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Sample records for intestinal radiation death

  1. Physiological Mechanisms of Acute Intestinal Radiation Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Radiation Death 18 3 1 A eutron 19 ABSTRACT (Contfnuo on rlvorJ of re.•u•ldy ,d d..nfflfy by blo*,t ftmO,) e overall objective was to claikUTyhe role...neutron kerma rates. These changes are attributable to attenuation of neutrons and the production of gamma rays by thermal neutroncapture by hydrogen in...but also injuries from blast and thermal effects. These non-ionizing radiation traumas can result in sequestering large amounts of fluid and

  2. Physiological mechanisms of acute intestinal radiation death. Technical report, 1 June 1983-1 June 1986

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    Jackson, K.L.; Geraci, J.P.

    1986-06-01

    The overall objective was to clarify the role of fluid and electrolyte loss, bile-duct ligation, radiation-damaged intestinal mucosa, bacterial toxemia and their interrelationships on radiation-induced gastrointestinal death. Using specific pathogen-free CD-1 male rats, this study found that endogenous enteric bacteria did not play a significant role in pure intestinal radiation death. Bile acids, per se, were shown to play little role in intestinal radiation death, but the inability of the denuded mucosa to absorb fluid and electrolytes, thereby producing hypovolemic shock, was the major mechanism.

  3. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death.

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    Matsuzaki-Horibuchi, Shiori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Nagako; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries.

  4. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

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    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  5. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

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    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  6. Brain death causes structural and inflammatory changes in donor intestine

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    Koudstaal, L.G.; 't Hart, Marieke; van den Berg, Anke; Olinga, Peter; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, R.J; Leuvenink, H.G.

    2005-01-01

    Brain death donors are frequently used for transplantation. Previous studies showed that brain death (BD) negatively affects the immunological and inflammatory status of both liver and kidney. Objective. Therefore we studied the inflammatory and morphological changes in donor small intestine after

  7. Surgical treatment of intestinal radiation injury

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    Maekelae, J.Ne.; Nevasaari, K.; Kairaluoma, M.I.

    1987-10-01

    A review of 43 consecutive patients requiring operation for serious intestinal radiation injury was undertaken to elucidate the efficacy of surgical treatment. The most common site of radiation injury was the rectum (19 cases), followed by the small bowel (13 cases), the colon (7 cases), and the combination of these (4 cases). The overall operative mortality was 14%; morbidity, 47%; and the postoperative symptom-free period, 18 +/- 30 months. Colostomy (N = 20) carried the lowest risk of mortality, 0%, as compared with resection (N = 17) and bypass procedure (N = 6), which were accompanied by the mortalities of 24% and 33%, respectively. During the follow-up (3-13 years) 12 patients (28%) died of recurrent cancer and 9 patients (21%) of persistent radiation injury, which yielded an overall mortality of 65% after resection and 50% and 65% after bypass and colostomy procedures, respectively. Continuing radiation damage led to 15 late reoperations. Ten of these were performed after colostomy, four after resection, and one after bypass. We conclude that colostomy cannot be regarded as a preferred operative method, because it does not prevent the progression of radiation injury and because it is, for this reason, associated with a higher late-complication rate. A more radical surgery is recommended but with the limitation that the operative method must be adapted to the operative finding.

  8. The role of ER stress response on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

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    Lee, Eun Sang; Kim, Kwang Seok; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Yong Jin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kang, Seong Man; Lim, Young Bin [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathologic factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, mechanism involved in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is triggered by perturbation of the ER functions, leading to the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive signaling cascade aimed at restoring ER homeostasis by facilitating the degradation of misfolded proteins and expanding the protein folding capacity of the cell. Recently, IR has also been shown to induce ER stress, thereby activating the UPR signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we report the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhance IR-induced caspase3 activation. Knockdown of xbp1 or atf6 with siRNA leads to inhibition of IR-induced caspase3 activation. Taken together, our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our findings could contribute to the development of new strategies based on modulating ER stress responses to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  9. Death in the intestinal epithelium-basic biology and implications for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blander, J Magarian

    2016-07-01

    Every 4-5 days, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) are terminated as they reach the end of their life. This process ensures that the epithelium is comprised of the fittest cells that maintain an impermeable barrier to luminal contents and the gut microbiota, as well as the most metabolically able cells that conduct functions in nutrient absorption, digestion, and secretion of antimicrobial peptides. IEC are terminated by apical extrusion-or shedding-from the intestinal epithelial monolayer into the gut lumen. Whether death by apoptosis signals extrusion or death follows expulsion by younger IEC has been a matter of debate. Seemingly a minor detail, IEC death before or after apical extrusion bears weight on the potential contribution of apoptotic IEC to intestinal homeostasis as a consequence of their recognition by intestinal lamina propria phagocytes. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), excessive death is observed in the ileal and colonic epithelium. The precise mode of IEC death in IBD is not defined. A highly inflammatory milieu within the intestinal lamina propria, rich in the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, increases IEC shedding and compromises barrier integrity fueling more inflammation. A milestone in the treatment of IBD, anti-TNF-α therapy, may promote mucosal healing by reversing increased and inflammation-associated IEC death. Understanding the biology and consequences of cell death in the intestinal epithelium is critical to the design of new avenues for IBD therapy.

  10. Surgical treatment of radiation induced injuries of the intestine

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    Schmitt, E.H.; Symmonds, R.E.

    1981-12-01

    In the patient who has received high dose irradiation of the pelvis and abdomen, all abdominopelvic operations should be avoided, unless it is absolutely essential. Persisting obstruction, hemorrhage, intestinal perforation with peritonitis and with abscess and fistula formation are valid indications for surgical intervention. Ninety-three patients have been operated upon for these complications after irradiation. Some anastomotic dehiscence occurred in ten patients. Six operative deaths occurred. Of the 93 patients, 65 were managed by means of complete resection of the involved segment of intestine, followed by restoration of intestinal continuity by means of an end-to-end anastomosis. This is the treatment of choice when the involved area can be safely resected. In the absence of actual intestinal necrosis and when segments of strictured small intestine are adherent deep in the pelvis, and intestinal bypass procedure may represent the treatment of choice. This was accomplished in 20 patients, two of whom eventually required a second operation for resection of the bypassed segment of intestine.

  11. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

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    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  12. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

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    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  13. A case of child death caused by intestinal volvulus following magnetic toy ingestion.

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    Olczak, Mieszko; Skrzypek, Ewa

    2015-05-01

    An 8-year boy was admitted to the ER of one of Warsaw's pediatric hospitals with a history of having bloody vomiting the day before. During admission the boy collapsed and lost consciousness. CPR was unsuccessful. On medico-legal autopsy, two foreign objects (small magnetic spheres--0.5 cm in diameter) were found in two different places in the small and large intestines and were notably attracted magnetically one to another. A loop of approximately 1-m length with features of small intestinal hemorrhagic necrosis and small intestinal mechanical obstruction was found. The cause of death was intestinal volvulus and small intestinal mechanical obstruction caused by ingestion of foreign objects (two neodymium magnets). Most likely these small magnetic spheres were part of a popular toy, the safety of which, lately, has been widely discussed.

  14. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

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    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  15. Cell Death in the Epithelia of the Intestine and Hepatopancreas in Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca.

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    Lidia Sonakowska

    Full Text Available The endodermal region of the digestive system in the freshwater shrimp Neocaridina heteropoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca consists of a tube-shaped intestine and large hepatopancreas, which is formed by numerous blind-ended tubules. The precise structure and ultrastructure of these regions were presented in our previous studies, while here we focused on the cell death processes and their effect on the functioning of the midgut. We used transmission electron microscopy, light and confocal microscopes to describe and detect cell death, while a quantitative assessment of cells with depolarized mitochondria helped us to establish whether there is the relationship between cell death and the inactivation of mitochondria. Three types of the cell death were observed in the intestine and hepatopancreas-apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. No differences were observed in the course of these processes in males and females and or in the intestine and hepatopancreas of the shrimp that were examined. Our studies revealed that apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy only involves the fully developed cells of the midgut epithelium that have contact with the midgut lumen-D-cells in the intestine and B- and F-cells in hepatopancreas, while E-cells (midgut stem cells did not die. A distinct correlation between the accumulation of E-cells and the activation of apoptosis was detected in the anterior region of the intestine, while necrosis was an accidental process. Degenerating organelles, mainly mitochondria were neutralized and eventually, the activation of cell death was prevented in the entire epithelium due to autophagy. Therefore, we state that autophagy plays a role of the survival factor.

  16. Rebamipide ameliorates radiation-induced intestinal injury in a mouse model.

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    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Hyo-Sun; Myung, Hyun-Wook; Myung, Jae Kyung; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2017-08-15

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a major side effect in cancer patients undergoing abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Radiation exposure produces an uncontrolled inflammatory cascade and epithelial cell loss leading to impaired epithelial barrier function. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of rebamipide on regeneration of the intestinal epithelia after radiation injury. The abdomens of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 13Gy of irradiation (IR) and then the mice were treated with rebamipide. Upon IR, intestinal epithelia were destroyed structurally at the microscopic level and bacterial translocation was increased. The intestinal damage reached a maximum level on day 6 post-IR and intestinal regeneration occurred thereafter. We found that rebamipide significantly ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal injury. In mice treated with rebamipide after IR, intestinal barrier function recovered and expression of the tight junction components of the intestinal barrier were upregulated. Rebamipide administration reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) were significantly reduced upon rebamipide administration. Intestinal cell proliferation and β-catenin expression also increased upon rebamipide administration. These data demonstrate that rebamipide reverses impairment of the intestinal barrier by increasing intestinal cell proliferation and attenuating the inflammatory response by inhibiting MMP9 and proinflammatory cytokine expression in a murine model of radiation-induced enteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury.

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    Sripathi M Sureban

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death. Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d, and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis.

  18. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury.

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    Sureban, Sripathi M; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis.

  19. Localized intestinal radiation and liquid diet enhance survival and permit evaluation of long-term intestinal responses to high dose radiation in mice.

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    Laurianne Van Landeghem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vivo studies of high dose radiation-induced crypt and intestinal stem cell (ISC loss and subsequent regeneration are typically restricted to 5-8 days after radiation due to high mortality and immune failure. This study aimed to develop murine radiation models of complete crypt loss that permit longer-term studies of ISC and crypt regeneration, repair and normalization of the intestinal epithelium. METHODS: In C57Bl/6J mice, a predetermined small intestinal segment was exteriorized and exposed to 14 Gy-radiation, while a lead shield protected the rest of the body from radiation. Sham controls had segment exteriorization but no radiation. Results were compared to C57Bl/6J mice given 14 Gy-abdominal radiation. Effects of elemental liquid diet feeding from the day prior to radiation until day 7 post-radiation were assessed in both models. Body weight and a custom-developed health score was assessed every day until day 21 post-radiation. Intestine was assessed histologically. RESULTS: At day 3 after segment radiation, complete loss of crypts occurred in the targeted segment, while adjacent and remaining intestine in segment-radiated mice, and entire intestine of sham controls, showed no detectable epithelial damage. Liquid diet feeding was required for survival of mice after segment radiation. Liquid diet significantly improved survival, body weight recovery and normalization of intestinal epithelium after abdominal radiation. Mice given segment radiation combined with liquid diet feeding showed minimal body weight loss, increased food intake and enhanced health score. CONCLUSIONS: The segment radiation method provides a useful model to study ISC/crypt loss and long-term crypt regeneration and epithelial repair, and may be valuable for future application to ISC transplantation or to genetic mutants that would not otherwise survive radiation doses that lead to complete crypt loss. Liquid diet is a simple intervention that improves

  20. Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.

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    Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

    2009-12-01

    Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

  1. Programmed cell death in whole body and organ systems by low dose radiation

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    Nomura, Taisei; Kinuta, Masakatsu; Hongyo, Tadashi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Hatanaka, Toshihiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    An extremely sensitive in vivo method to detect interphase cell death in the thymus, spleen and intestinal crypt was established by using frozen sections of these organs and tissues. The frozen sections as thick as 8 {mu}m were made after X-irradiation of the whole body or removed organs, and stained with 0.02% erythrosin B solution. When a single whole bode dose of X rays was given to various strains of mice, clusters of erythrosin positive cells were produced. They appear at 2 hr after irradiation and reached the maximuim at 4 hr, remaining at a similar level until 8 hr. The number of erythrosin B positive cells decreased after then by the elimination of dead cells. The cells were observed as a single cell death, observed in non-irradiated controls, at 24 hr after irradiation. The maximum erythrosin B positive cells and the associated number of clusters increased with increasing doses of X rays from 0.05 to 0.5 Gy. There were large differences in the radiation susceptivility among the inbred strains of mice for the induction of interphase cell death of thymic lymhocytes: radiation sesceptivility was high in C57BL/6J and AKR/J, intermediate in N4, A/J, PT and ST, and low in C3H/HeJ, HT, 101/H and DBA/2J. Similar results were observed in organ specificity to chemical mutagens. Erythrosin B positive cells was extremely increased in the thymus and spleen but not in the intestinal crypt with methylprednisolone, and vice versa with bleomycin. In vitro number of erythrosin B positive cells reached the maximum at 5 hr after X-irradiation; e.g., slightly later than in vivo method. The efficiency was about 60% in C57BL/6J mice when compared with in vivo method. (N.K.).

  2. Gastro-intestinal complications as one of causes of death in patients with rheumatic diseases

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    V N Sorotskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency of gastro-intestinal (Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation as direct cause of death in pts with rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Statistical analysis of Tula region patient care institutions documentation was performed to assess frequency and character of severe GI complications leading to death of pts. 300 cases of death which took place during 5 years (1996-2000 in 3 rheumatologic (105 cases and 10 therapeutic (195 cases departments of Tula region patient care institutions were studied. Results. Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation were the direct causes of death in 15 pts with rheumatic diseases i.e. in 5% from the whole number of died. GI complications caused death in 4 pts with chronic rheumatic heart disease (HRHD (1,7%, in 7 (15,2%with rheumatoid arthritis -, in 2 with ankylosing spondylitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (8,0 and 22,2% respectively. Pts with systemic sclerosis did not die because of GI damage. GI changes most frequently localized in duodenum (8 pts. 4 pts had complications connected with gastric ulcer and in 2 diffuse erosive damage of Gl mucosa was the source of bleeding. Conclusion. Severe Gl complications quite often lead to death of pts with rheumatic diseases in Tula region.

  3. Practical approaches to effective management of intestinal radiation injury: Benefit of resectional surgery

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    Nikolaos Perrakis; Evangelos Athanassiou; Dimitra Vamvakopoulou; Maria Kyriazi; Haris Kappos; Nikolaos C Vamvakopoulos; Iakovos Nomikos

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the outcome of patients undergoing surgical resection of the bowel for sustained radiation-induced damage intractable to conservative management.METHODS: During a 7-year period we operated on 17 cases (5 male, 12 female) admitted to our surgical department with intestinal radiation injury (IRI). They were originally treated for a pelvic malignancy by surgical resection followed by postoperative radiotherapy. During follow-up, they developed radiation enteritis requiring surgical treatment due to failure of conservative management.RESULTS: IRI was located in the terminal ileum in 12 patients, in the rectum in 2 patients, in the descending colon in 2 patients, and in the cecum in one patient. All patients had resection of the affected region(s). There were no postoperative deaths, while 3 cases presented with postoperative complications (17.7%). All patients remained free of symptoms without evidence of recurrence of IRI for a median follow-up period of 42 mo (range, 6-96 mo).CONCLUSION: We report a favorable outcome without IRI recurrence of 17 patients treated by resection of the diseased bowel segment.

  4. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo [Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Sook [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sunhoo, E-mail: sunhoo@kcch.re.kr [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  5. From DNA radiation damage to cell death: theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca

    2010-10-05

    Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to "historical" approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions) supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA "sublesions" and "lesions" as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal) chromosome aberrations, respectively.

  6. From DNA Radiation Damage to Cell Death: Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ballarini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to “historical” approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA “sublesions” and “lesions” as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal chromosome aberrations, respectively.

  7. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  8. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on digestive enzymes in radiation induced intestinal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Bhatia, Alka; Akhtar, Reyhan; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal mucosa, a rapidly proliferating tissue, is highly sensitive to radiation and undergoes apoptosis as a consequence of over generation of oxidative free radicals and the lack of the antioxidants. Thus the present study was designed to investigate the intestinal damage induced by radiation and to study if supplementation of the diet with antioxidant vitamins could ameliorate the intestinal damage and its digestive activity, as determined by the expression of various border enzymes. Swiss Albino rats (150-200 g body weight) were divided into six groups. Group I: Control untreated; Group II: Irradiated; Group III: Irradiated + vitamin A; Group IV: Irradiated + vitamin C; Group V: Irradiated + vitamin E; and Group VI: Irradiated + lycopene. Animals were exposed to whole body γ-radiation from (60)Co at the rate of 8 Gy for 15 min/rat. Intestinal morphology and changes in various digestive enzymes together with, DNA damage was studied in six groups and each group consisted of 18 animals. The gastrointestinal toxicity resulted in malabsorption, diarrhoea, weight loss, loss of appetite, abdominal haemorrhage and hair loss. The activities of sucrase and alkaline phosphatase were elevated and those of lactase, leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase or tranferase (γ-GTP) were markedly reduced. Antioxidant vitamin A, C or E supplementations prevented changes in brush border enzyme activities as compared to lycopene administration in rat intestine by radiation exposure. Intestinal histology showed that the vitamin supplementation to irradiated rats minimized the intestinal damage in rats. These findings suggest that the epithelial lining of the intestine is highly sensitive to radiation exposure and supplementation of antioxidant vitamins is helpful in minimizing the intestinal damage and supplementation by vitamin E was most potent in ameliorating the intestinal aberrations.

  9. Severe intestinal ischemia can trigger cardiovascular collapse and sudden death via a parasympathetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Alexander H; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2011-09-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO) followed by reperfusion are associated with high mortality. However, rapid cardiovascular failure and death may also occur before reperfusion in hemorrhagic shock and SAO. We show in a rat SAO model that, upon gut ischemia, mean arterial blood pressure transiently elevates and then drops fatally in one of two time courses: (i) gradually over ∼1 to 3 h or (ii) rapidly (often by >80 mmHg) over a period of 1 to 6 min. We hypothesize that fast fatal pressure drops (FFPDs) are due to failure of autonomic nervous system control. To test this, we treated rats with Glucose (10%) in the small intestinal lumen and intramuscularly administered xylazine to activate the parasympathetic nervous system or with a muscarinic anticholinergic (glycopyrrolate) or by total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy to attenuate parasympathetic nervous system activity. We also tested nafamostat mesilate (ANGD [6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfonate]), a protease inhibitor efficacious in preventing blood pressure loss in SAO with reperfusion, in the intestinal lumen. Fifty percent of animals receiving xylazine and Glucose died by FFPD (vs. 33% with neither, not statistically significant). Total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or glycopyrrolate treatment significantly reduced the incidence to 0% (P neurogenic shock or autonomic dysregulation associated with sudden death.

  10. Enhanced intestinal tumor multiplicity and grade in vivo after HZE exposure: mouse models for space radiation risk estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Daniela; Datta, Kamal; Doiron, Kathryn; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Fornace, Albert J

    2010-08-01

    Carcinogenesis induced by space radiation is considered a major risk factor in manned interplanetary and other extended missions. The models presently used to estimate the risk for cancer induction following deep space radiation exposure are based on data from A-bomb survivor cohorts and do not account for important biological differences existing between high-linear energy transfer (LET) and low-LET-induced DNA damage. High-energy and charge (HZE) radiation, the main component of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), causes highly complex DNA damage compared to low-LET radiation, which may lead to increased frequency of chromosomal rearrangements, and contribute to carcinogenic risk in astronauts. Gastrointestinal (GI) tumors are frequent in the United States, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer accounting for 10% of all cancer deaths. On the basis of the aforementioned epidemiological observations and the frequency of spontaneous precancerous GI lesions in the general population, even a modest increase in incidence by space radiation exposure could have a significant effect on health risk estimates for future manned space flights. Ground-based research is necessary to reduce the uncertainties associated with projected cancer risk estimates and to gain insights into molecular mechanisms involved in space-induced carcinogenesis. We investigated in vivo differential effects of gamma-rays and HZE ions on intestinal tumorigenesis using two different murine models, ApcMin/+ and Apc1638N/+. We showed that gamma- and/or HZE exposure significantly enhances development and progression of intestinal tumors in a mutant-line-specific manner, and identified suitable models for in vivo studies of space radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis.

  11. Analysis of changes in intestinal microflora of irradiated mice. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mal' tsev, V.N.; Pinegin, B.V.; Korshunov, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    In experiments on 3 groups of CBA mice exposed to doses of 900, 600 and 300 R ..gamma..-rays, it was demonstrated that the integral severity of post-radiation microflora in the intestine can be determined by means of information index h, which takes into consideration all changes occurring in different representatives of the intestinal microflora. Differential analysis of the mechanisms of radioinduced changes in microflora indicates that it is based on a decrease in lactobacilli and increase in enterococcus, proteus, colibacillus and yeast in the small intestine, with increase in colibacillus, clostridia, proteus and enterococcus in the large intestine.

  12. Evidence from Animal Models: Is a Restricted or Conventional Intestinal Microbiota Composition Predisposing to Risk for High-LET Radiation Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Irene; Schiestl, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microbiota affect cell responses to ionizing radiation at the molecular level and can be linked to the development of the immune system, controlled cell death or apoptosis. We have developed a microbiota mouse model and report here that high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induced the repair of chromosomal DNA lesions more efficiently in conventional than in restricted intestinal microbiota mice. Based on different phylotype densities after whole-body irradiation, bacterial indicator phylotypes were found to be more abundant in restricted in microbiota than in conventional microbiota. Genotoxic phenotypes of irradiated restricted and conventional microbiota mice were compared with ataxia telangiectasia-deficient restricted and conventional microbiota mice, respectively. Those indicator phylotypes, including Bacteroides (Gram-negative bacterium cTPY-13), Barnesiella intestinihominis and others, which were identified in nonirradiated restricted microbiota mice, increase in radiation-exposed conventional microbiota along with a reduction of persistent DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes. The dynamic change of phylotype abundances elucidated a feedback mechanism and effect of intestinal microbiota composition on the adaptive response to high-LET radiation. Several other bacterial phylotypes ( Helicobacter hepaticus , Helicobacter spp and others) were found to be more abundant in conventional than restricted microbiota. In this commentary, mouse models used in cancer research and radiotherapy for the study on the effects of intestinal microbiota composition on normal tissue radiation response are characterized and discussed. Highlights of this commentary: 1. Restricted microbiota phylotypes were correlated with persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and were found to orchestrate onco-protective controlled cell death after radiation; 2. Restricted microbiota composition reduced proinflammatory extracellular-stimulated immune responses, but

  13. Palmitoylethanolamide regulates development of intestinal radiation injury in a mast cell dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junru; Zheng, Junying; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Wang, Wen; Garg, Sarita; Prather, Paul L.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Mast cells and neuroimmune interactions regulate the severity of intestinal radiation mucositis, a dose-limiting toxicity during radiation therapy of abdominal malignancies. Aims Because endocannabinoids regulate intestinal inflammation, we investigated the effect of the cannabimimetic, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in a mast competent (+/+) and mast cell deficient (Ws/Ws) rat model. Methods Rats underwent localized, fractionated intestinal irradiation and received daily injections with vehicle or PEA from 1 day before until 2 weeks after radiation. Intestinal injury was assessed non-invasively by luminol bioluminescence, and, at 2 weeks, by histology, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis, gene expression analysis, and pathway analysis. Results Compared to +/+ rats, Ws/Ws rats sustained more intestinal structural injury (p=0.01), mucosal damage (p=0.02), neutrophil infiltration (p=0.0003), and collagen deposition (p=0.004). PEA reduced structural radiation injury (p=0.02), intestinal wall thickness (p=0.03), collagen deposition (p=0.03), and intestinal inflammation (p=0.02) in Ws/Ws rats, but not in +/+ rats. PEA inhibited mast cell-derived cellular immune response and anti-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-10 signaling, and activated the prothrombin pathway in +/+ rats. In contrast, while PEA suppressed non-mast cell derived immune responses, it increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 and IL-6 signaling and decreased activation of the prothrombin pathway in Ws/Ws rats. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the absence of mast cells exacerbate radiation enteropathy by mechanisms that likely involve the coagulation system, anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling, and the innate immune system; and that these mechanisms are regulated by PEA in a mast cell-dependent manner. The endocannabinoid system should be explored as target for mitigating intestinal radiation injury. PMID:24848354

  14. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII.Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  15. Long-term differential changes in mouse intestinal metabolomics after γ and heavy ion radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita K Cheema

    Full Text Available Tissue consequences of radiation exposure are dependent on radiation quality and high linear energy transfer (high-LET radiation, such as heavy ions in space is known to deposit higher energy in tissues and cause greater damage than low-LET γ radiation. While radiation exposure has been linked to intestinal pathologies, there are very few studies on long-term effects of radiation, fewer involved a therapeutically relevant γ radiation dose, and none explored persistent tissue metabolomic alterations after heavy ion space radiation exposure. Using a metabolomics approach, we report long-term metabolomic markers of radiation injury and perturbation of signaling pathways linked to metabolic alterations in mice after heavy ion or γ radiation exposure. Intestinal tissues (C57BL/6J, female, 6 to 8 wks were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QToF-MS two months after 2 Gy γ radiation and results were compared to an equitoxic ⁵⁶Fe (1.6 Gy radiation dose. The biological relevance of the metabolites was determined using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Metabolic profile analysis showed radiation-type-dependent spatial separation of the groups. Decreased adenine and guanosine and increased inosine and uridine suggested perturbed nucleotide metabolism. While both the radiation types affected amino acid metabolism, the ⁵⁶Fe radiation preferentially altered dipeptide metabolism. Furthermore, ⁵⁶Fe radiation caused upregulation of 'prostanoid biosynthesis' and 'eicosanoid signaling', which are interlinked events related to cellular inflammation and have implications for nutrient absorption and inflammatory bowel disease during space missions and after radiotherapy. In conclusion, our data showed for the first time that metabolomics can not only be used to distinguish between heavy ion and γ radiation exposures, but

  16. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  17. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Chintala, Madhu [Schering-Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, New Jersey (United States); Fink, Louis M. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin, E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgery Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  18. Pharmacologically blocking p53-dependent apoptosis protects intestinal stem cells and mice from radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwei; Wei, Liang; Cramer, Julie M; Leibowitz, Brian J; Judge, Colleen; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Linheng; Stelzner, Matthias G; Dunn, James C Y; Martin, Martin G; Lagasse, Eric; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2015-04-10

    Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation (IR) leads to debilitating and dose-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Using three-dimensional mouse crypt culture, we demonstrated that p53 target PUMA mediates radiation-induced apoptosis via a cell-intrinsic mechanism, and identified the GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR99021 as a potent radioprotector. CHIR99021 treatment improved Lgr5+ cell survival and crypt regeneration after radiation in culture and mice. CHIR99021 treatment specifically blocked apoptosis and PUMA induction and K120 acetylation of p53 mediated by acetyl-transferase Tip60, while it had no effect on p53 stabilization, phosphorylation or p21 induction. CHIR99021 also protected human intestinal cultures from radiation by PUMA but not p21 suppression. These results demonstrate that p53 posttranslational modifications play a key role in the pathological and apoptotic response of the intestinal stem cells to radiation and can be targeted pharmacologically.

  19. Death-associated protein kinase controls STAT3 activity in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakilam, Saritha; Gandesiri, Muktheshwar; Rau, Tilman T; Agaimy, Abbas; Vijayalakshmi, Mahadevan; Ivanovska, Jelena; Wirtz, Ralph M; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Benderska, Natalya; Wittkopf, Nadine; Chellappan, Ajithavalli; Ruemmele, Petra; Vieth, Michael; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Christiansen, Hans; Hartmann, Arndt; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Raja; Becker, Christoph; Steinberg, Pablo; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2013-03-01

    The TNF-IL-6-STAT3 pathway plays a crucial role in promoting ulcerative colitis-associated carcinoma (UCC). To date, the negative regulation of STAT3 is poorly understood. Interestingly, intestinal epithelial cells of UCC in comparison to ulcerative colitis show high expression levels of anti-inflammatory death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) and low levels of pSTAT3. Accordingly, epithelial DAPK expression was enhanced in STAT3(IEC-KO) mice. To unravel a possible regulatory mechanism, we used an in vitro TNF-treated intestinal epithelial cell model. We identified a new function of DAPK in suppressing TNF-induced STAT3 activation as DAPK siRNA knockdown and treatment with a DAPK inhibitor potentiated STAT3 activation, IL-6 mRNA expression, and secretion. DAPK attenuated STAT3 activity directly by physical interaction shown in three-dimensional structural modeling. This model suggests that DAPK-induced conformational changes in the STAT3 dimer masked its nuclear localization signal. Alternatively, pharmacological inactivation of STAT3 led to an increase in DAPK mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that STAT3 restricted DAPK expression by promoter binding, thereby reinforcing its own activation by inducing IL-6. This novel negative regulation principle might balance TNF-induced inflammation and seems to play an important role in the inflammation-associated transformation process as confirmed in an AOM+DSS colon carcinogenesis mouse model. DAPK as a negative regulator of STAT3 emerges as therapeutic option in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and UCC.

  20. The prevention of radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells by salvianic acid A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of radiation always provokes public debate, and the uses of radiation for therapeutic and other purposes have always been associated with some anxiety. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases including cerebrovascular diseases, coronary artery diseases, and myocardial infarction. Salvianolic acid A (SAA d (+-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid is the principal effective, watersoluble constituent of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In our present study, radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC in the presence and absence of SAA were examined. We investigated the effects of SAA on ROS formation and the activity of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, the lipid peroxidative index and the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidant (GSH. Finally, we investigated whether the reduction of radiation-induced cell death caused by SAA might be related to mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Present findings indicate that SAA is a promising radioprotective agent with a strong antioxidant activity. SAA exerted its protective action on the proliferative activity of HIEC cells as evidenced by decreased cytotoxicity after exposure to γ-radiation. It is possible that SAA achieved its radioprotective action, at least in part, by enhancing DNA repair and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, by scavenging ROS and by inhibiting the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  1. Prognosis of surgically treated radiation-induced damage to the intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnson, S.; Westerborn, O. (Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Orebro (Sweden)); Gerdin, B. (Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1992-10-01

    A series of 88 patients operated on during 24 years for radiation-induced damage (RID) to the intestinal tract were retrospectively reviewed and clinical and surgical factors were related to the ultimate prognosis by multivariate analysis. The first operation was performed on the small intestine in 47 patients, the large intestine in 32 patients or both in nine patients. Postoperative complications occurred in 35 patients (40%), with fatal outcome in 12 (13%). Thirty-one patients (35%) required further surgery and altogether 19 patients (22%) ultimately died from RID. Negative prognostic factors after the first operation were post-operative intestinal leak (P < 0.05) and operation for fistula or perforation (P < 0.01). The outcome after the last operation was negatively influenced by intestinal leak (P < 0.001) by the choice of bypass as operative procedure (P < 0.01) and by operation for fistula or perforation (P < 0.01). In addition, 43% of the patients in whom the disease had progressed between two explorations died from RID. Thus, the severity of the RID as diagnosed at laparotomy, and progression of the disease between two subsequent explorations were related to the prognosis. Care should be taken to avoid intestinal leak. Resections should be preferred to bypass of injured intestine whenever possible. (author).

  2. Surgical results in cases of intestinal radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deguchi, Hisatsugu; Ozawa, Tetsuro; Wada, Toshihiro; Tsugu, Yukio (Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-05-01

    Surgical procedures were performed on 25 patients suffering from late-phase intestinal tract disorders induced by irradiation. The primary diseases of these cases were almost exclusively gynecological in nature, such as cancer of the uterine cervix. Symptoms observed in these cases were overwhelming ileus followed by melena, fistulation and free perforation, as well as combination thereof. The most common portion involved was the recto-sigmoidal colon, followed by the ileo-cecum and ileum. As for the relationship of symptoms to the disordered portion, ileus was seen mainly in cases of disorders at the ileocecal portion; melena was observed exclusively in cases of disorders at the rectosigmoidal colon; fistulation was manifested mainly as recto-vaginal fistula or ileo-sigmoidal fistula; free perforation was observed at both the ileum and sigmoidal colon. Colostomy was the most frequent surgical method applied. Only 3 cases were able to undergo enterectomy. Other cases were subjected to enteroanastomosis or enterostomy. In most cases it was nearly in possible to excise the disordered portions. As for the effect of surgical procedures on symptoms, cases of melena or fistulation were all subjected to colostomy; the majority of these cases showed improvement in symptoms. Moreover, a high improvement ratio was obtained in cases of ileus which were subjected to enterectomy and enteroanastomosis. Cases of free perforation showed high improvement ratio irrespective of the surgical procedure given. As for postoperative complications, one case of free perforation at the ileum showed anastomotic leakage after partial resection. For cases suffering from late-phase intestinal tract disorders induced by irradiation, immediate resection of the disordered intestinal tract and anastomosis are ideal. However, conservative operations must be considered, based on the focal condition. (author).

  3. Radiation-induced intestinal neoplasia in a genetically-predisposed mouse (Min)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellender, M.; Larder, S.M.; Harrison, J.D.; Cox, R.; Silver, A.R.J. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    A mouse lineage with inherited predisposition to multiple intestinal neoplasia (min) has been proposed as a model to study human colorectal cancer. Min mice are heterozygous for the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene implicated in human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). There is an increased risk of intestinal cancer in humans following radiation exposure and the min mouse model may be used to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved. The present study showed a 2 Gy dose of x-rays doubles the tumour numbers in the murine gastrointestinal tract of F1 min heterozygotes. The distribution of tumours through the gut was also recorded. (authors)

  4. A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Act of 1979, as amended, Title 50, U.S.C., App. 2401 et seq. Violations of these export laws are subject to severe criminal penalties ...DTRA-TR-16-059 DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution is unlimited. Exposure to burn and radiation elicit epithelial cell death in...villus cells, promoting early cell death before migration is complete (Carter et al., 2014, Wolf et al., 1999). This response is fast and strong but

  5. Examinations on cases of surgery for radiation-induced disorders of large intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Tadaaki [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Author`s experience of surgery for radiation colitis was examined and discussed on the primary disease, radiation dose, major symptoms, surgical techniques, results and post-operative complication. Patients were 1 male and 21 females of the average age of 59.5 y. The primary diseases were bladder cancer for the male and uterine cancer for the females. The radiation dose ranged from 35-120 Gy and was 63.4 Gy in a mean. The symptoms for surgery were 14 ileuses, 4 intestinal hemorrhages, 1 perforation and 3 burrows. Colostomy was performed for 18 cases; enterostomy, 2; anastomosis, 1; and enterectomy, 1, which resulted in improvement of symptoms in 5 cases, 0, 1 and 1, respectively. The author concluded that radiation colitis should be treated preventively. (K.H.)

  6. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R., E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  7. Staphylococcal enterotoxin genes are common in Staphylococcus aureus intestinal flora in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and live comparison infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highet, Amanda R; Goldwater, Paul N

    2009-11-01

    Pathological and epidemiological findings in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) suggest an infectious aetiology with indications of involvement of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). While SEA, SEB and SEC have been found in the sera and tissues of SIDS cases, little is known about the role of intestinal Staphylococcus aureus or the roles of later-described toxins SEE, SEG, SEH, SEI and SEJ in SIDS. We used a molecular-based approach to define whether the intestinal tract could be a source of SEs to support the staphylococcal toxic shock hypothesis for SIDS. Intestinal contents from 57 SIDS infants and faeces from 79 age- and gender-matched live comparison infants were cultured and tested for S. aureus and sea-b-c-e-g-h-j and TSST using PCR. High proportions of infants in both groups carried toxigenic and nontoxigenic S. aureus. Significantly greater proportions of SIDS compared with comparison babies were positive for S. aureus (68.4% vs. 40.5%) and for SE genes (43.8% vs. 21.5%), suggesting a possible role in SIDS. The results indicate that colonization by S. aureus with SE genes is common in infants; however, their detection is unlikely to be a strong predictive tool for SIDS. Other factors (including immune response) may reveal a specific susceptibility to SEs in SIDS infants.

  8. Intestinal Blautia Is Associated with Reduced Death from Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenq, Robert R; Taur, Ying; Devlin, Sean M; Ponce, Doris M; Goldberg, Jenna D; Ahr, Katya F; Littmann, Eric R; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia C; Miller, Liza C; Docampo, Melissa D; Peled, Jonathan U; Arpaia, Nicholas; Cross, Justin R; Peets, Tatanisha K; Lumish, Melissa A; Shono, Yusuke; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Poeck, Hendrik; Hanash, Alan M; Barker, Juliet N; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio A; Pamer, Eric G; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between intestinal microbiota composition and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic blood/marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) is not well understood. Intestinal bacteria have long been thought to contribute to GVHD pathophysiology, but recent animal studies in nontransplant settings have found that anti-inflammatory effects are mediated by certain subpopulations of intestinal commensals. Hypothesizing that a more nuanced relationship may exist between the intestinal bacteria and GVHD, we evaluated the fecal bacterial composition of 64 patients 12 days after BMT. We found that increased bacterial diversity was associated with reduced GVHD-related mortality. Furthermore, harboring increased amounts of bacteria belonging to the genus Blautia was associated with reduced GVHD lethality in this cohort and was confirmed in another independent cohort of 51 patients from the same institution. Blautia abundance was also associated with improved overall survival. We evaluated the abundance of Blautia with respect to clinical factors and found that loss of Blautia was associated with treatment with antibiotics that inhibit anaerobic bacteria and receiving total parenteral nutrition for longer durations. We conclude that increased abundance of commensal bacteria belonging to the Blautia genus is associated with reduced lethal GVHD and improved overall survival.

  9. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hengwen [Department of Radiation, Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital (Guangdong Academy of Medical Science), Guangzhou, 510080, Guangdong (China); Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Yajie [Department of Pathology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Gao, Dongsheng [Department of Oncology, Guangdong Medical College Affiliated Pengpai Memorial Hospital, Hai Feng, 516400, Gungdong (China); Zhao, Shenting, E-mail: zhaoshenting@126.com [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China)

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  10. Electrical impedance spectroscopy as electrical biopsy for monitoring radiation sequelae of intestine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pei-Ju; Huang, Eng-Yen; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng; Huang, Yu-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance is one of the most frequently used parameters for characterizing material properties. The resistive and capacitive characteristics of tissue may be revealed by electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as electrical biopsy. This technique could be used to monitor the sequelae after irradiation. In this study, rat intestinal tissues after irradiation were assessed by EIS system based on commercially available integrated circuits. The EIS results were fitted to a resistor-capacitor circuit model to determine the electrical properties of the tissue. The variations in the electrical characteristics of the tissue were compared to radiation injury score (RIS) by morphological and histological findings. The electrical properties, based on receiver operation curve (ROC) analysis, strongly reflected the histological changes with excellent diagnosis performance. The results of this study suggest that electrical biopsy reflects histological changes after irradiation. This approach may significantly augment the evaluation of tissue after irradiation. It could provide rapid results for decision making in monitoring radiation sequelae prospectively.

  11. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy as Electrical Biopsy for Monitoring Radiation Sequelae of Intestine in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ju Chao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical impedance is one of the most frequently used parameters for characterizing material properties. The resistive and capacitive characteristics of tissue may be revealed by electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS as electrical biopsy. This technique could be used to monitor the sequelae after irradiation. In this study, rat intestinal tissues after irradiation were assessed by EIS system based on commercially available integrated circuits. The EIS results were fitted to a resistor-capacitor circuit model to determine the electrical properties of the tissue. The variations in the electrical characteristics of the tissue were compared to radiation injury score (RIS by morphological and histological findings. The electrical properties, based on receiver operation curve (ROC analysis, strongly reflected the histological changes with excellent diagnosis performance. The results of this study suggest that electrical biopsy reflects histological changes after irradiation. This approach may significantly augment the evaluation of tissue after irradiation. It could provide rapid results for decision making in monitoring radiation sequelae prospectively.

  12. Blood and small intestine cell kinetics under radiation exposures: Mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mathematical models which describe the dynamics of two vital body systems (hematopoiesis and small intestinal epithelium) in mammals exposed to acute and chronic radiation are developed. These models, based on conventional biological theories, are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations. Their variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning, that provides successful identification and verification of the models in hand. It is shown that the predictions of the models qualitatively and quantitatively agree with the respective experimental data for small laboratory animals (mice, rats) exposed to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates. The explanation of a number of radiobiological effects, including those of the low-level long-term exposures, is proposed proceeding from the modeling results. All this bears witness to the validity of employment of the developed models, after a proper identification, in investigation and prediction of radiation effects on the hematopoietic and small intestinal epithelium systems in various mammalian species, including humans. In particular, the models can be used for estimating effects of irradiation on astronauts in the long-term space missions, such as Lunar colonies and Mars voyages.

  13. Human epidermal keratinocytes death and expression of protein markers of apoptosis after ionizing radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Wong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Knowledge of the pathophysiology of the irradiated skin is important to understand the tolerance and cosmetic response of the human skin to radiation. There are limited studies on the effect of radiotherapy dosage and fraction size in inducing apoptotic cell death in human skin. The expression of apoptotic biomarkers within a controlled population in different fractionation schemes has also never been studied. This study aims to investigate radiation induced apoptotic cell death in human skin cells after fractionated radiation exposure and the expression of unique biomarkers that reflect cell death or biology using multiplexed immunoassays.Methods: Breast skin biopsies were obtained from a single individual and divided into small pieces. Each piece was irradiated under different radiotherapy treatment fractionation schedules to a total dose of 50Gy. The irradiated skin tissues were analysed using Tunnel, immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays for expression of apoptotic keratinocytes and biomarkers (p53, p21, and PCNA. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E immunostaining was performed to study the morphological changes in the skin cells. Results: Radiation is mostly absorbed by the epidermal layers and observed to damage the epidermal keratinocytes leading to the activation of apoptotic proteins. Apoptotic proteins (p53, p21 and PCNA were confirmed to be up-regulated in radiation exposed skin cells as compared to normal skin cells with no radiation. There is strong correlation of apoptotic protein expressions with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation. Statistical analysis with ANOVA revealed a significant increase of PCNA and p21 expression with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, 14 % (range 10.71% to 17.29% of the keratinocytes were positive for PCNA and 22.5% (range 18.28% to 27.2% for p21 after 2Gy of irradiation.  The most widespread, intense and uniform staining for PCNA

  14. Protective effect of vitamin A on acute radiation injury in the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Balkan, Mujdat; Demiriz, Murat; Dirican, Bahar; Oner, Koksal; Pak, Yucel [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey); Tibet, Hasan

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of vitamin A on the development of early radiation-induced reactions in the rat small intestine. The early effects of intraoperative gamma-radiation on the small bowel utilizing the terminal ileum of Sprague-Dawley rats and the protective effect of supplemental vitamin A on acute radiation injury were investigated. Three groups were included in the study: group I (10 rats) was the surgical control group; group II (13 rats) underwent only intraoperative irradiation; and group III (10 rats) was the vitamin A plus irradiation group. Exteriorized terminal ileal segments of groups II and III were exposed to a single fraction of 20 Gy of intraoperative gamma-irradiation. On the seventh postoperative day, terminal ileal segments of all rats were resected and histopathologically evaluated for ulceration, enteritis cystica profunda, atypical epithelial regeneration, fibrosis, vascular sclerosis, and inflammatory process. Although none of the above findings were present in the surgical control group, group III rats experienced less severe effects than group II rats. The results suggest the early side effects of radiation may be prevented by vitamin A supplementation. (author)

  15. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived Metabolomic Blood Plasma Markers for Prior Radiation Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ó Broin, Pilib [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Yeshiva University, New York, New York (United States); Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya [Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Stable Isotope and Metabolomics Core Facility, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Saha, Subhrajit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Hartil, Kirsten [Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Stable Isotope and Metabolomics Core Facility, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Emily I. [Department of Pharmacology, Proteomics Shared Resource, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldman, Devorah; Fleming, William Harv [Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kurland, Irwin J. [Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Stable Isotope and Metabolomics Core Facility, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan, E-mail: cguha@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Golden, Aaron, E-mail: aaron.golden@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Yeshiva University, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Assessing whole-body radiation injury and absorbed dose is essential for remediation efforts following accidental or deliberate exposure in medical, industrial, military, or terrorist incidents. We hypothesize that variations in specific metabolite concentrations extracted from blood plasma would correlate with whole-body radiation injury and dose. Methods and Materials: Groups of C57BL/6 mice (n=12 per group) were exposed to 0, 2, 4, 8, and 10.4 Gy of whole-body gamma radiation. At 24 hours after treatment, all animals were euthanized, and both plasma and liver biopsy samples were obtained, the latter being used to identify a distinct hepatic radiation injury response within plasma. A semiquantitative, untargeted metabolite/lipid profile was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which identified 354 biochemical compounds. A second set of C57BL/6 mice (n=6 per group) were used to assess a subset of identified plasma markers beyond 24 hours. Results: We identified a cohort of 37 biochemical compounds in plasma that yielded the optimal separation of the irradiated sample groups, with the most correlated metabolites associated with pyrimidine (positively correlated) and tryptophan (negatively correlated) metabolism. The latter were predominantly associated with indole compounds, and there was evidence that these were also correlated between liver and plasma. No evidence of saturation as a function of dose was observed, as has been noted for studies involving metabolite analysis of urine. Conclusions: Plasma profiling of specific metabolites related to pyrimidine and tryptophan pathways can be used to differentiate whole-body radiation injury and dose response. As the tryptophan-associated indole compounds have their origin in the intestinal microbiome and subsequently the liver, these metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for radiation injury within blood plasma.

  16. Methionine deficiency reduces autophagy and accelerates death in intestinal epithelial cells infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Li, Fengna; Ren, Wenkai; Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2015-10-01

    Infections by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) result in large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Dietary supplementation with amino acids has been considered as a potential mechanism to improve host defenses against infection. The goal of this study was to determine whether methionine deprivation alters ETEC interactions with porcine intestinal epithelial cells. IPEC-1 cells were cultured in media with or without L-methionine. Methionine deprivation resulted in enhanced ETEC adhesion and increased both the cytotoxicity and apoptotic responses of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. Methionine deprivation inhibited IPEC-1 cell autophagic responses, suggesting that the increased cytotoxicity of ETEC to methionine-deprived IPEC-1 cells might be due to defects in autophagy.

  17. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor

  18. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC(1638N/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC(1638N/+)) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(1638N/+) mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50cGy of (28)Si (energy: 300MeV/n; LET: 70keV/μm) or (56)Fe (energy: 1000MeV/n; LET: 148keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n=20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to (56)Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after (28)Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic

  19. Role of vitamin A in modulating the radiation-induced changes in intestinal disccharidases of rats exposed to multifractional gamma-radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, A.A. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo Univ. (Egypt)); Hassan, S.H.M. (Dept. of Drug Radiation Research, National Center of Radiation Research and Technology, Cairo (Egypt))

    1994-08-01

    Rats were subjected to fractionated whole-body irradiation (20x0.5 Gy). Intestinal lactase activity as well as maltase and sucrase activities were assessed. Vitamin A was administered at daily intraperitoneal dose of 15 000 IU/kg body weight for 7 days prior to radiotherapy and thereafter twice weekly throughout therapy up to 7 days post irradiation. In irradiated rats a marked decrease in intestinal lactase activity of about one-fourth of those in nonirradiated rats was observed. In addition, a significant reduction in maltase and sucrase activities of one half of the control group was observed. The application of vitamin A significantly improved the radiation-induced inhibition of intestinal enzymes. Pretreatment application of vitamin A is more efficient to protect against radiation injury than a posttreatment application. (orig./MG)

  20. Human epidermal keratinocytes death and expression of protein markers of apoptosis after ionizing radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Wong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Knowledge of the pathophysiology of the irradiated skin is important to understand the tolerance and cosmetic response of the human skin to radiation. There are limited studies on the effect of radiotherapy dosage and fraction size in inducing apoptotic cell death in human skin. The expression of apoptotic biomarkers within a controlled population in different fractionation schemes has also never been studied. This study aims to investigate radiation induced apoptotic cell death in human skin cells after fractionated radiation exposure and the expression of unique biomarkers that reflect cell death or biology using multiplexed immunoassays. Methods: Breast skin biopsies were obtained from a single individual and divided into small pieces. Each piece was irradiated under different radiotherapy treatment fractionation schedules to a total dose of 50Gy. The irradiated skin tissues were analysed using Tunnel, immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays for expression of apoptotic keratinocytes and biomarkers (p53, p21, and PCNA. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E immunostaining was performed to study the morphological changes in the skin cells. Results: Radiation is mostly absorbed by the epidermal layers and observed to damage the epidermal keratinocytes leading to the activation of apoptotic proteins. Apoptotic proteins (p53, p21 and PCNA were confirmed to be up-regulated in radiation exposed skin cells as compared to normal skin cells with no radiation. There is strong correlation of apoptotic protein expressions with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation. Statistical analysis with ANOVA revealed a significant increase of PCNA and p21 expression with increased radiation dosage and dose fractionation (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, 14 % (range 10.71% to 17.29% of the keratinocytes were positive for PCNA and 22.5% (range 18.28% to 27.2% for p21 after 2Gy of irradiation. The most widespread, intense and uniform staining for PCNA and

  1. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Bilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  2. A mathematical model of radiation carcinogenesis with induction of genomic instability and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, M; Niwa, O

    2001-11-01

    We developed a mathematical model of carcinogenesis that incorporates genomic instability, a feature characterized by long-term destabilization of the genome in irradiated cells that leads to an increase in cancer risk in the exposed individuals at the cancer-prone age. This model also considers the induction of cell death, another important effect of radiation on cells. It is assumed that cell killing by radiation may occur at all stages of the carcinogenic process. The resulting model can explain not only the paradoxical relationship between low mutation rates and high cancer incidence but also the low-order dose-response relationship of cancer risk.

  3. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of tumor cell death: ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles for radiation enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Christina Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy. In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes.

  4. Five-year survival and causes of death in patients on home parenteral nutrition for severe chronic and benign intestinal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Francisca; Baxter, Janet; Staun, Michael; Kelly, Darlene G; Hwa, Yi Lisa; Corcos, Olivier; De Francesco, Antonella; Agostini, Federica; Klek, Stanislaw; Santarpia, Lidia; Contaldo, Franco; Jonker, Cora; Wanten, Geert; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Van Gossum, Andre; Cuerda, Cristina; Virgili, Nuria; Pironi, Loris

    2017-06-19

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is the primary treatment for chronic intestinal failure (IF). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) is indicated when there is an increased risk of death due to HPN complications or to the underlying disease. Age, pathophysiologic conditions and underlying disease are known predictors of HPN dependency and overall survival. Although the cause of death on HPN is mostly related to underlying disease in these patients, the relationship between mortality and duration of HPN use remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to describe factors associated with survival and HPN dependency as well as causes of death in adult patients requiring HPN for chronic intestinal failure during the first 5 years of treatment with HPN. A multicenter international (European and USA) questionnaire-based retrospective follow-up of a cohort of 472 IF patients who started HPN was conducted between June and December 2000. Study endpoint was either end of 5-year follow-up, weaned-off HPN, ITx, or death on HPN. Data were analyzed for HPN dependence and overall survival using Kaplan-Meier models and log rank tests. The overall survival probability was 88%, 74% and 64% at 1, 3 and 5 years respectively. Survival was inversely related to age (p < .001) and higher in patients with Crohn's disease or chronic idiopathic pseudo-obstruction. A total of 169 (36.5%) patients were weaned-off HPN mainly (80%) within the first year and most frequently in patients with fistulae. Five of the 14 patients who underwent ITx died. By the end of the study, 104 (23%) of patients died on HPN; 65% of deaths occurred within the first 2.5 years of HPN. Younger ages at HPN initiation and underlying pathologies are significantly predictive of survival on HPN. Risk of death is greatest during the first 2 years of HPN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. The roles of mitochondria in radiation-induced autophagic cell death in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongyan; Wang, Benli; Yu, Feifei; Chen, Qiao; Tian, Yuxi; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria as the critical powerhouse of eukaryotic cells play important roles in regulating cell survival or cell death. Under numerous stimuli, impaired mitochondria will generate massive reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in the regulation of vital signals and could even determine the fate of cancer cells. While the roles of mitochondria in radiation-induced autophagic cell death still need to be elucidated. Human cervical cancer cell line, Hela, was used, and the SOD2 silencing model (SOD2-Ri) was established by gene engineering. Cell viability was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays, MitoTracker Green staining was used to detect mitochondrial mass, Western blot was used to detect protein expression, and the level of ROS, autophagy, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Ionizing radiation (IR) could induce the increase of MAPLC3-II/MAPLC3-I ratio, Beclin1 expression, and ROS generation but decrease the MMP in a time-dependent manner. After SOD2 silencing, the IR-induced changes of ROS and the MMP were significantly enhanced. Moreover, both the radio sensitivity and autophagy increased in SOD2-Ri cells. Whereas, compared with SOD2-Ri, the opposite results were obtained by NAC, an antioxidant. After the treatment with the inhibitor of mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), the rate of autophagy, ROS, and the total cell death induced by IR increased. In addition, the decrease of MMP was more obvious. However, these results were reversed by cyclosporine A (CsA). IR could induce ROS generation and mitochondrial damage which lead to autophagic cell death in Hela cells.

  6. Cell death induced by GSM 900-MHz and DCS 1800-MHz mobile telephony radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Chavdoula, Evangelia D; Nezis, Ioannis P; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2007-01-10

    In the present study, the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay--a well known technique widely used for detecting fragmented DNA in various types of cells--was used to detect cell death (DNA fragmentation) in a biological model, the early and mid stages of oogenesis of the insect Drosophila melanogaster. The flies were exposed in vivo to either GSM 900-MHz (Global System for Mobile telecommunications) or DCS 1800-MHz (Digital Cellular System) radiation from a common digital mobile phone, for few minutes per day during the first 6 days of their adult life. The exposure conditions were similar to those to which a mobile phone user is exposed, and were determined according to previous studies of ours [D.J. Panagopoulos, A. Karabarbounis, L.H. Margaritis, Effect of GSM 900-MHz mobile phone radiation on the reproductive capacity of D. melanogaster, Electromagn. Biol. Med. 23 (1) (2004) 29-43; D.J. Panagopoulos, N. Messini, A. Karabarbounis, A.L. Philippetis, L.H. Margaritis, Radio frequency electromagnetic radiation within "safety levels" alters the physiological function of insects, in: P. Kostarakis, P. Stavroulakis (Eds.), Proceedings of the Millennium International Workshop on Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, October 17-20, 2000, pp. 169-175, ISBN: 960-86733-0-5; D.J. Panagopoulos, L.H. Margaritis, Effects of electromagnetic fields on the reproductive capacity of D. melanogaster, in: P. Stavroulakis (Ed.), Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, Springer, 2003, pp. 545-578], which had shown a large decrease in the oviposition of the same insect caused by GSM radiation. Our present results suggest that the decrease in oviposition previously reported, is due to degeneration of large numbers of egg chambers after DNA fragmentation of their constituent cells, induced by both types of mobile telephony radiation. Induced cell death is recorded for the first time, in all types of cells

  7. The Role of Deoxycytidine Kinase (dCK in Radiation-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK is a key enzyme in deoxyribonucleoside salvage and the anti-tumor activity for many nucleoside analogs. dCK is activated in response to ionizing radiation (IR-induced DNA damage and it is phosphorylated on Serine 74 by the Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM kinase in order to activate the cell cycle G2/M checkpoint. However, whether dCK plays a role in radiation-induced cell death is less clear. In this study, we genetically modified dCK expression by knocking down or expressing a WT (wild-type, S74A (abrogates phosphorylation and S74E (mimics phosphorylation of dCK. We found that dCK could decrease IR-induced total cell death and apoptosis. Moreover, dCK increased IR-induced autophagy and dCK-S74 is required for it. Western blotting showed that the ratio of phospho-Akt/Akt, phospho-mTOR/mTOR, phospho-P70S6K/P70S6K significantly decreased in dCK-WT and dCK-S74E cells than that in dCK-S74A cells following IR treatment. Reciprocal experiment by co-immunoprecipitation showed that mTOR can interact with wild-type dCK. IR increased polyploidy and decreased G2/M arrest in dCK knock-down cells as compared with control cells. Taken together, phosphorylated and activated dCK can inhibit IR-induced cell death including apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe, and promote IR-induced autophagy through PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  8. Intestinal biospy in children with coeliac disease; a Swedish national study of radiation dose and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persliden, J.; Pettersson, H.B.L. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Faelth-Magnusson, K. [University of Linkoeping (Sweden). Faculty of Health Sciences

    1995-12-31

    In paediatric patients, fluoroscopy is used to monitor intestinal biopsies obtained for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. The radiation dose to the child is dependent on the equipment, the sedation of the patient and the experience of the operator. This study presents patient measurements from a national study in Sweden. The cancer excess lifetime mortality risk (CELMR) and the loss of life expectancy (LLE) are calculated for this patient group. TLD measurements were performed by dosemeters at 40 Swedish paediatric departments performing these biopsies. Information was received on sedation techniques, equipment used and fluoroscopy duration. An exponential curve fit was applied to the entrance and exit dose values and this dose distribution was integrated to get the integral dose. From this the mean absorbed dose in the irradiated volume was calculated. The mean and the median of the mean absorbed dose in the irradiated volume to the children was found to be 1.3 mGy (range 0.05-17.5 mGy) and 0.56 mGy respectively. The mean value of the entrance surface dose was 3.0 mGy (range 0.10-27.1 mGy) and the median was 1.4 mGy. The annual collective dose was calculated to 3.3 man Gy, based on 2500 biopsies per year. Variation in doses was found to depend on, e.g. the age of the equipment, focus to patient distance, sedation and operator experience. With this knowledge of doses received by the children in the diagnosis of coeliac disease, CELMR was found to be 0.5 per 25000 biopsies and LLE was 18 years. Recommendations are given on the proper choice of equipment for the reduction of fluoroscopy doses in pediatric radiology. (Author).

  9. Chromosome aberrations and cell death by ionizing radiation: Evolution of a biophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Carante, Mario P.

    2016-11-01

    The manuscript summarizes and discusses the various versions of a radiation damage biophysical model, implemented as a Monte Carlo simulation code, originally developed for chromosome aberrations and subsequently extended to cell death. This extended version has been called BIANCA (BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations). According to the basic assumptions, complex double-strand breaks (called ;Cluster Lesions;, or CLs) produce independent chromosome free-ends, mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d (or un-rejoining) leads to chromosome aberrations, and ;lethal aberrations; (i.e., dicentrics plus rings plus large deletions) lead to clonogenic cell death. The mean number of CLs per Gy and per cell is an adjustable parameter. While in BIANCA the threshold distance d was the second parameter, in a subsequent version, called BIANCA II, d has been fixed as the mean distance between two adjacent interphase chromosome territories, and a new parameter, f, has been introduced to represent the chromosome free-end un-rejoining probability. Simulated dose-response curves for chromosome aberrations and cell survival obtained by the various model versions were compared with literature experimental data. Such comparisons provided indications on some open questions, including the role of energy deposition clustering at the nm and the μm level, the probability for a chromosome free-end to remain un-rejoined, and the relationship between chromosome aberrations and cell death. Although both BIANCA and BIANCA II provided cell survival curves in general agreement with human and hamster fibroblast survival data, BIANCA II allowed for a better reproduction of dicentrics, rings and deletions considered separately. Furthermore, the approach adopted in BIANCA II for d is more consistent with estimates reported in the literature. After testing against aberration and survival data, BIANCA II was applied to investigate the depth-dependence of the radiation

  10. Cell death pathway modification induced by radiation: the role of microRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangming; Hu, Wentao; He, Jinpeng; Xu, Shuai; Ding, Nan; Yao, Bin; Wu, Xin; Pei, Hailong; Hua, Junrui; Wang, Jufang

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function as global negative regulators of gene expression and target one third of protein encoding genes. Even after exposure to low dose irradiation, miRNA expression patterns experience profound alteration in a variety of cell types. Therefore, miRNAs are certainly involved in cellular response to space radiation. It has become a very hot field to investigate the role of miRNAs in space radiation research in the past one decade. Basing on the published literature directly connected to radiation research, miR-21 and miR-34a are the best studied miRNAs whereas PTEN and ATM are the most interesting target genes. ATM is a general target for miR-18a, miR-26a/b, miR27a, miR-100, miR-101 and miR421. However, it also regulates the transcription of miRNAs including miR-21 and miR-125b. miR-21 is a widely studied miRNA and targets PDCD4, Big-h3, hMSH2 and PTEN. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor and its expression is also regulated by miR-22, miR-141, miR-205 and miR221/222. It is worthy to notice that ATM influences the expression of PTEN through miR-21. Another well-known tumor suppressor gene is p53, which is a target of miR-125b. As an important transcriptional factor, p53 regulates the expression of miR-34 family. The members of miR-34 family target Bcl-2, an anti-apoptosis gene. These factors compose a miRNA regulatory network modulating the cellular response to radiation via cell death pathway. Through this network, up-regulation of miR-21 and miR-34a increases the radiosensitivity of various types of cells, and changing the levels of the member of this network might develop a new strategy for radiosensitization. Our work focuses on the function of miR-185 and miR-663, two miRNAs drastically down-regulated by radiation. We have demonstrated ATR and TGF-beta as their targets, respectively. ATR is one of the key factors regulating cellular response to radiation and its reduction by miR-185 sensitizes cells to radiation by accelerating cell

  11. The Role of Photolabile Dermal Nitric Oxide Derivates in Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph V. Suschek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation comprising UVB (280–315 nm and UVA (315–400 nm on a daily basis. Within the last two decades, the molecular and cellular response to UVA/UVB and the possible effects on human health have been investigated extensively. It is generally accepted that the mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of UVB is due to the direct interaction with DNA. On the other hand, by interaction with non-DNA chromophores as endogenous photosensitizers, UVA induces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which play a pivotal role as mediators of UVA-induced injuries in human skin. This review gives a short overview about relevant findings concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying UVA/UVB-induced cell death. Furthermore, we will highlight the potential role of cutaneous antioxidants and photolabile nitric oxide derivates (NODs in skin physiology. UVA-induced decomposition of the NODs, like nitrite, leads not only to non-enzymatic formation of nitric oxide (NO, but also to toxic reactive nitrogen species (RNS, like peroxynitrite. Whereas under antioxidative conditions the generation of protective amounts of NO is favored, under oxidative conditions, less injurious reactive nitrogen species are generated, which may enhance UVA-induced cell death.

  12. From radiation-induced chromosome damage to cell death: modelling basic mechanisms and applications to boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Clerici, A M; Ferrari, C; Protti, N; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Cell death is a crucial endpoint in radiation-induced biological damage: on one side, cell death is a reference endpoint to characterise the action of radiation in biological targets; on the other side, any cancer therapy aims to kill tumour cells. Starting from Lea's target theory, many models have been proposed to interpret radiation-induced cell killing; after briefly discussing some of these models, in this paper, a mechanistic approach based on an experimentally observed link between chromosome aberrations and cell death was presented. More specifically, a model and a Monte Carlo code originally developed for chromosome aberrations were extended to simulate radiation-induced cell death applying an experimentally observed one-to-one relationship between the average number of 'lethal aberrations' (dicentrics, rings and deletions) per cell and -ln S, S being the fraction of surviving cells. Although such observation was related to X rays, in the present work, the approach was also applied to protons and alpha particles. A good agreement between simulation outcomes and literature data provided a model validation for different radiation types. The same approach was then successfully applied to simulate the survival of cells enriched with boron and irradiated with thermal neutrons at the Triga Mark II reactor in Pavia, to mimic a typical treatment for boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. The TGF-β/Smad repressor TG-interacting factor 1 (TGIF1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury independently of a Smad signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hneino

    Full Text Available Despite advances in radiation delivery protocols, exposure of normal tissues during the course of radiation therapy remains a limiting factor of cancer treatment. If the canonical TGF-β/Smad pathway has been extensively studied and implicated in the development of radiation damage in various organs, the precise modalities of its activation following radiation exposure remain elusive. In the present study, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 signaling and target genes expression may depend on radiation-induced modifications in Smad transcriptional co-repressors/inhibitors expressions (TGIF1, SnoN, Ski and Smad7. In endothelial cells (HUVECs and in a model of experimental radiation enteropathy in mice, radiation exposure increases expression of TGF-β/Smad pathway and of its target gene PAI-1, together with the overexpression of Smad co-repressor TGIF1. In mice, TGIF1 deficiency is not associated with changes in the expression of radiation-induced TGF-β pathway-related transcripts following localized small intestinal irradiation. In HUVECs, TGIF1 overexpression or silencing has no influence either on the radiation-induced Smad activation or the Smad3-dependent PAI-1 overexpression. However, TGIF1 genetic deficiency sensitizes mice to radiation-induced intestinal damage after total body or localized small intestinal radiation exposure, demonstrating that TGIF1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury. In conclusion, the TGF-β/Smad co-repressor TGIF1 plays a role in radiation-induced normal tissue damage by a Smad-independent mechanism.

  14. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Radiation Emergency Medicine Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Fujita, Mayumi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Meineke, Viktor [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  15. [Effect of IL-2 on the growth and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells radiated by neutron and mechanisms of IL-2 on the injured IEC-6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kai-fei; Peng, Rui-yun; Gao, Ya-bing; Wang, De-wen; Luo, Qing-liang; Dong, Bo; Ma, Jun-jie

    2007-08-01

    To observe the effect of neutron radiation on intestinal epithelial cells 6 (IEC-6), to study the effect of IL-2 on the proliferation and recovery of neutron-injured IEC-6, and to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of IL-2 on the injured IEC-6. 4Gy-neutron-injured IEC-6 were treated by IL-2, with or without the blocking agent JAK(1) (A77-1726). The change of proliferative activity and death manner of the treated IEC-6 were detected by MTT colorimetry and flow cytometry at 10, 15, 30 minutes and 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 hours respectively. The expression of IL-2Rbeta and the activation of JAK(1) of neutron-injured IEC-6 treated by IL-2 were detected by immunocytochemical stainning and Western blot. After IEC-6 were radiated by 4 Gy neutron for 24 hours, the proliferative activity of IEC-6 decreased markedly but increased strikingly after IL-2 treatment (PIEC-6 in IL-2-treated group decreased (PIEC-6 were treated by IL-2, JAK(1) was activated at 10 and 15 minutes, and the expression of IL-2Rbeta increased apparently at 24 hours. When treated by JAK(1) and IL-2, the proliferative activity of neutron-injured IEC-6 was much lower than that in IL-2-treated group. IL-2 can accelerate the proliferation of neutron-radiated IEC-6 and protect them from neutron injury. IL-2Rbeta and JAK(1) participate in the regulation of neutron-injured IEC-6 by IL-2.

  16. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  17. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  18. The modulation of radiation-induced cell death by genistein in K562 cells:Activation of thymidine kinase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Ho JEONG; Young Hee JIN; Eun Young KANG; Wol Soon JO; Hwan Tae PARK; Jae Dong LEE; Yeo Jin YOO; Soo Jin JEONG

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is one of the most effective tools in cancer therapy. In a previous study, we reported that protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors modulate the radiation responses in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)cell line K562. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, delayed radiation-induced cell death, while non-recepter tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A (HMA) enhances radiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we focused on the modulation of radiation-induced cell death by genistein and performed PCR-select suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH) to understand its molecular mechanism. We identified human thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), which is cell cycle regulatory gene and confirmed expression of TK1 mRNA by Northern blot analysis. Expression of TK1 mRNA and TK 1enzymatic activity were parallel in their increase and decrease. TK1 is involved in G1-S phase transition of cell cycle progression. In cell cycle analysis, we showed that radiation induced G2 arrest in K562 cells but it was not able to sustain. However, the addition of genistein to irradiated cells sustained a prolonged G2 arrest up to 120 h. In addition,the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, cyclin A and cyclin B 1, provided the evidences of G1/S progression and G2-arrest, and their relationship with TK1 in cells treated with radiation and genistein. These results suggest that the activation of TK1 may be critical to modulate the radiation-induced cell death and cell cycle progression in irradiated K562 cells.

  19. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2015-07-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5(+) stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5(+) stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-Cre(ERT2) × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ(+) crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5(+) stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool.

  20. Marked changes in endogenous antioxidant expression precede vitamin A, C and E-protectable, radiation-induced reductions in small intestinal nutrient transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Marjolaine; Kemp, Francis W; Agrawal, Amit; Attanasio, Alicia; Neti, Prasad VSV; Howell, Roger W; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly proliferating epithelial crypt cells of the small intestine are susceptible to radiation-induced oxidative stress, yet there is a dearth of data linking this stress to expression of antioxidant enzymes and to alterations of intestinal nutrient absorption. We previously showed that 5 – 14 d after acute γ-irradiation, intestinal sugar absorption decreased without change in antioxidant enzyme expression. In the present study, we measured antioxidant mRNA and protein expression in mouse intestines taken at early times postirradiation. Observed changes in antioxidant expression are characterized by a rapid decrease within 1 h postirradiation, followed by dramatic upregulation within 4 h, and then downregulation a few days later. The cell type and location expressing the greatest changes in levels of the oxidative stress marker 4HNE and in antioxidant enzymes are, respectively, epithelial cells responsible for nutrient absorption and the crypt region comprised mainly of undifferentiated cells. Consumption of a cocktail of antioxidant vitamins A, C and E, before irradiation, prevents reductions in transport of intestinal sugars, amino acids, bile acids and peptides. Ingestion of antioxidants may blunt radiation-induced decreases in nutrient transport, perhaps by reducing acute oxidative stress in crypt cells, thereby allowing the small intestine to retain its absorptive function when those cells migrate to the villus days after the insult. PMID:20970494

  1. Small intestine biopsy of children with coeliac disease: Influence of X-ray equipment on radiation dosage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persliden, J. [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden); Pettersson, H.B.L. [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden); Stenhammar, L. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Central Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden); Faelth-Magnusson, K. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden)

    1994-10-01

    In paediatric radiology intestinal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease are performed using fluoroscopy. The radiation exposure to the child depends on the X-ray equipment. We report patient measurements from three different equipments (A, B and C) together with a phantom study simulating children of different thicknesses relative to age. The median values of the mean absorbed dose to the child in the irradiated volume were 1.2 mGy (A), 0.79 mGy (B) and 0.15 mGy (C). The results show that the increase in tube potential with increasing distance in one equipment decreases the dosage, and also that modern equipment should be employed. Particularly old image intensifiers should not be used. With an optimal choice of equipment the dosage to the child can be reduced fourfold. The combination of an optimal technique of sedation and an experienced operator can reduce the dosage tenfold. (orig.)

  2. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in radiation exposed small intestinal mucosa of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwag, Hyon Joo [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ja; Rhee, Chung Sik [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes whose main function is the degradation of the extracellular matrix. Several studies have revealed that MMPs and TIMPs are related to the wound healing process and in photoaging caused by ultraviolet irradiation. However, the expressions of MMP and TIMP after irradiation have not, to the best of our knowledge, been studied. This study investigates the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in rat intestinal mucosa following irradiation. The entire abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated using a single dose method. The rats were sacrificed on day 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 14 following irradiation. Histopathological observations were made using hematoxilin and eosin staining. The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined using immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and ELISA. Radiation induced damage, associated with atrophic villi, and infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed from the first postirradiation day, and severe tissue damage was observed on the second and the third postirradiation days. An increase in mitosis and the number of regenerating crypts, as evidence of regeneration, were most noticeable on the fifth postirradiation day. From the immunohistochemistry, the MMP-2 expression was observed from the first postirradiation day, but was most conspicuous on the third and the fifth postirradiation days. The TIMP-2 expression was most conspicuous on the fifth postirradiation day. From the immunoblotting, the MMP-2 expression was strongly positive on the third postirradiation day, and that of TIMP-2 showed a strong positive response on the fifth postirradiation day. In ELISA, tests, the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2. were increased in the postirradiation groups compared to those of the normal controls, and showed a maximum increase on the fifth postirradiation day. These results were statistically significant. The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were increased in the intestinal mucosa of the rats

  3. Maintenance of radiation-induced intestinal fibrosis: Cellular and molecular features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valérie Haydont; Marie-Catherine Vozenin-Brotons

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in cell and molecular radiobiology clearly showed that tissue response to radiation injury cannot be restricted to a simple cell-killing process, but depends upon continuous and integrated pathogenic processes, involving cell differentiation and crosstalk between the various cellular components of the tissue within the extracellular matrix. Thus, the prior concept of primary cell target in which a single-cell type (whatever it's epithelial or endothelial cells) dictates the whole tissue response to radiation injury has to be replaced by the occurrence of coordinated multicellular response that may either lead to tissue recovery or to sequel development. In this context, the present review will focus on the maintenance of the radiation-induced wound healing and fibrogenic signals triggered by and through the microenvironment toward the mesencnymal cell compartment, and will highlight how sequential and sustained modifications in cell phenotypes will in cascade modify cell-to-cell interactions and tissue composition.

  4. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell; Effets des rayonnements ionisants sur la structure et la fonction de la cellule epitheliale intestinale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haton, C

    2005-06-15

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  5. Influencing factors of rat small intestinal epithelial cell cultivation and effects of radiation on cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Ze Ran; Yong Ping Su; Yong Jiang Wei; Guo Ping Ai; Tian Min Cheng; Yuan Lin

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONCrypt epithelial cells in normal small intestineproliferate at a high speed. But they are verydifficult to culture in vitro and passage stably. A lotof studies have been done[1-16]. Some domestic labsisolated and cultured crypt cells from embryonalintestines and aseptic animal intestine, but failed.We introduced normal rat epithelial cell line-IEC-6from the USA and its living condition for stablepassage was successfully established after trials. Thecell line was testified to be the small intestinalepithelial cell by electron microscopy,immunihistochemistry and enzymatic histoch-emistry. It has been applied to some relatedresearch work[17-21]. It was found that manyfactors were involved in the culture system. Ourpresent study focuses on the culture method and theinfluencing factors on IEC-6.

  6. DNA Repair Domain Modeling Can Predict Cell Death and Mutation Frequency for Wide Range Spectrum of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger, Louise; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Plante, Ianik; Evain, Trevor; Penninckx, Sebastien; Blattnig, Steve R.; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2017-01-01

    Exploration missions to Mars and other destinations raise many questions about the health of astronauts. The continuous exposure of astronauts to galactic cosmic rays is one of the main concerns for long-term missions. Cosmic ionizing radiations are composed of different ions of various charges and energies notably, highly charged energy (HZE) particles. The HZE particles have been shown to be more carcinogenic than low-LET radiation, suggesting the severity of chromosomal aberrations induced by HZE particles is one possible explanation. However, most mathematical models predicting cell death and mutation frequency are based on directly fitting various HZE dose response and are in essence empirical approaches. In this work, we assume a simple biological mechanism to model DNA repair and use it to simultaneously explain the low- and high-LET response using the exact same fitting parameters. Our work shows that the geometrical position of DNA repair along tracks of heavy ions are sufficient to explain why high-LET particles can induce more death and mutations. Our model is based on assuming DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired within repair domain, and that any DSBs located within the same repair domain cluster into one repair unit, facilitating chromosomal rearrangements and increasing the probability of cell death. We introduced this model in 2014 using simplified microdosimetry profiles to predict cell death. In this work, we collaborated with NASA Johnson Space Center to generate more accurate microdosimetry profiles derived by Monte Carlo techniques, taking into account track structure of HZE particles and simulating DSBs in realistic cell geometry. We simulated 224 data points (D, A, Z, E) with the BDSTRACKS model, leading to a large coverage of LET from 10 to 2,400 keV/µm. This model was used to generate theoretical RBE for various particles and energies for both cell death and mutation frequencies. The RBE LET dependence is in agreement with

  7. The effects of herbs on the radiation-induced apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; An, Mi Ra; Nah, Seung Yeol; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jae Ha; Shin, Dong Ho [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Sung Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik [Sangju National Univ., Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    This study was performed to determine the effect of several herbs on radiation-induced apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells. Longyanrou(Euphoris logana), Suanzaoren(Zizyphus vulgaris), Yuanzhi(Polygala tenuifolia), Rensan(Panax ginseng), Fuling(Poria cocos), Muxiang(Saussurea lappa), Chuanxiong(Cnidium offcinale), Baishaoyao(Paeonia lactifolia), Shengma(Cimicifuga heracleifolia), Chaihu(Bupleurum falcatum) and Dongchongxiacao(Paecilomyces japonica) reduced the frequency of radiation-induced apoptosis(p<0.05). Although the mechanisms of this effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that Longyanrou, Suanzaoren, Yuanzhi, Rensan, Fuling, Muxiang, Chuanxiong, Baishaoyao, Shengma, Chaihu and Dongchongxiacao might be useful inhibitors of apoptosis, especially since these are relative nontoxic natural products.

  8. 慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的治疗%Management of chronic radiation enteritis with intestinal obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周创业; 周振理; 马军宏; 吕鹏

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的治疗方法及疗效.方法:回顾分析21例慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的临床资料,对其进行总结.结果:7例保守治疗的病例中有5例复发,治愈率仅(28.6%,2/7),保守治疗效果不佳.14例手术患者总体疗效满意.10例行肠切除吻合术的患者,治愈率达(90.0%,9/10),可见手术治疗为慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的最佳方法.1例出现吻合口瘘的患者,再次手术证实为第1次手术切除肠管过少,残留病变肠管所致.结论:慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的最佳治疗方法为手术治疗,手术方式应尽量行肠切除一期吻合术,手术时应尽量切除全部病变肠管,避免出现吻合口瘘.同时肠造口术或旁路手术也是必要术式,应根据具体情况选择.%AIM: To evaluate the effect of various treatment methods for chronic radiation enteritis with concurrent intestinal obstruction.METHODS: The clinical data for 21 patients with chronic radiation enteritis and intestinal obstruction was retrospectively analyzed.RESULTS: Five of seven patients who received conservative treatment experienced relapse, and the cure rate was only 28.6%. Fourteen patients who underwent surgical treatment (of them ten patients underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis) had satisfactory outcome, and the cure rate was as high as 90.0%. One patient developed intestinal fistula, and re-operation confirmed that it was caused by residual radiation enteritis.CONCLUSION: Surgical treatment is the bestway for treatment of chronic radiation enteritis with intestinal obstruction. All intestinal lesions should be surgically removed to avoid intestinal fistula.

  9. Effect of adiponectin deficiency on intestinal damage and hematopoietic responses of mice exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponemone, Venkatesh; Fayad, Raja; Gove, Melissa E.; Pini, Maria [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Fantuzzi, Giamila, E-mail: giamila@uic.edu [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-08-07

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipose tissue-derived cytokine that regulates insulin sensitivity and inflammation. It is also involved in modulation of cell proliferation by binding to various growth factors. Based on its known effects in modulating cell proliferation and oxidative stress, APN may potentially be involved in regulating tissue damage and repair following irradiation. Adiponectin KO mice and their WT littermates were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 3 or 6 Gy gamma radiation. Radiation-induced alterations were studied in jejunum, blood, bone marrow and thymus at days 1 and 5 post-irradiation and compared with sham-irradiated groups. In WT mice, irradiation did not significantly alter serum APN levels while inducing a significant decrease in serum leptin. Irradiation caused a significant reduction in thymocyte cellularity, with concomitant decrease in CD4{sup +}, CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell populations, with no significant differences between WT and APN KO mice. Irradiation resulted in a significantly higher increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes in the blood of APN KO compared with WT mice, whereas frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow at day 5 was significantly higher in WT compared with APN KO mice. Finally, irradiation induced similar alterations in villus height and crypt cell proliferation in the jejunum of WT and APN KO mice. Jejunum explants from sham-irradiated APN KO mice produced higher levels of IL-6 compared with tissue from WT animals, but the difference was no longer apparent following irradiation. Our data indicate that APN deficiency does not play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury in mice, while it may participate in regulation of damage to the hematopoietic system.

  10. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Schult.) DC (Rubiaceae) Sensitizes THP-1 Cells to Radiation-induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lisa; Buckner, Alison; Buckner, Carly A; Cano, Pablo; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Schult.) DC (Rubiaceae), known as Cat's Claw or Uña de gato, is a traditionally used medicinal plant native to Peru. Some studies have shown that U. tomentosa can act as an antiapoptotic agent and enhance DNA repair in chemotherapy-treated cells although others have shown that U. tomentosa enhanced apoptosis. To determine if treatment with U. tomentosa can significantly enhance cell death in THP-1 cells exposed to ionizing radiation. THP-1 monocyte-like cells were treated with ethanolic extracts of U. tomentosa in the presence or absence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide and then exposed to ionizing radiation. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT and clonogenic assays and the effects on cell cycle measured by flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Changes in cell signaling were determined by immunoblotting and cytokine ELISA and activation of apoptosis measured by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation analysis. Treatment of THP-1 cells with U. tomentosa had a small effect on cell proliferation. However, when the U. tomentosa-pretreated cells were also subjected to 5-9 Gy ionizing radiation, they showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation and increased cellular apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. Treatment with U. tomentosa also decreased the expression of Cyclin E and Cyclin B, key regulators of normal cell cycle progression, and decreased the phosphorylation of various stress-activated, cell survival proteins including p38, ERK, and SAP/JNK kinase. These results suggest that U. tomentosa could be useful in enhancing cell death following anticancer therapies including ionizing radiation. Treatment of THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa increases their susceptibility to X-rays. The combination of Uncaria tomentosa and X-ray exposure strongly inhibits cell signaling and promotes apoptosis. Abbreviations Used: LPS: Lipopolysaccharide, TNF: Tumor necrosis factor: IL-1, Interleukin-1: SDS: Sodium

  11. Involvement of ERK-Nrf-2 signaling in ionizing radiation induced cell death in normal and tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S Patwardhan

    Full Text Available Prolonged oxidative stress favors tumorigenic environment and inflammation. Oxidative stress may trigger redox adaptation mechanism(s in tumor cells but not normal cells. This may increase levels of intracellular antioxidants and establish a new redox homeostasis. Nrf-2, a master regulator of battery of antioxidant genes is constitutively activated in many tumor cells. Here we show that, murine T cell lymphoma EL-4 cells show constitutive and inducible radioresistance via activation of Nrf-2/ERK pathway. EL-4 cells contained lower levels of ROS than their normal counterpart murine splenic lymphocytes. In response to radiation, the thiol redox circuits, GSH and thioredoxin were modified in EL-4 cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced clonogenic potential of EL-4 cells. Unirradiated lymphoma cells showed nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2, upregulation of its dependent genes and protein levels. Interestingly, MEK inhibitor abrogated its nuclear translocation suggesting role of ERK in basal and radiation induced Nrf-2 activation in tumor cells. Double knockdown of ERK and Nrf-2 resulted in higher sensitivity to radiation induced cell death as compared to individual knockdown cells. Importantly, NF-kB which is reported to be constitutively active in many tumors was not present at basal levels in EL-4 cells and its inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity of EL-4 cells. Thus our results reveal that, tumor cells which are subjected to heightened oxidative stress employ master regulator cellular redox homeostasis Nrf-2 for prevention of radiation induced cell death. Our study reveals the molecular basis of tumor radioresistance and highlights role of Nrf-2 and ERK.

  12. Intestinal Radiation-Induced Stricture Favours Small Bowel Obstruction by Phytobezoar: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Quercioli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bezoars represent the fifth most frequent cause of acute small bowel obstruction. Phytobezoar is the most common type of bezoar. It is a concretion of undigestible fibers derived from ingested vegetables and fruits. We report a case of a woman with a 1-year history of recurrent epigastric and periumbilical abdominal pain with intermittent vomiting caused by phytobezoar of the terminal ileum. After careful investigation of the case and review of literature, we identified the factor involved in bezoar formation as radiation-induced ileal stenosis due to previous treatment for a pelvic tumour. This report provides evidence to consider phytobezoar as a possible cause of small bowel obstruction in patients previously treated with abdominal radiotherapy.

  13. Indirect Tumor Cell Death After High-Dose Hypofractionated Irradiation: Implications for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiation Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chang W., E-mail: songx001@umn.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Park, Inhwan [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Koonce, Nathan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hui, Susanta [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Kim, Mi-Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dusenbery, Kathryn E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Sperduto, Paul W. [Minneapolis Radiation Oncology and Gamma Knife Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Cho, L. Chinsoo [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reveal the biological mechanisms underlying stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: FSaII fibrosarcomas grown subcutaneously in the hind limbs of C3H mice were irradiated with 10 to 30 Gy of X rays in a single fraction, and the clonogenic cell survival was determined with in vivo–in vitro excision assay immediately or 2 to 5 days after irradiation. The effects of radiation on the intratumor microenvironment were studied using immunohistochemical methods. Results: After cells were irradiated with 15 or 20 Gy, cell survival in FSaII tumors declined for 2 to 3 days and began to recover thereafter in some but not all tumors. After irradiation with 30 Gy, cell survival declined continuously for 5 days. Cell survival in some tumors 5 days after 20 to 30 Gy irradiation was 2 to 3 logs less than that immediately after irradiation. Irradiation with 20 Gy markedly reduced blood perfusion, upregulated HIF-1α, and increased carbonic anhydrase-9 expression, indicating that irradiation increased tumor hypoxia. In addition, expression of VEGF also increased in the tumor tissue after 20 Gy irradiation, probably due to the increase in HIF-1α activity. Conclusions: Irradiation of FSaII tumors with 15 to 30 Gy in a single dose caused dose-dependent secondary cell death, most likely by causing vascular damage accompanied by deterioration of intratumor microenvironment. Such indirect tumor cell death may play a crucial role in the control of human tumors with SBRT and SRS.

  14. The intestinal stem cell.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelium of the adult mammalian intestine is in a constant dialog with its underlying mesenchyme to direct progenitor proliferation, lineage commitment, terminal differentiation, and, ultimately, cell death. The epithelium is shaped into spatially distinct compartments that are dedicated to

  15. Combined low dose ionizing radiation and green tea-derived epigallocatechin-3-gallate treatment induces human brain endothelial cells death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Annabi, Borhane; Lachambre, Marie-Paule; Kim, Kwang Sik; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Moumdjian, Robert; Béliveau, Richard

    2006-11-01

    The microvasculature of brain tumors has been proposed as the primary target for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis. However, the contribution of low dose IR-induced non-apoptotic cell death pathways has not been investigated. This study aimed to characterize the effect of IR on human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and to assess the combined effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), a green tea-derived anti-angiogenic molecule. HBMEC were treated with EGCg, irradiated with a sublethal (effective in EGCg pretreated-cells reaching 70% cell death. Analysis of cell cycle revealed that IR-induced cell accumulation in G2-phase. Expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(CIP/Waf1) and p27(Kip) were increased by EGCg and IR. Although random DNA fragmentation increased by approximately 40% following combined EGCg/IR treatments, the synergistic reduction of cell survival was not related to increased pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9 and cytochrome C proteins. Cell necrosis increased 5-fold following combined EGCg/IR treatments while no changes in early or late apoptosis were observed. Our results suggest that the synergistic effects of combined EGCg/IR treatments may be related to necrosis, a non-apoptotic cell death pathway. Strategies sensitizing brain tumor-derived EC to IR may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy and EGCg may represent such a potential agent.

  16. Protective role of R-spondin1, an intestinal stem cell growth factor, against radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Bhanja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS results from a combination of direct cytocidal effects on intestinal crypt and endothelial cells and subsequent loss of the mucosal barrier, resulting in electrolyte imbalance, diarrhea, weight loss, infection and mortality. Because R-spondin1 (Rspo1 acts as a mitogenic factor for intestinal stem cells, we hypothesized that systemic administration of Rspo1 would amplify the intestinal crypt cells and accelerate the regeneration of the irradiated intestine, thereby, ameliorating RIGS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Male C57Bl/6 mice received recombinant adenovirus expressing human R-spondin1 (AdRspo1 or E.coli Lacz (AdLacz, 1-3 days before whole body irradiation (WBI or abdominal irradiation (AIR. Post-irradiation survival was assessed by Kaplan Meier analysis. RIGS was assessed by histological examination of intestine after hematoxilin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining of BrdU incorporation, Lgr5 and beta-catenin expression and TUNEL staining. The xylose absorption test (XAT was performed to evaluate the functional integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier. In order to examine the effect of R-spondin1 on tumor growth, AdRspo1 and AdLacZ was administered in the animals having palpable tumor and then exposed to AIR. There was a significant increase in survival in AdRspo1 cohorts compared to AdLacZ (p<0.003 controls, following WBI (10.4 Gy. Significant delay in tumor growth was observed after AIR in both cohorts AdRspo1 and AdLacZ but AdRspo1 treated animals showed improved survival compared to AdLacZ. Histological analysis and XAT demonstrated significant structural and functional regeneration of the intestine in irradiated animals following AdRspo1 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increase in Lgr5+ve crypt cells and the translocation of beta-catenin from the cytosol to nucleus and upregulation of beta-catenin target genes in AdRspo1-treated mice, as

  17. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Martinel Lamas

    Full Text Available Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01. This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01. JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  18. Effect of combined radiation injury on cell death and inflammation in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sachin S; Meeks, Christopher J; Mordwinkin, Nicholas M; Espinoza, Theresa B; Louie, Stan G; diZerega, Gere S; Rodgers, Kathleen E

    2015-07-01

    In the event of a nuclear disaster, the individuals proximal to the source of radiation will be exposed to combined radiation injury. As irradiation delays cutaneous repair, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI) on apoptosis and inflammation at the site of skin injury. Male C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to no injury, thermal injury only, radiation only (1 and 6 Gy) and CRBI (1 and 6 Gy) and euthanized at various times after for skin collection. TUNEL staining revealed that the CRBI 6 Gy group had a delayed and increased apoptotic response. This correlated with decreased recovery of live cells as compared to the other injuries. Similar response was observed when cleaved-caspase-3 immunohistochemical staining was compared between CRBI 6 Gy and thermal injury. TNFR1, caspase 8, Bax and IL-6 mRNA expression revealed that the higher CRBI group had delayed increase in mRNA expression as compared to thermal injury alone. RIPK1 mRNA expression and necrotic cell counts were delayed in the CRBI 6 Gy group to day 5. TNF-α and NFκB expression peaked in the CRBI 6 Gy group at day 1 and was much higher than the other injuries. Also, inflammatory cell counts in the CRBI 6 Gy group were lower at early time points as compared to thermal injury by itself. These data suggest that CRBI delays and exacerbates apoptosis and inflammation in skin as well as increases necrosis thus resulting in delayed wound healing.

  19. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (−1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC+ cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury. PMID:28289414

  20. Programmed cell death as a prognostic indicator for radiation therapy in cervical carcinoma patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhosle S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In clinical practice, radiation therapy often fails in cervical carcinoma stage IIIB and there is a need to develop a predictive assay for prognosis of radiation treatment outcome in cancer patient. We have attempted to evaluate the relevance of changes in Membrane Fluidity (MF and associated apoptotic cell death in cervical cancer cells after first fractionated dose of radiation therapy to treatment outcome of stage IIIB cervical carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods: Biopsies of 15 patients with histologically proven cervix cancer were collected from the patients before and 24 h after first fractionated radiation dose of 2 grays (Gy. Cell suspension made in Dulbecco′s Modified Eagle′s Medium (DMEM were used for further investigations and cell suspension of cervix cancer patient were used to measure MF by fluorescence polarization method and apoptotic index (AI was determined by Tdt dUTP Nucleotide End Labeling (TUNEL assay. Results: A substantial increase in MF and AI was observed in cervical cancer cells irradiated ex vivo . A significant correlation ( P < 0.001 was found between the changes in AI after first fractionated dose of radiotherapy and treatment outcome of patients. No significant correlation ( P > 0.1 was detected between changes in MF and treatment outcome of patients. Conclusion: Preliminary results showed significant change in MF and a marked increase in percentage apoptosis of cervix cancer cells irradiated ex vivo . The changes in AI after first fractionated dose of radiotherapy in cervical carcinoma patients may provide a predictor of prognosis for radiotherapy in uterine cervical carcinoma patients.

  1. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Small bowel; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: intestin grele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Pointreau, Y.; Barillot, I. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHRU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Roche-Forestier, S. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France); Barillot, I. [Universite Francois-Rabelais, centre de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France)

    2010-07-15

    The small bowel is a hollow organ involved in the transit and absorption of food. In relation to its anatomical location, a significant amount of this organ is exposed in whole or in part to ionizing radiation in external radiotherapy during abdominal or pelvic irradiation either for primary cancers or metastasis. The acute functional changes during external beam radiation are mainly leading to diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating. The main late side effects of irradiation of the small intestine are chronic diarrhea, malabsorption with steatorrhoea, abdominal spasms, intestinal obstruction, bleeding and fistulas. The architecture of the small intestine may be considered as parallel with a significant correlation between the irradiated volume of small bowel and the likelihood of acute toxicity, whatever the dose. The literature analysis recommends to consider the volume of small bowel receiving 15 Gy (threshold of 100 to 200 cm{sup 3}) but also 30 and 50 Gy (thresholds of 35 to 300 cm{sup 3}, depending on the level of dose considered). Modern techniques of conformal radiotherapy with modulated intensity will probably have beneficial impact on small bowel toxicity. (authors)

  2. Major intestinal complications of radiotherapy. Management and nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitel, M.; To, T.B.

    1987-12-01

    Hospitalization was required in 57 patients for intestinal injuries following radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix, endometrium, ovary, bladder, rectum, and other primary sites. Intestinal complications included stenosis, perforation, rectal ulcer, and rectovaginal, ileovaginal, and ileovesical fistula; 27 patients had multiple intestinal complications. Operation was necessary in 33 patients, as follows: bowel resections, 18; colostomy alone, five; adhesiolysis, five; ileocolic bypass, three; and Hartmann's procedure for sigmoid perforation, two. Five anastomotic leaks and six postoperative deaths occurred. Causes of death among the remaining patients included residual cancer (ten), de novo bowel cancer (two), radiation injury (four), and unrelated causes (six). Resection to uninvolved bowel, omental wrap of anterior resection anastomosis, avoidance of unnecessary adhesiolysis, and long-tube orientation seemed to contribute to successful operations. Nutritional support was used for repletion, post-operative fistulas, and short-gut syndrome.

  3. AMRI-59 has a role of radiosensitizer via enhancement of γ-ionizing radiation-induced apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wan Gi; Cho, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Ju Yeon; Hwang, Sang Gu; Um, Hong Duck; Park, Jong Kuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Recent in vitro studies have suggested that may increase the invasiveness of some cancer cells (e.g., glioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer cells) by stimulating several intracellular signaling pathways and in vivo studies have found that radiotherapy of primary tumor sites may promote metastasis. Thus, in addition to having therapeutic effects, IR might promote the malignant traits of surviving cancer cells. The existing efforts to develop radiosensitizing agents have focused on overcoming radioresistance and reducing damage to normal tissues. Recently, concepts of personalized- or precision medicine are developed due to advancement of mega data technique, which provide new targets to develop new anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we sought to identify the radiosensitizer effect of AMRI-59 in vitro and in vivo., which is recently developed specific inhibitor of peroxiredoxin (Prx) I. AMRI-59 enhanced radiation-induced cell death and its mean calculated dose enhancement ratio was 1.26. We also found combination of AMRI-59 and IR In a xenograft assay, the combined PHCM and radiation group showed 14.3 days of growth delay versus the control in terms of tumor growth. The enhancement factor of this combined treatment was determined to be 2.03.

  4. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some generally recognized patterns. Symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of acute intestinal ischemia typically ... confusion in older adults Symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia Signs and symptoms of chronic intestinal ischemia can ...

  5. IR spectroscopic characteristics of cell cycle and cell death probed by synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform IR spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, H. Y.; Martin, M. C.; Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K.; McKinney, W. R.

    2000-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform IR (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy allows the study of individual living cells with a high signal to noise ratio. Here we report the use of the SR-FTIR technique to investigate changes in IR spectral features from individual human lung fibroblast (IMR-90) cells in vitro at different points in their cell cycle. Clear changes are observed in the spectral regions corresponding to proteins, DNA, and RNA as a cell changes from the G(1)-phase to the S-phase and finally into mitosis. These spectral changes include markers for the changing secondary structure of proteins in the cell, as well as variations in DNA/RNA content and packing as the cell cycle progresses. We also observe spectral features that indicate that occasional cells are undergoing various steps in the process of cell death. The dying or dead cell has a shift in the protein amide I and II bands corresponding to changing protein morphologies, and a significant increase in the intensity of an ester carbonyl C===O peak at 1743 cm(-1) is observed. Copyright John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers (Biospectroscopy) 57: 329-335, 2000.

  6. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation.

  7. Space radiation exposure persistently increased leptin and IGF1 in serum and activated leptin-IGF1 signaling axis in mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Travel into outer space is fraught with risk of exposure to energetic heavy ion radiation such as (56)Fe ions, which due to its high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics deposits higher energy per unit volume of tissue traversed and thus more damaging to cells relative to low-LET radiation such as γ rays. However, estimates of human health risk from energetic heavy ion exposure are hampered due to lack of tissue specific in vivo molecular data. We investigated long-term effects of (56)Fe radiation on adipokines and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling axis in mouse intestine and colon. Six- to eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1.6 Gy of (56)Fe ions. Serum and tissues were collected up to twelve months post-irradiation. Serum was analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, IGF1, and IGF binding protein 3. Receptor expressions and downstream signaling pathway alterations were studied in tissues. Irradiation increased leptin and IGF1 levels in serum, and IGF1R and leptin receptor expression in tissues. When considered along with upregulated Jak2/Stat3 pathways and cell proliferation, our data supports the notion that space radiation exposure is a risk to endocrine alterations with implications for chronic pathophysiologic changes in gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  9. Intestinal obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  10. Apoptotic cell death during Drosophila oogenesis is differentially increased by electromagnetic radiation depending on modulation, intensity and duration of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagioglou, Niki E; Manta, Areti K; Giannarakis, Ioannis K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2016-01-01

    Present generations are being repeatedly exposed to different types and doses of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) from wireless technologies (FM radio, TETRA and TV stations, GSM and UMTS phones/base stations, Wi-Fi networks, DECT phones). Although there is controversy on the published data regarding the non-thermal effects of NIR, studies have convincingly demonstrated bioeffects. Their results indicate that modulation, intensity, exposure duration and model system are important factors determining the biological response to irradiation. Attempting to address the dependence of NIR bioeffectiveness on these factors, apoptosis in the model biological system Drosophila melanogaster was studied under different exposure protocols. A signal generator was used operating alternatively under Continuous Wave (CW) or Frequency Modulation (FM) emission modes, at three power output values (10 dB, 0, -10 dB), under four carrier frequencies (100, 395, 682, 900 MHz). Newly emerged flies were exposed either acutely (6 min or 60 min on the 6th day), or repeatedly (6 min or 60 min daily for the first 6 days of their life). All exposure protocols resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death (ACD) observed in egg chambers, even at very low electric field strengths. FM waves seem to have a stronger effect in ACD than continuous waves. Regarding intensity and temporal exposure pattern, EMF-biological tissue interaction is not linear in response. Intensity threshold for the induction of biological effects depends on frequency, modulation and temporal exposure pattern with unknown so far mechanisms. Given this complexity, translating such experimental data into possible human exposure guidelines is yet arbitrary.

  11. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) and enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation trigger antioxidant enzyme metabolism and programmed cell death in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huize; Gong, Yan; Han, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming increasingly widespread in the environment. Free cadmium ions released from commonly used NPs under ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation are potentially toxic to living organisms. With increasing levels of UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the ozone layer, the potential additive effect of NPs and UV-B radiation on plants is of concern. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-QDs), a common form of NP, and UV-B radiation on wheat seedlings. Graded doses of CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation were tested, either alone or in combination, based on physical characteristics of 5-day-old seedlings. Treatments of wheat seedlings with either CdTe-QDs (200 mg/L) or UV-B radiation (10 KJ/m(2)/d) induced the activation of wheat antioxidant enzymes. CdTe-QDs accumulation in plant root cells resulted in programmed cell death as detected by DNA laddering. CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation inhibited root and shoot growth, respectively. Additive inhibitory effects were observed in the combined treatment group. This research described the effects of UV-B and CdTe-QDs on plant growth. Furthermore, the finding that CdTe-QDs accumulate during the life cycle of plants highlights the need for sustained assessments of these interactions.

  12. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs and enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation trigger antioxidant enzyme metabolism and programmed cell death in wheat seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huize Chen

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are becoming increasingly widespread in the environment. Free cadmium ions released from commonly used NPs under ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation are potentially toxic to living organisms. With increasing levels of UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the ozone layer, the potential additive effect of NPs and UV-B radiation on plants is of concern. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-QDs, a common form of NP, and UV-B radiation on wheat seedlings. Graded doses of CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation were tested, either alone or in combination, based on physical characteristics of 5-day-old seedlings. Treatments of wheat seedlings with either CdTe-QDs (200 mg/L or UV-B radiation (10 KJ/m(2/d induced the activation of wheat antioxidant enzymes. CdTe-QDs accumulation in plant root cells resulted in programmed cell death as detected by DNA laddering. CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation inhibited root and shoot growth, respectively. Additive inhibitory effects were observed in the combined treatment group. This research described the effects of UV-B and CdTe-QDs on plant growth. Furthermore, the finding that CdTe-QDs accumulate during the life cycle of plants highlights the need for sustained assessments of these interactions.

  13. Intestinal failure in obstructive jaundice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F. Assimakopoulos; Constantine E. Vagianos; Aristides Charonis; Vassiliki N. Nikolopoulou; Chrisoula D. Scopa

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR We read with great interest the article by Ding LA and LiJS, which aimed to review the current knowledge on the physiology of normal intestinal barrier function and highlight the role of intestinal failure after various injurious insults in the development of septic complications or multiple organ failure with subsequent rapid clinical deterioration or even death.

  14. Impairment of the non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination pathways of DNA double strand break repair: Impact on spontaneous and radiation-induced mammary and intestinal tumour risk in Apc min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Jackie W; Coster, Margaret; Bouffler, Simon D

    2015-11-01

    Female Apc(min/+) mice carrying the BALB/c variant of Prkdc or heterozygous knockout for Xrcc2, were sham- or 2 Gy X-irradiated as adults to compare the effect of mild impairments of double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) respectively on spontaneous and radiation-induced mammary and intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice with impaired NHEJ showed no difference in incidence of spontaneous mammary tumours, compared with matched controls, (2.46 fold, P=0.121) and significantly less following irradiation (radiation-induced excess; 0.35 fold, P=0.008). In contrast mice with impaired HR presented with significantly less spontaneous mammary tumours than matched controls (0.33 fold, P=0.027) and significantly more following irradiation (radiation-induced excess; 3.3 fold, P=0.016). Spontaneous and radiation-induced intestinal adenoma multiplicity in the same groups were significantly greater than matched controls for mice with impaired NHEJ (sham; 1.29 fold, P<0.001, radiation-induced excess; 2.55 fold, P<0.001) and mice with impaired HR showed no significant differences (sham; 0.92 fold, P=0.166, radiation-induced excess; 1.16, P=0.274). Genetic insertion events were common in spontaneous tumours from NHEJ impaired mice compared with matched controls. γH2AX foci analysis suggests a significantly faster rate of DSB repair (MANOVA P<0.001) in intestinal than mammary tissue; apoptosis was also higher in irradiated intestine. To conclude, results suggest that pathway of choice for repair of spontaneous and radiation-induced DSBs is influenced by tissue type. NHEJ appears to play a greater role in DSB repair in intestinal tissue since impairment by functional change of Prkdc significantly increases the rate of mis-repair in intestinal but not mammary tissue. HR appears to play a greater role in DSB repair in adult mammary tissue since impaired HR results in significant changes in mammary but not in the intestinal

  15. Characterization and pharmacological modulation of intestinal inflammation induced by ionizing radiation; Caracterisation et modulation pharmacologique de l'inflammation intestinale induite par les rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gremy, O

    2006-12-15

    The use of radiation therapy to treat abdominal and pelvic malignancies inevitably involves exposure of healthy intestinal tissues which are very radiosensitive. As a result, most patients experience symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea. Such symptoms are associated with acute damage to intestine mucosa including radio-induced inflammatory processes. With a rat model of colorectal fractionated radiation, we have shown a gradual development of a colonic inflammation during radiation planning, without evident tissue injury. This radio-induced inflammation is characterized not only by the sur expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, a NF-kB activation, but also by a repression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear receptors PPARa and RXRa, both involved in inflammation control. This early inflammation is associated with a discreet neutrophil recruitment and a macrophage accumulation. Macrophages are still abnormally numerous in tissue 27 weeks after the last day of irradiation. Inflammatory process is the most often related to a specific immune profile, either a type Th1 leading to a cellular immune response, or a type Th2 for humoral immunity. According to our studies, a unique abdominal radiation in the rat induces an ileum inflammation and an immune imbalance resulting in a Th2-type profile. Inhibiting this profile is important as its persistence promotes chronic inflammation, predisposition to bacterial infections and fibrosis which is the main delayed side-effect of radiotherapy. The treatment of rats with an immuno-modulator compound, the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (C.A.P.E.), have the potential to both reduce ileal mucosal inflammation and inhibit the radio-induced Th2 status. In order to search new therapeutic molecular target, we has been interested in the PPARg nuclear receptor involved in the maintenance of colon mucosal integrity. In our abdominal irradiation model, we have demonstrated that the prophylactic

  16. Tissue toxicity induced by ionizing radiation to the normal intestine: Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms to improve the medical management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MC Vozenin-Brotons

    2007-01-01

    @@ At the present time, more than one-half of all cancer patients are treated with radiation therapy. Despite a good therapeutic index, radiotherapy can disable normal tissue injury to normal tissues in long-term cancer survivors.

  17. Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Necroptosis in the Gut and Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Anna; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host's internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  18. Interactions of radiation and adriamycin, bleomycin, mitomycin C or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II in intestinal crypt cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von der Maase, H

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and adriamycin (ADM), bleomycin (BLM), mitomycin C (MM-C), or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cis-DDP) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. ADM administered from 24 h before to 48 h after irradiation resulted in an almost...

  19. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Tae-Boo [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seok-Il [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jae-Youn [Laboratory of Modulation of Radiobiological Responses, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Gyu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Han, E-mail: yhlee87@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  20. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death; Regulation du cycle cellulaire et de la mort cellulaire radio-induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  1. Anti-tumor activity of TRA-8 anti-death receptor 5 (DR5) monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in a cervical cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, J Michael; Oliver, Patsy G; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Wenquan; Alvarez, Ronald D; Grizzle, William E; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2006-04-01

    There is substantial evidence that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) causes apoptosis via activation of death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). We sought to determine the therapeutic potential of TRA-8 (anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody) in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in a cervical cancer model. DR5 expression in 7 human cervical cancer cell lines was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence using murine TRA-8 in combination with flow cytometry. Cell lines were treated with TRA-8 alone or in combination with cisplatin, topotecan, or radiation, and cytotoxicity assays were performed. Mice were inoculated with ME-180 cancer cells and treated with different combinations of therapy. Animals receiving antibody were injected intraperitoneally with 200 microg of TRA-8. Animals received 9 Gy 60Co radiation divided into 3 fractions and 3 intraperitoneal doses of cisplatin (6 mg/kg) 1 h before radiation. A similar experiment was performed using topotecan (2 mg/kg) as the chemotherapeutic agent. DR5 was expressed to a varying degree on the cervical cancer cell lines. Combination treatment with TRA-8 and chemotherapy or radiation resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo, combination therapy with TRA-8, cisplatin, and radiation produced tumor growth inhibition that was significantly greater than the other groups. Similar results were seen in combination studies with topotecan. These data suggest that DR5 is a good target for activation of the apoptotic pathway. Monoclonal antibodies such as TRA-8 may play an important role in the development of an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced cervical cancer.

  2. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21) and fluoroquinolone mitigate radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Eva C; Barbon, Christine M; Kalish, Leslie A; Parmar, Kalindi; Kutok, Jeff; Mancuso, Christy J; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Suter, Eugénie E; Russell, Janice D; Palmer, Christine D; Gallington, Leighanne C; Voskertchian, Annie; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Cole, Geoffrey; Zhu, Kaya; D'Andrea, Alan; Soiffer, Robert; Weiss, Jerrold P; Levy, Ofer

    2011-11-23

    Identification of safe, effective treatments to mitigate toxicity after extensive radiation exposure has proven challenging. Only a limited number of candidate approaches have emerged, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has yet to approve any agent for a mass-casualty radiation disaster. Because patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation undergo radiation treatment that produces toxicities similar to radiation-disaster exposure, we studied patients early after such treatment to identify new approaches to this problem. Patients rapidly developed endotoxemia and reduced plasma bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a potent endotoxin-neutralizing protein, in association with neutropenia. We hypothesized that a treatment supplying similar endotoxin-neutralizing activity might replace the BPI deficit and mitigate radiation toxicity and tested this idea in mice. A single 7-Gy radiation dose, which killed 95% of the mice by 30 days, was followed 24 hours later by twice-daily, subcutaneous injections of the recombinant BPI fragment rBPI21 or vehicle alone for 14 or 30 days, with or without an oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including that against endotoxin-bearing Gram-negative bacteria. Compared to either fluoroquinolone alone or vehicle plus fluoroquinolone, the combined rBPI21 plus fluoroquinolone treatment improved survival, accelerated hematopoietic recovery, and promoted expansion of stem and progenitor cells. The observed efficacy of rBPI21 plus fluoroquinolone initiated 24 hours after lethal irradiation, combined with their established favorable bioactivity and safety profiles in critically ill humans, suggests the potential clinical use of this radiation mitigation strategy and supports its further evaluation.

  3. Endometriosis intestinal Intestinal endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La endometriosis es un trastorno ginecológico crónico, benigno y frecuente entre las mujeres en edad fértil, estimándose que existe algún grado de endometriosis hasta en el 15% de las mujeres premenopáusicas, asociándose a historia de infertilidad, antecedente de cesárea, dismenorrea y anormalidad en el sangrado uterino. Se cree que es debida al ascenso por las trompas de Falopio de contenido menstrual (menstruación retrógrada. En la afectación intestinal, el colon es el segmento más frecuentemente afectado, sobre todo a nivel rectosigmodeo. La clínica de presentación es inespecífica, siendo lo más frecuente el dolor abdominal y/o pélvico de tipo cólico que coincide o se exacerba con la menstruación. El diagnóstico diferencial incluye la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal, diverticulitis, colitis isquémica y procesos neoplásicos, siendo el diagnóstico definitivo anatomopatológico. En cuanto al tratamiento, éste dependerá de la clínica y de la edad de la paciente, así como de sus deseos de embarazo.Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation. In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment

  4. Comparison of biological effects between continuous and intermittent exposure to GSM-900-MHz mobile phone radiation: Detection of apoptotic cell-death features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavdoula, Evangelia D; Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2010-07-19

    In the present study we used a 6-min daily exposure of dipteran flies, Drosophila melanogaster, to GSM-900MHz (Global System for Mobile Telecommunications) mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR), to compare the effects between the continuous and four different intermittent exposures of 6min total duration, and also to test whether intermittent exposure provides any cumulative effects on the insect's reproductive capacity as well as on the induction of apoptotic cell death. According to our previous experiments, a 6-min continuous exposure per day for 5 days to GSM-900MHz and DCS-1800MHz (Digital Cellular System) mobile phone radiation, brought about a large decrease in the insect's reproductive capacity, as defined by the number of F(1) pupae. This decrease was found to be non-thermal and correlated with an increased percentage of induced fragmented DNA in the egg chambers' cells at early- and mid-oogenesis. In the present experiments we show that intermittent exposure also decreases the reproductive capacity and alters the actin-cytoskeleton network of the egg chambers, another known aspect of cell death that was not investigated in previous experiments, and that the effect is also due to DNA fragmentation. Intermittent exposures with 10-min intervals between exposure sessions proved to be almost equally effective as continuous exposure of the same total duration, whereas longer intervals between the exposures seemed to allow the organism the time required to recover and partly overcome the above-mentioned effects of the GSM exposure.

  5. Nuclear apoJ: A low dose radiation inducible regulator of cell death. Final report for period September 15, 1998 - September 14, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronow, Bruce J.

    2002-04-19

    This project was based on preliminary data that was published by Dr. Boothman (Yang et al. 2000) which indicated a strong induction of apoJ gene expression, increased secretion of the protein, and accumulation of an apparently somewhat different form of the apoJ protein in the nucleus of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells undergoing response to DNA damage. A clone expressing apoJ protein was isolated that was capable of interacting with Ku80, a component of the double strand break repair complex that is essential for the successful repair of rearranging immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes as evidenced by failure to produce mature B and T cells in the absence of Ku70. ApoJ clones isolated and characterized by Dr. Boothman bound strongly to a Ku-70 ''bait'' protein. Over-expression of these same clones in a cell line was capable of killing the cell. ApoJ is very strongly induced in many instances of programmed cell death and has been proposed repeatedly to play some sort of effector role in the process. Our principle hypothesis for this study was that the strong induction of the apoJ gene and the particular expression of a nuclear form of the protein was potentially a causal factor in the decision point made by the cell as it attempts to repair double-strand breakage based DNA damage. The hypothesis was that if sufficiently high damage occurred, it would be deleterious to maintain the cell's viability through continued DNA repair. One method to inhibit DNA repair might be by inhibiting proteins such as Ku-70 that are necessary for double-strand break repair. If apoJ does play a critical role in tipping the decision balance over to cell death, we reasoned that deficiency of apoJ would cause increased accumulation of cells with DNA damage and that this might decrease cell death in response to DNA damage and increase tumor occurrence rates. To test this hypothesis and its potential implications, we exposed wildtype and apoJ deficient animals that

  6. Surgical management of small-bowel radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillemoe, K.D.; Brigham, R.A.; Harmon, J.W.; Feaster, M.M.; Saunders, J.R.; d' Avis, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    We treated 17 patients with severe small-bowel radiation enteritis surgically. Fourteen patients were female. Gynecologic malignant lesions (cervical, ovarian, and endometrial) were the most frequent sites of the primary tumors for which radiation was given. Thirteen patients had bowel obstruction, and the remainder had enterovaginal fistulae. Intestinal bypass, rather than resection, was the preferred approach in the treatment of these patients, and was used in 11 cases. Successful palliation was provided in nine patients, with minimal morbidity and no operative deaths. Follow-up at eight to 60 months has shown no further sequelae of radiation injury or of blind loop syndrome. This supports the relative safety of intestinal bypass for the surgical management of small-bowel radiation enteritis.

  7. Radiation induces progenitor cell death, microglia activation, and blood-brain barrier damage in the juvenile rat cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Boström, Martina; Ek, C. Joakim; Li, Tao; Xie, Cuicui; Xu, Yiran; Sun, Yanyan; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa tumors are the most common childhood intracranial tumors, and radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments. However, irradiation induces long-term adverse effects that can have significant negative impacts on the patient’s quality of life. The purpose of this study was to characterize irradiation-induced cellular and molecular changes in the cerebellum. We found that irradiation-induced cell death occurred mainly in the external germinal layer (EGL) of the juvenile rat cerebellum. The number of proliferating cells in the EGL decreased, and 82.9% of them died within 24 h after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiation induced oxidative stress, microglia accumulation, and inflammation in the cerebellum. Interestingly, blood-brain barrier damage and blood flow reduction was considerably more pronounced in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions. The cerebellar volume decreased by 39% and the migration of proliferating cells to the internal granule layer decreased by 87.5% at 16 weeks after irradiation. In the light of recent studies demonstrating that the cerebellum is important not only for motor functions, but also for cognition, and since treatment of posterior fossa tumors in children typically results in debilitating cognitive deficits, this differential susceptibility of the cerebellum to irradiation should be taken into consideration for future protective strategies. PMID:28382975

  8. Development of a radiation track structure clustering algorithm for the prediction of DNA DSB yields and radiation induced cell death in Eukaryotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Michael; Bezak, Eva; Penfold, Scott

    2015-04-01

    The preliminary framework of a combined radiobiological model is developed and calibrated in the current work. The model simulates the production of individual cells forming a tumour, the spatial distribution of individual ionization events (using Geant4-DNA) and the stochastic biochemical repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) leading to the prediction of survival or death of individual cells. In the current work, we expand upon a previously developed tumour generation and irradiation model to include a stochastic ionization damage clustering and DNA lesion repair model. The Geant4 code enabled the positions of each ionization event in the cells to be simulated and recorded for analysis. An algorithm was developed to cluster the ionization events in each cell into simple and complex double strand breaks. The two lesion kinetic (TLK) model was then adapted to predict DSB repair kinetics and the resultant cell survival curve. The parameters in the cell survival model were then calibrated using experimental cell survival data of V79 cells after low energy proton irradiation. A monolayer of V79 cells was simulated using the tumour generation code developed previously. The cells were then irradiated by protons with mean energies of 0.76 MeV and 1.9 MeV using a customized version of Geant4. By replicating the experimental parameters of a low energy proton irradiation experiment and calibrating the model with two sets of data, the model is now capable of predicting V79 cell survival after low energy (<2 MeV) proton irradiation for a custom set of input parameters. The novelty of this model is the realistic cellular geometry which can be irradiated using Geant4-DNA and the method in which the double strand breaks are predicted from clustering the spatial distribution of ionisation events. Unlike the original TLK model which calculates a tumour average cell survival probability, the cell survival probability is calculated for each cell in the geometric tumour model

  9. EZH2 Protects Glioma Stem Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death in a MELK/FOXM1-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hak Kim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM-derived tumorigenic stem-like cells (GSCs may play a key role in therapy resistance. Previously, we reported that the mitotic kinase MELK binds and phosphorylates the oncogenic transcription factor FOXM1 in GSCs. Here, we demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2, EZH2, is targeted by the MELK-FOXM1 complex, which in turn promotes resistance to radiation in GSCs. Clinically, EZH2 and MELK are coexpressed in GBM and significantly induced in postirradiation recurrent tumors whose expression is inversely correlated with patient prognosis. Through a gain-and loss-of-function study, we show that MELK or FOXM1 contributes to GSC radioresistance by regulation of EZH2. We further demonstrate that the MELK-EZH2 axis is evolutionarily conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans. Collectively, these data suggest that the MELK-FOXM1-EZH2 signaling axis is essential for GSC radioresistance and therefore raise the possibility that MELK-FOXM1-driven EZH2 signaling can serve as a therapeutic target in irradiation-resistant GBM tumors.

  10. Death of an Arctic Mixed Phase Cloud: How Changes in the Arctic Environment Influence Cloud Properties and Cloud Radiative Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, E. L.; Posselt, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic mixed phase stratocumulus clouds exert an important influence on the radiative budget over the Arctic ocean and sea ice. Field programs and numerical experiments have shown the properties of these clouds to be sensitive to changes in the surface properties, thermodynamic environment, and aerosols. While it is clear that Arctic mixed-phase clouds respond to changes in the Arctic environment, uncertainty remains as to how climate warming will affect the cloud micro- and macrophysical properties. This is in no small part due to the fact that there are nonlinear interactions between changes in atmospheric and surface properties and changes in cloud characteristics. In this study, large-eddy simulations are performed of an arctic mixed phase cloud observed during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign. A parameter-space-filling uncertainty quantification technique is used to rigorously explore how simulated arctic mixed phase clouds respond to changes in the properties of the environment. Specifically, the cloud ice and aerosol concentration, surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, and large scale temperature, water vapor, and vertical motion are systematically changed, and the properties of the resulting clouds are examined. It is found that Arctic mixed phase clouds exhibit four characteristic behaviors: stability, growth, decay, and dissipation. Sets of environmental and surface properties that lead to the emergence of each type of behavior are presented, and the implications for the response of Arctic clouds to changes in climate are explored.

  11. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïté Hanot

    Full Text Available Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61 displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable

  12. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  13. Intestinal leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most often found when a person has an upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy or colonoscopy for another reason. Rarely, these tumors can cause bleeding, blockage or rupture of the intestines If this ...

  14. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... source and a camera through which a small clipper can be inserted). The tissue that is removed ... can help. Malabsorption Overview of Malabsorption Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome Celiac Disease Intestinal Lymphangiectasia Lactose Intolerance Short Bowel ...

  15. Parg deficiency confers radio-sensitization through enhanced cell death in mouse ES cells exposed to various forms of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Hidenori; Fujimori, Hiroaki [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Gunji, Akemi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Maeda, Daisuke [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Hirai, Takahisa [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Poetsch, Anna R. [ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Harada, Hiromi [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Yoshida, Tomoko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kyoritsu College of Pharmacy, 1-5-30 Shibakoen, Minatoku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Okayasu, Ryuichi [International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Masutani, Mitsuko, E-mail: mmasutan@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); ADP-Ribosylation in Oncology Project, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •Parg{sup −/−} ES cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} ES cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. •Parg{sup −/−} cells showed defects in DSB repair after carbon-ion irradiation. •PAR accumulation was enhanced after carbon-ion irradiation compared to γ-irradiation. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) is the main enzyme involved in poly(ADP-ribose) degradation. Here, the effects of Parg deficiency on sensitivity to low and high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation were investigated in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mouse Parg{sup −/−} and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 deficient (Parp-1{sup −/−}) ES cells were used and responses to low and high LET radiation were assessed by clonogenic survival and biochemical and biological analysis methods. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Transient accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) was enhanced in Parg{sup −/−} cells. Augmented levels of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) from early phase were observed in Parg{sup −/−} ES cells. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was similar in wild-type and Parp-1{sup −/−} cells and apoptotic cell death process was mainly observed in the both genotypes. These results suggested that the enhanced sensitivity of Parg{sup −/−} ES cells to γ-irradiation involved defective repair of DNA double strand breaks. The effects of Parg and Parp-1 deficiency on the ES cell response to carbon-ion irradiation (LET13 and 70 keV/μm) and Fe-ion irradiation (200 keV/μm) were also examined. Parg{sup −/−} cells were more sensitive to LET 70 keV/μm carbon-ion irradiation than Parp-1{sup −/−} cells. Enhanced apoptotic cell death also accompanied augmented levels of γ-H2AX in a biphasic manner peaked at 1 and 24 h. The induction level of p53 phophorylation at ser18 was

  16. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  17. Radioprotection of intestinal stem cells and whole body radiation lethality from photons and neutrons by prostaglandins along or in combination with WR-2721. Technical report 24 Feb 86-30 Sep 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.R.

    1990-12-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) have been shown to protect the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic cell renewal systems from some degree of radiation damage. The mechanism(s) to account for these observations are unknown. Based on preliminary evidence that PGs varied in the degree to which they afforded protection of intestinal stem cells, we studied protection by several PGs and their analogues. The most protective PGs found to date were 16,16 dm PGE2, misoprostol, a PGE1 analogues, and iloprost, a PGI2 analogue. The relative degrees of protection were 400%, 700% and 800% above control values at a dose of 13.5 137 Cs gamma radiation. These three PGs were used for subsequent studies. Iloprost is a stable PG at room temperature and was found to be protective given orally. In addition to radioprotection of the intestinal stem cells, these Pgs increased the LD50/6, LD50/30 and animal longevity through both the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic syndromes. Misoprostol protected the gut from JANUS neutrons and increased animal longevity following neutron irradiation. Although the mechanism for PG-induced radioprotection is unknown, it appears to be different compared to the widely studied amino thiol, WR-2721. Evidence to support this contention came from data showing that all these analogues were additive to the protective effect of Wr-2721.

  18. OPTN/SRTR 2015 Annual Data Report: Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2017-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant remains important in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2015, 196 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list, with equal numbers waiting for intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2015, 63.3% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 36.7% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was notably higher for intestine-liver than for intestine transplant candidates (respectively, 19.9 vs. 2.8 deaths per 100 waitlist years in 2014-2015). By age, pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 19.6 per 100 waitlist years, and lowest for children aged younger than 6 years, at 3.6 per 100 waitlist years. Pretransplant mortality by etiology was highest for candidates with non-congenital types of short-gut syndrome. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 70 in 2015. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 71 in 2015. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and non-congenital) was the main cause of disease leading to intestine and to intestine-liver transplant. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  19. Death Cafe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lizzy; Corr, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    This article explains the meaning of the phrase Death Cafe and describes what typically occurs at a Death Cafe gathering. The article traces the history of the Death Cafe movement, explores some reasons why people take part in a Death Cafe gathering, and gives examples of what individuals think they might derive from their participation. In addition, this article notes similarities between the Death Cafe movement and three other developments in the field of death, dying, and bereavement. Finally, this article identifies two provisional lessons that can be drawn from Death Cafe gatherings and the Death Cafe movement itself.

  20. 大黄素对急性放射性肠炎肠黏膜屏障的保护作用%Protective effects of emodin on intestinal mucosal barrier in acute radiation enteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉; 周冬枝; 夏欣欣; 韩萍萍; 曹丽君

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects and mechanisms of emodin on acute radiation enteritis models and intestinal mucosal barrier. Methods Totally 50 healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group, emodin prevention group, emodin treatment group and SiMiDa group. Emodin prevention group had been given emodin for 3 consecutive days in advance. Except normal group, the others were given a single dose of 10 Gy 6 MV of higher-energy X-rays on the abdominal region to establish acute radiation enteritis models. After 6 h, emodin prevention group, emodin treatment group and SiMiDa group were given intragastric administration for 4 days. The morphologic indexes were measured by light microscopy and the image analysis system. Intestinal diamine oxidase (DAO) activities as well as bacteria translocation rates of liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph node were measured. Intestinal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was measured by ELISA and nitric oxide (NO) level was measured by spectrophotometer. Results Emodin prevention group, emodin treatment group and SiMiDa group had significantly higher levels of villus height, crypt depth, thickness of mucosa and entire wall as well as DAO activities than model group (P0.05). Conclusion Emodin could significantly increase villus height of the small intestine, crypt depth and mucosal layer thickness, enhance intestinal tissue DAO activities, protect the intestinal mucosa, reduce bacterial translocation rate, and reduce TNF-α expression in the intestinal tissue and NO generation. There are no significant differences between prophylaxis and treatment administration of emodin.%目的 探讨大黄素对急性放射性肠炎疗效及对肠黏膜屏障保护的疗效机制.方法 SD大鼠50只,随机分为正常组、模型组、大黄素预防组、大黄素治疗组、思密达组.大黄素预防组提前灌胃给药3d,除正常组外的各组采用X射线照射建立急性放射性肠炎模型,照射后6h

  1. The Akt-inhibitor Erufosine induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells and increases the short term effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eibl Hans-Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer and associated with neoplastic transformation, malignant progression, and enhanced resistance to classical chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, it is a promising target for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, the cytotoxic action of the Akt inhibitor Erufosine (ErPC3 was analyzed in prostate cancer cells and compared to the cytotoxicity of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, the efficacy of combined treatment with Akt inhibitors and ionizing radiation in prostate cancer cells was examined. Materials and methods Prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, and LNCaP were treated with ErPC3 (1-100 µM, LY294002 (25-100 µM, irradiated (0-10 Gy, or subjected to combined treatments. Cell viability was determined by the WST-1 assay. Apoptosis induction was analyzed by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide in a hypotonic citrate buffer, and by Western blotting using antibodies against caspase-3 and its substrate PARP. Akt activity and regulation of the expression of Bcl-2 family members and key downstream effectors involved in apoptosis regulation were examined by Western blot analysis. Results The Akt inhibitor ErPC3 exerted anti-neoplastic effects in prostate cancer cells, however with different potency. The anti-neoplastic action of ErPC3 was associated with reduced phosphoserine 473-Akt levels and induction of apoptosis. PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells were also sensitive to treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. However, the ErPC3-sensitive PC3-cells were less susceptible to LY294002 than the ErPC3-refractory LNCaP cells. Although both cell lines were largely resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis, both cell lines showed higher levels of apoptotic cell death when ErPC3 was combined with radiotherapy. Conclusions Our data suggest that constitutive Akt activation and survival are

  2. On Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangyan

    2016-01-01

    Death is not a terrible word, but a provoking one. Different people have different opinions, but no one can convince others of what death really means. This article made a tentative and superficial analysis on death according to the true feeing and experiences of the author. In her opinion, we needn’t consider more about death; the important for the death is how to live meaningfully.

  3. ESPEN guidelines on chronic intestinal failure in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Arends, Jann; Bozzetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    : The GLs were developed by the Home Artificial Nutrition & Chronic Intestinal Failure Special Interest Group of ESPEN. The GRADE system was used for assigning strength of evidence. Recommendations were discussed, submitted to Delphi rounds, and accepted in an online survey of ESPEN members. RESULTS......: The following topics were addressed: management of HPN; parenteral nutrition formulation; intestinal rehabilitation, medical therapies, and non-transplant surgery, for short bowel syndrome, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and radiation enteritis; intestinal transplantation; prevention/treatment of CVC...

  4. Deliberating death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing a particular case study of a woman attempting to come to terms with her death, this article explores the difficult metaphors of death present within the Christian tradition. Tracing a Christian understanding of death back to the work of Augustine, the case study is utilized to highlight the difficulties presented by past and present theology embracing ideas of punishment within death. Following the trajectory of the case study, alternative understandings of death present in recent Christian theology and within Native American spirituality are presented in an attempt to find room for a fuller meaning of death post-reconciliation, but premortem.

  5. Cot Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  6. Redefining Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The results of 20 years of research on brain death will be released to the public, the Chinese Ministry of Health reported in early April. A special ministry team has drafted the criteria for brain death in Criteria for the Diagnosis of Brain Death in Adults (Revised Edition) and Technical Specifications for the Diagnosis

  7. Intestinal Coccidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycle that has 20% thin layer and 80% thick layer. Oocyst with thick layer is able to live a long time in nature. They are the third or forth of gastroentritis disease that have digestive disorder like anorexia, nausea, persistent diarrhoea, malabsorption and leanness. The disease forms choronic and acute stages and it is able to kill the immunodeficiency cases. Sometimes it has HIV symptoms similar to pneumonia and respiratory track infection. Laboratory diagnosis is based on Oocyst finding in stool exam and that shitter floatation and Cr (KOH2 are the best methods. Modified zyh-lnelson and fleocroum are the best staining methods too. This parasite is transmitted by zoonotic and Antroponotic origin. Molecular studies have shown two Genotypes (I&II. Genotype I is aquatic and II is zoonotic. The prevalence rate is 3% in infants and 10% in calves. Cyclospora: This parasite is novel and is bigger than cryptosporidium.It isn't known a clear life cycle but is transmitted by water, vegetables and fruits as raspberries. and mulberries. Human is a specific host. When a parasite is in the intestine it causes inflammatory reaction in Entrocyte.The patient shows watery diarrhoea with nausea, vomitting, pain, Stomach cramp, anorexia, malabsorption and cachexia. The disease period is 3 monthes in immunodeficiency cases but it is selflimited in normal cases. Autofluorescence characteristic is differential diagnosis, prevalence rate of disease is unknown. Isospora: This

  8. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  9. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy for radiation-induced vascular injury in small intestine of rat%脂肪干细胞修复辐射诱导的肠血管损伤研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常鹏宇; 崔爽; 姜新; 曲超; 蒋鑫萍; 罗景华; 曲雅勤; 董丽华

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价人源脂肪干细胞对辐射诱导的肠血管损伤的修复作用。方法选用成年雄性SD大鼠,共34只,给予全腹部15 Gy X射线照射。造模后,取其中17只给予P6代人源脂肪干细胞腹腔注射治疗( Ad-MSC治疗组);另17只大鼠给予双磷酸盐缓冲液( PBS)腹腔注射治疗( PBS溶剂对照组)。照射后第10天,流式细胞分析绒毛内CD31阳性内皮细胞的数量,免疫荧光染色分析新生的血管内皮细胞,免疫组织化学染色分析血管结构的连续性;并提取受照小肠组织总RNA,实时荧光定量PCR检测受照组织内基质细胞起源因子-1(SDF-1)、血管内皮细胞生长因子(VEGF)、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子(bFGF)以及血管内皮细胞生长因子受体(Flk-1)的表达量。检测Ad-MSC治疗组的受损小肠内新生的内皮细胞来源。结果与PBS溶剂对照组相比,Ad-MSC能够显著增加受损组织内CD31阳性内皮细胞数量(t=12�15,P<0�05),提高受损组织内的血管密度(20 d:t=10�33,P<0.05;30 d:t=32�85,P<0�05),上调血管生成基因VEGF、bFGF、Flk-1以及SDF-1的表达量(t=10�34、11�25、6�73、6�73,P<0�05)。维持受损部位小肠绒毛内的血管完整,并促进CD31阳性造血干/祖细胞向血管内皮细胞的分化,加速受损部位血管的新生。结论人源脂肪干细胞通过发挥促血管新生的作用来修复辐射诱导的肠血管损伤。%Objective To assess the therapeutic effect of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells on radiation-induced vascular injury in the small intestine of rat. Methods A total of 34 male Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in this study. To establish a model of radiation-induced intestinal injury, each rat was irradiated with 15 Gy in whole abdomen. 17 rats were randomly selected and infused intraperitoneally with passage 6 ( P6 ) Ad-MSCs, and the other 17

  10. The Necrosis-Avid Small Molecule HQ4-DTPA as a Multimodal Imaging Agent for Monitoring Radiation Therapy-Induced Tumor Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Marieke A. Stammes; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Scollard, Deborah A.; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J; Sinisi, Riccardo; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.; Thomas J A Snoeks; van Beek, Ermond R.; Chan, Alan B.; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Most effective antitumor therapies induce tumor cell death. Non-invasive, rapid and accurate quantitative imaging of cell death is essential for monitoring early response to antitumor therapies. To facilitate this, we previously developed a biocompatible necrosis-avid near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging probe, HQ4, which was radiolabeled with 111Indium-chloride (111In-Cl3) via the chelate diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), to enable clinical translation. T...

  11. Electrical biopsy of irradiated intestinal tissue with a simple electrical impedance spectroscopy system for radiation enteropathy in rats--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Jie; Huang, Eng-Yen; Lu, Yi-Yu; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2011-09-01

    Electrical impedance is one of the most often used parameters for characterizing material properties, especially in biomedical applications. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), used for revealing both resistive and capacitive characteristics, is good for use in tissue characterization. In this study, a portable and simple EIS system based on a commercially available chip was used to assess rat intestinal tissues following irradiation. The EIS results were fitted to a resistor and capacitor electrical circuit model to solve the electrical properties of the tissue. The variation in the tissue's electrical characteristics was compared to the morphological and histological findings. From the experimental results, it was clear that the electrical properties, based on receiver operation curve analysis, demonstrated good detection performance relative to the histological changes. The electrical parameters of the tissues could be used to distinguish the tissue's status for investigation, which introduced a concept of 'electrical biopsy', and this 'electrical biopsy' approach may be used to complement histological examinations.

  12. Calprotectin - A novel noninvasive marker for intestinal allograft monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudan, Debra; Vargas, Luciano; Sun, Yimin; Bok, Lisette; Dijkstra, Gerard; Langnas, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To identify a noninvasive screening test for intestinal allograft monitoring. Summary Background Data: Intestinal allograft rejection is difficult to distinguish from other causes of diarrhea and can rapidly lead to severe exfoliation or death. Protocol biopsies are standard for allograft

  13. Comparative study of interphase cell death and severity of bone marrow aplasia in bank voles of the Moscow suburbs and C57B1 mice under the influence of ionizing radiation. [Whole-body x irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samokhvalova, N.S.; Popova, M.F.; Domareva, O.P.; Suvorova, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Interphase of bone marrow cells, which may reach significant dimensions according to some researchers, is one of the criteria of radiation lesion to the marrow. The method of estimating the total number of nuclear cells in animal bone marrow also makes it possible to gain an idea about the severity of tissue destruction. The objective of this work was to study interphase cell death and severity of aplasia in the bone marrow of bank voles of the Moscow suburbs and C57B1 mice after exposing these animals to x rays.

  14. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, John T., E-mail: jolucas@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, John D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Laxton, Adrian W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  15. Natural death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C

    2000-01-01

    The increasing age of every human being is the beginning of the end of life, an obviously natural process, but any attempt to define the term 'natural death' soon encounters difficulties in defining what is meant by 'natural'. In the industrialized countries of the West, for example 'natural death' is thought of as the opposite of non-natural types of death such as accidental death, suicide, and homicide. The aim of our present survey is to discuss the meaning of the term 'natural death' under a clinical, a forensic and a scientific point of view with regard to recent developments especially in molecular biology. If there are 'external' physical influences, a medical-technical manipulation, a therapeutic or molecular biological intervention cannot be definitely ruled out as the cause of death, then use of the term 'natural death' in general is open to question. It will only remain meaningful if it can be applied with a specific meaning in definite practical situations. Current research and medical technology, however, do not allow use of the term 'natural death' in its conventional sense: it can thus be stricken from the medical vocabulary. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. [The complicated intestinal amebiasis in emergency surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostishev, V K; Khrupkin, V I; Afanas'ev, A N; Gorbacheva, I V; Bragin, M A

    2009-01-01

    18 patients with complicated forms of intestinal amebiasis were operated on acute appendicitis, liver abscess or total necrotic colitis. Appendectomy, abscess drainage and colon resection were performed respectively. There were no postoperative deaths. Features of amebic appendicitis and total necrotic amebic colitis are described using clinical cases demonstrations. Recommendations for the treatment of these forms of amebiasis are given.

  17. Effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell conditioned medium with and without inflammatory activation on radiation-induced intestinal injury%炎症预激活骨髓间充质干细胞条件培养基修复小肠黏膜急性辐射损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婉薇; 陈韵; 郑跃; 沙卫红; 王启仪; 叶山亮; 陈浩

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cels (MSC-CM) may represent a promising alternative to MSCs transplantation. Previous studies have shown that inflammatory activation can strengthen the multiple biological potencies of MSCs; however, normal MSCs with insufficiency of immunocompetence and migration ability are not effective for tissue damage repair. OBJECTIVE:To investigate differential effects of MSC-CM with and without inflammatory activation on radiation-induced intestinal injury.METHODS:MSCs from the bone marrow of SD rats were separated, cultured and identified, and then co-cultured with non-irradiated IEC-6 or irradiated IEC-6 in a transwel system for 24 hours. Then, MSCs with inflammatory activation were cultured alone for another 48 hours. After that, the supernatant was colected as non-activated MSC-CM (MSC-CMNOR) and MSC-CM under radiation-induced inflammatory condition (MSC-CMIR). Rats were exposed to 14 Gy whole abdominal irradiation and randomly divided into four groups: control group, radiation injury group (DMEM/F12), MSC-CMNOR group and MSC-CMIR group. Continuous administration was givenvia tail vein and intraperitoneal implantation of Alzet microosmotic pumps. Intestinal samples were colected at 1, 3, 7 days after radiation for analysis of short circuit variation, at 3 days after radiation for analysis of intestinal epithelium ultrastructure, and at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 days after radiation for histological observation of the intestinal epithelium using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Blood samples were colected at 1, 3, 7 days after radiation for analysis of serum xylose levels. In addition, the survival state and survival time of rats were observed and recorded. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The short circuit variation responding to electrical field stimulation was significantly reduced at al frequencies, but it was significantly improved in the MSC-CMIR group. Similarly, the intestinal absorption (serum xylose levels) was also significantly

  18. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  19. Malacoplaquia intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto José Frem Aun

    Full Text Available Malacoplakia is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown origin. However immunodeficiency states (immunossuppressive medication, old people, renal transplantation, leukaemia, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition and others have been associated with patients with malacoplakia. An infectious cause of malakoplakia is suggested by the finding of coliform bacteria in the phagolysosomes of macrophages. The histologic study is characterized by a infiltrate of large macrophages (Hansenmann cells with pathognomonic inclusions containing siderocalcific structures (Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Most of the cases reported in literature, involve the genitourinary tract, but other structures can be affected (brain, bone, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, intestine, and others. A 66-year-old man whith a abdominal mass, went to our hospital with a colonic tumour diagnosis. The patient was submitted to a surgery, with resection of the rigth colon. The disease was invading a portion of the retroperitoneal tissue that was removed. The histopatologic study showed the pathognomonic sign of malakoplakia (Hansenmann cells and Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Norfloxacin have been used to the complementar treatment with total cure of the patient.

  20. Neonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a premature baby include pneumonia (a lung infection), sepsis (a blood infection) and meningitis (an infection in the fluid around the brain and spinal cord). What birth defects most often cause neonatal death? The most common birth defects that cause ...

  1. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  2. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vucic

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  3. Surgical treatment of radiation injuries of the colon and rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jao, S.W.; Beart, R.W. Jr.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1986-02-01

    Between 1950 and 1983, radiation-induced proctitis was diagnosed proctoscopically in 720 patients at the Mayo Clinic. Sixty-two patients with severe colorectal symptoms were treated surgically. The interval from cessation of radiotherapy to onset of symptoms ranged from 3 weeks to 24 months (mean 33 months). The 62 patients underwent a total of 143 operations with 8 operative deaths (13 percent), and 40 patients (65 percent) had 61 complications. The morbidity rate was lower after colostomy alone (44 percent in 27 patients) than after more aggressive operations (80 percent in 35 patients). Transverse loop colostomy and descending colostomy were safer than sigmoid colostomy. The dissection adhesions, opening of tissue planes, and careless manipulation of intestine may result in necrosis and perforation of the intestine, bladder, or vaginal wall; these were the main causes of fecal and other internal fistulas in our study.

  4. Inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase as a protective effect of nicaraven in ionizing radiation- and ara-C-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Michiko; Akiyama, Nobutake; Sekine, Hiroshi; Mori, Mariko; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Nicaraven is a drug used for patients with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It crosses the blood-brain barrier and has potent antivasospastic and brain-protective effects. While nicaraven scavenges the hydroxyl radical, the mechanism of its protection remains obscure. In addition to the hydroxyl radical scavenging effect, nicaraven also exhibits inhibitory action on poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). The mechanism of the pharmacological action of nicaraven has not yet been clarified. Human myeloid HL-525 cells were exposed to ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide and the effect of nicaraven on the activation of the Egr-1 promoter was measured. Next, the action of the drug on DNA fragmentation and inhibition of thymidine uptake caused by the genotoxic stimulation of ionizing radiation or cytosine B-D-arabinofuranoside (ara-C) were assessed. Finally, direct inhibition of the PARP enzyme by nicaraven was measured. Nicaraven did not inhibit the activation of the Egr-1 promoter caused by H2O2 and the activation caused by ionizing radiation. However, the drug repressed DNA fragmentation and increased thymidine uptake dose-dependently. Nicaraven had a direct inhibitory effect on PARP. The effect of nicaraven on the Egr-1 promoter was different from that of another free-radical scavenger, N-acetyl cysteine. Nicaraven demonstrated similar protection of the PARP inhibitors including 3-aminobenzamide. Since nicaraven directly inhibits the PARP enzyme, the drug might be useful in oncology as well as in studying tissue-damaging conditions characterized by increased PARP activity.

  5. Surviving death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstroem, Anna

    2013-01-01

    such phases. The aim of this paper is to explore how an organization’s identity is re-constructed after organizational death. Based on interviews with members of a bankrupted bank who narrate their bankruptcy experiences, the paper explores how legacy organizational identity is constructed after...... organizational death. The paper shows how members draw on their legacy organizational identity to justify their past interpretations and responses to the intensifying bankruptcy threats. Members refer to their firm belief in the bank’s solid and robust identity claim when they explain how they disregarded...

  6. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  7. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  8. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible residue of food. The ileocecal valve of the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the ...

  9. Intestinal ischemia and infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001151.htm Small intestinal ischemia and infarction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intestinal ischemia and infarction occurs when there is a narrowing ...

  10. Death cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbæk, Torsten R; Kofoed, Pernille Bouteloup; Bove, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Death cap (Amanita phalloides) is commonly found and is one of the five most toxic fungi in Denmark. Toxicity is due to amatoxin, and poisoning is a serious medical condition, causing organ failure with potential fatal outcome. Acknowledgement and clarification of exposure, symptomatic and focused...

  11. Death Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Stühler, Rebekka Hellstrøm

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate why the Freudian term Death Drive is not acknowledged in modern psychological therapy. On basis of psychoanalytical theory and through a literary analysis, the project will present a discussion of the significance and presence of the term within these practises.

  12. "Spectacular Death"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid

    2016-01-01

    be labelled ‘spectacular death’ in which death, dying and mourning have increasingly become spectacles. Moreover, the author proposes that what is currently happening in contemporary Western society can be interpreted as an expression of a ‘partial re-reversal’ of ‘forbidden death’ to some...

  13. Isolation of a presumed mucoprotein fraction from rat intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinstein, R.N.; Butler, C.L.

    1950-12-31

    The mucoproteins of intestinal mucosa are of interest to radiation biochemistry for a variety of reasons: (a) the known sensitivity of intestine to x-radiation; (b) post-irradiation bacteremia characterized by the presence in the blood of intestinal microorganisms, which may indicate degradation of such a `ground substance` as mucoproteins are considered to be; (c) post-irradiation desquamation of intestinal epithelium; and (d) post-irradiation increase in serum polysaccharide, which may arise from degradation of x-ray sensitive glycoprotein (mucoprotein). Considerable effort has therefore been put into an attempt to isolate an intestinal mucoprotein on which to test the effects of irradiation. A protein fraction has now been isolated which, on the basis only of its method of preparation, is suggested may be a mucoprotein. The material has not yet been fully characterized, nor is its degree of homogeneity known. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Severe small bowel radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaen, J.; Santos, J.A.; Carrion, J.R.; Garcia, P. (Hospital General Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain))

    1989-01-01

    We have during recent years observed 8 patients with serious radiation injury to the small intestine. As the cases are quite illustrative, their symptomatology is briefly reported and the treatment and possible predisposing factors are analysed. (orig./MG).

  15. Vertebrate intestinal endoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Jason R; Lauf, Ryan; Shroyer, Noah F

    2011-03-01

    The endoderm gives rise to the lining of the esophagus, stomach and intestines, as well as associated organs. To generate a functional intestine, a series of highly orchestrated developmental processes must occur. In this review, we attempt to cover major events during intestinal development from gastrulation to birth, including endoderm formation, gut tube growth and patterning, intestinal morphogenesis, epithelial reorganization, villus emergence, as well as proliferation and cytodifferentiation. Our discussion includes morphological and anatomical changes during intestinal development as well as molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Surviving death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstroem, Anna

    2013-01-01

    such phases. The aim of this paper is to explore how an organization’s identity is re-constructed after organizational death. Based on interviews with members of a bankrupted bank who narrate their bankruptcy experiences, the paper explores how legacy organizational identity is constructed after...... organizational death. The paper shows how members draw on their legacy organizational identity to justify their past interpretations and responses to the intensifying bankruptcy threats. Members refer to their firm belief in the bank’s solid and robust identity claim when they explain how they disregarded...... increasing threats and fought to defend and preserve the organization. When the bank was declared bankrupt and the solid and robust identity claim was disconfirmed, members found comfort and guidance in an identity claim of local care and support. After the bankruptcy, part of the bank was acquired...

  17. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.

  18. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  19. Clinical analysis of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsutomu Namikawa; Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2009-01-01

    Primary anaplastic carcinoma is a rare variant of small intestinal cancer. Most reports of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are isolated case reports, therefore the clinicopathological features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this tumor type remain unclear. This review analyzes the available clinical characteristics of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine and investigates key differences from differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. A Medline search was performed using the keywords 'small intestine' and 'anaplastic carcinoma' or 'undifferentiated carcinoma'. Additional articles were obtained from references with in the papers identified by the Medline search. The literature revealed a poor prognosis for patients who underwent surgical resection for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, which gave a 3-year overall survival rate of 10.8% and a median survival time of 5.0 mo. The literature suggests that anaplastic carcinoma is markedly more aggressive than differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Surgical resection with the aim of complete tumor removal provides the only beneficial therapeutic option for patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, because chemotherapy and radiation therapy have no significant effect on the rate of survival. However, despite complete tumor resection, most patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are at great risk of disease recurrence. Multicenter clinical trials are expected to provide additional therapeutic strategies and establish the efficacy of multimodality adjuvant therapy. This report also highlights the importance of a systematic diagnostic approach for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.

  20. Long-term follow-up of patients on home parenteral nutrition in Europe: implications for intestinal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Joly, Francisca; Forbes, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions.......The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions....

  1. Long-term follow-up of patients on home parenteral nutrition in Europe: implications for intestinal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Joly, Francisca; Forbes, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions.......The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions....

  2. Distinct Shifts in Microbiota Composition during Drosophila Aging Impair Intestinal Function and Drive Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca I. Clark

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota have been correlated with aging and measures of frailty in the elderly. However, the relationships between microbial dynamics, age-related changes in intestinal physiology, and organismal health remain poorly understood. Here, we show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, characterized by an expansion of the Gammaproteobacteria, is tightly linked to age-onset intestinal barrier dysfunction in Drosophila. Indeed, alterations in the microbiota precede and predict the onset of intestinal barrier dysfunction in aged flies. Changes in microbial composition occurring prior to intestinal barrier dysfunction contribute to changes in excretory function and immune gene activation in the aging intestine. In addition, we show that a distinct shift in microbiota composition follows intestinal barrier dysfunction, leading to systemic immune activation and organismal death. Our results indicate that alterations in microbiota dynamics could contribute to and also predict varying rates of health decline during aging in mammals.

  3. Distinct Shifts in Microbiota Composition during Drosophila Aging Impair Intestinal Function and Drive Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rebecca I; Salazar, Anna; Yamada, Ryuichi; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Morselli, Marco; Alcaraz, Jeanette; Rana, Anil; Rera, Michael; Pellegrini, Matteo; Ja, William W; Walker, David W

    2015-09-08

    Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microbiota have been correlated with aging and measures of frailty in the elderly. However, the relationships between microbial dynamics, age-related changes in intestinal physiology, and organismal health remain poorly understood. Here, we show that dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, characterized by an expansion of the Gammaproteobacteria, is tightly linked to age-onset intestinal barrier dysfunction in Drosophila. Indeed, alterations in the microbiota precede and predict the onset of intestinal barrier dysfunction in aged flies. Changes in microbial composition occurring prior to intestinal barrier dysfunction contribute to changes in excretory function and immune gene activation in the aging intestine. In addition, we show that a distinct shift in microbiota composition follows intestinal barrier dysfunction, leading to systemic immune activation and organismal death. Our results indicate that alterations in microbiota dynamics could contribute to and also predict varying rates of health decline during aging in mammals.

  4. Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the porcine intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The normal intestinal epithelium is renewed with a turnover rate of 3-5 days. During Salmonella infection increased cell loss is observed, possibly as a result of programmed cell death (PCD). We have, therefore, studied the effects of Salmonella Typhimurium infection on three elements involved...... in scattered epithelial cells and the number of positive cells increased with increasing times of exposure to Salmonella (P

  5. Jejunum ileal intestinal atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio J. Puente Fonseca

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal atresia is one of the most important causes of intestinal obstruction in newborn. They constitute aorund 95% of total intestinal obstructions in this age group. Most of intestinal atresias are jejunoieal atresia. Although it is not frequent their relationship with other congenital anomalies, has been described the association in some cases with defects of intestine rotation, meconium peritonitis, with meconium ileus and rarely with the Hirschsprung diseases. The hereditary character has also been described in certain multiple intestinal atresias. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Jejunoileal atresia, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  6. Intestinal M cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer's patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions.

  7. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  8. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  9. Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Palapattu, Ganesh S. [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients

  10. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabolch, Aaron [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Daignault-Newton, Stephanie [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Olson, Karin B. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2-6, 7, 8-10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8-10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7-7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  11. Neonatal intestinal obstruction in Benin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osifo Osarumwense

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal obstruction is a life threatening condition in the newborn, with attendant high mortality rate especially in underserved subregion. This study reports the aetiology, presentation, and outcome of intestinal obstruction management in neonates. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of neonatal intestinal obstruction at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin, Nigeria, between January 2006-June 2008. Data were collated on a structured proforma and analysed for age, sex, weight, presentation, type/date of gestation/delivery, aetiology, clinical presentation, associated anomaly, treatment, and outcome. Results: There were 71 neonates, 52 were males and 19 were females (2.7:1. Their age range was between 12 hours and 28 days (mean, 7.9 ± 2.7 days and they weighed between 1.8 and 5.2 kg (average, 3.2 kg. The causes of intestinal obstruction were: Anorectal anomaly, 28 (39.4%; Hirschsprung′s disease, 8 (11.3%′ prematurity, 3 (4.2%; meconeum plug, 2 (2.8%; malrotation, 6 (8.5%; intestinal atresia, 8 (11.3%; necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, 4 (5.6%; obstructed hernia, 4 (5.6%; and spontaneous gut perforation, 3 (4.2%. Also, 27 (38% children had colostomy, 24 (33.8% had laparotomy, 9 (12.8% had anoplasty, while 11 (15.4% were managed nonoperatively. A total of 41 (57.7% neonates required incubator, 26 (36.6% needed total parenteral nutrition, while 15 (21.1% require d paediatric ventilator. Financial constraint, late presentation, presence of multiple anomalies, aspiration, sepsis, gut perforation, and bowel gangrene were the main contributors to death. Neonates with lower obstructions had a better outcome compared to those having upper intestinal obstruction ( P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Outcomes of intestinal obstruction are still poor in our setting; late presentation, financial constraints, poor parental motivation and lack of basic facilities were the major determinants of mortality.

  12. Invariant death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death’s scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death’s curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death’s invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death’s scaling of time. Variability in death rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes.

  13. Neuromodulation of intestinal inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costes, L.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system have been shown to exert a crucial role in the tight regulation of the immune response in the intestine. In particular, the vagus nerve was recently unraveled as an important player in this neuromodulation of intestinal inflammati

  14. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and/or pro...

  15. Morphometric study of injuries in the small intestine of wistar rats subjected to irradiation by cobalt 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Cristina S.C.; Oliveira, Arno H.; Reis, Renato J.; Manfrini, Francisco A.L.; Silva, Mario R.S. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mails: cristina_sad@yahoo.com.br; heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br; renatojulio@gmail.com; jrmanfrini@ig.com.br; mario@nuclear.ufmg.br; Mahecha, German A.B. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Morfologia]. E-mail: mahecha@icb.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of intestinal injuries due to ionizing radiation, four groups of male adult Wistar rats have been whole-body irradiated by cobalt-60 gamma-rays at three doses (2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy) and one dose rate (13.82 Gyh{sup -1}). Small intestine samples of the animals were taken 48h after the irradiation and immediately prepared for light microscopy, according to classical methods for histology. A large number of morphological differences were observed within the intestinal glands between the three doses used. It was observed that some of the epithelial glands alterations increased according to the dose used. Some of the alterations that can be highlighted are: the increase of the cellular and nuclear volume, basal cytoplasmatic vacuolisation, and cellular sloughed. Similar alterations were also observed in the goblet cell. The intestinal glands presented an increase of the luminal diameter. It was also observed atypical mitosis, cellular edema, and deformed nucleus in all the irradiated animals. The mitotic, apoptotic and necrotic index were calculated from intestinal gland cells. The mitotic index decreased according to the increase of the dose, but to all doses, there was an increase in relation to the control. On the other hand, the apoptotic index increased with the dose. The necrotic index presented an increase to all the doses. This rise was only significant to 2.0 and to 6.0 Gy. All of the results were significant to 2.0 and to 6.0 Gy compared to the control. This study shows a relation between dose and cellular death. (author)

  16. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  17. Selective sparing of goblet cells and paneth cells in the intestine of methotrexate-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); H.P. Meijer; J.A. Taminiau; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractProliferation, differentiation, and cell death were studied in small intestinal and colonic epithelia of rats after treatment with methotrexate. Days 1-2 after treatment were characterized by decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased numbers and depths

  18. Intestinal invagination Invaginación intestinal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayamnelys Aguilar Atanay

    Full Text Available Intestinal intussusceptions are the most frequent cause of acute surgical occlusive syndrome in infants; it is idiopathic in more than 90% of cases. Their treatment can be conservative, with reduction by means of imaging and hydrostatic procedures, or surgical. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Intestinal intussusceptions, approved by consensus in the 3th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Camagüey, Cuba; February 23 – 26, 2004.
    La invaginación intestinal es la causa más frecuente del síndrome de abdomen agudo quirúrgico oclusivo en lactantes y es idiopática en más del 90 % de los casos. Su tratamiento puede ser conservador, con reducción mediante procedimientos hidrostáticos combinados con vigilancia imaginológica, o quirúrgico. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para invaginación intestinal, aprobada por consenso en el 3er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Camagüey, 23 al 26 de febrero de 2004.

  19. [Two sudden deaths of children with mesenterium commune -- a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusová, Kateřina; Votava, Milan; Zeman, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the digestive system represent a complicated topic concerning many medical specializations. The goal of this article is to describe two cases of children with mesenterium commune. First was an infant (5.5 months old female) who died shortly after being admitted to hospital with acute bronchitis, vomiting and diarrhoea. The autopsy revealed the cause of death--volvulus of the entire small intestine and the first portion of the large intestine with haemorrhagic infarsation of the intestinal wall in an infant with congenital anomaly of intestinal fixation--mesenterium commune. Second case was a 2.5 years old female after two heart surgeries, with pulmonary hypertension, who died suddenly at home. The cause of death was volvulus of a portion of the small intestine with haemorrhagic infarsation of the intestinal wall and also mesenterium commune. Congenital malpositions of the intestine originate due to malrotation and malfixation of the intestine during prenatal and early postnatal period. This wide range of the individuals developmental disorders always result in a condition where the topographical findings in the abdominal cavity are not as commonly found. Abnormally positioned intestines cannot develop a normal mesentery and are prone to volvulus, which represents the most serious complication with acute abdominal symptoms and when diagnosed late, it can lead to sudden death. Whilst performing autopsies such cases are rarely seen. However in forensic medicine and also in clinical practice it is important to consider intestinal malposition as a cause of acute abdomen.

  20. Mycotoxins and the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Broom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biochemical pathways can yield various compounds that are not considered to be necessary for their growth and are thus referred to as secondary metabolites. These compounds have been found to have wide ranging biological effects and include potent poisons (mycotoxins. Mycotoxins invariably contaminate crops and (thus animal feeds. The intestine is the key link between ingested mycotoxins and their detrimental effects on the animal. Effects on the intestine, or intestinal environment, and immune system have been reported with various mycotoxins. These effects are almost certainly occurring across species. Most, if not all, of the reported effects of mycotoxins are negative in terms of intestinal health, for example, decreased intestinal cell viability, reductions in short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentrations and elimination of beneficial bacteria, increased expression of genes involved in promoting inflammation and counteracting oxidative stress. This challenge to intestinal health will predispose the animal to intestinal (and systemic infections and impair efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients, with the associated effect on animal productivity.

  1. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, F.

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane

  2. Childhood malnutrition and the intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Anne V; Dinh, Duy M; Ward, Honorine D

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 y, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections, and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has been suggested that malnutrition may delay the normal development of the gut microbiota in early childhood or force it toward an altered composition that lacks the required functions for healthy growth and/or increases the risk for intestinal inflammation. This review addresses our current understanding of the beneficial contributions of gut microbiota to human nutrition (and conversely the potential role of changes in that community to malnutrition), the process of acquiring an intestinal microbiome, potential influences of malnutrition on the developing microbiota, and the evidence directly linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome to childhood malnutrition. We review recent studies on the association between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and early childhood malnutrition and discuss them in the context of implications for intervention or prevention of the devastation caused by malnutrition.

  3. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the small intestine during an upper GI endoscopy. Biopsy A gastroenterologist can obtain a biopsy of the ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  4. Intestinal failure in childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    citrulline levels are predictive of intestinal recovery, or not, remains to be confirmed. ... GI secretions, salivary Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) release and gallbladder .... This cause of neonatal diarrhoea requires permanent PN. However,.

  5. Small intestine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  6. GROSS ANATOMY AND BLOOD SUPPLY OF SMALL INTESTINE IN FOETUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwer Unisa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF STUDY: To develop charts of length and width of small intestine, origin, length and branching pattern of celiac trunk and Superior mesenteric artery. This will help us to know any congenital anomaly in the small intestine, and abnormal origin, length, variation i n the branching pattern. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: The material used for the present study of 100 foetuses of different stages of gestation collected from Government maternity Hospital, Hanamkonda, ChandaKantha Memorial Hospital Warangal and private nursing h omes of Warangal D istrict of Andhra Pradesh within 10 hours of death. The dead foetuses were preserved in the hospital in 10% formalin. The foetuses were embalmed by injecting with 20 cc to 100 cc 10% formalin in to the cranial cavity and trunk depending o n the stage of gestation. Foetuses were dissected to expose small intestine and the blood vessels which supply it systematically in the following manner. OBSERVATIONS: The present study conducted has shown that length, width of small intestine was found to be increasing with foetal age. The length of celiac trunk, the length of superior mesenteric artery was found to increase proportionality with the foetal age. The causes of death in foetuses related to small intestine are intussusceptions intestional malr otation such as ladd’s bands, volvulus, cystic fibrosis, intestional infections and necrotizing enterocolitis. Knowledge related to gross anatomy and blood supply of small intestine is important because of these causes which may lead to death in foetus e s. In the present study no anomalies related to small intestine are found.

  7. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death.

  8. Strategies for preserving intestinal length in the short-bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.S.

    1987-03-01

    Total parenteral nutrition now permits long-term survival in patients after massive intestinal resection. Surgical therapy for the short-bowel syndrome is still largely experimental and cannot be recommended routinely. Thus, prevention of intestinal resection and conservation of intestinal length, when resection is necessary, should be emphasized. Strategies are presented that can be employed to preserve intestinal length when surgery is required in patients with a shortened bowel. These include strictureplasty, minimal resection, serosal patching, and intestinal tapering. In suitable candidates strictureplasty can relieve obstruction from strictures while avoiding resection. Minimal resection of involved intestine can be performed safely in selected patients with radiation injury or Crohn's disease. Serosal patching is an alternative to resection for the treatment of perforation or strictures of the intestine. Intestinal tapering can improve the function of dilated intestinal segments and eliminate the need for resection in intestinal atresia. The judicious use of these procedures can preserve intestinal length and obviate the need for long-term parenteral nutrition in patients after massive intestinal resection.

  9. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  10. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  11. The intestine is a blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  12. Anthranilate Fluorescence Marks a Calcium-Propagated Necrotic Wave That Promotes Organismal Death in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Cassandra; Allman, Erik; Mahanti, Parag; Benedetto, Alexandre; Cabreiro, Filipe; Pincus, Zachary; Matthijssens, Filip; Araiz, Caroline; Mandel, Abraham; Vlachos, Manolis; Edwards, Sally-Anne; Fischer, Grahame; Davidson, Alexander; Pryor, Rosina E.; Stevens, Ailsa; Slack, Frank J.; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Braeckman, Bart P.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Nehrke, Keith; Gems, David

    2013-01-01

    For cells the passage from life to death can involve a regulated, programmed transition. In contrast to cell death, the mechanisms of systemic collapse underlying organismal death remain poorly understood. Here we present evidence of a cascade of cell death involving the calpain-cathepsin necrosis pathway that can drive organismal death in Caenorhabditis elegans. We report that organismal death is accompanied by a burst of intense blue fluorescence, generated within intestinal cells by the necrotic cell death pathway. Such death fluorescence marks an anterior to posterior wave of intestinal cell death that is accompanied by cytosolic acidosis. This wave is propagated via the innexin INX-16, likely by calcium influx. Notably, inhibition of systemic necrosis can delay stress-induced death. We also identify the source of the blue fluorescence, initially present in intestinal lysosome-related organelles (gut granules), as anthranilic acid glucosyl esters—not, as previously surmised, the damage product lipofuscin. Anthranilic acid is derived from tryptophan by action of the kynurenine pathway. These findings reveal a central mechanism of organismal death in C. elegans that is related to necrotic propagation in mammals—e.g., in excitotoxicity and ischemia-induced neurodegeneration. Endogenous anthranilate fluorescence renders visible the spatio-temporal dynamics of C. elegans organismal death. PMID:23935448

  13. Vitamin D and Death by Sunshine

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Rebecca S.; Clare Gordon-Thomson; Rybchyn, Mark S.; Sequeira, Vanessa B.; Song, Eric J; Carter, Sally E.; Wannit Tongkao-On; Katie M. Dixon

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight is the major cause of skin cancer. Ultraviolet radiation (UV) from the sun causes damage to DNA by direct absorption and can cause skin cell death. UV also causes production of reactive oxygen species that may interact with DNA to indirectly cause oxidative DNA damage. UV increases accumulation of p53 in skin cells, which upregulates repair genes but promotes death of irreparably damaged cells. A benefit of sunlight is vitamin D, which is formed following exposure of 7-de...

  14. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome.

  15. Pediatric intestinal leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Amit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports an infant presenting with leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine. The patient presented with intermittent abdominal pain. Examination revealed a hard and mobile intraperitoneal mass. The tumor arose from the mid-ileum with regional lymphadenopathy. Excision of the tumor along with the involved bowel was performed followed by three cycles of chemotherapy. Histological diagnosis was that of a low-grade malignant leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine. Surgical excision was followed by three cycles of chemotherapy. After surgery and three cycles of chemotherapy, the patient was followed up for four years with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Surgery followed by chemotherapy was curative for leiomyosarcoma in our patient. Intestinal leiomyosarcoma should be kept as a differential diagnosis for mobile solid intraabdominal tumors in childhood.

  16. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  17. Gallstones: an intestinal disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Erpecum, K J; Van Berge-Henegouwen, G P

    1999-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that impaired intestinal motility may facilitate gallstone formation by influencing biliary deoxycholate levels or by modulating interdigestive gall bladder motility (fig 2), although a primary intestinal defect in gallstone pathogenesis has not yet been demonstrated. In the cold war period, most interesting events, from a political point of view, occurred at the border between capitalist and communist systems, near the iron curtain. Similarly, the gall bladder and biliary tract can be viewed as the border between liver and intestinal tract, where many interesting things occur with profound impact on both systems. Combined efforts by researchers in the field of hepatology and gastrointestinal motility should brake down the Berlin wall of ignorance of one of the most common diseases in the Western world.

  18. Bacteriotherapy of acute radiation sickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mal' tsev, V.N.; Korshunov, V.M.; Strel' nikov, V.A.; Ikonnikova, T.B.; Kissina, E.V.; Lyannaya, A.M.; Goncharova, G.I.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1979-04-01

    Acute sickness is associated with intestinal dysbacteriosis; there is a radical decrease in number of microorganisms of lactic fermentation (bifidobacterium, lactobacillus) and an increase in E. coli proteus, enterococcus, and clostridium. Extensive use is made of live microorganisms in the treatment of various diseases associated with intestinal dysbacteriosis; in the case of acute radiation sickness, yeast, colibacterin, and E. coli have been used. In a number of cases, such therapy increased survival and life expectancy of irradiated animals. In this study, microorganisms of lactic fermentation (lactobacillus, bifidobacterium) and colibacterin were used for treatment of acute radiation sickness.

  19. [Intestinal microbiocenosis in children with intestinal enzymopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamilova, A T; Akhmedov, N N; Pulatova, D B; Nurmatov, B A

    2001-01-01

    141 children with different kinds of intestinal enzymopathy were examined; of these, 33 had celiac disease, 39--the syndrome of celiac disease, 12--congenital lactase deficiency and 57--the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency. In these patients a significant decrease in the average characteristics of the main protective flora and the growth of hemolytic and lactose-negative enterobacteria were established. In all groups of patients increased amounts of Proteus were detected, which was indicative of profound dysbiosis. The content of bifidobacteria was found to be decreased in 89.5-97% of the patients and the content of lactic acid bacteria, in 15.8-33.3%. The decreased content of Escherichia coli with normal enzymatic activity (less than 10(7) colony-forming units) was noted in one-third of the patients with the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency, in about a half of the patients with the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency and least of all in patients with celiac disease (9.1%). The association of opportunistic microbes was detected in 15.6% of the patients, more often in those with celiac disease, the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency. The severity of disturbances in intestinal eubiosis was found to depend on the gravity of the patients' state.

  20. Brain Death Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinello, Irene M

    2015-09-01

    In the United States, each year 1% to 2% of deaths are brain deaths. Considerable variation in the practice of determining brain death still remains, despite the publication of practice parameters in 1995 and an evidence-based guideline update in 2010. This review is intended to give bedside clinicians an overview of definition, the causes and pitfalls of misdiagnosing brain death, and a focus on the specifics of the brain death determination process.

  1. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  2. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  3. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  4. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  5. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  6. A perspective for pediatric surgeons: chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A; Shaffer, H; Teja, K; Kelly, T; Grogan, E; Bruni, C

    1979-12-01

    Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIIP) is a disorder of alimentary tract motility with onset of symptoms in adolescence or young adulthood, characterized by recurring attacks of abdominal pain, distention, vomiting, and constipation often leading to malnutrition and death. Starting with an adolescent patient, treated for a succession of life-threatening attacks of pseudoobstruction, the authors have identified CIIP in four generations of a Virginia family. Studies show characteristic dilation and diminished motility of the esophagus and intestine. Surgery's role in CIIP is palliative, and operation should only be offered when medical measures have failed to control symptoms.

  7. Protective role of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide 1 on the radiation-induced acute intestinal mucosal injury%唐古特大黄多糖组分1对大鼠急性放射性肠损伤的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琳娜; 张甜; 石磊; 张志培; 李诗草; 关波; 张文娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective role of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharides 1 ( RTP1 ) on the ra-diation-induced acute intestinal mucosal injury in rats .Methods Rats in RTP1 group were treated with 200 , 400 or 800 mg/kg RTP1 by intragastric administration for 7 days.At the 7th day, rats in IC group and RTP1 groups received a single dose of 10 .0 Gy for the abdomianl regions .At the 4 th day of radiation , the small intestinal samples were collected for pathology analysis and levels of SOD , MDA, GSH were also detected .The levels of DAO , D-lactate and endotoxin in blood plasma were measured .Results Compared with the IC group , the mucosa structure of small intestine in the RTP1 group was greatly improved .RTP1 pretreatment decreased the levels of MDA , the plasma levels of DAO D-lactate and endotoxin (P<0.05);enhanced the activity of SOD and the level of GSH (P<0.05).Conclusion RTP1 can promote the recovery of intestinal mucosa damage , which may be related to its inhibition of intestinal epithelial injury and intracellular reactive oxygen species production caused by radiation .%目的:探讨唐古特大黄多糖组分1( Rheum tanguticum polysaccharides , RTP1)对辐射所致大鼠急性肠黏膜损伤的保护作用。方法 RTP1灌胃给药(剂量200、400、800 mg/kg)7 d后,除正常组大鼠外,其余各组均接受10.0 Gy/只一次性全腹均匀X射线照射1次,3d后处死动物,观察小肠黏膜病理形态改变,测定肠黏膜屏障功能、小肠组织氧化还原酶活性及血浆内毒素水平。结果RTP1预处理后可以改善肠黏膜损伤,升高SOD活性及GSH含量,降低MDA水平,抑制血浆中DAO、D-乳酸及内毒素水平,与IC组比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 RTP1通过减轻肠黏膜屏障功能损害,增强抗氧化能力保护辐射所致肠黏膜损伤。

  8. Death Education and Death-Related Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelter, Jon W.; Epley, Rita J.

    1979-01-01

    Assessed the impact of a death and dying course. Results showed no significant pre-test/post-test differences for the experimental or the control group, but indicated initial differences between the two groups, suggesting that students enrolling in a death and dying course have more favorable attitudes toward both suicide and abortion. (Author)

  9. Death Education and Death-Related Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelter, Jon W.; Epley, Rita J.

    1979-01-01

    Assessed the impact of a death and dying course. Results showed no significant pre-test/post-test differences for the experimental or the control group, but indicated initial differences between the two groups, suggesting that students enrolling in a death and dying course have more favorable attitudes toward both suicide and abortion. (Author)

  10. Aging and the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Over the lifetime of the animal, there are many changes in the function of the body's organ systems. In the gastrointestinal tract there is a general modest decline in the function of the esophagus, stomach, colon,pancreas and liver. In the small intestine, there may be subtle alterations in the intestinal morphology, as well as a decline in the uptake of fatty acids and sugars.The malabsorption may be partially reversed by aging glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) or dexamethasone.Modifications in the type of lipids in the diet will influence the intestinal absorption of nutrients: for example, in mature rats a diet enriched with saturated as compared with polysaturated fatty acids will enhance lipid and sugar uptake, whereas in older animals the opposite effect is observed. Thus, the results of studies of the intestinal adaptation performed in mature rats does not necessarily apply in older animals. The age-associated malabsorption of nutrients that occurs with aging may be one of the several factors which contribute to the malnutrition that occurs with aging.

  11. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increases with the duration and severity of the disease. A link between colorectal cancer and Crohn’s disease is less strong, but it applies more to ... usually effective in the replacement of nutrients. BILE SALT DIARRHEA ... in Crohn’s disease. This is the principal area for intestinal absorption ...

  12. Whither brain death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2014-01-01

    The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain death: the familiar term for human death determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain death was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain death has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human death but remains poorly understood by the public and by health professionals. The current controversies over brain death are largely restricted to the academy, but some practitioners express ambivalence over whether brain death is equivalent to human death. Brain death remains an accepted and sound concept, but more work is necessary to establish its biophilosophical justification and to educate health professionals and the public.

  13. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M Heimesaat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help

  14. Interaction between food components, intestinal microbiota and intestinal mucosa as a function of intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Sandt, H. van de

    2003-01-01

    Interaction between food components, intestinal microbiota and intestinal mucosa was studied as a function of intestinal health. A microbiota was found to be important for the onset and progression of inflammatory diseases. Studies revealed a prominent effect of micro-organisms on the gene expressio

  15. Cited1 deficiency suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Méniel

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of Apc in the murine intestine alters crypt-villus architecture and function. This process is accompanied by multiple changes in gene expression, including upregulation of Cited1, whose role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we explore the relevance of Cited1 to intestinal tumorigenesis. We crossed Cited1 null mice with Apc(Min/+ and AhCre(+Apc(fl/fl mice and determined the impact of Cited1 deficiency on tumour growth/initiation including tumour multiplicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and the transcriptome. We show that Cited1 is up-regulated in both human and murine tumours, and that constitutive deficiency of Cited1 increases survival in Apc(Min/+ mice from 230.5 to 515 days. However, paradoxically, Cited1 deficiency accentuated nearly all aspects of the immediate phenotype 4 days after conditional deletion of Apc, including an increase in cell death and enhanced perturbation of differentiation, including of the stem cell compartment. Transcriptome analysis revealed multiple pathway changes, including p53, PI3K and Wnt. The activation of Wnt through Cited1 deficiency correlated with increased transcription of β-catenin and increased levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin. Hence, immediately following deletion of Apc, Cited1 normally restrains the Wnt pathway at the level of β-catenin. Thus deficiency of Cited1 leads to hyper-activation of Wnt signaling and an exaggerated Wnt phenotype including elevated cell death. Cited1 deficiency decreases intestinal tumourigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice and impacts upon a number of oncogenic signaling pathways, including Wnt. This restraint imposed by Cited1 is consistent with a requirement for Cited1 to constrain Wnt activity to a level commensurate with optimal adenoma formation and maintenance, and provides one mechanism for tumour repression in the absence of Cited1.

  16. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  17. National Death Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Death Index (NDI) is a centralized database of death record information on file in state vital statistics offices. Working with these state offices, the...

  18. Intestinal ascariasis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Imtiaz; Rather, Muddasir; Naikoo, Ghulam; Amin, Abid; Mushtaq, Syed; Nazir, Mir

    2010-05-01

    Ascariasis is a staggering health problem commonly seen in children of endemic areas. In the abdomen, ascaris lumbricoides can cause a myriad of surgical complications. Intestinal obstruction by ascaris lumbricoides is commonly seen in children. Most cases are managed conservatively. The purpose was to study the clinical presentation and management of symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. A 3-year study was performed from April 2006 to April 2009 of pediatric-age patients who had symptomatic intestinal ascariasis. All patients had detailed clinical history, examination, plain X-ray of abdomen, and ultrasonography of abdomen. Peroperative findings were recorded in all patients who had surgical intervention. This prospective study had 360 patients. Male to female ratio was 1.37:1. 187 patients (52%) presented within 2-4 days of duration of illness. Mean +/- standard deviation (SD) age of patients was 6.35 +/- 2.25 years. Age group of 4-7 years (80%) was commonest group affected. Abdominal pain was a leading symptom in 357 patients (99%) with the pain in periumbilical area present in 215 patients (60%). In 227 patients (63%) abdominal distension was seen and was the commonest physical finding. Palpable worm masses were seen in 129 patients (36%); 81 patients (63%) had palpable worm masses in the umbilical quadrant. On X-ray of abdomen, visible worm masses were seen in 83 patients (23%). Abdominal sonography showed interloop fluid in 177 patients (49%) and free fluid in the pelvis of 97 patients (27%). The number of patients who were managed conservatively was 281 (78%), and 79 patients (22%) had surgical intervention. In patients who had surgical intervention, 39 patients (49%) had enterotomy and 7 patients (9%) had kneading of worms. Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients, and an overall mortality of 1% (1 patient) was seen. Ascaridial intestinal obstruction is common in children in the Kashmir. Abdominal pain is the leading symptom in

  19. A Model for Precise and Uniform Pelvic- and Limb-Sparing Abdominal Irradiation to Study the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Using Small Animal Irradiation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Velcich, Anna; Guha, Chandan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Currently, no readily available mitigators exist for acute abdominal radiation injury. Here, we present an animal model for precise and homogenous limb-sparing abdominal irradiation (LSAIR) to study the radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS). Materials and Methods: The LSAIR technique was developed using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with image guidance capabilities. We delivered LSAIR at doses between 14 and 18 Gy on 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Histological analysis was performed to confirm that the observed mortality was due to acute abdominal radiation injury. Results: A steep dose–response relationship was found for survival, with no deaths seen at doses below 16 Gy and 100% mortality at above 17 Gy. All deaths occurred between 6 and 10 days after irradiation, consistent with the onset of RIGS. This was further confirmed by histological analysis showing clear differences in the number of regenerative intestinal crypts between animals receiving sublethal (14 Gy) and 100% lethal (18 Gy) radiation. Conclusion: The developed LSAIR technique provides uniform dose delivery with a clear dose response, consistent with acute abdominal radiation injury on histological examination. This model can provide a useful tool for researchers investigating the development of mitigators for accidental or clinical high-dose abdominal irradiation. PMID:28203121

  20. Death and Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Death and Grief KidsHealth > For Teens > Death and Grief Print A A A What's in ... the reaction we have in response to a death or loss. Grief can affect our body, mind, ...

  1. Dreams of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Deirdre

    1989-01-01

    Examined frequency and characteristics of overt dreams of dying among healthy young adults. Dreams of dying were found to be rare but distinctive content category, representing overwhelmingly pleasant dreams. Over one-half of death dreams involved lengthy afterlife sequence, remainder focused on process of death. Death dreams of these healthy…

  2. Intestinal Malakoplakia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mahjoub

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Malakoplakia is a rare inflammatory disease, related to enterobacterial infection in the context of a disorder of cell-mediated immunity. Malakoplakia is exceptional in children and usually involves the gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis is exclusively based on histological analysis.Cases Presentation: In this paper we have reported 3 children with intestinal malakoplakia which were enrolled during a period of 6 years between 2001 to 2006 at Childrens Medical Center. Two were male, and one female. The main clinical manifestations were: chronic bloody and mucosal diarrhea, abdominal pain and polypoid masses detected by diagnostic colonoscopy. Histological diagnosis proved to be definite in these cases. The response to drug treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole in all three patients was good. Conclusion: The presence of intestinal malakoplakia must be ruled out in every child having chronic bloody mucosal diarrhea.

  3. Intestinal sugar transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie A Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrates are an important component of the diet.The carbohydrates that we ingest range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose) to disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) to complex polysaccharides. Most carbohydrates are digested by salivary and pancreatic amylases, and are further broken down into monosaccharides by enzymes in the brush border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes. For example, lactase-phloridzin hydrolase and sucraseisomaltase are two disaccharidases involved in the hydrolysis of nutritionally important disaccharides. Once monosaccharides are presented to the BBM, mature enterocytes expressing nutrient transporters transport the sugars into the enterocytes. This paper reviews the early studies that contributed to the development of a working model of intestinal sugar transport, and details the recent advances made in understanding the process by which sugars are absorbed in the intestine.

  4. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  5. Osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Louis; Skallerup, Anders; Olesen, Søren Schou

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure are associated with malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients that may negatively influence bone metabolism and increase the risk for developing osteoporosis. However, information regarding prevalence and contribution of individual...... risk factors is scarce. We investigated the prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with intestinal insufficiency and intestinal failure and identified associated risk factors. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including 167 clinically stable outpatients with intestinal...... insufficiency or intestinal failure. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry and the prevalence of osteoporosis was compared to a gender and age matched population. Several clinical and demographic parameters, including body mass index (BMI), vitamin-D, smoking habits...

  6. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  7. Unrecognised HIV related deaths.

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, A.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To establish whether follow up of deaths from selected HIV related causes could increase the number of cases of HIV infection reported to the Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC), and to estimate the proportion of deaths among HIV positive men that occurred in men who were not known to be HIV positive at the time of death by the person who signed the death certificate. DESIGN--Follow up of draft death entries received by the Office of Po...

  8. Infant death scene investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Pamela D; Ragan, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The sudden unexpected death of an infant is a tragedy to the family, a concern to the community, and an indicator of national health. To accurately determine the cause and manner of the infant's death, a thorough and accurate death scene investigation by properly trained personnel is key. Funding and resources are directed based on autopsy reports, which are only as accurate as the scene investigation. The investigation should include a standardized format, body diagrams, and a photographed or videotaped scene recreation utilizing doll reenactment. Forensic nurses, with their basic nursing knowledge and additional forensic skills and abilities, are optimally suited to conduct infant death scene investigations as well as train others to properly conduct death scene investigations. Currently, 49 states have child death review teams, which is an idea avenue for a forensic nurse to become involved in death scene investigations.

  9. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  10. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  11. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ho Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm, plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm, UV-B (280–320 nm and UV-A (320–390 nm. The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS. Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8 is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1 gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD.

  12. 小牛血去蛋白提取物对急性放射性肠炎大鼠小肠黏膜的修复作用及凋亡相关基因的影响%Effect of actovegin on intestinal mucosa and expression of bcl-2/bax genes in rats with acute radiation enteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴文; 林晓燕; 毕迎惠; 韩俊庆

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨小牛血去蛋白提取物(商品名爱维治)对急性放射性肠炎大鼠小肠黏膜的修复作用及对肠上皮细胞bcl-2、bax基因蛋白表达的影响.方法 以高能X线直线加速器给予实验大鼠全腹照射(9.0 Gy),建立辐射损伤模型.实验大鼠随机分成正常对照组、模型对照组、爱维治低、中、高剂量组.造模后连续4 d腹腔注射给药,取相应部佗的小肠制成病理切片,图像分析仪测定相关形态学指标,用免疫组化方法 检测小肠黏膜上皮细胞中凋亡相关蛋白bcl-2、bax的表达.结果 爱维治中、高剂量组小肠绒毛高度、隐窝深度、黏膜厚度和全层厚度分别为(254.66±26.71)μm、(166.47±25.31)μm、(510.44±30.27)μm、(610.38±37.56)μm和(261.71±30.12)μm、(165.41±19.89)μm、(511.71±29.64)μm、(608.98±34.23)μm,较模型对照组明显改善(P<0.05).爱维治中、高剂量组bax的表达量分别为(24.54±8.59)%和(23.24±9.10)%,低于模型对照组(P<0.05);爱维治中、高剂量组bcl-2的表达量分别为(55.54±8.59)%和(52.21±8.32)%,高于模型对照组(P<0.05);爱维治中、高剂量组bcl-2/bax的比值分别为2.2632和2.1275,高于模型对照组(0.3425,P<0.01).结论 爱维治通过促进抑凋亡蛋白bcl-2的表达,抑制促凋亡蛋白bax的表达,减少肠黏膜细胞凋亡,加速急性放射性肠炎受损肠黏膜的修复.%Objective To evaluate the effect of actovegin ( Nycomed,deproteinized hemoderivative of calf blood injection) on intestinal mucosa in rats with acute radiation enteritis,and observe the changes of expression of apoptosis-related bcl-2/bax genes.Methods An abdominal irradiation in a dose of 9.0 Gy X-ray of linear accelerator was performed once on a group of Wistar rats to establish a model of acute intestinal radiation enteritis.The experimental rats were randomly divided into five groups.Group 1 was normal control group;group 2 was model control group;groups 3,4 and 5 were

  13. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes o...

  14. Mechanisms of calcium transport in small intestine. Progress report, March 1, 1976--September 30, 1977. [Chickens, rats, lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, H.F.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: subcellular location of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/(1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/) in intestine of chickens; studies on receptor proteins in intestine for 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D3; studies on intestinal cytosol receptors in chickens and rats; control of intestinal calcium transport; effect of calcitonin on 25-OH-D/sub 3/-1-hydroxylase; isolation and identification of the active principle of Solonum glaucophyllum, the South American plant that causes metastatic calcification and death to grazing animals; and studies on lead transport in vitro and in vivo. (HLW)

  15. Microbes, intestinal inflammation and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad W; Kale, Amod A; Bere, Praveen; Vajjala, Sriharsha; Gounaris, Elias; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya

    2012-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is known for causing disturbed homeostatic balance among the intestinal immune compartment, epithelium and microbiota. Owing to the emergence of IBD as a major cause of morbidity and mortality, great efforts have been put into understanding the sequence of intestinal inflammatory events. Intestinal macrophages and dendritic cells act in a synergistic fashion with intestinal epithelial cells and microbiota to initiate the triad that governs the intestinal immune responses (whether inflammatory or regulatory). In this review, we will discuss the interplay of intestinal epithelial cells, bacteria and the innate immune component. Moreover, whether or not genetic intervention of probiotic bacteria is a valid approach for attenuating/mitigating exaggerated inflammation and IBD will also be discussed.

  16. [The diagnosis of death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Carlos; Goic, Alejandro; Lavados, Manuel; Quintana, Carlos; Rojas, Alberto; Serani, Alejandro; Vacarezza, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    This paper undertakes an analysis of the scientific criteria used in the diagnosis of death and underscores the importance of intellectual rigor in the definition of medical concepts, particularly regarding such a critical issue as the diagnosis of death. Under the cardiorespiratory criterion, death is defined as "the irreversible cessation of the functioning of an organism as a whole", and the tests used to confirm this criterion (negative life-signs) are sensitive and specific. In this case, cadaverous phenomena appear immediately following the diagnosis of death. On the other hand, doubts have arisen concerning the theoretical and the inner consistency of the criterion of brain death, since it does not satisfy the definition of "the irreversible cessation of the functioning of an organism as a whole", nor the requirement of "total and irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem". There is evidence to the effect that the tests used to confirm this criterion are not specific enough. It is clear that brain death marks the beginning of a process that eventually ends in death, though death does not occur at that moment. From an ethical point of view, the conflict arises between the need to provide an unequivocal diagnosis of death and the possibility of saving a life through organ transplantation. The sensitive issue of brain death calls for a more thorough and in-depth discussion among physicians and the community at large.

  17. Cideb facilitates the lipidation of chylomicrons in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Jun; Wang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Wu, Jie; Liu, Fang; Li, Le; Gao, Xing; Zhao, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Pei-Zhen; Li, Peng; Ye, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector b (Cideb), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, has been shown to play a critical role in maintaining hepatic lipid homeostasis by promoting the lipidation and maturation of VLDL particles. Here, we observed that Cideb is expressed in the jejunum and ileum sections of the small intestine, and its expression was induced by high-fat diet. Intragastric gavage with lipids resulted in the retention of lipids in the intestine in Cideb-deficient mice. In addition, we observed that mice with Cideb deficiency exhibited reduced intestinal chylomicron-TG secretion and increased lipid accumulation in the enterocytes. The sizes of chylomicrons secreted from the small intestine of Cideb-deficient mice were also smaller than those from wild-type mice. Furthermore, the overexpression of Cideb increased TG secretion and reduced lipid accumulation in the enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. In addition, we proved that Cideb was localized to the ER and LDs and could interact with ApoB48 in Caco-2 cells. Overall, these data revealed that Cideb plays an important role in controlling intestinal chylomicron lipidation.

  18. A Comparison of Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton- or Gamma-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgason, Ashley; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    There are many consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment which can adversely affect the health of a crew member. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) involving nausea and vomiting, damage to radio-sensitive tissue such as the blood forming organs and gastrointestinal tract, and cancer are some of these negative effects. The space radiation environment is ample with protons and contains gamma rays as well. Little knowledge exists to this point, however, regarding the effects of protons on mammalian systems; conversely several studies have been performed observing the effects of gamma rays on different animal models. For the research presented here, we wish to compare our previous work looking at whole-body exposure to protons using a mouse model to our studies of mice experiencing whole-body exposure to gamma rays as part of the radio-adaptive response. Radio-adaptation is a well-documented phenomenon in which cells exposed to a priming low dose of radiation prior to a higher dose display a reduction in endpoints like chromosomal aberrations, cell death, micronucleus formation, and more when compared to their counterparts receiving high dose-irradiation only. Our group has recently completed a radio-adaptive experiment with C57BL/6 mice. For both this study and the preceding proton research, the gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest doses of 0.1 Gy of protons and 0.05 Gy of gamma rays, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. A smaller percentage of crypts showed 3 or more apoptotic lesions in animals that received 6 Gy of gamma-irradiation compared to mice

  19. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Navarro; SJ Alonso; R Navarro; J Trujillo; E Jorge

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaphthalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastrointestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats.METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses,intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanolplant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg),cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2× 10-4, 6.4 × 10-4 and 1.2 × 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated.RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase.Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride.CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs.Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain.

  20. Programmed cell death: Superman meets Dr Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Pascal; Silke, John

    2003-12-01

    This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell death (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell death, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  1. Existential Concerns About Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Lene; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2014-01-01

    psychology or Kübler-Ross’ theory about death stages. The complex concerns might be explained using Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological thinking. We aimed to illuminate dying patients´ existential concerns about the impending death through a descriptive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer...... patients in Danish hospices. The main findings demonstrated how the patients faced the forthcoming death without being anxious of death but sorrowful about leaving life. Furthermore, patients expressed that they avoided thinking about death. However, some had reconstructed specific and positive ideas about...... afterlife and made accurate decisions for practical aspects of their death. The patients wished to focus on positive aspects in their daily life at hospice. It hereby seems important to have ongoing reflections and to include different theoretical perspectives when providing existential support to dying...

  2. Existential Concerns About Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Lene; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    psychology or Kübler-Ross’ theory about death stages. The complex concerns might be explained using Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological thinking. We aimed to illuminate dying patients´ existential concerns about the impending death through a descriptive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer...... patients in Danish hospices. The main findings demonstrated how the patients faced the forthcoming death without being anxious of death but sorrowful about leaving life. Furthermore, patients expressed that they avoided thinking about death. However, some had reconstructed specific and positive ideas about...... afterlife and made accurate decisions for practical aspects of their death. The patients wished to focus on positive aspects in their daily life at hospice. It hereby seems important to have ongoing reflections and to include different theoretical perspectives when providing existential support to dying...

  3. Early Intestinal Rehabilitation Therapy Ameliorates Intestinal Adaptation in Children with Short Bowel Syndrome: The Long-Term Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxiao; Lu, Chunlei; Li, Yousheng

    2016-12-01

    In the management of short bowel syndrome (SBS), the benefits of treatment with growth hormone (GH), glutamine, and enteral nutrition (EN) on intestinal adaptation among children patients is still controversial. The aim of present study is to determine whether GH, glutamine, and EN have positive effect on intestinal adaptation in children with SBS. Sixteen children with SBS (small bowel remnant length, 56.75 ± 8.09 cm; mean ± SE) were treated with GH (0.05 mg/kg/d), glutamine (0.45 mg/kg/d), plus EN-enriched fiber diet for four weeks. After four weeks of treatment, patients were discharged home; GH was discontinued, but the EN with glutamine was continued. Repeated treatment was performed if there were lose weight, dysplasia, or severe diarrhea. All patients completed the treatment. Body weight, intestinal absorptive capacity, and plasma levels of proteins were significantly improved after complete treatment, without any major adverse effects. On follow-up, no death was reported. Treatment with GH, glutamine, and EN in early stage significantly improved intestinal adaptation in pediatric patients with SBS. Furthermore, the positive effect of the treatment does not seem to be sustained once GH discontinued until the residual intestinal adaptation reaches its maximum.

  4. Liver Cirrhosis and Intestinal Bacterial Translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microlfora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microlfora may lead to microbial translocation, deifned as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal lfora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.

  5. The Effects of Death Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David

    Although fear of death is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of death and the fear of death have only occurred for the last few decades. Death education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of death education on death anxiety by…

  6. Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  7. Changes of Intestinal Permeability in Cholelithiasis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-long Sun; Shuo-dong Wu; Dong-xu Cui; Bao-lin Liu; Xian-wei Dai

    2009-01-01

    @@ In normal condition,intestine mucosa possesses barrier function.When the barrier function of intestine mucosa was damaged,intestinal bacteria,endotoxin,or other substances would enter blood.It is generally accepted that biliary bacteria origins from the intestine either via duodenal papilla or intestinal mucosa.In this study,we aimed to investigate the intestinal permeability changes of cholelithiasis patients to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of cholelithiasis.

  8. Exercise, Intestinal Absorption, and Rehydration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ KEYPOINTS 1. The proximal small intestine (duodenum & jejunum) is the primary site of fluid absorption. It absorbs about 50% to 60% of any given fluid load. The colon or large intestine absorbs approximately 80 to 90% of the fluid it receives, but accounts for only about 15% of the total fluid load.

  9. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Martino, Antonio [Trauma Center, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Di Pietto, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Department ' Magrassi-Lanzara' , Section of Radiology, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation.

  10. Programmed cell death and cell extrusion in rat duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium is continously renewed through a balance between cell division and cell loss. How this balance is achieved is uncertain. Thus, it is unknown to what extent programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to intestinal epithelial cell loss. We have used a battery...... of techniques detecting the events associated with PCD in order to better understand its role in the turnover of the intestinal epithelium, including modified double- and triple-staining techniques for simultaneously detecting multiple markers of PCD in individual cells. Only a partial correlation between TUNEL...... positivity for DNA fragmentation, c-jun phosphorylation on serine-63, positivity for activated caspase-3 and apoptotic morphology was observed. Our results show that DNA fragmentation does not invariable correlate to activation of caspase-3. Moreover, many cells were found to activate caspase-3 early...

  11. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption.

  12. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found in their cribs. SIDS is the leading cause of death in children between one month and one year old. Most SIDS deaths occur when babies are between one month and four months old. Premature babies, boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska ...

  13. Death Writ Large

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mainstream thanatology has devoted its efforts to improving the understanding, care, and social integration of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness or bereavement. This article suggests that it might now be time to expand the scope and mission to include large-scale death and death that occurs through complex and multi-domain…

  14. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  15. Death, Children, and Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robin L.

    The books listed in this annotated bibliography are intended to help children understand the reality of death and deal with the mystery and emotions that accompany it. Each entry indicates the genre and reading level of the book and provides a brief description of the attitude toward death that it conveys. The selections include fables, fantasy,…

  16. Date with Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑慧敏

    2016-01-01

    Have you ever heard about a popular movie called date with an angel? It must be sweet and lovely. But have you ever imagine about dating with death? What is your feeling when you have a chance to talk with death? Excited or afraid? I believe that many people definitely do not think about this question and neither do I.

  17. Death Acceptance through Ritual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using death-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "death-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…

  18. Conflicting Thoughts about Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Most research on children's conception of death has probed their understanding of its biological aspects: its inevitability, irreversibility and terminal impact. Yet many adults subscribe to a religious conception implying that death marks the beginning of a new life. Two recent empirical studies confirm that in the course of development, children…

  19. Facing Up to Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elizabeth Kubler

    1972-01-01

    Doctor urges that Americans accept death as a part of life and suggests ways of helping dying patients and their families face reality calmly, with peace. Dying children and their siblings, as well as children's feelings about relatives' deaths, are also discussed. (PD)

  20. Facing Up to Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elizabeth Kubler

    1972-01-01

    Doctor urges that Americans accept death as a part of life and suggests ways of helping dying patients and their families face reality calmly, with peace. Dying children and their siblings, as well as children's feelings about relatives' deaths, are also discussed. (PD)

  1. Death proteases come alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death in plants exhibits morphological features comparable to caspase-mediated apoptosis in animals, suggesting that plant cell death is executed by (caspase-like) proteases. However, to date, no caspase homologues have been identified in plants and therefore the existence and nature of these p

  2. Impact of Whole Body Irradiation on the Intestinal Microbiome- Considerations for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Santos, Orlando; Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Jones, Jeffrey; Greenberger, Joel S.; Epperly, Michael W.

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physiologic adaptation. Spaceflight-related changes have been reported in the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems to just name a few. However, to date, radiation exposure is one of the main limiting factors for long duration space exploration missions and especially a mission to Mars. Over the past few years through advances in technology, the characterization of the microbiome has revealed a large and complex community of microorganisms living in symbiosis with the human host. However, heterogeneity of the intestinal microbial spectrum in humans has been associated with a variety of diseases and susceptibility to infectious and toxic agents. Limited information is known about the influence of space environment in general and radiation in particular on the microbiome. Furthermore, multiple spaceflight and simulated microgravity experiments have shown changes in phenotypic microbial characteristics such as microbial growth, morphology, metabolism, genetic transfer, antibiotic and stress susceptibility, and an increase in virulence factors. We now report a study of the bacterial composition of the intestine in C57BL/6NTAC mice and the types of microbes entering the body at two time points after the LD 50/30 dose of total body irradiation using microarray-based assay, G3 PhyloChip 16S rRNA, and bioinformatics methods. Bacteria and archaea taxon richness was determined at the genus level and ranged from 2 to 107 and 0 to 3 respectively. As expected, pre-exposure blood samples exhibited less bacterial and archaeal genus richness compared to all other samples. However, the study shows a significant shift in the mouse gut microbial speciation in several bacterial families, with increases in the Turicibacteraceae and Enterobacteriaceae and decreases in the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae families. The findings most relevant to occupational

  3. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  4. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  5. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the area is stitched shut. Another treatment, called proton-beam radiation therapy , focuses the radiation on the ... after radiation treatment ends. Sore mouth and tooth decay. If you received radiation therapy to the head ...

  6. Radiation sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation. There are two basic types of radiation: ionizing and nonionizing. Nonionizing radiation comes in the form of light, radio waves, microwaves and radar. This kind of radiation usually ...

  7. Death in media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavićević Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role of media in a construction of public image speech and presentation of death. The main research questions could be posed as follows: does the media discourse confirm a thesis about modern society as the one which intensely avoids encounter with Death, or does it defy it? Frequent images or hints of death in visual media in films informative and entertainment programs-suggest certain changes related to this issue in the past few decades. This analysis focuses on printed media hence the paper assesses numerous issues of the daily journal Politika from 1963, 1972, 1973, 1979, 1985, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2007 and 2008, as well as some other daily journals after 2000. The analysis confirms a strong connection between the current political systems and ideology and speech about death. In addition, it reveals a political usage of this event but also speaks up about cultural and historical models, underlying all other constructions. During the 1960's and 1970's, the presentations, including the speech about death relied on the traditional understandings about inevitability of death and dying, and alternatively on atheistic beliefs related to the progress and wellbeing of the society. In this particular discourse, death was present to a limited degree, serving primarily to glorify socialist order. The end of the 1970's witnessed an increase in the glorification of the death, correlated with the decrease of the dominant political ideology. On the other hand, the 1990's brought about more presence of the national and religious symbolism and glorification of the dead as heroes. After 2000, mercantilism is evident throughout the media. All of the media broadcast drastic images of death and dead, thus providing an answer to the posed question at the beginning of this paper about the relationship of the modern society towards death but nevertheless, this still leaves out many implicit consequences and possible meanings.

  8. [Treatment of children with intestinal failure: intestinal rehabilitation, home parenteral nutrition or small intestine transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, E.G.; Oers, H.A. van; Escher, J.C.; Damen, G.M.; Rings, E.H.; Tabbers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterised by inadequate absorption of food or fluids, which is caused by insufficient bowel surface area or functioning. Children with chronic intestinal failure are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), which can be provided at home (HPN). In the Netherlands, HPN for chi

  9. A mouse model of acrodermatitis enteropathica: loss of intestine zinc transporter ZIP4 (Slc39a4 disrupts the stem cell niche and intestine integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Geiser

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human Zip4 gene cause acrodermatitis enteropathica, a rare, pseudo-dominant, lethal genetic disorder. We created a tamoxifen-inducible, enterocyte-specific knockout of this gene in mice which mimics this human disorder. We found that the enterocyte Zip4 gene in mice is essential throughout life, and loss-of-function of this gene rapidly leads to wasting and death unless mice are nursed or provided excess dietary zinc. An initial effect of the knockout was the reprogramming of Paneth cells, which contribute to the intestinal stem cell niche in the crypts. Labile zinc in Paneth cells was lost, followed by diminished Sox9 (sex determining region Y-box 9 and lysozyme expression, and accumulation of mucin, which is normally found in goblet cells. This was accompanied by dysplasia of the intestinal crypts and significantly diminished small intestine cell division, and attenuated mTOR1 activity in villus enterocytes, indicative of increased catabolic metabolism, and diminished protein synthesis. This was followed by disorganization of the absorptive epithelium. Elemental analyses of small intestine, liver, and pancreas from Zip4-intestine knockout mice revealed that total zinc was dramatically and rapidly decreased in these organs whereas iron, manganese, and copper slowly accumulated to high levels in the liver as the disease progressed. These studies strongly suggest that wasting and lethality in acrodermatitis enteropathica patients reflects the loss-of-function of the intestine zinc transporter ZIP4, which leads to abnormal Paneth cell gene expression, disruption of the intestinal stem cell niche, and diminished function of the intestinal mucosa. These changes, in turn, cause a switch from anabolic to catabolic metabolism and altered homeostasis of several essential metals, which, if untreated by excess dietary zinc, leads to dramatic weight loss and death.

  10. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  11. Life and Death Decision Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    LIFE SMOKING: CANCER, EMPHYSEMA, SHORTENED LIFE BATHING: FALLING, ELECTROCUTION CONTRACEPTION: DEATH , ILLNESS PREGNANCY: DEATH , ILLNESS ABORTION ...economic effect is the one with the highest probability of causing my death . -13- EXPECTED NET SYSTEM DESIGN BENEFIT TO ME DEATH DEATH (r A(excluding death ...0-AO81 424 STANFORD UNIV CALIF DEPT OF ENGtNEERING-ECONOM!C SYSTEMS F/6 12/1 LIFE ANDI DEATH DECISION ANALYSIS.CU) DEC 79 R A HOWARD N0OOIN-79-C-0036

  12. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohammad

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the status and epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Iran. The information was driven from an extensive Health Survey which was done by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, deputy of Research Affairs in 1990-92. Sampling fraction was 1 per 1000 of individuals aged between 2 and 69, the sampling method was cluster sampling and each cluster consisted of 7 families. Formal-ether was the method of finding parasites which included: Oxior, Ascariasis, Giardiasis, Entamoeba-histolytica, Tinea, Strongyloidiasis, Ancylostoma, and Trichocephaliasis. The highest prevalence rate belonged to Giardiasis with 14.4% and the lowest one belonged to Tinea and Ancylostoma with 0.2%. The prevalence rate in rural area was significantly lower than urban area (p<0.0001.

  13. [Death experience. Antidote against fear to death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fericgla, Josep M

    2003-12-01

    Fortunately, anthropology has brought to our modern society a higher interest for mankind's cultural dimension and the values which each people employ in order to make sense out of the changes which occur during our lives. It is this cultural dimension which permits men to develop our innate capacities and to become humans. However, in order to achieve this, we need experiences which are codified and interpreted by a values system which each individual has made his/her own. Some of these experiences take place inside cultural mores constructed expressly so that they are useful for one's lifestyle; these are known as rites. A rite, therefore, is an experience which leaves an impression, which implies social and biographical changes, which provides meaning to human beings' universal interests. Nonetheless, since rites usually are organized by diverse religions, it is convenient, as we enter the 21st Century, to speak about Experiences which Activate Structures as means to approach, to come to grasp with, some of the great causes of anxiety in humans: death and insanity. These Experiences which Activate Structures allow us to subjectively experiment, to conquer our fears and to be more conscious of our here and our now. Workshops on the Living Integration of One's Own Death are included in this context as an appropriate forum through which to approach death with knowledge and serenity, inducing changes in our own lifestyle as well and helping us to overcome situations of existential blockage.

  14. Brain death is not death: a critique of the concept, criterion, and tests of brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Ari R

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests that there are insurmountable problems for brain death as a criterion of death. The following are argued: (1) brain death does not meet an accepted concept of death, and is not the loss of integration of the organism as a whole; (2) brain death does not meet the criterion of brain death itself; brain death is not the irreversible loss of all critical functions of the entire brain; and (3) brain death may, however rarely, be reversible. I conclude that brain death, while a devastating neurological state with a dismal prognosis, is not death.

  15. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  16. DNA damage-induced cell death: lessons from the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena Lobo Borges; Rafael Linden; Jean YJ Wang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage can, but does not always, induce cell death. While several pathways linking DNA damage signals to mitochondria-dependent and -independent death machineries have been elucidated, the connectivity of these pathways is subject to regulation by multiple other factors that are not well understood. We have proposed two conceptual models to explain the delayed and variable cell death response to DNA damage: integrative surveillance versus autonomous pathways. In this review, we discuss how these two models may explain the in vivo regulation of cell death induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in the developing central nervous system, where the death response is regulated by radiation dose, cell cycle status and neuronal development.

  17. Intestinal spirochetosis and colon diverticulosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Marcus Aurelho de

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of intestinal spirochetosis in a 62-year-old white male is reported. The condition was characterized by chronic flatulence and episodes of intestinal hemorrhage, in addition to the evidence of hypotonic diverticular disease, with a large number of slender organisms in the colon epithelium and cryptae. Spirochetes were demonstrated by Whartin-Starry stain. The serologic tests for syphilis and HIV were positive. Spirochetosis was treated with penicillin G, and the patient remains free of intestinal complaints 20 months later.

  18. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter.

  19. Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  20. Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and...

  1. Death with dignity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aungst, Heide

    2008-01-01

      Aungst evaluates the first decade of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, a law enacted in 1997 that permits physicians to assist terminally ill patients in ending their lives by prescribing lethal doses of medication...

  2. Amending Death Rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China’s Criminal Law is being revised to cut down on death sentences and tighten up punishment for surging crimes The eighth amendment to the Criminal Law, demanding moreprudent use of capital punishment

  3. Hitler's Death Camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  4. Eighth Amendment & Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Joseph M.; Merrill, Denise W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson on capital punishment for juveniles based on three hypothetical cases. The goal of the lesson is to have students understand the complexities of decisions regarding the death penalty for juveniles. (JDH)

  5. Autoerotic deaths: four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, C T; Cadden, G A; Margolius, K A

    1994-07-01

    We describe the circumstances and post mortem medical findings of 4 unusual fatalities where death occurred during autoerotic practice. Three cases occurred in young to middle-aged men--hanging, electrocution and inhalation of a zucchini. The manner of death in each was accidental. The fourth case was an elderly man who died of ischemic heart disease, apparently whilst masturbating with a vacuum cleaner and a hair dryer.

  6. Childhood Malnutrition and the Intestinal Microbiome Malnutrition and the microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Anne V.; Dinh, Duy M.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 years, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has been suggested that malnutrition may delay the normal development of the gut microbiota in early childhood or force it towards an altered composition that lacks the required functions for healthy growth and/or increases the risk for intestinal inflammation. This review addresses our current understanding of the beneficial contributions of gut microbiota to human nutrition (and conversely the potential role of changes in that community to malnutrition), the process of acquiring an intestinal microbiome, potential influences of malnutrition on the developing microbiota and the evidence directly linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome to childhood malnutrition. We review recent studies on the association between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and early childhood malnutrition and discuss them in the context of implications for intervention or prevention of the devastation caused by malnutrition. PMID:25356748

  7. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  8. Plasma citrulline levels predict intestinal toxicity in patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem; Kotek, Ayse; Arslan, Gungor; Topkan, Erkan (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Baskent Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Adana (Turkey)), E-mail: hcemonal@hotmail.com; Unal, Birsel (Dept. of Biochemistry, Baskent Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)); Yavuz, Aydin; Yavuz, Melek (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) for abdominal and pelvic malignancies often causes severe small bowel toxicity. Citrulline concentrations are known to decrease with intestinal failure. We thus evaluated the feasibility of plasma citrulline levels in predicting radiation-induced intestinal toxicity. Material and methods. Fifty-three patients (36 prostate cancer, 17 endometrial cancer) who received 45 Gy pelvic RT using conventional fractionation were prospectively evaluated. Patients with prostate cancer received an additional 25-30.6 Gy conformal boost. Plasma citrulline levels were assessed on day 0, mid- (week 3) and post-RT (week 8), and four months post-RT. Dose-volume histogram, citrulline concentration changes, and weekly intestinal toxicity scores were analyzed. Results. Mean age was 63 years (range: 43-81 years) and mean baseline citrulline concentration was 38.0 +- 10.1 mumol/l. Citrulline concentrations were significantly reduced at week 3 (27.4 +- 5.9 mumol/l; p < 0.0001), treatment end (29.9 +- 8.8 mumol/l; p < 0.0001), and four months post-treatment (34.3 +- 12.1; p 0.01). The following factor pairs were significantly positively correlated: Citrulline concentration/mean bowel dose during, end of treatment, and four months post-RT; dose-volume parameters/citrulline change groups; cumulative mean radiation dose/intestinal toxicity at end and four months post-RT; citrulline changes/intestinal toxicity during and end of RT. Citrulline concentration changes significantly differed during treatment according to RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p < 0.0001). Although the citrulline changes differed significantly within RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p = 0.003), the difference between Grade 0 and Grade 1 did not differ significantly at the end of the treatment. At four months after RT, no significant differences were apparent. Conclusion. Citrulline-based assessment scores are objective and should be considered in measuring radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

  9. Intestinal acariasis in Anhui Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Pin Li; Jian Wang

    2000-01-01

    The mites found in stored food and house comprise a large group of subclass Acari, belonging to the suborder Acardida of the order Acarifornes. They can be found in dust and vacuum samples from floors, furniture, mattresses, Chinese herbal medicine, dry fruit, grain, flour, sugar, and bedding. These mites are nidicolous and feed on organic debris, including sloughed human skin, fungi, spilled food, pollen, etc. These mites are particularly prevalent in Chinese herbal medicine, dry fruit, grain, flour, sugar, beds, though carpeted floors near beds or couches may also have large numbers. The most common species are Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae , Dermatophagoides farinae , D . pteronyssinus, Glycyphagus domesticus, G. Ornatus, Carpoglyphus lactis and Tarsonemus granarius, etc. The viability of mites in storage is quite strong and they can invade and parasitize the intestines of humans[1 -15]. They can cause pulmonary acariasis[16-25] , urinary acariasis[26-33] and so on. The dejecta of mites is a quite strong allergen and can cause different allergic diseases[34-44]. Intestinal acariasis can be caused by some mites related to the way of diet intake and invading against intestinal mucosa, intestinal muscle[45-5a]. The first report of intestinal acariasis caused by these mites was made by Hinman et al (1934)[45]. From then on, all kinds of studies on the disease have been reported gradually. In order to make an epidemiological survey of intestinal acariasis the investigation of the disease was taken in some areas of Anhui Province from 1989 to 1996.

  10. Haemorrhage and intestinal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilia M. Pizzini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of coeliac disease is around 1% in general population but this is often unrecognised. The classical presentation of adult coeliac disease is characterized by diarrhoea and malabsorption syndrome, but atypical presentations are probably more common and are characterized by iron deficiency anaemia, weight loss, fatigue, infertility, arthralgia, peripheral neuropathy and osteoporosis. Unusual are the coagulation disorders (prevalence 20% and these are due to vitamin K malabsorption (prolonged prothrombin time. Clinical case: A 64-year-old man was admitted to our Department for an extensive spontaneous haematoma of the right leg. He had a history of a small bowel resection for T-cell lymphoma, with a negative follow-up and he didn’t report any personal or familiar history of bleeding. Laboratory tests showed markedly prolonged prothrombin (PT and partial-thromboplastin time (PTT, corrected by mixing studies, and whereas platelet count and liver tests was normal. A single dose (10 mg of intravenous vitamin K normalized the PT. Several days before the patient had been exposed to a superwarfarin pesticide, but diagnostic tests for brodifacoum, bromadiolone or difenacoum were negative. Diagnosis of multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulationfactor deficiencies (II, VII, IX, X due to intestinal malabsorption was made and coeliac disease was detected. Therefore the previous lymphoma diagnosis might be closely related to coeliac disease. Conclusions: A gluten free diet improves quality of life and restores normal nutritional and biochemical status and protects against these complications.

  11. Adult intestinal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J., E-mail: Jdavidson@doctors.org.u [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom); Plumb, A.; Burnett, H. [Salford Royal Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the alimentary tract to digest and absorb sufficient nutrition to maintain normal fluid balance, growth, and health. It commonly arises from disease affecting the mesenteric root. Although severe IF is usually managed in specialized units, it lies at the end of a spectrum with degrees of nutritional compromise being widely encountered, but commonly under-recognized. Furthermore, in the majority of cases, the initial enteric insult occurs in non-specialist IF centres. The aim of this article is to review the common causes of IF, general principles of its management, some commoner complications, and the role of radiology in the approach to a patient with severe IF. The radiologist has a crucial role in helping provide access for feeding solutions (both enteral and parenteral) and controlling sepsis (via drainage of collections) in an initial restorative phase of treatment, whilst simultaneously mapping bowel anatomy and quality, and searching for disease complications to assist the clinicians in planning a later, restorative phase of therapy.

  12. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Malacoplaquia intestinal Colonic malakoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto José Frem Aun

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Malacoplakia is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown origin. However immunodeficiency states (immunossuppressive medication, old people, renal transplantation, leukaemia, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition and others have been associated with patients with malacoplakia. An infectious cause of malakoplakia is suggested by the finding of coliform bacteria in the phagolysosomes of macrophages. The histologic study is characterized by a infiltrate of large macrophages (Hansenmann cells with pathognomonic inclusions containing siderocalcific structures (Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Most of the cases reported in literature, involve the genitourinary tract, but other structures can be affected (brain, bone, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, intestine, and others. A 66-year-old man whith a abdominal mass, went to our hospital with a colonic tumour diagnosis. The patient was submitted to a surgery, with resection of the rigth colon. The disease was invading a portion of the retroperitoneal tissue that was removed. The histopatologic study showed the pathognomonic sign of malakoplakia (Hansenmann cells and Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Norfloxacin have been used to the complementar treatment with total cure of the patient.

  14. [Deaths in hotels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risse, Manfred; Weilbächer, Nadine; Birngruber, Christoph; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2010-01-01

    There are no verified statistics about deaths occurring in hotels, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. A recent case induced us to conduct a systematic search for deaths in hotels in the autopsy reports of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen for the period from 1968 to 2009. This search yielded 22 evaluable cases in which persons had been found dead or had died in hotels. Data evaluated in the study were sex and age of the deceased, reason for the stay in the hotel and cause of death. Among the deaths, 18 were males and 4 females and the average age was 41 and 40 years respectively. 6 of the male guests had died from a natural and 10 from a non-natural cause. In the remaining two cases, the cause of death could not be determined, but as there was no evidence that another party had been involved, the cases were not further investigated. Of the 4 female guests, 3 had died of a natural cause; in one case, the cause of death remained unclear even after morphological and toxicological investigations. Surprisingly, a third of the men were found to be temporarily living in hotels due to social circumstances. This was not true for any of the women. Our retrospective analysis is based on a comparatively small number of deaths in what were mostly hotels in small to medium-sized towns. Interestingly, the gender ratio of 18:4 for deceased men and women was significantly higher than the usual gender ratio of 2:1 found for forensic autopsies. To be able to draw further conclusions, a greater number of cases would have to be analysed, for example by recruiting additional case files from other institutes of legal medicine. This would also open up the option of investigating possible regional variations.

  15. Typhoid intestinal perforation under 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Ikefuna, Anthony N

    2008-03-01

    Typhoid intestinal perforation is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries. The peculiar features in children 5 years. In the younger children, the predominant presentation was fever, vomiting and abdominal tenderness, and in the older children it was fever, abdominal pain and distension. Features of peritonitis were present in only 54.5% aged 1.3 (range 1-3) in the older children (poperative procedure (simple closure and segmental bowel resection) were similar in both groups. Post-operative complications were not significantly different in the two groups and included surgical wound infection, prolonged ileus, pulmonary infection, wound dehiscence, re-perforation, intra-abdominal abscess and incisional hernia. There were nine (40.9%) deaths in the 5s (p<0.05). Typhoid intestinal perforation in children <5 is associated with atypical presentation and high mortality. A high index of suspicion will ensure earlier presentation and might improve outcome.

  16. Factors determining colorectal cancer: the role of the intestinal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eNistal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, holds a complex community of microorganisms, which are essential for maintaining homeostasis. However, in recent years, many studies have implicated microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC, with this disease considered a major cause of death in the western world. The mechanisms underlying bacterial contribution in its development are complex and are not yet fully understood. However, there is increasing evidence showing a connection between intestinal microbiota and CRC. Intestinal microorganisms cause the onset and progression of CRC using different mechanisms, such as the induction of a chronic inflammation state, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation, the production of toxic metabolites or heterocyclic amine activation of pro-diet carcinogenic compounds. Despite these advances additional studies in humans and animal models will further decipher the relationship between microbiota and CRC, and aid in developing alternate therapies based on microbiota manipulation.

  17. Solitary Large Intestinal Diverticulitis in Leatherback Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, B A; Innis, C J; Daoust, P-Y; Wyneken, J; Miller, M; Harris, H; James, M C; Christiansen, E F; Foley, A

    2015-07-01

    Leatherback sea turtles are globally distributed and endangered throughout their range. There are limited data available on disease in this species. Initial observations of solitary large intestinal diverticulitis in multiple leatherbacks led to a multi-institutional review of cases. Of 31 subadult and adult turtles for which complete records were available, all had a single exudate-filled diverticulum, as large as 9.0 cm in diameter, arising from the large intestine immediately distal to the ileocecal junction. All lesions were chronic and characterized by ongoing inflammation, numerous intralesional bacteria, marked attenuation of the muscularis, ulceration, and secondary mucosal changes. In three cases, Morganella morganii was isolated from lesions. Diverticulitis was unrelated to the cause of death in all cases, although risk of perforation and other complications are possible.

  18. Reviews Equipment: Time Trial R/C Race Track Timer Book: A Universe from Nothing Equipment: Locktronics Electronics, Magnestism and Materials Unit Report: Nuclear Physics and Technology Book: Particle Physics Booklet: Radiation and You Book: The Million Death Quake Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Locktronics Electronics, Magnestism and Materials Unit Robust, reliable and proven classroom kit The Million Death Quake: the Science of Predicting the Earth's Deadliest Natural Disaster Accessible and well-written book covers everything you might (and perhaps should) want to know about earthquakes WORTH A LOOK Time Trial R/C Race Track Timer Fun kit for use with toy cars but little flexibility for other uses A Universe From Nothing: Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing Up-to-date account of cosmology explains very well but becomes polemical and loses focus Nuclear physics and technology—inside the atom IOP report useful for students considering a career in physics Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction Passages of good writing undermined by editing as the structure and illustrations disappoint Radiation and You Report is an interesting insight into radiation information from 25 years back, but some errors and a slow start let it down WEB WATCH App that aids star identification is highly recommended and videos for students and teachers also make the grade

  19. Pan-Nematoda Transcriptomic Elucidation of Essential Intestinal Functions and Therapeutic Targets With Broad Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-09-01

    The nematode intestine is continuous with the outside environment, making it easily accessible to anthelmintics for parasite control, but the development of new therapeutics is impeded by limited knowledge of nematode intestinal cell biology. We established the most comprehensive nematode intestinal functional database to date by generating transcriptional data from the dissected intestines of three parasitic nematodes spanning the phylum, and integrating the results with the whole proteomes of 10 nematodes (including 9 pathogens of humans or animals) and 3 host species and 2 outgroup species. We resolved 10,772 predicted nematode intestinal protein families (IntFams), and studied their presence and absence within the different lineages (births and deaths) among nematodes. Conserved intestinal cell functions representing ancestral functions of evolutionary importance were delineated, and molecular features useful for selective therapeutic targeting were identified. Molecular patterns conserved among IntFam proteins demonstrated large potential as therapeutic targets to inhibit intestinal cell functions with broad applications towards treatment and control of parasitic nematodes.

  20. Pediatric brain death determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Mudit; Ashwal, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Clinical guidelines for the determination of brain death in children were first published in 1987. These guidelines were revised in 2011 under the auspices of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Child Neurology Society, and provide the minimum standards that must be satisfied before brain death can be declared in infants and children. After achieving physiologic stability and exclusion of confounders, two examinations including apnea testing separated by an observation period (24 hours for term newborns up to 30 days of age, and 12 hours for infants and children from 31 days up to 18 years) are required to establish brain death. Apnea testing should demonstrate a final arterial PaCO2 20 mm Hg above the baseline and ≥ 60 mm Hg with no respiratory effort during the testing period. Ancillary studies (electroencephalogram and radionuclide cerebral blood flow) are not required to establish brain death and are not a substitute for the neurologic examination. The committee concluded that ancillary studies may be used (1) when components of the examination or apnea testing cannot be completed, (2) if uncertainty about components of the neurologic examination exists, (3) if a medication effect may be present, or (4) to reduce the interexamination observation period. When ancillary studies are used, a second clinical examination and apnea test should still be performed and components that can be completed must remain consistent with brain death.

  1. Precisely Tracking Childhood Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Tamer H; Koplan, Jeffrey P; Breiman, Robert F; Madhi, Shabir A; Heaton, Penny M; Mundel, Trevor; Ordi, Jaume; Bassat, Quique; Menendez, Clara; Dowell, Scott F

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the specific causes of neonatal and under-five childhood death in high-mortality geographic regions due to a lack of primary data and dependence on inaccurate tools, such as verbal autopsy. To meet the ambitious new Sustainable Development Goal 3.2 to eliminate preventable child mortality in every country, better approaches are needed to precisely determine specific causes of death so that prevention and treatment interventions can be strengthened and focused. Minimally invasive tissue sampling (MITS) is a technique that uses needle-based postmortem sampling, followed by advanced histopathology and microbiology to definitely determine cause of death. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is supporting a new surveillance system called the Child Health and Mortality Prevention Surveillance network, which will determine cause of death using MITS in combination with other information, and yield cause-specific population-based mortality rates, eventually in up to 12-15 sites in sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia. However, the Gates Foundation funding alone is not enough. We call on governments, other funders, and international stakeholders to expand the use of pathology-based cause of death determination to provide the information needed to end preventable childhood mortality.

  2. Death Threat and Death Concerns in the College Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacyk, Jerome; Eckstein, Daniel

    1980-01-01

    Thanatology students reported significantly lesser death threat and significantly greater death concerns. Trait anxiety was found to be a significant predictor of change in death threat in the Thanatology Group, with lesser anxiety associated with greater decline in death threat. (Author)

  3. Perspectives on Death: An Experiential Course on Death Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Edwin S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a college psychology course on death education (thanatology). Course objectives were to help students become aware of the feelings involved in facing death, encourage discussion on the subject of death, motivate students to change their attitudes about death, and encourage practical planning for funeral arrangements.…

  4. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  5. Sudden Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipsy María Gutiérrez Báez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the twentieth century, dying suddenly due to heart-related problems has become the main health issue in all countries where infectious diseases are not prevalent. Sudden death from cardiac causes is an important global health problem. Major databases were searched for the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. It has been demonstrated that there is a group of hereditary diseases with structural alterations or without apparent organic cause that explains many cases of sudden death in young people, whether related or not to physical exertion. Certain population groups are at higher risk for this disease. They are relatively easy to identify and can be the target of primary prevention measures.

  6. Amphetamine derivative related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora-Tamayo, C; Tena, T; Rodríguez, A

    1997-02-28

    Amphetamine its methylendioxy (methylendioxyamphetamine methylenedioxymethylamphetamine, methylenedioxyethylamphetamine) and methoxy derivatives (p-methoxyamphetamine and p-methoxymethylamphetamine) are widely abused in Spanish society. We present here the results of a systematic study of all cases of deaths brought to the attention of the Madrid department of the Instituto Nacional de Toxicologia from 1993 to 1995 in which some of these drugs have been found in the cadaveric blood. The cases were divided into three categories: amphetamine and derivatives, amphetamines and alcohol, amphetamines and other drugs. Data on age, sex, clinical symptoms, morphological findings, circumstances of death, when known, and concentration of amphetamine derivatives, alcohol and other drugs in blood are given for each group. The information provided here may prove to be useful for the forensic interpretation of deaths which are directly or indirectly related to abuse of amphetamine derivatives.

  7. Orchestrating an Exceptional Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja Marie Bornø

    , reinterpret and translate death and organ donation into something culturally acceptable and sense making. With chapters focusing analytically on the performance of trust, the transformative practices of hope, the aesthetization of ambiguous bodies, the sociality of exchangeable organs and the organ donation......This Ph.D. thesis explores the experiences of Danish donor families and the context of organ donation in Denmark. Based on comprehensive ethnographic studies at Danish hospitals and interviews with health care professionals and donor families, readers are invited on a journey into the complex...... processes of facing brain death and deciding about organ donation. This study suggests that organ donation should be understood as a ‘strange figure’ challenging traditions and attitudes regarding the boundaries between life and death and the practices surrounding dead human bodies. Simultaneously, organ...

  8. Orchestrating an Exceptional Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja Marie Bornø

    This Ph.D. thesis explores the experiences of Danish donor families and the context of organ donation in Denmark. Based on comprehensive ethnographic studies at Danish hospitals and interviews with health care professionals and donor families, readers are invited on a journey into the complex...... processes of facing brain death and deciding about organ donation. This study suggests that organ donation should be understood as a ‘strange figure’ challenging traditions and attitudes regarding the boundaries between life and death and the practices surrounding dead human bodies. Simultaneously, organ......, reinterpret and translate death and organ donation into something culturally acceptable and sense making. With chapters focusing analytically on the performance of trust, the transformative practices of hope, the aesthetization of ambiguous bodies, the sociality of exchangeable organs and the organ donation...

  9. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  10. Death by Propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H; Kaye, Alan David

    2017-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1986, propofol ( two, 6-diisopropylphenol) , an intravenous sedative-hypnotic agent, has been utilized for the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia and conscious sedation in over 80 percent of cases; largely replacing thiopental ( sodium pentothal) over a decade ago. Unrestricted as a controlled substance, propofol's abuse potential emerged quickly and was highlighted by the death of pop singer, Michael Jackson, in 2009. In order to assess the epidemiological features of fatal propofol abuse, a descriptive analysis of the scientific literature was conducted using Internet search engines. Well-documented cases of fatal propofol abuse were stratified as unintentional or accidental deaths and as intentional deaths by suicides or homicides. Continuous variables were compared for differences by unpaired, two-tailed t-tests with statistical significance indicated by p-values less than 0.05. Of 21 fatal cases of propofol abuse, 18 (86 percent ) occurred in healthcare workers, mostly anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists (n=14, 67 percent ). One case occurred in a layman who purchased propofol on the Internet. Seventeen deaths (81 percent ) were accidental; two were suicides (9.5 percent ) and two were homicides (9.5 percent ). Blood levels in intentional death cases were significantly greater than in accidental death cases (p less than 0.0001) all of which reflected initial therapeutic induction-level doses in the ranges of 2.0-2.5 mg/kg. Though lacking in analgesic effects, the abuse of propofol by young healthcare professionals, particularly operating room workers, has been significant; and likely underreported. Propofol is a dangerous drug with an evident abuse potential which often results in fatalities.

  11. [The death of Cleopatra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemain, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The image of a queen bitten by a snake is controversial and the facts, such as the swiftness of her death and her servants, and scientific experiments are in favour of a deadly poisoning. The author reminds that in the ancient texts the snake had sacred virtues and it was a symbolic image to embellish the suicide of the one who was sentenced to death by the Romans. Octaves set up the myth of a fatal bite which became an iconographic image for the cinema.

  12. Extinction. Histories of death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Żychliński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the last great novels of José Saramago, Death with Interruptions, begins with an epigraph taken from Ludwig Wittgenstein: “If, for example, you were to think more deeply about death, then it would be truly strange if, in so doing, you did not encounter new images, new linguistic fields”. The aim of my paper is to ponder on what kind of a new language game the Portuguese writer is offering us in his book and how to interpret his investigations from the angle of another contemporary literary and philosophical thanatological discourses.

  13. Elp3 drives Wnt-dependent tumor initiation and regeneration in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladang, Aurélie; Rapino, Francesca; Heukamp, Lukas C; Tharun, Lars; Shostak, Kateryna; Hermand, Damien; Delaunay, Sylvain; Klevernic, Iva; Jiang, Zheshen; Jacques, Nicolas; Jamart, Diane; Migeot, Valérie; Florin, Alexandra; Göktuna, Serkan; Malgrange, Brigitte; Sansom, Owen J; Nguyen, Laurent; Büttner, Reinhard; Close, Pierre; Chariot, Alain

    2015-11-16

    Tumor initiation in the intestine can rapidly occur from Lgr5(+) crypt columnar stem cells. Dclk1 is a marker of differentiated Tuft cells and, when coexpressed with Lgr5, also marks intestinal cancer stem cells. Here, we show that Elp3, the catalytic subunit of the Elongator complex, is required for Wnt-driven intestinal tumor initiation and radiation-induced regeneration by maintaining a subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Elp3 deficiency dramatically delayed tumor appearance in Apc-mutated intestinal epithelia and greatly prolonged mice survival without affecting the normal epithelium. Specific ablation of Elp3 in Lgr5(+) cells resulted in marked reduction of polyp formation upon Apc inactivation, in part due to a decreased number of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Mechanistically, Elp3 is induced by Wnt signaling and promotes Sox9 translation, which is needed to maintain the subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells. Consequently, Elp3 or Sox9 depletion led to similar defects in Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells in ex vivo organoids. Finally, Elp3 deficiency strongly impaired radiation-induced intestinal regeneration, in part because of decreased Sox9 protein levels. Together, our data demonstrate the crucial role of Elp3 in maintaining a subpopulation of Lgr5-derived and Sox9-expressing cells needed to trigger Wnt-driven tumor initiation in the intestine.

  14. Clinical and nutritional implications of radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, W.H.; Fan, A.; Halsted, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and nutritional significance of radiation enteritis was assessed in eight patients with chronic diarrhea which followed curative doses of radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Steatorrhea, found in seven malnourished patients, was ascribed to ileal disease or previous surgery, or to bacterial contamination of the small intestine. Lactose intolerance, assessed by breath hydrogen excretion after oral lactose and by jejunal lactase levels, was found in six patients. In a subgroup of five patients, the administration of two different defined formula liquid diets by nasoduodenal infusion decreased fecal fluid and energy losses by about one-half. Compared to Vivonex-HN, the infusion of Criticare-HN was associated with greater likelihood of intestinal gas production but a three-fold greater utilization of protein. Intestinal malabsorption and malnutrition in radiation enteritis has diverse etiologies. Whereas nutritional support by liquid diet limits fecal fluid and energy losses, these diets differ significantly in clinical tolerance and biologic value.

  15. Extra-intestinal coccidiosis in the kiwi (Apteryx spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kerri J; Alley, Maurice R; Pomroy, William E; Gartrell, Brett D; Castro, Isabel; Howe, Laryssa

    2013-04-01

    Despite significant conservation intervention, the kiwi (Apteryx spp.) is in serious population decline. To increase survival in the wild, conservation management includes rearing of young birds in captivity, safe from introduced mammalian predators. However, an increase in density of immunologically naïve kiwi increases the risk of exposure to disease, including coccidia. Intestinal coccidiosis has recently been described in the kiwi, and although extra-intestinal coccidiosis was first recognized in kiwi in 1978, very little is known about this disease entity. This study used archived histological tissues and reports from routine necropsies to describe the pathology of naturally occurring extra-intestinal coccidiosis. At least 4.5% of all kiwi necropsied during 1991 to 2011 (n=558) were affected by extra-intestinal coccidiosis, and it is estimated that it caused death in 0.9 to 1.2% of kiwi in the study group. Four forms were recognized: renal, hepatic, and, less commonly, splenic and pulmonary. At necropsy, renal coccidiosis was associated with miliary white streaks and foci through the kidneys, renomegaly, and renal pallor or congestion. Renal meronts and gametocytes were confined to the distal convoluted tubules and collecting ducts, and were associated with renal tubular necrosis and tubular obstruction. Hepatic miliary pinpoint foci were present throughout the hepatic parenchyma associated microscopically with macromeronts measuring 304×227 µm. In two cases, clusters of splenic meronts were identified, and a similar lesion was identified in the pulmonary interstitium of another case. Juvenile, captive kiwi were most often affected with extra-intestinal coccidiosis, illustrating an increased expression of disease with population manipulation for conservation purposes.

  16. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellanger Jérôme

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool α1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other

  17. Teaching about the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Paul; Eden, John Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the reasons for the death penalty, the reasons why the death penalty attracts so much attention, whether the death penalty is applied consistently, and the evidence that the application of the death penalty may be racially biased. Provides an accompanying article on "Teaching Ideas" by Ronald A. Banaszak. (CMK)

  18. Intestinal dysfunction associated with acute thoracolumbar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschiera, J L; Beerman, S P

    1990-03-01

    The frequency of intestinal dysfunction, particularly intestinal ileus, among patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise was assessed. We reviewed the medical records of 70 patients who met specific criteria. Only four (6%) of these patients developed intestinal dysfunction, manifested by vomiting, abdominal distention, diminished bowel sounds, or an intestinal ileus documented by an abdominal roentgenogram. Conservative initial nutritional management of the patients did not reduce the incidence of intestinal dysfunction. This study suggests that patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise are not at substantial risk of intestinal dysfunction and that nasogastric suction and restriction of oral intake are unnecessary in the initial management of these patients.

  19. Sonography of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim Nylund; Svein (φ)degaard; Trygve Hausken; Geir Folvik; Gülen Arslan Lied; Ivan Viola; Helwig Hauser; Odd-Helge Gilja

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been substantial development in the diagnostic possibilities for examining the small intestine. Compared with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy, ultrasonography has the advantage of being cheap, portable, flexible and user- and patient-friendly, while at the same time providing the clinician with image data of high temporal and spatial resolution. The method has limitations with penetration in obesity and with intestinal air impairing image quality. The flexibility ultrasonography offers the examiner also implies that a systematic approach during scanning is needed. This paper reviews the basic scanning techniques and new modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, strain rate imaging, hydrosonography, allergosonography, endoscopic sonography and nutritional imaging, and the literature on disease-specific findings in the small intestine. Some of these methods have shown clinical benefit, while others are under research and development to establish their role in the diagnostic repertoire. However, along with improved overall image quality of new ultrasound scanners, these methods have enabled more anatomical and physiological changes in the small intestine to be observed. Accordingly, ultrasound of the small intestine is an attractive clinical tool to study patients with a range of diseases.

  20. Small intestinal sulphoxidation of albendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, C; Alvarez, A I; Redondo, P; Voces, J; Del Estal, J L; Prieto, J G

    1995-05-01

    1. The in vitro sulphoxidation of Albendazole (ABZ) by rat intestinal microsomes has been examined. The results revealed intestinal sulphoxidation of ABZ by intestinal microsomes in a NADPH-dependent enzymatic system. The kinetic constants for sulphoxidase activity were Vmax = 46 pmol/min/mg protein and Michaelis constant Km = 6.8 microM. 2. The possible effect of inducers (Arochlor 1254 and ABZ pretreatment) and inhibitors (erythromycin, methimazole, carbon monoxide and fenbendazole), was also studied. In rat pretreated with Arochlor 1254, Vmax was 52 pmol/min/mg protein, whereas oral administration of ABZ increased the intestinal sulphoxidation of the drug, Vmax being 103 pmol/min/mg protein. 3. Erythromycin did not change the enzymatic bioconversion of ABZ, but methimazole and carbon monoxide inhibited the enzyme activity by approximately 60 and 30% respectively. Fenbendazole (a structural analogue of ABZ) was a competitive inhibitor of the sulphoxidation process, characterized by a Ki or 69 microM. 4. These data demonstrate that the intestinal enzymes contributing to the initial sulphoxidation of ABZ may be similar to the hepatic enzymes involved in the biotransformation process by the P450 and FMO systems, a conclusion that needs to be further established.

  1. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xing Liu; Hai-Tao Niu; Shu-Yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target.Data Sources:This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30,2015.Articles were selected using the following search temps:"Intestinal microbiota","trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)","trimethylamine (TMA)","cardiovascular",and "atherosclerosis".Study Selection:Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis.Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included.Results:A new CVD risk factor,TMAO,was recently identified.It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota,resulting in TMA release.TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver.Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD,particularly atherosclerosis;however,the details of this relationship remain unclear.Conclusions:Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management.

  2. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasert Saichua; Choosak Nithikathkul; Natthawut Kaewpitoon

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand.

  3. Parenteral nutrition in intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurkchubasche AG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arlet G Kurkchubasche,1 Thomas J Herron,2 Marion F Winkler31Department of Surgery and Pediatrics, 2Department of Surgery, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 3Department of Surgery/Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Intestinal failure is a consequence of extensive surgical resection resulting in anatomic loss and/or functional impairment in motility or absorptive capacity. The condition is clinically characterized by the inability to maintain fluid, energy, protein, electrolyte, or micronutrient balance when on a conventionally accepted, normal diet. Parenteral nutrition (PN is the cornerstone of management until intestinal adaptation returns the patient to a PN-independent state. Intestinal length, residual anatomic segments and motility determine the need for and duration of parenteral support. The goals of therapy are to provide sufficient nutrients to enable normal growth and development in children, and support a healthy functional status in adults. This review addresses indications for PN, the formulation of the PN solution, patient monitoring, and considerations for prevention of PN-associated complications. With the ultimate goal of achieving enteral autonomy, the important role of diet, pharmacologic interventions, and surgery is discussed.Keywords: intestinal failure, short-bowel syndrome, parenteral nutrition, home nutrition support, intestinal rehabilitation

  4. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  5. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting,such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partⅠ, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors,epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part Ⅱ will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids.

  6. Surgical aspects of intestinal injury due to pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatcher, P.A.; Thomson, H.J.; Ludgate, S.N.; Small, W.P.; Smith, A.N.

    1985-04-01

    Seventy-one patients with intestinal injury secondary to pelvic irradiation had predominantly large bowel lesions. Seventeen cases were treated conservatively and 54 came to surgery, 28 patients having more than one operation. Following this essentially salvage surgery there were more ileal than colonic anastomotic leaks. Thirty-four patients died during the follow-up period (2-12 years), 19 from recurrent malignancy, and nine as a result of continuing radiation effects. Seventy per cent of the patients who had a radiation fistula died as a result of malignancy. Of 42000 cases of pelvic malignancy treated by irradiation over the decade 1972-1982, surgical referrals for complications constituted 1.7%, with an overall radiation-related mortality of 0.2%. It is our opinion that colostomy alone has little part to play in this condition, and a policy based on excisional surgery is suggested.

  7. Diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calixto Machado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain death (BD should be understood as the ultimate clinical expression of a brain catastrophe characterized by a complete and irreversible neurological stoppage, recognized by irreversible coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea. The most common pattern is manifested by an elevation of intracranial pressure to a point beyond the mean arterial pressure, and hence cerebral perfusion pressure falls and, as a result, no net cerebral blood flow is present, in due course leading to permanent cytotoxic injury of the intracranial neuronal tissue. A second mechanism is an intrinsic injury affecting the nervous tissue at a cellular level which, if extensive and unremitting, can also lead to BD. We review here the methodology of diagnosing death, based on finding any of the signs of death. The irreversible loss of cardio-circulatory and respiratory functions can cause death only when ischemia and anoxia are prolonged enough to produce an irreversible destruction of the brain. The sign of such loss of brain functions, that is to say BD diagnosis, is fully reviewed.

  8. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan; Strulik, Holger

    the representative consumer is subject to physiological aging. In modeling aging we draw on recent research in the fields of biology and medicine. The speed of the aging process, and thus the time of death, are endogenously determined by optimal health investments. We calibrate the model to US data and proceed...

  9. [Death of Napoleon Bonaparte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camici, M

    2003-06-01

    The causa mortis of Napoleon Bonaparte has been vexata quaestio for a long time. The author tries to outline a picture of Napoleon from a sanitary point of view. From the report of doctor Francesco Antonmarchi who performed the autopsy, the author tries to understans the cause of death: gastric perforation due to malignant ulcer and subsequent peritonitis with pulmonary tubercolosis.

  10. Digital language death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Kornai

    Full Text Available Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide.

  11. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  12. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...

  13. The Death of Shankar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    ) in Bhubaneswar, the capital city of Orissa. The chapter explores the heterogeneous and hierarchical composition of the basti and unfolds the case of the social exclusion and ultimate death of a patient with tuberculosis who belonged to the poorest section of the basti, called Pradhan sahi. The case of both...

  14. Death in Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise; Kveiborg, Jacob; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents osteoarchaeological analyses of the human skeletal material from a burnt down house in Jutland, Denmark, dated to the first century bc. We describe how the osteological analyses of this complex site were approached and illustrate how we reconstructed the death of the human...

  15. Bee deaths need analysing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Alarm bells are ringing all over the world about the death of bee populations. Although it is not known exactly how severe the decline is, it is important to take the problem seriously. The signals are alarming and the bee is important, not just for natural ecosystems but also for the pollination of

  16. The Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan on the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the imposition of the death penalty. Focuses on the controversy concerning capital punishment and stimulates critical thinking in an analysis and discussion of eight hypothetical situations. Includes suggestions for readings, videotapes, and writing assignments. (NL)

  17. Death Penalty in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Amie L.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the legal and moral issues, controversies, and unique trial procedures involved with the death penalty. Discusses the 1972 landmark Supreme Court decision that resulted in many states abolishing this punishment, only to reintroduce it later with different provisions. Reviews the controversial case of Sam Sheppard. (MJP)

  18. Death due to volvulus in a white rhinoceros ceratotherium simum from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. de Vos

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute intestinal obstruction due to volvulus is described as the cause of death in an adult white rhinoceros cow. It is also pointed out that the gross anatomical features which predispose volvulus in the horse, are also present in the white rhinoceros and is considered to have some significance in the aetiology of the present case.

  19. Biological Research for Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Sik; Moon, Myung Sook; Byun, Hee Sun; Phyo, Ki Heon; Kim, Sung Keun

    2005-04-15

    The work scope of 'Biological Research for the Radiation Protection' had contained the research about ornithine decarboxylase and its controlling proteins, thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin, S-adenosymethionine decarboxylase, and glutamate decarboxylase 67KD effect on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(toxic agents). In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (or H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced apoptotic cell death, we utilized sensesed (or antisensed) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or paraquat). We also investigated whether genisteine(or thiamine) may enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of tumor cells caused by ionizing radiation (may enhance the preventing effect radiation or paraquat-induced damage) because such compounds are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects. Based on the above result, we suggest that the express regulation of theses genes have potentially importance for sensitizing the efficiency of radiation therapy of cancer or for protecting the radiation-induced damage of normal cells.

  20. MR imaging of the gastro-intestinal tract in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoermann, Marcus [Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital, Department of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: marcus.hoermann@meduniwien.ac.at

    2008-11-15

    MR imaging (MRI) is an established method for the evaluation of particularly inflammatory bowel disease in adults, as well as for acute abdominal pain in pregnant women. Despite the fact that MRI is ideally suited for the evaluation of children the method is still not established in these patients. The value of MRI in Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and appendicitis as well as intestinal tumors and malformations has been documented in children. There will be more indications in the future depending on the development of new imaging techniques, faster sequences, stronger gradients and increasing availability. Furthermore, the radiologist's attention must be drawn to decrease the radiation burden in children and to replace ionizing techniques especially in chronic disease with the need for repeated follow-up studies and in younger children. This review will discuss some general considerations for the use of MRI in evaluating the paediatric gastro-intestinal tract.

  1. Effects of Death Education on Fear of Death and Attitudes towards Death and Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Dan; Fretz, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Students in a death education course were compared with students of sex education and introductory psychology. After the death education course, students viewed death as more approachable, and wished to experience death in a more interpersonal as compared to a technological context. (Author)

  2. Radiation protection

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    This will be a simple explanation of the reasons why CERN has to be careful about radiation protections issues, a practical guide on how to recognize radiation dangers, the monitoring systems that make sure radiation levels are well tolerable norms, and a quick summary of what radiation levels mean in terms of personal risk.

  3. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway on methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Francisco JWS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methotrexate treatment has been associated to intestinal epithelial damage. Studies have suggested an important role of nitric oxide in such injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO, specifically iNOS on the pathogenesis of methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal mucositis. Methods Intestinal mucositis was carried out by three subcutaneous MTX injections (2.5 mg/kg in Wistar rats and in inducible nitric oxide synthase knock-out (iNOS-/- and wild-type (iNOS+/+ mice. Rats were treated intraperitoneally with the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 mg/Kg or L-NAME (20 mg/Kg, one hour before MTX injection and daily until sacrifice, on the fifth day. The jejunum was harvested to investigate the expression of Ki67, iNOS and nitrotyrosine by immunohistochemistry and cell death by TUNEL. The neutrophil activity by myeloperoxidase (MPO assay was performed in the three small intestine segments. Results AG and L-NAME significantly reduced villus and crypt damages, inflammatory alterations, cell death, MPO activity, and nitrotyrosine immunostaining due to MTX challenge. The treatment with AG, but not L-NAME, prevented the inhibitory effect of MTX on cell proliferation. MTX induced increased expression of iNOS detected by immunohistochemistry. MTX did not cause significant inflammation in the iNOS-/- mice. Conclusion These results suggest an important role of NO, via activation of iNOS, in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucositis.

  4. An endogenous nanomineral chaperones luminal antigen and peptidoglycan to intestinal immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J.; Thomas-McKay, Emma; Thoree, Vinay; Robertson, Jack; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A.; Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Grime, Geoffrey W.; Kirkby, Karen J.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Donaldson, David S.; Williams, Ifor R.; Rios, Daniel; Girardin, Stephen E.; Haas, Carolin T.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F. A.; Laman, Jon D.; Tanriver, Yakup; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert; Thompson, Richard P. H.; Pele, Laetitia C.

    2015-05-01

    In humans and other mammals it is known that calcium and phosphate ions are secreted from the distal small intestine into the lumen. However, why this secretion occurs is unclear. Here, we show that the process leads to the formation of amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles that trap soluble macromolecules, such as bacterial peptidoglycan and orally fed protein antigens, in the lumen and transport them to immune cells of the intestinal tissue. The macromolecule-containing nanoparticles utilize epithelial M cells to enter Peyer's patches, small areas of the intestine concentrated with particle-scavenging immune cells. In wild-type mice, intestinal immune cells containing these naturally formed nanoparticles expressed the immune tolerance-associated molecule ‘programmed death-ligand 1’, whereas in NOD1/2 double knockout mice, which cannot recognize peptidoglycan, programmed death-ligand 1 was undetected. Our results explain a role for constitutively formed calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the gut lumen and show how this helps to shape intestinal immune homeostasis.

  5. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  6. The intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Samuel J; Brandt, Lawrence J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has been and continues to be an epidemic in the United States. Obesity has been addressed in multiple health initiatives, including Healthy People 2010, with no state meeting the proposed goal of a prevalence of obesity fad diets, incentive-based exercise programs, and gastric bypass surgery; none of which have been optimal. In a murine model, it was shown that the majority of the intestinal microbiome consists of two bacterial phyla, the Bacteroidetes and the Firmicutes, and that the relative abundance of these two phyla differs among lean and obese mice; the obese mouse had a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (50% greater) than the lean mouse. The same results were appreciated in obese humans compared to lean subjects. The postulated explanation for this finding is that Firmicutes produce more complete metabolism of a given energy source than do Bacteroidetes, thus promoting more efficient absorption of calories and subsequent weight gain. Researchers were able to demonstrate that colonizing germ-free mice with the intestinal microbiome from obese mice led to an increased total body fat in the recipient mice despite a lack of change in diet. The converse, that, colonizing germ-free obese mice with the intestinal microbiome of thin mice causing a decreased total body fat in the recipient mice, has not yet been done. Other possible mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiome affects host obesity include induction of low-grade inflammation with lipopolysaccharide, regulation of host genes responsible for energy expenditure and storage, and hormonal communication between the intestinal microbiome and the host. The following review discusses the microbiome-obesity relationship and proposed mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota is hypothesized to influence weight gain.

  7. Small intestinal tophus mimicking tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Katoch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 72 year old male with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2 and previous gouty arthritis presented with weight loss, nausea, and vomiting. Ultrasound and CT scanning of the abdomen revealed a circumscribed tumor mass of the jejunum, 3.7 cm in diameter. Microscopic examination of the resected jejunum revealed the tumor to be a gouty tophus. To the best of our knowledge, three cases of tophi in the large intestine have previously been reported but none in the small intestine.

  8. Chronic pancreatitis: Maldigestion, intestinal ecology and intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency caused by chronic pancreatitis results from various factors whichregulate digestion and absorption of nutrients. Pancreatic function has been extensively studied over the last 40 years, even if some aspects of secretion and gastrointestinal adaptation are not completely understood. The main clinical manifestations of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency are fat malabsorption, known as steatorrhea, which consists of fecal excretion of more than 6 g of fat per day, weightloss, abdominal discomfort and abdominal swelling sensation. Fat malabsorption also results in a deficit of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) with consequent clinical manifestations. The relationships between pancreatic maldigestion, intestinal ecology and intestinal inflammation have not received particular attention, even if in clinical practice these mechanisms may be responsible for the low efficacy of pancreatic extracts in abolishing steatorrhea in some patients. The best treatments for pancreatic maldigestion should be re-evaluated, taking into account not only the correction of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extracts and the best duodenal pH to permit optimal efficacy of these extracts, but we also need to consider other therapeutic approaches including the decontamination of intestinal lumen, supplementation of bile acids and, probably, the use of probiotics which may attenuate intestinal inflammation

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  10. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  11. Microbiota, Intestinal Immunity, and Mouse Bustle

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglov, A.; Nedospasov, S

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota is regulated by the immune system. This paper discusses the role of cytokines and innate immunity lymphoid cells in the intestinal immune regulation by means of IgA.

  12. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welters, C.F.M.; Dejong, C.H.C.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Heineman, E.

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Welters CF, Dejong CH, Deutz NE, Heineman E. Department of Surgery, Academic Hospital and University of Maastricht, The Netherlands. Regaining enteral autonomy after extensive small bowel resection is dependent on intestinal adaptation. This adaptationa

  13. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  14. METHAPHYSICS OF DEATH PENALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Gromov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper studies the problem of death penalty justifiableness in terms of democratic society from the metaphysical viewpoint. Philosophical argumentation to justify death penalty is proposed as opposed to the common idea of inhuman and uncivilized nature of court practice of sentencing to death. The essence of the study is not to rehabilitate law-based murder but to explain dialectic relation of the degrees of moral responsibility of criminals and society nourishing evildoers. The author believes that refusal from death penalty under the pretence of rule of humanism is just a liberal façade, plausible excuse for defective moral state of the society which, rejecting its own guiltiness share as for current disregards of the law, does not grow but downgrades proper human dignity. Methodology. The author applies an approach of dialectic reflection being guided by the perception of unity, relativeness and complementarity of evil and good striving to determine efficient way of resolving their contradictions in the context of moral progress of the society. Originality. Proposing philosophic approach to a death penalty problem instead of legal one, the author is not going to discuss the role of horrification, control or cruelty of the measure of restraint; moreover, he does not consider the issue of its efficiency or inefficiency. The author also does not concern vexation of mind of a criminal sentenced to life imprisonment for “humanitarian” reasons. The purpose of the author is to demonstrate that aim of the punishment is to achieve justice which becomes spiritual challenge and moral recompense not only for the criminal but for the whole society. Conclusions. Crime is first of all a problem of a society; thus, criminal behaviour of certain individuals should only be considered through a prism of moral state of the whole community. Attitude to a death penalty is the problem of spirituality and its dramatic sophistication. The author

  15. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that t

  16. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Caz

    Full Text Available The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors.

  17. AN AUDIT OF MATERNAL DEATHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal death is a great tragedy in the family life. It is crusade to know not just the medical cause of the death but the circumstances what makes these continued tragic death even more unacceptable is that deaths are largely preventable

  18. Intestinal epithelial cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia; Roda; Alessandro; Sartini; Elisabetta; Zambon; Andrea; Calafiore; Margherita; Marocchi; Alessandra; Caponi; Andrea; Belluzzi; Enrico; Roda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) seems to involve a primary defect in one or more of the elements responsible for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and oral tolerance. The most important element is represented by the intestinal barrier, a complex system formed mostly by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). IECs have an active role in producing mucus and regulating its composition; they provide a physical barrier capable of controlling antigen traff ic through the intestinal muco...

  19. Deletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in genetically targeted mice supports development of intestinal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehm Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells develop severe tissue inflammation in lung, skin, and liver with premature death, whereas the intestine remains uninflamed. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the activation of T cells and the development of intestinal inflammation. Methods Foxp3-GFP-DTR (human diphtheria toxin receptor C57BL/6 mice allow elimination of Foxp3+ Treg by treatment with Dx (diphtheria toxin. The influence of Foxp3+ Treg on intestinal inflammation was tested using the CD4+ T-cell transfer colitis model in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice and the acute DSS-colitis model. Results Continuous depletion of Foxp3+ Treg in Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice led to dramatic weight loss and death of mice by day 28. After 10 days of depletion of Foxp3+ Treg, isolated CD4+ T-cells were activated and produced extensive amounts of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17A. Transfer of total CD4+ T-cells isolated from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice did not result in any changes of intestinal homeostasis in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice. However, administration of DTx between days 14 and 18 after T-cell reconstitution, lead to elimination of Foxp3+ Treg and to immediate weight loss due to intestinal inflammation. This pro-inflammatory effect of Foxp3+ Treg depletion consecutively increased inflammatory cytokine production. Further, the depletion of Foxp3+ Treg from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice increased the severity of acute dSS-colitis accompanied by 80% lethality of Treg-depleted mice. CD4+ effector T-cells from Foxp3+ Treg-depleted mice produced significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Intermittent depletion of Foxp3+ Treg aggravates intestinal inflammatory responses demonstrating the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the balance at the mucosal surface of the intestine.

  20. Death of the Moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Woolf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The image of moths gathering around a source of light recurs in Woolf’s private writings and becomes an import motif also in her novels and essays. It is most probably the description of moths in her sister’s letter that become an initial inspiration for writing of The Waves, Woolf’s most radical experiment in novelistic form, where she strives to create a subject-less perspective. On the other hand The Death of The Moth, a 1927 essay, whose first translation into Polish comes together with the present commentary from the translator, is a crystal-clear description of the world as seen by the writer/narrator at her desk, surrounded by exuberant life but witnessing death

  1. Gaddafi's Death Poses Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The death of Muammar Gaddafi marks a new era for Libya.It also poses a huge challenge for Libyan authorities dealing with tribal conflicts.He Wenping,a researcher with the Institute of West-Asian and African Studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences,believes that Libya is in danger of falling into a period of internal strife and tribal conflict.

  2. Death, medicine & bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G

    1994-12-01

    The assumptions of philosophy need scrutiny as much the assumptions of medicine do. Scrutiny shows that the philosophical method of bioethics is compromised, for it shares certain fundamental assumptions with medicine itself. To show this requires an unorthodox style of philosophy--a literary one. To show the compromised status of bioethics the paper discusses some seminal utilitarian discussions of the definition of death, of whether it is a bad thing, and of when it ought to occur.

  3. The TNO gastro-intestinal model (TIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minekus, M.

    2015-01-01

    The TNO Gastro–Intestinal Model (TIM) is a multi–compartmental model, designed to realistically simulate conditions in the lumen of the gastro–intestinal tract. TIM is successfully used to study the gastro–intestinal behavior of a wide variety of feed, food and pharmaceutical products. Experiments i

  4. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; DEMONCHY, JGR; HEYMANS, HSA

    1992-01-01

    The role of the physiologic barrier function of the small bowel and its possible role in health and disease has attracted much attention over the past decade. The intestinal mucosal barrier for luminal macromolecules and microorganism is the result of non-immunologic and immunologic defense mechanis

  5. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peristaltic). They occur mostly in the upper small intestine and fade out before moving too far down-stream. They occur in most people at infrequent intervals, but in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) they may be associated with abdominal pain. ...

  6. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  7. Entomoftoromicose intestinal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábia Aparecida Carvalho

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de entomoftoromicose intestinal causada por Entomophthorales, em indivíduo de 19 anos, agricultor e sem doença associada. O paciente foi submetido a ressecção intestinal e o diagnóstico foi feito após análise da peça cirúrgica. Após revisão da literatura, são discutidos a evolução clínica, as características clinicopatológicas, as dificuldades no diagnóstico e o tratamento dessa entidade rara.A case of intestinal entomophthoramycosis caused by Entomophthorales in a man with 19 years-old, farmer and without associated disease. The patient was submitted to a intestinal ressection and diagnosis was carried through after analisys of the surgical specimen. After a review of the literature, the clinical evolution, clinico-pathologic features, difficulties in diagnosis and treatment are discussed.

  8. Drug Transporters in the Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    The enterocyte monolayer in the intestinal membrane impacts on the bioavailability (BA) of many orally administered active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The monolayer expresses a multitude of membrane transporters belonging to the solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) families ...

  9. Milk products and intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, R; Bovee-Oudenhoven, IMJ; Sesink, ALA; Kleibeuker, JH

    1998-01-01

    Milk products may improve intestinal health by means of the cytoprotective effects of their high calcium phosphate (CaPi) content. We hypothesized that this cytoprotection may increase host defenses against bacterial infections as well as decrease colon cancer risk. This paper summarizes our studies

  10. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  11. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6 was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  12. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    Full Text Available Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6 was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  13. Treatment of short bowel syndrome in children. Value of the Intestinal Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, Uenis; Barros, Fabio de; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun

    2016-09-01

    The main cause of acute intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, generally as a result of resection of extensive segments of small intestine. As a result, the main symptoms are watery diarrhea, malabsorption syndrome, chronic malnutrition, and death, if the patient is not properly treated. If the length of the remaining intestine is greater than 30 cm, complete adaptation is possible and the patient may not require parenteral nutrition. The currently recommended treatment includes the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and enteral nutrition, always aimed at constant weight gain, in conjunction with surgeries aimed at elongating the dilated bowel. This set of procedures constitutes what is called an Intestinal Rehabilitation Program. This therapy was used in 16 children in periods ranging from 8 months to 7.5 years, with survival in 75% of the cases. Finally, the last resort to be used in children with complete resection of the small bowel is an intestinal transplant. However, to date there is no record of a Brazilian child that has survived this procedure, despite it being attempted in seven patients. We conclude that the results of the intestinal rehabilitation program are encouraging for the continuation of this type of treatment and stimulate the creation of the program in other pediatric care institutions.

  14. Treatment of short bowel syndrome in children. Value of the Intestinal Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uenis Tannuri

    Full Text Available Summary The main cause of acute intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, generally as a result of resection of extensive segments of small intestine. As a result, the main symptoms are watery diarrhea, malabsorption syndrome, chronic malnutrition, and death, if the patient is not properly treated. If the length of the remaining intestine is greater than 30 cm, complete adaptation is possible and the patient may not require parenteral nutrition. The currently recommended treatment includes the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and enteral nutrition, always aimed at constant weight gain, in conjunction with surgeries aimed at elongating the dilated bowel. This set of procedures constitutes what is called an Intestinal Rehabilitation Program. This therapy was used in 16 children in periods ranging from 8 months to 7.5 years, with survival in 75% of the cases. Finally, the last resort to be used in children with complete resection of the small bowel is an intestinal transplant. However, to date there is no record of a Brazilian child that has survived this procedure, despite it being attempted in seven patients. We conclude that the results of the intestinal rehabilitation program are encouraging for the continuation of this type of treatment and stimulate the creation of the program in other pediatric care institutions.

  15. The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: intestinal symbionts of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Jorgensen, J. Z.; Dolan, S.; Kolchinsky, R.; Rainey, F. A.; Lo, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named "Arthromitus" in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225-233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death's head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats.

  16. The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: intestinal symbionts of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Jorgensen, J. Z.; Dolan, S.; Kolchinsky, R.; Rainey, F. A.; Lo, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named "Arthromitus" in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225-233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death's head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats.

  17. Death preparedness: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod-Sordjan, Renee

    2014-05-01

    To report analysis of the concept death preparedness in the context of end-of-life shared decisions and communication. Forty percent of older people require decision-making and communication in the final days of life. Elaborate defence mechanisms have yielded a public consciousness that no longer passively views death acceptance, but instead has a defensive orientation of preparedness. The term 'death preparedness' depicts this death attitude. Concept analysis. Data were collected over 3 months in 2013. A series of searches of scholarly peer-reviewed literature published in English were conducted of multiple databases. Specific keywords included such phrases as: death acceptance, death avoidance, death rejection, death preparedness, resolution of life, breaking bad news and readiness to die. Walker and Avant's method was chosen as a deductive method to distinguish between the defining attributes of death preparedness and its relevant attributes. Death preparedness involves a transition of facilitated communication with a healthcare provider that leads to awareness and/or acceptance of end of life, as evidenced by an implementation of a plan. An appraisal of attitudes towards death and one's mortality precedes the concept, followed by an improved quality of death and dignity at end of life. The concept of death preparedness in the process of dying should be the focus of research to explore areas to improve advanced directive planning and acceptance of palliation for chronic health conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Death Sentences: A Content Analysis of Children's Death Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Devereaux A.; Hupp, Julie M.

    2008-01-01

    A multidimensional concept of death must include biological, sociocultural, and emotional components. Children glean information about death in many ways, one of which is through books. In this study, the authors compared the 3 dimensions of death-related information (irreversibility, inevitability, nonfunctionality) in 24 young children's picture…

  19. A Death in the Family: Death as a Zen Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K.; Rubinstein, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on original research that explored family reaction to the death of an elderly husband and father. We interviewed 34 families (a family included a widow and two adult biological children) approximately 6 to 10 months after the death. In one-on-one interviews, we discussed family members' initial reaction to the death, how the…

  20. Radioprotective potential of histamine on rat small intestine and uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carabajal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to improve knowledge about histamine radioprotective potential investigating its effect on reducing ionising radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage on the rat small intestine and uterus. Forty 10-week-old male and 40 female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Histamine and histamine-5Gy groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Histamine-5Gy and untreated-5Gy groups were irradiated with a dose of whole-body Cesium-137 irradiation. Three days after irradiation animals were sacrificed and tissues were removed, fixed, and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferation, apoptosis and oxidative DNA markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate chromosomal damage. Histamine treatment reduced radiation-induced mucosal atrophy, oedema and vascular damage produced by ionising radiation, increasing the number of crypts per circumference (239±12 vs 160±10; P<0.01. This effect was associated with a reduction of radiation-induced intestinal crypts apoptosis. Additionally, histamine decreased the frequency of micronuclei formation and also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG immunoreactivity, a marker of DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, radiation induced flattening of the endometrial surface, depletion of deep glands and reduced mitosis, effects that were completely blocked by histamine treatment. The expression of a proliferation marker in uterine luminal and glandular cells was markedly stimulated in histamine treated and irradiated rats. The obtained evidences indicate that histamine is a potential candidate as a safe radioprotective agent that might increase the therapeutic index of radiotherapy for intra-abdominal and pelvic cancers. However, its efficacy needs to be carefully investigated in prospective clinical trials.

  1. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  2. Principals Of Radiation Toxicology: Important Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    “All things are poison, and nothing is without poison; only the dose permits something not to be poisonous.” Paracelsus Key Words: Radiation Toxins (RT), Radiation Toxicants (RTc), Radiation Poisons (RP), Radiation Exposure (RE), Radiation Toxicology is the science about radiation poisons. [D.Popov et al. 2012,J.Zhou et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins is a specific proteins with high enzymatic activity produced by living irradiated mammals. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxicants is a substances that produce radiomimetics effects, adverse biological effects which specific for radiation. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxic agent is specific proteins that can produce pathological biological effects specific for physical form of radiation.[D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev 2007] Different Toxic Substances isolated from cells or from blood or lymph circulation. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins may affects many organs or specific organ, tissue, specific group of cells. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007] For example: Radiation Toxins could induce collective toxic clinical states to include: systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMODS),and finally, toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). [T. Azizova et al. 2005, Konchalovsky et al., 2005, D. Popov et al 2012] However, Radiation Toxins could induce specific injury of organs or tissue and induce Acute Radiation Syndromes such as Acute Radiation Cerebrovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Cardiovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Hematopoietic Syndrome, Acute Radiation GastroIntestinal Syndrome. [ D.Popov et al. 1990, 2012, V. Maliev et al. 2007] Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure and the dose-response relationship is a fundamental and essential concept in classic Toxicology and Radiation Toxicology.[ D.Popov et al

  3. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Readmissions Complications and Deaths measures - national data. This data set includes national-level data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee...

  4. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Readmissions, Complications and Deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee complication...

  5. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Readmissions Complications and Deaths measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee...

  6. On social death: ostracism and the accessibility of death thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Caroline; Kidd, David C; Castano, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Being rejected, excluded, or simply ignored is a painful experience. Ostracism researchers have shown its powerful negative consequences (Williams, 2007), and sociologists have referred to such experiences as social death (Bauman, 1992). Is this is just a metaphor or does being ostracized make death more salient in people's minds? An experiment was conducted in which participants experienced ostracism or inclusion using the Cyberball manipulation, and the accessibility of death-related thoughts was measured via a word-stem completion puzzle. Results showed enhanced death-thought accessibility in the ostracism condition, as well as a negative effect of dispositional self-esteem on the accessibility of death-related thoughts.

  7. Omcg1 is critically required for mitosis in rapidly dividing mouse intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Léguillier

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that factors involved in transcription-coupled mRNA processing are important for the maintenance of genome integrity. How these processes are linked and regulated in vivo remains largely unknown. In this study, we addressed in the mouse model the function of Omcg1, which has been shown to participate in co-transcriptional processes, including splicing and transcription-coupled repair. Using inducible mouse models, we found that Omcg1 is most critically required in intestinal progenitors. In absence of OMCG1, proliferating intestinal epithelial cells underwent abnormal mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death. As a consequence, the crypt proliferative compartment of the small intestine was quickly and totally abrogated leading to the rapid death of the mice. Lack of OMCG1 in embryonic stem cells led to a similar cellular phenotype, with multiple mitotic defects and rapid cell death. We showed that mutant intestinal progenitors and embryonic stem cells exhibited a reduced cell cycle arrest following irradiation, suggesting that mitotic defects may be consecutive to M phase entry with unrepaired DNA damages. These findings unravel a crucial role for pre-mRNA processing in the homeostasis of the small intestine and point to a major role of OMCG1 in the maintenance of genome integrity.

  8. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. IgA isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  9. Eartkquake Death Tolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopoff, Leon; Sornette, Didier

    1995-12-01

    In the risk and insurance literature, the (one-point) distributions of losses in natural disasters have been proposed to be characterized by “fat tail” power laws, i.e. very large destruction may occur with a non-vanishing rate. A naive hypothesis of uncorrelated Poissonian occurrence would suggest that the losses are solely characterized by the properties of the underlying power law distributions, i.e. the longer we wait, the more dramatic will be the largest disaster, which could be as much as a finite fraction of the total population or the total wealth of a country. We find indeed that the numbers Z of deaths in the very largest earthquakes of this century can be described by a power law distribution P(Z)simeq Z^{-(1+δ)} with δ=1.0±0.3, implying an unbounded behavior for the most devastating earthquakes. However, the distribution of the number of deaths per capita in each country in this century has a well-defined maximum value, suggesting that the naive extrapolation of the power law distribution is incorrect and that the understanding of correlations is necessary to ascertain the level of risk from natural disasters. The one-point distributions only provide an upper bound of the expected risk. We propose a speculative model to explain the correlations between deaths in large earthquakes and their countries of occurrence: we suggest that large ancient civilizations that have matured into large present-day populations were the beneficiaries of isolation from marauders due to the relative geographic protection by tectonic processes largely of an orogenic nature.

  10. [X-ray endoscopic semiotics and diagnostic algorithm of radiation studies of preneoplastic gastric mucosa changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberov, R F; Gorshkov, A N

    1997-01-01

    The X-ray endoscopic semiotics of precancerous gastric mucosal changes (epithelial dysplasia, intestinal epithelial rearrangement) was examined by the results of 1574 gastric examination. A diagnostic algorithm was developed for radiation studies in the diagnosis of the above pathology.

  11. Death In The Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Burnard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914. J.R. Mcneill. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. xvi + 371 pp. (Paper US$ 24.99 Medicine in an Age of Commerce and Empire: Britain and its Tropical Colonies 1660-1830. Mark Harrison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. x + 353 pp. (Cloth £65.00 Death in the New World: Cross-Cultural Encounters, 1492-1800. Erik R. Seeman. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. xii + 372 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00

  12. Sudden Death of Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Ting

    2009-01-01

    A new development in the dynamical behavior of elementary quantum systems is the surprising discovery that correlation between two quantum units of information called qubits can be degraded by environmental noise in a way not seen previously in studies of dissipation. This new route for dissipation attacks quantum entanglement, the essential resource for quantum information as well as the central feature in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen so-called paradox and in discussions of the fate of Schr\\"{o}inger's cat. The effect has been labeled ESD, which stands for early-stage disentanglement or, more frequently, entanglement sudden death. We review recent progress in studies focused on this phenomenon.

  13. [The death of Ravel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, D

    1975-04-04

    The composer Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) was chronically ill during the last five years of his life. He was suffering from Pick's astrophy, the first signs of which appeared in 1923 and 1927 and which were probably already reflected in the stereotypy of the "Bolero" of 1928. Transient apractic symptoms were prominent, later, difficulty in finding words, agraphia and alexia. Ravel left no completed composition after an accident to the head in 1932. Complete apathy and involutional phenomena characterize the period before the death of the master, who passed away a few days after a surgical operation on the brain.

  14. Amyloidosis of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kala, Zdenek [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: zkala@tiscali.cz; Valek, Vlastimil [Department of Radiology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Kysela, Petr [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: pkysel@email.cz

    2007-07-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease characterized by forming pathological protein deposits - amyloid - in many organs and tissues. This decreases their functionality. The aim of this small study was to determine, whether the radiological picture of the small intestine involvement in amyloidosis is in some sense specific as sometimes described in literature giving rise to high suspicion for the disease in symptomatic patients. Material and methods: The prospective study comprising seven patients hospitalized in surgical department is presented together with a survey on the disease, its appearance in radiological imaging. All patients underwent abdominal ultrasound (ATL 5000 HDI, 7-12 MHz linear probe, no contrast enhancement, supine position), abdominal CT (Somatom Plus, Siemens, single detector, conventional abdominal CT protocol) and enteroclysis (Micropaque suspension 300 ml, application rate of 75 ml/min, dilution with HP-7000 being 1:1 and HP-7000 solution 2000 ml, application rate of 120 ml/min.). Results: The amyloid deposits in the small intestine could be visualized in five of seven patients with the disease. Enteroclysis revealed a diffuse slowed down intestinal motility with an obstruction-like picture in all of our seven patients. The intestinal secretion was normal, plicae were getting polyp-like shape in five of them forming so called 'thumb printing' picture. CT showed thickening of the intestinal wall due to deposits with poor blood supply and contrast retention in five of seven patients. Ultrasound visualized thickened, hypoechoic nodular plicae and slowed down motility in these five patients. The most striking finding was the pathological deposits in the intestinal wall were highly hypo-vascular. However, this picture is very similar to that of ischemic enteritis. All seven patients had proven amyloid deposits from bioptic specimens. Conclusion: The diagnosis of amyloidosis must be supported by bioptic examination as it has no pathognomic

  15. [Intestinal-brain axis. Neuronal and immune-inflammatory mechanisms of brain and intestine pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V M; Riabichenko, E V

    2013-01-01

    Mutually directed connections between intestine and brain are implemented by endocrine, neural and immune systems and nonspecific natural immunity. Intestine micro flora as an active participant of intestine-brain axis not only influences intestine functions but also stimulates the development of CNS in perinatal period and interacts with higher nervous centers causing depression and cognitive disorders in pathology. A special role belongs to intestine microglia. Apart from mechanic (protective) and trophic functions for intestine neurons, glia implements neurotransmitter, immunologic, barrier and motoric functions in the intestine. An interconnection between intestine barrier function and hematoencephalic barrier regulation exists. Chronic endotoxinemia as a result of intestine barrier dysfunction forms sustained inflammation state in periventricular zone of the brain with consequent destabilization of hematoencephalic barriers and spread oF inflammation to other parts of the brain resulting in neurodegradation development.

  16. Asthma, sports, and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDario, A Geoffrey; Becker, Jack M

    2005-01-01

    The impact of asthma on the general population has been described in detail in medical literature. However, asthma also has a significant impact on the pediatric and adult athlete. This is rarely reported in either the lay press or the medical literature. In 2003, Becker and coworkers conducted a retrospective analysis of the incidence of asthma as a direct cause of death in competitive athletes across the United States between 1993 and 2000. They sought to raise awareness that severe asthma exacerbations and even death can occur during sports from asthma in athletes, while still supporting the concept of maximal participation in sporting activities. To their knowledge, this remains the only published study looking specifically at this issue. Fortunately, fatal asthma events are infrequent in either the adult or the pediatric populations. Those rare cases involving athletes are commonly highlighted in the lay press when they do occur, e.g., when the victim is a college football player such as Rashidi Wheeler. Wheeler died of a fatal asthma exacerbation on August 3, 2002, during a conditioning drill as a member of the Northwestern University football team. Although he was known to have chronic asthma with no obvious barriers to health care, he nevertheless succumbed to his condition. Here, we report a similar, although less well-known, case of an adolescent who died as a direct result of an asthma exacerbation during a high school physical education class. We also offer a brief review of the literature regarding morbidity and mortality in athletes.

  17. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M. Agostina; Mah, Amanda T.; Krebs, Adrienne E.; Dehmer, Jeffrey J.; McNaughton, Kirk K.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Magness, Scott T.; Lund, P. Kay

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFPLow) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFPHigh) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFPLow ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFPHigh ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFPHigh facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFPLow actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.—Van Landeghem, L., Santoro, M. A., Mah, A. T., Krebs, A. E., Dehmer, J. J., McNaughton, K. K., Helmrath, M. A., Magness, S. T., Lund, P. K. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations. PMID:25837582

  18. Heme in intestinal epithelial cell turnover, differentiation,detoxification, inflammation, carcinogenesis, absorption and motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip S Oates; Adrian R West

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a simple epithelium that undergoes constant renewal involving cell division,differentiation and cell death. In addition, the epithelial lining separates the hostile processes of digestion and absorption that occur in the intestinal lumen from the aseptic environment of the internal milieu by defensive mechanisms that protect the epithelium from being breached. Central to these defensive processes is the synthesis of heme and its catabolism by heme oxygenase (HO). Dietary heme is also an important source of iron for the body which is taken up intact by the enterocyte.This review describes the recent literature on the diverse properties of heme/HO in the intestine tract.The roles of heme/HO in the regulation of the cell cycle/apoptosis, detoxification of xenobiotics, oxidative stress,inflammation, development of colon cancer, hemeiron absorption and intestinal motility are specifically examined.

  19. Survival of patients identified as candidates for intestinal transplantation: a 3-year prospective follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, L.; Forbes, A.; Joly, F.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The US Medicare indications for intestinal transplantation are based on failure of home parenteral nutrition. The American Society of Transplantation also includes patients at high risk of death from their primary disease or with high morbidity intestinal failure. A 3-year...... prospective study evaluated the appropriateness of these indications. METHODS: Survival on home parenteral nutrition or after transplantation was analyzed in 153 (97 adult, 56 pediatric) candidates for transplantation and 320 (262 adult, 58 pediatric) noncandidates, enrolled through a European multicenter......%-100%), and 100% in parenteral nutrition failure, high-risk primary disease, and high-morbidity intestinal failure, respectively (P = .034). Fifteen candidates underwent transplantation. Six died, including all 3 of those who were in hospital, and 25% of those who were at home at time of transplantation (P = .086...

  20. Pathological fear of cot death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, H; Dalal, B M; Brockington, I F

    1998-01-01

    Cot death (sudden infant death syndrome) is one of the most common causes of death in the first year of life. Four cases with a pathological fear of cot death are presented. All the patients were depressed and in 2 cases the fear of cot death had an obsessional quality. In all cases there were complications during pregnancy (miscarriage, threatened abortion, recurrent vomiting in last trimester). In 1 case, the patient knew 3 mothers who had suffered cot deaths; in another, the infant was gravely ill in the neonatal period. Pathological fear of cot death can be recognised by the presence of two central features - overvigilance and excessive nocturnal checking of the baby's breathing. Therapeutic interventions are discussed.

  1. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - pelvic radiation

  2. [Chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, T; Navarrete, J; Celestina, A

    1989-01-01

    Much has been written about gastric mucosae behavior and the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to learn something more about these matters in peruvian population. We selected 100 patients with endoscopically no localized lesions between 30 to 70 years of age. We took 8 samples of gastric mucosae in each patient which were carefully examined for the presence of inflammatory changes, settle the line type between antral and fundic mucosae and the frequency of intestinal metaplasia finding. The results showed disagreement between endoscopic and histological findings, so we conclude it is better to diagnose chronic gastritis on the basis of histological parameters. The line between antral and fundic mucosae was of the close type one found in 87% of all cases and it advanced proximally with increasing age. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 46% of the whole number of patients and the rate of occurrence increased in 50% over 50 years age. These findings will let us compare future investigations of gastric mucosae behavior with localized benign or malign lesions.

  3. Hirschsprung's disease - Postsurgical intestinal dysmotility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tresoldi das Neves Romaneli

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the case of an infant with Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis, which, after surgical resection of the aganglionic segment persisted with irreversible functional intestinal obstruction; discuss the difficulties in managing this form of congenital aganglionosis and discuss a plausible pathogenetic mechanism for this case. Case description: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis was established in a two-month-old infant, after an episode of enterocolitis, hypovolemic shock and severe malnutrition. After colonic resection, the patient did not recover intestinal motor function that would allow enteral feeding. Postoperative examination of remnant ileum showed the presence of ganglionic plexus and a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in the proximal bowel segments. At 12 months, the patient remains dependent on total parenteral nutrition. Comments: Hirschsprung's disease presenting as total colonic aganglionosis has clinical and surgical characteristics that differentiate it from the classic forms, complicating the diagnosis and the clinical and surgical management. The postoperative course may be associated with permanent morbidity due to intestinal dysmotility. The numerical reduction or alteration of neural connections in the interstitial cells of Cajal may represent a possible physiopathological basis for the condition.

  4. Intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-yi; WANG Fang; FENG Jie-xiong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on the observation that coagulation necrosis occurs in the majority of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) patients,it is clear that intestinal ischemia is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of NEC.However,the published studies regarding the role of intestinal ischemia in NEC are controversial.The aim of this paper is to review the current studies regarding intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and NEC,and try to elucidate the exact role of intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction in NEC.Data sources The studies cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms used were "intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction" and "neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis".Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators in the field were selected.Results Immature regulatory control of mesentery circulation makes the neonatal intestinal microvasculature vulnerable.When neonates are subjected to stress,endothelial cell dysfunction occurs and results in vasoconstriction of arterioles,inflammatory cell infiltration and activation in venules,and endothelial barrier disruption in capillaries.The compromised vasculature increases circulation resistance and therefore decreases intestinal perfusion,and may eventually progress to intestinal necrosis.Conclusion Intestinal ischemia plays an important role through the whole course of NEC.New therapeutic agents targeting intestinal ischemia,like HB-EGF,are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of NEC.

  5. Immunogenetic control of the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietta, Eric; Rishi, Abdul; Taneja, Veena

    2015-07-01

    All vertebrates contain a diverse collection of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, on their various body surfaces, and the ecological community of these microorganisms is referred to as the microbiota. Mucosal sites, such as the intestine, harbour the majority of microorganisms, and the human intestine contains the largest community of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. This intestinal community of bacteria is diverse, and there is a significant variability among individuals with respect to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Both genetic and environmental factors can influence the diversity and composition of the intestinal bacteria with the predominant environmental factor being diet. So far, studies have shown that diet-dependent differences in the composition of intestinal bacteria can be classified into three groups, called enterotypes. Other environmental factors that can influence the composition include antibiotics, probiotics, smoking and drugs. Studies of monozygotic and dizygotic twins have proven that genetics plays a role. Recently, MHC II genes have been associated with specific microbial compositions in human infants and transgenic mice that express different HLA alleles. There is a growing list of genes/molecules that are involved with the sensing and monitoring of the intestinal lumen by the intestinal immune system that, when genetically altered, will significantly alter the composition of the intestinal microflora. The focus of this review will be on the genetic factors that influence the composition of the intestinal microflora.

  6. Trends in upper gastro-intestinal cancer among the elderly in Denmark, 1980-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønnemann, Katrine R; Mortensen, Michael B; Krogh, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Background Upper gastro-intestinal cancer (UGIC) includes malignancies in esophagus, stomach and small intestine, and represents some of the most frequent malignancies worldwide. The aim of the present analysis was to describe incidence, mortality and survival in UGIC patients in Denmark from 1980...... to 2012 according to differences in age and time periods.Material and methods UGIC was defined as ICD-10 codes C15-C17. Data derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered...... from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013.Results The proportion of male patients over the age of 70 years diagnosed with esophageal cancer was constant over time (around 42%) but increased in females to 49...

  7. Stem cell injury and restitution after ionizing irradiation in intestine, liver, salivary gland, mesenteric lymph node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hyun; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sun Joo; Jang, Won Suk [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    There is little information about radiation injury on stem cell resident in other organs. In addition there is little experimental model in which radiation plays a role on proliferation stem cell in adult organ. This study was carried out to evaluate the early response of tissue injury and restitution in intestine, liver, salivary gland and lymph node, and to develop in vivo model to investigate stem cell biology by irradiation. The study is to assay the early response to radiation and setup an animal model for radiation effect on cellular response. Duodenal intestine, liver, submandibular salivary gland and mesenteric lymph node were selected to compare apoptosis and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression to radiosensitivity. For the effect of radiation on cellular responses, rats were irradiated during starvation. Conclusionly, this study showed the value of apoptosis in detection system for evaluating cellular damage against radiation injury. Because apoptosis was regularly inducted depending on tissue-specific pattern, dose and time sequence as well as cellular activity. Furthermore in vivo model in the study will be helped in the further study to elucidate the relationship between radiation injury and starvation or malnutrition. (author). 22 refs., 6 figs

  8. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...... health investments. At the same time, physiological aspects of the aging process influence optimal savings and health investment. We calibrate the model for the average US male in 2000 and proceed to show that the calibrated model accounts well for the cross-country link between labor productivity...... and life expectancy in the same year ("the Preston curve"); cross-country income differences can explain differences in life expectancy at age 20 of up to a decade. Moreover, technological change in health care of about 1.1% per year can account for the observed shift in the Preston curve between 1980...

  9. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...... health investments. At the same time, physiological aspects of the aging process inuence optimal savings and health investment. We calibrate the model for the average US male in 2000 and proceed to show that the calibrated model accounts well for the cross-country link between labor productivity and life...... expectancy in the same year ("the Preston curve"); cross-country income differences can explain differences in life expectancy at age 20 of up to a decade. Moreover, technological change in health care of about 1.1% per year can account for the observed shift in the Preston curve between 1980 and 2000....

  10. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    and life expectancy in the same year ("the Preston curve"); cross-country income differences can explain differences in life expectancy at age 20 of up to a decade. Moreover, technological change in health care of about 1.1% per year can account for the observed shift in the Preston curve between 1980......This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...... health investments. At the same time, physiological aspects of the aging process influence optimal savings and health investment. We calibrate the model for the average US male in 2000 and proceed to show that the calibrated model accounts well for the cross-country link between labor productivity...

  11. Death, time, and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Riccardo

    2013-08-01

    Working through the awareness of death and the consciousness of time, it is hypothesized, plays a decisive role in the analytic process and in the mental growth of psychotic analysands, as well as in the integration of the psychotic areas in healthier patients. Clinical material is presented from a psychotic woman treated analytically, four sessions a week, for twelve years. The patient suffered several acute relapses, during which the analytic work was not interrupted. Her fourth psychotic episode in the course of analysis, which involved a delusion about gray men and the theft of time, is explored in particular depth. This phase fostered the patient's recognition of the value of time, together with the acquisition of her own center of psychosensory integration, the basis of an ability to learn from experience.

  12. Metalloproteins and neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David R

    2010-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease that are very common and other diseases that are notorious but occur less often such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In each case a protein is closely linked to the pathology of these diseases. These proteins include alpha-synuclein, the prion protein and Aβ. Despite first being discovered because of aggregates of these amyloidogenic proteins found in the brains of patients, these proteins all exist in the healthy brain where their normal function involves binding of metals. Recognition of these proteins as metalloproteins implies that the diseases they are associated with are possibly diseases with altered metal metabolism at their heart. This review considers the evidence that cell death in these diseases involves not just the aggregated proteins but also the metals they bind.

  13. Honor on Death Row

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Eaton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Southern United States is described as having a culture of honor, an argument that has been used to explain higher crime rates in the Southern United States than in the rest of the country. This research explored whether the combination of honor-related violence and traditional southern politeness norms is related to regional differences in the degree of remorse expressed by those who have committed violent crimes. It was proposed that different social norms regarding politeness and apologies in the Southern United States would be reflected in the narratives provided by offenders. The data came from the final statements that offenders on death row made before they were executed. Results showed that, compared with offenders executed in the non-Southern United States, offenders executed in the South more often apologized for their crimes in their final statements, but they were not necessarily more remorseful.

  14. Organ donations after death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernarda Logar

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses public opinion on post-mortem organ donation, especially the difference between high support of public opinion to transplant activity, its general readiness to donate organs and the low number of signed organ donor cards. Through different approaches the article tries to point out possible factors relevant to the decision to donate organs. Early studies showed demographic variables and information as significant factors when deciding to donate organs after death. As there was not enough evidence that long-term effect through these factors is significant, the need for new investigation has grown. Social cognition theories helped understanding the difference mentioned above. It seems that the use of this approach might contribute to the understanding the problem and to delimit most useful factors when working with public.

  15. Randomized trial on the application of biofragmentable anastomosis ring in intestinal anastomosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuang; YANG Bin; HE Jia-hui; ZHANG Yu-chao; LAI Dong-ming

    2009-01-01

    Background The biofragmentable anastomosis ring(BAR)is a simple alternative device to create intestinal anastomosis.Our study was designed to evaluate the clinical value of BAR in intestinal anastomosis.Methods A total of 167 patients performed intestinal anastomosis from January 2002 to February 2006 were randomized to BAR group(n=82)and manual suture group(n=85)as control.They were equally allocated to the two groups regarding sex,age,site of anastomosis,emergent or elective surgery and contaminant diseases.The results of postoperative complications and recovery were recorded in each group.Results Eighty-seven intraperitoneal BAR anastomoses were completed in 82 patients.Two and one postoperative deaths were recorded in BAR and suture group,respectively,no deaths were directly related to anastomotic technique.In suture group,anastomotic leakage and early bleeding both occurred in two patients respectively,no anastomotic bleeding occurred in BAR group,one patient in BAR group developed enterocutaneous fistulae.Perioperative bleeding,operation time and length of hospitalization were similar in two groups(P>0.05).Time for return of bowel function was significantly shortened in BAR group than that in suture group(P<0.05).Conclusion The BAR appears to be a standard,easy,safe and effective altemative either in elective or emergent intraperitoneal intestinal anastomotic surgery.

  16. The suppressor of cytokine signaling SOCS1 promotes apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells via p53 signaling in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaopeng; Shan, Xiaohang; Qian, Ji; Ji, Qianqian; Wang, Liang; Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Manhua; Ding, Haifang; Liu, Qingqing; Chen, Lingling; Zhang, Dongmei; Ni, Runzhou

    2016-08-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling SOCS1 is a member of the cytokine signaling pathway inhibitor family, which is induced by the IFN-γ induced JAK signaling pathway. The expression of SOCS1 has been found to increase in Crohn's disease (CD) patients, but the role of SOCS1 in intestinal epithelium is unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether SOCS1 has a role in the death of intestinal epithelial cells and intestinal injury. The results showed that the expression of SOCS1 increased in CD patients, and the expression of SOCS1, p-p53 and PUMA increased in the mouse TNBS induced colitis model. Using IFN-γ treated HT-29 cells as an apoptotic model of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro, we confirmed that SOCS1 promoted apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells by activating p53. In HT-29 cells which were treated with IFN-γ, the interaction between p53 and SOCS1 and phosphorylation of p53 were significantly higher than untreated cells. When knocking SOCS1 down by using SOCS1 siRNA, phosphorylation of p53 and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells which was induced by IFN-γ were significantly inhibited. In summary, our findings suggest that SOCS1 may promote apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells at least partly through mediating p53 signaling.

  17. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  18. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2016-02-16

    This report presents final 2013 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2013," the National Center for Health Statistics’ annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2013. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2013, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Cerebrovascular diseases; Alzheimer’s disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2013 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Sudden infant death syndrome; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as

  19. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2015-08-31

    This report presents final 2012 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2012," the National Center for Health Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2012. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2012, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These causes accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2012 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods.

  20. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2015-07-27

    This report presents final 2011 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements ‘‘Deaths: Final Data for 2011,’’ the National Center for Health Statistics’ annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2011. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD–10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2011, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer’s disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2011 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission

  1. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  2. Surveillance of gastric intestinal metaplasia for the prevention of gastric cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the stomach is the second leading cause of cancer related death in the world. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a recognised premalignant condition of the stomach. It has been described as occurring in up to one in five patients in western countries. Although there is a definite risk of progression from GIM to cancer, published guidelines and statements differ as to the utility and structure of surveillance programs for this condition.

  3. Biodegradable intestinal stents:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanhui Wang; Nan Li; Rui Li; Yawei Li; Liqun Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents are an attractive alternative to self-expanding metal stents in the treatment of intestinal strictures. Biodegradable stent can be made of biodegradable polymers and biodegradable metals (magnesium alloys). An overview on current biodegradable intestinal stents is presented. The future trends and perspectives in the development of biodegradable intestinal stents are proposed. For the biodegradable polymer intestinal stents, the clinical trials have shown promising results, although improved design of stents and reduced migration rate are expected. For the biodegradable magnesium intestinal stents, results of preliminary studies indicate magnesium alloys to have good biocompatibility. With many of the key fundamental and practical issues resolved and better methods for adjusting corrosion resistance and progressing biocompatibilities of magnesium alloys, it is possible to use biodegradable intestinal stents made of magnesium alloys in hospital in the not too distant future.

  4. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  7. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  8. The study of the radiation protection of propolis to the radiation effects in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y.H.; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Muto, H. [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan); Yanagisawa, Takaharu; Iwasa, Toshihiro; Bamen, K.

    2000-05-01

    The profit which radiation brought to the Homo sapiens is very big. But, radiation has even harmful parameter for the human besides one case. After effect on man to the radiation is thought about, the individual of which sensibility is the highest is a fetus. Therefore, even an effects to this fetus is grasped precisely, and protection criterion and resource are decided from the viewpoint of the protection of radiation as well. If it does so, a child and maturitas aren't so difficult as in the protection of radiation and the managerial side. It was examined about control group, propolis administration chisels for medical use group, 1.5 Gy independent exposure group and propolis pluse 1.5 Gy group in this study. It was examined about the protection of radiation of propolis which to malformation, fetal death, arrested development, and so on in the organogenesis (8 days post conception) being done when sensibility is the highest against the teratogenesis. Preimplantation death rate was compared with the control group and the sham control group, and statistical significant difference wasn't recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group, propolis administration 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group. As for the embryonic death rate, propolis was administered, and obviously embryonic death rate was poorer than the 1.5 Gy independent exposure group, and significant difference was recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group (p<0.001). It has a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group made clear by this research fetal death rate propolis administer more only 1.5 Gy exposure fetal death rate development low (p<0.001). Fetal death rate wasn't recognized by propolis administration group (Sham control). As for the teratogenesis rate, propolis was administered, and the teratogenesis rate of the 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group was higher than the 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group. But, this is thought anamorphosis appear by propolis administration so

  9. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  10. Regulation of intestinal lactase in adult hypolactasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, M.; Mevissen, G; Fischer, M; Olsen, W.; Goodspeed, D; Genini, M; Boll, W; Semenza, G; Mantei, N

    1992-01-01

    Relative deficiency of intestinal lactase activity during adulthood, adult hypolactasia, is a common condition worldwide. We studied the regulation of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in normal and adult hypolactasic subjects by correlating transcript abundance in intestinal biopsies with relative synthetic rates for the protein in cultured intestinal explants. After metabolic labelling studies in six subjects, precursor lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was identified in amounts directly proportional t...

  11. Appendicular Tourniquet: A Cause of Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Santhosh Chikkanayakanahalli; Gangappa, Rajashekara Babu; Varghese, Edison Vadakkenchery

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is one of the common surgical emergencies seen in daily practice. Postoperative adhesions are notorious for being the most common cause for intestinal obstruction. Occasionally, laparotomy findings do come as a surprise to surgeons. Here one such case is discussed. A patient was operated on with suspicion of intestinal obstruction secondary to postoperative adhesions. However, laparotomy revealed the appendix to be inflamed, curled around the terminal ileum and acting as a tourniquet. PMID:27437300

  12. A primatological perspective on death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R

    2011-05-01

    Some questions that arise from observations of responses to dead and dying individuals by nonhuman primates are discussed, focusing on psychological issues. The phenomenon of transport and care of dead infants is reviewed, along with the consequences of the mother dying for orphaned offspring. It is argued that particular attention should be paid to how the context of a death affects individuals, for example, traumatic accidental or predation-induced death versus peaceful death following illness. Some primates kill others of their own or other species, which raises additional questions about death awareness and empathy. Observations from both the field and captivity can contribute toward a better understanding of the psychological meaning of death for primates. Some aspects of death awareness recognized by developmental psychologists might help guide research efforts in this area.

  13. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk.

  14. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  15. Proposed Radiation Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davey, C. S.

    2004-07-01

    Current scientific evidence is that radiation at low levels is not harmful, but beneficial. This is borne out by both radiobiology and epidemiology. The ICRP 26 recommended limits of 50 mSv and 5 mSv per annum are comparable with the average natural background levels in Iran and Norway, respectively, and levels five times higher than that quoted for Iran are to be found in some populated parts of this world. The new limits proposed for ionising radiation are generated by comparison to existing recommended limits for essential minerals. There is a range of acceptable exposures to radiation, just as there is for minerals. The replacement for the ICRP 60 recommendations (20 mSv and 1 mSv for radiation workers and public respectively) should be higher limits of 200 mSv and 50 mSv. There should also be minimum recommended annual levels of 10 mSv, for both radiation workers and the public. The consequences of not proposing this change are continuing huge negative impacts to society. In cancer therapy, even the older guidelines caused unnecessary expense and delays. The cost to Canada is astronomical, when one considers the effect of the existing limits on the use of nuclear power, and the resulting use of hydrocarbons and the consequent increase in acid rain, etc. Of course, the same thing can be said of the entire world limited funds are diverted from areas where they would be better applied, and alternative solutions to societal needs are implemented, solutions which increase pollution and cause injury and death. It is time to reverse the current, expensive trend into misapplied ALARA, based on the paranoia about all things nuclear, which has developed since the linear no-threshold hypothesis was first proposed.propose the transition to a realistic and balanced approach to ionising radiation. (Author)

  16. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Eiichi [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Hosokawa, Masaya [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Faculty of Human Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University, Osaka (Japan); Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Geriatric Medicine, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita (Japan); Seino, Yutaka [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University (Japan); CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation (JST), Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  17. Deaths: leading causes for 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2012-10-26

    This report presents final 2009 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the Division of Vital Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2009. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2009, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These causes accounted for approximately 75% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2009 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods.

  18. Deaths: leading causes for 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2013-12-20

    This report presents final 2010 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the Division of Vital Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2010. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2010, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; Influenza and pneumonia; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These 10 causes accounted for 75% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2010 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Necrotizing enterocolitis of newborn. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and post-neonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source

  19. Parental divorce and parental death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Jette; Thuen, Frode; Poul, Bruun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify research on children and adolescents who experience double bereavement, i.e. the experience of loss through parental divorce followed by either parental death or critical illness with imminent death. This knowledge may identify evidence to underpin knowledge......; challenges in both custodial and non-custodial parental death; risk of mental health problems, and the need of support and interventions....

  20. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  1. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  2. An Endogenous Nanomineral Chaperones Luminal Antigen and Peptidoglycan to Intestinal Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J; Thomas-McKay, Emma; Thoree, Vinay; Robertson, Jack; Hewitt, Rachel E; Skepper, Jeremy N; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A; Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Grime, Geoffrey W; Kirkby, Karen J; Mabbott, Neil A; Donaldson, David S; Williams, Ifor R; Rios, Daniel; Girardin, Stephen E; Haas, Carolin T; Bruggraber, Sylvaine FA; Laman, Jon D; Tanriver, Yakup; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert; Thompson, Richard P H; Pele, Laetitia C

    2015-01-01

    In humans and other mammals, it is known that calcium and phosphate ions are secreted from the distal small intestine into the lumen. However, why this secretion occurs is unclear. Here, we show that the process leads to the formation of amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles that trap soluble macromolecules, such as bacterial peptidoglycan and orally-fed protein antigens, in the lumen and transport them to immune cells of the intestinal tissue. The macromolecule-containing nanoparticles utilize epithelial M cells to enter Peyer’s patches - small areas of the intestine concentrated with particle-scavenging immune cells. In wild type mice, intestinal immune cells containing these naturally-formed nanoparticles expressed the immune tolerance-associated molecule ‘programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)’, whereas in NOD1/2 double knock-out mice, which cannot recognize peptidoglycan, PD-L1 was undetected. Our results explain a role for constitutively formed calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the gut lumen and how this helps to shape intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:25751305

  3. The effect of small intestine heterogeneity on irreversible electroporation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is an ablation modality that utilizes microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. This results in selective cell death while preserving all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix. Here, finite element analysis and experimental results are utilized to examine the effect of NTIRE on the small intestine due to concern over collateral damage to this organ during NTIRE treatment of abdominal cancers. During previous studies, the electrical treatment parameters were chosen based on a simplified homogeneous tissue model. The small intestine, however, has very distinct layers, and a more realistic model is needed to further develop this technology for precise clinical applications. This study uses a two-dimensional finite element solution of the Laplace and heat conduction equations to investigate how small intestine heterogeneities affect the electric field and temperature distribution. Experimental results obtained by applying NTIRE to the rat small intestine in vivo support the heterogeneous effect of NTIRE on the tissue. The numerical modeling indicates that the electroporation parameters chosen for this study avoid thermal damage to the tissue. This is supported by histology obtained from the in vivo study, which showed preservation of extracellular structures. The finite element model also indicates that the heterogeneous structure of the small intestine has a significant effect on the electric field and volume of cell ablation during electroporation and could have a large impact on the extent of treatment. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue should be accounted for in clinical treatment planning.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: Not just trefoil peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F Assimakopoulos; Chrisoula D Scopa; Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou; Constantine E Vagianos

    2008-01-01

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14 (8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials.

  5. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  6. Intestinal myiasis caused by Muscina stabulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivekar, S; Senthil, K; Srinivasan, R; Sureshbabu, L; Chand, P; Shanmugam, J; Gopal, R

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal maggots were isolated from a patient, who had reported to the Department of General Medicine of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry, in southern India with complaints of abdominal distress, bloating of abdomen and intestinal hurry following a meal. He was diagnosed as a case of intestinal myiasis. Maggots obtained from his stool were identified to be Muscina stabulans based on characteristic patterns of posterior spiracles. He was treated with purgatives and albendazole. This intestinal myiasis case caused by M. stabulans is reported here because of its rare occurrence and the need to establish a correct diagnosis.

  7. Intestinal myiasis caused by Muscina stabulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivekar S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal maggots were isolated from a patient, who had reported to the Department of General Medicine of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Puducherry, in southern India with complaints of abdominal distress, bloating of abdomen and intestinal hurry following a meal. He was diagnosed as a case of intestinal myiasis. Maggots obtained from his stool were identified to be Muscina stabulans based on characteristic patterns of posterior spiracles. He was treated with purgatives and albendazole. This intestinal myiasis case caused by M. stabulans is reported here because of its rare occurrence and the need to establish a correct diagnosis.

  8. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase may decrease intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and improve intestinal epithelial barrier function after ischemia- reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Yun Zheng; Xiao-Bing Fu; Jian-Guo Xu; Jing-Yu Zhao; Tong-Zhu Sun; Wei Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat small intestine after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)insult and the relationship between activation of p38 MAPK and apoptotic cell death of intestine.METHODS: Ninety Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups, namely sham-operated group (C), I/R vehicle group (R) and SB203580 pre-treated group(S).In groups R and S, the superior mesenteric artery(SMA)was separated and occluded for 45 min, then released for reperfusion for0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h. In group C, SMA was separated without occlusion. Plasma D-lactate levels were examined and histological changes were observed under a light microscope. The activity of p38 MAPK was determined by Western immunoblotting and apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUDP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL).RESULTS: Intestinal ischemia followed by reperfusion activated p38 MAPK, and the maximal level of activation (7.3-fold vs sham-operated group) was reached 30 min after I/R. Treatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor,reduced intestinal apoptosis (26.72±3.39% vs62.50±3.08%in I/R vehicle, P<0.01) and decreased plasma D-lactate level (0.78±0.15 mmol/L in I/R vehicle vs0.42±0.17 mmol/L in SB-treated group) and improved post-ischemic intestinal histological damage.CONCLUSION: p38 MAPK plays a crucial role in the signal transduction pathway mediating post-ischemic intestinal apoptosis, and inhibition of p38 MAPK may attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  9. Intestinal innate antiviral immunity and immunobiotics: beneficial effects against rotavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Villena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract are the main portal entry of pathogens such as rotavirus (RVs, which is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe and a major cause of severe acute intestinal infection in livestock animals. The interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and immune cells with RVs have been studied for several years, and now it is known that the innate immune responses triggered by this virus can have both beneficial and detrimental effects for the host. It was demonstrated that natural RVs infection in infants and experimental challenges in mice result in the intestinal activation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs like Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and striking secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators that can lead to increased local tissue damage and immunopathology. Therefore, modulating desregulated intestinal immune responses triggered by PRRs activation are a significant promise for reducing the burden of RVs diseases. The ability of immunoregulatory probiotic microorganisms (immunobiotics to protect against intestinal infections such as those caused by RVs, are among the oldest effects studied for these important group of beneficial microbes. In this review, we provide an update of the current status on the modulation of intestinal antiviral innate immunity by immunobiotics, and their beneficial impact on RVs infection. In addition, we describe the research of our group that demonstrated the capacity of immunobiotic strains to beneficially modulated TLR3-triggered immune response in IECs, reduce the disruption of intestinal homeostasis caused by intraepithelial lymphocytes, and improve the resistance to RVs infections.

  10. The protective effects of black garlic extract for blood and intestinal mucosa to irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Do Young; KIm, Joon Sun; Choi, Hyeong Seok [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Hyeok; Park, Won Suk; Min, Byung In [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The radiation has been utilized in a number of fields, even though the use of plenty cause a variety of side effects. This study was confirmed for radiation protective effects of aged garlic to contribute to the prevention of disasters that are radiation exposure. We studied the Complete Blood cell Count(CBC) and the small intestine after feeding aged garlic extract into Sprague Dawley Rat which irradiated X-ray beam 7 and 13 Gy. Garlic extract was administered to the results in the experimental group showed a notable difference in the CBC of platelets (p<0.05), red blood cells (p<0.05) and early damaged white blood cells (p<0.05). In addition, it was confirmed that experimental group's small intestine crypt is more survival than irradiation group significantly. And experimental group has small intestine villi length almost similar to the normal group. result of the aged garlic study will be able to be of great benefit for the radiation relevant emergency management.

  11. The Fated Death of Tess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉

    2012-01-01

      The theme of this essay is about the fated deaths of Tess.The emphasis is‘inevitability’. Tess’s Death is mainly due to the social influence and man-made factors. Because of the low social status and moral conceptions, there is no living room left for Tess. Her parents push her get closer to her tragedy as well. Alec and Angel are the two persons who directly and indirectly cause Tess’s death. In addition, there are also some subjective causes for her doom. The symbolic red in the novel intentionally indicates the’inevitability’of her death.

  12. [Genetics of sudden unexplained death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Brugada, Ramon

    2014-03-20

    Sudden unexplained death is defined by death without a conclusive diagnosis after autopsy and it is responsible for a large percentage of sudden deaths. The progressive interaction between genetics and forensics in post-mortem studies has identified inheritable alterations responsible for pathologies associated with arrhythmic sudden death. The genetic diagnosis of the deceased enables the undertaking of preventive measures in family members, many of them asymptomatic but at risk. The implications of this multidisciplinary translational medical approach are complex, requiring the dedication of a specialized team. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Kovbasnjuk (Olga); N.C. Zachos (Nicholas C.); J. Foulke-Abel (Jennifer); J. In (Julie); E. Blutt, E. (Sarah); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); M. Estes (Mary); M. Donowitz (Mark)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIdentification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate “indefinite” ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed “mini-intesti

  14. Application of Three-Dimensional Imaging to the Intestinal Crypt Organoids and Biopsied Intestinal Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D histopathology is the standard analytical method for intestinal biopsied tissues; however, the role of 3-dimensional (3D imaging system in the analysis of the intestinal tissues is unclear. The 3D structure of the crypt organoids from the intestinal stem cell culture and intestinal tissues from the donors and recipients after intestinal transplantation was observed using a 3D imaging system and compared with 2D histopathology and immunohistochemistry. The crypt organoids and intestinal tissues showed well-defined 3D structures. The 3D images of the intestinal tissues with acute rejection revealed absence of villi and few crypts, which were consistent with the histopathological features. In the intestinal transplant for megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome, the donor’s intestinal tissues had well-developed nerve networks and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs in the muscle layer, while the recipient’s intestinal tissues had distorted nerve network and the ICCs were few and sparsely distributed, relative to those of the donor. The 3D images showed a clear spatial relationship between the microstructures of the small bowel and the features of graft rejection. In conclusion, integration of the 3D imaging and 2D histopathology provided a global view of the intestinal tissues from the transplant patients.

  15. Eleven years of management of children with intestinal failure and not candidates for intestinal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI Spagnuolo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available MI Spagnuolo, MP Cicalese, E Bruzzese, MA Caiazzo, S Di Caro, V Squeglia, A GuarinoDepartment of Paediatrics, University Federico II, Naples, ItalyBackground: Children with intestinal failure need parenteral nutrition to survive, and the only alternative is intestinal transplantation which still entails high mortality. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes in candidates and noncandidates for intestinal transplantation, and to compare the outcomes with and without transplant surgery.Patients and methods: The clinical records of children admitted to hospital from 1997 to 2008 because of intestinal failure were reviewed for etiology of intestinal failure, age at start of parenteral nutrition, duration of parenteral nutrition, indications for intestinal transplantation, and outcome.Results: Thirty-four children were enrolled. Median age at start of parenteral nutrition was 13.1 (median 20.7 months. There was no difference in survival rate between candidates and noncandidates for intestinal transplantation. Survival was significantly higher in candidates who did not undergo intestinal transplantation than in children who underwent intestinal transplantation (P < 0.001.Conclusion: Candidates for intestinal transplantation who did not undergo transplant surgery had a better outcome than children who underwent transplant surgery.Keywords: intestinal transplantation, intestinal failure, parenteral nutrition, children

  16. History of brain death as death: 1968 to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    The concept of brain death was formulated in 1968 in the landmark report A Definition of Irreversible Coma. While brain death has been widely accepted as a determination of death throughout the world, many of the controversies that surround it have not been settled. Some may be rooted in a misconstruction about the history of brain death. The concept evolved as a result of the convergence of several parallel developments in the second half of the 20th century including advances in resuscitation and critical care, research into the underlying physiology of consciousness, and growing concerns about technology, medical futility, and the ethics of end of life care. Organ transplantation also developed in parallel, and though it clearly benefited from a new definition of death, it was not a principal driving force in its creation. Since 1968, the concept of brain death has been extensively analyzed, debated, and reworked. Still there remains much misunderstanding and confusion, especially in the general public. In this comprehensive review, I will trace the evolution of the definition of brain death as death from 1968 to the present, providing background, history and context.

  17. Death Becomes Her

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Sunčič

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The representation of women as quintessential villains in the Greek imagery makes the analysis of good or even ideal female characters a delicate task. The only foils to a gamut of women villains are but two good characters, Penelope and Alcestis. Of the two, only Alcestis can be examined in the carnivalesque context of comedy. Alcestis is excessively praised throughout the play, which at the time of carnival translates into swearing and slander. However, since each offense is nullified by the one that follows, the play can be resolved in a cheerful mood and with a great banquet. Heracles plays the role of a joker who appears to be a privileged character, allowed to say certain things in a way which confers immunity. In the funeral rites he restrains excessive grief and invites the mourning Admetus to enjoy life, love, food and drink. Untouched by pollution or sanctions despite a string of ritual offenses, the ideal woman Alcestis is portrayed as a comic female character who represents an ideal only in the carnivalesque time of laughter and rebirth. Outside the carnivalesque laughter it is immobility, silence and death that define the ideal woman.

  18. Necrotizing enterocolitis and death in a goat kid associated with enterotoxin (CPE)-producing Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Mariano E Fernandez; Saputo, Julian; Leger, Judy St; Puschner, Birgit; Fisher, Derek J; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-12-01

    A goat kid died after being depressed for several days. No significant gross abnormalities were observed at postmortem examination, while histopathological analysis revealed diffuse necrotizing enterocolitis. Isolation of Clostridium perfringens type A secreting enterotoxin (CPE) and presence of CPE in the small intestine suggest that CPE contributed to the death of this kid.

  19. Necrotizing enterocolitis and death in a goat kid associated with enterotoxin (CPE)-producing Clostridium perfringens type A

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    A goat kid died after being depressed for several days. No significant gross abnormalities were observed at postmortem examination, while histopathological analysis revealed diffuse necrotizing enterocolitis. Isolation of Clostridium perfringens type A secreting enterotoxin (CPE) and presence of CPE in the small intestine suggest that CPE contributed to the death of this kid.

  20. Dietary influences on intestinal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhoen, Marc; Brucklacher-Waldert, Verena

    2012-10-01

    The function of the gastrointestinal tract relies on a monolayer of epithelial cells, which are essential for the uptake of nutrients. The fragile lining requires protection against insults by a diverse array of antigens. This is accomplished by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, which constitute a highly organized immune organ. In this Review, we discuss several recent findings that provide a compelling link between dietary compounds and the organization and maintenance of immune tissues and lymphocytes in the intestine. We highlight some of the molecular players involved, in particular ligand-activated nuclear receptors in lymphoid cells.

  1. Inflammatory mediators and intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, M S; MacKendrick, W

    1994-06-01

    Although the causes of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are not well understood, there is compelling evidence to suggest that the inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This article examines the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and other mediators on the development of NEC, and attempts to explain the association of the putative NEC risk factors with altered mediator production and subsequent intestinal injury. The authors hypothesize that PAF is a key mediator in the final common pathway leading to NEC.

  2. Intestinal inflammation and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Lilian; Bourreille, Arnaud; Dietrich, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal inflammation results in the production of inflammatory pain-inducing mediators that may directly activate colon sensory neurons. Endogenous opioids produced by mucosal effector CD4(+) T lymphocytes identified as colitogenic may paradoxically counterbalance the local pro-algesic effect of inflammatory mediators by acting on opioid receptors expressed on sensory nerve endings. The review will focus on the endogenous immune-mediated regulation of visceral inflammatory pain, current pain treatments in inflammatory bowel diseases and prospectives on new opioid therapeutic opportunities to alleviate pain but avoiding common centrally-mediated side effects.

  3. [Intestinal complications from vascular prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, C; Calvete, J; García, J; Buch, E; Castells, P; Lledó, S

    1993-01-01

    Secondary FAE is a rare complication, usually located at the duodenum. The typical clinical presentation is like a digestive hemorrhage or a sepsis. We report two cases of FAE with atypical manifestations. The first case presented a lower digestive hemorrhage produced by the fistulization to the sigma. The second case appeared like an intestinal obliteration caused by the full emigration of a prosthesis to the jejunum. We wish to remark the importance of the clinical suspicion of a FAE (Key of diagnosis), and the sparing relevance of the complementary examinations and the urgency of a surgical treatment in order to avoid the high rate of morbi-mortality associated with this complication.

  4. Recent advances in the management of radiation colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jannis Kountouras; Christos Zavos

    2008-01-01

    Radiation colitis,an insidious,progressive disease of increasing frequency,develops 6 mo to 5 years after regional radiotherapy for malignancy,owing to the deleterious effects of the latter on the colon and the small intestine.When dealing with radiation colitis and its complications,the most conservative modality should be employed because the areas of intestinal injury do not tend to heal.Acute radiation colitis is mostly selflimited,and usually,only supportive management is required.Chronic radiation colitis,a poorly predictable progressive disease,is considered as a precancerous lesion;radiation-associated malignancy has a tendency to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and to bear a dismal prognosis.Therefore,management of chronic radiation colitis remains a major challenge owing to the progressive evolution of the disease,including development of fibrosis,endarteritis,edema,fragility,perforation,partial obstruction,and cancer.Patients are commonly managed conservatively.Surgical intervention is difficult to perform because of the extension of fibrosis and alterations in the gut and mesentery,and should be reserved for intestinal obstruction,perforation,fistulas,and severe bleeding.Owing to the difficulty in managing the complications of acute and chronic radiation colitis,particular attention should be focused onto the prevention strategies.Uncovering the fibrosis mechanisms and the molecular events underlying radiation bowel disease could lead to the introduction of new therapeutic and/or preventive approaches.A variety of novel,mostly experimental,agents have been used mainly as a prophylaxis,and improvements have been made in radiotherapy delivery,including techniques to reduce the amount of exposed intestine in the radiation field,as a critical strategy for prevention.

  5. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  6. Prematurity reduces functional adaptation to intestinal resection in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Thymann, Thomas; Qvist, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement ...

  7. Tumor necrosis factor suppresses NR5A2 activity and intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis to sustain chronic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Chieh; Lee, Cheng-tse; Chung, Bon-chu

    2014-02-25

    Intestinal crypt epithelial cells synthesize glucocorticoids, steroid hormones that protect against inflammatory bowel disease. To investigate how intestinal glucocorticoids are regulated during chronic inflammation, we induced chronic colitis in mice by exposing them to the chemical dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). We found that intestinal glucocorticoid secretion and expression of the genes Cyp11a1 and Cyp11b1 (which encode enzymes that synthesize glucocorticoids) were initially stimulated, but declined during the chronic phase, whereas tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and inflammatory cytokines secreted by T helper type 1 (TH1) and TH17 cells continuously increased in abundance in the inflamed colon. This suggested that inadequate intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis is a feature of chronic intestinal inflammation. We screened for cytokines that regulated intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis and found that TNF suppressed corticosterone secretion and Cyp11a1 and Cyp11b1 expression in an intestinal crypt epithelial cell line. TNF suppressed steroidogenesis by activating the transcription factors c-Jun and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which both interacted with the transcription factor NR5A2 and repressed Cyp11a1 reporter activity. This repression was relieved by expression of a dominant-negative form of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1), inhibitor of NF-κB, or by a JNK inhibitor. Furthermore, the dominant-negative TNF inhibitor XPro1595 inhibited c-Jun and NF-κB activation in mice, restored intestinal Cyp11a1 and Cyp11b1 expression, reduced colonic cell death, and rescued chronic colitis caused by DSS. Thus, during chronic colitis, TNF suppresses intestinal steroidogenic gene expression by inhibiting the activity of NR5A2, thus decreasing glucocorticoid synthesis and sustaining chronic inflammation.

  8. Staging Death, Translating Death, Rehearsing Death: A Photographer’s Apprenticeship in Dying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Fargione

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The preponderance of death imagery in the mass media and a recent interest of photography in the practice of death suggest the need to reevaluate our approach to death and dying, especially when violence is involved. This essay is a case study of History of Violence, Claudio Cravero's last photographic project. His collection of "portraits" reproduce apparent dead bodies, mostly attacked in their own domestic spheres, but neither the perpetrator of death (a mysterious murderer?, nor the weapon used (an omnipresent knife, should be considered as main focal points of the artist's inquiry. The undoubtful protagonist of these photographs, instead, is the light, that illuminates fear: not of death itself, rather of the obnoxious indifference to it, as the result of generalized death imagery saturation.     The staged apparent death displayed in Cravero's photographs serve both as a memento mori and as a strategy to come to terms with the idea of death. In short, it is an apprentship in dying through a domesticating translation practice. Eventually, Cravero's History of Violence offers a complex reflection on the interplay between each individual story and macrolevel social History, thus providing some hypotheses of where violence and death fit in that odd geometry of time and space that we call life.

  9. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  10. Sudden death in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Garrido, Beatriz; Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are usually associated with an increased risk of premature death with a wide range of rates and causes of mortality. "Sudden death" has been defined as the abrupt and unexpected occurrence of fatality for which no satisfactory explanation of the cause can be ascertained. In many cases of sudden death, autopsies do not clarify the main cause. Cardiovascular complications are usually involved in these deaths. The purpose of this review was to report an update of the existing literature data on the main findings with respect to sudden death in eating disorders by means of a search conducted in PubMed. The most relevant conclusion of this review seems to be that the main causes of sudden death in eating disorders are those related to cardiovascular complications. The predictive value of the increased QT interval dispersion as a marker of sudden acute ventricular arrhythmia and death has been demonstrated. Eating disorder patients with severe cardiovascular symptoms should be hospitalized. In general, with respect to sudden death in eating disorders, some findings (eg, long-term eating disorders, chronic hypokalemia, chronically low plasma albumin, and QT intervals >600 milliseconds) must be taken into account, and it must be highlighted that during refeeding, the adverse effects of hypophosphatemia include cardiac failure. Monitoring vital signs and performing electrocardiograms and serial measurements of plasma potassium are relevant during the treatment of eating disorder patients.

  11. Death Drive in Tourism Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina

    2014-01-01

    The psychoanalytical concept of the death drive refers to a constant metapsychological force at the junction between life and death: it is not understood in a biological sense of physical demise of the body, nor in opposition to life. Geographies of tourist performances in places in the proximity of

  12. Studying Death: Problems of Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The methods and problems of research on the psychology of death include ethical difficulties, the conceptual poverty and oversimplification of most rating systems, and an overemphasis on anxiety and fear. The changes resulting from death education or therapy and their relation to modes of denial should be studied. (Author)

  13. Death Outlook and Social Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifel, Herman; Schag, Daniel

    1980-01-01

    Examined the hypothesis that there is a relationship between outlook on death and orientation toward mercy killing, abortion, suicide, and euthanasia. Some relationships between death attitudes and perspectives on the social issues emphasized the need to consider specific circumstances as well as abstract concepts. (Author)

  14. Death Drive in Tourism Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina

    2014-01-01

    The psychoanalytical concept of the death drive refers to a constant metapsychological force at the junction between life and death: it is not understood in a biological sense of physical demise of the body, nor in opposition to life. Geographies of tourist performances in places in the proximity of

  15. Brain death: the European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citerio, Giuseppe; Murphy, Paul G

    2015-04-01

    Some of the seminal steps toward the recognition and definition of brain death were European. There is a general consensus on both the medical concept of brain death in Europe as well as the minimum fundamental clinical standards that are required for its diagnosis-the absence of consciousness, brainstem reflexes, and the ability to breathe in the absence of reversible or confounding conditions. Two aspects of brain death determination are addressed in this article. The authors analyze how brain death is diagnosed across Europe, identifying both the similarities and differences that exist between countries (the latter mainly concerning ancillary tests, timing, and the number of physicians involved in the brain death determination). In addition, they describe the very considerable variations in when brain death determinations are made between and within individual European countries, and propose that they are due to differences in the end-of-life care practices in patients with irreversible brain injuries, medical attitudes, and organ donation practices. Although legislation is available to standardize the brain death diagnosis process in most individual European countries, there are still disparities across Europe as a whole. The current variation in practice makes a continental consensus for the definition of brain death imperative.

  16. Death Competence: An Ethical Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamino, Louis A.; Ritter, R. Hal, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The authors argued that death competence, defined as specialized skill in tolerating and managing clients' problems related to dying, death, and bereavement, is a necessary prerequisite for ethical practice in grief counseling. A selected review of the literature tracing the underpinnings of this concept reveals how a robust construct of death…

  17. Scintigraphic evaluation of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Bai, M. S.; Cho, K. K.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    A law recognizing brain death is a life saving legal measure in patients suffering from badly diseased organs such as kidney, liver, heart, and lung. Such law is being discussed for legalization at the Korean National Assembly. There are various criteria used for brain death in western world and brain scintiscan is one of them. However, the scintiscan is not considered in establishing brain death in the draft of the law. The purpose of this report is to spread this technique in nuclear medicine society as well as in other medical societies. We evaluated 7 patients with clinical suspicion of brain death by various causes. The patient's age ranged from 5 to 39 years. We used 5-20mCi {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO (d.1-hexamethyl propylene amine oxime) or ECD (Ethyl Cysteinate Dimer), lipophilic agents that cross BBB (blood brain barrier). A dynamic study followed by static or SPECT (single photon emission tomography) was performed. Interpretive criteria used for brain death were 1) no intracranial circulation 2) no brain uptake. The second criteria is heavily used. Five of 7 patients were scintigraphically brain dead and the remaining 2 had some brain uptake excluding the diagnosis of scintigraphic brain death. In conclusion, cerebral perfusion study using a lipophilic brain tracer offers a noninvasive, rapid, easy, accurate and reliable mean in the diagnosis of brain death. We believe that this modality should be included in the criteria of brain death in the draft of the proposed Korean law.

  18. Counselling via a "Death Perspective."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Howard

    1986-01-01

    Points out the progress in the clinical literature in helping people deal with the event of death but argues there is great neglect in the literature regarding viewing death as a perspective, and its valuable clinical use. By referring to Heidegger's contributions to existential psychology, explains what is meant by this perspective and its…

  19. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  20. IGF1 stimulates crypt expansion via differential activation of 2 intestinal stem cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Krebs, Adrienne E; Dehmer, Jeffrey J; McNaughton, Kirk K; Helmrath, Michael A; Magness, Scott T; Lund, P Kay

    2015-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has potent trophic effects on normal or injured intestinal epithelium, but specific effects on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are undefined. We used Sox9-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter mice that permit analyses of both actively cycling ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(Low)) and reserve/facultative ISCs (Sox9-EGFP(High)) to study IGF1 action on ISCs in normal intestine or during crypt regeneration after high-dose radiation-induced injury. We hypothesized that IGF1 differentially regulates proliferation and gene expression in actively cycling and reserve/facultative ISCs. IGF1 was delivered for 5 days using subcutaneously implanted mini-pumps in uninjured mice or after 14 Gy abdominal radiation. ISC numbers, proliferation, and transcriptome were assessed. IGF1 increased epithelial growth in nonirradiated mice and enhanced crypt regeneration after radiation. In uninjured and regenerating intestines, IGF1 increased total numbers of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISCs and percentage of these cells in M-phase. IGF1 increased percentages of Sox9-EGFP(High) ISCs in S-phase but did not expand this population. Microarray revealed that IGF1 activated distinct gene expression signatures in the 2 Sox9-EGFP ISC populations. In vitro IGF1 enhanced enteroid formation by Sox9-EGFP(High) facultative ISCs but not Sox9-EGFP(Low) actively cycling ISCs. Our data provide new evidence that IGF1 activates 2 ISC populations via distinct regulatory pathways to promote growth of normal intestinal epithelium and crypt regeneration after irradiation.