.1 ± 2.9 and 6.9 ± 3.5 in the SID group, respectively. Results showed great changes after speech therapy treatment (F

  12. Comparison of Voice Handicap Index Scores Between Female Students of Speech Therapy and Other Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafiadis, Dionysios; Chronopoulos, Spyridon K; Siafaka, Vassiliki; Drosos, Konstantinos; Kosma, Evangelia I; Toki, Eugenia I; Ziavra, Nausica

    2017-09-01

    Students' groups (eg, teachers, speech language pathologists) are presumably at risk of developing a voice disorder due to misuse of their voice, which will affect their way of living. Multidisciplinary voice assessment of student populations is currently spread widely along with the use of self-reported questionnaires. This study compared the Voice Handicap Index domains and item scores between female students of speech and language therapy and of other health professions in Greece. We also examined the probability of speech language therapy students developing any vocal symptom. Two hundred female non-dysphonic students (aged 18-31) were recruited. Participants answered the Voice Evaluation Form and the Greek adaptation of the Voice Handicap Index. Significant differences were observed between the two groups (students of speech therapy and other health professions) through Voice Handicap Index (total score, functional and physical domains), excluding the emotional domain. Furthermore, significant differences for specific Voice Handicap Index items, between subgroups, were observed. In conclusion, speech language therapy students had higher Voice Handicap Index scores, which probably could be an indicator for avoiding profession-related dysphonia at a later stage. Also, Voice Handicap Index could be at a first glance an assessment tool for the recognition of potential voice disorder development in students. In turn, the results could be used for indirect therapy approaches, such as providing methods for maintaining vocal health in different student populations. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Speech and language therapy intervention with a group of persistent and prolific young offenders in a non-custodial setting with previously undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Juliette; Bryan, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of children with behaviour and school problems (related to both academic achievement and social participation) are recognized as having undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties. Both speech, language and communication difficulties and school failure are risk factors for offending. To investigate the prevalence of speech, language and communication difficulties in a group of persistent and prolific young offenders sentenced to the Intensive Supervision and Surveillance Programme (ISSP), and to provide a preliminary evaluation of the impact of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention. Seventy-two entrants to ISSP over 12 months were screened by the speech and language therapist. Those showing difficulties then had a detailed language assessment followed by intervention delivered jointly by the speech and language therapist and the youth offending team staff. Reassessment occurred at programme completion. A total of 65% of those screened had profiles indicating that they had language difficulties and might benefit from speech and language therapy intervention. As a cohort, their language skills were lower than those of the general population, and 20% scored at the 'severely delayed' level on standardized assessment. This is the first study of speech and language therapy within community services for young offenders, and is the first to demonstrate language improvement detectable on standardized language tests. However, further research is needed to determine the precise role of speech and language therapy within the intervention programme. Children and young people with behavioural or school difficulties coming into contact with criminal justice, mental health, psychiatric, and social care services need to be systematically assessed for undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties. Appropriate interventions can then enable the young person to engage with verbally mediated interventions. © 2011 Royal College

  14. Integrating Music Therapy Services and Speech-Language Therapy Services for Children with Severe Communication Impairments: A Co-Treatment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; McCarthy, John; Rodgers-Smith, Amy; Porter, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Documenting how music therapy can be integrated with speech-language therapy services for children with communication delay is not evident in the literature. In this article, a collaborative model with procedures, experiences, and communication outcomes of integrating music therapy with the existing speech-language services is given. Using…

  15. Automatic speech recognition (ASR) and its use as a tool for assessment or therapy of voice, speech, and language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzing, Peter; Maier, Andreas; Ahlander, Viveka Lyberg

    2009-01-01

    In general opinion computerized automatic speech recognition (ASR) seems to be regarded as a method only to accomplish transcriptions from spoken language to written text and as such quite insecure and rather cumbersome. However, due to great advances in computer technology and informatics methodology ASR has nowadays become quite dependable and easier to handle, and the number of applications has increased considerably. After some introductory background information on ASR a number of applications of great interest for professionals in voice, speech, and language therapy are pointed out. In the foreseeable future, the keyboard and mouse will by means of ASR technology be replaced in many functions by a microphone as the human-computer interface, and the computer will talk back via its loud-speaker. It seems important that professionals engaged in the care of oral communication disorders take part in this development so their clients may get the optimal benefit from this new technology.

  16. [Potential analysis of research on speech therapy-led communication training in aphasia following stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Sabrina; Lauer, Norina; Corsten, Sabine; Voigt-Radloff, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, about 100,000 people currently suffer from aphasia. This speech disorder occurs as a result of neurologic events such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Aphasia causes major limitations in social participation and quality of life and can be associated with unemployability and social isolation. For affected persons, it is essential to regain and maintain autonomy in daily life, both at work and with family and friends. The loss of autonomy is perceived much more dramatically than the loss of speech. Clients wish to minimise this loss of autonomy in daily life. As full recovery is not achievable in chronic aphasia, treatment must focus on improved compensatory approaches and on supporting the clients' coping strategies. Based on eight randomised comparisons including 347 participants, a recent Cochrane review (Brady et al., 2012) revealed that speech therapy - as compared with no treatment - had positive effects on functional communication in clients suffering from aphasia (0.30 SMD; 95% CI[0.08 to 0.52]). There was no evidence suggesting that one type of training was superior to the others. However, quality of life and social participation were not evaluated as outcomes. Recent studies found that speech therapy-led training for communication and self-efficacy and the integration of communication partners may have a positive impact on these client-centred outcomes. Speech therapy-led training for communication within a group setting should be manualised and pilot-tested with respect to feasibility and acceptance in a German sample of people with aphasia and their communication partners. Instruments measuring quality of life and social participation can be validated within the scope of this feasibility study. These research efforts are necessary to prepare a large-scale comparative effectiveness research trial comparing the effects of both usual speech therapy and speech therapy-led group communication training on quality of life and social participation

  17. Reflections on clinical learning in novice speech-language therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E; Davidson, Bronwyn J; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice has been reported. Indeed, there has been limited investigation of the nature of speech-language therapy students' reflections. (1) To describe the breadth and depth of reflection skills of novice speech-language therapy students by utilizing structured reflective learning journals. (2) To evaluate the use of a coding system to determine its reliability and relevance in identifying reflection skills. Participants were 52 students in their second year of a 4-year undergraduate speech-language therapy programme. Mean participant age was 20.5 years; all students were female. Participants completed guided written reflections following three interviews with a standardized patient (an actor portraying a parent of a child with delayed speech development). Reflections were coded by two raters. Nine participants' reflections were recoded by raters A and B to establish intra-rater reliability. Inter-rater reliability between these two raters was calculated and a third rater completed coding of 20% of students' reflections to further establish inter-rater reliability. Results indicated that the majority of students were categorized as 'reflectors'. All students demonstrated at least one element of reflection. Their reflective writing primarily focused on a discussion of the content of and strategies used within the interviews, and reflection on and for action. Results also indicated that the coding system used within the study was reliable in determining both the breadth and depth of student reflections. This study found that novice speech-language therapy students can reflect on their clinical learning experiences within a structured clinical

  18. Five analogies between a King's Speech treatment and contemporary play therapies.

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    Terr, Lenore C

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric patients frequently respond positively to play therapy, which may rely on psychoanalytic, Jungian, cognitive-behavioral, familial, school-based, or other theories. I wished to determine if there were unifying principles that tie together these various types of play treatments. The fact-based film, The King's Speech, vividly illustrates play utilized by Lionel Logue in his speech treatment (1926-1939) of the future King of England. In the film I found five analogies to the play therapy I employ in office practice. The play scenes in The King's Speech point to five unifying principles among contemporary play therapies: (1) the crucial nature of the relationship, (2) the centrality of having fun, (3) the occasional reliance on others, (4) the interjection of pithy talk, and (5) the usefulness of a little drama. No matter what theory a play therapist ascribes to, these five unifying principles should be kept in mind during treatment.

  19. Factors Affecting Delayed Referral for Speech Therapy in Iranian children with Speech and Language Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshanak Vameghi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Early detection of children who are at risk for speech and language impairment and those at early stages of delay is crucial for provision of early intervention services. However, unfortunately in Iran, this disorder is not identified or referred for proper treatment and rehabilitation at early critical stages. Materials & Methods: This study was carried out in two phases. The first phase which was qualitative in nature was meant to identify all potentially affective factors through literature review as well as by acquiring the viewpoints of experts and families on this issue. Twelve experts and 9 parents of children with speech and language disorders participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews, thereby completing the first draft of potentially affective factors compiled through literature review. The completed list of factors finally led to the design of a questionnaire for identifying “factors affecting late referral in childhood speech and language impairment”. The questionnaire was approved for face and content validity. The cronbach’s alpha was determined to be 0.81. Two groups of parents were asked to complete the questionnaire: the parents of children who had attended speech and language clinics located on the west and central regions of Tehran city, after their child was 3 years old and those who had attended before their child was 3 years old, as the case and control group, respectively. Results: According to the results, among the seven factors which showed significant difference between the two groups of children before definite diagnosis of speech and language disorders was arrived for the child, 3 factors were related to the type of guidance and consultation received by the family from physicians, 2 factors were related to parents’ lack of awareness and knowledge, and 2 factors were related to the screening services received. All six factors showing significant difference between the two groups after

  20. Integration of literacy into speech-language therapy: a descriptive analysis of treatment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Justice, Laura M; Logan, Jessica A R; Schwarz, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was: (a) to examine the extent to which speech-language therapy provided to children with language disorders in the schools targets code-based literacy skills (e.g., alphabet knowledge and phonological awareness) during business-as-usual treatment sessions, and (b) to determine whether literacy-focused therapy time was associated with factors specific to children and/or speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Participants were 151 kindergarten and first-grade children and 40 SLPs. Video-recorded therapy sessions were coded to determine the amount of time that addressed literacy. Assessments of children's literacy skills were administered as well as questionnaires regarding characteristics of SLPs (e.g., service delivery, professional development). Results showed that time spent addressing code-related literacy across therapy sessions was variable. Significant predictors included SLP years of experience, therapy location, and therapy session duration, such that children receiving services from SLPs with more years of experience, and/or who utilized the classroom for therapy, received more literacy-focused time. Additionally, children in longer therapy sessions received more therapy time on literacy skills. There is considerable variability in the extent to which children received literacy-focused time in therapy; however, SLP-level factors predict time spent in literacy more than child-level factors. Further research is needed to understand the nature of literacy-focused therapy in the public schools. Readers will be able to: (a) define code-based literacy skills, (b) discuss the role that speech-language pathologists have in fostering children's literacy development, and (c) identify key factors that may currently influence the inclusion of literacy targets in school-based speech-language therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of melody-based aphasia therapy may strongly depend on rhythm and conversational speech formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Left-hemisphere stroke patients suffering from language and speech disorders are often able to sing entire pieces of text fluently. This finding has inspired a number of melody-based rehabilitation programs – most notable among them a treatment known as Melodic Intonation Therapy – as well as two fundamental research questions. When the experimental design focuses on one point in time (cross section, one may determine whether or not singing has an immediate effect on syllable production in patients with language and speech disorders. When the design focuses on changes over several points in time (longitudinal section, one may gain insight as to whether or not singing has a long-term effect on language and speech recovery. The current work addresses both of these questions with two separate experiments that investigate the interplay of melody, rhythm and lyric type in 32 patients with non-fluent aphasia and apraxia of speech (Stahl et al., 2011; Stahl et al., 2013. Taken together, the experiments deliver three main results. First, singing and rhythmic pacing proved to be equally effective in facilitating immediate syllable production and long-term language and speech recovery. Controlling for various influences such as prosody, syllable duration and phonetic complexity, the data did not reveal any advantage of singing over rhythmic speech. This result was independent of lesion size and lesion location in the patients. Second, patients with extensive left-sided basal ganglia lesions produced more correct syllables when their speech was paced by rhythmic drumbeats. This observation is consistent with the idea that regular auditory cues may partially compensate for corticostriatal damage and thereby improve speech-motor planning (Grahn & Watson, 2013. Third, conversational speech formulas and well-known song lyrics yielded higher rates of correct syllable production than novel word sequences – whether patients were singing or speaking

  2. The Effects of Speech and Language Therapy Intervention on Children with Pragmatic Language Impairments in Mainstream School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine; Lloyd, Julian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Catherine Adams, clinical senior lecturer in speech and language therapy at the University of Manchester, and Julian Lloyd, senior lecturer in psychology at Newman College, Birmingham, describe the implementation and effects of an intensive programme of speech and language therapy for children who have pragmatic language…

  3. Qualitative Study of the Therapeutic Relationship in Speech and Language Therapy: Perspectives of Adults with Acquired Communication and Swallowing Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Considerations of the negotiated therapeutic relationship in speech and language therapy are somewhat scarce, with specific therapeutic factors generally framed from psycholinguistic, behavioural, or neurological perspectives. Aims: To explore the therapeutic relationship in speech and language therapy, focusing on the personal…

  4. Auditory-Motor Mapping Training: Comparing the Effects of a Novel Speech Treatment to a Control Treatment for Minimally Verbal Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenausky, Karen; Norton, Andrea; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Auditory-Motor Mapping Training (AMMT), an intonation-based treatment for facilitating spoken language in minimally verbal children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), to a matched control treatment, Speech Repetition Therapy (SRT). 23 minimally verbal children with ASD (20 male, mean age 6;5) received at least 25 sessions of AMMT. Seven (all male) were matched on age and verbal ability to seven participants (five male) who received SRT. Outcome measures were Percent Syllables Approximated, Percent Consonants Correct (of 86), and Percent Vowels Correct (of 61) produced on two sets of 15 bisyllabic stimuli. All subjects were assessed on these measures several times at baseline and after 10, 15, 20, and 25 sessions. The post-25 session assessment timepoint, common to all participants, was compared to Best Baseline performance. Overall, after 25 sessions, AMMT participants increased by 19.4% Syllables Approximated, 13.8% Consonants Correct, and19.1% Vowels Correct, compared to Best Baseline. In the matched AMMT-SRT group, after 25 sessions, AMMT participants produced 29.0% more Syllables Approximated (SRT 3.6%);17.9% more Consonants Correct (SRT 0.5); and 17.6% more Vowels Correct (SRT 0.8%). Chi-square tests showed that significantly more AMMT than SRT participants in both the overall and matched groups improved significantly in number of Syllables Approximated per stimulus and number of Consonants Correct per stimulus. Pre-treatment ability to imitate phonemes, but not chronological age or baseline performance on outcome measures, was significantly correlated with amount of improvement after 25 sessions. Intonation-based therapy may offer a promising new interventional approach for teaching spoken language to minimally verbal children with ASD.

  5. [Clinical characteristics and speech therapy of lingua-apical articulation disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-hua; Jin, Xing-ming; Zhang, Yi-wen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiao-ming

    2006-03-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and speech therapy of 62 children with lingua-apical articulation disorder. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), Gesell development scales (Gesell), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Preschool Children (WPPSI) and speech test were performed for 62 children at the ages of 3 to 8 years with lingua-apical articulation disorder. PPVT was used to measure receptive vocabulary skills. GESELL and WPPSI were utilized to represent cognitive and non-verbal ability. The speech test was adopted to assess the speech development. The children received speech therapy and auxiliary oral-motor functional training once or twice a week. Firstly the target sound was identified according to the speech development milestone, then the method of speech localization was used to clarify the correct articulation placement and manner. It was needed to change food character and administer oral-motor functional training for children with oral motor dysfunction. The 62 cases with the apical articulation disorder were classified into four groups. The combined pattern of the articulation disorder was the most common (40 cases, 64.5%), the next was apico-dental disorder (15 cases, 24.2%). The third was palatal disorder (4 cases, 6.5%) and the last one was the linguo-alveolar disorder (3 cases, 4.8%). The substitution errors of velar were the most common (95.2%), the next was omission errors (30.6%) and the last was absence of aspiration (12.9%). Oral motor dysfunction was found in some children with problems such as disordered joint movement of tongue and head, unstable jaw, weak tongue strength and poor coordination of tongue movement. Some children had feeding problems such as preference of eating soft food, keeping food in mouths, eating slowly, and poor chewing. After 5 to 18 times of therapy, the effective rate of speech therapy reached 82.3%. The lingua-apical articulation disorders can be classified into four groups. The combined pattern of the

  6. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Wibke; Linden, Ulrike; Ostermann, Thomas

    2010-07-21

    Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic and supportive therapy for children with delayed speech development

  7. Speech and Language Therapy/Pathology: Perspectives on a Gendered Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litosseliti, Lia; Leadbeater, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Background: The speech and language therapy/pathology (SLT/SLP) profession is characterized by extreme "occupational sex segregation", a term used to refer to persistently male- or female-dominated professions. Men make up only 2.5% of all SLTs in the UK, and a similar imbalance is found in other countries. Despite calls to increase…

  8. Promoting lexical learning in the speech and language therapy of children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronkainen, Riitta; Laakso, Minna; Lonka, Eila; Tykkyläinen, Tuula

    2017-01-01

    This study examines lexical intervention sessions in speech and language therapy for children with cochlear implants (CIs). Particular focus is on the therapist's professional practices in doing the therapy. The participants in this study are three congenitally deaf children with CIs together with their speech and language therapist. The video recorded therapy sessions of these children are studied using conversation analysis. The analysis reveals the ways in which the speech and language therapist formulates her speaking turns to support the children's lexical learning in task interaction. The therapist's multimodal practices, for example linguistic and acoustic highlighting, focus both on the lexical meaning and the phonological form of the words. Using these means, the therapist expands the child's lexical networks, specifies and corrects the meaning of the target words, and models the correct phonological form of the words. The findings of this study are useful in providing information for clinicians and speech and language therapy students working with children who have CIs as well as for the children's parents.

  9. Involving Adult Service Users with Learning Disabilities in the Training of Speech and Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Celia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project carried out at City University London, Department of Language and Communication Science, where adult service users with learning disabilities trained first-year speech and language therapy students. The training involved presentations by the service users on their involvement in interviewing support staff,…

  10. Speech and Language Therapy Students: How Do Those with "Non Traditional" University Entry Qualifications Perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christina H.; Mahon, Matt; Newton, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Background: Entry to speech and language therapy (SLT) undergraduate pre-registration programmes in the UK is usually achieved through qualifications attained at school (e.g. A-levels). A smaller number of people who did not succeed academically at school enter through qualifications achieved post-schooling, e.g. Access to Higher Education…

  11. Sounds for Study: Speech and Language Therapy Students' Use and Perception of Exercise Podcasts for Phonetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rachael-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Currently little is known about how students use podcasts of exercise material (as opposed to lecture material), and whether they perceive such podcasts to be beneficial. This study aimed to assess how exercise podcasts for phonetics are used and perceived by second year speech and language therapy students. Eleven podcasts of graded phonetics…

  12. Staying on the Same Wavelength: Talking about Talking in Paediatric Speech and Language Therapy Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrills, Dariel

    2009-01-01

    Participants in speech and language therapy sessions engage in talk about talking to accomplish different social actions: identifying and explaining linguistic concepts; correcting language use; and repairing misunderstanding. Different traditions in interaction research have examined the practices of topic management, correction, and repair in…

  13. Teaching evidence-based speech and language therapy: Influences from formal and informal curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on influences from formal and informal curriculum on the effectiveness of teaching evidence-based speech and language therapy. A study showed that while EBP knowledge and skills increase during the years of study, motivational beliefs such as EBP task value and

  14. Perceptions of Staff on Embedding Speech and Language Therapy within a Youth Offending Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Karen; Gregory, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to ascertain the views of staff and managers within a youth offending team on their experiences of working with a speech and language therapist (SLT). The model of therapy provision was similar to the whole-systems approach used in schools. The impact of the service on language outcomes is reported elsewhere…

  15. Grounded Theory as a Method for Research in Speech and Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeat, J.; Perry, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The use of qualitative methodologies in speech and language therapy has grown over the past two decades, and there is now a body of literature, both generally describing qualitative research, and detailing its applicability to health practice(s). However, there has been only limited profession-specific discussion of qualitative…

  16. The Role of Mexican Immigrant Mothers' Beliefs on Parental Involvement in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerer, Sharon E.; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.

    2006-01-01

    The "sociocultural framework" highlights the contributions of children's cultural and linguistic contexts to early language and literacy development. To collaborate with parents in early intervention programs, including speech-language therapy, there must be a sincere commitment to the development of cultural competence. Hispanics are…

  17. [Quality of vocational education in speech therapy - development and implementation of a quality assurance programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, A; Kawski, S; Koch, U; Härter, M

    2014-12-01

    The provision of high-quality health-services is only possible if it is based on vocational education of corresponding quality. To promote the quality of vocational education in speech therapy, a quality assurance programme was developed in a scientifically supervised multi-step process. The main goals of the quality assurance programme include: (i) external review of the quality of education by means of well-defined criteria, (ii) certification of schools that meet the requirements, and (iii) provision of feedback to schools about their results. A total of 208 quality indicators cover the essential aspects of vocational education in speech therapy, and apply to the structural, process and outcome quality. These indicators are based on a literature survey as well as on expert opinion, and are calibrated by data. The data are collected by using questionnaires (school management, teachers in speech therapy, students, consecutive patient sample) and are validated by specific document analyses and telephone audits. Each school receives an individual quality report of its achieved results benchmarked to other schools. Since the initial implementation in 2008, a total of 50 schools participated in the quality assurance programme and 41 achieved certification. Therefore, the defined set of quality criteria has been disseminated and utilized by about half of all German schools for vocational education in speech therapy. The evaluation of the data on quality collected across all schools highlights the strengths and weaknesses of vocational education as well as the demands for quality improvement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Child Speech, Language and Communication Need Re-Examined in a Public Health Context: A New Direction for the Speech and Language Therapy Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, James; Reilly, Sheena; Snow, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Historically speech and language therapy services for children have been framed within a rehabilitative framework with explicit assumptions made about providing therapy to individuals. While this is clearly important in many cases, we argue that this model needs revisiting for a number of reasons. First, our understanding of the nature…

  19. Speech intelligibility in cerebral palsy children attending an art therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Magdalena; Pachalska, Maria; Lipowska, Małgorzata; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Makarowski, Ryszard; Mirski, Andrzej; Jastrzebowska, Grazyna

    2010-05-01

    Dysarthia is a common sequela of cerebral palsy (CP), directly affecting both the intelligibility of speech and the child's psycho-social adjustment. Speech therapy focused exclusively on the articulatory organs does not always help CP children to speak more intelligibly. The program of art therapy described here has proven to be helpful for these children. From among all the CP children enrolled in our art therapy program from 2005 to 2009, we selected a group of 14 boys and girls (average age 15.3) with severe dysarthria at baseline but no other language or cognitive disturbances. Our retrospective study was based on results from the Auditory Dysarthria Scale and neuropsychological tests for fluency, administered routinely over the 4 months of art therapy. All 14 children in the study group showed some degree of improvement after art therapy in all tested parameters. On the Auditory Dysarthia Scale, highly significant improvements were noted in overall intelligibility (pArt therapy improves the intelligibility of speech in children with cerebral palsy, even when language functions are not as such the object of therapeutic intervention.

  20. [Psychomotor education and speech therapy when weaning a child off artificial feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malécot-Le Meur, Gaëlle; Soulez-Larivière, Laure; Abadie, Véronique; Thouvenin, Béatrice; Rastel, Christine; Chalouhi, Christel

    To support children and their families with weaning off artificial nutrition, a psychomotor therapist and speech therapist from the 'Pierre Robin syndrome and congenital sucking-swallowing disorders' specialist rare disease centre at Necker-Enfant Malades hospital in Paris, have set up a joint consultation, as a complement to medical consultations. This programme shows how speech therapy and psychomotor education can complement each other in order to help children and their parents during this difficult period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Speech therapy in adolescents with Down syndrome: In pursuit of communication as a fundamental human right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rvachew, Susan; Folden, Marla

    2018-02-01

    The achievement of speech intelligibility by persons with Down syndrome facilitates their participation in society. Denial of speech therapy services by virtue of low cognitive skills is a violation of their fundamental human rights as proclaimed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in general and in Article 19 in particular. Here, we describe the differential response of an adolescent with Down syndrome to three speech therapy interventions and demonstrate the use of a single subject randomisation design to identify effective treatments for children with complex communication disorders. Over six weeks, 18 speech therapy sessions were provided with treatment conditions randomly assigned to targets and sessions within weeks, specifically comparing auditory-motor integration prepractice and phonological planning prepractice to a control condition that included no prepractice. All treatments involved high intensity practice of nonsense word targets paired with tangible referents. A measure of generalisation from taught words to untaught real words in phrases revealed superior learning in the auditory-motor integration condition. The intervention outcomes may serve to justify the provision of appropriate supports to persons with Down syndrome so that they may achieve their full potential to receive information and express themselves.

  2. Speech-rhythm characteristics of client-centered, Gestalt, and rational-emotive therapy interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C L

    1981-07-01

    The aim of this study was to discover whether client-centered, Gestalt, and rational-emotive psychotherapy interviews could be described and differentiated on the basis of quantitative measurement of their speech rhythms. These measures were taken from the sound portion of a film showing interviews by Carl Rogers, Frederick Perls, and Albert Ellis. The variables used were total session and percentage of speaking times, speaking turns, vocalizations, interruptions, inside and switching pauses, and speaking rates. The three types of interview had very distinctive patterns of speech-rhythm variables. These patterns suggested that Rogers's Client-centered therapy interview was patient dominated, that Ellis's rational-emotive therapy interview was therapist dominated, and that Perls's Gestalt therapy interview was neither therapist nor patient dominated.

  3. Accessing children's knowledge of sociolinguistic rules for speech therapy lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripich, D N; Panagos, J M

    1985-11-01

    Eight dyads of misarticulating school children (M = 7:9 years) enrolled in clinical programs were videotaped while they role-played 5-min remedial articulation lessons. Analysis of lesson transcripts was carried out at selected levels (lesson management, roles, discourse contexts, communicative acts, discourse sequences, and topic introduction). The "clinicians" controlled the lesson tasks and topics and used communicative acts in a manner typical of adult clinicians. The "clients" role-played cooperatively and displayed the response patterns of children receiving remedial lessons. Hierarchical relationships among the selected levels of analysis suggested the use of a cohesive register appropriate for clinical teaching. It is suggested that children's sociolinguistic perspectives on remedial speech and language lessons should be taken into account when intervention lessons are planned and implemented.

  4. Should singing activities be included in speech and voice therapy for prepubertal children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinta, Tiija; Welch, Graham F

    2008-01-01

    Customarily, speaking and singing have tended to be regarded as two completely separate sets of behaviors in clinical and educational settings. The treatment of speech and voice disorders has focused on the client's speaking ability, as this is perceived to be the main vocal behavior of concern. However, according to a broader voice-science perspective, given that the same vocal structure is used for speaking and singing, it may be possible to include singing in speech and voice therapy. In this article, a theoretical framework is proposed that indicates possible benefits from the inclusion of singing in such therapeutic settings. Based on a literature review, it is demonstrated theoretically why singing activities can potentially be exploited in the treatment of prepubertal children suffering from speech and voice disorders. Based on this theoretical framework, implications for further empirical research and practice are suggested.

  5. The therapeutic effect of neurologic music therapy and speech language therapy in post-stroke aphasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kil-Byung; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yoo, Jeehyun; Hwang, Ji Youn; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Sung-Kyun

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of neurologic music therapy (NMT) and speech language therapy (SLT) through improvement of the aphasia quotient (AQ) in post-stroke aphasic patients. Twenty-one post-stroke, nonfluent aphasia patients who had ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke on radiologic evaluation were divided into the NMT and SLT groups. They received NMT and SLT for 1 month. Language function was assessed by Korean version-Western Aphasia Battery before and after therapy. NMT consisted of therapeutic singing and melodic intonation therapy, and SLT consisted of language-oriented therapy. Significant improvements were revealed in AQ, repetition, and naming after therapy in the NMT group and improvements in repetition in the SLT group of chronic stroke patients (ptherapies are effective treatments in the chronic stage of stroke and NMT is effective in subacute post-stroke aphasic patients.

  6. Speech-language therapy for adolescents with written-language difficulties: the South African context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, D; Schutte, L; van der Merwe, M; Geertsema, S

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether privately practising speech-language therapists in South Africa are fulfilling their role of identification, assessment and intervention for adolescents with written-language and reading difficulties. Further needs concerning training with regard to this population group were also determined. A survey study was conducted, using a self-administered questionnaire. Twenty-two currently practising speech-language therapists who are registered members of the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association (SASLHA) participated in the study. The respondents indicated that they are aware of their role regarding adolescents with written-language difficulties. However, they feel that South-African speech-language therapists are not fulfilling this role. Existing assessment tools and interventions for written-language difficulties are described as inadequate, and culturally and age inappropriate. Yet, the majority of the respondents feel that they are adequately equipped to work with adolescents with written-language difficulties, based on their own experience, self-study and secondary training. The respondents feel that training regarding effective collaboration with teachers is necessary to establish specific roles, and to promote speech-language therapy for adolescents among teachers. Further research is needed in developing appropriate assessment and intervention tools as well as improvement of training at an undergraduate level.

  7. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) to Speech-Language Therapy Students: Are Students Competent and Confident EBP Users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use EBP principles in their future…

  8. A Qualitative Exploration of Therapeutic Relationships from the Perspective of Six Children Receiving Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Robert; Crowley, Niamh; Oliviera, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Although some studies have explored the adult therapeutic relationship in speech-language pathology, few, if any, have examined it with regard to children. This study aimed to explore the therapeutic relationship in pediatric speech and language therapy, focusing on the child's experience. Accordingly, the study was qualitative and involved the…

  9. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students: are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use

  10. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students : are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van Dijk; B. Spek; M Wieringa-de Waard; C. Lucas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness

  11. Acoustic Changes in the Speech of Children with Cerebral Palsy Following an Intensive Program of Dysarthria Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Lombardo, Eftychia; Steen, Nick; Miller, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Background: The speech intelligibility of children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy has been observed to increase following therapy focusing on respiration and phonation. Aims: To determine if speech intelligibility change following intervention is associated with change in acoustic measures of voice. Methods & Procedures: We recorded 16…

  12. Speech therapy in peripheral facial palsy: an orofacial myofunctional approach - doi:10.5020/18061230.2009.p259

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipólito Virgílio Magalhães Jr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To delineate the contributions of speech therapy in the rehabilitation of peripheral facial palsy, describing the role of orofacial myofunctional approach in this process. Methods: A literature review of published articles since 1995, held from March to December 2008, based on the characterization of peripheral facial palsy and its relation with speechlanguage disorders related to orofacial disorders in mobility, speech and chewing, among others. The review prioritized scientific journal articles and specific chapters from the studied period. As inclusion criteria, the literature should contain data on peripheral facial palsy, quotes on the changes in the stomatognathic system and on orofacial miofunctional approach. We excluded studies that addressed central paralysis, congenital palsy and those of non idiopathic causes. Results: The literature has addressed the contribution of speech therapy in the rehabilitation of facial symmetry, with improvement in the retention of liquids and soft foods during chewing and swallowing. The orofacial myofunctional approach contextualized the role of speech therapy in the improvement of the coordination of speech articulation and in the gain of oral control during chewing and swallowing Conclusion: Speech therapy in peripheral facial palsy contributed and was outlined by applying the orofacial myofunctional approach in the reestablishment of facial symmetry, from the work directed to the functions of the stomatognathic system, including oralfacial exercises and training of chewing in association with the training of the joint. There is a need for a greater number of publications in this specific area for speech therapy professional.

  13. Effects of Speech Therapy in Hospitalized Patients with Post-Stroke Dysphagia: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

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    Joice Santos Andrade

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Speech therapy in hospital bed in post-stroke hospitalized patients with dysphagia seems to bring satisfactory results in the short-term, revealing the importance of diagnosis and early intervention in these cases.

  14. An empirical study on the effect of speech therapy with cognitive behavior therapy on reducing the severity of stuttering and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Ansari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of speech therapy with Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT on reducing the severity of stuttering & anxiety for adults who stutter in the city of Isfahan, Iran. The study used a semi-experimental design with pre-test/post-test control groups and it was conducted among 24 clients. The sample was selected through available sampling method among the clients suffering from stuttering and attended public speech therapy clinics of Isfahan. The measurement instruments were Stuttering Severity Instrument (SSI4 and Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI. After doing the pretest, clients were placed into one experimental group of speech therapy with CBT and one control group. Speech therapy for this research included ten 45-minutes sessions accomplished for each individual subject and CBT included ten 90-minutes group sessions. After finishing the therapy sessions, the posttest was executed on both groups. For statistical analysis of data, Analysis of Covariance was carried out. The research findings indicated that speech therapy with CBT reduced the severity of Stuttering and Anxiety. Speech therapy with CBT is effective in reducing Stuttering & Anxiety.

  15. Efficacy of melody-based aphasia therapy may strongly depend on rhythm and conversational speech formulas

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Stahl

    2014-01-01

    Left-hemisphere stroke patients suffering from language and speech disorders are often able to sing entire pieces of text fluently. This finding has inspired a number of melody-based rehabilitation programs – most notable among them a treatment known as Melodic Intonation Therapy – as well as two fundamental research questions. When the experimental design focuses on one point in time (cross section), one may determine whether or not singing has an immediate effect on syllable production in p...

  16. Music Therapy for Aphasia - How can Music Help People with Aphasia Reclaim Speech?

    OpenAIRE

    Rommerud, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    For hundreds of years, it has been observed that people with aphasia can sing words fluently, even though they cannot speak. This thesis will investigate how this observation has led to therapy methods, the goals of which are to facilitate propositional speech using music, and how and why these show good results. Various kinds of literature relating to this area will be presented, as well as interviews with music therapists having experience with aphasic patients, an interview with a former a...

  17. Relationship between adherence to speech therapy in patients with dysphonia and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte de Almeida, Letícia; Santos, Lívia Rodrigues; Bassi, Iara Barreto; Teixeira, Letícia Caldas; Côrtes Gama, Ana Cristina

    2013-09-01

    The present study analyzed if aspects of voice-related quality of life (VRQOL) were associated with adherence to voice therapy in teachers. Retrospective survey in which the medical records of 179 dysphonic teachers (62, abandonment group and 114, discharge group) who underwent speech therapy at the Speech Therapy Clinic at the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (AV-HCUFMG) were analyzed. Female teachers with dysphonia referred by Gerência de Saúde e Perícia Médica (Department of Health and Medical Analysis) of Belo Horizonte City Hall were included. The variables of interest were: age, number of voice therapy sessions attended (attendance), number of sessions missed (absence), type of dysphonia, and Vocal Activity and Protocol Profile (VAPP) scores administered during the first therapy session as a component of voice assessment. The chi-square test was used to assess categorical variables. For continuous variables, the Mann-Whitney test, a nonparametric test for independent samples, was used. The groups differed with regard to the type of dysphonia as well as the several parameters of the VAPP: vocal self-perception, effects at work, effects on daily communication, effects on emotion, and the total VAPP score. Individuals with less favorable VRQOL scores were less adherent to voice therapy compared with subjects with more favorable VRQOL. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cortical thickness in children receiving intensive therapy for idiopathic apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadis, Darren S; Goshulak, Debra; Namasivayam, Aravind; Pukonen, Margit; Kroll, Robert; De Nil, Luc F; Pang, Elizabeth W; Lerch, Jason P

    2014-03-01

    Children with idiopathic apraxia experience difficulties planning the movements necessary for intelligible speech. There is increasing evidence that targeted early interventions, such as Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT), can be effective in treating these disorders. In this study, we investigate possible cortical thickness correlates of idiopathic apraxia of speech in childhood, and changes associated with participation in an 8-week block of PROMPT therapy. We found that children with idiopathic apraxia (n = 11), aged 3-6 years, had significantly thicker left supramarginal gyri than a group of typically-developing age-matched controls (n = 11), t(20) = 2.84, p ≤ 0.05. Over the course of therapy, the children with apraxia (n = 9) experienced significant thinning of the left posterior superior temporal gyrus (canonical Wernicke's area), t(8) = 2.42, p ≤ 0.05. This is the first study to demonstrate experience-dependent structural plasticity in children receiving therapy for speech sound disorders.

  19. Speech-language therapy for adolescents with written-language difficulties: The South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danel Erasmus

    2013-11-01

    Method: A survey study was conducted, using a self-administered questionnaire. Twenty-two currently practising speech-language therapists who are registered members of the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association (SASLHA participated in the study. Results: The respondents indicated that they are aware of their role regarding adolescents with written-language difficulties. However, they feel that South-African speech-language therapists are not fulfilling this role. Existing assessment tools and interventions for written-language difficulties are described as inadequate, and culturally and age inappropriate. Yet, the majority of the respondents feel that they are adequately equipped to work with adolescents with written-language difficulties, based on their own experience, self-study and secondary training. The respondents feel that training regarding effective collaboration with teachers is necessary to establish specific roles, and to promote speech-language therapy for adolescents among teachers. Conclusion: Further research is needed in developing appropriate assessment and intervention tools as well as improvement of training at an undergraduate level.

  20. Metacognition in speech and language therapy for children with social (pragmatic) communication disorders: implications for a theory of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaile, Jacqueline; Adams, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Metacognition is a significant component of complex interventions for children who have developmental language disorders. Research into how metacognition operates in the content or process of developmental language therapy delivery is limited. Identification and description of proposed active therapy components, such as metacognition, may contribute to our understanding of how to deliver complex communication interventions in an optimal manner. To analyse aspects of metacognition during therapy derived from a manualized speech and language intervention (the Social Communication Intervention Programme-SCIP) as delivered to children who have social (pragmatic) communication disorder (SPCD) and to examine the dynamic process of delivering therapy. A purposive sample of eight filmed therapy sessions was selected from the video data corpus of intervention-arm participants within a randomized controlled trial. The child-therapist interactions during therapy sessions from five children (aged between 5;11 and 10;3) in the SCIP trial were transcribed. Filmed sessions represented a variety of communication profiles and SCIP therapy content. Starting from existing theory on metacognition, cycles of iterative analysis were performed using a mixed inductive-deductive qualitative analysis. A preliminary list of metacognitive content embedded in the intervention was developed into a metacognitive coding framework (MCF). A thematic analysis of the identified metacognitive content of the intervention was then carried out across the whole sample. Thematic analysis revealed the presence of metacognition in the content and delivery of SCIP intervention. Four main themes of metacognitive person, task and strategy knowledge, and monitoring/control were identified. Metacognition was a feature of how children's ability to monitor language, pragmatic and social interaction skills, in themselves and other people, was developed. Task design and delivery methods were found to play a

  1. Speech and language therapy interventions for children with cleft palate: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Alyson; Sell, Debbie; Whiting, Penny; Roulstone, Sue; Albery, Liz; Persson, Martin; Verhoeven, Andrea; Burke, Margaret; Ness, Andy R

    2013-01-01

    Objective :  (1) To examine the evidence for the effectiveness of differences in timing and type of speech and language therapy for children with cleft palate with or without a cleft lip and (2) to identify types of interventions assessed. Design :  Nine databases, including MEDLINE and EMBASE, were searched between inception and March 2011 to identify published articles relating to speech and language therapy for children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Studies that included at least 10 participants and reported outcome measures for speech and/or language measures were included. Studies where the experimental group had less than 90% of children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip were excluded. Two reviewers independently completed inclusion assessment, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment for all studies identified. Results :  A total of 17 papers were evaluated: six randomized control trials and 11 observational studies. Studies varied widely on risk of bias, intervention used, and outcome measures reported. None of the studies had a low risk of bias. In terms of intervention approaches, seven studies evaluated linguistic approaches and 10 evaluated motor approaches. Outcomes measures did not support either approach over the other, and based on data reported it was difficult to ascertain which approach is more effective for children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Conclusions :  The review found little evidence to support any specific intervention. Key uncertainties need to be identified and adequately powered, methodologically rigorous studies conducted to provide a secure evidence base for speech-language therapy practice in children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip.

  2. Changes in Voice Onset Time and Motor Speech Skills in Children following Motor Speech Therapy: Evidence from /pa/ productions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vickie Y.; Kadis, Darren S.; Oh, Anna; Goshulak, Debra; Namasivayam, Aravind; Pukonen, Margit; Kroll, Robert; De Nil, Luc F.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated changes in motor speech control and inter-gestural coordination for children with speech sound disorders (SSD) subsequent to PROMPT (Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets) intervention. We measured the distribution patterns of voice onset time (VOT) for a voiceless stop (/p/) to examine the changes in inter-gestural coordination. Two standardized tests were used (VMPAC, GFTA-2) to assess the changes in motor speech skills and articulation. Data showed positive changes in patterns of VOT with a lower pattern of variability. All children showed significantly higher scores for VMPAC, but only some children showed higher scores for GFTA-2. Results suggest that the proprioceptive feedback provided through PROMPT had a positive influence on motor speech control and inter-gestural coordination in voicing behavior. This set of VOT data for children with SSD adds to our understanding of the speech characteristics underlying motor speech control. Directions for future studies are discussed. PMID:24446799

  3. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

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    Linden Ulrike

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Results Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. Conclusions This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic

  4. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Results Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. Conclusions This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic and supportive therapy for

  5. Self-Administered Computer Therapy for Apraxia of Speech: Two-Period Randomized Control Trial With Crossover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Rosemary; Cowell, Patricia E; Dyson, Lucy; Inglis, Lesley; Roper, Abigail; Whiteside, Sandra P

    2016-03-01

    There is currently little evidence on effective interventions for poststroke apraxia of speech. We report outcomes of a trial of self-administered computer therapy for apraxia of speech. Effects of speech intervention on naming and repetition of treated and untreated words were compared with those of a visuospatial sham program. The study used a parallel-group, 2-period, crossover design, with participants receiving 2 interventions. Fifty participants with chronic and stable apraxia of speech were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 order conditions: speech-first condition versus sham-first condition. Period 1 design was equivalent to a randomized controlled trial. We report results for this period and profile the effect of the period 2 crossover. Period 1 results revealed significant improvement in naming and repetition only in the speech-first group. The sham-first group displayed improvement in speech production after speech intervention in period 2. Significant improvement of treated words was found in both naming and repetition, with little generalization to structurally similar and dissimilar untreated words. Speech gains were largely maintained after withdrawal of intervention. There was a significant relationship between treatment dose and response. However, average self-administered dose was modest for both groups. Future software design would benefit from incorporation of social and gaming components to boost motivation. Single-word production can be improved in chronic apraxia of speech with behavioral intervention. Self-administered computerized therapy is a promising method for delivering high-intensity speech/language rehabilitation. URL: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1278-0601. Unique identifier: ISRCTN88245643. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Atendimento fonoaudiológico em grupo Speech therapy group care

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    Manuela Luchesi Brazil Araújo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Tema: atendimento fonoaudiológico em grupo na área da Fonoaudiologia. Para sua realização, visitou-se os textos publicados em revistas científicas da área, nos últimos 15 anos, e os capítulos de livros e dissertações que se detiveram em tematizar o atendimento fonoaudiológico em grupo. Objetivo: identificar, entender e discutir: 1 os princípios teóricos que justificam a indicação do atendimento em grupo, que o estruturam e o sustentam de maneira a explicitar como a dinâmica do grupo age sobre os sintomas ; 2 os critérios para a composição e formação dos grupos e, principalmente, 3 a intervenção do fonoaudiólogo e a possibilidade de eficácia de sua terapêutica. Conclusão: o levantamento bibliográfico identificou diferentes práticas fonoaudiológicas em grupo, atreladas a diversas perspectivas teóricas. No que diz respeito aos critérios de formação, à função do fonoaudiólogo no grupo, à prevalência do atendimento em grupo em relação ao individual, houve divergências de opiniões, dado que os textos visitados, não (corresponderam com a consistência teórica esperada. Tal resultado se deve ao fato de haver uma certa adoção irrefletida de conceitos de outras áreas, sem argumentação e sem a reestruturação que sua transposição para a clínica fonoaudiológica, exigiria. Sugere-se que estas incoerências ocorrem porque não se evidencia a preocupação em articular os estudos teóricos aos elementos que configuram a clínica fonoaudiológica, a saber: a semiologia, a etiologia, a diagnóstica e a terapêutica.Background: the theme of this literature review is the group therapy in the Speech Therapy area. To perform it, we studied the texts published in scientific journals of the field, in the last 15 years, in the form of articles, book chapters and dissertations, which were focused on the group therapy. Purpose: the goal is to identify, understand and discuss, the following themes: 1 the theoretical

  7. Speech language therapy bilingual clinic, a written language therapeutical proposal to deaf people: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarinello, Ana Cristina; Massi, Giselle; Berberian, Ana Paula; Tonocchi, Rita; Lustosa, Sandra Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the written production of a deaf person who is in the process of written language acquisition. One person with hearing disability, called R., participated in this study together with his Speech Language Pathologist. The therapist, proficient in sign language, acted as an interlocutor and interpreter, prioritizing the interactive nature of language and interfering in the written production only when it was requested. During the 3 years of work with R., a change in stance toward written language was observed. In addition, he began to reflect on his texts and utilize written Portuguese in a way that allowed his texts to be more coherent. Writing became an opportunity to show his singularity and to begin reconstructing his relationship with language. Speech language pathology and audiology therapy, at a bilingual clinic, can allow people with hearing disability early access to sign language and, consequently, enable the development of the written form of Portuguese.

  8. Speech language therapy practice in a bilingual dialogical clinic: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Beatriz Zaki Porcelli; Guarinello, Ana Cristina; Massi, Giselle; Tonocchi, Rita; Berberian, Ana Paula

    this study aims to discuss the use of Brazilian sign language as the first language for a deaf individual going to a bilingual dialogic clinic from dialogic activities. This is a longitudinal study, including one deaf individual, called N, interacting with his family and speech therapists. During the therapeutic process developed inside the bilingual dialogical clinic, N participated in interactive contexts and could constitute himself as author of his sign language texts. In addition, he started to act dialogically and use verbal and nonverbal signs. Through interactive and dialogical situations developed inside the speech language therapy clinic, this deaf participant got control of his sign language, and started to get interest in and control of the Portuguese language, especially in the written form.

  9. FOSTERING ENGLISH VOCABULARY MASTERY TO AUTISTIC 190 STUDENTS THROUGH SPEECH THERAPY

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    Farid Noor Romadlon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to get a good education is also provided for children with special needs (autistic children. One of the abilities given to autistic students is the ability to communicate in English based on the student‘s condition. Children with special needs (autism also have similar abilities to normal children in learning English. The difference is the service and the duration of time in achieving the target of learning goals in autistic students. In the process of teaching and learning in schools for disabled students, students are difficult to be motivated when learning English and personal treatment for each student is less so they cannot get maximum skill. This study is to describe the implementation of Speech Therapy in English teaching of autistic students, SMP LB Sunan Muria and to know the effectiveness of Speech Therapy in improving autistic students‘ English vocabularies. The study showed some points as the results. In using Speech Therapy, teacher broke it down into some stages of teaching. They were drilling known as Primata or direct interaction which teacher exposed a story orally and ask students to repeat word to word. Academic modification was done to simplify the material given to the students so they understood it easily. Media assistance was intensively involved to foster students‘ understanding, pronunciation, and visualization. The last treatment in teaching was giving reward to students so they kept motivated to do the activity and to study. The therapy resulted positive progress from the students and this technique is effective to improve English vocabularies of autistic students.

  10. Ingressive Speech Errors: A Service Evaluation of Speech-Sound Therapy in a Child Aged 4;6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastelj, Laura; Knight, Rachael-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background: A pattern of ingressive substitutions for word-final sibilants can be identified in a small number of cases in child speech disorder, with growing evidence suggesting it is a phonological difficulty, despite the unusual surface form. Phonological difficulty implies a problem with the cognitive process of organizing speech into sound…

  11. Evaluation of an Expert System for the Generation of Speech and Language Therapy Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir; López-Nores, Martín; García-Duque, Jorge; Pazos-Arias, José J; Arévalo-Lucero, Daysi

    2016-07-01

    Speech and language pathologists (SLPs) deal with a wide spectrum of disorders, arising from many different conditions, that affect voice, speech, language, and swallowing capabilities in different ways. Therefore, the outcomes of Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) are highly dependent on the accurate, consistent, and complete design of personalized therapy plans. However, SLPs often have very limited time to work with their patients and to browse the large (and growing) catalogue of activities and specific exercises that can be put into therapy plans. As a consequence, many plans are suboptimal and fail to address the specific needs of each patient. We aimed to evaluate an expert system that automatically generates plans for speech and language therapy, containing semiannual activities in the five areas of hearing, oral structure and function, linguistic formulation, expressive language and articulation, and receptive language. The goal was to assess whether the expert system speeds up the SLPs' work and leads to more accurate, consistent, and complete therapy plans for their patients. We examined the evaluation results of the SPELTA expert system in supporting the decision making of 4 SLPs treating children in three special education institutions in Ecuador. The expert system was first trained with data from 117 cases, including medical data; diagnosis for voice, speech, language and swallowing capabilities; and therapy plans created manually by the SLPs. It was then used to automatically generate new therapy plans for 13 new patients. The SLPs were finally asked to evaluate the accuracy, consistency, and completeness of those plans. A four-fold cross-validation experiment was also run on the original corpus of 117 cases in order to assess the significance of the results. The evaluation showed that 87% of the outputs provided by the SPELTA expert system were considered valid therapy plans for the different areas. The SLPs rated the overall accuracy, consistency

  12. Fonoterapia em glossectomia total: estudo de caso Speech therapy in total glossectomy: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Alves Vieira

    2011-12-01

    evaluation, the subject was diagnosed with severe mechanical oropharyngeal dysphagia and alteration in speech articulation. Speech rehabilitation used direct and indirect therapies. Indirect therapy focused on oral motor control, sensitivity, mobility, motricity, tonus and posture of the structures adjacent to the resected tongue. Direct therapy used the head back posture maneuver to help the ejection of food into the pharynx. The patient started exclusive oral feeding, except for solid foods, after ten months in treatment. Over-articulation, speed and rhythm exercises were used to improve speech intelligibility. Thus, the results of speech-language pathology intervention were considered positive, and the patient was discharged after a year in treatment. It is concluded that tongue resections present significant sequelae to swallowing and speech functions and, therefore, speech-language pathology intervention activity is indispensible for the modification and adaptation of these functions, in addition to providing the patient with better quality of life.

  13. The provision of speech-language therapy in services destined to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense-Netrval, Danielle Azarias; Fernandes, Fernanda Dreux Miranda

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) worldwide has been a major public health concern; therefore, discussion about the services and therapies required has become important. This study aimed to characterize the provision of speech-language therapy services in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo. To this end, a questionnaire with 23 questions was developed based on the Balanced Scorecard methodology. This questionnaire was applied to 854 individuals assisted in 25 ASD services. The results show that only 64% of the ASD services offer speech-language therapy and that the number of individuals assisted is below the expected. Therefore, there is a necessity for better management in the speech-language therapy services offered to the ASD population.

  14. Auditory Discrimination as a Condition for E-Learning Based Speech Therapy: A Proposal for an Auditory Discrimination Test (ADT) for Adult Dysarthric Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijer, L. J.; Rietveld, A. C. M.; van Stiphout, A. J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Web based speech training for dysarthric speakers, such as E-learning based Speech Therapy (EST), puts considerable demands on auditory discrimination abilities. Aims: To discuss the development and the evaluation of an auditory discrimination test (ADT) for the assessment of auditory speech discrimination skills in Dutch adult…

  15. Speech therapy in peripheral facial palsy: an orofacial myofunctional approach - doi:10.5020/18061230.2009.p259

    OpenAIRE

    Hipólito Virgílio Magalhães Jr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the contributions of speech therapy in the rehabilitation of peripheral facial palsy, describing the role of orofacial myofunctional approach in this process. Methods: A literature review of published articles since 1995, held from March to December 2008, based on the characterization of peripheral facial palsy and its relation with speechlanguage disorders related to orofacial disorders in mobility, speech and chewing, among others. The review prioritized scientifi...

  16. Attitudes of a group of South African speech-language pathologists towards stutterers and stuttering therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B; Ross, E; Girson, J

    1997-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the attitudes of a group of South African speech-language pathologists towards stuttering and stuttering therapy. Further aims were to investigate whether a stereotype of stutterers was found among these speech-language pathologists, and to determine whether there was any relationship between the attitudes held about stutterers, and the therapists' training and experience. A random probability sample of respondents was selected from the population of speech therapists registered with the Interim Medical and Dental Council of South Africa (I.M.D.C.S.A.). A self-administered mailed questionnaire was employed to realise the aims of the study. The main result of this investigation indicated that almost 50% of the sample of qualified clinicians surveyed, viewed stutterers as a group characterised by specific personality traits and psychological problems. This belief held true irrespective of the number of years of experience working in the field, the time of graduation, the frequency of treating stutterers, or the training emphasis. Implications of these results are considered with respect to student training, continuing education of qualified practitioners and future research.

  17. [Speech therapy assessment: field study on psychometric properties, practicability, acceptance and process quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt-Radloff, S; Leonhart, R; Schwer, B; Junde, I; Heiss, H W

    2005-01-01

    to investigate the internal consistency, responsiveness, discriminative validity, practicability, acceptance and process quality of a recently developed Speech Therapy Assessment (STA) under routine work conditions of speech and language therapists in German speaking countries. Since standardised, generic and ICF-oriented assessment tools for documentation and evaluation of speech therapy interventions for adult clients are missing in German speaking countries and existing tests cover only sub-areas, the STA has been developed in the years 1995 to 2002. By means of different domains, speech and language therapists assess client (1) communication, (2) aphasia, (3) speech apraxia, (4) dysarthria and (5) dysphagia as well as (6) her or his dealing with corresponding disabilities. 17 therapists from 14 institutions applied the STA to 260 adult clients with language, speaking or swallowing disorders. The clients were included in the study consecutively over a period of 7 month. After this period, the therapists completed a questionnaire regarding the benefit and practicability of the STA. Cronbach alpha was calculated as indicator for internal consistency, effect sizes (standardised response means) for responsiveness and ROC values for discriminative validity. The answers of the questionnaire about the benefit of the STA were evaluated both, quantitatively and qualitatively. The internal consistency and discriminative validity were high (Cronbach alpha: 0.79 to 0.95; ROC-values: 0.84 to 0.98). Effect sizes regarding responsiveness were moderate (standardised response means: 0.46 to 0.78). On a 5-step Likert scale (1 = very good, 5 = inadequate), the therapists rated the average (standard deviation) benefit of the STA with: practicability 2.6 (1.2), acceptance 2.8 (1.3), impact on diagnostics 2.8 (1.3), impact on finding therapeutic goals 3.5 (1.2), impact on communication with other rehabilitation partners 2.7 (1.5) and overall judgement 2.6 (0.9). The STA fulfils

  18. The applicability of normalisation process theory to speech and language therapy: a review of qualitative research on a speech and language intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Deborah M

    2011-08-12

    The Bercow review found a high level of public dissatisfaction with speech and language services for children. Children with speech, language, and communication needs (SLCN) often have chronic complex conditions that require provision from health, education, and community services. Speech and language therapists are a small group of Allied Health Professionals with a specialist skill-set that equips them to work with children with SLCN. They work within and across the diverse range of public service providers. The aim of this review was to explore the applicability of Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) to the case of speech and language therapy. A review of qualitative research on a successfully embedded speech and language therapy intervention was undertaken to test the applicability of NPT. The review focused on two of the collective action elements of NPT (relational integration and interaction workability) using all previously published qualitative data from both parents and practitioners' perspectives on the intervention. The synthesis of the data based on the Normalisation Process Model (NPM) uncovered strengths in the interpersonal processes between the practitioners and parents, and weaknesses in how the accountability of the intervention is distributed in the health system. The analysis based on the NPM uncovered interpersonal processes between the practitioners and parents that were likely to have given rise to successful implementation of the intervention. In previous qualitative research on this intervention where the Medical Research Council's guidance on developing a design for a complex intervention had been used as a framework, the interpersonal work within the intervention had emerged as a barrier to implementation of the intervention. It is suggested that the design of services for children and families needs to extend beyond the consideration of benefits and barriers to embrace the social processes that appear to afford success in embedding

  19. Pursuing Precision Speech-Language Therapy Services for Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jena; Yoder, Paul J

    2016-11-01

    The behavioral phenotype of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) offers one avenue for developing speech-language therapy services that are tailored to the individual's characteristics that affect treatment response. Behavioral phenotypes are patterns of behavioral strengths and weaknesses for specific genetic disorders that can help guide the development and implementation of effective interventions. Nonetheless, individual differences within children with DS must be acknowledged and addressed because behavioral phenotypes are probabilistic, not deterministic. Developing precision speech-language therapy services to maximize learning opportunities and outcomes for children with DS calls for increased collaboration among clinicians and researchers to address the needs, challenges, and opportunities on three interconnected themes: (1) moving effective interventions from research to practice, (2) making evidence-based, child-specific treatment intensity decisions, and (3) considering child motivation and temperament characteristics. Increased availability of intervention materials and resources as well as more specific recommendations that acknowledge individual differences could help narrow the research-practice gap. Clear descriptions of disciplined manipulations of treatment intensity components could lead to more effective intervention services. Last, addressing motivation and temperament characteristics, such as the personality-motivation orientation, in children with DS may help maximize learning opportunities. Focused attention and collaboration on these key themes could produce substantial, positive changes for children with DS and their families in the coming decade. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Fonoaudiologia X ronco/apneia do sono Speech therapy and snore and sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Barros Soares

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: sendo o sono necessário para termos energia, o ronco e a apneia do sono tornam-se obstáculos que acarretam problemas de saúde, como também problemas sociais, conjugais, escolares, entre outros. OBJETIVO: contribuir para um maior conhecimento do profissional fonoaudiólogo sobre as causas, consequências, diagnóstico e formas de tratamento da apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS, a fim de favorecer a definição da conduta por este profissional, seja ela, encaminhar para um diagnóstico, tratar (por meio de fonoterapia essa patologia ou indicar o tratamento médico, seja ele, cirúrgico ou conservador. CONCLUSÃO: as possíveis alterações fonoaudiológicas encontradas nestes pacientes são: língua alargada apresentando hipotonia, palato mole com volume aumentado, dificuldade na alimentação devido ao aporte insuficiente de ar e ao bruxismo, possivelmente causado pela tensão e ansiedade decorrentes das noites mal dormidas. Outras alterações podem ser encontradas decorrentes do tratamento cirúrgico empregado em alguns casos, como a disfagia ou até mesmo alterações na fala e na ressonância da fala decorrente de uma uvulopalatoplastia. O enfoque do tratamento fonoaudiológico é a mioterapia dos músculos envolvidos, priorizando a musculatura palatal. Percebe-se que o fonoaudiólogo pode contribuir para amenizar os sintomas encontrados nestas patologias, proporcionando uma qualidade de vida melhor aos seus portadores.BACKGROUND: sleeping is necessary to provide us with energy. However, snoring and sleep apnea become obstacles that cause not only health problems, but also social, marital and educational issues. PURPOSE: contribute with a better understanding of the causes to the speech therapist, as well as the diagnosis and forms of treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA. Facilitate the definition of conduct by the therapist, be it a guide for a diagnosis, a treatment for that disease (through speech therapy or the indication of

  1. National survey of speech and language therapy provision for people with Parkinson's disease in the United Kingdom: therapists' practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nick; Deane, Katherine H O; Jones, Diana; Noble, Emma; Gibb, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Communication and swallowing changes feature prominently in Parkinson's disease. People with Parkinson's disease appear under-represented in speech-language therapy clinics in the United Kingdom. The nature of the speech-language therapy services in the UK to people with Parkinson's disease has not been examined. To ascertain the number of speech-language therapists in the UK who work with people with Parkinson's disease; to establish the nature of contacts in terms of caseloads, referral stages and routes, management practices, assessments and treatments employed; and to reflect on service provision in relation to published guidelines. A questionnaire survey of speech-language therapists. A total of 185 speech-language therapists responded. They were treating a median of three (inter-quartile range (IQR) = 1-6) people with Parkinson's disease with a further median of five (IQR = 1-10) on review. The majority of contacts were for assessment and advice given, especially in later and earlier stages of Parkinson's disease. Typically, respondents offered a median of six sessions (IQR = 6-8) of treatment, each session lasting a median of 45 min (IQR = 45-60), delivered over a median period of 42 days (IQR = 28-56). Speech-language therapists worked in a variety of settings, predominantly hospital. They received referrals principally from medical specialities, from whom the majority had support. Referrals were perceived in general to be later in Parkinson's disease progression than desired. Assessment focused primarily on impairment measures, in contrast to a belief that therapy focus on activity and participation issues. Speech-language therapists were relatively confident in treating people with Parkinson's disease, but 75% wanted more training. Speech-language therapist services for people with Parkinson's disease in the UK are restricted on most dimensions. Management practices often do not match guideline suggestions. Consideration needs to be given to the training

  2. Toward a Model of Pediatric Speech Sound Disorders (SSD) for Differential Diagnosis and Therapy Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, Hayo; Maassen, Bernardus; Maas, Edwin; van Lieshout, Pascal; Maassen, Ben; Terband, Hayo

    2016-01-01

    The classification and differentiation of pediatric speech sound disorders (SSD) is one of the main questions in the field of speech- and language pathology. Terms for classifying childhood and SSD and motor speech disorders (MSD) refer to speech production processes, and a variety of methods of

  3. Occupational, Physical, and Speech Therapy Treatment Activities During Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Dijkers, Marcel P; Barrett, Ryan S; Horn, Susan D; Giuffrida, Clare G; Timpson, Misti L; Carroll, Deborah M; Smout, Randy J; Hammond, Flora M

    2015-08-01

    To describe the use of occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), and speech therapy (ST) treatment activities throughout the acute rehabilitation stay of patients with traumatic brain injury. Multisite prospective observational cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients (N=2130) admitted for initial acute rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury. Patients were categorized on the basis of admission FIM cognitive scores, resulting in 5 fairly homogeneous cognitive groups. Not applicable. Percentage of patients engaged in specific activities and mean time patients engaged in these activities for each 10-hour block of time for OT, PT, and ST combined. Therapy activities in OT, PT, and ST across all 5 cognitive groups had a primary focus on basic activities. Although advanced activities occurred in each discipline and within each cognitive group, these advanced activities occurred with fewer patients and usually only toward the end of the rehabilitation stay. The pattern of activities engaged in was both similar to and different from patterns seen in previous practice-based evidence studies with different rehabilitation diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The Temporal Smile. Speech therapy for facial palsy patients after temporal lengthening myoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert-Prou, M-P

    2003-10-01

    We present our approach to speech therapy developed for patients with definitive peripheral facial palsy treated by temporal lengthening myoplasty. The main goal is to rehabilitate smiling function, a major component in social communication codes, by transferring labial and jugal functions to the transferred temporal muscle. Several phases are involved. The first phase, termed the Mandibular Smile involves mobilization of the mandible (original function of the temporal) by contraction of the transferred temporal and inducing an elevation of the commissura labiorum. The second phase, the Voluntary Temporal Smile is obtained by contraction of the temporal independently of mandibular movement which remains under voluntary control. The smile produces should become as symmetrical as possible. Finally, the last phase is designed to achieve a spontaneous smile independent of mandibular movement Spontaneous Temporal Smile. Temporal contraction should produce both a "real" expressive smile and good quality articulate speech, saliva evacuation, prehension, and labial junction. Acquisition of the Temporal Smile involves cerebral plasticity implying rehabilitation processes both on the peripheral and central levels.

  5. Parents with Learning Disabilities and Speech and Language Therapy. A Service Evaluation of Referrals and Episodes of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Jois

    2012-01-01

    The speech and language therapy (SLT) service in an area of northern England receives referrals of parents who have learning disabilities. The aim of this study was to identify current referral patterns and quantify the level of demand upon the SLT service from this relatively new referral population to enable to service to meet the needs of these…

  6. Mexican Immigrant Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Communication Disabilities, Emergent Literacy Development, and Speech-Language Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerer, Sharon E.; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.; Hughes, Marie Tejero

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This qualitative study explored mothers' perceptions of their children's communication disabilities, emergent literacy development, and speech-language therapy programs. Method: Participants were 14 Mexican immigrant mothers and their children (age 17-47 months) who were receiving center-based services from an early childhood intervention…

  7. 42 CFR 485.719 - Condition of participation: Arrangements for physical therapy and speech pathology services to be...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIALIZED PROVIDERS Conditions of Participation for Clinics, Rehabilitation Agencies, and Public Health Agencies as Providers of Outpatient Physical Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Services § 485.719... outside resource may not bill the patient or Medicare for the services. This limitation is based on...

  8. Increasing Early Childhood Educators' Use of Communication-Facilitating and Language-Modelling Strategies: Brief Speech and Language Therapy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, David; Proctor, Penny; Gill, Wendy; Heaven, Sue; Marr, Jane; Young, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Intensive Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) training courses for Early Childhood Educators (ECEs) can have a positive effect on their use of interaction strategies that support children's communication skills. The impact of brief SLT training courses is not yet clearly understood. The aims of these two studies were to assess the impact of a brief…

  9. The "Robustness" of Vocabulary Intervention in the Public Schools: Targets and Techniques Employed in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Murphy, Kimberly A.; Pratt, Amy; Biancone, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined vocabulary intervention--in terms of targets and techniques--for children with language impairment receiving speech-language therapy in public schools (i.e., non-fee-paying schools) in the United States. Vocabulary treatments and targets were examined with respect to their alignment with the empirically validated practice of…

  10. A Bioecological Framework to Evaluate Communicative Participation Outcomes for Preschoolers Receiving Speech-Language Therapy Interventions in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Barbara J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Preschool Speech and Language Program (PSLP) in Ontario, Canada, is a publicly funded intervention service for children from birth to 5 years with communication disorders. It has begun a population-level programme evaluation of children's communicative participation outcomes following therapy. Data are currently being collected for…

  11. Subjective Experiences of Speech and Language Therapy in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Spurgeon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Parkinson’s disease can produce a range of speech-language pathologies, which may require intervention. While evaluations of speech-language therapy have been undertaken, no work has been undertaken to capture patients’ experiences of therapy. This was the aim of the present study. Methods. Semistructured interviews, using themes derived from the literature, were conducted with nine Parkinson’s disease patients, all of whom had undergone speech-language therapy. Participants’ responses were analysed in accordance with Thematic Network Analysis. Results. Four themes emerged: emotional reactions (frustration, embarrassment, lack of confidence, disappointment, and anxiety; physical impact (fatigue, breathing and swallowing, and word production; practical aspects (cost of treatment, waiting times, and the actual clinical experience; and expectations about treatment (met versus unmet. Conclusions. While many benefits of speech-language therapy were reported, several negative issues emerged which could impact adversely on rehabilitation. Parkinson’s disease is associated with a range of psychological and physical sequelae, such as fatigue and depression; recognising any individual experiences which could exacerbate the existing condition and incorporating these into treatment planning may improve rehabilitation outcomes.

  12. Teaching of human physiology. A study with speech therapy students about the theme ‘homeostasis’

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    Viviane Souza Galvão

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was made with the purpose of understanding the learning process of first-year Speech Therapy students under the discipline General Physiology. The research of the theme homeostasis involved a sample of these students and teaching actions about this subject with the use of teaching resources. The nature of the study is a qualitative one based on the Ausubelian theoretical matrix in which teaching actions involve progressive differentiation and integrative reconciliation, articulation between concepts and ideas traditionally produced and taught in a fragmentary manner. The results obtained show that students develop more scientific ideas about biological phenomena, in particular homeostasis, that they start to take a more active part in the (reconstruction of personal knowledge and in the development of a new school curriculum; that they overcome the knowledge fragmentation which makes understanding, representing and teaching knowledge itself harder nowadays.

  13. Curriculam change: construction of a new pedagogical training project in the field of Speech Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Bonini Trenche

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The first year of implementation of the new pedagogical project for the Speech Therapy course at the Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC-SP is analyzed. The aim was not only to analyze the changes in pedagogical concepts and practices, but also to construct collective work by the social body of the course. The results indicated that the new pedagogical activities (seminars, tutorials, workshops and instructive experiences were important tools for achieving the proposed changes in the new curricular model. Highlighted among other advances were: greater integration between basic disciplines and professionalizing activities; better comprehension by students of the importance of training based on the population's needs; greater linkage between teaching, research and extension activities; interaction among students at various levels of training, regarding health promotion and disease prevention actions; planning of supplementary pedagogical activities according to students' needs detected in educational assessments.

  14. Internal evaluation department of speech therapy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Hooshang Dadgar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Internal evaluation is an important part of organization monitoring. One of the Ministry of Health's policies is to encourage educational departments to conduct internal evaluations. The aim of internal evaluation of department of speech therapy was appraising its education, research and treatment qualities and determining its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOTs to identify the ways of overcoming weakness and threats.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 phases to evaluate 10 factors. Participants were undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate students, academic staff, director of the department along with the patients. The internal evaluation software for educational and research centers released by Center of Medical Education Studies and Development was modified and utilized. Data was analyzed by calculating mean of means.Results: Mean of means from highest to lowest scores were respectively as follows: the quality of diagnosis, treatment and dealing with patients 4.15 out of 5; as well as the quality of academic staff 3.5 were in the range of desirable category; qualities of management and organizational structure 3.34, graduate students 3.21, teaching and learning processes 3.1, missions and goals 3.09, instructional methods and curriculum models 2.99, educational and research equipments 2.9, students 2.76 and research 2.67 were within the range of rather desirable category. Total score was 3.17 (63.4% which was within the range of rather desirable category.Conclusion: The department of speech therapy was in rather desirable state before merger. That result was appropriate according to the department's conditions and supplies.

  15. Developing a scale to measure parental attitudes towards preschool speech and language therapy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, M; Campbell, R; Peters, T J; Roulstone, S; Enderby, P

    2001-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing recognition of the need to involve clients in decisions about the healthcare they receive and in the evaluation of services offered. In health services research, survey and scaling methods have become important tools for research into 'consumer views' and the perspectives of people receiving healthcare. In spite of the increase in recent years in the participation of parents in their children's Speech and Language Therapy (SLT), there has been little attempt to investigate parents' perceptions and opinions of the services they receive. Moreover, there has been no previous attempt to derive a scale to measure these attitudes. The paper reports a study that explored the attitudes to therapy of 81 parents whose preschool children were receiving SLT intervention. Factor analysis of 12 items on a questionnaire revealed three issues salient in parental attitudes to therapy: practical help, emotional support and the perceived effectiveness of the service. The validity of these factors was supported by other findings from the questionnaire. The properties of the resulting scales are discussed and the ways in which they might be further refined and developed for use in SLT are suggested.

  16. Changes in hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation saturation in the brain and skeletal muscle induced by speech therapy - a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, U; Scholkmann, F; Rosenberger, R; Wolf, M; Nelle, M

    2011-01-01

    Arts speech therapy (AST) is a therapeutic method within complementary medicine and has been practiced for decades for various medical conditions. It comprises listening and the recitation of different forms of speech exercises under the guidance of a licensed speech therapist. The aim of our study was to noninvasively investigate whether different types of recitation influence hemodynamics and oxygenation in the brain and skeletal leg muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Seventeen...

  17. Speech disorders - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after age 4 (I want...I want my doll. I...I see you.) Putting in (interjecting) extra ... may outgrow milder forms of speech disorders. Speech therapy may help with more severe symptoms or any ...

  18. Analysis of the Level of Dysphagia, Anxiety, and Nutritional Status Before and After Speech Therapy in Patients with Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdz, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The rehabilitation in oropharyngeal dysphagia evidence-based implies the relationship between the interventions and their results. Objective: Analyze level of dysphagia, oral ingestion, anxiety levels and nutritional status of patients with stroke diagnosis, before and after speech therapy. Method: Clinical assessment of dysphagia partially using the Protocol of Risk Assessment for Dysphagia (PARD, applying the scale Functional Oral Intake Scale for Dysphagia in Stroke Patients (FOIS, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI and the Mini Nutritional Assessment MNA®. The sample consisted of 12 patients, mean age of 64.6 years, with a medical diagnosis of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke and without cognitive disorders. All tests were applied before and after speech therapy (15 sessions. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test, McNemar's test, Bowker's symmetry test and Wilcoxon's test. Results: During the pre-speech therapy assessments, 33.3% of patients had mild to moderate dysphagia, 88.2% did not receive food orally, 47.1% of the patients showed malnutrition and 35.3% of patients had mild anxiety level. After the therapy sessions, it was found that 33.3% of patients had mild dysphagia, 16.7% were malnourished and 50% of patients had minimal level of anxiety. Conclusion:  There were statistically significant evolution of the level of dysphagia (p = 0.017 and oral intake (p = 0.003 post-speech therapy. Although not statistically significant, there was considerable progress in relation to the level of anxiety and nutritional status.

  19. Speech and language therapy service delivery: overcoming limited provision for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, L M T; Martinez, J; Valente, A R; Costa, M C

    2017-10-01

    To test an alternative Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) service delivery model based on partnerships between a University and local schools and charities, and to report on the impact and feasibility of intervention based on long-term outcome measures and three case studies with individual analysis of Reliable Change. The following six-step model was tested: 1-establishing partnerships; 2-flagging children; 3-pre-treatment SLT assessment; 4-reporting and discussion with parents and teachers; 5-treatment; 6-post-treatment assessment. Case studies are presented. A partnership was established with one kindergarten in a pre-test and a total of 25 kindergartens during the second phase of the process. A group of 139 children were then flagged and assessed. The following long-term outcomes (18 months post-therapy) were investigated: phonetic-phonological standardised test percentiles and raw scores; receptive and expressive language percentiles and raw scores according to a standardised language test; percentage of syllables stuttered; duration of stuttering moments; academic achievement in norm-tests' core areas (mathematics, Portuguese language and social studies). Case studies and a 95% credible interval analysis to assess Reliable Change are presented. Seventy five (54%) children needed SLT support. Fifty (67%) of those children returned to the clinic for long-term assessments and the analysis of all outcome measures showed significant improvements in their performance, 18 months post-therapy. Case Studies Reliable Change analysis revealed a statistically significant improvement, which also clearly shows the feasibility and the positive impact of the intervention. This specialised and differentiated care network constitutes an alternative delivery system of SLT services that addresses the lack of support currently experienced by children and their families. The long-term outcome measures and the 95% credible interval analysis are reliable methods to determine the

  20. The Combination of Rhythm and Pitch Can Account for the Beneficial Effect of Melodic Intonation Therapy on Connected Speech Improvements in Broca’s Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a structured protocol for language rehabilitation in people with Broca’s aphasia. The main particularity of MIT is the use of intoned speech, a technique in which the clinician stylizes the prosody of short sentences using simple pitch and rhythm patterns. In the original MIT protocol, patients must repeat diverse sentences in order to espouse this way of speaking, with the goal of improving their natural, connected speech. MIT has long been regarded as a promising treatment but its mechanisms are still debated. Recent work showed that rhythm plays a key role in variations of MIT, leading to consider the use of pitch as relatively unnecessary in MIT. Our study primarily aimed to assess the relative contribution of rhythm and pitch in MIT’s generalization effect to non-trained stimuli and to connected speech. We compared a melodic therapy (with pitch and rhythm) to a rhythmic therapy (with rhythm only) and to a normally spoken therapy (without melodic elements). Three participants with chronic post-stroke Broca’s aphasia underwent the treatments in hourly sessions, 3 days per week for 6 weeks, in a cross-over design. The informativeness of connected speech, speech accuracy of trained and non-trained sentences, motor-speech agility, and mood was assessed before and after the treatments. The results show that the three treatments improved speech accuracy in trained sentences, but that the combination of rhythm and pitch elicited the strongest generalization effect both to non-trained stimuli and connected speech. No significant change was measured in motor-speech agility or mood measures with either treatment. The results emphasize the beneficial effect of both rhythm and pitch in the efficacy of original MIT on connected speech, an outcome of primary clinical importance in aphasia therapy. PMID:25157222

  1. The Combination of Rhythm and Pitch Can Account for the Beneficial Effect of Melodic Intonation Therapy on Connected Speech Improvements in Broca's Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a structured protocol for language rehabilitation in people with Broca's aphasia. The main particularity of MIT is the use of intoned speech, a technique in which the clinician stylizes the prosody of short sentences using simple pitch and rhythm patterns. In the original MIT protocol, patients must repeat diverse sentences in order to espouse this way of speaking, with the goal of improving their natural, connected speech. MIT has long been regarded as a promising treatment but its mechanisms are still debated. Recent work showed that rhythm plays a key role in variations of MIT, leading to consider the use of pitch as relatively unnecessary in MIT. Our study primarily aimed to assess the relative contribution of rhythm and pitch in MIT's generalization effect to non-trained stimuli and to connected speech. We compared a melodic therapy (with pitch and rhythm) to a rhythmic therapy (with rhythm only) and to a normally spoken therapy (without melodic elements). Three participants with chronic post-stroke Broca's aphasia underwent the treatments in hourly sessions, 3 days per week for 6 weeks, in a cross-over design. The informativeness of connected speech, speech accuracy of trained and non-trained sentences, motor-speech agility, and mood was assessed before and after the treatments. The results show that the three treatments improved speech accuracy in trained sentences, but that the combination of rhythm and pitch elicited the strongest generalization effect both to non-trained stimuli and connected speech. No significant change was measured in motor-speech agility or mood measures with either treatment. The results emphasize the beneficial effect of both rhythm and pitch in the efficacy of original MIT on connected speech, an outcome of primary clinical importance in aphasia therapy.

  2. The combination of rhythm and pitch can account for the beneficial effect of Melodic intonation therapy on connected speech improvements in Broca’s aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eZumbansen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Melodic intonation therapy (MIT is a structured protocol for language rehabilitation in people with Broca’s aphasia. The main particularity of MIT is the use of intoned-speech, a technique in which the clinician stylizes the prosody of short sentences using simple pitch and rhythm patterns. In the original MIT protocol, patients must repeat diverse sentences in order to espouse this way of speaking, with the goal of improving their natural, connected speech. MIT has long been regarded as a promising treatment but its mechanisms are still debated. Recent work showed that rhythm plays a key role in variations of MIT, leading to consider the use of pitch as relatively unnecessary in MIT. Our study primarily aimed to prospectively assess the relative contribution of rhythm and pitch in MIT’s generalization effect to non-trained stimuli and to connected speech. We compared a melodic therapy (with pitch and rhythm with a rhythmic therapy (with rhythm only and with a normally spoken therapy (without melodic elements. Three participants with chronic post-stroke Broca’s aphasia underwent the treatments in hourly sessions three days a week for six weeks, in a cross-over design. The informativeness of connected speech, speech accuracy of trained and non-trained sentences, motor-speech agility and mood was assessed before and after the treatments. The results show that the three treatments improved speech accuracy in trained sentences, but that the combination of rhythm and pitch elicited the strongest generalization effect both to non-trained stimuli and connected speech. No significant change was measured in motor-speech agility or mood measures, with neither treatment. The results emphasize the beneficial effect of both rhythm and pitch in the efficacy of original MIT on connected speech, an outcome of primary clinical importance in aphasia therapy.

  3. The effectiveness of melodic intonation therapy on fundamental frequency and intensity in Persian autistic children’s speech

    OpenAIRE

    Neda Ferdosi; Hassan Ashayeri; Yahya Modarresi; Belghis Rovshan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder with several speech disorders such as prosodic and pragmatic impairments. Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) based on Albert et al. model (1973) is a rehabilitation method, developed on prosodic features. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MIT on Persian autistic children’s prosody.Methods: An easy version of MIT, adopted for Persian language was designed by researchers. Then, after a successful pilot study on...

  4. Online learning in speech and language therapy: Student performance and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic

    2006-03-01

    Behavioural studies form an essential component of the Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) undergraduate degree. This study aimed to produce online teaching material in behavioural studies suitable for undergraduate SLT students, explore students' views on the online material, record their performance when taught through this innovative method and compare their performance to a group taught through the traditional lecture based method. Finally, it aimed to explore the relationship between engagement with the module and performance. SLT students completed an online health psychology/sociology module and their performance was compared to students who completed a traditional lecture based course. Student evaluations of the online course were also recorded as was their engagement with the online module. Results suggested that there was no significant difference between students taught through an online medium compared to those taught through "traditional lectures". An evaluation survey suggested that students appeared to enjoy the material although there was some reluctance to develop an independent learning style. Online learning has a great deal to offer SLT education. However, material has to be developed that can both engage and motivate learners, thereby enhancing student independent learning.

  5. Speech and language therapy/pathology: perspectives on a gendered profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litosseliti, Lia; Leadbeater, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The speech and language therapy/pathology (SLT/SLP) profession is characterized by extreme 'occupational sex segregation', a term used to refer to persistently male- or female-dominated professions. Men make up only 2.5% of all SLTs in the UK, and a similar imbalance is found in other countries. Despite calls to increase diversity in the allied health professions more generally, research into the reasons for occupational sex segregation and gender as a potential key factor remains scarce. This study aims to explore the potential role of gender/gendered discourses in people's decision to pursue a career in SLT/SLP. It seeks to illustrate how gendered assumptions/expectations/discourses continue to construct SLT as a 'gendered' profession, and to make some recommendations in this area for SLT recruitment and practice. The study adopted a qualitative design which elicited research participants' views, knowledge and experiences (in their own words) in relation to the research questions. Data collection involved two iterative phases: a preliminary data phase--which involved semi-structured interviews with newly qualified SLT graduates and practising SLTs, and the completion of questionnaires by undergraduate SLTs--and a main/focus group phase. In the focus group phase reported in this paper, six focus groups in total were held with SLTs, teachers of SLT, and careers advisors in London, UK. The data were analysed qualitatively using grounded theory principles, thematic analysis and discourse analysis. The findings extend our knowledge and understanding of gender as a parameter of people's motivations and perceptions, which can influence their choice of career (e.g. as regards pay and flexibility). The findings also show that discourses around women as carers, nurturers and communicators constitute key ways through which the SLT profession continues to be constructed as 'women's work'. The topic of structural gender inequalities in the profession was also discussed in the

  6. International students of speech and language therapy in the UK: do we meet their needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Goldbart, Juliet; Evans, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Informal evidence suggests that many Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) students from outside of the UK and/or Republic of Ireland who come to the UK either do not return to their home country on qualification or do not practise as SLTs in the public sector. Many factors may contribute to this situation. Concern that it may result in part from a poor match between UK SLT education and the demands of the role in other countries led the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) to fund a study of international SLT students' experiences of UK qualifying courses. To discover and describe the experiences, views and expectations of current and past international students studying SLT in the UK and past international students' experiences, views and expectations of practising as SLTS, both inside and outside the UK. To consider the implications of the findings for (1) international students planning to work as SLTs; (2) UK SLT students planning to practise outside the UK; and (3) all those involved in SLT education: educational institutions; supervising SLTs; RCSLT. The study involved distributing 166 postal questionnaires (some directly to (ex)students and some to their Higher Education Institutes, or HEIs) and carrying out 23 interviews, with both current students and those qualifying since May 1994. Quantitative analysis was carried out using SPSS using descriptive statistics. Qualitative analysis used content and thematic analyses. Seventy-one questionnaires were received from current and past students, representing a minimum response rate of 43%. (It was not possible to verify exactly how many questionnaires were distributed by HEIs.) The results describe the diverse range of respondents' experiences of studying and working in the UK, their views of working in their home countries and the UK, and their suggestions about strategies that might be adopted to support them further. The results revealed that students come from a wide diversity of countries

  7. Setting up a cohort study in speech and language therapy: lessons from The UK Cleft Collective Speech and Language (CC-SL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Yvonne; Humphries, Kerry; Stock, Nicola Marie; Rumsey, Nichola; Lewis, Sarah; Davies, Amy; Bennett, Rhiannon; Sandy, Jonathan

    2017-12-18

    Efforts to increase the evidence base in speech and language therapy are often limited by methodological factors that have restricted the strength of the evidence to the lower levels of the evidence hierarchy. Where higher graded studies, such as randomized controlled trials, have been carried out, it has sometimes been difficult to obtain sufficient power to detect a potential effect of intervention owing to small sample sizes or heterogeneity in the participants. With certain clinical groups such as cleft lip and palate, systematic reviews of intervention studies have shown that there is no robust evidence to support the efficacy of any one intervention protocol over another. To describe the setting up of an observational clinical cohort study and to present this as an alternative design for answering research questions relating to prevalence, risk factors and outcomes from intervention. The Cleft Collective Speech and Language (CC-SL) study is a national cohort study of children born with cleft palate. Working in partnership with regional clinical cleft centres, a sample size of over 600 children and 600 parents is being recruited and followed up from birth to age 5 years. Variables being collected include demographic, psychological, surgical, hearing, and speech and language data. The process of setting up the study has led to the creation of a unique, large-scale data set which is available for researchers to access now and in future. As well as exploring predictive factors, the data can be used to explore the impact of interventions in relation to individual differences. Findings from these investigations can be used to provide information on sample criteria and definitions of intervention and dosage which can be used in future trials. The observational cohort study is a useful alternative design to explore questions around prevalence, risk factors and intervention for clinical groups where robust research data are not yet available. Findings from such a

  8. Effects of a music therapy voice protocol on speech intelligibility, vocal acoustic measures, and mood of individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneishi, E

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a Music Therapy Voice Protocol (MTVP) on speech intelligibility, vocal intensity, maximum vocal range, maximum duration of sustained vowel phonation, vocal fundamental frequency, vocal fundamental frequency variability, and mood of individuals with Parkinson's disease. Four female patients, who demonstrated voice and speech problems, served as their own controls and participated in baseline assessment (study pretest), a series of MTVP sessions involving vocal and singing exercises, and final evaluation (study posttest). In study pre and posttests, data for speech intelligibility and all acoustic variables were collected. Statistically significant increases were found in speech intelligibility, as rated by caregivers, and in vocal intensity from study pretest to posttest as the results of paired samples t-tests. In addition, before and after each MTVP session (session pre and posttests), self-rated mood scores and selected acoustic variables were collected. No significant differences were found in any of the variables from the session pretests to posttests, across the entire treatment period, or their interactions as the results of two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures. Although not significant, the mean of mood scores in session posttests (M = 8.69) was higher than that in session pretests (M = 7.93).

  9. Videofluoroscopic assessment of dysphagia: A questionnaire survey of protocols, roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Maxine [Section of Gastrointestinal Science, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mpower@fs1.ho.man.ac.uk; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich [Academic Department of GI-Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals, Manchester (United Kingdom); Kasthuri, Ram S. [Academic Department of GI-Radiology, South Manchester University Hospitals, Manchester (United Kingdom); Nicholson, David A. [Radiology, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hamdy, Shaheen [Section of Gastrointestinal Science, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    Videofluoroscopy (VF) is the 'gold standard' assessment for oropharyngeal dysphagia and radiographers are beginning to direct this examination independently, yet little is known about the roles and responsibilities of the core professions of radiology and speech and language therapy and their practice in this examination. Aim: To evaluate VF practice and identify the roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed and distributed to speech and language therapists (SALT) and radiologists via national special interest networks. Information regarding protocols, test materials, supervision, radiation protection and training was obtained. Results: One hundred and thirteen questionnaires were completed, 83% of respondents had more than 5 years service. Most were carrying out VF on an 'ad hoc' basis with only 32% participating in more than 6 assessments per month. There was no consensus on protocol and 41% chose to thicken barium solutions by adding more barium sulphate powder, potentially predisposing patients to complications. Over 50% of SALTs had received one day post-graduate training in VF, whereas, only one radiologist had specific VF training. Conclusion: Despite its importance in determining the feeding route for patients, VF is carried out infrequently by most clinicians and protocols vary widely. Moreover, intra- and inter-disciplinary training and supervision is minimal. More work is needed to develop standard guidelines, to improve the quality of the examination and its reproducibility.

  10. Videofluoroscopic assessment of dysphagia: A questionnaire survey of protocols, roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Maxine; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Kasthuri, Ram S.; Nicholson, David A.; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2006-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy (VF) is the 'gold standard' assessment for oropharyngeal dysphagia and radiographers are beginning to direct this examination independently, yet little is known about the roles and responsibilities of the core professions of radiology and speech and language therapy and their practice in this examination. Aim: To evaluate VF practice and identify the roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed and distributed to speech and language therapists (SALT) and radiologists via national special interest networks. Information regarding protocols, test materials, supervision, radiation protection and training was obtained. Results: One hundred and thirteen questionnaires were completed, 83% of respondents had more than 5 years service. Most were carrying out VF on an 'ad hoc' basis with only 32% participating in more than 6 assessments per month. There was no consensus on protocol and 41% chose to thicken barium solutions by adding more barium sulphate powder, potentially predisposing patients to complications. Over 50% of SALTs had received one day post-graduate training in VF, whereas, only one radiologist had specific VF training. Conclusion: Despite its importance in determining the feeding route for patients, VF is carried out infrequently by most clinicians and protocols vary widely. Moreover, intra- and inter-disciplinary training and supervision is minimal. More work is needed to develop standard guidelines, to improve the quality of the examination and its reproducibility

  11. Promoting international mobility in The Degree of Speech and Language Therapy: a case of an educational good practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Mendizábal de la Cruz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The constant modification of teaching and learning methods require the design of innovative strategies and the identification of educational good practices. The Degree of Speech and Language Therapy at theUniversityofValladolidhas developed various actions to promote international mobility of students and staff members, within the framework of interuniversity innovative educational projects. The objectives are: to make students aware of the role of the international dimension to increase the quality of their training; to expose innovative educational strategies to promote the international mobility; to foster internationalization of studies as a driver of research in this field; to establish Spanish as the language of reference in speech and language therapy. Descriptive methodology of performed actions was used. Results included: questionnaire sent to speech and language therapists in order to know their language skills and to enhance their importance, participation in courses, workshops and meetings, as well as in international mobility programs and exchange of experiences, teaching of subjects in English, publication of multilingual educational materials, contacts with American and European institutions and participation in international networks, blogging. It is concluded that the whole educative community should help to provide university programs of an international identity, and mobility should be provided of a social sense promoting equal opportunities for all groups.

  12. Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment (CAAST): effects of a novel therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, Julie L; Wright, Sandra; Nessler, Christina; Mauszycki, Shannon C

    2014-12-01

    This investigation was designed to examine the effects of a newly developed treatment for aphasia and acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). Combined Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Treatment (CAAST) targets language and speech production simultaneously, with treatment techniques derived from Response Elaboration Training (Kearns, 1985) and Sound Production Treatment (Wambaugh, Kalinyak-Fliszar, West, & Doyle, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine whether CAAST was associated with positive changes in verbal language and speech production with speakers with aphasia and AOS. Four participants with chronic aphasia and AOS received CAAST applied sequentially to sets of pictures in the context of multiple baseline designs. CAAST entailed elaboration of participant-initiated utterances, with sound production training applied as needed to the elaborated productions. The dependent variables were (a) production of correct information units (CIUs; Nicholas & Brookshire, 1993) in response to experimental picture stimuli, (b) percentage of consonants correct in sentence repetition, and (c) speech intelligibility. CAAST was associated with increased CIU production in trained and untrained picture sets for all participants. Gains in sound production accuracy and speech intelligibility varied across participants; a modification of CAAST to provide additional speech production treatment may be desirable.

  13. The 'robustness' of vocabulary intervention in the public schools: targets and techniques employed in speech-language therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Murphy, Kimberly A; Pratt, Amy; Biancone, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined vocabulary intervention-in terms of targets and techniques-for children with language impairment receiving speech-language therapy in public schools (i.e., non-fee-paying schools) in the United States. Vocabulary treatments and targets were examined with respect to their alignment with the empirically validated practice of rich vocabulary intervention. Participants were forty-eight 5-7-year-old children participating in kindergarten or the first-grade year of school, all of whom had vocabulary-specific goals on their individualized education programmes. Two therapy sessions per child were coded to determine what vocabulary words were being directly targeted and what techniques were used for each. Study findings showed that the majority of words directly targeted during therapy were lower-level basic vocabulary words (87%) and very few (1%) were academically relevant. On average, three techniques were used per word to promote deep understanding. Interpreting findings against empirical descriptions of rich vocabulary intervention indicates that children were exposed to some but not all aspects of this empirically supported practice. © 2013 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  14. Mexican immigrant mothers' perceptions of their children's communication disabilities, emergent literacy development, and speech-language therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerer, Sharon E; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A; Hughes, Marie Tejero

    2007-08-01

    This qualitative study explored mothers' perceptions of their children's communication disabilities, emergent literacy development, and speech-language therapy programs. Participants were 14 Mexican immigrant mothers and their children (age 17-47 months) who were receiving center-based services from an early childhood intervention program, located in a large urban city in the Midwestern United States. Mother interviews composed the primary source of data. A secondary source of data included children's therapy files and log notes. Following the analysis of interviews through the constant comparative method, grounded theory was generated. The majority of mothers perceived their children as exhibiting a communication delay. Causal attributions were diverse and generally medical in nature (i.e., ear infections, seizures) or due to familial factors (i.e., family history and heredity, lack of extended family). Overall, mothers seemed more focused on their children's speech intelligibility and/or expressive language in comparison to emergent literacy abilities. To promote culturally responsive intervention, mothers recommended that professionals speak Spanish, provide information about the therapy process, and use existing techniques with Mexican immigrant families.

  15. The Combination of Rhythm and Pitch Can Account for the Beneficial Effect of Melodic Intonation Therapy on Connected Speech Improvements in Broca’s Aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a structured protocol for language rehabilitation in people with Broca’s aphasia. The main particularity of MIT is the use of intoned speech, a technique in which the clinician stylizes the prosody of short sentences using simple pitch and rhythm patterns. In the original MIT protocol, patients must repeat diverse sentences in order to espouse this way of speaking, with the goal of improving their natural, connected speech. MIT has long been regarded as a p...

  16. [Lublin - the capital of polish speech and language therapy. Half a century of slt education in UMCS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Tomasz

    Lublin is the capital of Polish speech and language therapy (SLT) and this fact is justified by both historical as well as support in evaluating the potential of science - research and teaching, particularly in connection with the activities of the Department of Logopedics/SLT and Applied Linguistics of University of Maria Curie-Skłodowska and Polish Logopedic Society. The article discusses the history of the formation of SLT in Poland, strongly associated with Lublin, and also presents Lublin SLT educational traditions and the current teaching and research activities of the Department of Logopedics/SLT and Applied Linguistics of UMCS.

  17. Potentials of speech disorders correction in 4-6 yrs children by means of ergo and art therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Petrenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out methodic of speech disorders correction in 4-6 yrs children by ergo and art therapy means. Material: during academic year three groups of children (n=97 were being observed: two groups - with speech disorders (control and main and one group of healthy children. Psycho-motor and cognitive functions were assessed with the help of tests for motor coordination (speed of their fulfillment, verbal thinking. Results: it was found that characteristic feature of such children is critical estimation of own speech insufficiency and conscious avoiding oral answers. By cluster analysis results increase of homogeneity in psycho-physical condition’s positive changes, cognitive functions and dance abilities resulted from dance-correction training program were shown. Conclusions: the worked out dance-correction choreographic trainings helps in the following: developing rhythm sense; strengthening of skeleton and muscles; memory, attention, thinking and imagination simulation. Acquiring of such experience will help a child to further successfully train different art-creative and sports kinds of activities; to master choreography and gymnastic as well as different musical instruments.

  18. Lee Silverman voice treatment versus standard NHS speech and language therapy versus control in Parkinson's disease (PD COMM pilot): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackley, Catherine M; Smith, Christina H; Rick, Caroline; Brady, Marian C; Ives, Natalie; Patel, Ramilla; Roberts, Helen; Dowling, Francis; Jowett, Sue; Wheatley, Keith; Patel, Smitaa; Kelly, Debbie; Sands, Gina; Clarke, Carl

    2014-06-07

    Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder affecting approximately 127,000 people in the UK, with an estimated two thirds having speech-related problems. Currently there is no preferred approach to speech and language therapy within the NHS and there is little evidence for the effectiveness of standard NHS therapy or Lee Silverman voice treatment. This trial aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of randomizing people with Parkinson's disease-related speech or voice problems to Lee Silverman voice treatment or standard speech and language therapy compared to a no-intervention control. The PD COMM pilot is a three arm, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Randomization will be computer-generated with participants randomized at a ratio of 1:1:1. Participants randomized to intervention arms will be immediately referred to the appropriate speech and language therapist. The target population are patients with a confirmed diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease who have problems with their speech or voice. The Lee Silverman voice treatment intervention group will receive the standard regime of 16 sessions between 50 and 60 minutes in length over four weeks, with extra home practice. The standard speech and language therapy intervention group will receive a dose determined by patients' individual needs, but not exceeding eight weeks of treatment. The control group will receive standard care with no speech and language therapy input for at least six months post-randomization. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline (pre-randomization) and post- randomization at three, six, and 12 months. The outcome measures include patient-reported voice measures, quality of life, resource use, and assessor-rated speech recordings. The recruitment aim is at least 60 participants over 21 months from 11 sites, equating to at least 20 participants in each arm of the trial. This trial is ongoing and recruitment commenced in May 2012. This study will

  19. The Effect of Picture Exchange Communication System and Speech Therapy on Communication Development of 4-8 Years Old Autistic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Pour-Ismaili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compares the effect of speech therapy and picture exchange communication system (PECS on communication development of 4-8 year old autistic children. Materials & Methods: This is an experimental and comparison study. In this study 10 subjects including PECS and speech therapy groups were selected using the available sampling method on the base of including and excluding criteria. Both groups were matched according to age and developmental indices of Niusha scale. Dependent variables were listening, receptive language, expressive language, cognition, speech and social communication. Intervention was applied for both groups similarly divided in 40 minute sessions 3 times a weak for 3 months. Our parameters were evaluated by Niusha development scale before and after interventions. The results were analyzed clinically and statistically by sum-ranks willkokson and rank- signed willkokson. Results: Post test comparison between the two groups revealed that the members of PECS group had a more progress in listening, receptive language, cognition and social communication skills rather than speech therapy group. But these differences were not significant statistically and T(sum ranks was between critical values. Conclusion: considering the results, it could be concluded that PECS is a effective strategy to train non-verbal autistic children. Moreover it could be used as a supplement teaching method beside other therapeutic method such as speech therapy.

  20. Contributions of speech-language therapy to the integration of individuals with Down syndrome in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Talita Maria Monteiro Farias; Lima, Ivonaldo Leidson Barbosa; Alves, Giorvan Ânderson Dos Santos; Delgado, Isabelle Cahino

    2018-03-01

    To analyze the contributions of speech-language therapy in the integration of young individuals with Down syndrome (DS) into the workplace, with reference to their professionalization. A questionnaire was distributed to eight undergraduate students (tutors) who participated in a project with individuals with DS, five mothers of individuals with DS, and five employees from the institution in which the present study was conducted. The questionnaire assessed the communication, memory, behavior, social interaction, autonomy and independence of the participants with DS, called "trainees". The trainees were employed in one of five routine work sectors at the university that conducted the present study. The data collected in this descriptive and cross-sectional study were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The Research Ethics Committee of the affiliated institute approved the project. Mothers and tutors rated the trainees' language skills as "good". However, their ratings differed from those of the participating employees. After the trainees with DS were placed in a work environment, significant changes were observed in their communication and autonomy. There was no improvement in the trainees' independence, but after training noticeable changes were observed in their social behavior and autonomy. Speech-language therapy during vocational training led to positive changes in the social behavior of individuals with DS, as evidenced by an increase in their autonomy and communication.

  1. Inequalities in the Provision of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapy Services across London Boroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The inverse-care law suggests that fewer healthcare resources are available in deprived areas where health needs are greatest. Aims: To examine the provision of paediatric speech and language services across London boroughs and to relate provision to the level of deprivation of the boroughs. Methods & Procedures: Information on the…

  2. Telepractice in Speech-Language Therapy: The Use of Online Technologies for Parent Training and Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Melinda R.; Chung, Moon Y.; Biller, Maysoon F.; Appel, Katie E.; Meadan, Hedda; Halle, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners have found that telepractice is an effective means of increasing access to high-quality services that meet children's unique needs and is a viable mechanism to deliver speech-language services for multiple purposes. We offer a framework to facilitate the implementation of practices that are used in direct…

  3. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  4. Surgical speech disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tianjie; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2014-11-01

    Most speech disorders of childhood are treated with speech therapy. However, two conditions, ankyloglossia and velopharyngeal dysfunction, may be amenable to surgical intervention. It is important for surgeons to work with experienced speech language pathologists to diagnose the speech disorder. Children with articulation disorders related to ankyloglossia may benefit from frenuloplasty. Children with velopharyngeal dysfunction should have standardized clinical evaluation and instrumental asseessment of velopharyngeal function. Surgeons should develop a treatment protocol to optimize speech outcomes while minimizing morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The UK education of overseas students in speech and language therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J; Goldbart, J; Phillips, J; Evans, R

    2001-01-01

    Informal evidence suggests that many overseas speech and language therapists (SLTs) either do not return to their home country on qualification or do not work as SLTs in the public sector. Many factors may contribute to this situation. However, concern that it may result in part from a poor match between UK SLT education and the demands of the role in other countries, led the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) to fund a study of overseas SLT students' experiences of UK qualifying courses. The study involved questionnaires and interviews with current students and those qualifying since May 1994. The focus of this paper is the respondents' experiences of studying and working in the UK, their views of the advantages and disadvantages of working in their home countries and the UK and supportive strategies that UK universities and other agencies might adopt. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial on Very Early Speech and Language Therapy in Acute Stroke Patients with Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Laska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aphasia affects one third of acute stroke patients. There is a considerable spontaneous recovery in aphasia, but impaired communication ability remains a great problem. Communication difficulties are an impediment to rehabilitation. Early treatment of the language deficits leading to increased communication ability would improve rehabilitation. The aim of this study is to elucidate the efficacy of very early speech and language therapy (SLT in acute stroke patients with aphasia. Methods: A prospective, open, randomized, controlled trial was carried out with blinded endpoint evaluation of SLT, starting within 2 days of stroke onset and lasting for 21 days. 123 consecutive patients with acute, first-ever ischemic stroke and aphasia were randomized. The SLT treatment was Language Enrichment Therapy, and the aphasia tests used were the Norsk grunntest for afasi (NGA and the Amsterdam-Nijmegen everyday language test (ANELT, both performed by speech pathologists, blinded for randomization. Results: The primary outcome, as measured by ANELT at day 21, was 1.3 in the actively treated patient group and 1.2 among controls. NGA led to similar results in both groups. Patients with a higher level of education (>12 years improved more on ANELT by day 21 than those with Conclusions: Very early intensive SLT with the Language Enrichment Therapy program over 21 days had no effect on the degree of aphasia in unselected acute aphasic stroke patients. In aphasic patients with more fluency, SLT resulted in a significant improvement as compared to controls. A higher educational level of >12 years was beneficial.

  7. Non-Attendance and Utilization of a Speech and Language Therapy Service: A Retrospective Pilot Study of School-Aged Referrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Amy; Flynn, Catherine; Antonijevic-Elliott, Stanislava; Lyons, Rena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-attendance and inappropriate referrals affect the effective and efficient running of healthcare services. Non-engagement with speech and language therapy (SLT) services may lead to negative long-term consequences for children in need of SLT intervention. Currently there is a dearth of research on non-attendance and non-engagement…

  8. A Randomized, Rater-Blinded, Parallel Trial of Intensive Speech Therapy in Sub-Acute Post-Stroke Aphasia: The SP-I-R-IT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel Pavao; Leal, Gabriela; Fonseca, Isabel; Farrajota, Luisa; Aguiar, Marta; Fonseca, Jose; Lauterbach, Martin; Goncalves, Luis; Cary, M. Carmo; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; Ferro, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is conflicting evidence regarding the benefits of intensive speech and language therapy (SLT), particularly because intensity is often confounded with total SLT provided. Aims: A two-centre, randomized, rater-blinded, parallel study was conducted to compare the efficacy of 100 h of SLT in a regular (RT) versus intensive (IT)…

  9. Competent in Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Validation of a Measurement Tool that Measures EBP Self-Efficacy and Task Value in Speech-Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the impact their teaching has on these…

  10. Short-term effect of short, intensive speech therapy on articulation and resonance in Ugandan patients with cleft (lip and) palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anke Luyten; H. Vermeersch; A. Hodges; K. Bettens; K. van Lierde; G. Galiwango

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to assess the short-term effectiveness of short and intensive speech therapy provided to patients with cleft (lip and) palate (C(L)P) in terms of articulation and resonance. Methods: Five Ugandan patients (age: 7.3-19.6 years) with non-syndromic C(L)P

  11. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP): validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the

  12. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP) : validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Lucas; M. Wieringa-de Waard; N. van Dijk; B. Spek

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to

  13. Constrained versus Unconstrained Intensive Language Therapy in Two Individuals with Chronic, Moderate-to-Severe Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech: Behavioral and fMRI Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Jacquie; Pulvermuller, Friedemann; Silva, Nicole; Burke, Katherine; Andrianopoulos, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I study investigated behavioral and functional MRI (fMRI) outcomes of 2 intensive treatment programs to improve naming in 2 participants with chronic moderate-to-severe aphasia with comorbid apraxia of speech (AOS). Constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT; Pulvermuller et al., 2001) has demonstrated positive outcomes in some…

  14. Efficacy of speech therapy in children with language disorders : specific language impairment compared with language impairment in comorbidity with cognitive delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorhuis-Brouwer, SM; Knijff, WA

    2002-01-01

    Objective: this article discusses the effect of speech therapy on language comprehension, language production and non-verbal functioning in two groups of children with developmental language disorders. Design: retrospective study-a follow-up after a mean of 2 years, Materials and methods: verbal and

  15. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-07-01

     There are an estimated 30,000-40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977-2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children.

  16. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000-40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977-2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09% addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5% were from Canada, 3 (13.6% were from Japan, 2 (9% were from Brazil, 2 (9% were from Germany, 1 (4.5% was from the USA, 1 (4.5% was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5% was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (rehabilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children.

  17. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000–40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977–2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children. PMID:25991964

  18. Metacognition in Speech and Language Therapy for Children with Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorders: Implications for a Theory of Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaile, Jacqueline; Adams, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Metacognition is a significant component of complex interventions for children who have developmental language disorders. Research into how metacognition operates in the content or process of developmental language therapy delivery is limited. Identification and description of proposed active therapy components, such as metacognition,…

  19. Speech disorder prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladis Fornaris-Méndez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Language therapy has trafficked from a medical focus until a preventive focus. However, difficulties are evidenced in the development of this last task, because he is devoted bigger space to the correction of the disorders of the language. Because the speech disorders is the dysfunction with more frequently appearance, acquires special importance the preventive work that is developed to avoid its appearance. Speech education since early age of the childhood makes work easier for prevent the appearance of speech disorders in the children. The present work has as objective to offer different activities for the prevention of the speech disorders.

  20. New graduates’ perceptions of preparedness to provide speech-language therapy services in general and dysphagia services in particular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shajila Singh

    2015-06-01

    Methods: New graduates of six South African universities were recruited to participate in a survey by completing an electronic questionnaire exploring their perceptions of the dysphagia curricula and their preparedness to practise across the scope of the profession of speechlanguage therapy. Results: Eighty graduates participated in the study yielding a response rate of 63.49%. Participants perceived themselves to be well prepared in some areas (e.g. child language: 100%; articulation and phonology: 97.26%, but less prepared in other areas (e.g. adult dysphagia: 50.70%; paediatric dysarthria: 46.58%; paediatric dysphagia: 38.36% and most unprepared to provide services requiring sign language (23.61% and African languages (20.55%. There was a significant relationship between perceptions of adequate theory and clinical learning opportunities with assessment and management of dysphagia and perceptions of preparedness to provide dysphagia services. Conclusion: There is a need for review of existing curricula and consideration of developing a standard speech-language therapy curriculum across universities, particularly in service provision to a multilingual population, and in both the theory and clinical learning of the assessment and management of adult and paediatric dysphagia, to better equip graduates for practice.

  1. The effectiveness of melodic intonation therapy on fundamental frequency and intensity in Persian autistic children’s speech

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    Neda Ferdosi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder with several speech disorders such as prosodic and pragmatic impairments. Melodic intonation therapy (MIT based on Albert et al. model (1973 is a rehabilitation method, developed on prosodic features. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MIT on Persian autistic children’s prosody.Methods: An easy version of MIT, adopted for Persian language was designed by researchers. Then, after a successful pilot study on a 10-years-old boy for one month, 13 subjects were selected for the main study. All the subjects were autistic, male, right-handed, 7-10-years-old Persian children studied for 48 sessions (16 weeks. Background information gathered from the parents by a questionnaire. As pre- and post-test, some assessments about children’s fundamental frequency (Fº and intensity of the Persian vowel sounds and declarative and interrogative sentences were accomplished. The data analysis was done using Praat and SPSS softwares.Results: There was a statistically significant increase in acoustic features, such as intensity, and fundamental frequency of declarative and interrogative sentences; also all six vowels of Persian, excluding /â/ and /æ/ (p<0.05 for all.Conclusion: The widely reported unusual prosody in autistic children was quantified by this study, too. In addition, there was convincing evidence of the positive effects of melodic intonation therapy on acoustic features in Persian autistic children.

  2. Fonoaudiologia e apneia do sono: uma revisão Speech therapy and sleepy apnae: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erilucia Pereira Santa Rosa

    2010-10-01

    essential to get an accurate diagnosis and correct actions with a multidisciplinary team, where the Speech Therapist is included. PURPOSE: to analyze, through literature, the interaction of Speech Therapist and SOHAS. CONCLUSION: with this study, we can identify SOHAS complexity and show the importance of performance in speech therapy for these patients for a better quality of life.

  3. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students: are students competent and confident EBP users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, B; Wieringa-de Waard, M; Lucas, C; van Dijk, N

    2013-01-01

    The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use EBP principles in their future profession not only depends on EBP knowledge and skills, but also on self-efficacy and task value students perceive towards EBP. To investigate the relation between EBP knowledge and skills, and EBP self-efficacy and task value in different year groups of Dutch SLT students. Students from three year groups filled in a tool that measured EBP knowledge and skills: the Dutch Modified Fresno (DMF). EBP self-efficacy and task value were assessed by using a 20-item questionnaire. Both tools were validated for this population. Mean scores for the three year groups were calculated and tested for group differences using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a post-hoc Games-Howell procedure. With a multiple linear regression technique it was assessed whether EBP self-efficacy and task value predict learning achievement scores on the DMF. Other possible predictors included in the model were: level of prior education, standard of English, having had mathematics in prior education and the SLT study year. A total of 149 students filled in both measurement tools. Mean scores on EBP knowledge and skills were significantly different for the three year groups, with students who were further along their studies scoring higher on the DMF. Mean scores on the EBP self-efficacy and task value questionnaire were the same for the three year groups: all students valued EBP positive but self-efficacy was low in all groups. Of the possible predictors, only the year in which students study and EBP self-efficacy were significant predictors for learning achievements in EBP. Despite a significant increase in EBP knowledge and skills over the years as assessed by

  4. A Review Of Different Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Therapies By Speech And Language Pathologists

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    Ehsan Nadeifar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the common symptoms after stroke and is a marker for poor prognosis. Select the best therapy procedure is important. This study reviews the various therapy methods available to clinicians. Methods: An electronic database search was performed on PubMed and Embase. The search was limited to English publications. Terms such as stroke, dysphagia, swallowing disorders; deglutition, deglutition disorders, treatment outcome, electro-stimulation-therapy, thermal-stimulation, muscle-training, rehabilitation, also extensive manual searching was conducted. Results: oropharyngeal dysphagia interventions are divided into 5 groups based on the type of therapy: 1- bolus modifications and management (Compensatory Techniques, 2- swallow maneuvers and postures (Compensatory Techniques and/or Rehabilitative Techniques 3- combination of interventions (Compensatory Techniques and/or Rehabilitative Techniques, 4- electro-stimulation and thermo-tactile stimulation (Facilitation Techniques, 5- other interventions (Rehabilitative Techniques. Conclusion: There are different therapy procedures that can be use for Oropharyngeal dysphagia after stroke, but there are questions about the most effective of therapy, although some positive significant outcome studies have been published.

  5. Cholinergic Potentiation and Audiovisual Repetition-Imitation Therapy Improve Speech Production and Communication Deficits in a Person with Crossed Aphasia by Inducing Structural Plasticity in White Matter Tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Marcelo L; De-Torres, Irene; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Torres-Prioris, María J; Alfaro, Francisco; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; López-Barroso, Diana; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Donepezil (DP), a cognitive-enhancing drug targeting the cholinergic system, combined with massed sentence repetition training augmented and speeded up recovery of speech production deficits in patients with chronic conduction aphasia and extensive left hemisphere infarctions (Berthier et al., 2014). Nevertheless, a still unsettled question is whether such improvements correlate with restorative structural changes in gray matter and white matter pathways mediating speech production. In the present study, we used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to study treatment-induced brain changes in gray matter and white matter tracts in a right-handed male with chronic conduction aphasia and a right subcortical lesion (crossed aphasia). A single-patient, open-label multiple-baseline design incorporating two different treatments and two post-treatment evaluations was used. The patient received an initial dose of DP (5 mg/day) which was maintained during 4 weeks and then titrated up to 10 mg/day and administered alone (without aphasia therapy) during 8 weeks (Endpoint 1). Thereafter, the drug was combined with an audiovisual repetition-imitation therapy (Look-Listen-Repeat, LLR) during 3 months (Endpoint 2). Language evaluations, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were performed at baseline and at both endpoints in JAM and once in 21 healthy control males. Treatment with DP alone and combined with LLR therapy induced marked improvement in aphasia and communication deficits as well as in selected measures of connected speech production, and phrase repetition. The obtained gains in speech production remained well-above baseline scores even 4 months after ending combined therapy. Longitudinal DWI showed structural plasticity in the right frontal aslant tract and direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus with both interventions. VBM revealed no structural changes in other white matter tracts nor in cortical areas linked by these tracts. In

  6. Interdisciplinaridade na fonoaudiologia: a concepção do professor Interdisciplinarity in speech language therapy: the teacher's conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Mancopes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a concepção de interdisciplinaridade referida pelos professores fonoaudiólogos do curso de Fonoaudiologia da Universidade do Vale do Itajaí. MÉTODOS: a pesquisa orientou-se por uma abordagem qualitativa através da Análise do Discurso de Linha Francesa, tendo como instrumento de coleta de dados a entrevista em profundidade. RESULTADOS: após a análise, identificaram-se diferentes posições sujeito, onde se podem observar a concepção e o conhecimento sobre a interdisciplinaridade, as possíveis situações pedagógicas nas quais a interdisciplinaridade acontece, além dos obstáculos às práticas interdisciplinares. CONCLUSÃO: percebeu-se que não há ainda um conhecimento sedimentado sobre a interdisciplinaridade que resulte numa linha de trabalho com princípios teórico-metodológicos suficientemente definidos e consistentes. Por fim, este trabalho revela a necessidade de maior investimento em pesquisas a fim de sustentar os princípios da interdisciplinaridade no campo da Fonoaudiologia, com intuito de expandir os horizontes desse profissional que, antes de tudo, precisa entender-se como profissional da saúde o qual vive cotidianamente uma realidade que exige um olhar plural.PURPOSE: to analyze the concept of interdisciplinarity among teachers of the speech therapy course at the University of Vale do Itajaí. METHODS: the research was guided by a qualitative approach, through a discourse analysis following the French model, using an in-depth interview as the data collection tool. RESULTS: following the analysis, different subject positions were identified, in which knowledge of interdisciplinarity, the possible pedagogical situations in which it occurs, and the obstacles to interdisciplinary practices, were identified. CONCLUSION: It was realized that there is still a lack of firmly-grounded knowledge on the subject of interdisciplinarity that can lead to a work model with sufficiently defined and consistent

  7. Effectiveness of 1:1 Speech and Language Therapy for Older Children with (Developmental) Language Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbels, Susan H.; Wright, Lisa; Brockbank, Sally; Godfrey, Caroline; Harris, Catherine; Leniston, Hannah; Neary, Kate; Nicoll, Hilary; Nicoll, Lucy; Scott, Jackie; Maric, Nataša

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evidence of the effectiveness of therapy for older children with (developmental) language disorder (DLD), and particularly those with receptive language impairments, is very limited. The few existing studies have focused on particular target areas, but none has looked at a whole area of a service. Aims: To establish whether for…

  8. Dysphagia Therapy in Stroke: A Survey of Speech and Language Ttherapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, S. K.; Wellwood, I.; Smith, C. H.; Newham, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke, leading to adverse outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for dysphagia therapy, thus making it difficult to determine the best approaches to treatment. Clinical decisions are often based on usual practice, however no formal method of monitoring practice patterns exists. Aims: To…

  9. Design and evaluation of a virtual reality exposure therapy system with automatic free speech interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Heijden, N.; Brinkman, W.P.

    2011-01-01

    Research on Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) to treat social phobia is not new. Still few studies focus on creating an elaborate conversation between the patient and characters in a virtual environment. This study focuses on techniques to run a semi-scripted conversation between virtual

  10. Relationship among academic engagement, burnout and student perceptions of curriculum delivery in Speech and Language Therapy Students from University of Concepcion, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaria, Rocio; Carmona, Lorena; Perez, Cristhian; Parra, Paula

    2017-09-01

    To relate engagement and academic burnout with curriculum evaluation among speech therapy students. This observational, cross-sectional study was conducted at the end of the first academic semester for each level and at the end of a theoretical class in order to ensure the maximum participation rate at the University of Concepción, Concepción, Chile, and comprised students of a speech and language therapy programme.Curriculum evaluation scale, academic engagement and academic burnout questionnaires were used. STATA SE 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 200 participants, 157(78.50%) were women and 43(21.50%) men. The overall mean age was 20.81±2.15 years (range: 18-30 years). Emotional burnout was inversely correlated with the evaluation of teaching and evaluation methods, distribution of fields, teaching team and achievement of objectives (pburnout and higher levels of academic engagement.

  11. Lee Silverman Voice Treatment versus standard speech and language therapy versus control in Parkinson's disease: a pilot randomised controlled trial (PD COMM pilot).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackley, Catherine M; Smith, Christina H; Rick, Caroline E; Brady, Marian C; Ives, Natalie; Patel, Smitaa; Woolley, Rebecca; Dowling, Francis; Patel, Ramilla; Roberts, Helen; Jowett, Sue; Wheatley, Keith; Kelly, Debbie; Sands, Gina; Clarke, Carl E

    2018-01-01

    Speech-related problems are common in Parkinson's disease (PD), but there is little evidence for the effectiveness of standard speech and language therapy (SLT) or Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD®). The PD COMM pilot was a three-arm, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial (RCT) of LSVT LOUD®, SLT and no intervention (1:1:1 ratio) to assess the feasibility and to inform the design of a full-scale RCT. Non-demented patients with idiopathic PD and speech problems and no SLT for speech problems in the past 2 years were eligible. LSVT LOUD® is a standardised regime (16 sessions over 4 weeks). SLT comprised individualised content per local practice (typically weekly sessions for 6-8 weeks). Outcomes included recruitment and retention, treatment adherence, and data completeness. Outcome data collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months included patient-reported voice and quality of life measures, resource use, and assessor-rated speech recordings. Eighty-nine patients were randomised with 90% in the therapy groups and 100% in the control group completing the trial. The response rate for Voice Handicap Index (VHI) in each arm was ≥ 90% at all time-points. VHI was highly correlated with the other speech-related outcome measures. There was a trend to improvement in VHI with LSVT LOUD® (difference at 3 months compared with control: - 12.5 points; 95% CI - 26.2, 1.2) and SLT (difference at 3 months compared with control: - 9.8 points; 95% CI - 23.2, 3.7) which needs to be confirmed in an adequately powered trial. Randomisation to a three-arm trial of speech therapy including a no intervention control is feasible and acceptable. Compliance with both interventions was good. VHI and other patient-reported outcomes were relevant measures and provided data to inform the sample size for a substantive trial. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN75223808. registered 22 March 2012.

  12. Speech Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Speech Problems KidsHealth / For Teens / Speech Problems What's in ... a person's ability to speak clearly. Some Common Speech and Language Disorders Stuttering is a problem that ...

  13. Lateralization for Speech Predicts Therapeutic Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kishon, Ronit; Abraham, Karen; Alschuler, Daniel M.; Keilp, John G.; Stewart, Jonathan W.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2015-01-01

    A prior study (Bruder et al., 1997) found left hemisphere advantage for verbal dichotic listening was predictive of clinical response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. This study aimed to confirm this finding and to examine the value of neuropsychological tests, which have shown promise for predicting antidepressant response. Twenty depressed patients who subsequently completed 14 weeks of CBT and 74 healthy adults were tested on a Dichotic Fused Words Test (DFWT). Patient...

  14. The Teaching of Reading, Writing and Language in a Clinical Speech and Language Setting: A Blended Therapy Intervention Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammons, Kerrie Allen

    2013-01-01

    With a growing body of research that supports a link between language and literacy, governing bodies in the field of speech and language pathology have recognized the need to reconsider the role of speech-language pathologists in addressing the emergent literacy needs of preschoolers who struggle with literacy and language concepts. This study…

  15. Long-Term Outcomes of Speech Therapy for Seven Adolescents with Visual Feedback Technologies: Ultrasound and Electropalatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacsfalvi, Penelope; Bernhardt, Barbara May

    2011-01-01

    This follow-up study investigated the speech production of seven adolescents and young adults with hearing impairment 2-4 years after speech intervention with ultrasound and electropalatography. Perceptual judgments by seven expert listeners revealed that five out of seven speakers either continued to generalize post-treatment or maintained their…

  16. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Center for Cancer Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chepeha, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  17. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  18. Lateralization for speech predicts therapeutic response to cognitive behavioral therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishon, Ronit; Abraham, Karen; Alschuler, Daniel M; Keilp, John G; Stewart, Jonathan W; McGrath, Patrick J; Bruder, Gerard E

    2015-08-30

    A prior study (Bruder, G.E., Stewart, J.W., Mercier, M.A., Agosti, V., Leite, P., Donovan, S., Quitkin, F.M., 1997. Outcome of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression: relation of hemispheric dominance for verbal processing. Journal of Abnormal Psychology 106, 138-144.) found left hemisphere advantage for verbal dichotic listening was predictive of clinical response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. This study aimed to confirm this finding and to examine the value of neuropsychological tests, which have shown promise for predicting antidepressant response. Twenty depressed patients who subsequently completed 14 weeks of CBT and 74 healthy adults were tested on a Dichotic Fused Words Test (DFWT). Patients were also tested on the National Adult Reading Test to estimate IQ, and word fluency, choice RT, and Stroop neuropsychological tests. Left hemisphere advantage on the DFWT was more than twice as large in CBT responders as in non-responders, and was associated with improvement in depression following treatment. There was no difference between responders and non-responders on neuropsychological tests. The results support the hypothesis that the ability of individuals with strong left hemisphere dominance to recruit frontal and temporal cortical regions involved in verbal dichotic listening predicts CBT response. The large effect size, sensitivity and specificity of DFWT predictions suggest the potential value of this brief and inexpensive test as an indicator of whether a patient will benefit from CBT for depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Atendimento fonoaudiológico intensivo em pacientes operados de fissura labiopalatina: relato de casos Intensive speech therapy in patients operated for cleft lip and palate: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Rosário Ferreira Lima

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Devido à carência de fonoaudiólogos para atendimento ao paciente com fissura labiopalatina em várias regiões do Brasil, novos programas de atendimento devem ser desenvolvidos para esses indivíduos. A terapia intensiva de fala tem sido relatada na literatura como uma modalidade alternativa. Este trabalho relata a experiência com alguns casos de atendimento fonoaudiológico intensivo, e compara o desempenho na produção da fala de quatro pacientes operados de fissura palatina, antes e após a terapia fonoaudiológica intensiva. Foram atendidos, no período de férias escolares, três adultos e um adolescente que apresentavam distúrbios articulatórios compensatórios. O atendimento teve duração de três horas diárias para cada paciente, durante dez dias, divididos em terapia individual e em grupo. No início e fim do período de terapia, os pacientes foram avaliados por uma fonoaudióloga que não participou dos atendimentos. Também foi gravada em vídeo uma amostra de fala espontânea, contagem de 1 a 20 e repetição de uma lista de palavras e frases com fonemas oclusivos orais e fricativos. Todos os pacientes mostraram evolução satisfatória na terapia intensiva, com adequação dos fonemas trabalhados na fala dirigida, necessitando ainda de acompanhamento fonoterápico para sua automatização. A terapia intensiva mostrou ser uma alternativa eficaz e viável nesses casos, podendo também ser uma estratégia durante o início do tratamento fonoaudiológico convencional.Due to the lack of speech therapists at various regions of Brazil to assist patients with cleft lip and palate, new intervention programs must be developed for these individuals. Intensive speech therapy has been cited in literature as an alternative modality. This article relates the experience of four cleft lip patients, comparing their speech performances before and after the intensive intervention. The subjects, three adults and one adolescent with compensatory

  20. Trial participants' experiences of early enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke compared with employed visitor support: a qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Gomersall, Timothy; Bowen, Audrey

    2013-02-01

    To explore trial participants' experiences of the process and outcomes of early, enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke with support from an employed visitor. Qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Twney-two people who, after stroke, had a diagnosis of aphasia (12), dysarthria (5) or both (5) and who participated in the ACT NoW study. Eight English NHS usual care settings. Individual interviews. Thematic content analysis assisted by a bespoke data transformation protocol for incorporating non-verbal and semantically ambiguous data. Participants highly regarded regular and sustained contact with someone outside of immediate family/friends who engaged them in deliberate activities/communication in the early months after stroke. Participants identified differences in the process of intervention between speech and language therapists and employed visitors. But no major discriminations were made between the impact or value of this contact according to whether provided by a speech and language therapist or employed visitor. Participant-defined criteria for effectiveness of contact included: impact on mood and confidence, self-recognition of progress and the meeting of individual needs. As in the randomized controlled trial, participants reported no evidence of added benefit of early communication therapy beyond that from attention control. The findings do not imply that regular contact with any non-professional can have beneficial effects for someone with aphasia or dysarthria in the early weeks following a stroke. The study points to specific conditions that would have to be met for contact to have a positive effect.

  1. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  2. Cholinergic Potentiation and Audiovisual Repetition-Imitation Therapy Improve Speech Production and Communication Deficits in a Person with Crossed Aphasia by Inducing Structural Plasticity in White Matter Tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L. Berthier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Donepezil (DP, a cognitive-enhancing drug targeting the cholinergic system, combined with massed sentence repetition training augmented and speeded up recovery of speech production deficits in patients with chronic conduction aphasia and extensive left hemisphere infarctions (Berthier et al., 2014. Nevertheless, a still unsettled question is whether such improvements correlate with restorative structural changes in gray matter and white matter pathways mediating speech production. In the present study, we used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to study treatment-induced brain changes in gray matter and white matter tracts in a right-handed male with chronic conduction aphasia and a right subcortical lesion (crossed aphasia. A single-patient, open-label multiple-baseline design incorporating two different treatments and two post-treatment evaluations was used. The patient received an initial dose of DP (5 mg/day which was maintained during 4 weeks and then titrated up to 10 mg/day and administered alone (without aphasia therapy during 8 weeks (Endpoint 1. Thereafter, the drug was combined with an audiovisual repetition-imitation therapy (Look-Listen-Repeat, LLR during 3 months (Endpoint 2. Language evaluations, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM were performed at baseline and at both endpoints in JAM and once in 21 healthy control males. Treatment with DP alone and combined with LLR therapy induced marked improvement in aphasia and communication deficits as well as in selected measures of connected speech production, and phrase repetition. The obtained gains in speech production remained well-above baseline scores even 4 months after ending combined therapy. Longitudinal DWI showed structural plasticity in the right frontal aslant tract and direct segment of the arcuate fasciculus with both interventions. VBM revealed no structural changes in other white matter tracts nor in cortical areas linked by these

  3. Fonoaudiologia e educação infantil: uma parceria necessária Speech therapy and infantile education: a necessary partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Carla Santos Maranhão

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar as informações que os professores de educação infantil possuem em relação a Fonoaudiologia na escola, bem como sobre temas ligados à área de linguagem. MÉTODOS: foi aplicado um questionário, contendo 17 questões objetivas em uma amostra com 73 professores de educação infantil da rede municipal de ensino da cidade de Maceió-AL. RESULTADOS: os participantes relacionaram a atuação fonoaudiológica na escola à presença de alterações no desenvolvimento da criança. O índice de professores da amostra que obtiveram contato com o fonoaudiólogo na escola é de 4,1%. Estes educadores relatam que apenas 57,5% receberam informações sobre a aquisição de linguagem e o desenvolvimento da escrita. CONCLUSãO: com a realização da presente pesquisa foi possível confirmar a necessidade de reforçar as ações fonoaudiológicas na escola, bem como a parceria entre fonoaudiólogos e professores.PURPOSE: to investigate the knowledge of infantile education teachers about the speech therapy at school, as well as on subjects regarding language area. METHODS: 73 infantile education teachers in public schools of Maceió-AL answered a questionnaire containing 17 objective questions. RESULTS: the participants related the performance of speech therapy staff at schools to the presence of alterations in children development. Only 4.1% of the teachers have had contact with some speech therapist at school. These educators report that only 57.5% received information about language acquisition and development of writing. CONCLUSION: upon accomplishing this research it was possible to confirm the necessity for reinforcing speech therapy related actions in school, as well as the partnership among speech therapists and teachers.

  4. Intensive speech and language therapy in patients with chronic aphasia after stroke: a randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenstein, Caterina; Grewe, Tanja; Flöel, Agnes; Ziegler, Wolfram; Springer, Luise; Martus, Peter; Huber, Walter; Willmes, Klaus; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Abel, Stefanie; Glindemann, Ralf; Domahs, Frank; Regenbrecht, Frank; Schlenck, Klaus-Jürgen; Thomas, Marion; Obrig, Hellmuth; de Langen, Ernst; Rocker, Roman; Wigbers, Franziska; Rühmkorf, Christina; Hempen, Indra; List, Jonathan; Baumgaertner, Annette

    2017-04-15

    Treatment guidelines for aphasia recommend intensive speech and language therapy for chronic (≥6 months) aphasia after stroke, but large-scale, class 1 randomised controlled trials on treatment effectiveness are scarce. We aimed to examine whether 3 weeks of intensive speech and language therapy under routine clinical conditions improved verbal communication in daily-life situations in people with chronic aphasia after stroke. In this multicentre, parallel group, superiority, open-label, blinded-endpoint, randomised controlled trial, patients aged 70 years or younger with aphasia after stroke lasting for 6 months or more were recruited from 19 inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation centres in Germany. An external biostatistician used a computer-generated permuted block randomisation method, stratified by treatment centre, to randomly assign participants to either 3 weeks or more of intensive speech and language therapy (≥10 h per week) or 3 weeks deferral of intensive speech and language therapy. The primary endpoint was between-group difference in the change in verbal communication effectiveness in everyday life scenarios (Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test A-scale) from baseline to immediately after 3 weeks of treatment or treatment deferral. All analyses were done using the modified intention-to-treat population (those who received 1 day or more of intensive treatment or treatment deferral). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01540383. We randomly assigned 158 patients between April 1, 2012, and May 31, 2014. The modified intention-to-treat population comprised 156 patients (78 per group). Verbal communication was significantly improved from baseline to after intensive speech and language treatment (mean difference 2·61 points [SD 4·94]; 95% CI 1·49 to 3·72), but not from baseline to after treatment deferral (-0·03 points [4·04]; -0·94 to 0·88; between-group difference Cohen's d 0·58; p=0·0004). Eight patients had

  5. A disciplina de Libras no contexto de formação acadêmica em Fonoaudiologia Libras discipline in speech language therapy academic context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Guarinello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a inserção da disciplina de Libras em cursos nacionais de graduação em Fonoaudiologia, enfocando carga horária, período em que é ofertada, a natureza/estrutura da mesma; bem como, a avaliação de graduandos quanto à contribuição de tal disciplina na sua formação acadêmica e nas relações estabelecidas com sujeitos surdos. MÉTODO: foi aplicado um questionário a 240 acadêmicos de sete cursos de graduação em Fonoaudiologia, ofertados em Instituições de Ensino nacionais. Para tanto, adotou-se como critério de inclusão, acadêmicos que já tivessem cumprido a carga horária total da disciplina de Libras. O questionário foi respondido por escrito nas dependências dos cursos. Os resultados, analisados quantitativamente, foram organizados e apresentados em tabelas de frequências absolutas e relativas. RESULTADOS: os achados demonstram que se por um lado dentre os acadêmicos predomina a visão de que a carga horária destinada à referida disciplina é insuficiente, por outro existe uma conscientização por parte dos mesmos quanto à importância e à necessidade da formação em Libras. CONCLUSÃO: a partir de tal estudo pode-se evidenciar a necessidade do aprofundamento de discussões no contexto fonoaudiológico acerca da formação acadêmica voltada a Libras, bem como a definição de critérios e parâmetros que garantam um ensino de qualidade em torno de tal conteúdo. Esse estudo aponta para a necessidade do implemento de pesquisas que ofereçam elementos para o avanço na formação acadêmica fonoaudiológica voltada ao referido conteúdo, bem como, contribuam para a avanço de práticas fonoaudiológicas bilíngues, clínicas e educacionais, dirigidas a sujeitos surdos.PURPOSE: to analyze the insertion of a sign language discipline in national speech language therapy courses, approaching the number of hours spent with the discipline, the period when its offered, the structure nature, and the

  6. A disciplina de Libras no contexto de formação acadêmica em fonoaudiologia Libras discipline in speech language therapy academic context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Guarinello

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a inserção da disciplina de Libras em cursos nacionais de graduação em Fonoaudiologia, enfocando carga horária, período em que é ofertada, a natureza/estrutura da mesma; bem como, a avaliação de graduandos quanto à contribuição de tal disciplina na sua formação acadêmica e nas relações estabelecidas com sujeitos surdos. MÉTODO: foi aplicado um questionário a 240 acadêmicos de sete cursos de graduação em Fonoaudiologia, ofertados em Instituições de Ensino nacionais. Para tanto, adotou-se como critério de inclusão, acadêmicos que já tivessem cumprido a carga horária total da disciplina de Libras. O questionário foi respondido por escrito nas dependências dos cursos. Os resultados, analisados quantitativamente, foram organizados e apresentados em tabelas de frequências absolutas e relativas. RESULTADOS: os achados demonstram que se por um lado dentre os acadêmicos predomina a visão de que a carga horária destinada à referida disciplina é insuficiente, por outro existe uma conscientização por parte dos mesmos quanto à importância e à necessidade da formação em Libras. CONCLUSÃO: a partir de tal estudo pode-se evidenciar a necessidade do aprofundamento de discussões no contexto fonoaudiológico acerca da formação acadêmica voltada a Libras, bem como a definição de critérios e parâmetros que garantam um ensino de qualidade em torno de tal conteúdo. Esse estudo aponta para a necessidade do implemento de pesquisas que ofereçam elementos para o avanço na formação acadêmica fonoaudiológica voltada ao referido conteúdo, bem como, contribuam para a avanço de práticas fonoaudiológicas bilíngues, clínicas e educacionais, dirigidas a sujeitos surdos.PURPOSE: to analyze the insertion of a sign language discipline in national speech language therapy courses, approaching the number of hours spent with the discipline, the period when its offered, the structure nature, and the

  7. Singing can improve speech function in aphasics associated with intact right basal ganglia and preserve right temporal glucose metabolism: Implications for singing therapy indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanuma, Kyoko; Meguro, Kenichi; Satoh, Masayuki; Tashiro, Manabu; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, we know that some aphasic patients can sing well despite their speech disturbances. Herein, we report 10 patients with non-fluent aphasia, of which half of the patients improved their speech function after singing training. We studied ten patients with non-fluent aphasia complaining of difficulty finding words. All had lesions in the left basal ganglia or temporal lobe. They selected the melodies they knew well, but which they could not sing. We made a new lyric with a familiar melody using words they could not name. The singing training using these new lyrics was performed for 30 minutes once a week for 10 weeks. Before and after the training, their speech functions were assessed by language tests. At baseline, 6 of them received positron emission tomography to evaluate glucose metabolism. Five patients exhibited improvements after intervention; all but one exhibited intact right basal ganglia and left temporal lobes, but all exhibited left basal ganglia lesions. Among them, three subjects exhibited preserved glucose metabolism in the right temporal lobe. We considered that patients who exhibit intact right basal ganglia and left temporal lobes, together with preserved right hemispheric glucose metabolism, might be an indication of the effectiveness of singing therapy.

  8. Speech and language therapy in Sure Start Local Programmes: a survey-based analysis of practice and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Sure Start has been a flagship policy for the UK Labour Government since 1998. Its aim was to improve the life chances of children under five years of age who live in areas of socio-economic disadvantage by means of multi-agency, multidisciplinary Sure Start Local Programmes (SSLPs). Speech and language therapists have played a key part in many SSLPs, and have had the opportunity to extend their roles. Despite the scrutiny paid to Sure Start, there has been no comprehensive analysis of speech and language therapists' contribution to date. Studies have focused on individual programmes or small samples: there has been no attempt to collate the full range of practice. As Sure Start evolved and Children's Centres emerged, it became vital to learn from the Sure Start experience and inform the mainstreaming of practice, before the window of opportunity closed. The survey aims were, firstly, to identify the range of practice amongst speech and language therapists working in SSLPs, highlighting new practice, and, secondly, to categorize the practices according to the tiered model of UK health and social services of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT 2006). An online mixed-method, semi-structured survey was designed to elicit primarily quantitative and categorical data. A total of 501 Sure Start Local Programmes were invited to take part. A total of 128 speech and language therapists responded, giving a response rate of 26%. A descriptive analysis of the response data was undertaken. A total of 103 respondents (80%) reported maintaining a clinical role as well as extending their roles to include preventative services. Of those 103 respondents, 69% were able to see referred children at a younger average age and 80% saw them more quickly than before Sure Start. A wide variety of preventative practice was identified. A widening of access to speech and language therapist was reported in terms of venues used and hours offered. Respondents reported on

  9. Language development, delay and intervention-the views of parents from communities that speech and language therapy managers in England consider to be under-served.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Harding, Sam; Roulstone, Sue

    2017-07-01

    Evidence-based practice includes research evidence, clinical expertise and stakeholder perspectives. Stakeholder perspectives are important and include parental ethno-theories, which embrace views about many aspects of speech, language and communication, language development, and interventions. The Developmental Niche Framework provides a useful theory to understand parental beliefs. Ethnotheories, including those about language development, delay and interventions, may vary cross culturally and are less well understood in relation to families who may be considered 'under-served' or 'hard-to-reach' by speech and language therapy services. Who is considered to be under-served and the reasons why some families are under-served are complex. To describe beliefs and reported practices, in relation to speech and language development, delay and intervention, of parents and carers from a small number of groups in England who were perceived to be under-served in relation to SLT services. As part of a wider National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded study (Child Talk), seven focus groups (with a total of 52 participants) were held with parents from three communities in England. Topics addressed included beliefs about language development, language delay and parents' reported responses to language delay. Data were transcribed and analysed using adapted framework analysis, which also drew on directed content analysis. Four themes resulted that broadly matched the topics addressed in the focus groups: language development and the environment; causes and signs of speech and language delay; responses to concerns about speech, language and communication; and improving SLT. These produced some previously unreported ideas, e.g., about how language develops and the causes of delay. The findings are discussed in relation to previous literature and the Developmental Niche Framework. Clinical implications include ideas about issues for SLTs to discuss with families and the

  10. Speech Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina

    2011-01-01

    About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011.......About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011....

  11. Speech-to-Speech Relay Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Guide Speech to Speech Relay Service Speech-to-Speech (STS) is one form of Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS). TRS is a service that allows persons with hearing and speech disabilities ...

  12. Review of Visual Speech Perception by Hearing and Hearing-Impaired People: Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn; Hickson, Louise; Dodd, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background: Speech perception is often considered specific to the auditory modality, despite convincing evidence that speech processing is bimodal. The theoretical and clinical roles of speech-reading for speech perception, however, have received little attention in speech-language therapy. Aims: The role of speech-read information for speech…

  13. Relationship between speech motor control and speech intelligibility in children with speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aravind Kumar; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Yu, Vickie Y; Kadis, Darren S; Kroll, Robert; Pang, Elizabeth W; De Nil, Luc F

    2013-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to investigate the impact of speech motor issues on the speech intelligibility of children with moderate to severe speech sound disorders (SSD) within the context of the PROMPT intervention approach. The word-level Children's Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM), the sentence-level Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and tests of speech motor control and articulation proficiency were administered to 12 children (3:11 to 6:7 years) before and after PROMPT therapy. PROMPT treatment was provided for 45 min twice a week for 8 weeks. Twenty-four naïve adult listeners aged 22-46 years judged the intelligibility of the words and sentences. For CSIM, each time a recorded word was played to the listeners they were asked to look at a list of 12 words (multiple-choice format) and circle the word while for BIT sentences, the listeners were asked to write down everything they heard. Words correctly circled (CSIM) or transcribed (BIT) were averaged across three naïve judges to calculate percentage speech intelligibility. Speech intelligibility at both the word and sentence level was significantly correlated with speech motor control, but not articulatory proficiency. Further, the severity of speech motor planning and sequencing issues may potentially be a limiting factor in connected speech intelligibility and highlights the need to target these issues early and directly in treatment. The reader will be able to: (1) outline the advantages and disadvantages of using word- and sentence-level speech intelligibility tests; (2) describe the impact of speech motor control and articulatory proficiency on speech intelligibility; and (3) describe how speech motor control and speech intelligibility data may provide critical information to aid treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clozapine-Induced Microseizures, Orofacial Dyskinesia, and Speech Dysfluency in an Adolescent with Treatment Resistant Early Onset Schizophrenia on Concurrent Lithium Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekananda Rachamallu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic used in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia. It has a well-known side effect profile, including agranulocytosis, decreased seizure threshold, and tardive dyskinesia. In addition, numerous case reports have described clozapine-induced stuttering in adults. However, there has been only one previous case report describing it in the adolescent population. In addition, concurrent lithium therapy has been shown to enhance the neurotoxic effects of antipsychotics and lower the seizure threshold. Here, we report on the development of clozapine-induced microseizures, orofacial dyskinesia, and stuttering in a 17-year-old adolescent male with treatment of refractory early onset schizophrenia on clozapine and concurrent lithium therapy. The patient’s symptoms of schizophrenia responded well to the clozapine regimen. However, with the escalating dose of clozapine, the patient developed speech dysfluency in the form of stuttering and perioral twitching. An electroencephalogram confirmed seizure activity. Due to similarities with tardive dyskinesia, symptoms of microseizures induced by atypical antipsychotics may not be accurately diagnosed. A multidisciplinary treatment of speech dysfluency is of particular importance in the adolescent schizophrenic patients, who are expected to have longer duration of lifetime exposure to antipsychotics and in whom peer group interaction is crucial for normal personal and social development.

  15. Clozapine-Induced Microseizures, Orofacial Dyskinesia, and Speech Dysfluency in an Adolescent with Treatment Resistant Early Onset Schizophrenia on Concurrent Lithium Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachamallu, Vivekananda; Haq, Ayman; Song, Michael M; Aligeti, Manish

    2017-01-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic used in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia. It has a well-known side effect profile, including agranulocytosis, decreased seizure threshold, and tardive dyskinesia. In addition, numerous case reports have described clozapine-induced stuttering in adults. However, there has been only one previous case report describing it in the adolescent population. In addition, concurrent lithium therapy has been shown to enhance the neurotoxic effects of antipsychotics and lower the seizure threshold. Here, we report on the development of clozapine-induced microseizures, orofacial dyskinesia, and stuttering in a 17-year-old adolescent male with treatment of refractory early onset schizophrenia on clozapine and concurrent lithium therapy. The patient's symptoms of schizophrenia responded well to the clozapine regimen. However, with the escalating dose of clozapine, the patient developed speech dysfluency in the form of stuttering and perioral twitching. An electroencephalogram confirmed seizure activity. Due to similarities with tardive dyskinesia, symptoms of microseizures induced by atypical antipsychotics may not be accurately diagnosed. A multidisciplinary treatment of speech dysfluency is of particular importance in the adolescent schizophrenic patients, who are expected to have longer duration of lifetime exposure to antipsychotics and in whom peer group interaction is crucial for normal personal and social development.

  16. Introductory speeches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This CD is multimedia presentation of programme safety upgrading of Bohunice V1 NPP. This chapter consist of introductory commentary and 4 introductory speeches (video records): (1) Introductory speech of Vincent Pillar, Board chairman and director general of Slovak electric, Plc. (SE); (2) Introductory speech of Stefan Schmidt, director of SE - Bohunice Nuclear power plants; (3) Introductory speech of Jan Korec, Board chairman and director general of VUJE Trnava, Inc. - Engineering, Design and Research Organisation, Trnava; Introductory speech of Dietrich Kuschel, Senior vice-president of FRAMATOME ANP Project and Engineering

  17. Addressing Phonological Memory in Language Therapy with Clients Who Have Down Syndrome: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Gayle G.; Conners, Frances A.; Barber, Angela B.; Price, Hannah R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Phonological memory (PM) plays a significant role in language development but is impaired in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Without formal recommendations on how to address PM limitations in clients with DS, it is possible speech-language pathologists (SLPs) find ways to do so in their practices. Aims: This study asked if and how…

  18. Improved Vocabulary Production after Naming Therapy in Aphasia: Can Gains in Picture Naming Generalise to Connected Speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Paul; Sage, Karen; Ralph, Matt Lambon

    2009-01-01

    Background: Naming accuracy for nouns and verbs in aphasia can vary across different elicitation contexts, for example, simple picture naming, composite picture description, narratives, and conversation. For some people with aphasia, naming may be more accurate to simple pictures as opposed to naming in spontaneous, connected speech; for others,…

  19. Habilidades em consciência silábica e fonêmica de crianças com fala desviante com e sem intervenção fonoaudiológica Syllabic and phonemic awareness abilities in children with speech disorder with and without speech therapy intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Tavares Marchetti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o desempenho de crianças com desvio fonológico evolutivo (DFE que receberam intervenção fonoaudiológica com enfoque fonológico e de crianças com DFE que não receberam esta em habilidades de consciência fonológica (CF. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 23 sujeitos com diagnóstico de DFE, sendo que 14 crianças fizeram parte do Grupo de Estudo 1 (GE1, que recebeu terapia fonoaudiológica, e as outras nove fizeram parte do Grupo de Estudo 2 (GE2, que ainda não havia recebido fonoterapia. Todos os sujeitos foram submetidos à avaliação fonoaudiológica e da consciência fonológica. RESULTADOS: Das 26 sub-tarefas de CF aplicadas nos grupos de estudo, houve diferença estatisticamente significativa somente na tarefa T7-dissílabas (reversão silábica, confirmando o pior desempenho do GE2 (pPURPOSE: To compare the performances of children with evolutive phonological disorder (EPD that had phonologically-focused speech therapy and children with EPD who did not undergo therapy in phonological awareness (PA abilities. METHODS: Twenty three subjects with EPD diagnosis were evaluated. The 14 children that composed Study Group 1 (SG1 received speech therapy, while the other nine who were part of Study Group 2 (SG2 had not yet received speech therapy. All subjects underwent speech and language pathology evaluation and PA assessment. RESULTS: From the 26 sub-tasks of PA applied, only one showed statistically significant difference, confirming worse performance of the SG2 (p<0.05. However, analysis of the means showed that SG1 tended to present a better performance overall than SG2. Despite these results, even subjects who received speech therapy intervention presented low performances on the tasks. CONCLUSION: Statistically significant difference was observed only in the sub-test T7-two syllables (syllabic reversion among children with EPD who received speech intervention and children with EPD without speech therapy. However, the

  20. An Ecosystem of Intelligent ICT Tools for Speech-Language Therapy Based on a Formal Knowledge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir; López-Nores, Martín; Pazos-Arias, José; Quisi-Peralta, Diego; García-Duque, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The language and communication constitute the development mainstays of several intellectual and cognitive skills in humans. However, there are millions of people around the world who suffer from several disabilities and disorders related with language and communication, while most of the countries present a lack of corresponding services related with health care and rehabilitation. On these grounds, we are working to develop an ecosystem of intelligent ICT tools to support speech and language pathologists, doctors, students, patients and their relatives. This ecosystem has several layers and components, integrating Electronic Health Records management, standardized vocabularies, a knowledge database, an ontology of concepts from the speech-language domain, and an expert system. We discuss the advantages of such an approach through experiments carried out in several institutions assisting children with a wide spectrum of disabilities.

  1. Coral amador: efeitos de uma proposta de intervenção fonoaudiológica Amateur choir: the effect of speech therapy intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Miranda Loiola

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar os efeitos de uma proposta de intervenção fonoaudiológica com base na prática educativa, por meio de avaliação de fonoaudiólogos, professores de canto e dos próprios coristas amadores participantes, analisando, em momento pré e pós-intervenção fonoaudiológica, os parâmetros de respiração, projeção e tessitura vocal na voz cantada. MÉTODOS: o programa teve o referencial teórico de ZABALA (1998 sobre a prática educativa. Dez cantores de coral amador responderam a um questionário de caracterização e realizaram gravações da extensão vocal e canto, pré e pós-intervenção. Durante seis encontros, foi abordado o aquecimento vocal, anatomia e fisiologia da voz cantada, bem-estar vocal, respiração e propriocepção da voz. As gravações foram analisadas por juízes fonoaudiólogos e professores de canto, que avaliaram a respiração, projeção e tessitura vocal. Os coristas, sem acesso às gravações, realizaram auto-avaliação dos mesmos parâmetros. RESULTADOS: avaliação dos juízes: tessitura vocal teve mais alterações positivas, seguida da respiração e projeção vocal. Todos os parâmetros tiveram mudanças significantes (p PURPOSE: to check the effects of a speech therapy intervention, based on the educational practice, by the assessment of speech and language pathologists, singing teachers and amateur choral singers themselves, analyzing the parameters of breathing, projection and vocal range profile in singing voice, pre and post speech therapy intervention. METHODS: the program was the theoretical framework of Zabala (1998 on educational practice. Ten amateur choral singers responded to a characterization questionnaire and conducted recordings of vocal range and singing, pre and post intervention. During six meetings, we approached warm up, anatomy and physiology as for the singing voice, vocal health, breathing and voice perception. The recordings were analyzed by judges (speech

  2. The effect of group music therapy on mood, speech, and singing in individuals with Parkinson's disease--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefant, Cochavit; Baker, Felicity A; Lotan, Meir; Lagesen, Simen Krogstie; Skeie, Geir Olve

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder where patients exhibit impairments in speech production. Few studies have investigated the influence of music interventions on vocal abilities of individuals with PD. To evaluate the influence of a group voice and singing intervention on speech, singing, and depressive symptoms in individuals with PD. Ten patients diagnosed with PD participated in this one-group, repeated measures design study. Participants received the sixty-minute intervention, in a small group setting once a week for 20 consecutive weeks. Speech and singing quality were acoustically analyzed using a KayPentax Multi-Dimensional Voice Program, voice ability using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and depressive symptoms using the Montgomery and Asberg Depression rating scale (MADRS). Measures were taken at baseline (Time 1), after 10 weeks of weekly sessions (Time 2), and after 20 weeks of weekly sessions (Time 3). Significant changes were observed for five of the six singing quality outcomes at Time 2 and 3, as well as voice range and the VHI physical subscale at Time 3. No significant changes were found for speaking quality or depressive symptom outcomes; however, there was an absence of decline on speaking quality outcomes over the intervention period. Significant improvements in singing quality and voice range, coupled with the absence of decline in speaking quality support group singing as a promising intervention for persons with PD. A two-group randomized control study is needed to determine whether the intervention contributes to maintenance of speaking quality in persons with PD.

  3. Speak, Move, Play and Learn with Children on the Autism Spectrum: Activities to Boost Communication Skills, Sensory Integration and Coordination Using Simple Ideas from Speech and Language Pathology and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Lois Jean; Gonzalez, America X.; Zawadzki, Maciej; Presley, Corinda

    2012-01-01

    This practical resource is brimming with ideas and guidance for using simple ideas from speech and language pathology and occupational therapy to boost communication, sensory integration, and coordination skills in children on the autism spectrum. Suitable for use in the classroom, at home, and in community settings, it is packed with…

  4. Cost Analysis of Direct versus Indirect and Individual versus Group Modes of Manual-Based Speech-and-Language Therapy for Primary School-Age Children with Primary Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kirstin; Marshall, Marjorie; Boyle, James; McCartney, Elspeth; O'Hare, Anne; Forbes, John

    2009-01-01

    Background: The study is the first within trial cost analysis of direct versus indirect and individual versus group modes of speech-and-language therapy for children with primary language impairment. Aims: To compare the short-run resource consequences of the four interventions alongside the effects achieved measured by standardized scores on a…

  5. Neural Entrainment to Speech Modulates Speech Intelligibility

    OpenAIRE

    Riecke, Lars; Formisano, Elia; Sorger, Bettina; Baskent, Deniz; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2018-01-01

    Speech is crucial for communication in everyday life. Speech-brain entrainment, the alignment of neural activity to the slow temporal fluctuations (envelope) of acoustic speech input, is a ubiquitous element of current theories of speech processing. Associations between speech-brain entrainment and acoustic speech signal, listening task, and speech intelligibility have been observed repeatedly. However, a methodological bottleneck has prevented so far clarifying whether speech-brain entrainme...

  6. Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are placed in the mouth, much like an orthodontic retainer. The two most common types are 1) the speech bulb and 2) the palatal lift. The speech bulb is designed to partially close off the space between the soft palate and the throat. The palatal lift appliance serves to lift the soft palate to a ...

  7. Speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  8. Fonoaudiologia e pedagogia especial em um sistema escolar inclusivo na Alemanha Speech therapy and special education in inclusive school system in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Mussmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A pedagogia tradicional e a terapia tradicional para os distúrbios da fala e linguagem (Sprachheilpädagogik na Alemanha, áreas de ensino especializado das ciências da educação, têm sido requisitadas a definir recursos educacionais justificáveis para um sistema escolar inclusivo e reestruturado. Este trabalho pretende refletir sobre as vantagens da pedagogia inclusiva na Alemanha, fornecendo dados comparativos entre a pedagogia tradicional, separatista e a inclusiva. Recursos institucionais e didáticos bem desenvolvidos têm mostrado, entretanto, perspectivas úteis em um sistema inclusivo, quando o princípio de subsidiaridade é seguido. A história e a evolução da área desta pedagogia especial poderiam fornecer informações acerca dos limites e possibilidades da educação inclusiva, principalmente para alunos com distúrbios da linguagem. Os resultados apontam para o fato de que em diferentes níveis e pontos de transição, pode-se trabalhar diretamente com o suporte à criança ou indiretamente com consultoria ou formação contínua da equipe pedagógica docente para a criança.The traditional Sprachheilpädagogik, the speech and language pedagogy and therapy in educational contexts in Germany, is currently being challenged to define as a specialized educational domain of education and educational science their resources with a justifiable educational theory for the inclusive restructuring of the school system. However, well-developed educational and institutional resources show useful perspectives in an inclusive system if the principle of subsidiarity is followed. A network-based organization would be one way. The restructuring of the special schools for pupils with speech and language disabilities would be another way.

  9. Neural entrainment to speech modulates speech intelligibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riecke, Lars; Formisano, Elia; Sorger, Bettina; Başkent, Deniz; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2018-01-01

    Speech is crucial for communication in everyday life. Speech-brain entrainment, the alignment of neural activity to the slow temporal fluctuations (envelope) of acoustic speech input, is a ubiquitous element of current theories of speech processing. Associations between speech-brain entrainment and

  10. Neural Entrainment to Speech Modulates Speech Intelligibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riecke, Lars; Formisano, Elia; Sorger, Bettina; Baskent, Deniz; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2018-01-01

    Speech is crucial for communication in everyday life. Speech-brain entrainment, the alignment of neural activity to the slow temporal fluctuations (envelope) of acoustic speech input, is a ubiquitous element of current theories of speech processing. Associations between speech-brain entrainment and

  11. Contextually-relevant resources in Speech-language Therapy and Audiology in South Africa: Are there any?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Pascoe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this editorial introduction we aim to explore the notion of contextually-relevant resources. We argue that it is the responsibility of Speech Language Therapists (SLTs and Audiologists (As working in South Africa to develop contextually relevant resources, and not to rely on the countries or cultures where the professions originated to do so. Language is often cited as the main barrier to contextually relevant resources: most SLTs and As are aware of the need for more resources in the indigenous local languages. However, the issue is not as straightforward as translating resources from English into other languages. The challenges related to culture, e.g. formal education, familiarity with the test situation, have to be considered; as well as the population on which norms were obtained; the nature of vocabulary or picture items. This paper introduces four original research papers that follow in this edition of the journal, and showcases them as examples of innovative development in our field. At the same time we call for the further development of assessment materials, intervention resources, and contributions to the evidence base in our context. We emphasise the importance of local knowledge to drive the development of these resources in innovative and perhaps unexpected ways, and suggest that all clinicians have an important role to play in this process.

  12. Synopsis of organized educational activity in the preparatory speech therapy group for children with SSD "Journey to the words-actions"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchkova E.V.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available formation of predictive vocabulary at preschool children with severe speech disorders is one of the important areas of correctional and educational work of the teacher-speech therapist. The material is the final lesson on predictive vocabulary formation among preschool children. The tasks identify completeness of the following skills: the ability to form prefixed verbs, to coordinate present indefinite verbs with nouns in number, to use in speech multi-valued verbs

  13. Fonoaudiologia e estética facial: estudo de casos Speech therapy and facial esthetic: cases studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Paes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: caracterizar as modificações presentes no comportamento facial após tratamento fonoaudiológico proposto para face, através da comparação das medidas da projeção do sulco nasogeniano ao tragus pré e pós-tratamento fonoaudiológico MÉTODOS: a população foi constituída de 10 professores atendidos no Hospital dos Servidores do Estado de Pernambuco de ambos os sexos, e com idade entre 33 e 63 anos. O processo de coleta de dados consistiu de protocolos de anamnese e avaliação, protocolo de desempenho, além do registro fotográfico. Foi realizada a medida da projeção do sulco nasogeniano ao tragus. Durante dezesseis sessões foram trabalhados exercícios isotônicos, isométricos, isocinéticos, massagens, manipulações faciais, equilíbrio funcional estomatognático, além de orientações aos cuidados faciais. RESULTADOS: foi constatada uma redução das medidas da projeção do sulco nasogeniano ao tragus em ambos os lados, observando-se também um notório equilíbrio entre os lados direito e esquerdo. CONCLUSÃO: o programa de tratamento proposto para face reduziu as medidas da projeção do sulco nasogeniano ao tragus e proporcionou um equilíbrio entre essas medidas.PURPOSE: to describe the modifications in the face behavior after the speech language pathology treatment proposed for the face, by comparing the measurements of the projection related to the nasolabial sulcus to the tragus of these patients before and after the speech language pathology treatment. METHODS: the surveyed population was mad up by 10 teachers treated at the "Hospital dos Servidores do Estado" aged between 33 and 63 years. Data collection process was made up by protocols, anamnesis and evaluation, performance protocol, in addition to the photographic record. A measurement of the nasolabial sulcus to the tragus was carried out. Throughout the 16-session, we carried on specific orientation about face isotonic, isometric and isokinetic

  14. Practice makes perfect? The pedagogic value of online independent phonetic transcription practice for speech and language therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titterington, Jill; Bates, Sally

    2018-01-01

    Accuracy of phonetic transcription is a core skill for speech and language therapists (SLTs) worldwide (Howard & Heselwood, 2002). The current study investigates the value of weekly independent online phonetic transcription tasks to support development of this skill in year one SLT students. Using a mixed methods observational design, students enrolled in a year one phonetics module completed 10 weekly homework activities in phonetic transcription on a stand-alone tutorial site (WebFon (Bates, Matthews & Eagles, 2010)) and 5 weekly online quizzes (the 'Ulster Set' (Titterington, unpublished)). Student engagement with WebFon was measured in terms of the number of responses made to 'sparks' on the University's Virtual Learning Environment Discussion Board. Measures of phonetic transcription accuracy were obtained for the 'Ulster Set' and for a stand-alone piece of coursework at the end of the module. Qualitative feedback about experience with the online learning was gathered via questionnaire. A positive significant association was found between student engagement with WebFon and performance in the 'Ulster Set', and between performance in the 'Ulster Set' and final coursework. Students valued both online independent learning resources as each supported different learning needs. However, student compliance with WebFon was significantly lower than with the 'Ulster Set'. Motivators and inhibitors to engagement with the online resources were investigated identifying what best maximised engagement. These results indicate that while 'independent' online learning can support development of phonetic transcription skills, the activities must be carefully managed and constructively aligned to assessment providing the level of valance necessary to ensure effective engagement.

  15. Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Health Info » Voice, Speech, and Language Apraxia of Speech On this page: What is apraxia of speech? ... additional information about apraxia of speech? What is apraxia of speech? Apraxia of speech (AOS)—also known as acquired ...

  16. Inhibitory non-invasive brain stimulation to homologous language regions as an adjunct to speech and language therapy in post-stroke aphasia: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begonya eOtal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic communication impairment is common after stroke, and conventional speech and language therapy (SLT strategies have limited effectiveness in post-stroke aphasia. Neurorehabilitation with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NIBS ‒ particularly repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS ‒ may enhance the effects of SLT in selected patients. Applying inhibitory NIBS to specific homologous language regions may induce neural reorganization and reduce interhemispheric competition. This mini review highlights randomized controlled trials (RCTs and randomized cross-over trials using low-frequency rTMS or cathodal tDCS over the non-lesioned non-language dominant hemisphere and performs an exploratory meta-analysis of those trials considered combinable. Using a random-effects model, a meta-analysis of nine eligible trials involving 215 participants showed a significant mean effect size of 0.51 (95% CI = 0.24 to 0.79 for the main outcome accuracy of naming in language assessment. No heterogeneity was observed (I2 = 0%. More multicenter RCTs with larger populations and homogenous intervention protocols are required to confirm these and the longer-term effects.

  17. Speech enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Chen, Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    We live in a noisy world! In all applications (telecommunications, hands-free communications, recording, human-machine interfaces, etc.) that require at least one microphone, the signal of interest is usually contaminated by noise and reverberation. As a result, the microphone signal has to be ""cleaned"" with digital signal processing tools before it is played out, transmitted, or stored.This book is about speech enhancement. Different well-known and state-of-the-art methods for noise reduction, with one or multiple microphones, are discussed. By speech enhancement, we mean not only noise red

  18. School Leavers with Learning Disabilities Moving from Child to Adult Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) Teams: SLTs' Views of Successful and Less Successful Transition Co-Working Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Elspeth; Muir, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    School-leaving for pupils with long-term speech, language, swallowing or communication difficulties requires careful management. Speech and language therapists (SLTs) support communication, secure assistive technology and manage swallowing difficulties post-school. UK SLTs are employed by health services, with child SLT teams based in schools.…

  19. Non-fluent speech following stroke is caused by impaired efference copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenaughty, Lynda; Basilakos, Alexandra; Bonilha, Leonardo; den Ouden, Dirk-Bart; Rorden, Chris; Stark, Brielle; Fridriksson, Julius

    2017-09-01

    Efference copy is a cognitive mechanism argued to be critical for initiating and monitoring speech: however, the extent to which breakdown of efference copy mechanisms impact speech production is unclear. This study examined the best mechanistic predictors of non-fluent speech among 88 stroke survivors. Objective speech fluency measures were subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA). The primary PCA factor was then entered into a multiple stepwise linear regression analysis as the dependent variable, with a set of independent mechanistic variables. Participants' ability to mimic audio-visual speech ("speech entrainment response") was the best independent predictor of non-fluent speech. We suggest that this "speech entrainment" factor reflects integrity of internal monitoring (i.e., efference copy) of speech production, which affects speech initiation and maintenance. Results support models of normal speech production and suggest that therapy focused on speech initiation and maintenance may improve speech fluency for individuals with chronic non-fluent aphasia post stroke.

  20. Speech Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benesty, Jacob; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    and their performance bounded and assessed in terms of noise reduction and speech distortion. The book shows how various filter designs can be obtained in this framework, including the maximum SNR, Wiener, LCMV, and MVDR filters, and how these can be applied in various contexts, like in single-channel and multichannel...

  1. Speech Intelligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas

    Speech intelligibility (SI) is important for different fields of research, engineering and diagnostics in order to quantify very different phenomena like the quality of recordings, communication and playback devices, the reverberation of auditoria, characteristics of hearing impairment, benefit using hearing aids or combinations of these things.

  2. Correlates of older adults' discrimination of acoustic properties in speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neger, T.M.; Janse, E.; Rietveld, A.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory discrimination of speech stimuli is an essential tool in speech and language therapy, e.g., in dysarthria rehabilitation. It is unclear, however, which listener characteristics are associated with the ability to perceive differences between one's own utterance and target speech. Knowledge

  3. Dimensions of Early Speech Sound Disorders: A Factor Analytic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara A.; Freebairn, Lisa A.; Hansen, Amy J.; Stein, Catherine M.; Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Taylor, H. Gerry

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to classify children with speech sound disorders (SSD) empirically, using factor analytic techniques. Participants were 3-7-year olds enrolled in speech/language therapy (N=185). Factor analysis of an extensive battery of speech and language measures provided support for two distinct factors, representing the skill…

  4. Practical steps in the rehabilitation of children with speech and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-25

    Jun 25, 2015 ... for learning disabilities, speech disorders and language impairments in children include low Apgar score, ... gated children and adults who were referred for speech and language therapy at the University of Ilorin ... ency disorder (i.e., stuttering), and autism spectrum dis- order. The role of speech-language ...

  5. 78 FR 49717 - Speech-to-Speech and Internet Protocol (IP) Speech-to-Speech Telecommunications Relay Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ...] Speech-to-Speech and Internet Protocol (IP) Speech-to-Speech Telecommunications Relay Services; Telecommunications Relay Services and Speech-to-Speech Services for Individuals With Hearing and Speech Disabilities... Internet Protocol (IP) Speech-to-Speech Telecommunications Relay Services; Telecommunications Relay...

  6. "I live in a bubble": Speech-language therapy and audiology students' expectations and experiences of a rural community work practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, J; Barratt, J

    2013-01-01

    Locally and internationally, there have been renewed calls for equitable access to healthcare services. Simultaneously, caseloads have become more challenging and contexts more complex, which may be overwhelming to new graduates. The South African context offers a particularly interesting example of these challenges. Educators need to use innovative ways to ensure that curricula adequately prepare students for rural community work, while developing a sense of leadership that links clinical practice to theory, policy, ethics and social responsibility. Rural practica offer opportunities for sensitizing and equipping students for working in underserviced communities and a number of international studies have documented their potential usefulness. There is limited research, however, that examines how exposure to rural community work may shape students' responses to the realities of working in such contexts. This study aimed to explore the processes underlying a group of South African speech-language therapy and audiology students' appreciation and understanding of the realities of work in a rural community after a rural practicum. A four-day practicum took place in a rural community in South Africa. The practicum incorporated basic audiological tasks and structured observations. Twenty-five third-year students completed anonymous pre- and post-practicum open-ended questionnaires. The questionnaires explored their expectations and perceptions of the practicum, perceived challenges and benefits of working in rural community areas, and considerations that might need to be taken into account. The questionnaires were analysed and compared using thematic analysis principles. Results revealed a distinction between students' emotional and personal expectations of, and responses to, the practicum compared to their clinical expectations and responses. Before the practicum, students indicated a number of anxieties such as not feeling emotionally prepared or feeling anxious about

  7. 42 CFR 485.715 - Condition of participation: Speech pathology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Speech pathology... Agencies as Providers of Outpatient Physical Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Services § 485.715 Condition of participation: Speech pathology services. If speech pathology services are offered, the...

  8. The Clinical Practice of Speech and Language Therapists with Children with Phonologically Based Speech Sound Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Lousada, Marisa; Jesus, Luis M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Children with speech sound disorders (SSD) represent a large number of speech and language therapists' caseloads. The intervention with children who have SSD can involve different therapy approaches, and these may be articulatory or phonologically based. Some international studies reveal a widespread application of articulatory based approaches in…

  9. Evaluating evidence-based health care teaching and learning in the undergraduate human nutrition; occupational therapy; physiotherapy; and speech, language and hearing therapy programs at a sub-Saharan African academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonees, Anel; Rohwer, Anke; Young, Taryn

    2017-01-01

    It is important that all undergraduate healthcare students are equipped with evidence-based health care (EBHC) knowledge and skills to encourage evidence-informed decision-making after graduation. We assessed EBHC teaching and learning in undergraduate human nutrition (HN); occupational therapy (OT); physiotherapy (PT); and speech, language and hearing therapy (SPLH) programs at a sub-Saharan African university. We used methodological triangulation to obtain a comprehensive understanding of EBHC teaching and learning: (1) through a document review of module guides, we identified learning outcomes related to pre-specified EBHC competencies; we conducted (2) focus group discussions and interviews of lecturers to obtain their perspectives on EBHC and on EBHC teaching and learning; and we (3) invited final year students (2013) and 2012 graduates to complete an online survey on EBHC attitudes, self-perceived EBHC competence, and their experience of EBHC teaching and learning. We reviewed all module outlines (n = 89) from HN, PT and SLHT. The OT curriculum was being revised at that time and could not be included. Six lecturers each from HN and OT, and five lecturers each from PT and SLHT participated in the focus groups. Thirty percent (53/176) of invited students responded to the survey. EBHC competencies were addressed to varying degrees in the four programs, although EBHC teaching and learning mostly occurred implicitly. Learning outcomes referring to EBHC focused on enabling competencies (e.g., critical thinking, biostatistics, epidemiology) and were concentrated in theoretical modules. Key competencies (e.g., asking questions, searching databases, critical appraisal) were rarely addressed explicitly. Students felt that EBHC learning should be integrated throughout the four year study period to allow for repetition, consolidation and application of knowledge and skills. Lecturers highlighted several challenges to teaching and practising EBHC, including lack of

  10. 78 FR 49693 - Speech-to-Speech and Internet Protocol (IP) Speech-to-Speech Telecommunications Relay Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ...] Speech-to-Speech and Internet Protocol (IP) Speech-to-Speech Telecommunications Relay Services; Telecommunications Relay Services and Speech-to-Speech Services for Individuals With Hearing and Speech Disabilities... amends telecommunications relay services (TRS) mandatory minimum standards applicable to Speech- to...

  11. Modificações faciais em clientes submetidos a tratamento estético fonoaudiológico da face em Clínica-Escola de Fonoaudiologia Face changes on patients after aesthetic speech therapy treatment in School-Practice of Speech Therapy

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    Hilda Gabriela Arantes de Arizola

    2012-12-01

    School of Speech Therapy and checking whether these changes were perceived by patients, other people and by audiologists, as well as checking their satisfaction as for the results. METHOD: the study included 11 women aged 40 to 50 years (average 44.5 ± 3.6 years. Exclusion criteria: women undergoing previous speech therapy treatment, aesthetic facial surgery, or neurological disorders. They were submitted to 10 therapy sessions, with isotonic and isometric exercises. Furthermore, they answered a questionnaire about perceived changes. The "before and after" pictures were analyzed by speech-language pathologist being specialists in oral motricity who identified the presence or absence of changes. In a 100mm visual analogue scale, the satisfaction score on the facial appearance after and before treatment was flagged. RESULTS: all patients (100% have perceived facial changes: eye and lips wrinkles' reduction as well as nasolabial furrow, more defined lips, youthful and shining skin, and mitigation of wrinkle expressions (90.91%. The others have referred the following changes (45.45%: reduction of undereyes' shadows, youthful and shining skin. The specialists have not found agreement, although they have realized changes in greater or lesser degree in the majority of the variables analyzed. The average degree of facial appearance satisfaction increased from 46.18 to 82.09 (p=0.05. CONCLUSION: speech treatment has proportioned facial changes which were noted by the patients, by others and by the specialists. The patients have shown more satisfaction with their faces' aesthetic aspects after the speech treatment.

  12. Speech Recognition

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    Adrian Morariu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of speech recognition by pattern recognition techniques. Learning consists in determining the unique characteristics of a word (cepstral coefficients by eliminating those characteristics that are different from one word to another. For learning and recognition, the system will build a dictionary of words by determining the characteristics of each word to be used in the recognition. Determining the characteristics of an audio signal consists in the following steps: noise removal, sampling it, applying Hamming window, switching to frequency domain through Fourier transform, calculating the magnitude spectrum, filtering data, determining cepstral coefficients.

  13. Movement cognition and narration of the emotions treatment versus standard speech therapy in the treatment of children with borderline intellectual functioning: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, V; Baglio, G; Baglio, F; Canevini, M P; Zanette, M

    2017-04-20

    Borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) is defined as a "health meta-condition… characterized by various cognitive dysfunctions associated with an intellectual quotient (IQ) between 71 and 85 which determines a deficit in the individual's functioning both in the restriction of activities and in the limitation of social participation". It can be caused by many factors, including a disadvantaged background and prematurity. BIF affects 7-12% of primary school children that show academic difficulties due to poor executive functioning. In many children with BIF, language, movement and social abilities are also affected, making it difficult to take part in daily activities. Dropping out of school and psychological afflictions such as anxiety and depression are common in children with BIF. This study investigates whether an intensive rehabilitation program that involves all of the areas affected in children with BIF (Movement, Cognition and Narration of emotions, MCNT) is more effective than Standard Speech Therapy (SST). This is a multicenter interventional single blind randomized controlled study. Children aged between 6 to 11 years who attend a mainstream primary school and have multiple learning difficulties, behavioral problems and an IQ ranging between 85 to 70 have been enrolled. Participants are randomly allocated to one of three groups. The first group receives individual treatment with SST for 45 min, twice a week for 9 months. The second group receives the experimental treatment MCNT for 3 h per day, 5 days/ week for 9 months and children work in small groups. The third group consists of children on a waiting list for the SST for nine months. BIF is a very frequent condition with no ad hoc treatment. Over the long term, there is a high risk to develop psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Due to its high social impact, we consider it very important to intervene during childhood so as to intercept the remarkable plasticity of the developing brain. "Study

  14. Therapy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Independent School District, TX.

    Reviewed are the goals and activities of the therapy services in the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program. Specific sections detail activities for speech therapy (such as diagnostic assessment, habilitation, consultation, and reporting procedures), occupational therapy (including identification and assessment, and services to children,…

  15. Speech, language and swallowing in Huntington’ Disease

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    Maryluz Camargo-Mendoza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD has been described as a genetic condition caused by a mutation in the CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine nucleotide sequence. Depending on the stage of the disease, people may have difficulties in speech, language and swallowing. The purpose of this paper is to describe these difficulties in detail, as well as to provide an account on speech and language therapy approach to this condition. Regarding speech, it is worth noticing that characteristics typical of hyperkinetic dysarthria can be found due to underlying choreic movements. The speech of people with HD tends to show shorter sentences, with much simpler syntactic structures, and difficulties in tasks that require complex cognitive processing. Moreover, swallowing may present dysphagia that progresses as the disease develops. A timely, comprehensive and effective speech-language intervention is essential to improve the quality of life of people and contribute to their communicative welfare.

  16. Acesso ao serviço de fonoaudiologia: a implantação do acolhimento no município de Toledo - PR Access to service of speech therapy: implementing the embracement practice in Toledo City - PR

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    Juliana Cunha da Costa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: para inserir o acolhimento nos serviços de saúde, é preciso desenvolver formas de receber a população; respeitando os diferentes modos de como o usuário procura ajuda. Desta forma, o presente trabalho é um relato de experiência, que teve por objetivo agilizar o acesso ao serviço de Fonoaudiologia, bem com escutar e dar respostas mais adequadas aos usuários. PROCEDIMENTOS: como forma de estruturar o acesso foi realizada a implantação das práticas de acolhimento na porta de entrada ao serviço de Fonoaudiologia do município de Toledo, no Paraná. Para a realização do acolhimento foram estabelecidos dois momentos. O primeiro referiu-se a lista de espera de usuários que necessitava ser conhecida e no momento posterior, os novos usuários escolheram entre dias e horários fixos, como forma de entrada no serviço de Fonoaudiologia. Em alguns encontros houve também a participação de enfermeiro, psicólogo e assistente social. RESULTADOS: ofereceu-se aos usuários melhor acesso ao atendimento fonoaudiológico, proporcionou o enriquecimento da relação profissional/usuário, à adequação dos procedimentos terapêuticos e esclarecimentos quanto ao funcionamento do serviço. CONCLUSÃO: a implantação do acolhimento na porta de entrada ao serviço de Fonoaudiologia agilizou o acesso da população, assim como escutar implica em respeitar as demandas do usuário.BACKGROUND: for the embracement practice in health services to occur it is necessary to develop ways to receive the population, respecting the different modes of how the users seek help. In this way, this assignment is an experience report that had as objective to expedite the access to service of speech therapy, as well as to listen and to give more appropriate answers to the users. PRODUCERS: as a way to structure the access, one accomplished the implementation of embracement´s practice in the incoming door at the services of speech therapy at Toledo´s city in

  17. Efetividade da fonoterapia e proposta de intervenção breve em respiradores orais Effectiveness of speech and language therapy and brief intervention proposal in mouth breathers

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    Andréia Marson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar o efeito da intervenção fonoaudiológica em um grupo de respiradores orais e propor terapia fonoaudiológica mínima no tratamento da respiração oral. MÉTODO: estudo prospectivo longitudinal, casuística de 40 sujeitos respiradores orais tratados no Hospital das Clínicas - setor de Reabilitação Orofacial do Ambulatório de Respirador Oral da Disciplina de Otorrinolaringologia da Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP. Realizada documentação fotográfica, avaliação clínica, aplicação de protocolo para categorizar modo respiratório, postura (lábios e bochechas; força e praxias (lábios, bochechas e língua nas semanas 0, 12 e 24. A proposta terapêutica constou de treino e conscientização da respiração nasal; manobras para aquecimento e vascularização da musculatura orofacial; aplicação de pontos e zonas motoras na face; manobras passivas; uso do impulso distal; exercícios miofuncionais e registro da percepção dos pacientes sobre suas condições olfativas e obstruções nasais.Teste estatístico: não paramétrico de Igualdade de Duas Proporções, p PURPOSE: to check the effect of speech and language therapy on a group of mouth breathers, as well proposing a minimum therapy for mouth breathing treatment. METHOD: longitudinal prospective study, casuistic on 40 mouth breather subjects who were patients from the Otorhinolaryngology Ambulatory of UNICAMP Hospital. On weeks 0, 12 and 24, we proceeded photographical documentation, clinical assessment, and protocol application in order to categorize the breathing mode, posture (lips and cheeks, strength and movement (lips, cheeks and tongue. The applied therapeutic proposal consisted of practicing and awareness on nasal breathing; maneuvers to warm and vascularize the orofacial muscles; application of points and motor zones on the face; passive maneuvers; use of distal impulse; myofunctional exercises and register

  18. O gênero sinopse como proposta de ação fonoaudiológica voltada para o desenvolvimento de competências em leitura e escrita / The speech genre synopsis as a proposal of speech therapy action aiming the development of reading and writing competences

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    Rita Signor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho apresentamos parte de uma pesquisa na qual objetivamos analisar a contribuição da teoria de gêneros do discurso de Bakhtin (2003 para a prática fonoaudiológica. Para tanto, elaboramos uma proposta terapêutica e a aplicamos em uma situação de atendimento em grupo. O grupo foi composto por cinco sujeitos (adolescentes com queixas de dificuldades de leitura e escrita. Neste artigo são apresentados excertos da interlocução em um dos gêneros selecionados para o trabalho terapêutico: o gênero sinopse. Os dados foram analisados à luz do dialogismo bakhtiniano. Os resultados levam a crer que os sujeitos conseguiram produzir textos adequados ao gênero em questão. Sugerem, ainda, que as práticas ancoradas em uma perspectiva enunciativo-discursiva foram efetivas, pois, por meio de contextos significativos de uso da língua, os sujeitos se aproximaram da escrita e da leitura e, com isso, desenvolveram competências linguísticas e discursivas necessárias à interação nessas práticas.In the present work we present part of a research that aimed at analyzing the contribution of Bakhtin`s speech genre theory for the speech therapy practice. In order to do so, we developed a therapeutic approach and applied it in a group care situation. The group was composed by five teenagers with complaints of reading and writing difficulties. In the present article we present excerpts of interlocution in one of the speech genres selected for the therapeutic work: the speech genre synopsis. The data was analysed according to Bakhtinian dialogism. The results lead to believe that the subjects were able to produce texts which can be considered adequate to the speech genre in question. The results suggest, in addition, that practices based on a discursive perspective were effective because the group – immersed in meaningful contexts of language use – developed linguistic and discursive competences necessary in reading and writing.

  19. Standardization of Speech Corpus

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    Ai-jun Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Speech corpus is the basis for analyzing the characteristics of speech signals and developing speech synthesis and recognition systems. In China, almost all speech research and development affiliations are developing their own speech corpora. We have so many different kinds numbers of Chinese speech corpora that it is important to be able to conveniently share these speech corpora to avoid wasting time and money and to make research work more efficient. The primary goal of this research is to find a standard scheme which can make the corpus be established more efficiently and be used or shared more easily. A huge speech corpus on 10 regional accented Chinese, RASC863 (a Regional Accent Speech Corpus funded by National 863 Project will be exemplified to illuminate the standardization of speech corpus production.

  20. Language Development, Delay and Intervention--The Views of Parents from Communities That Speech and Language Therapy Managers in England Consider to Be Under-Served

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Harding, Sam; Roulstone, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based practice includes research evidence, clinical expertise and stakeholder perspectives. Stakeholder perspectives are important and include parental ethno-theories, which embrace views about many aspects of speech, language and communication, language development, and interventions. The Developmental Niche Framework…

  1. Speech perception as an active cognitive process

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    Shannon eHeald

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One view of speech perception is that acoustic signals are transformed into representations for pattern matching to determine linguistic structure. This process can be taken as a statistical pattern-matching problem, assuming realtively stable linguistic categories are characterized by neural representations related to auditory properties of speech that can be compared to speech input. This kind of pattern matching can be termed a passive process which implies rigidity of processingd with few demands on cognitive processing. An alternative view is that speech recognition, even in early stages, is an active process in which speech analysis is attentionally guided. Note that this does not mean consciously guided but that information-contingent changes in early auditory encoding can occur as a function of context and experience. Active processing assumes that attention, plasticity, and listening goals are important in considering how listeners cope with adverse circumstances that impair hearing by masking noise in the environment or hearing loss. Although theories of speech perception have begun to incorporate some active processing, they seldom treat early speech encoding as plastic and attentionally guided. Recent research has suggested that speech perception is the product of both feedforward and feedback interactions between a number of brain regions that include descending projections perhaps as far downstream as the cochlea. It is important to understand how the ambiguity of the speech signal and constraints of context dynamically determine cognitive resources recruited during perception including focused attention, learning, and working memory. Theories of speech perception need to go beyond the current corticocentric approach in order to account for the intrinsic dynamics of the auditory encoding of speech. In doing so, this may provide new insights into ways in which hearing disorders and loss may be treated either through augementation or

  2. Perfil dos pacientes atendidos no setor de fonoaudiologia de um serviço público de Recife - PE Profile of patients receiving speech therapy care at a public service at Recife-PE

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    Percy Maria de Lima Barros

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: traçar o perfil dos pacientes cadastrados e atendidos pelo setor de Fonoaudiologia de um serviço público de Recife. MÉTODOS: o estudo foi realizado a partir da coleta e análise dos dados referentes à origem do encaminhamento, faixa etária, gênero, queixas fonoaudiológicas de crianças, adolescentes, adultos e idosos, colhidos das fichas das entrevistas iniciais. A amostra foi constituída por todos os indivíduos cadastrados no setor de Fonoaudiologia de um serviço público da cidade de Recife, no período de julho de 2007 a maio de 2008. RESULTADOS: dos 251 pacientes atendidos, 12 foram excluídos da pesquisa, três destes obtiveram alta fonoaudiológica e nove não apresentavam os dados completos. Das fichas analisadas, houve um maior número de encaminhamento realizado por Pediatras (25%, em seguida Otorrinolaringologista (16% e Clínico Geral (10%, sendo a maioria do sexo masculino (61%, com idade entre 0 a 11 anos de idade. De acordo com as queixas, as mais freqüentes foram de desvio fonológico (14%, seguidos de atraso de linguagem (11%, disfluência (10% e respirador oral (8%. Em relação ao número de queixas apresentadas, 72% apresentaram uma queixa, 25% duas queixas e 2 % três queixas associadas. CONCLUSÕES: o perfil atendido no setor de fonoaudiologia de um serviço público da cidade de Recife, apesar de ser variado, é em sua maioria do sexo masculino, encaminhado por pediatras, com alteração de voz e idade entre 0 a 11 anos, apresentando frequentemente uma única queixa fonoaudiológica.PURPOSE: to delineate the profile of patients registered and attended by a Speech Therapy sector in a public service at Recife. METHODS: the study was conducted from the collection and analysis of data concerning the origin of referral, age, gender, speech complaints of children, adolescents, adults and elderly, collected from the records of initial interviews. The sample consisted of all individuals registered in the

  3. Fonoaudiologia e humanização: percepção de fonoaudiólogas de um hospital público Speech and language therapy and humanization: perception of speech and language therapist of a public hospital

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    Sorel Herrera Celín

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar o conhecimento e aplicação da Política Nacional de Humanização por fonoaudiólogos de um hospital público de Belo Horizonte. MÉTODO: trata-se de um estudo qualitativo que teve como instrumento de coleta de dados um formulário elaborado pelas pesquisadoras. A amostra foi composta por 25 fonoaudiólogas de um hospital público. Foi realizada análise quantitativa das questões de caracterização da amostra e análise quanti-qualitativa de conteúdo na qual foram identificadas e elencadas as categorias de análise e a frequência de ocorrência dos conteúdos e expressões para as questões discursivas. RESULTADOS: na análise quantitativa, percebeu-se que 68% das fonoaudiólogas eram formadas há mais de cinco anos; 88% tinham pós-graduação; 56% atuavam na área de Audiologia; 52% atuavam também em instituições privadas e 60% referiram conhecer a PNH. Na análise qualitativa, as necessidades/demandas apontadas para garantia do atendimento humanizado constaram dos eixos temáticos gestão e organização dos serviços de saúde, instrumentalização do trabalhador da saúde, multiprofissional e intersetorial, além do respeito às demandas e direitos do usuário. CONCLUSÃO: o conceito de humanização apresentado pelas fonoaudiólogas está em consonância com o descrito na PNH. E quanto aos eixos para garantia da atenção humanizada tomando com referência a instituição, o usuário e o profissional, as entrevistadas citaram parcialmente os princípios da Política Nacional de Humanização.PURPOSE: to investigate speech therapists knowledge and application as for the National Policy of Humanization (NPH in a public hospital in Belo Horizonte METHOD: it is a qualitative and qualitative study. With 25 speech therapists answering a self-applicable questionnaire, used as instrument for data collection, elaborated by the authors. A quantitative analysis was carried through on the questions referring to sample

  4. The Social Communication Intervention Project: a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of speech and language therapy for school-age children who have pragmatic and social communication problems with or without autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine; Lockton, Elaine; Freed, Jenny; Gaile, Jacqueline; Earl, Gillian; McBean, Kirsty; Nash, Marysia; Green, Jonathan; Vail, Andy; Law, James

    2012-01-01

    Children who show disproportionate difficulty with the pragmatic as compared with the structural aspects of language are described as having pragmatic language impairment (PLI) or social communication disorder (SCD). Some children who have PLI also show mild social impairments associated with high-functioning autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There is little robust evidence of effectiveness of speech-language interventions which target the language, pragmatic or social communication needs of these children. To evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive manualized social communication intervention (SCIP) for children who have PLI with or without features of ASD. In a single-blind RCT design, 88 children with pragmatic and social communication needs aged 5;11-10;8, recruited from UK speech and language therapy services, were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to SCIP or to treatment-as-usual. Children in the SCIP condition received up to 20 sessions of direct intervention from a specialist research speech and language therapist working with supervised assistants. All therapy content and methodology was derived from an intervention manual. A primary outcome measure of structural language and secondary outcome measures of narrative, parent-reported pragmatic functioning and social communication, blind-rated perceptions of conversational competence and teacher-reported ratings of classroom learning skills were taken pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention and at 6-month follow-up. Analysis was by intention to treat. No significant treatment effect was found for the primary outcome measure of structural language ability or for a measure of narrative ability. Significant treatment effects were found for blind-rated perceptions of conversational competence, for parent-reported measures of pragmatic functioning and social communication, and for teacher-reported ratings of classroom learning skills. There is some evidence of an intervention effect on blind and

  5. Eficácia da fonoterapia em um caso de afasia expressiva decorrente de acidente vascular encefálico Speech therapy effectiveness in a case of expressive aphasia resulting from stroke

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    Letícia Regina Kunst

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo de caso foi relatar e analisar o caso de um paciente afásico adulto em tratamento fonoaudiológico na clínica escola do Curso de Fonoaudiologia de uma instituição federal de ensino. O sujeito estudado é um paciente do sexo masculino, com 68 anos de idade, em tratamento na clínica escola desde maio de 2009, sendo que seu processo terapêutico foi analisado até dezembro de 2010. Quanto à história clínica, o paciente sofreu acidente vascular encefálico isquêmico no hemisfério esquerdo, em janeiro de 2009, quando repentinamente apresentou um quadro de mutismo. Após serem realizadas avaliações fonoaudiológicas, concluiu-se que o mesmo apresentava como hipótese diagnóstica "Afasia de expressão, oral e escrita, decorrente de acidente vascular encefálico isquêmico." Diante disto foi elaborado o planejamento terapêutico. Desde o início do processo de terapia foi possível observar evoluções linguísticas no paciente. O fato de o sujeito ter procurado atendimento fonoaudiológico 15 dias após o acometimento pelo acidente vascular encefálico, provavelmente foi um fator fundamental para sua boa recuperação, pois há um grau de recuperação espontânea em pacientes afásicos, porém a melhora é mínima sem o tratamento adequado. Em aproximadamente um mês de terapia fonoaudiológica, o paciente expandiu consideravelmente seu vocabulário. Apesar de a área lesada ser extensa e fundamental para a linguagem, observou-se avanços bastante positivos com a terapia. Deste modo, acredita-se que a intervenção fonoaudiológica precoce contribuiu, em grande parte, para a reorganização da atividade linguística, visto que o paciente comunica-se satisfatoriamente considerando a grande extensão de sua lesão.The purpose of this article was doing a report case of an aphasic client subjected to speech therapy in the clinic of a Speech Pathology and Audiology course of a federal university. The studied subject is

  6. Rate and rhythm control strategies for apraxia of speech in nonfluent primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beber, Bárbara Costa; Berbert, Monalise Costa Batista; Grawer, Ruth Siqueira; Cardoso, Maria Cristina de Almeida Freitas

    2018-01-01

    The nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia is characterized by apraxia of speech and agrammatism. Apraxia of speech limits patients' communication due to slow speaking rate, sound substitutions, articulatory groping, false starts and restarts, segmentation of syllables, and increased difficulty with increasing utterance length. Speech and language therapy is known to benefit individuals with apraxia of speech due to stroke, but little is known about its effects in primary progressive aphasia. This is a case report of a 72-year-old, illiterate housewife, who was diagnosed with nonfluent primary progressive aphasia and received speech and language therapy for apraxia of speech. Rate and rhythm control strategies for apraxia of speech were trained to improve initiation of speech. We discuss the importance of these strategies to alleviate apraxia of speech in this condition and the future perspectives in the area.

  7. The Influence of Visual and Auditory Information on the Perception of Speech and Non-Speech Oral Movements in Patients with Left Hemisphere Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Gabriele; Thielmann, Anke; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left hemisphere often suffer from oral-facial apraxia, apraxia of speech, and aphasia. In these patients, visual features often play a critical role in speech and language therapy, when pictured lip shapes or the therapist's visible mouth movements are used to facilitate speech production and articulation. This demands…

  8. Speech and Language Developmental Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info » Voice, Speech, and Language Speech and Language Developmental Milestones On this page: How do speech ... and language developmental milestones? How do speech and language develop? The first 3 years of life, when ...

  9. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Delayed Speech or Language Development KidsHealth / For Parents / Delayed Speech ... their child is right on schedule. How Are Speech and Language Different? Speech is the verbal expression ...

  10. Tratamento médico e fonoaudiológico da disfonia espasmódica: uma revisão bibliográfica Medical treatment and speech therapy for spasmodic dysphonia: a literature review

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    Eliana Maria Gradim Fabron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A disfonia espasmódica (DE é um distúrbio vocal caracterizado por voz tensa-estrangulada, com quebras de sonoridade e que compromete a comunicação do indivíduo. O objetivo deste estudo é apresentar uma revisão bibliográfica dos tratamentos médico e fonoaudiológico proposto para a DE no período entre 2006 e 2010. Os tratamentos descritos foram: injeção de toxina botulínica (TB, miectomia, neurectomia, denervação e reinervação laríngea seletiva adutora, tireoplastia, miotermia tiroaritenóidea com radiofrequência, injeção de lidocaína, homeopatia e tratamento fonoaudiológico (fonoterapia. O uso de injeção de TB mostrou resultados que indicaram a satisfação dos pacientes tratados, embora alguns dos artigos apontassem a necessidade de reaplicação da toxina frequentemente, como desvantagem. Os procedimentos cirúrgicos foram considerados duradouros e indicados para os pacientes que não quiseram se submeter às aplicações de TB. Tais estudos, no entanto, apresentaram contingência de pacientes restrita e os resultados foram baseados, na maioria das investigações, no julgamento dos próprios pacientes sobre a sua qualidade vocal. Os tratamentos, com uso de lidocaína e homeopatia, mostraram resultados positivos em relação à qualidade vocal dos pacientes e foram sugeridos como uma opção, também, para aqueles que não gostariam de ser submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico ou à aplicação de TB. Os poucos estudos que reportam fonoterapia assinalaram bons resultados quando a mesma foi associada à injeção de TB, mostrando a escassez de informações nesta área. Futuras pesquisas envolvendo a fonoterapia no tratamento da DE são necessárias.Spasmodic dysphonia (SD is a voice disorder characterized by a strained-strangled voice, with sound breaks and has implications in one's communication. The purpose of this study is to present a bibliographic review of the speech therapy and medical treatment suggested for SD

  11. Speech and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Speech problems like stuttering Developmental disabilities Learning disorders Autism spectrum disorder Brain injury Stroke Some speech and communication problems may be genetic. Often, no one knows the causes. By first grade, about 5 percent of children ...

  12. Speech Development of Autistic Children by Interactive Computer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Ferdous, S. M.; Ahmed, Syed Ishtiaque; Anwar, Anika

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Speech disorder is one of the most common problems found with autistic children. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the introduction of computer-based interactive games along with the traditional therapies in order to help improve the speech of autistic children. Design/methodology/approach: From analysis of the works of Ivar…

  13. Treating Speech Comprehensibility in Students with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Paul J.; Camarata, Stephen; Woynaroski, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether a particular type of therapy (Broad Target Speech Recasts, BTSR) was superior to a contrast treatment in facilitating speech comprehensibility in conversations of students with Down syndrome who began treatment with initially high verbal imitation. Method: We randomly assigned 51 5- to 12-year-old students to…

  14. [Non-speech oral motor treatment efficacy for children with developmental speech sound disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ygual-Fernandez, A; Cervera-Merida, J F

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of speech disorders by means of speech therapy two antagonistic methodological approaches are applied: non-verbal ones, based on oral motor exercises (OME), and verbal ones, which are based on speech processing tasks with syllables, phonemes and words. In Spain, OME programmes are called 'programas de praxias', and are widely used and valued by speech therapists. To review the studies conducted on the effectiveness of OME-based treatments applied to children with speech disorders and the theoretical arguments that could justify, or not, their usefulness. Over the last few decades evidence has been gathered about the lack of efficacy of this approach to treat developmental speech disorders and pronunciation problems in populations without any neurological alteration of motor functioning. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has advised against its use taking into account the principles of evidence-based practice. The knowledge gathered to date on motor control shows that the pattern of mobility and its corresponding organisation in the brain are different in speech and other non-verbal functions linked to nutrition and breathing. Neither the studies on their effectiveness nor the arguments based on motor control studies recommend the use of OME-based programmes for the treatment of pronunciation problems in children with developmental language disorders.

  15. Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis and Associated Abnormal Speech and Language Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naran, Sanjay; Miller, Matthew; Shakir, Sameer; Ware, Benjamin; Camison, Liliana; Ford, Matthew; Goldstein, Jesse; Losee, Joseph E

    2017-07-01

    Although many metrics for neurodevelopment in children with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis have been analyzed, few have directly examined early language acquisition and speech development. The authors characterized language acquisition and speech development in children with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. The authors' institutional database was queried for nonsyndromic craniosynostosis from 2000 to 2014. Patients with an identified syndrome were excluded. Specific data elements included age, gender, velopharyngeal adequacy by means of the Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale, evaluation for anatomical motor delay, language acquisition delay/disorder, articulation or speech sound production delays/disorders, and whether speech therapy was recommended. Diagnosis of a submucous cleft palate was noted. One hundred one patients met inclusion criteria, of which 57.4 percent were male. Average age at the time of the most recent speech evaluation was 6.1 years (range, 2.31 to 17.95 years); 43.6 percent had normal speech/language metrics and 56.4 percent had one or more abnormalities, including anatomical motor delay/disorder (29.7 percent), language acquisition delay/disorder (21.8 percent), articulation or speech production delay/disorder (4.0 percent), hypernasality (15.8 percent), and velopharyngeal insufficiency or borderline competency (23.8 percent). Average Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale score was 1.3 (range, 0 to 5), and 29.7 percent (n = 30) of patients were recommended to have speech therapy. In addition, 25.8 percent of patients were diagnosed with a submucous cleft palate. One in four patients with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis carried a diagnosis of submucous cleft palate. The authors found that abnormal speech and language development occurs in one in 1.7 patients with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis, and that speech therapy for such abnormal development is warranted in one in 3.4 of them-a prevalence two to five times higher compared with the general pediatric

  16. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercise Use in Acquired Dysarthria Management: Regimes and Rationales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Muir, Margaret; Allen, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are described in speech and language therapy manuals and are thought to be much used in acquired dysarthria intervention, though there is no robust evidence of an influence on speech outcome. Opinions differ as to whether, and for which dysarthria presentations, NSOMExs are appropriate. Aims:…

  17. Machine Translation from Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard; Olive, Joseph; McCary, John; Christianson, Caitlin

    This chapter describes approaches for translation from speech. Translation from speech presents two new issues. First, of course, we must recognize the speech in the source language. Although speech recognition has improved considerably over the last three decades, it is still far from being a solved problem. In the best of conditions, when the speech comes from high quality, carefully enunciated speech, on common topics (such as speech read by a trained news broadcaster), the word error rate is typically on the order of 5%. Humans can typically transcribe speech like this with less than 1% disagreement between annotators, so even this best number is still far worse than human performance. However, the task gets much harder when anything changes from this ideal condition. Some of the conditions that cause higher error rate are, if the topic is somewhat unusual, or the speakers are not reading so that their speech is more spontaneous, or if the speakers have an accent or are speaking a dialect, or if there is any acoustic degradation, such as noise or reverberation. In these cases, the word error can increase significantly to 20%, 30%, or higher. Accordingly, most of this chapter discusses techniques for improving speech recognition accuracy, while one section discusses techniques for integrating speech recognition with translation.

  18. A Pilot Investigation of Speech Sound Disorder Intervention Delivered by Telehealth to School-Age Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Grogan-Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a school-based telehealth service delivery model and reports outcomes made by school-age students with speech sound disorders in a rural Ohio school district. Speech therapy using computer-based speech sound intervention materials was provided either by live interactive videoconferencing (telehealth, or conventional side-by-side intervention.  Progress was measured using pre- and post-intervention scores on the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 (Goldman & Fristoe, 2002. Students in both service delivery models made significant improvements in speech sound production, with students in the telehealth condition demonstrating greater mastery of their Individual Education Plan (IEP goals. Live interactive videoconferencing thus appears to be a viable method for delivering intervention for speech sound disorders to children in a rural, public school setting. Keywords:  Telehealth, telerehabilitation, videoconferencing, speech sound disorder, speech therapy, speech-language pathology; E-Helper

  19. Digital speech processing using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Gopi, E S

    2014-01-01

    Digital Speech Processing Using Matlab deals with digital speech pattern recognition, speech production model, speech feature extraction, and speech compression. The book is written in a manner that is suitable for beginners pursuing basic research in digital speech processing. Matlab illustrations are provided for most topics to enable better understanding of concepts. This book also deals with the basic pattern recognition techniques (illustrated with speech signals using Matlab) such as PCA, LDA, ICA, SVM, HMM, GMM, BPN, and KSOM.

  20. Managing the reaction effects of speech disorders on speech ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... persons having speech disorders. Speech disorders must be treated so that speech defectives will be helped out of their speech problems and be prevented from becoming obsessed by frustrations resulting from their speech disorders. African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation Vol. 6 2004: 91-95 ...

  1. Epidemilogical Profile of Speech and Language Disorder in North Central Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Aremu, Shuaib K.; Afolabi, Olushola A.; Alabi, Biodun S.; Elemunkan, Isiah O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Speech-language pathologists/Otolaryngologists recognize high prevalence of speech and language disorder among children. The aim of the study is to find out the epidemiological profile of speech and language disorder in north central Nigeria. Method: A five year retrospective review of all referral to speech and language therapy unit ENT Department between January 2005 and December 2009. Information retrieved and analysed included bio-data, clinical presentation and diagnosis of t...

  2. Increased activation of the hippocampus during a Chinese character subvocalization task in adults with cleft lip and palate palatoplasty and speech therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Chunlin; Chen, Long; Xing, Xiyue; Li, Xiangyang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Renji

    2017-08-16

    This study aimed to explore brain activation in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) using a Chinese character subvocalization task, in which the stimuli were selected from a clinical articulation evaluation test. CLP is a congenital disability. Individuals with CLP usually have articulation disorder caused by abnormal lip and palate structure. Previous studies showed that primary somatosensory and motor areas had a significant difference in activation in patients with CLP. However, whether brain activation was restored to a normal level after palatoplasty and speech rehabilitation is not clear. Two groups, adults after palatoplasty with speech training and age-matched and sex-matched controls, participated in this study. Brain activation during Chinese character subvocalization task and behavioral data were recorded using functional MRI. Patients with CLP responded to the target significantly more slowly compared with the controls, whereas no significant difference in accuracy was found between the groups. Brain activation had similar patterns between groups. Broca's area, Wernicke's area, motor areas, somatosensory areas, and insula in both hemispheres, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in the right hemisphere were activated in both groups, with no statistically significant difference. Furthermore, the two-sample t-test showed that the hippocampus in the left hemisphere was activated significantly in patients with CLP compared with the controls. The results suggested that the hippocampus might be involved in the language-related neural circuit in patients with CLP and play a role of pronunciation retrieval to help patients with CLP to complete the pronunciation effectively.

  3. Speech and Hearing Problems among Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstenson, Blue

    1978-01-01

    Findings from speech and hearing tests of older people in South Dakota community senior programs indicate the need for better testing and therapy procedures. Lipreading may be more effective than hearing aids, and factors other than hearing may be involved. Some problems and needs are noted. (MF)

  4. Internet images of the speech pathology profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nicole

    2017-06-05

    Objective The Internet provides the general public with information about speech pathology services, including client groups and service delivery models, as well as the professionals providing the services. Although this information assists the general public and other professionals to both access and understand speech pathology services, it also potentially provides information about speech pathology as a prospective career, including the types of people who are speech pathologists (i.e. demographics). The aim of the present study was to collect baseline data on how the speech pathology profession was presented via images on the Internet. Methods A pilot prospective observational study using content analysis methodology was conducted to analyse publicly available Internet images related to the speech pathology profession. The terms 'Speech Pathology' and 'speech pathologist' to represent both the profession and the professional were used, resulting in the identification of 200 images. These images were considered across a range of areas, including who was in the image (e.g. professional, client, significant other), the technology used and the types of intervention. Results The majority of images showed both a client and a professional (i.e. speech pathologist). While the professional was predominantly presented as female, the gender of the client was more evenly distributed. The clients were more likely to be preschool or school aged, however male speech pathologists were presented as providing therapy to selected age groups (i.e. school aged and younger adults). Images were predominantly of individual therapy and the few group images that were presented were all paediatric. Conclusion Current images of speech pathology continue to portray narrow professional demographics and client groups (e.g. paediatrics). Promoting images of wider scope to fully represent the depth and breadth of speech pathology professional practice may assist in attracting a more diverse

  5. Conhecimento, crença e uso de medicina alternativa e complementar por fonoaudiólogas Knowledge, beliefs and practices toward alternative and complementary therapies among speech-language pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaise Manzini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo é entender o conhecimento, as crenças e o uso das medicinas alternativas e complementares entre fonoaudiólogas que atuam no setor público de saúde. O estudo foi realizado em um hospital terciário de Ribeirão Preto, SP. Um questionário desenvolvido para os propósitos do estudo foi administrado em uma casuística de 40 fonoaudiólogas. Os itens do questionário foram criados conforme uma revisão da literatura. A aceitação de medicinas alternativas e complementares, como acupuntura e homeopatia, é expressiva entre as profissionais entrevistadas. Os resultados do presente estudo sugerem que o uso e a prática destas medicinas são feitos de forma racional, com certa prudência. As entrevistadas admitem que um tratamento complementar deve ser submetido a testes científicos antes de sua aceitação, e que é desaconselhável a um paciente buscar um tratamento alternativo ou complementar sem antes consultar o médico.The purpose of this study is to understand the knowledge, beliefs, concerns and practices toward alternative and complementary therapies among speech-language pathologists in a Brazilian public hospital. The current study was conducted in a large tertiary hospital in Ribeirão Preto, Southeastern Brazil. A questionnaire developed to measure knowledge, beliefs and practices on alternative and complementary therapies was answered by forty speech-language pathologists. The questionnaire items were created via literature review. Alternative and complementary therapies as acupuncture and homeopathy have high acceptance among the interviewed professionals. The results of the present study suggest that the use and practice of these techniques are made in a rational manner, with some prudence. The interviewed professionals admit that complementary treatment must be submitted to scientific tests before its acceptance, and that it is inadvisable for the patient to try treatment with alternative and

  6. Escrever é reescrever: desenvolvendo competências em leitura e escrita no contexto da clínica fonoaudiológica Writing is rewriting: developing reading and writing competences in the context of speech therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Signor

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar um recorte de uma pesquisa qualitativa, longitudinal e de cunho sócio-histórico. A finalidade da pesquisa foi o desenvolvimento de uma proposta terapêutica embasada na teoria de gêneros do discurso de Bakhtin. Para a efetivação da proposta, desenvolveu-se um estudo de caso de atendimento terapêutico grupal. O grupo foi composto por cinco adolescentes que apresentavam queixas de dificuldades de leitura e escrita. A proposta com os gêneros partiu da produção escrita de uma peça de teatro, baseada em um romance lido em terapia, da publicação da peça em site e de sua encenação. Apresenta-se neste artigo parte da interlocução com apenas um dos sujeitos do grupo, o sujeito D, em processo de (reescrita de texto em um dos gêneros abordados: o gênero peça de teatro. Os dados foram analisados à luz do dialogismo bakhtiniano.In this paper we are presenting a part of a qualitative and sociohistorical research, in which we propose a therapy based on Bakthin's theory about speech genres. Our objective was to analyze the contribution of this theory to clinical speech therapy field. We have developed a therapeutic treatment in a group formed by subjects who had complaints about their reading and writing skills. We have selected the following genres in our work: novel, play, synopsis and publicity poster. We have prioritized the genre play because the other genres were used as a part of an activity whose objective was to write a play, that was based on the adaptation of a novel read during the therapy, to publish it in a website and to stage it. Here we will present just the interlocution with one of the subjects of the group, the subject D, during the process of (rewriting the play. All data was analyzed according to the bakhtinian dialogism.

  7. Intervenção fonoaudiológica em recém-nascido pré-termo com gastrosquise Speech language therapy in a preterm newborn infant with gastroschisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilene de Souza Rocha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever a intervenção fonoaudiológica para a adequação da função alimentar por meio da avaliação e tratamento do sistema estomatognático e suas funções. O estudo foi feito a partir do relato de caso de um recém-nascido pré-termo com gastrosquise que foi alimentado por sonda, atendido na Neonatologia do Hospital Luterano, no período de 29/03/2005 a 22/04/2005. A avaliação fonoaudiológica foi realizada, seguindo o protocolo padronizado do serviço de Neonatologia e apresentou os seguintes resultados: órgãos do sistema estomatognático no que se refere à postura, conformação e mobilidade dentro da normalidade; reflexos orais presentes; força e ritmo adequados na sucção não nutritiva; alteração na sensibilidade oral com reflexo nauseoso anteriorizado e exacerbado; sinal de estresse de alteração respiratória durante a sucção nutritiva na mamadeira; e dificuldade de pegar o seio materno. Foram realizadas três sessões de intervenção fonoaudiológica, uma vez por semana, com orientação para a equipe de enfermagem dar continuidade na estimulação oral nos demais dias. Em uma das sessões, a mãe recebeu orientações sobre os benefícios da amamentação e a importância do uso adequado de chupetas e bico de mamadeira do tipo ortodôntico para o desenvolvimento adequado das funções orais. O recém-nascido do relato de caso teve alta sem alterações orais, mamando no seio materno com complementação de mamadeira, sugerindo desta forma, a importância da intervenção fonoaudiológica para a adequação da função alimentar.The aim of this study was to describe the speech-language therapy regarding the adequation of the feeding function by assessing and treating the stomatognathic system and its functions. The study was carried out based on a case report of a preterm newborn infant with gastroschisis, who was tube fed while assisted in the Neonatology division of Lutheran Hospital

  8. SPEECH HABILITATION IN THE SCHOOLS FOR THE CLEFT PALATE CHILD, THE NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT PROCEEDINGS (MARCH 17-20, 1965).

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN HATTUM, ROLLAND J.; AND OTHERS

    DESIGNED TO STRENGTHEN THE SKILLS, COMPETENCIES, AND KNOWLEDGE OF SPEECH CORRECTION TEACHERS, THIS SUMMARY OF A SPECIAL STUDY INSTITUTE CONTAINS A SERIES OF PRESENTATIONS. SPEAKERS DISCUSS ASPECTS OF CLEFT PALATE INCLUDING SPEECH, SPEECH ANATOMY, SURGICAL AND DENTAL MANAGEMENT, DIAGNOSIS, AND SPEECH THERAPY. SPEAKERS REPRESENT MEDICAL AND…

  9. Speech profile of patients undergoing primary palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Katia Ignacio; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Alonso, Nivaldo; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2017-10-26

    To characterize the profile and speech characteristics of patients undergoing primary palatoplasty in a Brazilian university hospital, considering the time of intervention (early, before two years of age; late, after two years of age). Participants were 97 patients of both genders with cleft palate and/or cleft and lip palate, assigned to the Speech-language Pathology Department, who had been submitted to primary palatoplasty and presented no prior history of speech-language therapy. Patients were divided into two groups: early intervention group (EIG) - 43 patients undergoing primary palatoplasty before 2 years of age and late intervention group (LIG) - 54 patients undergoing primary palatoplasty after 2 years of age. All patients underwent speech-language pathology assessment. The following parameters were assessed: resonance classification, presence of nasal turbulence, presence of weak intraoral air pressure, presence of audible nasal air emission, speech understandability, and compensatory articulation disorder (CAD). At statistical significance level of 5% (p≤0.05), no significant difference was observed between the groups in the following parameters: resonance classification (p=0.067); level of hypernasality (p=0.113), presence of nasal turbulence (p=0.179); presence of weak intraoral air pressure (p=0.152); presence of nasal air emission (p=0.369), and speech understandability (p=0.113). The groups differed with respect to presence of compensatory articulation disorders (p=0.020), with the LIG presenting higher occurrence of altered phonemes. It was possible to assess the general profile and speech characteristics of the study participants. Patients submitted to early primary palatoplasty present better speech profile.

  10. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Moses, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Speech alarms have been used extensively in aviation and included in International Building Codes (IBC) and National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Life Safety Code. However, they have not been implemented on space vehicles. Previous studies conducted at NASA JSC showed that speech alarms lead to faster identification and higher accuracy. This research evaluated updated speech and tone alerts in a laboratory environment and in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in a realistic setup.

  11. Qualidade de vida e voz pós-radioterapia: repercussões para a fonoaudiologia Quality of life and voice after radiotherapy: speech therapy repercussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Jacob Daniel Salomão de Campos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o tratamento radioterápico do câncer de cabeça e pescoço tem mostrado resultados importantes no controle da doença quando neoadjuvante ou mesmo concomitante à quimioterapia. Pesquisas apontam um aumento da sobrevida após 5 anos de tratamento do câncer de laringe, o que torna necessário e justifica os esforços realizados na reabilitação da comunicação dos pacientes, e destaca a presença do profissional de Fonoaudiologia na equipe de radioterapia. OBJETIVO: descrever as seqüelas com repercussão fonoaudiológica, tais como alterações na qualidade vocal e na qualidade de vida, associadas ao tratamento proposto para tumores de cabeça e pescoço, em especial aquelas originadas após a radioterapia. CONCLUSÃO: Várias seqüelas, agudas e crônicas, como rouquidão, odinofagia e afonia, que envolvem dificuldades na comunicação oral e/ou deglutição dos pacientes após o tratamento radioterápico em cabeça e pescoço, interfere de maneira direta na comunicação, deglutição e qualidade de vida dos pacientes. Os profissionais envolvidos no tratamento desse câncer, dentre eles o fonoaudiólogo, através do conhecimento sobre o tratamento e as fragilidades terapêuticas que comprometem a qualidade vocal e qualidade de vida desses pacientes, busca contribuir no processo de recuperação minimizando os danos causados pela doença e melhorando a condição de saúde do indivíduo.BACKGROUND: radiotherapy for head and neck cancer has been important for disease control, both as neo-adjuvant and concomitant to chemotherapy. 5-year survival rates after larynx cancer have increased, justifying the efforts towards rehabilitation of patients` communication and highlighting the importance of the speech-language pathologist in the radiotherapy team. New scientific and therapeutic breakthroughs have turned organ preservation into a strong ally in head and neck cancer treatment. PURPOSE: to show the speech-language-related sequelae, such

  12. Principles of speech coding

    CERN Document Server

    Ogunfunmi, Tokunbo

    2010-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that all forms of communication-including voice-will be transmitted through packet-switched networks based on the Internet Protocol (IP). Therefore, the design of modern devices that rely on speech interfaces, such as cell phones and PDAs, requires a complete and up-to-date understanding of the basics of speech coding. Outlines key signal processing algorithms used to mitigate impairments to speech quality in VoIP networksOffering a detailed yet easily accessible introduction to the field, Principles of Speech Coding provides an in-depth examination of the

  13. Saúde auditiva dos recém-nascidos: atuação da fonoaudiologia na Estratégia Saúde da Família Newborn hearing health: speech therapy acting on Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martins Maia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar o acompanhamento dos recém-nascidos quanto à promoção da saúde auditiva após a inserção da fonoaudiologia na Estratégia Saúde da Família. MÉTODO: estudo retrospectivo e documental com abordagem quantitativa com 88 recém-nascidos que realizaram o teste da orelhinha, no período de fevereiro a maio de 2010, a partir dos relatórios mensais de devolutiva do Serviço de Atenção a Saúde Auditiva do município, consolidados mensais e prontuários de um Centro de Saúde da Família em Sobral-Ce. RESULTADOS: dos recém-nascidos avaliados, 35 (39,77% falharam no teste, entre estes, 7 (20% apresentam indicador de risco para deficiência auditiva e 28 (80% não apresentavam nenhum risco. Verificou-se também divergências entre os dados do Serviço de Atenção a Saúde Auditiva e os prontuários do Centro de Saúde da Família quanto a classificação dos indicadores de risco para a perda auditiva. Observou-se ainda que, o número de encaminhamentos para o teste da orelhinha aumentou 8,33%. Em relação ao reteste, 1 (7,69% criança retornou nos meses de março a agosto de 2009 e entre os meses de setembro/2009 a fevereiro/2010 após a atuação da fonoaudiologia no CSF do Sumaré 17 (65,38% crianças realizaram o reteste. CONCLUSÃO: os dados sugerem a importância da presença do fonoaudiólogo na atenção primária, sendo fundamental no acompanhamento e monitoramento do diagnóstico precoce das alterações auditivas.PURPOSE: to analyze the monitoring of the newborn and the promotion of hearing health after insertion of speech therapy at the Family Health Strategy. METHOD: this is a retrospective documentary study with quantitative approach using 88 infants who underwent OAE testing in the period from February to May 2010, we examined the monthly reports’ devolution of the Health Hearing Service of the Municipality, consolidated monthly statements and the handbooks of the Center for Family Health in Sobral

  14. Intensive Treatment with Ultrasound Visual Feedback for Speech Sound Errors in Childhood Apraxia

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Leece, Megan C.; Maas, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is an adjunct to traditional speech therapy that has shown to be beneficial in the remediation of speech sound errors. Ultrasound biofeedback can be utilized during therapy to provide clients additional knowledge about their tongue shapes when attempting to produce sounds that are in error. The additional feedback may assist children with childhood apraxia of speech in stabilizing motor patterns, thereby facilitating more consistent and accurate productions of sounds and sy...

  15. SCANDCLEFT RANDOMIZED TRIALS: SPEECH OUTCOMES IN 5-YEAR-OLDS WITH UCLP - velopharyngeal competency and hypernasality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmander, Anette; Persson, Christina; Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    ) operated on with different surgical methods for primary palatal repair. A secondary aim was to estimate burden of care in terms of received additional secondary surgeries and speech therapy. Design: Three parallel group, randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10...... of secondary pharyngeal surgeries, number of fistulae, and speech therapy visits differed. Trial registration: ISRCTN29932826. Keywords: Randomised clinical trial, Scandcleft, primary palatal repair, unilateral cleft lip and palate, speech, intercentre study, cross-linguistic...

  16. Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedmann: relato de caso da intervenção fonoaudiológica Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: case report of speech therapy intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara de Lavra-Pinto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: descrever a evolução de um caso de Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedmann com macroglossia submetido à fonoterapia quanto aos aspectos estruturais e miofuncionais do sistema estomatognático. PROCEDIMENTOS: inicialmente foram coletados os dados do prontuário e foi realizada a entrevista inicial com a mãe. Após, a paciente, com 1 ano e 2 meses de idade, foi submetida à avaliação fonoaudiológica clínica e foram realizados exames complementares (avaliação otorrinolaringológica, exame videofluoroscópico e avaliação audiológica. Após seis meses de terapia miofuncional com a utilização de técnicas passivas, foi realizada uma reavaliação. RESULTADOS: na avaliação fonoaudiológica inicial observou-se flacidez de lábios e bochechas; ausência de vedamento labial; língua com tensão diminuída, hemi-hipertrofia direita e acentuada projeção anterior; dificuldades na mastigação e na deglutição de alimentos sólidos. Decorridos seis meses de terapia miofuncional, constatou-se maior rigidez da musculatura de lábios e bochechas, posteriorização da língua com aumento da tensão muscular, e desempenho adequado na mastigação e deglutição de alimentos sólidos. CONCLUSÃO: a intervenção fonoaudiológica precoce, baseada em técnicas de terapia miofuncional, apresentou resultados considerados satisfatórios para este caso de Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedmann com macroglossia.BACKGROUND: describe structural and myofunctional aspects of the stomatognathic system for a case of Beckwith-Wiedmann syndrome with macroglossia that received speech therapy intervention. PROCEDURES: first, the patient clinical data was collected from hospital files. An initial interview was carried through with the mother. Then, the patient was submitted to a clinical myofunctional evaluation. Some additional complementary examinations were also held (otolaryngological assessment, videofluoroscopy examination and audiological evaluation. After six months

  17. Speech Language Assessments in Te Reo in a Primary School Maori Immersion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kershni

    2012-01-01

    This research originated from the need for a speech and language therapy assessment in te reo Maori for a particular child who attended a Maori immersion unit. A Speech and Language Therapy te reo assessment had already been developed but it needed to be revised and normative data collected. Discussions and assessments were carried out in a…

  18. Literacy Instruction for Young Children with Severe Speech and Physical Impairments: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauter, Donna W.; Myers, Sarah R.; Classen, Audra I.

    2017-01-01

    Children with severe speech and physical impairment who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) present unique challenges in literacy development. Traditional reading instruction has not met these students' needs. Occupational therapy and speech therapy provide supports to mediate limitations to literacy instruction. A systematic…

  19. Advertising and Free Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Allen, Ed.; Johnson, M. Bruce, Ed.

    The articles collected in this book originated at a conference at which legal and economic scholars discussed the issue of First Amendment protection for commercial speech. The first article, in arguing for freedom for commercial speech, finds inconsistent and untenable the arguments of those who advocate freedom from regulation for political…

  20. Illustrated Speech Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William M.

    Written for students in the fields of speech correction and audiology, the text deals with the following: structures involved in respiration; the skeleton and the processes of inhalation and exhalation; phonation and pitch, the larynx, and esophageal speech; muscles involved in articulation; muscles involved in resonance; and the anatomy of the…

  1. Speech Quality Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    2.271 Sound Patterns of English, N. Chomsky and H. Halle, Haper zi Row, New York, 1968. 12.281 "Speech Synthesis by Rule," J. N. Holmes, I. G...L. H. Nakatani, B. J. McDermott, "Effect of Pitch and Formant Manipulations on Speech Quality," Bell Telephone Laboratories, Technical Memorandum, 72

  2. Speech and Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grade and has recently been diagnosed with childhood apraxia of speech—or CAS. CAS is a speech disorder marked ... 800.242.5338 | http://www.cleftline.org Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America | CASANA http://www.apraxia- ...

  3. Free Speech. No. 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Peter E., Ed.

    This issue of "Free Speech" contains the following articles: "Daniel Schoor Relieved of Reporting Duties" by Laurence Stern, "The Sellout at CBS" by Michael Harrington, "Defending Dan Schorr" by Tome Wicker, "Speech to the Washington Press Club, February 25, 1976" by Daniel Schorr, "Funds…

  4. Private Speech in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Authoritarian teaching practices in ballet inhibit the use of private speech. This paper highlights the critical importance of private speech in the cognitive development of young ballet students, within what is largely a non-verbal art form. It draws upon research by Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky and contemporary socioculturalists, to…

  5. Ear, Hearing and Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    An introduction is given to the the anatomy and the function of the ear, basic psychoacoustic matters (hearing threshold, loudness, masking), the speech signal and speech intelligibility. The lecture note is written for the course: Fundamentals of Acoustics and Noise Control (51001)...

  6. Promoção da saúde e ações fonoaudiológicas em educacão infantil Health promotion and speech and language therapy actions in infantile education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Escalda Mendonça

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar o conhecimento de educadores de uma unidade de educação infantil de Belo Horizonte a respeito do desenvolvimento da comunicação humana e seus distúrbios em crianças e as suas concepções sobre a atuação fonoaudiológica nessas instituições MÉTODO: estudo transversal desenvolvido em três etapas: Diagnóstico Institucional; Aplicação de formulário para caracterização do conhecimento das educadoras a respeito do desenvolvimento e distúrbios da comunicação humana; Planejamento e realização de oficinas. A análise da relação entre variáveis foi realizada utilizando o Teste Exato de Fisher, considerando o nível de significância de 5% no programa estatístico Epi Info 2000, versão 3.2.2. RESULTADOS: a maioria das educadoras respondeu corretamente às questões relacionadas ao uso e à compreensão da linguagem pela criança e às atitudes adequadas para a comunicação entre adultos e crianças. 66,7% acertaram as questões a respeito dos marcos do desenvolvimento de linguagem e 58,3% responderam incorretamente à questão relativa ao processamento auditivo. Foram realizadas 17 oficinas com os temas "Processamento Auditivo" e "Saúde Vocal", nas 8 salas que participaram da atividade 172 alunos na faixa etária de 3 a 6 anos, 8 professoras e 4 estagiárias. CONCLUSÕES: as educadoras demonstraram conhecimentos acerca da aquisição e desenvolvimento de linguagem, dos distúrbios da comunicação humana, e da atuação do fonoaudiólogo, principalmente na perspectiva clínica e preventiva. As oficinas realizadas propiciaram a discussão da importância do desenvolvimento de ações de prevenção e promoção da saúde em Fonoaudiologia.PURPOSE: to check the knowledge of educators from a kindergarten unit of Belo Horizonte regarding the development of human communication and its disorders in children and their conceptions about the performance of speech therapy in these institutions. METHOD: the study was

  7. Speech and language support: How physicians can identify and treat speech and language delays in the office setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharir, Madhavi; Barnett, Noel; Taras, Jillian; Cole, Martha; Ford-Jones, E Lee; Levin, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Failure to recognize and intervene early in speech and language delays can lead to multifaceted and potentially severe consequences for early child development and later literacy skills. While routine evaluations of speech and language during well-child visits are recommended, there is no standardized (office) approach to facilitate this. Furthermore, extensive wait times for speech and language pathology consultation represent valuable lost time for the child and family. Using speech and language expertise, and paediatric collaboration, key content for an office-based tool was developed. The tool aimed to help physicians achieve three main goals: early and accurate identification of speech and language delays as well as children at risk for literacy challenges; appropriate referral to speech and language services when required; and teaching and, thus, empowering parents to create rich and responsive language environments at home. Using this tool, in combination with the Canadian Paediatric Society’s Read, Speak, Sing and Grow Literacy Initiative, physicians will be better positioned to offer practical strategies to caregivers to enhance children’s speech and language capabilities. The tool represents a strategy to evaluate speech and language delays. It depicts age-specific linguistic/phonetic milestones and suggests interventions. The tool represents a practical interim treatment while the family is waiting for formal speech and language therapy consultation. PMID:24627648

  8. Content Analysis of the Professional Journal of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, III: 1966-2015--Into the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Linda; Stansfield, Jois; Bloch, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Background: Following content analyses of the first 30 years of the UK speech and language therapy professional body's journal, this study was conducted to survey the published work of the speech (and language) therapy profession over the last 50 years and trace key changes and themes. Aim: To understand better the development of the UK speech and…

  9. Clozapine-Induced Microseizures, Orofacial Dyskinesia, and Speech Dysfluency in an Adolescent with Treatment Resistant Early Onset Schizophrenia on Concurrent Lithium Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rachamallu, Vivekananda; Haq, Ayman; Song, Michael M.; Aligeti, Manish

    2017-01-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic used in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia. It has a well-known side effect profile, including agranulocytosis, decreased seizure threshold, and tardive dyskinesia. In addition, numerous case reports have described clozapine-induced stuttering in adults. However, there has been only one previous case report describing it in the adolescent population. In addition, concurrent lithium therapy has been shown to enhance the neurotoxic effects of antips...

  10. An optimal speech processor for efficient human speech ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our experimental findings suggest that the auditory filterbank in human ear functions as a near-optimal speech processor for achieving efficient speech communication between humans. Keywords. Human speech communication; articulatory gestures; auditory filterbank; mutual information. 1. Introduction. Speech is one of ...

  11. Musician advantage for speech-on-speech perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Başkent, Deniz; Gaudrain, Etienne

    Evidence for transfer of musical training to better perception of speech in noise has been mixed. Unlike speech-in-noise, speech-on-speech perception utilizes many of the skills that musical training improves, such as better pitch perception and stream segregation, as well as use of higher-level

  12. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and school personnel about an individual education plan (IEP) provide instructions for home exercise programs recommend when ... Parents Kids Teens Delayed Speech or Language Development Autism Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Cerebral Palsy Occupational Therapy ...

  13. Speech Communication and Signal Processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on 'Auditory-like filter bank: An optimal speech processor for efficient human speech commu- nication', Ghosh et al argue that the auditory filter bank in human ear is a near-optimal speech processor for efficient speech communication between human beings. They use mutual informa- tion criterion to design the optimal filter ...

  14. Environmental Contamination of Normal Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Trevor A.

    1990-01-01

    Environmentally contaminated speech errors (irrelevant words or phrases derived from the speaker's environment and erroneously incorporated into speech) are hypothesized to occur at a high level of speech processing, but with a relatively late insertion point. The data indicate that speech production processes are not independent of other…

  15. Speech processing in mobile environments

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on speech processing in the presence of low-bit rate coding and varying background environments. The methods presented in the book exploit the speech events which are robust in noisy environments. Accurate estimation of these crucial events will be useful for carrying out various speech tasks such as speech recognition, speaker recognition and speech rate modification in mobile environments. The authors provide insights into designing and developing robust methods to process the speech in mobile environments. Covering temporal and spectral enhancement methods to minimize the effect of noise and examining methods and models on speech and speaker recognition applications in mobile environments.

  16. Categories of auditory performance and speech intelligibility ratings of early-implanted children without speech training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqun Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether speech therapy can lead to better results for early cochlear implantation (CI children. PATIENTS: A cohort of thirty-four congenitally profoundly deaf children who underwent CI before the age of 18 months at the Sixth Hospital affiliated with Shanghai Jiaotong University from January 2005 to July 2008 were included. Nineteen children received speech therapy in rehabilitation centers (ST, whereas the remaining fifteen cases did not (NST, but were exposed to the real world, as are normal hearing children. METHODS: All children were assessed before surgery and at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery with the Categories of Auditory Performance test (CAP and the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR. Each assessment was given by the same therapist who was blind to the situation of the child at each observation interval. CAP and SIR scores of the groups were compared at each time point. RESULTS: Our study showed that the auditory performance and speech intelligibility of trained children were almost the same as to those of untrained children with early implantation. The CAP and SIR scores of both groups increased with increased time of implant use during the follow-up period, and at each time point, the median scores of the two groups were about equal. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that great communication benefits are achieved by early implantation (<18 months without routine speech therapy. The results exemplify the importance of enhanced social environments provided by everyday life experience for human brain development and reassure parents considering cochlear implants where speech training is unavailable.

  17. Degraded neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds in a rat model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T; Rahebi, Kimiya C; Borland, Michael S; Buell, Elizabeth P; Centanni, Tracy M; Fink, Melyssa K; Im, Kwok W; Wilson, Linda G; Kilgard, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with Rett syndrome have greatly impaired speech and language abilities. Auditory brainstem responses to sounds are normal, but cortical responses are highly abnormal. In this study, we used the novel rat Mecp2 knockout model of Rett syndrome to document the neural and behavioral processing of speech sounds. We hypothesized that both speech discrimination ability and the neural response to speech sounds would be impaired in Mecp2 rats. We expected that extensive speech training would improve speech discrimination ability and the cortical response to speech sounds. Our results reveal that speech responses across all four auditory cortex fields of Mecp2 rats were hyperexcitable, responded slower, and were less able to follow rapidly presented sounds. While Mecp2 rats could accurately perform consonant and vowel discrimination tasks in quiet, they were significantly impaired at speech sound discrimination in background noise. Extensive speech training improved discrimination ability. Training shifted cortical responses in both Mecp2 and control rats to favor the onset of speech sounds. While training increased the response to low frequency sounds in control rats, the opposite occurred in Mecp2 rats. Although neural coding and plasticity are abnormal in the rat model of Rett syndrome, extensive therapy appears to be effective. These findings may help to explain some aspects of communication deficits in Rett syndrome and suggest that extensive rehabilitation therapy might prove beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Speech and Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hallucinations/Delusions Pain Skeletal & Bone Health Skin Changes Sleep Disorders Small Handwriting Speech & Swallowing Problems Urinary Incontinence Vision Changes Weight Management Diagnosis Treatment Help Us Make a Difference We need your ...

  19. Anxiety and ritualized speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalljee, Mansur; Cook, Mark

    1975-01-01

    The experiment examines the effects on a number of words that seem irrelevant to semantic communication. The Units of Ritualized Speech (URSs) considered are: 'I mean', 'in fact', 'really', 'sort of', 'well' and 'you know'. (Editor)

  20. Speech impairment (adult)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 13. Kirshner HS. Dysarthria and apraxia of speech. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  1. Trainable Videorealistic Speech Animation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezzat, Tony F

    2002-01-01

    .... After processing the corpus automatically, a visual speech module is learned from the data that is capable of synthesizing the human subject's mouth littering entirely novel utterances that were not...

  2. Speech perception as categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Lori L; Lotto, Andrew J

    2010-07-01

    Speech perception (SP) most commonly refers to the perceptual mapping from the highly variable acoustic speech signal to a linguistic representation, whether it be phonemes, diphones, syllables, or words. This is an example of categorization, in that potentially discriminable speech sounds are assigned to functionally equivalent classes. In this tutorial, we present some of the main challenges to our understanding of the categorization of speech sounds and the conceptualization of SP that has resulted from these challenges. We focus here on issues and experiments that define open research questions relevant to phoneme categorization, arguing that SP is best understood as perceptual categorization, a position that places SP in direct contact with research from other areas of perception and cognition.

  3. Charisma in business speeches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niebuhr, Oliver; Brem, Alexander; Novák-Tót, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    to business speeches. Consistent with the public opinion, our findings are indicative of Steve Jobs being a more charismatic speaker than Mark Zuckerberg. Beyond previous studies, our data suggest that rhythm and emphatic accentuation are also involved in conveying charisma. Furthermore, the differences...... between Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg and the investor- and customer-related sections of their speeches support the modern understanding of charisma as a gradual, multiparametric, and context-sensitive concept....

  4. Speech spectrum envelope modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vích, Robert; Vondra, Martin

    Vol. 4775, - (2007), s. 129-137 ISSN 0302-9743. [COST Action 2102 International Workshop. Vietri sul Mare, 29.03.2007-31.03.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET301710509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : speech * speech processing * cepstral analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.302, year: 2005

  5. Memory for speech and speech for memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, J L; Kutz, K J

    1975-03-01

    Thirty kindergarteners, 15 who substituted /w/ for /r/ and 15 with correct articulation, received two perception tests and a memory test that included /w/ and /r/ in minimally contrastive syllables. Although both groups had nearly perfect perception of the experimenter's productions of /w/ and /r/, misarticulating subjects perceived their own tape-recorded w/r productions as /w/. In the memory task these same misarticulating subjects committed significantly more /w/-/r/ confusions in unspoken recall. The discussion considers why people subvocally rehearse; a developmental period in which children do not rehearse; ways subvocalization may aid recall, including motor and acoustic encoding; an echoic store that provides additional recall support if subjects rehearse vocally, and perception of self- and other- produced phonemes by misarticulating children-including its relevance to a motor theory of perception. Evidence is presented that speech for memory can be sufficiently impaired to cause memory disorder. Conceptions that restrict speech disorder to an impairment of communication are challenged.

  6. Simultaneous natural speech and AAC interventions for children with childhood apraxia of speech: lessons from a speech-language pathologist focus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Elizabeth R; McCarthy, John W

    2015-03-01

    In childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), children exhibit varying levels of speech intelligibility depending on the nature of errors in articulation and prosody. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies are beneficial, and commonly adopted with children with CAS. This study focused on the decision-making process and strategies adopted by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) when simultaneously implementing interventions that focused on natural speech and AAC. Eight SLPs, with significant clinical experience in CAS and AAC interventions, participated in an online focus group. Thematic analysis revealed eight themes: key decision-making factors; treatment history and rationale; benefits; challenges; therapy strategies and activities; collaboration with team members; recommendations; and other comments. Results are discussed along with clinical implications and directions for future research.

  7. Order and Chaos. Margins of “normality” between diagnosis and therapy: from the preliminary meeting to the plot of a speech to come

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Nardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As human beings, we are driven by two eternal feelings in perpetual fight: the search for order and the fascination of chaos. Man live inside this fight: between body and language, substance and history, soul and its biological reflections. Every moment we act, talk, think, or dream, mirrors an experience of the present related to a given order. As Jung wrote: “there is a cosmos in every chaos and a secret order in every disorder”. Thus, Man is an entity where the being and the becoming, the endless and the ended coexist. It is exactly the present state of the psychic life that can be subjected to a given disorder. Then the different disturbs of the various psychic functions interact in an entangled way in shaping that psychic state identified by a structural disorganization of the experience, which is pathologic. In the therapeutic process, our “fluctuating” attention will listen to the emotions experienced by the patient, as symbolic expressions of dreamlike elements. Such attention will be put both during the diagnostic inquiry including the administration of the Rorschach Test and in the other phases of the therapeutic path. Free associations will provide the basis of both a sound shape and a visual listening of elements hanging between order and chaos, asymmetry and symmetry, past and present, inner and outer world. This should help the “person” in her/his recovering the integrity of belonging to the self: to be “soul” (psyche of “life” (bìos. Keywords: Rorschach Test, psychodiagnosis and therapy, order and chaos, clinical psychology and psychoanalysis.

  8. Bridging the Gap Between Speech and Language: Using Multimodal Treatment in a Child With Apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Cheryl D; Pitterle, Kathleen; Kurtz, Marie; Nakhla, Mark; Todorow, Carlyn

    2016-09-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech is a neurologic speech sound disorder in which children have difficulty constructing words and sounds due to poor motor planning and coordination of the articulators required for speech sound production. We report the case of a 3-year-old boy strongly suspected to have childhood apraxia of speech at 18 months of age who used multimodal communication to facilitate language development throughout his work with a speech language pathologist. In 18 months of an intensive structured program, he exhibited atypical rapid improvement, progressing from having no intelligible speech to achieving age-appropriate articulation. We suspect that early introduction of sign language by family proved to be a highly effective form of language development, that when coupled with intensive oro-motor and speech sound therapy, resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Practical speech user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  10. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, A.; Moses, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently on the International Space Station (ISS) and other space vehicles Caution & Warning (C&W) alerts are represented with various auditory tones that correspond to the type of event. This system relies on the crew's ability to remember what each tone represents in a high stress, high workload environment when responding to the alert. Furthermore, crew receive a year or more in advance of the mission that makes remembering the semantic meaning of the alerts more difficult. The current system works for missions conducted close to Earth where ground operators can assist as needed. On long duration missions, however, they will need to work off-nominal events autonomously. There is evidence that speech alarms may be easier and faster to recognize, especially during an off-nominal event. The Information Presentation Directed Research Project (FY07-FY09) funded by the Human Research Program included several studies investigating C&W alerts. The studies evaluated tone alerts currently in use with NASA flight deck displays along with candidate speech alerts. A follow-on study used four types of speech alerts to investigate how quickly various types of auditory alerts with and without a speech component - either at the beginning or at the end of the tone - can be identified. Even though crew were familiar with the tone alert from training or direct mission experience, alerts starting with a speech component were identified faster than alerts starting with a tone. The current study replicated the results from the previous study in a more rigorous experimental design to determine if the candidate speech alarms are ready for transition to operations or if more research is needed. Four types of alarms (caution, warning, fire, and depressurization) were presented to participants in both tone and speech formats in laboratory settings and later in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA). In the laboratory study, the alerts were presented by software and participants were

  11. Verbal-linguistic ability of children with speech and language disorders in Primorsko- karst region

    OpenAIRE

    Berginc, Moira

    2017-01-01

    In the last years, the studies regarding people with speech and language disorders are focused on child development. Consequently, a growing need has emerged for more accurate diagnosis and precise objective speech therapy. Because of this, the demand for more accurate assessment tests is increasing. As nowadays the Slovenian area is characterized by the lack of standardized and non-standardized tests for speech and language development in children, we would need a comprehensive test covering...

  12. Intelligibility of speech of children with speech and sound disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ivetac, Tina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine speech intelligibility of children with primary speech and sound disorders aged 3 to 6 years in everyday life. The research problem is based on the degree to which parents or guardians, immediate family members (sister, brother, grandparents), extended family members (aunt, uncle, cousin), child's friends, other acquaintances, child's teachers and strangers understand the speech of children with speech sound disorders. We examined whether the level ...

  13. Application of automatic speech recognition to quantitative assessment of tracheoesophageal speech with different signal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haderlein, Tino; Riedhammer, Korbinian; Nöth, Elmar; Toy, Hikmet; Schuster, Maria; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Hornegger, Joachim; Rosanowski, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Tracheoesophageal voice is state-of-the-art in voice rehabilitation after laryngectomy. Intelligibility on a telephone is an important evaluation criterion as it is a crucial part of social life. An objective measure of intelligibility when talking on a telephone is desirable in the field of postlaryngectomy speech therapy and its evaluation. Based upon successful earlier studies with broadband speech, an automatic speech recognition (ASR) system was applied to 41 recordings of postlaryngectomy patients. Recordings were available in different signal qualities; quality was the crucial criterion for this study. Compared to the intelligibility rating of 5 human experts, the ASR system had a correlation coefficient of r = -0.87 and Krippendorff's alpha of 0.65 when broadband speech was processed. The rater group alone achieved alpha = 0.66. With the test recordings in telephone quality, the system reached r = -0.79 and alpha = 0.67. For medical purposes, a comprehensive diagnostic approach to (substitute) voice has to cover both subjective and objective tests. An automatic recognition system such as the one proposed in this study can be used for objective intelligibility rating with results comparable to those of human experts. This holds for broadband speech as well as for automatic evaluation via telephone. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Diferentes modelos de terapia fonoaudiológica nos casos de simplificação do onset complexo com alongamento compensatório Different types of speech therapy in cases of simplifying the complex onset with compensatory lengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Giacchini

    2011-02-01

    [] and [l]. In the total of people, two were submitted to phonological therapy (PT, based on the model of the minimum pair and two therapy phonetic-articulatory (TA emphasizing the co-articulation of the sound, the use of visual clues, tactile/kinesthetic and auditory, and articulatory training. Children received two weekly visits for the acquisition of CCV (80% of correct structure in spontaneous speech. To check the difference in time of phonetic and phonological therapy was applied the T Test for independent samples of 5% significance level. The therapeutic advances of the subjects were analyzed in a qualitative. RESULTS: in the comparison of the results in the sessions between the average obtained with each therapeutic model, we found that children receiving TA needed half of the time of the subjects that underwent PT, although not statistically significant (p = 0.40. It is relevant to highlight the difference in time of treatment in clinical practice,. CONCLUSION: children using SCL, benefit when submitted to therapy in order to promote an phonetic implementation and not the phonological organization, since that the patients who were exposed to TA obtained faster progresses when compared to the phonological model.

  15. Eficácia da fonoterapia em disfagia neurogênica usando a escala funcional de ingestão por via oral (FOIS como marcador Efficacy of speech therapy in neurogenic dysphagia using functional oral intake scale (FOIS as a parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Furkim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a eficácia da fonoterapia e a interferência dos fatores de risco para disfagia no atendimento de pacientes adultos internados com doença neurológica e sintoma de disfagia, tendo a escala funcional de ingestão por via oral como marcador da progressão segura da dieta por via oral. MÉTODOS: foi realizado estudo retrospectivo de 49 prontuários de pacientes com disfagia neurogênica, atendidos em fonoterapia no leito hospitalar e comparada a escala de ingestão de alimentação por via oral antes e depois da terapia - FOIS, (mede a quantidade e tipo de alimento que o paciente consegue ingerir por via oral de forma segura. Foram estudados também possíveis fatores de interferência na melhora via ingestão oral na fonoterapia como: doença de base, idade, condições respiratórias, condições clínicas, estado de consciência, tempo de terapia e número de sessões. RESULTADOS: dos 49 pacientes, 36 apresentaram melhora na FOIS após a fonoterapia. Quanto aos possíveis fatores de interferência nessa melhora, foram constatados: a piora clínica do doente, as intercorrências clínicas e o rebaixamento do nível de consciência, como estatisticamente significantes para a não evolução em fonoterapia visando à ingestão de alimentos por via oral. Os outros fatores analisados como: doença de base, idade, condições respiratórias, tempo e numero de sessões não demonstraram significância estatística, sugerindo não interferir na melhora ou piora do paciente. CONCLUSÃO: observa-se melhora efetiva da ingestão de alimentos por via oral nos pacientes com disfagia neurogênica atendidos em ambiente hospitalar em fonoterapia, salvo se apresentarem intercorrências clínicas e rebaixamento do nível de consciência durante o processo.PURPOSE: to evaluate efficacy of speech therapy treatments and the interference of risk factors in adult patients admitted to the wards with neurological diseases and symptoms of dysphagia

  16. Dual Perspectives on Theory in Clinical Practice: Practice Makes Perfect: The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a case study to suggest that some children view speech-language therapy as a separate situation for learning practicing new sounds and language forms whereas the purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Clinical implications of this potential incompatibility between practicing speech and communicating…

  17. Tackling the complexity in speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    section includes four carefully selected chapters. They deal with facets of speech production, speech acoustics, and/or speech perception or recognition, place them in an integrated phonetic-phonological perspective, and relate them in more or less explicit ways to aspects of speech technology. Therefore......, we hope that this volume can help speech scientists with traditional training in phonetics and phonology to keep up with the latest developments in speech technology. In the opposite direction, speech researchers starting from a technological perspective will hopefully get inspired by reading about...... the questions, phenomena, and communicative functions that are currently addressed in phonetics and phonology. Either way, the future of speech research lies in international, interdisciplinary collaborations, and our volume is meant to reflect and facilitate such collaborations...

  18. Maria Montessori on Speech Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David A.

    1973-01-01

    Montessori's theory of education, as related to speech communication skills learning, is explored for insights into speech and language acquisition, pedagogical procedure for teaching spoken vocabulary, and the educational environment which encourages children's free interaction and confidence in communication. (CH)

  19. Speech spectrogram expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, J.; Macallister, J.; Michalek, T.; Ross, S.

    1983-01-01

    Various authors have pointed out that humans can become quite adept at deriving phonetic transcriptions from speech spectrograms (as good as 90percent accuracy at the phoneme level). The authors describe an expert system which attempts to simulate this performance. The speech spectrogram expert (spex) is actually a society made up of three experts: a 2-dimensional vision expert, an acoustic-phonetic expert, and a phonetics expert. The visual reasoning expert finds important visual features of the spectrogram. The acoustic-phonetic expert reasons about how visual features relates to phonemes, and about how phonemes change visually in different contexts. The phonetics expert reasons about allowable phoneme sequences and transformations, and deduces an english spelling for phoneme strings. The speech spectrogram expert is highly interactive, allowing users to investigate hypotheses and edit rules. 10 references.

  20. RECOGNISING SPEECH ACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Kaburise

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech Act Theory (SAT, a theory in pragmatics, is an attempt to describe what happens during linguistic interactions. Inherent within SAT is the idea that language forms and intentions are relatively formulaic and that there is a direct correspondence between sentence forms (for example, in terms of structure and lexicon and the function or meaning of an utterance. The contention offered in this paper is that when such a correspondence does not exist, as in indirect speech utterances, this creates challenges for English second language speakers and may result in miscommunication. This arises because indirect speech acts allow speakers to employ various pragmatic devices such as inference, implicature, presuppositions and context clues to transmit their messages. Such devices, operating within the non-literal level of language competence, may pose challenges for ESL learners.

  1. Speech identity conversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondra, Martin; Vích, Robert

    Vol. 3445, - (2005), s. 421-426 ISSN 0302-9743. [International Summer School on Neural Nets "E. R. Caianiello". Course: Nonlinear Speech Modeling and Applications /9./. Vietri sul Mare, 13.09.2004-18.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/04/1097; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/02/0124; GA MŠk(CZ) OC 277.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : speech synthesis * computer science Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  2. The chairman's speech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper contains a transcript of a speech by the chairman of the UKAEA, to mark the publication of the 1985/6 annual report. The topics discussed in the speech include: the Chernobyl accident and its effect on public attitudes to nuclear power, management and disposal of radioactive waste, the operation of UKAEA as a trading fund, and the UKAEA development programmes. The development programmes include work on the following: fast reactor technology, thermal reactors, reactor safety, health and safety aspects of water cooled reactors, the Joint European Torus, and under-lying research. (U.K.)

  3. Designing speech for a recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Kerstin

    is investigated on three candidates for so-called ‘simplified registers’: speech to children (also called motherese or baby talk), speech to foreigners (also called foreigner talk) and speech to robots. The volume integrates research from various disciplines, such as psychology, sociolinguistics...

  4. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Information is carried in changes of a signal. The paper starts with revis- iting Dudley's concept of the carrier nature of speech. It points to its close connection to modulation spectra of speech and argues against short-term spectral envelopes as dominant carriers of the linguistic information in speech. The history of ...

  5. Speech Communication and Signal Processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Communicating with a machine in a natural mode such as speech brings out not only several technological challenges, but also limitations in our understanding of how people communicate so effortlessly. The key is to understand the distinction between speech processing (as is done in human communication) and speech ...

  6. Inter-Rater Reliability for Speech-Language Therapists' Judgement of Oesophageal Abnormality during Oesophageal Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oesophageal abnormalities are common findings in a speech-language therapy videofluoroscopy clinic. Fluoroscopic screening involving oropharynx alone fails to identify these patients. Oesophageal screening as an adjunct to videofluoroscopy is gaining popularity. Yet currently, little is known about the reliability of speech and…

  7. 20 Ways for Classroom Teachers to Collaborate with Speech-Language Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kellie L.; Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Boon, Richard T.; Fore, Cecil, III

    2010-01-01

    Students with disabilities are increasingly receiving services in the general education classroom, and as a result, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are using a variety of flexible models to meet the needs of these students. Although some schools continue to provide pullout service delivery models for speech-language therapy, many are…

  8. When Speech Therapists Are Scarce, One-on-One Sessions Go Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    When therapists are scarce, some schools are turning to online speech lessons. The author reports on how the use of online speech therapy is growing. Schools need to provide the right equipment, including computers with high-speed Internet access and webcams, and, in some cases, an aide or parent might have to supervise while the child is working…

  9. Speech Deterioration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) after Manifestation of Bulbar Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Tanja; Ruottinen, Hanna; Puhto, Riitta; Helminen, Mika; Palmio, Johanna

    2018-01-01

    Background: The symptoms and their progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are typically studied after the diagnosis has been confirmed. However, many people with ALS already have severe dysarthria and loss of adequate speech at the time of diagnosis. Speech-and-language therapy interventions should be targeted timely based on…

  10. Speech-Language Therapists' Process of Including Significant Others in Aphasia Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallé, Marie-Christine; Le Dorze, Guylaine; Mingant, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although aphasia rehabilitation should include significant others, it is currently unknown how this recommendation is adopted in speech-language therapy practice. Speech-language therapists' (SLTs) experience of including significant others in aphasia rehabilitation is also understudied, yet a better understanding of clinical…

  11. Reconceptualizing Practice with Multilingual Children with Speech Sound Disorders: People, Practicalities and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Sarah; McLeod, Sharynne; Wong, Sandie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The speech and language therapy profession is required to provide services to increasingly multilingual caseloads. Much international research has focused on the challenges of speech and language therapists' (SLTs) practice with multilingual children. Aims: To draw on the experience and knowledge of experts in the field to: (1)…

  12. Stakeholders' Qualitative Perspectives of Effective Telepractice Pedagogy in Speech-Language Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Megan S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Academic programmes in speech-language pathology are increasingly providing telehealth/telepractice clinical education to students. Despite this growth, there is little information describing effective ways to teach it. Aims: The current exploratory study analyzed the perceptions of speech-language pathology/therapy (SLP/SLT) faculty,…

  13. A construção da identidade de sujeitos deficientes no grupo terapêutico-fonoaudiológico Identity formation of disabled individuals within a speech therapy group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Almeida Leite

    2008-08-01

    the internalization of roles. These roles are defined, in the first instance, by those persons who provide the most concrete reference points for the child, in particular their family, and beyond that by the wider social group to which they belong. Our objective was to reflect upon the formation of the personal identity of mentally disabled young people who were receiving speech therapy, this therapy being conducted in a group context. Transcripts of the language used by the subjects in constructing their self image were analyzed. This study was based upon the results obtained from previous research, conducted with groups of siblings of subjects classified as mentally disabled. These results revealed a negative image held by those siblings of their disabled brother or sister. The material analyzed is part of a data bank of videotapes, of disabled youngsters receiving group speech therapy in a school clinic setting, taken over a two year period. This data was transcribed and analyzed according to the guidelines of micro genetic analysis, taking into consideration minute details of interviews and in particular details and clips of interactive episodes. The examination of the data was directed towards the actions of the subjects of the study, their interpersonal relations and the social context in which these took place. The analysis conducted in this study aims to establish a relationship between the images these subjects have of themselves and the image put across by the social group to which they belong. The results demonstrated the resonance of the discourse of the social group in the verbalizations of the subjects. We conclude that to transform the image that the subjects with intellectual disability have of themselves it is necessary to direct actions to those who are close to them, namely family, friends, colleagues and their social group in general.

  14. Hearing speech in music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth-Reino Ekström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The masking effect of a piano composition, played at different speeds and in different octaves, on speech-perception thresholds was investigated in 15 normal-hearing and 14 moderately-hearing-impaired subjects. Running speech (just follow conversation, JFC testing and use of hearing aids increased the everyday validity of the findings. A comparison was made with standard audiometric noises [International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA noise and speech spectrum-filtered noise (SPN]. All masking sounds, music or noise, were presented at the same equivalent sound level (50 dBA. The results showed a significant effect of piano performance speed and octave (P<.01. Low octave and fast tempo had the largest effect; and high octave and slow tempo, the smallest. Music had a lower masking effect than did ICRA noise with two or six speakers at normal vocal effort (P<.01 and SPN (P<.05. Subjects with hearing loss had higher masked thresholds than the normal-hearing subjects (P<.01, but there were smaller differences between masking conditions (P<.01. It is pointed out that music offers an interesting opportunity for studying masking under realistic conditions, where spectral and temporal features can be varied independently. The results have implications for composing music with vocal parts, designing acoustic environments and creating a balance between speech perception and privacy in social settings.

  15. Media Criticism Group Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To integrate speaking practice with rhetorical theory. Type of speech: Persuasive. Point value: 100 points (i.e., 30 points based on peer evaluations, 30 points based on individual performance, 40 points based on the group presentation), which is 25% of course grade. Requirements: (a) References: 7-10; (b) Length: 20-30 minutes; (c)…

  16. Expectations and speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Molly; Russell, Jamie

    2015-05-01

    Socio-indexical cues and paralinguistic information are often beneficial to speech processing as this information assists listeners in parsing the speech stream. Associations that particular populations speak in a certain speech style can, however, make it such that socio-indexical cues have a cost. In this study, native speakers of Canadian English who identify as Chinese Canadian and White Canadian read sentences that were presented to listeners in noise. Half of the sentences were presented with a visual-prime in the form of a photo of the speaker and half were presented in control trials with fixation crosses. Sentences produced by Chinese Canadians showed an intelligibility cost in the face-prime condition, whereas sentences produced by White Canadians did not. In an accentedness rating task, listeners rated White Canadians as less accented in the face-prime trials, but Chinese Canadians showed no such change in perceived accentedness. These results suggest a misalignment between an expected and an observed speech signal for the face-prime trials, which indicates that social information about a speaker can trigger linguistic associations that come with processing benefits and costs.

  17. Visualizing structures of speech expressiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Graugaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    vowels and consonants, and which converts the speech energy into visual particles that form complex visual structures, provides us with a mean to present the expressiveness of speech into a visual mode. This system is presented in an artwork whose scenario is inspired from the reasons of language......Speech is both beautiful and informative. In this work, a conceptual study of the speech, through investigation of the tower of Babel, the archetypal phonemes, and a study of the reasons of uses of language is undertaken in order to create an artistic work investigating the nature of speech...

  18. Brain-inspired speech segmentation for automatic speech recognition using the speech envelope as a temporal reference

    OpenAIRE

    Byeongwook Lee; Kwang-Hyun Cho

    2016-01-01

    Speech segmentation is a crucial step in automatic speech recognition because additional speech analyses are performed for each framed speech segment. Conventional segmentation techniques primarily segment speech using a fixed frame size for computational simplicity. However, this approach is insufficient for capturing the quasi-regular structure of speech, which causes substantial recognition failure in noisy environments. How does the brain handle quasi-regular structured speech and maintai...

  19. Content Analysis of the Professional Journal of the College of Speech Therapists II: Coming of Age and Growing Maturity, 1946-65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Jois; Armstrong, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Following a content analysis of the first 10 years of the UK professional journal "Speech," this study was conducted to survey the published work of the speech (and language) therapy profession in the 20 years following the unification of two separate professional bodies into the College of Speech Therapists. Aim: To…

  20. Representation of speech variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Tessa; Holt, Rachael F

    2017-07-01

    Speech signals provide both linguistic information (e.g., words and sentences) as well as information about the speaker who produced the message (i.e., social-indexical information). Listeners store highly detailed representations of these speech signals, which are simultaneously indexed with linguistic and social category membership. A variety of methodologies-forced-choice categorization, rating, and free classification-have shed light on listeners' cognitive-perceptual representations of the social-indexical information present in the speech signal. Specifically, listeners can accurately identify some talker characteristics, including native language status, approximate age, sex, and gender. Additionally, listeners have sensitivity to other speaker characteristics-such as sexual orientation, regional dialect, native language for non-native speakers, race, and ethnicity-but listeners tend to be less accurate or more variable at categorizing or rating speakers based on these constructs. However, studies have not necessarily incorporated more recent conceptions of these constructs (e.g., separating listeners' perceptions of race vs ethnicity) or speakers who do not fit squarely into specific categories (e.g., for sex perception, intersex individuals; for gender perception, genderqueer speakers; for race perception, multiracial speakers). Additional research on how the intersections of social-indexical categories influence speech perception is also needed. As the field moves forward, scholars from a variety of disciplines should be incorporated into investigations of how listeners' extract and represent facets of personal identity from speech. Further, the impact of these representations on our interactions with one another in contexts outside of the laboratory should continue to be explored. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1434. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1434 This article is categorized under: Linguistics > Language Acquisition Linguistics > Language in Mind and Brain Psychology

  1. Nobel peace speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua FRYE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Peace Prize has long been considered the premier peace prize in the world. According to Geir Lundestad, Secretary of the Nobel Committee, of the 300 some peace prizes awarded worldwide, “none is in any way as well known and as highly respected as the Nobel Peace Prize” (Lundestad, 2001. Nobel peace speech is a unique and significant international site of public discourse committed to articulating the universal grammar of peace. Spanning over 100 years of sociopolitical history on the world stage, Nobel Peace Laureates richly represent an important cross-section of domestic and international issues increasingly germane to many publics. Communication scholars’ interest in this rhetorical genre has increased in the past decade. Yet, the norm has been to analyze a single speech artifact from a prestigious or controversial winner rather than examine the collection of speeches for generic commonalities of import. In this essay, we analyze the discourse of Nobel peace speech inductively and argue that the organizing principle of the Nobel peace speech genre is the repetitive form of normative liberal principles and values that function as rhetorical topoi. These topoi include freedom and justice and appeal to the inviolable, inborn right of human beings to exercise certain political and civil liberties and the expectation of equality of protection from totalitarian and tyrannical abuses. The significance of this essay to contemporary communication theory is to expand our theoretical understanding of rhetoric’s role in the maintenance and development of an international and cross-cultural vocabulary for the grammar of peace.

  2. Speech and the right hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, E M

    1991-01-01

    Two facts are well recognized: the location of the speech centre with respect to handedness and early brain damage, and the involvement of the right hemisphere in certain cognitive functions including verbal humour, metaphor interpretation, spatial reasoning and abstract concepts. The importance of the right hemisphere in speech is suggested by pathological studies, blood flow parameters and analysis of learning strategies. An insult to the right hemisphere following left hemisphere damage can affect residual language abilities and may activate non-propositional inner speech. The prosody of speech comprehension even more so than of speech production-identifying the voice, its affective components, gestural interpretation and monitoring one's own speech-may be an essentially right hemisphere task. Errors of a visuospatial type may occur in the learning process. Ease of learning by actors and when learning foreign languages is achieved by marrying speech with gesture and intonation, thereby adopting a right hemisphere strategy.

  3. Metaheuristic applications to speech enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kunche, Prajna

    2016-01-01

    This book serves as a basic reference for those interested in the application of metaheuristics to speech enhancement. The major goal of the book is to explain the basic concepts of optimization methods and their use in heuristic optimization in speech enhancement to scientists, practicing engineers, and academic researchers in speech processing. The authors discuss why it has been a challenging problem for researchers to develop new enhancement algorithms that aid in the quality and intelligibility of degraded speech. They present powerful optimization methods to speech enhancement that can help to solve the noise reduction problems. Readers will be able to understand the fundamentals of speech processing as well as the optimization techniques, how the speech enhancement algorithms are implemented by utilizing optimization methods, and will be given the tools to develop new algorithms. The authors also provide a comprehensive literature survey regarding the topic.

  4. Conversation, speech acts, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Speakers frequently have specific intentions that they want others to recognize (Grice, 1957). These specific intentions can be viewed as speech acts (Searle, 1969), and I argue that they play a role in long-term memory for conversation utterances. Five experiments were conducted to examine this idea. Participants in all experiments read scenarios ending with either a target utterance that performed a specific speech act (brag, beg, etc.) or a carefully matched control. Participants were more likely to falsely recall and recognize speech act verbs after having read the speech act version than after having read the control version, and the speech act verbs served as better recall cues for the speech act utterances than for the controls. Experiment 5 documented individual differences in the encoding of speech act verbs. The results suggest that people recognize and retain the actions that people perform with their utterances and that this is one of the organizing principles of conversation memory.

  5. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services furnished under § 410.62; (iii) Outpatient physical therapy and speech-language pathology services... physical therapy and speech-language pathology services furnished by a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions...

  6. Speech Motor Control in Fluent and Dysfluent Speech Production of an Individual with Apraxia of Speech and Broca's Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.; Bose, Arpita; Square, Paula A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2007-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is typically described as a motor-speech disorder with clinically well-defined symptoms, but without a clear understanding of the underlying problems in motor control. A number of studies have compared the speech of subjects with AOS to the fluent speech of controls, but only a few have included speech movement data and if…

  7. Oral motor functions, speech and communication before a definitive diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Tanja; Korpijaakko-Huuhka, Anna-Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Puhto, Riitta; Hollo, Kirsi; Ylinen, Aarne; Palmio, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the cranial nerve symptoms, speech disorders and communicative effectiveness of Finnish patients with diagnosed or possible amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at their first assessment by a speech-language pathologist. The group studied consisted of 30 participants who had clinical signs of bulbar deterioration at the beginning of the study. They underwent a thorough clinical speech and communication examination. The cranial nerve symptoms and ability to communicate were compared in 14 participants with probable or definitive ALS and in 16 participants with suspected or possible ALS. The initial type of ALS was also assessed. More deterioration in soft palate function was found in participants with possible ALS than with diagnosed ALS. Likewise, a slower speech rate combined with more severe dysarthria was observed in possible ALS. In both groups, there was some deterioration in communicative effectiveness. In the possible ALS group the diagnostic delay was longer and speech therapy intervention actualized later. The participants with ALS showed multidimensional decline in communication at their first visit to the speech-language pathologist, but impairments and activity limitations were more severe in suspected or possible ALS. The majority of persons with bulbar-onset ALS in this study were in the latter diagnostic group. This suggests that they are more susceptible to delayed diagnosis and delayed speech therapy assessment. It is important to start speech therapy intervention during the diagnostic processes particularly if the person already shows bulbar symptoms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Predicting automatic speech recognition performance over communication channels from instrumental speech quality and intelligibility scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, L.F.; Möller, S.; Beerends, J.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of automatic speech recognition based on coded-decoded speech heavily depends on the quality of the transmitted signals, determined by channel impairments. This paper examines relationships between speech recognition performance and measurements of speech quality and intelligibility

  9. Sensorimotor Interactions in Speech Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Shiller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Auditory input is essential for normal speech development and plays a key role in speech production throughout the life span. In traditional models, auditory input plays two critical roles: 1 establishing the acoustic correlates of speech sounds that serve, in part, as the targets of speech production, and 2 as a source of feedback about a talker's own speech outcomes. This talk will focus on both of these roles, describing a series of studies that examine the capacity of children and adults to adapt to real-time manipulations of auditory feedback during speech production. In one study, we examined sensory and motor adaptation to a manipulation of auditory feedback during production of the fricative “s”. In contrast to prior accounts, adaptive changes were observed not only in speech motor output but also in subjects' perception of the sound. In a second study, speech adaptation was examined following a period of auditory–perceptual training targeting the perception of vowels. The perceptual training was found to systematically improve subjects' motor adaptation response to altered auditory feedback during speech production. The results of both studies support the idea that perceptual and motor processes are tightly coupled in speech production learning, and that the degree and nature of this coupling may change with development.

  10. Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwarsson, Jenny; Morris, David Jackson; Balling, Laura Winther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The cognitive load generated by online speech production may vary with the nature of the speech task. This article examines 3 speech tasks used in voice therapy carry-over exercises, in which a patient is required to adopt and automatize new voice behaviors, ultimately in daily spontaneous...

  11. An acoustic feature-based similarity scoring system for speech rehabilitation assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syauqy, Dahnial; Wu, Chao-Min; Setyawati, Onny

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a tool to assist speech therapy and rehabilitation, which focused on automatic scoring based on the comparison of the patient's speech with another normal speech on several aspects including pitch, vowel, voiced-unvoiced segments, strident fricative and sound intensity. The pitch estimation employed the use of cepstrum-based algorithm for its robustness; the vowel classification used multilayer perceptron (MLP) to classify vowel from pitch and formants; and the strident fricative detection was based on the major peak spectral intensity, location and the pitch existence in the segment. In order to evaluate the performance of the system, this study analyzed eight patient's speech recordings (four males, four females; 4-58-years-old), which had been recorded in previous study in cooperation with Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Taoyuan General Hospital. The experiment result on pitch algorithm showed that the cepstrum method had 5.3% of gross pitch error from a total of 2086 frames. On the vowel classification algorithm, MLP method provided 93% accuracy (men), 87% (women) and 84% (children). In total, the overall results showed that 156 tool's grading results (81%) were consistent compared to 192 audio and visual observations done by four experienced respondents. Implication for Rehabilitation Difficulties in communication may limit the ability of a person to transfer and exchange information. The fact that speech is one of the primary means of communication has encouraged the needs of speech diagnosis and rehabilitation. The advances of technology in computer-assisted speech therapy (CAST) improve the quality, time efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of the disorders. The present study attempted to develop tool to assist speech therapy and rehabilitation, which provided simple interface to let the assessment be done even by the patient himself without the need of particular knowledge of speech processing while at the

  12. Speech is Golden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Henrichsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Danish municipalities are ready to begin to adopt automatic speech recognition, but at the same time remain nervous following a long series of bad business cases in the recent past. Complaints are voiced over costly licences and low service levels, typical effects of a de facto monopoly...... on the supply side. The present article reports on a new public action strategy which has taken shape in the course of 2013-14. While Denmark is a small language area, our public sector is well organised and has considerable purchasing power. Across this past year, Danish local authorities have organised around...... the speech technology challenge, they have formulated a number of joint questions and new requirements to be met by suppliers and have deliberately worked towards formulating tendering material which will allow fair competition. Public researchers have contributed to this work, including the author...

  13. Speech is Golden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Henrichsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    on the supply side. The present article reports on a new public action strategy which has taken shape in the course of 2013-14. While Denmark is a small language area, our public sector is well organised and has considerable purchasing power. Across this past year, Danish local authorities have organised around...... the speech technology challenge, they have formulated a number of joint questions and new requirements to be met by suppliers and have deliberately worked towards formulating tendering material which will allow fair competition. Public researchers have contributed to this work, including the author...... of the present article, in the role of economically neutral advisers. The aim of the initiative is to pave the way for the first profitable contract in the field - which we hope to see in 2014 - an event which would precisely break the present deadlock and open up a billion EUR market for speech technology...

  14. Voz, deglutição e qualidade de vida de pacientes com alteração de mobilidade de prega vocal unilateral pré e pós-fonoterapia Voice, deglutition and quality of life of patients with unilateral vocal cords mobility alteration prior and post speech therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Davison Mangilli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar as contribuições da fonoterapia na voz, na deglutição e na qualidade de vida de pacientes com alteração unilateral de mobilidade de prega vocal. MÉTODOS: Os sujeitos foram 13 pacientes, de ambos os sexos, com alteração unilateral de mobilidade de prega vocal. Foi realizado um levantamento da história clínica, dos dados de avaliação pré e pós-fonoterapia e da qualidade de vida dos mesmos a partir dos prontuários, das fitas de exame e das gravações de exames. RESULTADOS: Após a intervenção fonoaudiológica foi possível observar: nove pacientes apresentaram melhora da qualidade vocal após fonoterapia; todos os pacientes apresentaram melhora em pelo menos um parâmetro da avaliação acústica; dez pacientes apresentaram classificação dentro dos limites de normalidade em relação à escala de severidade da disfagia e nove em relação à escala de penetração/aspiração; seis pacientes referiram menor desvantagem vocal; nove pacientes referiram menor impacto da disfagia na qualidade de vida. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados apontam melhoras na voz, na deglutição, na limitação vocal e na qualidade de vida relacionada à deglutição após fonoterapia. Pode-se dizer que a fonoterapia parece ser efetiva na melhora da voz, da deglutição, do nível de desvantagem vocal e da qualidade de vida em deglutição de pacientes com alterações na mobilidade das pregas vocais.PURPOSE: To investigate the contributions of speech therapy in voice, deglutition and quality of life of participants with unilateral vocal cords mobility alteration. METHODS: The subjects were 13 patients, both genders, with unilateral vocal cords mobility alteration. A research of clinical history, evaluation prior and post speech therapy and quality of life was carried out based on protocols, exam tapes and recordings from the participants' files. RESULTS: After speech therapy, it was possible to observe that: nine participants had better

  15. Multilevel Analysis in Analyzing Speech Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddattu, Vasudeva; Krishna, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The speech produced by human vocal tract is a complex acoustic signal, with diverse applications in phonetics, speech synthesis, automatic speech recognition, speaker identification, communication aids, speech pathology, speech perception, machine translation, hearing research, rehabilitation and assessment of communication disorders and many…

  16. Bridging music and speech rhythm: rhythmic priming and audio-motor training affect speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Nia; Astésano, Corine; Schön, Daniele

    2015-02-01

    Following findings that musical rhythmic priming enhances subsequent speech perception, we investigated whether rhythmic priming for spoken sentences can enhance phonological processing - the building blocks of speech - and whether audio-motor training enhances this effect. Participants heard a metrical prime followed by a sentence (with a matching/mismatching prosodic structure), for which they performed a phoneme detection task. Behavioural (RT) data was collected from two groups: one who received audio-motor training, and one who did not. We hypothesised that 1) phonological processing would be enhanced in matching conditions, and 2) audio-motor training with the musical rhythms would enhance this effect. Indeed, providing a matching rhythmic prime context resulted in faster phoneme detection, thus revealing a cross-domain effect of musical rhythm on phonological processing. In addition, our results indicate that rhythmic audio-motor training enhances this priming effect. These results have important implications for rhythm-based speech therapies, and suggest that metrical rhythm in music and speech may rely on shared temporal processing brain resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurophysiology of Speech Differences in Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Molfese, Peter J.; Gumkowski, Nina; Sorcinelli, Andrea; Harwood, Vanessa; Irwin, Julia; Landi, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a picture naming task of simple and complex words in children with typical speech and with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Results reveal reduced amplitude prior to speaking complex (multisyllabic) words relative to simple (monosyllabic) words for the CAS group over the right hemisphere during a time window thought to reflect phonological encoding of word forms. Group differences were also observed prior to production of spoken tokens regardless of word complexity during a time window just prior to speech onset (thought to reflect motor planning/programming). Results suggest differences in pre-speech neurolinguistic processes. PMID:25090016

  18. IBM MASTOR SYSTEM: Multilingual Automatic Speech-to-speech Translator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Yuqing; Gu, Liang; Zhou, Bowen; Sarikaya, Ruhi; Afify, Mohamed; Kuo, Hong-Kwang; Zhu, Wei-zhong; Deng, Yonggang; Prosser, Charles; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    .... Challenges include speech recognition and machine translation in adverse environments, lack of training data and linguistic resources for under-studied languages, and the need to rapidly develop...

  19. [Improving speech comprehension using a new cochlear implant speech processor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Deile, J; Kortmann, T; Hoppe, U; Hessel, H; Morsnowski, A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter clinical field study was to assess the benefits of the new Freedom 24 sound processor for cochlear implant (CI) users implanted with the Nucleus 24 cochlear implant system. The study included 48 postlingually profoundly deaf experienced CI users who demonstrated speech comprehension performance with their current speech processor on the Oldenburg sentence test (OLSA) in quiet conditions of at least 80% correct scores and who were able to perform adaptive speech threshold testing using the OLSA in noisy conditions. Following baseline measures of speech comprehension performance with their current speech processor, subjects were upgraded to the Freedom 24 speech processor. After a take-home trial period of at least 2 weeks, subject performance was evaluated by measuring the speech reception threshold with the Freiburg multisyllabic word test and speech intelligibility with the Freiburg monosyllabic word test at 50 dB and 70 dB in the sound field. The results demonstrated highly significant benefits for speech comprehension with the new speech processor. Significant benefits for speech comprehension were also demonstrated with the new speech processor when tested in competing background noise.In contrast, use of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) did not prove to be a suitably sensitive assessment tool for comparative subjective self-assessment of hearing benefits with each processor. Use of the preprocessing algorithm known as adaptive dynamic range optimization (ADRO) in the Freedom 24 led to additional improvements over the standard upgrade map for speech comprehension in quiet and showed equivalent performance in noise. Through use of the preprocessing beam-forming algorithm BEAM, subjects demonstrated a highly significant improved signal-to-noise ratio for speech comprehension thresholds (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio for 50% speech comprehension scores) when tested with an adaptive procedure using the Oldenburg

  20. Neurophysiology of speech differences in childhood apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L; Molfese, Peter J; Gumkowski, Nina; Sorcinelli, Andrea; Harwood, Vanessa; Irwin, Julia R; Landi, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a picture naming task of simple and complex words in children with typical speech and with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Results reveal reduced amplitude prior to speaking complex (multisyllabic) words relative to simple (monosyllabic) words for the CAS group over the right hemisphere during a time window thought to reflect phonological encoding of word forms. Group differences were also observed prior to production of spoken tokens regardless of word complexity during a time window just prior to speech onset (thought to reflect motor planning/programming). Results suggest differences in pre-speech neurolinguistic processes.

  1. A serious game for children with speech disorders and hearing problems

    OpenAIRE

    Nasiri, Nahid

    2017-01-01

    Tezin basılısı İstanbul Şehir Üniversitesi Kütüphanesi'ndedir. Speechimpedimentaffectingchildrenwithhearingdifficultiesandspeechdisordersrequires speech therapy and much practice to overcome. In fact, speech therapy via serious games gives an opportunity to children with speech disorders and hearing problems to overcome their problems. As far as children are more inclined to play games, so we intend to learn them by entertainments like serious games. In this thesis, we have designed and imple...

  2. Speech endpoint detection with non-language speech sounds for generic speech processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Matthew; Romanowski, Brian

    2009-05-01

    Non-language speech sounds (NLSS) are sounds produced by humans that do not carry linguistic information. Examples of these sounds are coughs, clicks, breaths, and filled pauses such as "uh" and "um" in English. NLSS are prominent in conversational speech, but can be a significant source of errors in speech processing applications. Traditionally, these sounds are ignored by speech endpoint detection algorithms, where speech regions are identified in the audio signal prior to processing. The ability to filter NLSS as a pre-processing step can significantly enhance the performance of many speech processing applications, such as speaker identification, language identification, and automatic speech recognition. In order to be used in all such applications, NLSS detection must be performed without the use of language models that provide knowledge of the phonology and lexical structure of speech. This is especially relevant to situations where the languages used in the audio are not known apriori. We present the results of preliminary experiments using data from American and British English speakers, in which segments of audio are classified as language speech sounds (LSS) or NLSS using a set of acoustic features designed for language-agnostic NLSS detection and a hidden-Markov model (HMM) to model speech generation. The results of these experiments indicate that the features and model used are capable of detection certain types of NLSS, such as breaths and clicks, while detection of other types of NLSS such as filled pauses will require future research.

  3. Receptive speech in early implanted children later diagnosed with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, B; Jotic, A; Miric, D; Nikolic, M; Jankovic, N; Arsovic, N

    2016-06-01

    Incidence of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is rising through the years with estimated 1 in 68 in the US in 2014. This incidence is also rising in the population of congenitally deaf children. Favorable outcome after early cochlear implantation is expected due to plasticity and reorganization capacity of brain in infants and toddlers, but outcomes could be significantly modified in children with diagnosed ASD. Current methods of screening for autism have difficulties in establishing diagnosis in children who have both autism and other developmental delays, especially at such an early age. The aim of the study was to assess the development of auditory perception and speech intelligibility in implanted children with profound congenital hearing loss who were diagnosed with ASD comparing to those who were typically developing. Fourteen children underwent cochlear implantation; four were later diagnosed with ASD and ten were typically developing. All children underwent intensive postoperative speech and hearing therapy. The development of auditory perception and speech intelligibility was assessed using the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) and the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) during the 5-years follow-up. In children later diagnosed with ASD, auditory processing developed slowly. Depending on the individual capabilities, by the age of six they could identify environmental sounds or discriminate speech sounds. Speech Intelligibility in children with ASD was at best rated as category 2, with very little or no progress up to the age of six, despite extensive speech and language therapy. Communication skills were strongly affected by a degree of autistic features expression. Preoperative psychological assessment in congenitally deaf infants should be expanded by the use of validated instruments for early detection of autism. The possibility of developing ASD should be kept in mind by all professionals involved in programs for cochlear

  4. Rehabilitation of Oronasal Speech Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Shemshadi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Oronasal region, as an important organ of taste and smell, being respected for its impact on the resonace, which is crucial for any normal speech production. Different congenital, acquired and/or developmentalpdefect, may not only have impacts on the quality of respiration, phonation, resonance, also on the process of a normal speech. This article will enable readers to have more focus in such important neuroanatomical speech zones disorders and their respective proper rehabilitation methods in different derangements. Among all other defects, oronasal malfunctionings would definitely has an influence on the oronasal sound resonance and furtherly render impairments on a normal speech production. Rehabilitative approach by speech and language pathologist is highly recommended to alleviate most of oronasal speech disorders.

  5. Speech and the Right Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. R. Critchley

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Two facts are well recognized: the location of the speech centre with respect to handedness and early brain damage, and the involvement of the right hemisphere in certain cognitive functions including verbal humour, metaphor interpretation, spatial reasoning and abstract concepts. The importance of the right hemisphere in speech is suggested by pathological studies, blood flow parameters and analysis of learning strategies. An insult to the right hemisphere following left hemisphere damage can affect residual language abilities and may activate non-propositional inner speech. The prosody of speech comprehension even more so than of speech production—identifying the voice, its affective components, gestural interpretation and monitoring one's own speech—may be an essentially right hemisphere task. Errors of a visuospatial type may occur in the learning process. Ease of learning by actors and when learning foreign languages is achieved by marrying speech with gesture and intonation, thereby adopting a right hemisphere strategy.

  6. Acquired apraxia of speech: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knollman-Porter, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is an acquired adult neurogenic communication disorder that often occurs following stroke. The purpose of this article is to review current research studies addressing the diagnostic and therapeutic management of AOS. Traditional definitions and characteristics are compared with current features that assist in the differential diagnosis of AOS. Prognostic indicators are reviewed in addition to how neuroplasticity may impact treatment in chronic AOS. Treatment techniques discussed include the articulatory kinematic approach (AKA), use of augmentative/alternative communication devices, intersystemic facilitation/reorganization, and constraint-induced therapy. Finally, the need to address functional communication through support groups, outside the therapeutic environment, is discussed.

  7. Abortion and compelled physician speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentlicher, David

    2015-01-01

    Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  8. Speech Recognition on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    The enthusiasm of deploying automatic speech recognition (ASR) on mobile devices is driven both by remarkable advances in ASR technology and by the demand for efficient user interfaces on such devices as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). This chapter presents an overview of ASR...... in the mobile context covering motivations, challenges, fundamental techniques and applications. Three ASR architectures are introduced: embedded speech recognition, distributed speech recognition and network speech recognition. Their pros and cons and implementation issues are discussed. Applications within...... command and control, text entry and search are presented with an emphasis on mobile text entry....

  9. Psychotic speech: a neurolinguistic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, A; Wales, R J

    1994-06-01

    The existence of an aphasia-like language disorder in psychotic speech has been the subject of much debate. This paper argues that a discrete language disorder could be an important cause of the disturbance seen in psychotic speech. A review is presented of classical clinical descriptions and experimental studies that have explored the similarities between psychotic language impairment and aphasic speech. The paper proposes neurolinguistic tasks which may be used in future studies to elicit subtle language impairments in psychotic speech. The usefulness of a neurolinguistic model for further research in the aetiology and treatment of psychosis is discussed.

  10. Phonetic Consequences of Speech Disfluency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shriberg, Elizabeth E

    1999-01-01

    .... Analyses of American English show that disfluency affects a variety of phonetic aspects of speech, including segment durations, intonation, voice quality, vowel quality, and coarticulation patterns...

  11. Current trends in multilingual speech processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    ; speech-to-speech translation; language identification. ... interest owing to two strong driving forces. Firstly, technical advances in speech recognition and synthesis are posing new challenges and opportunities to researchers.

  12. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  13. Speech and Language Problems in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children vary in their development of speech and language skills. Health care professionals have lists of milestones ... it may be due to a speech or language disorder. Children who have speech disorders may have ...

  14. Surgical and radiological effects upon the development of speech after total laryngectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The data presented examine the relationship between postlaryngectomy communication method, and the extent of total laryngectomy and the use of radiation therapy. The expectations of speech therapy providers were also examined. The author interviewed 60 laryngectomy patients who were six months to 3 1/2 years postsurgery. Surgeries were grouped into four categories and correlated with communication method. The relationship was statistically significant with the most apparent deterrent effect exhibited only for the most extreme surgical excisions. There was no relationship with the use of radiation therapy. In many cases speech therapy providers' expectations were not supported by the data

  15. An optimal speech processor for efficient human speech ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    above, the speech signal is recorded at 21739 Hz for English subjects and 20000 Hz for. Cantonese and Georgian subjects. We downsampled the speech signals to 16 kHz for our anal- ysis. Using these parallel acoustic and articulatory data from Cantonese and Georgian, we will be able to examine our communication ...

  16. Alternative Speech Communication System for Persons with Severe Speech Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sid-Ahmed Selouani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Assistive speech-enabled systems are proposed to help both French and English speaking persons with various speech disorders. The proposed assistive systems use automatic speech recognition (ASR and speech synthesis in order to enhance the quality of communication. These systems aim at improving the intelligibility of pathologic speech making it as natural as possible and close to the original voice of the speaker. The resynthesized utterances use new basic units, a new concatenating algorithm and a grafting technique to correct the poorly pronounced phonemes. The ASR responses are uttered by the new speech synthesis system in order to convey an intelligible message to listeners. Experiments involving four American speakers with severe dysarthria and two Acadian French speakers with sound substitution disorders (SSDs are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods. An improvement of the Perceptual Evaluation of the Speech Quality (PESQ value of 5% and more than 20% is achieved by the speech synthesis systems that deal with SSD and dysarthria, respectively.

  17. Alternative Speech Communication System for Persons with Severe Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selouani, Sid-Ahmed; Sidi Yakoub, Mohammed; O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    2009-12-01

    Assistive speech-enabled systems are proposed to help both French and English speaking persons with various speech disorders. The proposed assistive systems use automatic speech recognition (ASR) and speech synthesis in order to enhance the quality of communication. These systems aim at improving the intelligibility of pathologic speech making it as natural as possible and close to the original voice of the speaker. The resynthesized utterances use new basic units, a new concatenating algorithm and a grafting technique to correct the poorly pronounced phonemes. The ASR responses are uttered by the new speech synthesis system in order to convey an intelligible message to listeners. Experiments involving four American speakers with severe dysarthria and two Acadian French speakers with sound substitution disorders (SSDs) are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods. An improvement of the Perceptual Evaluation of the Speech Quality (PESQ) value of 5% and more than 20% is achieved by the speech synthesis systems that deal with SSD and dysarthria, respectively.

  18. Multimodal Speech Capture System for Speech Rehabilitation and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebkhi, Nordine; Desai, Dhyey; Islam, Mohammad; Lu, Jun; Wilson, Kimberly; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2017-11-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are trained to correct articulation of people diagnosed with motor speech disorders by analyzing articulators' motion and assessing speech outcome while patients speak. To assist SLPs in this task, we are presenting the multimodal speech capture system (MSCS) that records and displays kinematics of key speech articulators, the tongue and lips, along with voice, using unobtrusive methods. Collected speech modalities, tongue motion, lips gestures, and voice are visualized not only in real-time to provide patients with instant feedback but also offline to allow SLPs to perform post-analysis of articulators' motion, particularly the tongue, with its prominent but hardly visible role in articulation. We describe the MSCS hardware and software components, and demonstrate its basic visualization capabilities by a healthy individual repeating the words "Hello World." A proof-of-concept prototype has been successfully developed for this purpose, and will be used in future clinical studies to evaluate its potential impact on accelerating speech rehabilitation by enabling patients to speak naturally. Pattern matching algorithms to be applied to the collected data can provide patients with quantitative and objective feedback on their speech performance, unlike current methods that are mostly subjective, and may vary from one SLP to another.

  19. Measurement of speech parameters in casual speech of dementia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Roelant; Jonkers, Roel; Jalvingh, Fedor; Bastiaanse, Yvonne

    Measurement of speech parameters in casual speech of dementia patients Roelant Adriaan Ossewaarde1,2, Roel Jonkers1, Fedor Jalvingh1,3, Roelien Bastiaanse1 1CLCG, University of Groningen (NL); 2HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht (NL); 33St. Marienhospital - Vechta, Geriatric Clinic Vechta

  20. Interactive Speech-Defect Diagnostic/Therapeutic/Prosthetic Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, R. H. T.; Brieseman, N. P.; Clark, T. M.; Elder, A. G.; Fright, W. R.; Garden, K. L.; Kennedy, W. K.; Squires, P. L.; Thorpe, C. W.; Jelinek, H. J.; Turner, S. G.

    1987-11-01

    We have designed and built a portable real-time speech processing system, which incorporates a TMS 32010 (i.e. a co-processor) within an IBM personal computer. The system design is discussed as is the speech therapy software that has been implemented. Displays of loudness, pitch and vocal tract cross-section as computed by the system are illustrated. Preliminary results show that an estimate of the glottal excitation, as extracted using shift-and-add, vary between individuals. We indicate why the estimate of the glottal excitation may be useful in the diagnosis of glottal disorders.

  1. Impact of speech-generating devices on the language development of a child with childhood apraxia of speech: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Carina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of speech-generating devices (SGDs) on the communication and language development of a 2-year-old boy with severe childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). An A-B design was used over a treatment period of 1 year, followed by three additional follow-up measurements, in order to evaluate the implementation of SGDs in the speech therapy of a 2;7-year-old boy with severe CAS. In total, 53 therapy sessions were videotaped and analyzed to better understand his communicative (operationalized as means of communication) and linguistic (operationalized as intelligibility and consistency of speech-productions, lexical and grammatical development) development. The trend-lines of baseline phase A and intervention phase B were compared and percentage of non-overlapping data points were calculated to verify the value of the intervention. The use of SGDs led to an immediate increase in the communicative development of the child. An increase in all linguistic variables was observed, with a latency effect of eight to nine treatment sessions. The implementation of SGDs in speech therapy has the potential to be highly effective in regards to both communicative and linguistic competencies in young children with severe CAS. Implications for Rehabilitation Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a neurological speech sound disorder which results in significant deficits in speech production and lead to a higher risk for language, reading and spelling difficulties. Speech-generating devices (SGD), as one method of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), can effectively enhance the communicative and linguistic development of children with severe CAS.

  2. Comparison of speech performance in labial and lingual orthodontic patients: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ambesh Kumar; Rozario, Joe E.; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The intensity and duration of speech difficulty inherently associated with lingual therapy is a significant issue of concern in orthodontics. This study was designed to evaluate and to compare the duration of changes in speech between labial and lingual orthodontics. Materials and Methods: A prospective longitudinal clinical study was designed to assess speech of 24 patients undergoing labial or lingual orthodontic treatment. An objective spectrographic evaluation of/s/sound was done using software PRAAT version 5.0.47, a semiobjective auditive evaluation of articulation was done by four speech pathologists and a subjective assessment of speech was done by four laypersons. The tests were performed before (T1), within 24 h (T2), after 1 week (T3) and after 1 month (T4) of the start of therapy. The Mann-Whitney U-test for independent samples was used to assess the significance difference between the labial and lingual appliances. A speech alteration with P appliance systems caused a comparable speech difficulty immediately after bonding (T2). Although the speech recovered within a week in the labial group (T3), the lingual group continued to experience discomfort even after a month (T4). PMID:25540661

  3. A pilot study into the effect of vocal exercises and singing on dysarthric speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of vocal exercises and singing on intelligibility and speech naturalness for subjects with acquired dysarthria following traumatic brain injury or stroke. A multiple case study design was used, involving pre, mid, and post-treatment assessments of intelligibility, rate, naturalness, and pause time for four subjects with dysarthria. Each subject participated in 24 individual music therapy sessions over eight weeks involving oral motor respiratory exercises, rhythmic and melodic articulation exercises, rhythmic speech cuing, vocal intonation therapy, and therapeutic singing using familiar songs. Results were measured using a standardized dysarthric speech assessment--the Sentence Intelligibility Test, waveform analysis, and ratings of speech naturalness. Statistically significant improvements in functional speech intelligibility were achieved but improvements in rate of speech were not significant. Speech naturalness improved post-treatment and a reduction in the number and length of pauses was verified via waveform analysis. Preliminary findings suggest that a program of vocal exercises and singing may facilitate more normative speech production for people with acquired dysarthria and support the need for further research in this area.

  4. Auditory Modeling for Noisy Speech Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...) has used its existing technology in phonetic speech recognition, audio signal processing, and multilingual language translation to design and demonstrate an advanced audio interface for speech...

  5. Teaching Speech Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teaching Speech Acts

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I argue that pragmatic ability must become part of what we teach in the classroom if we are to realize the goals of communicative competence for our students. I review the research on pragmatics, especially those articles that point to the effectiveness of teaching pragmatics in an explicit manner, and those that posit methods for teaching. I also note two areas of scholarship that address classroom needs—the use of authentic data and appropriate assessment tools. The essay concludes with a summary of my own experience teaching speech acts in an advanced-level Portuguese class.

  6. Questions You May Want to Ask Your Child's Speech-Language Pathologist = Preguntas que usted le podria hacer al patologo del habla y el lenguaje de su hijo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This accordion style pamphlet, dual sided with English and Spanish text, suggests questions for parents to ask their Speech-Language Pathologist and speech and language therapy services for their children. Sample questions include: How will I participate in my child's therapy sessions? How do you decide how much time my child will spend on speech…

  7. Preliteracy speech sound production skill and later literacy outcomes: a study using the Templin Archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Megan S; Trainin, Guy; Smit, Ann Bosma; Bernthal, John E; Nelson, Ron

    2012-01-01

    This archival study examined the relationship between the speech sound production skill of kindergarten children and literacy outcomes in Grades 1-3 in a data set where most children's vocabulary skills were within normal limits, speech therapy was not provided until 2nd grade, and phonological awareness instruction was discouraged at the time data were collected. Data were accessed from the Templin Archive (2004), and the speech sound production skill of 272 kindergartners were examined relative to literacy outcomes in 1st and 2nd grade (reading) and 3rd grade (spelling). Kindergartners in the 7th percentile for speech sound production skill scored more poorly in 1st- and 2nd-grade reading and 3rd-grade spelling than did kindergartners with average speech sound production skill; kindergartners in the 98th percentile achieved superior literacy skills compared to the mean. Phonological awareness mediated the effects of speech sound production skill on reading and spelling; vocabulary did not account for any unique variance. Speech sound disorders appear to be an overt manifestation of a complex interaction among variables influencing literacy skills, including nonlanguage cognition, vocabulary, letter knowledge, and phonological awareness. These interrelationships hold across the range of speech sound production skill, as children with superior speech sound production skill experience superior literacy outcomes.

  8. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next ...

  9. Separating Underdetermined Convolutive Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Wang, DeLiang; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    a method for underdetermined blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. The proposed framework is applicable for separation of instantaneous as well as convolutive speech mixtures. It is possible to iteratively extract each speech signal from the mixture by combining blind source separation...

  10. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  11. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  12. Indirect speech acts in English

    OpenAIRE

    Василина, В. Н.

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with indirect speech acts in Englishspeaking discourse. Different approaches to their analysis and the reasons for their use are discussed. It is argued that the choice of the form of speech actsdepends on the parameters of communicative partners.

  13. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  14. Perceptual Learning of Interrupted Speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benard, Michel Ruben; Başkent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    The intelligibility of periodically interrupted speech improves once the silent gaps are filled with noise bursts. This improvement has been attributed to phonemic restoration, a top-down repair mechanism that helps intelligibility of degraded speech in daily life. Two hypotheses were investigated

  15. A fonoaudiologia na relação entre escolas regulares de ensino fundamental e escolas de educação especial no processo de inclusão Speech therapy in the interaction between regular primary schools and special education schools in the process of inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice de Souza Ramos

    2008-08-01

    professionals involved, focusing specifically on the speech therapist. The method used was a descriptive analytical survey; a questionnaire was applied in six Special Education Schools and six Regular Schools of the public school system of the city of Belo Horizonte. Six coordinators and 42 teachers from the regular schools and nine coordinators and 61 teachers from the special education schools took part in the study, which involved a total of 118 individuals. The questionnaire covered aspects related to school administration, teacher education, student profile, professionals involved in the educational process, and forms of contact between Health and Education institutions that provide services. Among other issues, the analysis of the results showed a great demand for speech therapy services, which as yet are generally unavailable in the field of education. Interaction between the two types of schools does not occur in all the institutions that were researched. Both types have limited knowledge of Speech Therapy, especially in regular schools. The research revealed a lack of investment in teacher development and in parents' orientation regarding the process of inclusion. We concluded that the field of Speech Therapy is yet to be explored in the process of inclusion. Its contribution for health in the school environment depends directly on the interdisciplinary action of the services provided by the fields of Education and Health, and on cooperation among speech therapists, educators and parents.

  16. Speech development delay in a child with foetal alcohol syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A female foetus in her mother’s womb was exposed to high concentrations of alcohol at each stage of pregnancy on a long-term basis, which resulted in a permanent disability. In addition to a number of deficiencies in the overall functioning of the body of the child, there are serious problems pertaining to verbal communication. This thesis aims to describe foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS disease and present the basic problems with communication functions in a child, caused by damage of brain structures responsible for speech development. The thesis includes a speech diagnosis and therapy program adapted to the presented case. In the Discussion Section we have presented characteristics of communication disorders in case of children with FAS and the description of developmental malformations, neurobehavioral disorders, and environmental factors affecting the development of the child’s speech.

  17. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercises in Post-Stroke Dysarthria Intervention: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, C.; Muir, M.; Allen, C.; Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been little robust evaluation of the outcome of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention for post-stroke dysarthria. Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are a common component of dysarthria intervention. A feasibility study was designed and executed, with participants randomized into two groups, in one of which…

  18. Dissociated Crossed Speech Areas in a Tumour Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Mauler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past, the eloquent areas could be deliberately localised by the invasive Wada test. The very rare cases of dissociated crossed speech areas were accidentally found based on the clinical symptomatology. Today functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI-based imaging can be employed to non-invasively localise the eloquent areas in brain tumour patients for therapy planning. A 41-year-old, left-handed man with a low-grade glioma in the left frontal operculum extending to the insular cortex, tension headaches, and anomic aphasia over 5 months underwent a pre-operative speech area localisation fMRI measurement, which revealed the evidence of the transhemispheric disposition, where the dominant Wernicke speech area is located on the left and the Broca’s area is strongly lateralised to the right hemisphere. The outcome of the Wada test and the intraoperative cortico-subcortical stimulation mapping were congruent with this finding. After tumour removal, language area function was fully preserved. Upon the occurrence of brain tumours with a risk of impaired speech function, the rare dissociate crossed speech areas disposition may gain a clinically relevant meaning by allowing for more extended tumour removal. Hence, for its identification, diagnostics which take into account both brain hemispheres, such as fMRI, are recommended.

  19. A pilot exploration of speech sound disorder intervention delivered by telehealth to school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan-Johnson, Susan; Gabel, Rodney M; Taylor, Jacquelyn; Rowan, Lynne E; Alvares, Robin; Schenker, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a school-based telehealth service delivery model and reports outcomes made by school-age students with speech sound disorders in a rural Ohio school district. Speech therapy using computer-based speech sound intervention materials was provided either by live interactive videoconferencing (telehealth), or conventional side-by-side intervention. Progress was measured using pre- and post-intervention scores on the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 (Goldman & Fristoe, 2002). Students in both service delivery models made significant improvements in speech sound production, with students in the telehealth condition demonstrating greater mastery of their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals. Live interactive videoconferencing thus appears to be a viable method for delivering intervention for speech sound disorders to children in a rural, public school setting.

  20. Visual Speech Fills in Both Discrimination and Identification of Non-Intact Auditory Speech in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerger, Susan; Damian, Markus F.; McAlpine, Rachel P.; Abdi, Herve

    2018-01-01

    To communicate, children must discriminate and identify speech sounds. Because visual speech plays an important role in this process, we explored how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification by children. Critical items had intact visual speech (e.g. baez) coupled to non-intact (excised onsets) auditory speech (signified…

  1. Coevolution of Human Speech and Trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horan, R.D.; Bulte, E.H.; Shogren, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a paleoeconomic coevolutionary explanation for the origin of speech in modern humans. The coevolutionary process, in which trade facilitates speech and speech facilitates trade, gives rise to multiple stable trajectories. While a `trade-speech¿ equilibrium is not an inevitable outcome for

  2. Automated Speech Rate Measurement in Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Heidi; Dekens, Tomas; Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Latacz, Lukas; Verhelst, Werner; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, a new algorithm for automated determination of speech rate (SR) in dysarthric speech is evaluated. We investigated how reliably the algorithm calculates the SR of dysarthric speech samples when compared with calculation performed by speech-language pathologists. Method: The new algorithm was trained and tested using Dutch…

  3. The "Checkers" Speech and Televised Political Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaningam, Carl

    Richard Nixon's 1952 "Checkers" speech was an innovative use of television for political communication. Like television news itself, the campaign fund crisis behind the speech can be thought of in the same terms as other television melodrama, with the speech serving as its climactic episode. The speech adapted well to television because…

  4. Predicting masking release of lateralized speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabot-Leclerc, Alexandre; MacDonald, Ewen; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Locsei et al. (2015) [Speech in Noise Workshop, Copenhagen, 46] measured ˝ speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in anechoic conditions where the target speech and the maskers were lateralized using interaural time delays. The maskers were speech-shaped noise (SSN) and reversed babble with 2, 4, or 8...

  5. Neural and Behavioral Mechanisms of Clear Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Jenna Silver

    2017-01-01

    Clear speech is a speaking style that has been shown to improve intelligibility in adverse listening conditions, for various listener and talker populations. Clear-speech phonetic enhancements include a slowed speech rate, expanded vowel space, and expanded pitch range. Although clear-speech phonetic enhancements have been demonstrated across a…

  6. Fonoaudiologia e promoção da saúde: relato de experiência baseado em visitas domiciliares Speech therapy and health promotion: an experience report based on domiciliary visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Niegia Garcia de Goulart

    2010-10-01

    . METHODS: from conducting domiciliary visits and interviews with a local inhabitant of each visited home we raised general demands in the process of health and illness, as well as the counseling and referrals for primary care services whenever needed. RESULTS: 30 families were visited, of which 27 have women as the main emotional and financial provider of the family, and none of these women completed primary school. On average there are five residents per household, with at least 2 children and an elderly, ten visited families do not have one permanent job. Children usually attend school regularly. Smoking and high rate of dropouts in adolescence were also commonly mentioned. Among the 63 children living in the visited homes, delays in language and phonological disorders consist of the most commonly mentioned alterations in human communication, as well as the use of a pacifier and / or bottle. Each visit resulted in a brief descriptive report on the findings, as well as referrals and advice were given. Systematical discussions were held in order to review the referrals made by the basic health unit team. CONCLUSIONS: the oral speech therapy related alterations were the most commonly referred to by the visited population, as well as the demand for guidance on the sensory-motor-oral functions. Focus has been place on health promotion and education based on domiciliary visits. The effectiveness of the actions performed should be evaluated.

  7. Speech recovery device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, Christen M.

    2000-10-19

    There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

  8. Speech recovery device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, Christen M.

    2004-04-20

    There is provided an apparatus and method for assisting speech recovery in people with inability to speak due to aphasia, apraxia or another condition with similar effect. A hollow, rigid, thin-walled tube with semi-circular or semi-elliptical cut out shapes at each open end is positioned such that one end mates with the throat/voice box area of the neck of the assistor and the other end mates with the throat/voice box area of the assisted. The speaking person (assistor) makes sounds that produce standing wave vibrations at the same frequency in the vocal cords of the assisted person. Driving the assisted person's vocal cords with the assisted person being able to hear the correct tone enables the assisted person to speak by simply amplifying the vibration of membranes in their throat.

  9. Segmento tardio do desempenho em linguagem de crianças com desvio fonológico após terapia fonológica Late follow-up of language performance of children with phonological disorders after speech therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bolli Mota

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar um acompanhamento tardio do desempenho em habilidades de linguagem de um grupo de estudo com histórico de desvio fonológico (após ter realizado terapia fonológica, comparando-o com um grupo controle. MÉTODOS: Dezoito sujeitos, nove do grupo de estudo e nove do controle, participaram do estudo e foram avaliados quanto à linguagem escrita a partir da aplicação de atividades de compreensão de texto, complementação de sentenças, formação de sentenças, sequencialização de parágrafos e combinação de sentenças que fazem parte do Exame de Linguagem TIPITI. RESULTADOS: Os resultados da pesquisa mostraram correlações estatísticas significantes, positivas e fortes, nas habilidades de linguagem, entre os grupos estudados e, também, diferenças estatisticamente significantes entre o grupo experimental e o grupo controle, na análise do teste Kruskal-Wallis. CONCLUSÃO: Verificou-se que, mesmo após a realização de terapia fonológica e a superação dos desvios, o grupo de estudo apresentou desempenho inferior ao do grupo controle.PURPOSE: To carry out a late follow-up of the performance on language abilities of a study group with history of phonological disorders (after speech therapy, compared to a control group with normal phonological development. METHODS: Eighteen subjects, nine from the study group and nine from the control group, participated in the study and were evaluated on written language, carrying out tasks of text comprehension, sentences complementation, sentences formation, paragraph continuation, and sentences combination, which are part of the TIPITI Language Assessment. RESULTS: The results showed positive and strong statistically significant correlation between the groups regarding the language abilities. Statistically significant differences were also found between study and control groups on the Kruskal-Wallis test. CONCLUSION: It was verified that, even after speech therapy and overcoming

  10. Speech deterioration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after manifestation of bulbar symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Tanja; Ruottinen, Hanna; Puhto, Riitta; Helminen, Mika; Palmio, Johanna

    2018-03-01

    The symptoms and their progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are typically studied after the diagnosis has been confirmed. However, many people with ALS already have severe dysarthria and loss of adequate speech at the time of diagnosis. Speech-and-language therapy interventions should be targeted timely based on communicative need in ALS. To investigate how long natural speech will remain functional and to identify the changes in the speech of persons with ALS. Altogether 30 consecutive participants were studied and divided into two groups based on the initial type of ALS, bulbar or spinal. Their speech disorder was evaluated on severity, articulation rate and intelligibility during the 2-year follow-up. The ability to speak deteriorated to poor and necessitated augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods with 60% of the participants. Their speech remained adequate on average for 18 months from the first bulbar symptom. Severity, articulation rate and intelligibility declined with nearly all participants during the study. To begin with speech deteriorated more in the bulbar group than in the spinal group and the difference remained during the whole follow-up with some exceptions. The onset of bulbar symptoms indicated the time to loss of speech better than when assessed from ALS diagnosis or the first speech therapy evaluation. In clinical work, it is important to take the initial type of ALS into consideration when determining the urgency of AAC measures as people with bulbar-onset ALS are more susceptible to delayed evaluation and AAC intervention. © 2017 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  11. Theater, Speech, Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Vitez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a medium as a substantial translator: an intermediary between the producers and receivers of a communicational act. A medium is a material support to the spiritual potential of human sources. If the medium is a support to meaning, then the relations between different media can be interpreted as a space for making sense of these meanings, a generator of sense: it means that the interaction of substances creates an intermedial space that conceives of a contextualization of specific meaningful elements in order to combine them into the sense of a communicational intervention. The theater itself is multimedia. A theatrical event is a communicational act based on a combination of several autonomous structures: text, scenography, light design, sound, directing, literary interpretation, speech, and, of course, the one that contains all of these: the actor in a human body. The actor is a physical and symbolic, anatomic, and emblematic figure in the synesthetic theatrical act because he reunites in his body all the essential principles and components of theater itself. The actor is an audio-visual being, made of kinetic energy, speech, and human spirit. The actor’s body, as a source, instrument, and goal of the theater, becomes an intersection of sound and light. However, theater as intermedial art is no intermediate practice; it must be seen as interposing bodies between conceivers and receivers, between authors and auditors. The body is not self-evident; the body in contemporary art forms is being redefined as a privilege. The art needs bodily dimensions to explore the medial qualities of substances: because it is alive, it returns to studying biology. The fact that theater is an archaic art form is also the purest promise of its future.

  12. Speech enhancement theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Loizou, Philipos C

    2013-01-01

    With the proliferation of mobile devices and hearing devices, including hearing aids and cochlear implants, there is a growing and pressing need to design algorithms that can improve speech intelligibility without sacrificing quality. Responding to this need, Speech Enhancement: Theory and Practice, Second Edition introduces readers to the basic problems of speech enhancement and the various algorithms proposed to solve these problems. Updated and expanded, this second edition of the bestselling textbook broadens its scope to include evaluation measures and enhancement algorithms aimed at impr

  13. Computational neuroanatomy of speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickok, Gregory

    2012-01-05

    Speech production has been studied predominantly from within two traditions, psycholinguistics and motor control. These traditions have rarely interacted, and the resulting chasm between these approaches seems to reflect a level of analysis difference: whereas motor control is concerned with lower-level articulatory control, psycholinguistics focuses on higher-level linguistic processing. However, closer examination of both approaches reveals a substantial convergence of ideas. The goal of this article is to integrate psycholinguistic and motor control approaches to speech production. The result of this synthesis is a neuroanatomically grounded, hierarchical state feedback control model of speech production.

  14. Visual speech influences speech perception immediately but not automatically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, Holger; Reinisch, Eva

    2017-02-01

    Two experiments examined the time course of the use of auditory and visual speech cues to spoken word recognition using an eye-tracking paradigm. Results of the first experiment showed that the use of visual speech cues from lipreading is reduced if concurrently presented pictures require a division of attentional resources. This reduction was evident even when listeners' eye gaze was on the speaker rather than the (static) pictures. Experiment 2 used a deictic hand gesture to foster attention to the speaker. At the same time, the visual processing load was reduced by keeping the visual display constant over a fixed number of successive trials. Under these conditions, the visual speech cues from lipreading were used. Moreover, the eye-tracking data indicated that visual information was used immediately and even earlier than auditory information. In combination, these data indicate that visual speech cues are not used automatically, but if they are used, they are used immediately.

  15. INTEGRATING MACHINE TRANSLATION AND SPEECH SYNTHESIS COMPONENT FOR ENGLISH TO DRAVIDIAN LANGUAGE SPEECH TO SPEECH TRANSLATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. SANGEETHA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an interface between the machine translation and speech synthesis system for converting English speech to Tamil text in English to Tamil speech to speech translation system. The speech translation system consists of three modules: automatic speech recognition, machine translation and text to speech synthesis. Many procedures for incorporation of speech recognition and machine translation have been projected. Still speech synthesis system has not yet been measured. In this paper, we focus on integration of machine translation and speech synthesis, and report a subjective evaluation to investigate the impact of speech synthesis, machine translation and the integration of machine translation and speech synthesis components. Here we implement a hybrid machine translation (combination of rule based and statistical machine translation and concatenative syllable based speech synthesis technique. In order to retain the naturalness and intelligibility of synthesized speech Auto Associative Neural Network (AANN prosody prediction is used in this work. The results of this system investigation demonstrate that the naturalness and intelligibility of the synthesized speech are strongly influenced by the fluency and correctness of the translated text.

  16. Towards a Definition: What Does "Health Promotion" Mean to Speech and Language Therapists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Morag; Spence, William

    2012-01-01

    Background: As UK healthcare moves towards the ideals of prevention and enablement, health promotion is more commonly cited as an area of practice. In comparison with its allied health profession peers, physiotherapy and occupational therapy, the speech and language therapy profession has little evidence to demonstrate that it has explored what…

  17. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  18. Assessing the treatment effects in apraxia of speech : introduction and evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple

  19. Comprehension of synthetic speech and digitized natural speech by adults with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hux, Karen; Knollman-Porter, Kelly; Brown, Jessica; Wallace, Sarah E

    2017-09-01

    Using text-to-speech technology to provide simultaneous written and auditory content presentation may help compensate for chronic reading challenges if people with aphasia can understand synthetic speech output; however, inherent auditory comprehension challenges experienced by people with aphasia may make understanding synthetic speech difficult. This study's purpose was to compare the preferences and auditory comprehension accuracy of people with aphasia when listening to sentences generated with digitized natural speech, Alex synthetic speech (i.e., Macintosh platform), or David synthetic speech (i.e., Windows platform). The methodology required each of 20 participants with aphasia to select one of four images corresponding in meaning to each of 60 sentences comprising three stimulus sets. Results revealed significantly better accuracy given digitized natural speech than either synthetic speech option; however, individual participant performance analyses revealed three patterns: (a) comparable accuracy regardless of speech condition for 30% of participants, (b) comparable accuracy between digitized natural speech and one, but not both, synthetic speech option for 45% of participants, and (c) greater accuracy with digitized natural speech than with either synthetic speech option for remaining participants. Ranking and Likert-scale rating data revealed a preference for digitized natural speech and David synthetic speech over Alex synthetic speech. Results suggest many individuals with aphasia can comprehend synthetic speech options available on popular operating systems. Further examination of synthetic speech use to support reading comprehension through text-to-speech technology is thus warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intervenção fonoaudiológica em recém-nascido pré-termo: estimulação oromotora e sucção não-nutritiva Preterm newborns speech therapy: oromotor stimulation and non-nutritive sucking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Fernanda Bernal Calado

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: intervenção fonoaudiológica em recém-nascido pré-termo, com uso das técnicas de estimulação oromotora e sucção não-nutritiva. PROCEDIMENTOS: participaram da intervenção fonoaudiológica dois recém-nascidos gemelares com idade gestacional corrigida de 35 semanas e 2/7 dias. Foi realizada a avaliação fonoaudiológica para verificar a prontidão do prematuro para o início da alimentação por via oral e a eficiência da alimentação por via oral por meio das relações: volume aceito pelo volume total prescrito e volume aceito pelo tempo de aceitação da dieta. Posteriormente foi sorteada a técnica que cada recém-nascido receberia. RN1 recebeu a técnica de estimulação oromotora e o RN2 recebeu a técnica de sucção não-nutritiva. Em seguida, receberam 10 sessões de terapia fonoaudiológica e foram reavaliados. RESULTADOS: após as sessões de estimulação os recém-nascidos apresentaram melhora nos reflexos orais e no padrão de sucção não nutritiva e melhoraram no aproveitamento da dieta oral. CONCLUSÃO: ambos os recém-nascidos foram beneficiados com a intervenção fonoaudiológica.BACKGROUND: Preterm Newborns speech therapy with the use of oromotor stimulation and non-nutritive sucking. PROCEDURES: two Twin Newborns took part in this speech therapy with corrected gestational age of 35 weeks and 2/7 days. The clinical speech assessment was performed in order to check the premature readiness for the beginning of oral feeding and the efficiency of oral feeding by some relations such as the accepted volume by the total prescribed volume and the accepted volume by the time of the diet acceptance. Later on we picked up the technique that each newborn would receive. The First newborn got the oromotor stimulation and the second newborn has got the non-nutritive sucking technique. They went 10 (ten sessions each and have been revaluated. RESULTS: after the stimulation procedures both newborns showed improvement in

  1. The Benefit of Movement: Dance/Movement Therapy and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Chloe M.

    2016-01-01

    There are various forms of therapies for children with disabilities, including physical therapy, speech therapy, and alternative therapies such as music and dance therapy. Each form of therapy has its benefits for those with disabilities, but ultimately the success of the therapy rests on the attention paid to the individual. Especially for…

  2. Evaluation of pitch coding alternatives for vibrotactile stimulation in speech training of the deaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbacena, I L; Barros, A T; Freire, R C S; Vieira, E C A

    2007-01-01

    Use of vibrotactile feedback stimulation as an aid for speech vocalization by the hearing impaired or deaf is reviewed. Architecture of a vibrotactile based speech therapy system is proposed. Different formulations for encoding the fundamental frequency of the vocalized speech into the pulsed stimulation frequency are proposed and investigated. Simulation results are also presented to obtain a comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of the different formulated transformations. Results of the perception sensitivity to the vibrotactile stimulus frequency to verify effectiveness of the above transformations are included

  3. Temporal plasticity in auditory cortex improves neural discrimination of speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T; Shetake, Jai A; Engineer, Navzer D; Vrana, Will A; Wolf, Jordan T; Kilgard, Michael P

    Many individuals with language learning impairments exhibit temporal processing deficits and degraded neural responses to speech sounds. Auditory training can improve both the neural and behavioral deficits, though significant deficits remain. Recent evidence suggests that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with rehabilitative therapies enhances both cortical plasticity and recovery of normal function. We predicted that pairing VNS with rapid tone trains would enhance the primary auditory cortex (A1) response to unpaired novel speech sounds. VNS was paired with tone trains 300 times per day for 20 days in adult rats. Responses to isolated speech sounds, compressed speech sounds, word sequences, and compressed word sequences were recorded in A1 following the completion of VNS-tone train pairing. Pairing VNS with rapid tone trains resulted in stronger, faster, and more discriminable A1 responses to speech sounds presented at conversational rates. This study extends previous findings by documenting that VNS paired with rapid tone trains altered the neural response to novel unpaired speech sounds. Future studies are necessary to determine whether pairing VNS with appropriate auditory stimuli could potentially be used to improve both neural responses to speech sounds and speech perception in individuals with receptive language disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial localization of speech segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Brian Lykkegaard

    1999-01-01

    Much is known about human localization of simple stimuli like sinusoids, clicks, broadband noise and narrowband noise in quiet. Less is known about human localization in noise. Even less is known about localization of speech and very few previous studies have reported data from localization...... of speech in noise. This study attempts to answer the question: ``Are there certain features of speech which have an impact on the human ability to determine the spatial location of a speaker in the horizontal plane under adverse noise conditions?''. The study consists of an extensive literature survey...... the task of the experiment. The psychoacoustical experiment used naturally-spoken Danish consonant-vowel combinations as targets presented in diffuse speech-shaped noise at a peak SNR of -10 dB. The subjects were normal hearing persons. The experiment took place in an anechoic chamber where eight...

  5. Censored: Whistleblowers and impossible speech

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Kate

    2017-01-01

    What happens to a person who speaks out about corruption in their organization, and finds themselves excluded from their profession? In this article, I argue that whistleblowers experience exclusions because they have engaged in ‘impossible speech’, that is, a speech act considered to be unacceptable or illegitimate. Drawing on Butler’s theories of recognition and censorship, I show how norms of acceptable speech working through recruitment practices, alongside the actions of colleagues, can ...

  6. Identifying Deceptive Speech Across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-25

    collection of deceptive and non-deceptive speech recorded from interviews between native speaker of Mandarin and of English instructed to answer...report, such as final, technical, interim, memorandum, master’s thesis, progress , quarterly, research, special, group study, etc. 3. DATES COVERED...non-deceptive speech recorded from interviews between native speaker of Mandarin and of English and are currently completing the use of this data to

  7. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Doubé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate “Correct”/”Incorrect” feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a “Wizard of Oz” experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human “Wizard” will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children.

  8. Comparing Feedback Types in Multimedia Learning of Speech by Young Children With Common Speech Sound Disorders: Research Protocol for a Pretest Posttest Independent Measures Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubé, Wendy; Carding, Paul; Flanagan, Kieran; Kaufman, Jordy; Armitage, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    Children with speech sound disorders benefit from feedback about the accuracy of sounds they make. Home practice can reinforce feedback received from speech pathologists. Games in mobile device applications could encourage home practice, but those currently available are of limited value because they are unlikely to elaborate "Correct"/"Incorrect" feedback with information that can assist in improving the accuracy of the sound. This protocol proposes a "Wizard of Oz" experiment that aims to provide evidence for the provision of effective multimedia feedback for speech sound development. Children with two common speech sound disorders will play a game on a mobile device and make speech sounds when prompted by the game. A human "Wizard" will provide feedback on the accuracy of the sound but the children will perceive the feedback as coming from the game. Groups of 30 young children will be randomly allocated to one of five conditions: four types of feedback and a control which does not play the game. The results of this experiment will inform not only speech sound therapy, but also other types of language learning, both in general, and in multimedia applications. This experiment is a cost-effective precursor to the development of a mobile application that employs pedagogically and clinically sound processes for speech development in young children.

  9. Exploring Australian speech-language pathologists' use and perceptions ofnon-speech oral motor exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F; Rose, Tanya A; Cheah, Mynn

    2018-01-29

    To explore Australian speech-language pathologists' use of non-speech oral motor exercises, and rationales for using/not using non-speech oral motor exercises in clinical practice. A total of 124 speech-language pathologists practising in Australia, working with paediatric and/or adult clients with speech sound difficulties, completed an online survey. The majority of speech-language pathologists reported that they did not use non-speech oral motor exercises when working with paediatric or adult clients with speech sound difficulties. However, more than half of the speech-language pathologists working with adult clients who have dysarthria reported using non-speech oral motor exercises with this population. The most frequently reported rationale for using non-speech oral motor exercises in speech sound difficulty management was to improve awareness/placement of articulators. The majority of speech-language pathologists agreed there is no clear clinical or research evidence base to support non-speech oral motor exercise use with clients who have speech sound difficulties. This study provides an overview of Australian speech-language pathologists' reported use and perceptions of non-speech oral motor exercises' applicability and efficacy in treating paediatric and adult clients who have speech sound difficulties. The research findings provide speech-language pathologists with insight into how and why non-speech oral motor exercises are currently used, and adds to the knowledge base regarding Australian speech-language pathology practice of non-speech oral motor exercises in the treatment of speech sound difficulties. Implications for Rehabilitation Non-speech oral motor exercises refer to oral motor activities which do not involve speech, but involve the manipulation or stimulation of oral structures including the lips, tongue, jaw, and soft palate. Non-speech oral motor exercises are intended to improve the function (e.g., movement, strength) of oral structures. The

  10. Enhancement of speech signals - with a focus on voiced speech models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Sidsel Marie

    This thesis deals with speech enhancement, i.e., noise reduction in speech signals. This has applications in, e.g., hearing aids and teleconference systems. We consider a signal-driven approach to speech enhancement where a model of the speech is assumed and filters are generated based on this mo......This thesis deals with speech enhancement, i.e., noise reduction in speech signals. This has applications in, e.g., hearing aids and teleconference systems. We consider a signal-driven approach to speech enhancement where a model of the speech is assumed and filters are generated based...

  11. Novel Techniques for Dialectal Arabic Speech Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Elmahdy, Mohamed; Minker, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Novel Techniques for Dialectal Arabic Speech describes approaches to improve automatic speech recognition for dialectal Arabic. Since speech resources for dialectal Arabic speech recognition are very sparse, the authors describe how existing Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) speech data can be applied to dialectal Arabic speech recognition, while assuming that MSA is always a second language for all Arabic speakers. In this book, Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (ECA) has been chosen as a typical Arabic dialect. ECA is the first ranked Arabic dialect in terms of number of speakers, and a high quality ECA speech corpus with accurate phonetic transcription has been collected. MSA acoustic models were trained using news broadcast speech. In order to cross-lingually use MSA in dialectal Arabic speech recognition, the authors have normalized the phoneme sets for MSA and ECA. After this normalization, they have applied state-of-the-art acoustic model adaptation techniques like Maximum Likelihood Linear Regression (MLLR) and M...

  12. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti eAdank

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006. Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented speech, are beginning to be identified. This review will outline neural bases associated with perception of accented speech in the light of current models of speech perception, and compare these data to brain areas associated with processing other speech distortions. We will subsequently evaluate competing models of speech processing with regards to neural processing of accented speech. See Cristia et al. (2012 for an in-depth overview of behavioural aspects of accent processing.

  13. Tactile Modulation of Emotional Speech Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Salminen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally only speech communicates emotions via mobile phone. However, in daily communication the sense of touch mediates emotional information during conversation. The present aim was to study if tactile stimulation affects emotional ratings of speech when measured with scales of pleasantness, arousal, approachability, and dominance. In the Experiment 1 participants rated speech-only and speech-tactile stimuli. The tactile signal mimicked the amplitude changes of the speech. In the Experiment 2 the aim was to study whether the way the tactile signal was produced affected the ratings. The tactile signal either mimicked the amplitude changes of the speech sample in question, or the amplitude changes of another speech sample. Also, concurrent static vibration was included. The results showed that the speech-tactile stimuli were rated as more arousing and dominant than the speech-only stimuli. The speech-only stimuli were rated as more approachable than the speech-tactile stimuli, but only in the Experiment 1. Variations in tactile stimulation also affected the ratings. When the tactile stimulation was static vibration the speech-tactile stimuli were rated as more arousing than when the concurrent tactile stimulation was mimicking speech samples. The results suggest that tactile stimulation offers new ways of modulating and enriching the interpretation of speech.

  14. Análise da produção científica fonoaudiológica nacional sobre gagueira Analysis of speech and language therapy national scientific production on stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Alberti Pascoal de Lima Damasceno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a produção científica fonoaudiológica nacional no que diz respeito à gagueira, entre os anos de 1980 a 2008, considerando: período da publicação; distribuição de frequência por período; tipos de publicação; temáticas abordadas; vertente epistemológica e área da Fonoaudiologia a que o trabalho pertence. MÉTODOS: seleção e análise de publicações em livros, capítulos de livros e periódicos nacionais de Fonoaudiologia. RESULTADOS: foram encontradas 131 publicações: estando 0,8% na década de 80; 15,2% na de 90; e 84% no período de 2000-2008. Quanto ao tipo formam publicados, 8,4% em livros, 42% de capítulos de livro e 49,6% de periódicos. Quanto às temáticas, foram mais frequentes: "Clínica Fonoaudiológica" (50%; "Reflexões Teóricas" (9,4%; "Características da Fluência" (7,2%; "Gagueira e Audição" (5,8%; "Atitudes em Relação à Gagueira" (5,2%; "Origem da Gagueira" (5,2% e "Características da Gagueira" (4,4%. Quanto à vertente epistemológica, 74% era positivista, 22,2% dialético histórica e 3,8% fenomenológica. As áreas fonoaudiológicas mais encontradas foram: Motricidade Orofacial (37,4%, Linguagem (34,3% e Nenhuma das Áreas Fonoaudiológicas (25,2%. CONCLUSÃO: a produção pesquisada teve o crescimento mais expressivo de 2000 a 2008. O fato de a produção encontrar-se principalmente na forma de artigos e capítulos de livros revela interesse tanto em pesquisa como na construção de teoria. A presença das três vertentes epistemológicas indica que o tema gagueira é controverso e complexo, isso é indicado também pelo fato de a produção distribuir-se pelas áreas de Motricidade Orofacial e Linguagem. Há necessidade de desenvolver a produção na área da Saúde Pública.PURPOSE: to analyze the Brazilian Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences production on stuttering, between the years 1980 and 2008, considering the: publication period; distribution per period; types of

  15. Attitudes of Turkish speech and language therapists toward stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maviş, Ilknur; St Louis, Kenneth O; Özdemir, Sertan; Toğram, Bülent

    2013-06-01

    The study sought to identify clinical beliefs and attitudes of speech and language therapists (SLTs) in Turkey and to compare them to previous research on SLTs in the USA and UK. The Clinician Attitudes Toward Stuttering (CATS) inventory was administered by mail to nearly all-practicing SLTs in Turkey (n=61). Turkish SLTs, whose caseloads contained a substantial number of people who stutter, agreed with CATS items suggesting psychological causes and problems for those who stutter. They strongly believed therapy should focus on parent counseling for preschoolers who stutter as well as adolescents. They were not optimistic about carrying out stuttering therapy nor about the likelihood that children who stutter could be effectively treated. Attitudes toward stuttering by clinicians who treat them are important considerations in the conduct and outcomes of stuttering therapy. Additionally, SLTs working with stuttering clients should benefit from professional views and clinical experiences of their colleagues from surveys such as this one. The reader will be able to describe: (a) the components of the CATS, (b) common themes in Turkish speech and language therapists' attitudes toward stuttering, (c) differences between the attitudes of speech and language therapists from Turkey versus the United States and the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental comparison between speech transmission index, rapid speech transmission index, and speech intelligibility index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larm, Petra; Hongisto, Valtteri

    2006-02-01

    During the acoustical design of, e.g., auditoria or open-plan offices, it is important to know how speech can be perceived in various parts of the room. Different objective methods have been developed to measure and predict speech intelligibility, and these have been extensively used in various spaces. In this study, two such methods were compared, the speech transmission index (STI) and the speech intelligibility index (SII). Also the simplification of the STI, the room acoustics speech transmission index (RASTI), was considered. These quantities are all based on determining an apparent speech-to-noise ratio on selected frequency bands and summing them using a specific weighting. For comparison, some data were needed on the possible differences of these methods resulting from the calculation scheme and also measuring equipment. Their prediction accuracy was also of interest. Measurements were made in a laboratory having adjustable noise level and absorption, and in a real auditorium. It was found that the measurement equipment, especially the selection of the loudspeaker, can greatly affect the accuracy of the results. The prediction accuracy of the RASTI was found acceptable, if the input values for the prediction are accurately known, even though the studied space was not ideally diffuse.

  17. Neural pathways for visual speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne E Bernstein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the questions, what levels of speech can be perceived visually, and how is visual speech represented by the brain? Review of the literature leads to the conclusions that every level of psycholinguistic speech structure (i.e., phonetic features, phonemes, syllables, words, and prosody can be perceived visually, although individuals differ in their abilities to do so; and that there are visual modality-specific representations of speech qua speech in higher-level vision brain areas. That is, the visual system represents the modal patterns of visual speech. The suggestion that the auditory speech pathway receives and represents visual speech is examined in light of neuroimaging evidence on the auditory speech pathways. We outline the generally agreed-upon organization of the visual ventral and dorsal pathways and examine several types of visual processing that might be related to speech through those pathways, specifically, face and body, orthography, and sign language processing. In this context, we examine the visual speech processing literature, which reveals widespread diverse patterns activity in posterior temporal cortices in response to visual speech stimuli. We outline a model of the visual and auditory speech pathways and make several suggestions: (1 The visual perception of speech relies on visual pathway representations of speech qua speech. (2 A proposed site of these representations, the temporal visual speech area (TVSA has been demonstrated in posterior temporal cortex, ventral and posterior to multisensory posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS. (3 Given that visual speech has dynamic and configural features, its representations in feedforward visual pathways are expected to integrate these features, possibly in TVSA.

  18. Atuação fonoaudiológica na estimulação precoce da sucção não-nutritiva em recém-nascidos pré-termo Action of speech therapy on early stimulation of non-nutritive sucking in preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisse Taliane Lira Moura

    2009-01-01

    for comparison: birth weight, total days in high-risk, total days in medium risk, tonus, weight-gain, length of speech therapy intervention and hospital discharge. The babies were treated in the ICU of Hospital Regional de Taguatinga in Brasilia / DF. RESULTS: the first newborn (RN1 spent 19 days in high risk, the RN2 spent three days and RN3, four days. The stimulation sucking of RN1 was delayed, because of the several days in high risk, where there is no speech therapy activity. It was difficult for the RN1 to develop its suction reflex and RN1 was discharged with the aid of bank milk. RN2 and RN3 were discharged performing effective suction at mother breast without any recommendation. CONCLUSION: data obtained in this study point out to the effectiveness of speech therapy intervention with respect to early stimulation of sucking in preterm newborn, being related to hospital discharge and to overall development of the newborn. The early stimulation of speech therapy in preterm newborn infants is a key-factor for an effective, pleasant and functional feed in the maternal breast. Besides providing a greater link between mother and baby while in hospital, speech therapy may promote time reduction a for hospital discharge.

  19. Atuação fonoaudiológica na síndrome da apnéia e hipopnéia obstrutiva do sono: relato de caso Speech therapy in the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Maria de Paula Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a contribuição da Fonoaudiologia no tratamento de uma paciente com a síndrome da apnéia e hipopnéia obstrutiva do sono. MÉTODOS: relato de caso de um paciente do sexo feminino, de sessenta anos de idade, com a síndrome da apnéia e hipopnéia do sono, de grau grave, que se submeteu ao atendimento fonoaudiológico para melhora do quadro de apnéia/hipopnéia, ronco e cansaço diurno. Foram realizadas avaliação clínica de motricidade orofacial e polissonografia antes e após a fonoterapia. Com base na avaliação clínica foi elaborado um plano terapêutico que buscou propiciar à paciente relaxamento cervical e da musculatura supra-hióidea, melhora na aeração nasal, adequação do posicionamento e força de língua, fortalecimento dos músculos do palato mole e sua mobilidade, aumento de força da musculatura mastigatória, treino da mastigação bilateral alternada e abaixamento do osso hióide. RESULTADOS: após 12 sessões de terapia fonoaudiológica, com duração de 40 minutos cada, pôde-se observar diminuição da tensão cervical, relaxamento da musculatura supra-hióidea, adequação do posicionamento do osso hióide, língua normotensa com dorso rebaixado, palato mole com mobilidade normal e mastigação adequada. A paciente relatou importante melhora no cansaço diurno. O resultado da segunda polissonografia indicou diminuição de 44 para 3 eventos por hora de apnéia e hipopnéia durante o sono, tendo o quadro passado do nível grave a um índice de distúrbio respiratório baixo não mais caracterizando doença apnéica do sono. CONCLUSÃO: a fonoterapia foi eficaz para o tratamento deste caso de síndrome da apnéia e hipopnéia do sono.Purpose: to check the contribution of speech therapy in the treatment of a patient with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. METHODS: case description of a sixty-year old, female patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome that underwent

  20. Prediction of speech intelligibility based on an auditory preprocessing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus Forup Corlin; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Classical speech intelligibility models, such as the speech transmission index (STI) and the speech intelligibility index (SII) are based on calculations on the physical acoustic signals. The present study predicts speech intelligibility by combining a psychoacoustically validated model of auditory...

  1. Contextual variability during speech-in-speech recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Susanne; Bradlow, Ann R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the influence of background language variation on speech recognition. English listeners performed an English sentence recognition task in either "pure" background conditions in which all trials had either English or Dutch background babble or in mixed background conditions in which the background language varied across trials (i.e., a mix of English and Dutch or one of these background languages mixed with quiet trials). This design allowed the authors to compare performance on identical trials across pure and mixed conditions. The data reveal that speech-in-speech recognition is sensitive to contextual variation in terms of the target-background language (mis)match depending on the relative ease/difficulty of the test trials in relation to the surrounding trials.

  2. Voice Activity Detection. Fundamentals and Speech Recognition System Robustness

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, J.; Gorriz, J. M.; Segura, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter has shown an overview of the main challenges in robust speech detection and a review of the state of the art and applications. VADs are frequently used in a number of applications including speech coding, speech enhancement and speech recognition. A precise VAD extracts a set of discriminative speech features from the noisy speech and formulates the decision in terms of well defined rule. The chapter has summarized three robust VAD methods that yield high speech/non-speech discri...

  3. If it quacks like a duck: reviewing health care providers' speech restrictions under the first prong of Central Hudson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Shawn L

    2013-01-01

    The First Amendment protects the speech of health care providers. This protection can limit states' abilities to protect patients from harmful therapies involving speech, such as sexual orientation change efforts. Because providers' speech is more similar to commercial speech than traditional political discourse, it is possible to create a First Amendment review analysis that better balances states' police powers with providers' First Amendment rights. Under a "single-prong" approach, the first prong of Central Hudson can be used to identify quackery, which is analogous to false or misleading commercial speech and would therefore be outside the protection of the First Amendment. Because health care must be tailored to individual patients, restrictions on speech that survive the first prong of Central Hudson would be subject to strict scrutiny in order to leave the therapeutic decision to the provider and her patient, and maintain consistency with current jurisprudence. This Comment examines litigation from California's attempted ban on sexual orientation change therapy to illustrate the conflicts created by the current approach to First Amendment review of health care provider speech. This Comment then demonstrates the benefit of the proposed single-prong approach, including how it simultaneously protects patients from harm while protecting health care providers' speech.

  4. Management of developmental speech and language disorders: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Anne; Bremner, Lynne

    2016-03-01

    The identification of developmental problems in a child's acquisition of speech, language and/or communication is a core activity in child surveillance. These are common difficulties with up to 15% of toddlers being 'late talkers' and 7% of children entering school with persisting impairments of their language development. These delays can confer disadvantages in the long term, adversely affecting language, cognition, academic attainment, behaviour and mental health. All children presenting with significant speech and language delay should be investigated with a comprehensive hearing assessment and be considered for speech and language therapy assessment. Socioeconomic adversity correlates with delayed language development. Clinical assessment should confirm that the presentation is definitely not acquired (see part 2) and will also guide whether the difficulty is primary, in which there are often familial patterns, or secondary, from a very wide range of aetiologies. Symptoms may be salient, such as the regression of communication in language difficulty itself is the realm of the speech and language therapist, who has an ever-increasing evidence-based choice of interventions. This should take place within a multidisciplinary team, particularly for children with more severe conditions who may benefit from individualised parental and educational supports. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Speech Inconsistency in Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Language Impairment, and Speech Delay: Depends on the Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzini-Seigel, Jenya; Hogan, Tiffany P.; Green, Jordan R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The current research sought to determine (a) if speech inconsistency is a core feature of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) or if it is driven by comorbid language impairment that affects a large subset of children with CAS and (b) if speech inconsistency is a sensitive and specific diagnostic marker that can differentiate between CAS and…

  6. Represented Speech in Qualitative Health Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Represented speech refers to speech where we reference somebody. Represented speech is an important phenomenon in everyday conversation, health care communication, and qualitative research. This case will draw first from a case study on physicians’ workplace learning and second from a case study...... on nurses’ apprenticeship learning. The aim of the case is to guide the qualitative researcher to use own and others’ voices in the interview and to be sensitive to represented speech in everyday conversation. Moreover, reported speech matters to health professionals who aim to represent the voice...... of their patients. Qualitative researchers and students might learn to encourage interviewees to elaborate different voices or perspectives. Qualitative researchers working with natural speech might pay attention to how people talk and use represented speech. Finally, represented speech might be relevant...

  7. Speech Recognition: Its Place in Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szul, Linda F.; Bouder, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Suggests uses of speech recognition devices in the classroom for students with disabilities. Compares speech recognition software packages and provides guidelines for selection and teaching. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  8. Speech input interfaces for anaesthesia records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    Speech recognition as a medical transcript tool is now common in hospitals and is steadily increasing......Speech recognition as a medical transcript tool is now common in hospitals and is steadily increasing...

  9. Modeling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    by the normal as well as impaired auditory system. Jørgensen and Dau [(2011). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 1475-1487] proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII......) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech. Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting...... the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well as noisy speech processed by spectral subtraction. However, the sEPSM cannot account for speech subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of speech is destroyed, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast...

  10. Perceived Liveliness and Speech Comprehensibility in Aphasia: The Effects of Direct Speech in Auditory Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewold, Rimke; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Nickels, Lyndsey; Huiskes, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that in semi-spontaneous speech, individuals with Broca's and anomic aphasia produce relatively many direct speech constructions. It has been claimed that in "healthy" communication direct speech constructions contribute to the liveliness, and indirectly to the comprehensibility, of speech.…

  11. The Role of Visual Speech Information in Supporting Perceptual Learning of Degraded Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Rachel V.; Johnsrude, Ingrid S.

    2012-01-01

    Following cochlear implantation, hearing-impaired listeners must adapt to speech as heard through their prosthesis. Visual speech information (VSI; the lip and facial movements of speech) is typically available in everyday conversation. Here, we investigate whether learning to understand a popular auditory simulation of speech as transduced by a…

  12. Common neural substrates support speech and non-speech vocal tract gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Kenney, Mary Kay; Loucks, Torrey M J; Poletto, Christopher J; Ludlow, Christy L

    2009-08-01

    The issue of whether speech is supported by the same neural substrates as non-speech vocal tract gestures has been contentious. In this fMRI study we tested whether producing non-speech vocal tract gestures in humans shares the same functional neuroanatomy as non-sense speech syllables. Production of non-speech vocal tract gestures, devoid of phonological content but similar to speech in that they had familiar acoustic and somatosensory targets, was compared to the production of speech syllables without meaning. Brain activation related to overt production was captured with BOLD fMRI using a sparse sampling design for both conditions. Speech and non-speech were compared using voxel-wise whole brain analyses, and ROI analyses focused on frontal and temporoparietal structures previously reported to support speech production. Results showed substantial activation overlap between speech and non-speech function in regions. Although non-speech gesture production showed greater extent and amplitude of activation in the regions examined, both speech and non-speech showed comparable left laterality in activation for both target perception and production. These findings posit a more general role of the previously proposed "auditory dorsal stream" in the left hemisphere--to support the production of vocal tract gestures that are not limited to speech processing.

  13. Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Jennifer; Iuzzini-Seigel, Jenya; Cabbage, Kathryn; Green, Jordan R.; Hogan, Tiffany P.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is hypothesized to arise from deficits in speech motor planning and programming, but the influence of abnormal speech perception in CAS on these processes is debated. This study examined speech perception abilities among children with CAS with and without language impairment compared to those with…

  14. Motor Speech Phenotypes of Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, and Progressive Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Matthew L.; Brodtmann, Amy; Darby, David; Vogel, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to create a comprehensive review of speech impairment in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive apraxia of speech in order to identify the most effective measures for diagnosis and monitoring, and to elucidate associations between speech and neuroimaging. Method: Speech and…

  15. Listeners Experience Linguistic Masking Release in Noise-Vocoded Speech-in-Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Navin; Kokkinakis, Kostas; Williams, Brittany T.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether listeners with normal hearing perceiving noise-vocoded speech-in-speech demonstrate better intelligibility of target speech when the background speech was mismatched in language (linguistic release from masking [LRM]) and/or location (spatial release from masking [SRM]) relative to the…

  16. Visual context enhanced. The joint contribution of iconic gestures and visible speech to degraded speech comprehension.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijvers, L.; Özyürek, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated whether and to what extent iconic co-speech gestures contribute to information from visible speech to enhance degraded speech comprehension at different levels of noise-vocoding. Previous studies of the contributions of these 2 visual articulators to speech

  17. Inner Speech's Relationship with Overt Speech in Poststroke Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Brielle C.; Geva, Sharon; Warburton, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Relatively preserved inner speech alongside poor overt speech has been documented in some persons with aphasia (PWA), but the relationship of overt speech with inner speech is still largely unclear, as few studies have directly investigated these factors. The present study investigates the relationship of relatively preserved inner speech…

  18. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  19. THE ONTOGENESIS OF SPEECH DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Braudo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to acquaint the specialists, working with children having developmental disorders, with age-related norms for speech development. Many well-known linguists and psychologists studied speech ontogenesis (logogenesis. Speech is a higher mental function, which integrates many functional systems. Speech development in infants during the first months after birth is ensured by the innate hearing and emerging ability to fix the gaze on the face of an adult. Innate emotional reactions are also being developed during this period, turning into nonverbal forms of communication. At about 6 months a baby starts to pronounce some syllables; at 7–9 months – repeats various sounds combinations, pronounced by adults. At 10–11 months a baby begins to react on the words, referred to him/her. The first words usually appear at an age of 1 year; this is the start of the stage of active speech development. At this time it is acceptable, if a child confuses or rearranges sounds, distorts or misses them. By the age of 1.5 years a child begins to understand abstract explanations of adults. Significant vocabulary enlargement occurs between 2 and 3 years; grammatical structures of the language are being formed during this period (a child starts to use phrases and sentences. Preschool age (3–7 y. o. is characterized by incorrect, but steadily improving pronunciation of sounds and phonemic perception. The vocabulary increases; abstract speech and retelling are being formed. Children over 7 y. o. continue to improve grammar, writing and reading skills. The described stages may not have strict age boundaries, as soon as they are dependent not only on environment, but also on the child’s mental constitution, heredity and character.

  20. Speech-language performance in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuijkschot, Joris; Maassen, Ben; Gorter, Jan Willem; Gerven, Marjo van; Willemsen, Michèl

    2009-04-01

    To describe speech-language pathology in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) in relation to their cognitive and motor impairment. Observational case series. Cognitive functioning was assessed in 16 patients with SLS (nine males; seven females) using different neuropsychological tests. Speech-language pathology was studied focusing on dysarthria, oral motor functioning, speech intelligibility and language development. Potential correlations between speech-language pathology and other neurological symptoms (e.g. spasticity) were studied. The median cognitive developmental age was 5;8 (n = 13; range 3;5-8;0) years. A variable degree of mainly pseudobulbar dysarthria was found. Speech intelligibility was influenced by dysarthria, but was also related to language pathology. No correlation between motor functioning and dysarthria or cognitive development was observed. Dysarthria and language problems are important factors in daily life functioning of patients with SLS. Based upon the clinical profile found, early speech-language therapy is recommended in order to optimize their speech-language development.