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Sample records for intestinal mucosal immune

  1. Intestinal stromal cells in mucosal immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, B M J; Simmons, A

    2013-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that non-hematopoietic stromal cells of the intestine have multiple roles in immune responses and inflammation at this mucosal site. Despite this, many still consider gut stromal cells as passive structural entities, with past research focused heavily on their roles in fibrosis, tumor progression, and wound healing, rather than their contributions to immune function. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of stromal cells in intestinal immunity, highlighting the many immunological axes in which stromal cells have a functional role. We also consider emerging data that broaden the potential scope of their contribution to immunity in the gut and argue that these so-called "non-immune" cells are reclassified in light of their diverse contributions to intestinal innate immunity and the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis.

  2. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine presents a huge surface area to the outside environment, a property that is of critical importance for its key functions in nutrient digestion, absorption, and waste disposal. As such, the intestine is constantly exposed to dietary and microbial-derived foreign antigens, to which im...... of the role these subsets play in the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis and inflammation will help to define novel strategies for the treatment of intestinal pathologies and contribute to improved rational design of mucosal vaccines....... immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive...... immune responses. In the intestinal mucosa, DCs are located diffusely throughout the intestinal lamina propria, within gut-associated lymphoid tissues, including Peyer's patches and smaller lymphoid aggregates, as well as in intestinal-draining lymph nodes, including mesenteric lymph nodes...

  3. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

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    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  4. Mucosal innate immune cells regulate both gut homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Continuous exposure of intestinal mucosal surfaces to diverse microorganisms and their metabolites reflects the biological necessity for a multifaceted, integrated epithelial and immune cell-mediated regulatory system. The development and function of the host cells responsible for the barrier function of the intestinal surface (e.g., M cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and columnar epithelial cells) are strictly regulated through both positive and negative stimulation by the luminal microbiota. Stimulation by damage-associated molecular patterns and commensal bacteria-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns provokes the assembly of inflammasomes, which are involved in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Mucosal immune cells located beneath the epithelium play critical roles in regulating both the mucosal barrier and the relative composition of the luminal microbiota. Innate lymphoid cells and mast cells, in particular, orchestrate the mucosal regulatory system to create a mutually beneficial environment for both the host and the microbiota. Disruption of mucosal homeostasis causes intestinal inflammation such as that seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we review the recent research on the biological interplay among the luminal microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal innate immune cells in both healthy and pathological conditions. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

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    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Reduction of intestinal mucosal immune function in heat-stressed rats and bacterial translocation.

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    Liu, Xiaoxi; Li, Huanrong; Lu, An; Zhong, Yougang; Hou, Xiaolin; Wang, Ning; Jia, Dan; Zan, Junlan; Zhao, Hong; Xu, Jianqin; Liu, Fenghua

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to further understand the effects and mechanism of heat stress on the intestinal mucosal immune system of the rat, including changes in the intestinal mucosal barrier and immune function and their effects on bacterial translocation. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into control and heat-stress groups. Both groups were housed in a 25°C environment of 60% relative humidity. The heat-stress group was subjected to 40°C for 2 h daily over 3 days. Compared with the control group villi length in the small intestines of the heat-stress group was shortened. Jejunal mucosa were seriously damaged and the number of goblet cells in the epithelia of the duodenum and jejunum was significantly reduced. Electron microscopy revealed intestinal mucosal disorder, a large number of exudates of inflammatory fibrous material, fuzzy tight junction structure between epithelial cells, and cell gap increases in the heat-stress group. Transcription of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10, was significantly reduced, as was that of the intestinal mucosal immune-related proteins TLR2, TLR4, and IgA. The number of CD3(+) T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD8(-) T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) was significantly lower, while the number of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells was significantly increased. The bacteria isolated from the MLNs were Escherichia coli. Heat stress damages rat intestinal mechanical and mucosal immune barriers, and reduces immune function of the intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymphoid tissues, leading to bacterial translocation.

  7. The role of CD103+ Dendritic cells in the intestinal mucosal immune system.

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    Darren Thomas Ruane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available While dendritic cells (DC are central to the induction and regulation of adaptive immunity, these cells are very heterogenous and specific subsets can be characterized based on the expression of cell surface markers and functional properties. Intestinal CD103+ DCs are the subject of particular interest due to their role in regulating mucosal immunity. Since the epithelial surfaces are constantly exposed to a high antigenic load, tight regulation of innate and adaptive intestinal immune responses is vital as intestinal inflammation can have detrimental consequences for the host. Strategically positioned within the lamina propria, CD103+ DCs play an important role in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. These cells are required for the induction of tolerogenic immune responses and imprinting gut homing phenotypic changes on antigen-specific T cells. Recent insights into their development and regulatory properties have revealed additional immunoregulatory roles and further highlighted their importance for intestinal immunity. In this review we discuss the nature of the intestinal CD103+ DC population and the emerging roles of these cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity.

  8. Intestinal commensal bacteria mediate lung mucosal immunity and promote resistance of newborn mice to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jerilyn; Oehrle, Katherine; Worthen, George; Alenghat, Theresa; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Deshmukh, Hitesh

    2017-02-08

    Immature mucosal defenses contribute to increased susceptibility of newborn infants to pathogens. Sparse knowledge of age-dependent changes in mucosal immunity has hampered improvements in neonatal morbidity because of infections. We report that exposure of neonatal mice to commensal bacteria immediately after birth is required for a robust host defense against bacterial pneumonia, the leading cause of death in newborn infants. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of interleukin-22 (IL-22)-producing group 3 innate lymphoid cells (IL-22 + ILC3) into the lungs of newborn mice. This influx was dependent on sensing of commensal bacteria by intestinal mucosal dendritic cells. Disruption of postnatal commensal colonization or selective depletion of dendritic cells interrupted the migratory program of lung IL-22 + ILC3 and made the newborn mice more susceptible to pneumonia, which was reversed by transfer of commensal bacteria after birth. Thus, the resistance of newborn mice to pneumonia relied on commensal bacteria-directed ILC3 influx into the lungs, which mediated IL-22-dependent host resistance to pneumonia during this developmental window. These data establish that postnatal colonization by intestinal commensal bacteria is pivotal in the development of the lung defenses of newborns. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Rhubarb Supplementation Promotes Intestinal Mucosal Innate Immune Homeostasis through Modulating Intestinal Epithelial Microbiota in Goat Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jinzhen; Wu, Jian; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuanshe; Zhong, Rongzhen; Tan, Zhiliang

    2018-01-31

    The abuse and misuse of antibiotics in livestock production pose a potential health risk globally. Rhubarb can serve as a potential alternative to antibiotics, and several studies have looked into its anticancer, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to test the effects of rhubarb supplementation to the diet of young ruminants on innate immune function and epithelial microbiota in the small intestine. Goat kids were fed with a control diet supplemented with or without rhubarb (1.25% DM) and were slaughtered at days 50 and 60 of age. Results showed that the supplementation of rhubarb increased ileal villus height (P = 0.036), increased jejujal and ileal anti-inflammatory IL-10 production (P immune function were accompanied by shifts in ileal epithelial bacterial ecosystem in favor of Blautia, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Pseudomonas, and with a decline in the relative abundance of Staphylococcus (P immune homeostasis by modulating intestinal epithelial microbiota during the early stages of animal development.

  10. Evaluation value of intestinal flora detection for intestinal mucosal inflammation and immune response in patients with ulcerative colitis

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    Yan Zou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the evaluation value of intestinal flora detection for intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response in patients with ulcerative colitis. Methods: The patients who were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in Zigong Fifth People’s Hospital between March 2015 and February 2017 were selected as the UC group, and those who were diagnosed with colonic polyps were selected as the control group. Fresh excreta were collected to detect the number of intestinal flora, and the diseased intestinal mucosa tissue was collected to detect the expression of inflammatory response molecules and immune cell transcription factors. Results: enterococcus contents in intestinal tract and TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC group were significantly higher than those of control group while bifidobacteria contents in intestinal tract and SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group; TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC patients with grade II and grade III flora disturbance were significantly higher than those of UC patients with normal flora and grade I flora disturbance while SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of UC patients with normal flora and grade I flora disturbance; TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC patients with grade III flora disturbance were significantly higher than those of UC patients with grade II flora disturbance while SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of UC patients with grade II flora disturbance. Conclusion: The intestinal flora disturbance in patients with ulcerative colitis can result in inflammatory response activation and immune response disorder.

  11. Protective effect of perioperative recombinant human growth hormone application on intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with intestinal obstruction and the assessment of immune inflammatory response

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    Jun-Yi Jia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the protective effect of perioperative recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH application on intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with intestinal obstruction and the influence on the immune inflammatory response. Methods: 60 patients with intestinal obstruction who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between February 2013 and July 2016 were selected as the research subjects and divided into the control group (n=34 who received conventional surgical treatment and the observation group (n=26 who received surgery combined with perioperative r-hGH treatment. The serum levels of intestinal mucosal barrier indexes, immunoglobulin and inflammatory response indicators were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of intestinal mucosal barrier indexes, immunoglobulin and inflammatory response indicators were not statistically significant between the two groups of patients. After treatment, serum intestinal mucosal barrier indexes Endotoxin, D-Lactate and DAO levels in observation group were lower than those in control group, immunoglobulin IgA, IgM and IgG levels were higher than those in control group, and inflammatory response indicators IL-1, IL-6, PCT and TNF-α levels were lower than those in control group patients. Conclusion: Perioperative r-hGH application in patients with intestinal obstruction can protect the intestinal mucosal barrier, also optimize the humoral immunity and suppress the systemic inflammatory response.

  12. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Intestinal Disease. The role of bacterial products, food components and drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol-Schoenmakers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The challenge of the mucosal gut associated immune system is to remain unresponsive to food products and commensal microbiota, while mounting an appropriate immune response towards pathogens. This implicates the necessity of tight immune regulation within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT).

  13. Basis for the Age-related Decline in Intestinal Mucosal Immunity

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    Douglas L. Schmucker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly are characterized by mucosal immunosenescence and high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases of the intestinal tract. Little is known about how the differentiation of immunoglobulin A (IgA plasma cells in Peyer's patches (PPs and their subsequent homing to the small intestinal lamina propria (LP is affected by aging. Quantitative immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the number of IgA+ cells in the PPs, coupled with significant declines in the numbers of IgA+ and antibody-positive cells in the intestinal LP of senescent rats compared to young adult animals. These data suggest that aging diminishes the emigration of IgA immunoblasts from these lymphoid aggregates, as well as their migration to the intestinal LP. Flow cytometry and lymphocyte adoptive transfer studies showed 3- to 4-fold age-related declines in the homing of antibody-containing cells and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes to the small intestines of rhesus macaques and rats, respectively. The number of peripheral blood IgA immunoblasts expressing the homing molecule α4β7 declined 30% in senescent rats. This was accompanied by a >17% decrease in the areal density of LP blood vessels staining positive for the cell adhesion molecule MAdCAM-1. Cumulatively, declines in expression of these homing molecules constitute a substantial age-related diminution of IgA immunoblast homing potential. In vitro antibody secretion by LP plasma cells, i.e. antibody secreted per antibody-positive cell, remains unchanged as a function of donor age. Intestinal mucosal immunosenescence is a consequence of reduced homing of IgA plasma cells to the intestinal LP as a result of declines in homing molecule expression.

  14. Effect of acupuncture intervention on the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response balance in animals with ulcerative colitis

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    Meng-Fan Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of acupuncture intervention on the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response balance in animals with ulcerative colitis (UC. Methods: Adult, male SPF SD rats were selected and randomly divided into the control group, UC group and acupuncture group, and then the acupuncture intervention was established after the UC animal model was established. 14 d after intervention, the expression of inflammatory mediators and Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cytokines in intestinal mucosa, and the levels of inflammatory mediators and Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cytokines in serum were detected. Results: NF-kB, HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 levels in serum of UC group were significantly higher than those of control group while IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 levels in serum were significantly lower than those of control group; NF-kB, HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 levels in serum of acupuncture group were significantly lower than those of UC group while IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 levels in serum were significantly higher than those of UC group. Conclusions: Acupuncture intervention can regulate the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response of animals with ulcerative colitis.

  15. Notable mucosal immune responses induced in the intestine of zebrafish (Danio rerio) bath-vaccinated with a live attenuated Vibrio anguillarum vaccine.

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    Liu, Xiaohong; Wu, Haizhen; Chang, Xinyue; Tang, Yufei; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-09-01

    Live attenuated vaccine is one of the efficient vaccine candidates in aquaculture, which can be easily delivered to fish via bath-vaccination. An outstanding advantage of bath-vaccination is that vaccine delivery is through the same route as that utilized by many fish pathogens, generating specific mucosal immune responses. In this work, we investigated the mucosal immune responses induced by a live attenuated Vibrio anguillarum vaccine in zebrafish via bath-vaccination. Bacteria proliferated rapidly in 3 h after vaccination and maintained at a high level until 6 h in the intestine. Besides, bacteria persisted in the intestine for a longer time whereas decreased rapidly in the skin and gills. Moreover, a significant up-regulation of TLR5 triggering a MyD88-dependent signaling pathway was observed in the intestine, which implied that flagella were the crucial antigenic component of the live attenuated vaccine. And macrophages and neutrophils showed active responses participating in antigen recognition and sampling after vaccination. Furthermore, an inflammation was observed with plenty of lymphocytes in the intestine at 24 h post vaccination but eliminated within 7 days. In conclusion, the live attenuated V. anguillarum vaccine induced notable mucosal immune responses in the intestine which could be used as a mucosal vaccine vector in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Always one step ahead: How pathogenic bacteria use the type III secretion system to manipulate the intestinal mucosal immune system

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    Marchès Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intestinal immune system and the epithelium are the first line of defense in the gut. Constantly exposed to microorganisms from the environment, the gut has complex defense mechanisms to prevent infections, as well as regulatory pathways to tolerate commensal bacteria and food antigens. Intestinal pathogens have developed strategies to regulate intestinal immunity and inflammation in order to establish or prolong infection. The organisms that employ a type III secretion system use a molecular syringe to deliver effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. These effectors target the host cell cytoskeleton, cell organelles and signaling pathways. This review addresses the multiple mechanisms by which the type III secretion system targets the intestinal immune response, with a special focus on pathogenic E. coli.

  17. Effect of enteral immunonutrition after radical surgery for esophageal carcinoma on anti-tumor immune response and intestinal mucosal barrier function

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    Tong He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of enteral immunonutrition after radical surgery for esophageal carcinoma on anti-tumor immune response and intestinal mucosal barrier function. Methods: A total of 102 patients who received radical surgery for esophageal carcinoma in our hospital between May 2013 and December 2016 were selected and randomly divided into observation group and control group who received postoperative enteral immunonutrition and routine enteral nutrition respectively. 1 d before operation as well as 1 d and 7 d after operation, peripheral blood immune cell marker expression and serum intestinal mucosal barrier injury marker levels were detected. Results: 1 d after operation, peripheral blood T-bet, NKG2D, NKp30, NKp44 and NKp46 fluorescence intensity of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those 1d before operation while peripheral blood GATA-3 and Foxp3 fluorescence intensity as well as serum DAO, Occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-1 levels were significantly higher than those 1d before operation; peripheral blood T-bet, NKG2D, NKp30, NKp44 and NKp46 fluorescence intensity of observation group 7 d after operation were significantly higher than those 1 d after operation while peripheral blood GATA-3 and Foxp3 fluorescence intensity as well as serum DAO, Occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-1 levels were significantly lower than those 1 d after operation; peripheral blood T-bet, GATA-3, Foxp3, NKG2D, NKp30, NKp44 and NKp46 fluorescence intensity of control group 7 d after operation were not significant different from those 1 d after operation, and serum DAO, Occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-1 levels were significantly lower than those 1d after operation. Conclusion: Enteral immunonutrition after radical surgery for esophageal carcinoma can enhance the anti-tumor immune response and improve the intestinal mucosal barrier function.

  18. Inside the mucosal immune system.

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    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  19. The short isoform of the CEACAM1 receptor in intestinal T cells regulates mucosal immunity and homeostasis via Tfh cell induction.

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    Chen, Lanfen; Chen, Zhangguo; Baker, Kristi; Halvorsen, Elizabeth M; da Cunha, Andre Pires; Flak, Magdalena B; Gerber, Georg; Huang, Yu-Hwa; Hosomi, Shuhei; Arthur, Janelle C; Dery, Ken J; Nagaishi, Takashi; Beauchemin, Nicole; Holmes, Kathryn V; Ho, Joshua W K; Shively, John E; Jobin, Christian; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L; Higgins, Darren E; Blumberg, Richard S

    2012-11-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule like I (CEACAM1) is expressed on activated T cells and signals through either a long (L) cytoplasmic tail containing immune receptor tyrosine based inhibitory motifs, which provide inhibitory function, or a short (S) cytoplasmic tail with an unknown role. Previous studies on peripheral T cells show that CEACAM1-L isoforms predominate with little to no detectable CEACAM1-S isoforms in mouse and human. We show here that this was not the case in tissue resident T cells of intestines and gut associated lymphoid tissues, which demonstrated predominant expression of CEACAM1-S isoforms relative to CEACAM1-L isoforms in human and mouse. This tissue resident predominance of CEACAM1-S expression was determined by the intestinal environment where it served a stimulatory function leading to the regulation of T cell subsets associated with the generation of secretory IgA immunity, the regulation of mucosal commensalism, and defense of the barrier against enteropathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of dietary supplementation of lipid-coated zinc oxide on intestinal mucosal morphology and expression of the genes associated with growth and immune function in weanling pigs

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    Young Min Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of a lipid-coated zinc oxide (ZnO supplement Shield Zn (SZ at the sub-pharmacological concentration on intestinal morphology and gene expression in weanling pigs, with an aim to gain insights into the mechanism of actions for SZ. Methods Forty 22-day-old weanling pigs were fed a nursery diet supplemented with 100 or 2,500 mg Zn/kg with uncoated ZnO (negative control [NC] or positive control [PC], respectively, 100, 200, or 400 mg Zn/kg with SZ for 14 days and their intestinal tissues were taken for histological and molecular biological examinations. The villus height (VH and crypt depth (CD of the intestinal mucosa were measured microscopically following preparation of the tissue specimen; expression of the genes associated with growth and immune function was determined using the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results There was no difference in daily gain, gain:feed, and diarrhea score between the SZ group and either of NC and PC. The VH and VH:CD ratio were less for the SZ group vs NC in the jejunum and duodenum, respectively (p<0.05. The jejunal mucosal mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I and interleukin (IL-10 regressed and tended to regress (p = 0.053 on the SZ concentration with a positive coefficient, respectively, whereas the IL-6 mRNA level regressed on the SZ concentration with a negative coefficient. The mRNA levels of IGF-I, zonula occludens protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, and IL-10 did not differ between the SZ group and either of NC and PC; the occludin and transforming growth factor-β1 mRNA levels were lower for the SZ group than for PC. Conclusion The present results are interpreted to suggest that dietary ZnO provided by SZ may play a role in intestinal mucosal growth and immune function by modulating the expression of IGF-I, IL-6, and IL-10 genes.

  1. Brain-gut axis and mucosal immunity: a perspective on mucosal psychoneuroimmunology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    The role of the brain-gut axis has traditionally been investigated in relation to intestinal motility, secretion, and vascularity. More recently, the concept of brain-gut dialogue has extended to the relationship between the nervous system and mucosal immune function. There is compelling evidence for a reciprocal or bi-directional communication between the immune system and the neuroendocrine system. This is mediated, in part, by shared ligands (chemical messengers) and receptors that are common to the immune and nervous systems. Although the concept of psychoneuroimmunology and neuroimmune cross-talk has been studied primarily in the context of the systemic immune system, it is likely to have special significance in the gut. The mucosal immune system is anatomically, functionally, and operationally distinct from the systemic immune system and is subject to independent regulatory signals. Furthermore, the intestinal mucosal immune system operates in a local milieu that depends on a dense innervation for its integrity, with juxtaposition of neuroendocrine cells and mucosal immune cells. An overview of evidence for the biologic plausibility of a brain-gut-immune axis is presented and its potential relevance to mucosal inflammatory disorders is discussed.

  2. Dysbiosis gut microbiota associated with inflammation and impaired mucosal immune function in intestine of humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Wu, Na; Wang, Xuemei; Chi, Yujing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Xinyun; Hu, Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yulan

    2015-02-03

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has recently been considered to be under the influence of the gut microbiota, which might exert toxic effects on the human host after intestinal absorption and delivery to the liver via the portal vein. In this study, the composition of the gut microbiota in NAFLD patients and healthy subjects was determined via 16S ribosomal RNA Illumina next-generation sequencing. Among those taxa displaying greater than 0.1% average abundance in all samples, five genera, including Alistipes and Prevotella, were significantly more abundant in the gut microbiota of healthy subjects compared to NAFLD patients. Alternatively, Escherichia, Anaerobacter, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus were increased in the gut microbiota of NAFLD patients compared to healthy subjects. In addition, decreased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ were detected in the NAFLD group compared to the healthy group. Furthermore, irregularly arranged microvilli and widened tight junctions were observed in the gut mucosa of the NAFLD patients via transmission electron microscopy. We postulate that aside from dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, gut microbiota-mediated inflammation of the intestinal mucosa and the related impairment in mucosal immune function play an important role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  3. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development.

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    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Azegami, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases.

  4. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Early Infancy: Monitoring and Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Hol, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe mucosal immune system of infants is dependent on the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Homeostasis results from the interaction between the mucosa and exogenous factors such as dietar and microbial agents. Induction and maintenance of homeostasis is a highly regluated system that involves different cell types. If homeostasis is lost this may lead to disease, including allergy and chronic intestinal inflammation. In this thesis we observed whether loss of homeostasis leading ...

  5. Mucosal Ecological Network of Epithelium and Immune Cells for Gut Homeostasis and Tissue Healing.

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    Kurashima, Yosuke; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2017-04-26

    The intestinal epithelial barrier includes columnar epithelial, Paneth, goblet, enteroendocrine, and tuft cells as well as other cell populations, all of which contribute properties essential for gastrointestinal homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa is covered by mucin, which contains antimicrobial peptides and secretory IgA and prevents luminal bacteria, fungi, and viruses from stimulating intestinal immune responses. Conversely, the transport of luminal microorganisms-mediated by M, dendritic, and goblet cells-into intestinal tissues facilitates the harmonization of active and quiescent mucosal immune responses. The bacterial population within gut-associated lymphoid tissues creates the intratissue cohabitations for harmonized mucosal immunity. Intermolecular and intercellular communication among epithelial, immune, and mesenchymal cells creates an environment conducive for epithelial regeneration and mucosal healing. This review summarizes the so-called intestinal mucosal ecological network-the complex but vital molecular and cellular interactions of epithelial mesenchymal cells, immune cells, and commensal microbiota that achieve intestinal homeostasis, regeneration, and healing.

  6. Effects of Cortisol on the Intestinal Mucosal Immune Response during Cohabitant Challenge with IPNV in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niklasson, Lars; Sundh, Henrik; Olsen, Rolf-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) causes high incidence of disease in salmonids during the first period after SW transfer. During this period as well as during periods of stress, cortisol levels increase and indications of a relationship between IPNV susceptibility and cortisol have been...... response differs from the systemic, but that both are modulated by the stress hormone cortisol....... suggested. The intestine is an entry route and a target tissue for IPNV displaying severe enteritis and sloughing of the mucosa in infected fish. The mechanisms behind effects of the virus on the intestinal tissue and the impact of cortisol on the effect remain unclear. In the present study, Atlantic salmon...

  7. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a "self-eating" survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders.

  8. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Salinas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT, the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT. Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  9. Fermented milk with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus S1K3 (MTCC5957) protects mice from salmonella by enhancing immune and nonimmune protection mechanisms at intestinal mucosal level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemgang, Tanedjeu Sonfack; Kapila, Suman; Shanmugam, Venkatesa Perumal; Reddi, Srinu; Kapila, Rajeev

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which an Indian indigenous probiotic culture, Lactobacillus rhamnosus S1K3, could overcome the pathogenic strain Salmonella enterica with an emphasis on the response at the intestinal mucosal level after long-term (30days) consumption. S1K3 was able to produce antimicrobial compounds against the pathogens. The probiotic adhered strongly to intestinal epithelium and maintained its integrity in presence of Salmonella through stimulation of tight junction and antimicrobial peptide genes in vitro. Mice prefed for 30days with S1K3-fermented milk exhibited low incidence of pathogenic Salmonella at mucosal and systemic levels. The probiotic induced TLRs transcripts at the Peyer's patches, followed by an increase in the Secretory-IgA in intestinal fluid, the IgA-secreting cells in lamina propria of small intestine and the IgA level in serum. Moreover, S1K3 maintained the protein level of IL-12, increased the IL-4 and reduced the TGF-β level in intestinal fluid/serum at the later stage of infection. All these actions concurred to lower the count of Salmonella in feces, its invasion in spleen, liver and intestine tissues and improved the health status of probiotic-fed group. In view of this performance, S1K3 appears to be a suitable candidate for the development of nutraceutical food. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of the smell of Seirogan, a wood creosote, on dermal and intestinal mucosal immunity and allergic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu; Miura, Takanori; Sato, Eisuke F.; Inoue, Masayasu

    2012-01-01

    Seirogan, a wood creosote, has been used as an antidiarrhetic drug in Asian countries including Japan for many years. This antidiarrhetic has recently been used as a sugar-coated pill because Seirogan has a strong smell. The strong smell of the uncoated form of Seirogan may modulate the defense systems of animals because the sense of smell is important for the detection of toxic metabolites in foods contaminated with pathogens. This study examined the effect of the sugar-coated and uncoated forms of this antidiarrhetic on the immunological response and inflammatory reactions in mice that had been sensitized with either fluorescein isothiocyanate or oxazolone. The sensitization of mice with either FITC or oxazolone markedly increased the plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and mucosal IgA and elicited severe inflammation in the colon by a mechanism that could be suppressed by exposure of animals to the smell of uncoated Seirogan as effectively as the oral administration of the agent. Dermal inflammation in the FITC- and oxazolone-sensitized mice was also suppressed effectively either by the exposure to the smell or oral administration of the agent. Biochemical and histochemical analyses revealed that the elevated levels of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α and mucosal IgA were significantly decreased by exposure to the smell of uncoated Seirogan as well as by oral administration of the agent. Exposure of mice to the smell of Seirogan but not oral administration of the agent selectively increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol, particularly in the sensitized animals. These observations suggest that exposing the animals to the smell of Seirogan per se activated the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and systemically modulated immunological reactions to suppress the allergic reactions. PMID:22962524

  11. Intestinal IgA⁺ cell numbers as well as IgA, IgG, and IgM contents correlate with mucosal humoral immunity of broilers during supplementation with high fluorine in the diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qin; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Liu, Juan; Deng, Yubing

    2013-07-01

    Fluoride (F), a well-recognized harmful substance, is easily absorbed by the intestinal mucosa. The intestinal mucosal immune system is equipped with unique innate and adaptive defense mechanisms that provide a first line of protection against infectious agents. Meanwhile, immunoglobulins are the major secretory products of the adaptive immune system and their levels can be a strong indicator of a disease or condition. In this study, therefore, we investigated the effects of high dietary fluorine on the numbers of immunoglobulin A-positive (IgA(+)) cells in the lamina propria of intestines (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) by immunohistochemistry as well as on the contents of immunoglobulin A (IgA), immunoglobulin G (IgG), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) in the mucosa of intestines (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 280 1-day-old healthy avian broilers were randomly divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet (fluorine 22.6 mg/kg) or the same basal diet supplemented with 400, 800, and 1,200 mg/kg fluorine (high fluorine groups I, II, and III) in the form of sodium fluoride (NaF) for 42 days. The experimental data showed that the numbers of IgA(+) cells as well as the IgA, IgG, and IgM contents were significantly decreased (P fluorine groups II and III when compared with those of the control group. It was concluded that dietary fluorine in the range of 800-1,200 mg/kg significantly reduced the numbers of the IgA(+) cells and the contents of aforementioned immunoglobulins in the intestines (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) of broilers, which could finally impact the mucosal humoral immune function in the intestines by a way that reduces the lymphocyte population and/or lymphocyte activation.

  12. Intestinal immune maturation is accompanied by temporal changes in the composition of the microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den C.G.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Wehrmaker, A.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Parmentier, H.K.; Lammers, A.

    2016-01-01

    In animals establishment of the intestinal microbial ecosystem is influenced by mucosal immune functions. As mucosal immune functions dynamically change during development of juvenile layer chicken, this study focused on dynamics in the ileal microbiota composition in relation to intestinal immune

  13. Mucosal immunity in Toxoplasma gondii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulthess, J; Fourreau, D; Darche, S; Meresse, B; Kasper, L; Cerf-Bensussan, N; Buzoni-Gatel, D

    2008-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that frequently infects a large spectrum of warm-blooded animals. This parasite induces abortion and establishes both chronic and silent infections, particularly in the brain. Parasite penetration into the host activates a strong anti-parasite immune response. In the present paper, we will discuss the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity that occurs within the infected intestine to clear the parasite and to maintain intestinal homeostasis despite the exacerbation of an inflammatory immune response.

  14. Innate Immunity to Mucosal Candida Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Verma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal epithelial tissues are exposed to high numbers of microbes, including commensal fungi, and are able to distinguish between those that are avirulent and those that cause disease. Epithelial cells have evolved multiple mechanisms to defend against colonization and invasion by Candida species. The interplay between mucosal epithelial tissues and immune cells is key for control and clearance of fungal infections. Our understanding of the mucosal innate host defense system has expanded recently with new studies bringing to light the importance of epithelial cell responses, innate T cells, neutrophils, and other phagocytes during Candida infections. Epithelial tissues release cytokines, host defense peptides, and alarmins during Candida invasion that act in concert to limit fungal proliferation and recruit immune effector cells. The innate T cell/IL-17 axis and recruitment of neutrophils are of central importance in controlling mucosal fungal infections. Here, we review current knowledge of the innate immunity at sites of mucosal Candida infection, with a focus on infections caused by C. albicans.

  15. Immunology: The Neuronal Pathway to Mucosal Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, Stephan; Maizels, Rick M

    2018-01-08

    Type 2 immunity at mucosal surfaces is thought to be initiated by type 2 innate lymphoid cells. New studies report that these cells are themselves activated by the neuropeptide neuromedin U, produced by cholinergic neurons in the gut and in airways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunology: the neuronal pathway to mucosal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Löser, Stephan; Maizels, Rick M.

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 immunity at mucosal surfaces is thought to be initiated by type 2 innate lymphoid cells. New studies report that these cells are themselves activated by the neuropeptide neuromedin U, produced by cholinergic neurons in the gut and in airways.

  17. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interc...

  18. A Cross-Talk Between Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids and the Host Mucosal Immune System Regulates Intestinal Homeostasis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Araújo, João Ricardo; Di Santo, James P

    2018-02-15

    Gut microbiota has a fundamental role in the energy homeostasis of the host and is essential for proper "education" of the immune system. Intestinal microbial communities are able to ferment dietary fiber releasing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The SCFAs, particularly butyrate (BT), regulate innate and adaptive immune cell generation, trafficing, and function. For example, BT has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the recruitment and proinflammatory activity of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and effector T cells and by increasing the number and activity of regulatory T cells. Gut microbial dysbiosis, ie, a microbial community imbalance, has been suggested to play a role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The relationship between dysbiosis and IBD has been difficult to prove, especially in humans, and is probably complex and dynamic, rather than one of a simple cause and effect relationship. However, IBD patients have dysbiosis with reduced numbers of SCFAs-producing bacteria and reduced BT concentration that is linked to a marked increase in the number of proinflammatory immune cells in the gut mucosa of these patients. Thus, microbial dysbiosis and reduced BT concentration may be a factor in the emergence and severity of IBD. Understanding the relationship between microbial dysbiosis and reduced BT concentration to IBD may lead to novel therapeutic interventions.

  19. Mucosal Immunity and the Onset of Allergic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusei Ohshima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal barriers encounter an environment that is rich in pathogens that possess mechanisms for invading mucosal tissues. These barriers also encounter innocuous antigens, such as foods, airborne antigens, and microbiota. The mucosa has developed a sophisticated immune system that can mount robust immune responses against pathogenic antigens, while maintaining mucosal tolerance against non-pathogenic antigens. Accumulating evidence indicates that the mucosal epithelium, dendritic cells, and a subtype of T cells with regulatory properties play important roles in the development and maintenance of mucosal tolerance. Moreover, the micribiota also contribute to regulating the mucosal immune system. A failure to develop or the breakdown of mucosal tolerance can result in allergic diseases, such as food allergy and asthma. By taking advantage of the unique characteristics of the mucosal immune system, strategies that induce regulatory cells in vivo and, thereby, reconstitute mucosal tolerance may be used to develop novel therapies that are suitable for treating or preventing of allergic diseases.

  20. Regionalized Development and Maintenance of the Intestinal Adaptive Immune Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agace, William Winston; McCoy, Kathy D.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal immune system has the daunting task of protecting us from pathogenic insults while limiting inflammatory responses against the resident commensal microbiota and providing tolerance to food antigens. This role is particularly impressive when one considers the vast mucosal surface...... and changing landscape that the intestinal immune system must monitor. In this review, we highlight regional differences in the development and composition of the adaptive immune landscape of the intestine and the impact of local intrinsic and environmental factors that shape this process. To conclude, we...... review the evidence for a critical window of opportunity for early-life exposures that affect immune development and alter disease susceptibility later in life....

  1. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  2. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E; McDermott, Courtney D; Stewart, Taryn P; Hudson, William H; Rios, Daniel; Fasken, Milo B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to which S. boulardii contacts and influences the host mucosal immune system. Understanding the nature of these interactions is crucial for application of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vehicle. In this study, we explore both intrinsic and immunomodulatory properties of S. boulardii in the healthy mucosal immune system. Genomic sequencing and morphological analysis of S. boulardii reveals changes in cell wall components compared to non-probiotic S. cerevisiae that may partially account for probiotic functions of S. boulardii. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry demonstrate limited S. boulardii association with murine Peyer's patches. We also show that although S. boulardii induces a systemic humoral immune response, this response is small in magnitude and not directed against S. boulardii itself. RNA-seq of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes indicates that even repeated administration of S. boulardii induces few transcriptional changes in the healthy intestine. Together these data strongly suggest that interaction between S. boulardii and the mucosal immune system in the healthy intestine is limited, with important implications for future work examining S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent and therapeutic delivery vehicle.

  3. Mucosal pathobiology and molecular signature of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castro, Ana M; Martínez, Cristina; Salvo-Romero, Eloísa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders in developed countries. Its etiology remains unknown; however, a common finding, regardless of IBS subtype, is the presence of altered intestinal barrier. In fact, signaling and location of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, in connection with increased immune activity, seem abnormal in the intestinal epithelium of IBS patients. Despite that most research is performed on distal segments of the intestine, altered permeability has been reported in both, the small and the large bowel of all IBS subtypes. The small intestine carries out digestion and nutrient absorption and is also the site where the majority of immune responses to luminal antigens takes place. In fact, the upper intestine is more exposed to environmental antigens than the colon and is also a site of symptom generation. Recent studies have revealed small intestinal structural alterations of the epithelial barrier and mucosal immune activation in association with intestinal dysfunction, suggesting the commitment of the intestine as a whole in the pathogenesis of IBS. This review summarizes the most recent findings on mucosal barrier alterations and its relationship to symptoms arising from the small intestine in IBS, including epithelial structural abnormalities, mucosal immune activation, and microbial dysbiosis, further supporting the hypothesis of an organic origin of IBS. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Sublingual Delivery of Vaccines for the Induction of Mucosal Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choi, Youngjoo; Cheon, In Su

    2013-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to incoming pathogens which can cause infections that result in severe morbidity and/or mortality. Studies have reported that mucosal immunity is important for providing protection against these pathogens and that mucosal vaccination is effective in preventing local infections. For many years, the sublingual mucosa has been targeted to deliver immunotherapy to treat allergic hypersensitivities. However, the potential of vaccine delivery via sublingual mucosal has received little attention until recently. Recent studies exploring such potential have documented the safety and effectiveness of sublingual immunization, demonstrating the ability of sublingual immunization to induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses against a variety of antigens, including soluble proteins, inter particulate antigens, and live-attenuated viruses. This review will summarize the recent findings that address the promising potential of sublingual immunization in proving protection against various mucosal pathogens. PMID:23885221

  5. The role of intestinal microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchiaroni, F; Tortora, A; Gabrielli, M; Bertucci, F; Gigante, G; Ianiro, G; Ojetti, V; Scarpellini, E; Gasbarrini, A

    2013-02-01

    The human gut is an ecosystem consisting of a great number of commensal bacteria living in symbiosis with the host. Several data confirm that gut microbiota is engaged in a dynamic interaction with the intestinal innate and adaptive immune system, affecting different aspects of its development and function. To review the immunological functions of gut microbiota and improve knowledge of its therapeutic implications for several intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases associated to dysregulation of the immune system. Significant articles were identified by literature search and selected based on content, including atopic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases and treatment of these conditions with probiotics. Accumulating evidence indicates that intestinal microflora has protective, metabolic, trophic and immunological functions and is able to establish a "cross-talk" with the immune component of mucosal immunity, comprising cellular and soluble elements. When one or more steps in this fine interaction fail, autoimmune or auto-inflammatory diseases may occur. Furthermore, it results from the data that probiotics, used for the treatment of the diseases caused by the dysregulation of the immune system, can have a beneficial effect by different mechanisms. Gut microbiota interacts with both innate and adaptive immune system, playing a pivotal role in maintenance and disruption of gut immune quiescence. A cross talk between the mucosal immune system and endogenous microflora favours a mutual growth, survival and inflammatory control of the intestinal ecosystem. Based on these evidences, probiotics can be used as an ecological therapy in the treatment of immune diseases.  

  6. Mucosal Immune Responses of Mice Experimentally Infected with Pygidiopsis summa (Trematoda: Heterophyidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Park, Young-Jin; Park, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Bong-Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immune responses against Pygidiopsis summa (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) infection were studied in ICR mice. Experimental groups consisted of group 1 (uninfected controls), group 2 (infection with 200 metacercariae), and group 3 (immunosuppression with Depo-Medrol and infection with 200 metacercariae). Worms were recovered in the small intestine at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-infection (PI). Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), mast cells, and goblet cells were counted in intestinal tissue sections stained with Giemsa, astra-blue, and periodic acid-Schiff, respectively. Mucosal IgA levels were measured by ELISA. Expulsion of P. summa from the mouse intestine began to occur from days 3-5 PI which sustained until day 7 PI. The worm expulsion was positively correlated with proliferation of IEL, mast cells, goblet cells, and increase of IgA, although in the case of mast cells significant increase was seen only at day 7 PI. Immunosuppression suppressed all these immune effectors and inhibited worm reduction in the intestine until day 7 PI. The results suggested that various immune effectors which include IEL, goblet cells, mast cells, and IgA play roles in regulating the intestinal mucosal immunity of ICR mice against P. summa infection. PMID:24623878

  7. Effects of synbiotics on intestinal mucosal barrier in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xue

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Probiotics can improve the concentration of colonic probiotics, while synbiotics can improve probiotics concentration and mucosa thickness in colon, decrease L/M ratio and bacterial translocation. Synbiotics shows more protective effects on intestinal mucosal barrier in rats after cecectomy and gastrostomy and the intervention of specific antibiotics.

  8. Microbiota, intestinal immunity, and mouse bustle

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglov, A.; Nedospasov, S.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota is regulated by the immune system. This paper discusses the role of cytokines and innate immunity lymphoid cells in the intestinal immune regulation by means of IgA.

  9. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume; Neunlist, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability. Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO-1 and FAK. These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS-induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS-induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS-induced changes in ZO-1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased the mucosal density of neutrophils

  10. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-11-17

    The mucosal immune system - consisting of adaptive and innate immune cells as well as the epithelium - is profoundly influenced by its microbial environment. There is now growing evidence that the converse is also true, that the immune system shapes the composition of the intestinal microbiome. During conditions of health, this bidirectional interaction achieves a homeostasis in which inappropriate immune responses to non-pathogenic microbes are averted and immune activity suppresses blooms of potentially pathogenic microbes (pathobionts). Genetic alteration in immune/epithelial function can affect host gardening of the intestinal microbiome, contributing to the diversity of intestinal microbiota within a population and in some cases allowing for unfavorable microbial ecologies (dysbiosis) that confer disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v modulates gene expression in the ileum of pigs: prediction of crosstalk between intestinal immune cells and sub-mucosal adipocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, M.M.; Gross, G.; Liu, Yapin; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Niewold, T.; Meulen, van der J.; Smits, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    To study host–probiotic interactions in parts of the intestine only accessible in humans by surgery (jejunum, ileum and colon), pigs were used as model for humans. Groups of eight 6-week-old pigs were repeatedly orally administered with 5 × 1012 CFU Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (L. plantarum 299v)

  12. Characterization of Mucosal Disaccharidases from Human Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Amiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used a brush border membrane (BBM preparation from human small intestine to analyze the proportion and the activity of major intestinal disaccharidases, including sucrase-isomaltase (SI, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH. SI, MGAM and LPH respectively constituted 8.2%, 2.7% and 1.4% of total BBM protein. The activity of SI and LPH decreased threefold after purification from the brush border membrane, which highlights the effect of membrane microdomains on the functional capacity of these enzymes. All of the disaccharidases showed optimal activity at pH 6, over 50% residual activity between pH 5 to pH 7, and increasing activity with rising temperatures up to 45 °C, along with a stable functional structure. Therefore the enzymes can withstand mild intraluminal pH alterations with adequate function, and are able to increase their activity with elevated core body temperature. Our data provide a functional measure for characterization of intestinal disaccharidases under different physiological and pathological conditions.

  13. Temporal and spatial interplay of microbiota and intestinal mucosa drive establishment of immune homeostasis in conventionalized mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidy, El S.; Baarlen, van P.; Derrien, M.; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, D.J.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Levenez, F.; Dore, J.; Dekker, J.; Samsom, J.N.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    During colonization of germfree mice with the total fecal microbial community of their conventionally born and raised siblings (conventionalization), the intestinal mucosal immune system initiates and maintains a balanced immune response. However, the genetic regulation of these balanced,

  14. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host’s defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  15. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury augments intestinal mucosal injury and bacterial translocation in jaundiced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksek, Yunus Nadi; Kologlu, Murat; Daglar, Gül; Doganay, Mutlu; Dolapci, Istar; Bilgihan, Ayse; Dolapçi, Mete; Kama, Nuri Aydin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local effects and degree of bacterial translocation related with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat obstructive jaundice model. Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three groups; including Group 1 (jaundice group), Group 2 (jaundice-ischemia group) and Group 3 (ischemia group). All rats had 2 laparotomies. After experimental interventions, tissue samples for translocation; liver and ileum samples for histopathological examination, 25 cm of small intestine for mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels and blood samples for biochemical analysis were obtained. Jaundiced rats had increased liver enzyme levels and total and direct bilirubin levels (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels were found to be high in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion groups (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal damage was more severe in rats with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion after bile duct ligation (p<0.05). Degree of bacterial translocation was also found to be significantly high in these rats (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosa is disturbed more severely in obstructive jaundice with the development of ischemia and reperfusion. Development of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in obstructive jaundice increases bacterial translocation.

  16. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Early Infancy: Monitoring and Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hol (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe mucosal immune system of infants is dependent on the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Homeostasis results from the interaction between the mucosa and exogenous factors such as dietar and microbial agents. Induction and maintenance of homeostasis is a highly regluated system that

  17. Dietary l-arginine inhibits intestinal Clostridium perfringens colonisation and attenuates intestinal mucosal injury in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Zengpeng; Li, Huixian; Guo, Shuangshuang; Liu, Dan; Guo, Yuming

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary l-arginine level and feeding duration on the intestinal damage of broilers induced by Clostridium perfringens (CP) in vivo, and the antimicrobial effect of its metabolite nitric oxide (NO) in vitro. The in vivo experiment was designed as a factorial arrangement of three dietary treatments×two challenge statuses. Broilers were fed a basal diet (CON) or a high-arginine diet (ARG) containing 1·87 % l-arginine, or CON for the first 8 d and ARG from days 9 to 28 (CON/ARG). Birds were co-infected with or without Eimeria and CP (EM/CP). EM/CP challenge led to intestinal injury, as evidenced by lower plasma d-xylose concentration (Pl-arginine supplementation (Pl-arginine supplementation (Pl-arginine supplementation elevated (Pl-arginine supplementation could inhibit CP overgrowth and alleviate intestinal mucosal injury by modulating innate immune responses, enhancing barrier function and producing NO.

  18. Characterization of the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii in the Healthy Mucosal Immune System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Hudson

    Full Text Available The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been shown to ameliorate disease severity in the context of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, use of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vector would require delivery of S. boulardii to a healthy, uninflamed intestine. In contrast to inflamed mucosal tissue, the diverse microbiota, intact epithelial barrier, and fewer inflammatory immune cells within the healthy intestine may all limit the degree to which S. boulardii contacts and influences the host mucosal immune system. Understanding the nature of these interactions is crucial for application of S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent or therapeutic delivery vehicle. In this study, we explore both intrinsic and immunomodulatory properties of S. boulardii in the healthy mucosal immune system. Genomic sequencing and morphological analysis of S. boulardii reveals changes in cell wall components compared to non-probiotic S. cerevisiae that may partially account for probiotic functions of S. boulardii. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry demonstrate limited S. boulardii association with murine Peyer's patches. We also show that although S. boulardii induces a systemic humoral immune response, this response is small in magnitude and not directed against S. boulardii itself. RNA-seq of the draining mesenteric lymph nodes indicates that even repeated administration of S. boulardii induces few transcriptional changes in the healthy intestine. Together these data strongly suggest that interaction between S. boulardii and the mucosal immune system in the healthy intestine is limited, with important implications for future work examining S. boulardii as a prophylactic agent and therapeutic delivery vehicle.

  19. Mucosal and systemic immune modulation by Trichuris trichiura in a self-infected individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, A; Rasmussen, T K; Nejsum, P

    2017-01-01

    Helminthic therapy of immune-mediated diseases has gained attention in recent years, but we know little of how helminths modulate human immunity. In this study, we investigated how self-infection with Trichuris (T.) trichiura in an adult man without intestinal disease affected mucosal and systemic...... trichiura colonization induced equally increased expressions of T-helper (h)1-, Th2-, Th17- and Treg-associated cytokines and transcription factors, measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed several indicators of modulation of systemic immunity during the T. trichiura infection. Plasma...... immunity. Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at baseline, during T. trichiura infection, and after its clearance following mebendazole treatment. Unexpectedly, the volunteer experienced a Campylobacter colitis following T. trichiura clearance, and this served as a positive infectious control. Trichuris...

  20. Intestinal barrier: A gentlemen's agreement between microbiota and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricilli, Andrea Moro; Castoldi, Angela; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-02-15

    Our body is colonized by more than a hundred trillion commensals, represented by viruses, bacteria and fungi. This complex interaction has shown that the microbiome system contributes to the host's adaptation to its environment, providing genes and functionality that give flexibility of diet and modulate the immune system in order not to reject these symbionts. In the intestine, specifically, the microbiota helps developing organ structures, participates of the metabolism of nutrients and induces immunity. Certain components of the microbiota have been shown to trigger inflammatory responses, whereas others, anti-inflammatory responses. The diversity and the composition of the microbiota, thus, play a key role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and explain partially the link between intestinal microbiota changes and gut-related disorders in humans. Tight junction proteins are key molecules for determination of the paracellular permeability. In the context of intestinal inflammatory diseases, the intestinal barrier is compromised, and decreased expression and differential distribution of tight junction proteins is observed. It is still unclear what is the nature of the luminal or mucosal factors that affect the tight junction proteins function, but the modulation of the immune cells found in the intestinal lamina propria is hypothesized as having a role in this modulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the interaction of the gut microbiota with the immune system in the development and maintenance of the intestinal barrier.

  1. Effects of intestinal mucosal blood flow and motility on intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Bin; Liu, Jing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-02-07

    To investigate the role of intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF) and motility in the damage of intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with traumatic brain injury. Sixty-four healthy male Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: traumatic brain injury (TBI) group (n=32), rats with traumatic brain injury; and control group (n=32), rats with sham-operation. Each group was divided into four subgroups (n=8) as 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after operation. Intestinal motility was measured by the propulsion ratio of a semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink). IMBF was measured with the laser-Doppler technique. Endotoxin and D-xylose levels in plasma were measured to evaluate the change of intestinal mucosal barrier function following TBI. The level of endotoxin was significantly higher in TBI group than in the control group at each time point (0.382±0.014 EU/mL vs 0.102±0.007 EU/mL, 0.466±0.018 EU/mL vs 0.114±0.021 EU/mL, 0.478±0.029 EU/mL vs 0.112±0.018 EU/mL and 0.412±0.036 EU/mL vs 0.108±0.011 EU/mL, Ppermeability is increased obviously in TBI rats. Decrease of intestinal motility and IMBF occur early in TBI, both are important pathogenic factors for stress-related damage of the intestinal mucosal barrier in TBI.

  2. Influencing mucosal homeostasis and immune responsiveness: the impact of nutrition and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van't Land, Belinda; Schijf, Marcel A; Martin, Rocio; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M

    2011-09-01

    Both nutrition and orally ingested drugs pass the gastrointestinal mucosa and may affect the balance between the mucosal immune system and microbial community herein, i.e. affecting composition of the microbial community as well as the status of local immune system that controls microbial composition and maintains mucosal integrity. Numerous ways are known by which the microbial community stimulates mammalian host's immune system and vice versa. The communication between microbiota and immune system is principally mediated by interaction of bacterial components with pattern recognition receptors expressed by intestinal epithelium and various local antigen-presenting cells, resulting in activation or modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Current review describes some of the factors influencing development and maintenance of a proper mucosal/immune balance, with special attention to Toll like receptor signaling and regulatory T cell development. It further describes examples (antibiotic use, HIV and asthma will be discussed) showing that disruption of the balance can be linked to immune function failure. The therapeutic potential of nutritional pharmacology herein is the main focus of discussion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yosuke; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Takayama, Shun; Mukai, Rieko; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Majima, Atsushi; Yasuda-Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Fukui, Akifumi; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2018-03-25

    Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  5. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Katja; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2016-11-01

    Historically, mucosal immunity-i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism's various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes-has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders. Copyright © 2016 Schröder and Bosch.

  6. Toxicological Effects of Nickel Chloride on IgA+ B Cells and sIgA, IgA, IgG, IgM in the Intestinal Mucosal Immunity in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangyuan Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicological effects of dietary NiCl2 on IgA+ B cells and the immunoglobulins including sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM in the small intestine and cecal tonsil of broilers by the methods of immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Two hundred and forty one-day-old avian broilers were randomly divided into four groups and fed on a control diet and three experimental diets supplemented with 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Compared with the control group, the IgA+ B cell number and the sIgA, IgA, IgG, and IgM contents in the NiCl2-treated groups were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in the excess of 300 mg/kg had negative effects on the IgA+ B cell number and the abovementioned immunoglobulin contents in the small intestine and the cecal tonsil. NiCl2-reduced sIgA, IgA, IgG and IgM contents is due to decrease in the population and/or the activation of B cell. The results suggest that NiCl2 at high levels has intestinal mucosal humoral immunotoxicity in animals.

  7. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Schroder

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Historically, mucosal immunity—i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism’s various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes—has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders.

  8. Secretory IgA's complex roles in immunity and mucosal homeostasis in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantis, N J; Rol, N; Corthésy, B

    2011-11-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) serves as the first line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric toxins and pathogenic microorganisms. Through a process known as immune exclusion, SIgA promotes the clearance of antigens and pathogenic microorganisms from the intestinal lumen by blocking their access to epithelial receptors, entrapping them in mucus, and facilitating their removal by peristaltic and mucociliary activities. In addition, SIgA functions in mucosal immunity and intestinal homeostasis through mechanisms that have only recently been revealed. In just the past several years, SIgA has been identified as having the capacity to directly quench bacterial virulence factors, influence composition of the intestinal microbiota by Fab-dependent and Fab-independent mechanisms, promote retro-transport of antigens across the intestinal epithelium to dendritic cell subsets in gut-associated lymphoid tissue, and, finally, to downregulate proinflammatory responses normally associated with the uptake of highly pathogenic bacteria and potentially allergenic antigens. This review summarizes the intrinsic biological activities now associated with SIgA and their relationships with immunity and intestinal homeostasis.

  9. The Opportunistic Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes: Pathogenicity and Interaction with the Mucosal Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schuppler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen causing listeriosis, an often fatal infection leading to meningitis, sepsis, or infection of the fetus and abortion in susceptible individuals. It was recently found that the bacterium can also cause acute, self-limiting febrile gastroenteritis in healthy individuals. In the intestinal tract, L. monocytogenes penetrates the mucosa directly via enterocytes, or indirectly via invasion of Peyer’s patches. Animal models for L. monocytogenes infection have provided many insights into the mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the development of new model systems has allowed the investigation of factors that influence adaptation to the gastrointestinal environment as well as adhesion to and invasion of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract are permanently exposed to an enormous antigenic load derived from the gastrointestinal microbiota present in the human bowel. The integrity of the important epithelial barrier is maintained by the mucosal immune system and its interaction with the commensal flora via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the interaction of L. monocytogenes with the host immune system that triggers the antibacterial immune responses on the mucosal surfaces of the human gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Dual oxidase in mucosal immunity and host-microbe homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun Soo; Choi, Myoung Kwon; Lee, Won-Jae

    2010-07-01

    Mucosal epithelia are in direct contact with microbes, which range from beneficial symbionts to pathogens. Accordingly, hosts must have a conflicting strategy to combat pathogens efficiently while tolerating symbionts. Recent progress has revealed that dual oxidase (DUOX) plays a key role in mucosal immunity in organisms that range from flies to humans. Information from the genetic model of Drosophila has advanced our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of DUOX and its role in mucosal immunity. Further investigations of DUOX regulation in response to symbiotic or non-symbiotic bacteria and the in vivo consequences in host physiology will give a novel insight into the microbe-controlling system of the mucosa. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone o...... demonstrate for the first time that recombinant plant viruses have potential as mucosal vaccines without the requirement for adjuvant and that the nasal route is most effective for the delivery of these nonreplicating particles....... or in the presence of ISCOM matrix, primed CPMV-specific T cells and generated high titers of CPMV- and FnBP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in sera. Furthermore, CPMV- and FnBP-specific IgA and IgG could also be detected in the bronchial, intestinal, and vaginal lavage fluids, highlighting the ability of CVPs...

  12. Intestinal Innate Antiviral Immunity and Immunobiotics: Beneficial Effects against Rotavirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Villena, Julio; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria Guadalupe; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract are the main portal entry of pathogens such as rotavirus (RVs), which is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe and a major cause of severe acute intestinal infection in livestock animals. The interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and immune cells with RVs have been studied for several years, and now it is known that the innate immune responses triggered by this virus can have both bene...

  13. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout...... the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease...

  14. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  15. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  16. ROR gamma t is dispensable for the development of intestinal mucosal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, T; Shiohara, T; Hibi, T; Suematsu, M; Ishikawa, H

    2008-05-01

    To examine the origin of intestinal mucosal T cells and, in particular, unconventional CD8 alpha alpha(+) T cells, we have undertaken a thorough analysis of the gut immune compartment in euthymic and athymic mice carrying either wild-type or mutant transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-gamma t (ROR gamma t). We identified a previously unrealized complexity of gut cryptopatch (CP) cells that challenges the previous assertion that CP cells comprise ROR gamma t-expressing adult counterparts of fetal lymphoid tissue inducer (Lti) cells. We showed that many CP cells express intermediate T cell differentiation markers, whether or not they express ROR gamma t, and found that CPs are not completely dependent on ROR gamma t, as previously reported, but merely fewer in number in the ROR gamma t-deficient condition. Indeed, c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-)ROR gamma t(-) cells inside the CP and c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-)ROR gamma t(-) and c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-)ROR gamma t(low) cells outside the CP basically remain in the gut mucosa of ROR gamma t-deficient ROR gamma t(EGFP/EGFP) mice. Consistent with these non-Lti-like c-kit(+)IL-7R(+)Lin(-) cells being gut T cell progenitors, ROR gamma t-deficient mice develop the normal number of intestinal mucosal T cells. These results clearly reassert the intraintestinal differentiation of the body's largest peripheral T cell subpopulation.

  17. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  18. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  19. [Scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) aspects of intestinal mucosal surface in childhood coeliac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, R; Bottaro, G; Ricca, O; Galasso, S

    1982-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal surface in 5 children suffered with Coeliac Disease was observed at Scanning Electron Microscopy. The comparison between two techniques of dehydration demonstrated that the Alcool-Amile Acetate dehydration reduces the technical errors to the minimum. Therefore, a better visualization allows us to recognize the surface coat, the microvillous and some mucosal functional aspects (scale off), which were previously undistinguished. There are no differences between the mucosal aspects in adult coeliac disease and childhood coelia disease.

  20. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclo...

  1. Induction of specific immunoglobulin A in the small intestine, colon-rectum, and vagina measured by a new method for collection of secretions from local mucosal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneberg, B; Kendall, D; Amerongen, H M; Apter, F M; Kraehenbuhl, J P; Neutra, M R

    1994-01-01

    In order study patterns of local antibody responses following mucosal immunization of mice via different routes, a method for collection of secretions directly from mucosal surfaces was developed. Mice were immunized on days 0, 10, 17, and 24 by administration of cholera toxin into the oral cavity, stomach, colon-rectum, or vagina. At sacrifice on day 32, absorbent wicks were placed in the oral cavity and, via an applicator tube, into the vagina and distal colon-rectum and along the entire small intestine after flushing of luminal contents. Protein was quantitatively extracted from wicks, and specific anti-cholera toxin immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Concentrations of specific IgA in secretions at various mucosal sites were dramatically influenced by the route of immunization. Oral immunization effectively induced IgA in saliva, and the intragastric route was optimal for induction of IgA in the small intestine. High levels of specific IgA appeared on the colonic-rectal mucosal surface only after rectal delivery of antigen. Oral, gastric, and rectal immunizations also produced distant responses in the vagina. Following vaginal immunization, however, neither local nor distant IgA responses were detected. These results suggest that vaccines intended for protection of colonic-rectal and vaginal mucosal surfaces might best be administered by the rectal route.

  2. Dietary L-arginine supplementation reduces Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppelmann Tal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine (ARG and nitric oxide maintain the mucosal integrity of the intestine in various intestinal disorders. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of oral ARG supplementation on intestinal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis following methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal damage in a rat. Methods Male rats were divided into four experimental groups: Control rats, CONTR-ARG rats, were treated with oral ARG given in drinking water 72 hours before and 72 hours following vehicle injection, MTX rats were treated with a single dose of methotrexate, and MTX-ARG rats were treated with oral ARG following injection of MTX. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 72 hours following MTX injection. RT-PCR was used to determine bax and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Results MTX-ARG rats demonstrated greater jejunal and ileal bowel weight, greater ileal mucosal weight, greater ileal mucosal DNA and protein levels, greater villus height in jejunum and ileum and crypt depth in ileum, compared to MTX animals. A significant decrease in enterocyte apoptosis in the ileum of MTX-ARG rats (vs MTX was accompanied by decreased bax mRNA and protein expression and increased bcl-2 protein levels. Conclusions Treatment with oral ARG prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following MTX- injury in the rat.

  3. Fecal microbiota transplantation and bacterial consortium transplantation have comparable effects on the re-establishment of mucosal barrier function in mice with intestinal dysbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a promising therapy, despite some reports of adverse side effects. Bacterial consortia transplantation (BCT for targeted restoration of the intestinal ecosystem is considered a relatively safe and simple procedure. However, no systematic research has assessed the effects of FMT and BCT on immune responses of intestinal mucosal barrier in patients. We conducted complementary studies in animal models on the effects of FMT and BCT, and provide recommendations for improving the clinical outcomes of these treatments. To establish the dysbiosis model, male BALB/c mice were treated with ceftriaxone intra-gastrically for 7 days. After that, FMT and BCT were performed on ceftriaxone-treated mice for 3 consecutive days to rebuild the intestinal ecosystem. Post-FMT and post-BCT changes of the intestinal microbial community and mucosal barrier functions were investigated and compared. Disruption of intestinal microbial homeostasis impacted the integrity of mucosal epithelial layer, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. These outcomes were accompanied by overexpression of Muc2, significant decrease of SIgA secretion, and overproduction of defensins and inflammatory cytokines. After FMT and BCT, the intestinal microbiota recovered quickly, this was associated with better reconstruction of mucosal barriers and re-establishment of immune networks compared with spontaneous recovery (SR. Although based on a short-term study, our results suggest that FMT and BCT promote the re-establishment of intestinal microbial communities in mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, and contribute to the temporal and spatial interactions between microbiota and mucosal barriers. The effects of BCT are comparable to that of FMT, especially in normalizing the intestinal levels of Muc2, SIgA, and defensins.

  4. The role of innate signaling in the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jerry M; Loonen, Linda M P; Karczewski, Jurgen M

    2010-01-01

    In the intestine innate recognition of microbes is achieved through pattern recognition receptor (PRR) families expressed in immune cells and different cell lineages of the intestinal epithelium. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) families are emerging as key mediators of immunity through their role as maturation factors of immune cells and triggers for the production of cytokines and chemokines and antimicrobial factors. At the mucosal surface chronic activation of the immune system is avoided through the epithelial production of a glycocalyx, steady-state production of antimicrobial factors as well as the selective expression and localization of PRRs. Additionally, the polarization of epithelial TLR signaling and suppression of NF-kappaB activation by luminal commensals appears to contribute to the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity. Several studies have demonstrated that TLR signaling in epithelial cells contributes to a range of homeostatic mechanisms including proliferation, wound healing, epithelial integrity, and regulation of mucosal immune functions. The intestinal epithelium appears to have uniquely evolved to maintain mucosal tolerance and immunity, and future efforts to further understand the molecular mechanisms of intestinal homeostasis may have a major impact on human health. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal immunization confers long-term protection against intragastrically established Neospora caninum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Teixeira-Coelho, Maria; Osório, Hugo; Teixeira, Luzia; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2016-12-07

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite responsible for heavy economic losses in dairy and beef cattle farms worldwide. Although vaccination is widely regarded as the preferable strategy to prevent neosporosis no commercial vaccine is currently available. We have previously shown that intranasal immunization with an N. caninum antigen extract enriched in hydrophobic proteins plus CpG adjuvant protected mice against intragastrically established neosporosis. Nevertheless, the antigen specificity as well as the long-term protective effect of this immunization strategy were not determined. Here, we show that the protective effect of this intranasal immunization procedure lasted for at least 20weeks. Protection was accompanied by long-lasting elevated levels of parasite-specific serum IgG and intestinal IgA. Moreover, spleen and mesenteric lymph node cells obtained from non-infected long-term immunized mice responded by producing interferon-γ following in vitro parasite-antigen recall. Analysis of serum IgG and intestinal IgA antibody reactivity in immunized mice identified dense granule antigen 7 (NcGRA7) and microneme associated protein 1 (NcMIC1) as immunodominant antigens respectively recognized by those antibody fractions. In summary, this work shows that a previously reported mucosal immunization strategy against N. caninum infection established through the gastrointestinal tract is effective in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunity to intestinal pathogens: lessons learned from Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Salmonella are a common source of food or water-borne infection and cause a wide range of clinical disease in human and animal hosts. Salmonella are relatively easy to culture and manipulate in a laboratory setting, and the infection of laboratory animals induces robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, immunologists have frequently turned to Salmonella infection models to expand understanding of immunity to intestinal pathogens. In this review, I summarize current knowledge of innate and adaptive immunity to Salmonella and highlight features of this response that have emerged from recent studies. These include the heterogeneity of the antigen-specific T-cell response to intestinal infection, the prominence of microbial mechanisms to impede T and B-cell responses, and the contribution of non-cognate pathways for elicitation of T-cell effector functions. Together, these different issues challenge an overly simplistic view of host-pathogen interaction during mucosal infection but also allow deeper insight into the real-world dynamic of protective immunity to intestinal pathogens. PMID:24942689

  7. Innate immune signalling at the intestinal epithelium in homeostasis and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Hornef, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium—which constitutes the interface between the enteric microbiota and host tissues—actively contributes to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis and defends against pathogenic microbes. The recognition of conserved microbial products by cytosolic or transmembrane pattern recognition receptors in epithelial cells initiates signal transduction and influences effector cell function. However, the signalling pathways, effector molecules and regulatory mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood, and the functional outcome is poorly defined. This review analyses the complex and dynamic role of intestinal epithelial innate immune recognition and signalling, on the basis of results in intestinal epithelial cell-specific transgene or gene-deficient animals. This approach identifies specific epithelial cell functions within the diverse cellular composition of the mucosal tissue, in the presence of the complex and dynamic gut microbiota. These insights have thus provided a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the intestinal epithelium in innate immunity during homeostasis and disease. PMID:22801555

  8. Clinical implications of the sugar absorption test: intestinal permeability test to assess mucosal barrier function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil, J. J.; van Elburg, R. M.; van Overbeek, F. M.; Mulder, C. J.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Heymans, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    Functional integrity as an aspect of the mucosal barrier function of the small bowel can be estimated by the intestinal permeability for macromolecules. In the first part of this paper, an overview of intestinal permeability and its measurement is given. In the second part of the paper our own

  9. Mucosal immunization using proteoliposome and cochleate structures from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B induce mucosal and systemic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Judith Del; Zayas, Caridad; Romeu, Belkis; Acevedo, Reinaldo; González, Elizabeth; Bracho, Gustavo; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Balboa, Julio; Lastre, Miriam

    2009-12-01

    Most pathogens either invade the body or establish infection in mucosal tissues and represent an enormous challenge for vaccine development by the absence of good mucosal adjuvants. A proteoliposome-derived adjuvant from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (AFPL1, Adjuvant Finlay Proteoliposome 1) and its derived cochleate form (Co, AFCo1) contain multiple pathogen-associated molecular patterns as immunopotentiators, and can also serve as delivery systems to elicit a Th1-type immune response. The present studies demonstrate the ability of AFPL1and AFCo1 to induce mucosal and systemic immune responses by different mucosal immunizations routes and significant adjuvant activity for antibody responses of both structures: a microparticle and a nanoparticle with a heterologous antigen. Therefore, we used female mice immunized by intragastric, intravaginal, intranasal or intramuscular routes with both structures alone or incorporated with ovalbumin (OVA). High levels of specific IgG antibody were detected in all sera and in vaginal washes, but specific IgA antibody in external secretions was only detected in mucosally immunized mice. Furthermore, antigen specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were all induced. AFPL1 and AFCo1 are capable of inducing IFN-gamma responses, and chemokine secretions, like MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta. However, AFCo1 is a better alternative to induce immune responses at mucosal level. Even when we use a heterologous antigen, the AFCo1 response was better than with AFPL1 in inducing mucosal and systemic immune responses. These results support the use of AFCo1 as a potent Th1 inducing adjuvant particularly suitable for mucosal immunization.

  10. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  11. Innate Immune Activation in Intestinal Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host prot...

  12. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  13. Intestinal immune maturation is accompanied by temporal changes in the composition of the microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, G; De Vries-Reilingh, G; Wehrmaker, A M; Savelkoul, H F J; Parmentier, H K; Lammers, A

    2016-11-30

    In animals establishment of the intestinal microbial ecosystem is influenced by mucosal immune functions. As mucosal immune functions dynamically change during development of juvenile layer chicken, this study focused on dynamics in the ileal microbiota composition in relation to intestinal immune development. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum and amount of bacteria coated with IgA, a hallmark of intestinal immune maturation, were analysed. The composition of the intestinal microbiota transiently changed at the age of 14-42 days compared to the microbiota composition before and after this period. This temporal deviation in microbiota composition was associated to a temporal increase in transcriptional activity of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Furthermore, before week two limited amounts of faecal bacteria were bound by IgM and from week two increasing amounts of bacteria were bound by IgA, reaching a maximal level of 70% of IgA-coated bacteria at 6 weeks of age. These data could indicate that prior to achievement of intestinal homeostasis at 6-10 weeks post hatch, activation of inflammatory pathways cause a temporal disturbance of the microbiota composition. This period of imbalance may be essential for adequate immune development and establishment of intestinal homeostasis.

  14. The Neuromodulation of the Intestinal Immune System and Its Relevance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Verheijden, Simon; Bosmans, Goele; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    One of the main tasks of the immune system is to discriminate and appropriately react to "danger" or "non-danger" signals. This is crucial in the gastrointestinal tract, where the immune system is confronted with a myriad of food antigens and symbiotic microflora that are in constant contact with the mucosa, in addition to any potential pathogens. This large number of antigens and commensal microflora, which are essential for providing vital nutrients, must be tolerated by the intestinal immune system to prevent aberrant inflammation. Hence, the balance between immune activation versus tolerance should be tightly regulated to maintain intestinal homeostasis and to prevent immune activation indiscriminately against all luminal antigens. Loss of this delicate equilibrium can lead to chronic activation of the intestinal immune response resulting in intestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In order to maintain homeostasis, the immune system has evolved diverse regulatory strategies including additional non-immunological actors able to control the immune response. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates a bidirectional link between the two systems in which the brain modulates the immune response via the detection of circulating cytokines and via direct afferent input from sensory fibers and from enteric neurons. In the current review, we will highlight the most recent findings regarding the cross-talk between the nervous system and the mucosal immune system and will discuss the potential use of these neuronal circuits and neuromediators as novel therapeutic tools to reestablish immune tolerance and treat intestinal chronic inflammation.

  15. Potential role of the intestinal microbiota of the mother in neonatal immune education

    OpenAIRE

    Donnet-Hughes, Anne; Perez, Pablo F.; Doré, Joël; Leclerc, Marion; Levenez, Florence; Benyacoub, Jalil; Serrant, Patrick; Segura-Roggero, Iris; Schiffrin, Eduardo J.

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal dendritic cells are at the heart of decision-making processes that dictate immune reactivity to intestinal microbes. They ensure tolerance to commensal bacteria and a vigorous immune response to pathogens. It has recently been demonstrated that the former involves a limited migration of bacterially loaded dendritic cells from the Peyer's patches to the mesenteric lymph nodes. During lactation, cells from gut-associated lymphoid tissue travel to the breast via the lymphatics and periph...

  16. Role of viability of probiotic strains in their persistence in the gut and in mucosal immune stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, C Maldonado; Perdigón, G

    2004-01-01

    To determine how probiotic bacteria contact with intestinal epithelial and immune cells and the conditions to induce a good mucosal immune stimulation. Lactobacillus casei was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine its interaction with the gut. We compared the influence of viable and nonviable lactic acid bacteria on the intestinal mucosal immune system (IMIS) and their persistence in the gut of mice. TEM showed whole Lact. casei adhered to the villi; the bacterial antigen was found in the cytoplasm of the enterocytes. Viable bacteria stimulated the IMIS to a greater extent than nonviable bacteria with the exception of Lact. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. For all the strains assayed at 72 h no antigenic particles were found in the intestine. Antigenic particles but not the whole bacteria can enter to epithelial cells and contact with the immune cells. Bacterial viability is a condition for a better stimulation of the IMIS. We demonstrated that only antigenic particle interact with the immune cells and their fast clearance from the gut agrees with those described for the particulate antigens. The regular consumption of probiotics should not adversely affect the host.

  17. Interleukin-22 alleviates metabolic disorders and restores mucosal immunity in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Ota, Naruhisa; Manzanillo, Paolo; Kates, Lance; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Eidenschenk, Celine; Zhang, Juan; Lesch, Justin; Lee, Wyne P; Ross, Jed; Diehl, Lauri; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Kolumam, Ganesh; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2014-10-09

    The connection between an altered gut microbiota and metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease is well established. Defects in preserving the integrity of the mucosal barriers can result in systemic endotoxaemia that contributes to chronic low-grade inflammation, which further promotes the development of metabolic syndrome. Interleukin (IL)-22 exerts essential roles in eliciting antimicrobial immunity and maintaining mucosal barrier integrity within the intestine. Here we investigate the connection between IL-22 and metabolic disorders. We find that the induction of IL-22 from innate lymphoid cells and CD4(+) T cells is impaired in obese mice under various immune challenges, especially in the colon during infection with Citrobacter rodentium. While innate lymphoid cell populations are largely intact in obese mice, the upregulation of IL-23, a cytokine upstream of IL-22, is compromised during the infection. Consequently, these mice are susceptible to C. rodentium infection, and both exogenous IL-22 and IL-23 are able to restore the mucosal host defence. Importantly, we further unveil unexpected functions of IL-22 in regulating metabolism. Mice deficient in IL-22 receptor and fed with high-fat diet are prone to developing metabolic disorders. Strikingly, administration of exogenous IL-22 in genetically obese leptin-receptor-deficient (db/db) mice and mice fed with high-fat diet reverses many of the metabolic symptoms, including hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. IL-22 shows diverse metabolic benefits, as it improves insulin sensitivity, preserves gut mucosal barrier and endocrine functions, decreases endotoxaemia and chronic inflammation, and regulates lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissues. In summary, we identify the IL-22 pathway as a novel target for therapeutic intervention in metabolic diseases.

  18. Oral immunization of a non-recombinant Lactococcus lactis surface displaying influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1 induces mucosal immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pui-Fong Jee

    Full Text Available Mucosal immunization of influenza vaccine is potentially an effective approach for the prevention and control of influenza. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the ability of oral immunization with a non-recombinant Lactococcus lactis displaying HA1/L/AcmA recombinant protein, LL-HA1/L/AcmA, to induce mucosal immune responses and to accord protection against influenza virus infection in mice. The LL-HA1/L/AcmA was orally administered into mice and the immune response was evaluated. Mice immunized with LL-HA1/L/AcmA developed detectable specific sIgA in faecal extract, small intestine wash, BAL fluid and nasal fluid. The results obtained demonstrated that oral immunization of mice with LL-HA1/L/AcmA elicited mucosal immunity in both the gastrointestinal tract and the respiratory tract. The protective efficacy of LL-HA1/L/AcmA in immunized mice against a lethal dose challenge with influenza virus was also assessed. Upon challenge, the non-immunized group of mice showed high susceptibility to influenza virus infection. In contrast, 7/8 of mice orally immunized with LL-HA1/L/AcmA survived. In conclusion, oral administration of LL-HA1/L/AcmA in mice induced mucosal immunity and most importantly, provided protection against lethal influenza virus challenge. These results highlight the potential application of L. lactis as a platform for delivery of influenza virus vaccine.

  19. TGF-β2 suppresses macrophage cytokine production and mucosal inflammatory responses in the developing intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Akhil; Kelly, David R; Nicola, Teodora; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Jain, Sunil K; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne; Athar, Mohammad; Shimamura, Masako; Bhandari, Vineet; Aprahamian, Charles; Dimmitt, Reed A; Serra, Rosa; Ohls, Robin K

    2011-01-01

    Premature neonates are predisposed to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), an idiopathic, inflammatory bowel necrosis. We investigated whether NEC occurs in the preterm intestine due to incomplete noninflammatory differentiation of intestinal macrophages, which increases the risk of a severe mucosal inflammatory response to bacterial products. We compared inflammatory properties of human/murine fetal, neonatal, and adult intestinal macrophages. To investigate gut-specific macrophage differentiation, we next treated monocyte-derived macrophages with conditioned media from explanted human fetal and adult intestinal tissues. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression and bioactivity were measured in fetal/adult intestine and in NEC. Finally, we used wild-type and transgenic mice to investigate the effects of deficient TGF-β signaling on NEC-like inflammatory mucosal injury. Intestinal macrophages in the human preterm intestine (fetus/premature neonate), but not in full-term neonates and adults, expressed inflammatory cytokines. Macrophage cytokine production was suppressed in the developing intestine by TGF-β, particularly the TGF-β(2) isoform. NEC was associated with decreased tissue expression of TGF-β(2) and decreased TGF-β bioactivity. In mice, disruption of TGF-β signaling worsened NEC-like inflammatory mucosal injury, whereas enteral supplementation with recombinant TGF-β(2) was protective. Intestinal macrophages progressively acquire a noninflammatory profile during gestational development. TGF-β, particularly the TGF-β(2) isoform, suppresses macrophage inflammatory responses in the developing intestine and protects against inflammatory mucosal injury. Enterally administered TGF-β(2) protected mice from experimental NEC-like injury. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glycan recognition at the interface of the intestinal immune system: target for immune modulation via dietary components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kivit, Sander; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E M

    2011-09-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly exposed to the luminal content, which includes micro-organisms and dietary components. Prebiotic non-digestible oligosaccharides may be supplemented to the diet to exert modulation of immune responses in the intestine. Short chain galacto- and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS), functionally mimicking oligosaccharides present in human milk, have been reported to reduce the development of allergy through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and immune system. Nonetheless, the underlying working mechanisms of scGOS/lcFOS are unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells lining the mucosa are known to express carbohydrate (glycan)-binding receptors that may be involved in modulation of the mucosal immune response. This review aims to provide an overview of glycan-binding receptors, in particular galectins, which are expressed by intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells. In addition, their involvement in health and disease will be addressed, especially in food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease, diseases originating from the gastro-intestinal tract. Insight in the recognition of glycans in the intestinal tract may open new avenues for the treatment of intestinal inflammatory diseases by either nutritional concepts or pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct effect of infliximab on intestinal mucosa sustains mucosal healing: exploring new mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, Valentina; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Boninsegna, Alma; Bibbò, Stefano; Poscia, Andrea; Alfieri, Sergio; Rosa, Fausto; Amato, Arianna; Cammarota, Giovanni; Papa, Alfredo; Sgambato, Alessandro; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Infliximab is effective in inflammatory bowel disease through several mechanisms, possibly acting at the mucosal level. To assess the role of infliximab on intestinal mucosa and whether it contributes to mucosal healing. Human colonic mucosal biopsies were incubated with or without infliximab. Cultured biopsies were evaluated for histological staining, CD68, CD3, E-cadherin and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) expression, and apoptosis. A scratch assay and MTT assay were performed with Caco2 cells in the presence of infliximab and/or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or treated with supernatants obtained from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human intestinal fibroblasts treated with TNF-α and infliximab alone or in association. Infliximab-treated biopsies displayed a better histological appearance, reduced inflammation with an increase of E-cadherin, phospho-ERK and apoptosis. Supernatants showed lower TNF-α, IL-17, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration, with an increase in fibroblast-growth-factor. Motility at scratch assay and proliferation at MTT assay of Caco2 cells displayed differential modulation by TNF-α and infliximab, directly or through supernatants of human intestinal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to them. Infliximab contributes to the mucosal healing process by acting directly at an intestinal mucosal level; infliximab indirectly affects epithelial cell migration and proliferation by acting on both fibroblasts and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Interleukin-22-producing innate immune cells: new players in mucosal immunity and tissue repair?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vivier, Eric; Spits, Hergen; Cupedo, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal tissues, lying at the interface with the external environment, are constantly challenged by microbial, physical and chemical assaults. To provide the necessary immune defence to such challenges, lymph nodes and Peyer's patches are formed in utero in response to inductive signals from

  3. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

  4. Fungal dysbiosis: immunity and interactions at mucosal barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Iliyan D; Leonardi, Irina

    2017-10-01

    Fungi and mammals share a co-evolutionary history and are involved in a complex web of interactions. Studies focused on commensal bacteria suggest that pathological changes in the microbiota, historically known as dysbiosis, are at the root of many inflammatory diseases of non-infectious origin. However, the importance of dysbiosis in the fungal community - the mycobiota - was only recently acknowledged to have a pathological role, as novel findings have suggested that mycobiota disruption can have detrimental effects on host immunity. Fungal dysbiosis and homeostasis are dynamic processes that are probably more common than actual fungal infections, and therefore constantly shape the immune response. In this Review, we summarize specific mycobiota patterns that are associated with fungal dysbiosis, and discuss how mucosal immunity has evolved to distinguish fungal infections from dysbiosis and how it responds to these different conditions. We propose that gut microbiota dysbiosis is a collective feature of complex interactions between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities that can affect immunity and that can influence health and disease.

  5. Assessment of intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation employing nuclear methods in murine mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Rafaela M.; Takenaka, Isabella K.T.M.; Barros, Patricia A.V.; Moura, Livia P.; Contarini, Sara M.L.; Amorim, Juliana M.; Castilho, Raquel O.; Leite, Camila M.A.; Cardoso, Valbert N.; Diniz, Simone Odilia F. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, Mg (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Mucositis affects approximately 80% of patients who receive chemotherapy combinations. The lesions are painful, restrict food intake and make patients more susceptible to systemic infections. Some agents and strategies are being studied for controlling mucositis, none of them is used in clinical practice. In Minas Gerais, many studies have addressed the popular use of the plant Arrabidaea chica in the form of tea, to treat intestinal cramps and diarrhea, the main symptoms of mucositis. Objective: To evaluate the potential of Arrabidaea chica extract in the management of the integrity of the intestinal mucosa, using the experimental model of gut mucositis induced by 5-Fluorouracila (5-FU). Methods: The UFMG Ethics Committee for Animal Experimentation (CETEA/UFMG) approved this study (nº 411/2015). Male BALB/c mice between 6-8 weeks of age were randomly divided into four groups (n=9) as follows: 1. Control (CTL) - oral administration of saline solution (10 days); 2. A. chica (AC) - oral administration of A. chica extract (10 days); 3. Mucositis (MUC) - underwent mucositis (5-FU) (10 days); 4. Mucositis + A. chica (MUC+ AC) - underwent mucositis and received oral administration of A. chica extract (10 days). At the 7{sup th} day, mice in the MUC and MUC + AC groups received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection containing 300 mg/kg 5-FU, whereas the animals of the CTL and AC groups received a saline IP injection. After 72 hours (10{sup th} experimental day), intestinal permeability was determined by measuring the radioactivity diffusion in the blood after oral administration of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) and bacterial translocation was determined by measuring the radioactivity diffusion in the blood after oral administration of E. coli labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc). After 4 hours, the mice were euthanized and assessed for intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and

  6. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (Pprobiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (Pprobiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future. PMID:26406888

  7. Rorγt+ innate lymphoid cells in intestinal homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Domingo, Patricia; Cupedo, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) combine innate and adaptive immune functions and are part of the first line of defense against mucosal infections. ILC are set apart from adaptive lymphocytes by their independence on RAG genes and the resulting absence of specific antigen receptors. In this review, we will discuss the biology and function of intestinal ILC that express the nuclear hormone receptor Rorγt (encoded by the Rorc gene) and highlight their role in intestinal homeostasis and immunity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Crosstalk between the intestinal microbiota and the innate immune system in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Dagenais, Maryse; Saleh, Maya

    2013-09-01

    : Inflammatory bowel diseases are a set of complex and chronic disorders that arise in genetically predisposed individuals due to a lack of tolerance to the gut microflora. Although the intestinal microbiota is required for the proper development of the host and the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, its dysbiosis is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases pathogenesis. In this review, we focus the discussion on the crosstalk between the innate immune system and the microbiota. We examine new findings from genetic and functional studies investigating the critical role of the intestinal epithelial cell layer and the processes that maintain its integrity in health and disease. We further explore the mechanisms of the mucosal innate immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, and innate-like lymphocytes in mediating immunological tolerance at the steady state or pathogenic inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. Defensin carriers for better mucosal immunity in the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, Oren; Chapnik, Nava; Nussinovitch, Amos

    2010-06-30

    The innate immunity utilizes a battery of broad-spectrum antibacterial cationic polypeptides named defensins. In humans, defensins are the first line of defense against pathogens, and their expression has been implicated in several diseases. In addition to exerting direct antimicrobial effects, defensins facilitate and amplify innate and adaptive immune responses. HD-5 is a polypeptide that plays a pivotal role in combating bacteria in the digestive system. Our results show that HD-5 can be entrapped within alginate carriers and strengthen their structure without changing their brittleness. In addition, carrier-entrapped HD-5 is released when incubated in buffer and/or stomach-simulating solution and still retains its activity after the release. This incubation also led to a decrease in carrier strength as well as an increase in their brittleness. Nevertheless the carriers did not disintegrate and remained intact throughout the diffusion process. The release of the defensin exhibited a bimodal behavior, suggesting that it was found both in a cross-linked and non-cross-linked form within the carrier. These results indicate that defensins encapsulated within alginate carriers could possibly be used for better mucosal immunity in the digestive system. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ghrelin improves intestinal mucosal atrophy during parenteral nutrition: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Waka; Kaji, Tatsuru; Onishi, Shun; Nakame, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Koji; Kawano, Takafumi; Mukai, Motoi; Souda, Masakazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Tanimoto, Akihide; Ieiri, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has been reported to be associated with mucosal atrophy of the small intestine. Ghrelin has hormonal, orexigenic, and metabolic activities. We investigated whether ghrelin improved intestinal mucosal atrophy using a TPN-supported rat model. Rats underwent jugular vein catheterization and were divided into four groups: TPN alone (TPN), TPN plus low-dose ghrelin (TPNLG), TPN plus high-dose ghrelin (TPNHG), and oral feeding with normal chow (OF). Ghrelin was administered continuously at dosages of 10 or 50 μg/kg/day. On day 6 rats were euthanized, and the small intestine was harvested and divided into the jejunum and ileum. Then the villus height (VH) and crypt depth (CD) were evaluated. The jejunal and ileal VH and CD in the TPN group were significantly decreased compared with those in the OF group. TPNHG improved only VH of the jejunum. TPNLG improved VH and CD of the jejunum and CD of the ileum. The improvement of TPNLG was significantly stronger than that in CD of the jejunum and ileum. TPN was more strongly associated with mucosal atrophy in the jejunum than in the ileum. Low-dose intravenous administration of ghrelin improved TPN-associated intestinal mucosal atrophy more effectively than high-dose administration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Effect of dietary fat on the distribution of mucosal mass and cell proliferation along the small intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, A P; Thompson, R P

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated how substitution of long chain triglycerides for glucose in a mixed diet affects the overall small intestinal mucosal mass and the distribution of mucosal mass and cell proliferation along the small intestine. Four groups of eight female Wistar rats (180-200 g) were isocalorically fed mixed diets containing the essential fatty acid rich oil Efamol substituted for glucose at concentrations of 1.2%, 10%, 25%, and 50% total calories for 20 to 23 days. The small intestine ...

  12. Analysis of the Human Mucosal Response to Cholera Reveals Sustained Activation of Innate Immune Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Daniel L; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Genereux, Diane P; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Ellis, Crystal N; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Alam, Nur Haq; Paul, Anik; Hossain, Lazina; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Charles, Richelle C; Weil, Ana A; LaRocque, Regina C; Calderwood, Stephen B; Ryan, Edward T; Karlsson, Elinor K; Qadri, Firdausi; Harris, Jason B

    2018-02-01

    To better understand the innate immune response to Vibrio cholerae infection, we tracked gene expression in the duodenal mucosa of 11 Bangladeshi adults with cholera, using biopsy specimens obtained immediately after rehydration and 30 and 180 days later. We identified differentially expressed genes and performed an analysis to predict differentially regulated pathways and upstream regulators. During acute cholera, there was a broad increase in the expression of genes associated with innate immunity, including activation of the NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signaling pathways, which, unexpectedly, persisted even 30 days after infection. Focusing on early differences in gene expression, we identified 37 genes that were differentially expressed on days 2 and 30 across the 11 participants. These genes included the endosomal Toll-like receptor gene TLR8 , which was expressed in lamina propria cells. Underscoring a potential role for endosomal TLR-mediated signaling in vivo , our pathway analysis found that interferon regulatory factor 7 and beta 1 and alpha 2 interferons were among the top upstream regulators activated during cholera. Among the innate immune effectors, we found that the gene for DUOX2, an NADPH oxidase involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, was upregulated in intestinal epithelial cells during cholera. Notably, the observed increases in DUOX2 and TLR8 expression were also modeled in vitro when Caco-2 or THP-1 cells, respectively, were stimulated with live V. cholerae but not with heat-killed organisms or cholera toxin alone. These previously unidentified features of the innate immune response to V. cholerae extend our understanding of the mucosal immune signaling pathways and effectors activated in vivo following cholera. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway on methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Francisco JWS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methotrexate treatment has been associated to intestinal epithelial damage. Studies have suggested an important role of nitric oxide in such injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO, specifically iNOS on the pathogenesis of methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal mucositis. Methods Intestinal mucositis was carried out by three subcutaneous MTX injections (2.5 mg/kg in Wistar rats and in inducible nitric oxide synthase knock-out (iNOS-/- and wild-type (iNOS+/+ mice. Rats were treated intraperitoneally with the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 mg/Kg or L-NAME (20 mg/Kg, one hour before MTX injection and daily until sacrifice, on the fifth day. The jejunum was harvested to investigate the expression of Ki67, iNOS and nitrotyrosine by immunohistochemistry and cell death by TUNEL. The neutrophil activity by myeloperoxidase (MPO assay was performed in the three small intestine segments. Results AG and L-NAME significantly reduced villus and crypt damages, inflammatory alterations, cell death, MPO activity, and nitrotyrosine immunostaining due to MTX challenge. The treatment with AG, but not L-NAME, prevented the inhibitory effect of MTX on cell proliferation. MTX induced increased expression of iNOS detected by immunohistochemistry. MTX did not cause significant inflammation in the iNOS-/- mice. Conclusion These results suggest an important role of NO, via activation of iNOS, in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucositis.

  14. Mucosal immunity and B cells in teleosts: effect of vaccination and stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eParra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against those threats and they act as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also function as immunologically active tissues. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues have been described in fish, which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills and nose. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as its regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues is still not well known in most of fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs are one of the key players in the immune response after vaccination. Recent findings about IgT in trout have delimited the compartmentalization of immune response in systemic and mucosal. The existence of IgT as a specialized mucosa Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring mucosal specific responses after vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most of the fish species. Vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, the interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review we will summarized the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccines on B cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a small number of studies have been published regarding mucosal stress and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes.

  15. Saireito (TJ-114, a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, reduces 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice by inhibiting cytokine-mediated apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Kato

    Full Text Available Clinical chemotherapy frequently causes intestinal mucositis as a side effect, which is accompanied by severe diarrhea. We recently showed that the cytokine-mediated apoptotic pathway might be important for the development of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Saireito, the traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo medicine, is widely used to treat diarrhea and various inflammatory diseases in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the effect of saireito on 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice, especially in relation to apoptosis in the intestinal crypt. Male C57BL/6 mice were given 5-FU (50 mg/kg, i.p. once daily for 6 days. Intestinal mucositis was evaluated histochemically. Saireito (100-1000 mg/kg was administered p.o. twice daily for 6 days. Repeated 5-FU treatment caused severe intestinal mucositis including morphological damage, which was accompanied by body weight loss and diarrhea. Daily administration of saireito reduced the severity of intestinal mucositis in a dose-dependent manner. Body weight loss and diarrhea during 5-FU treatment were also significantly attenuated by saireito administration. The number of apoptotic and caspase-3-activated cells in the intestinal crypt was increased, and was accompanied by up-regulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β mRNA within 24 h of the first 5-FU injection. However, all of these measures were significantly lower after saireito administration. These results suggest that saireito attenuates 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. This action may come from the reduction of apoptosis in the intestinal crypt via suppression of the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, saireito may be clinically useful for the prevention of intestinal mucositis during cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Effects of positive acceleration exposure on intestinal mucosal barrier and sIgA level in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie QIU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effect of positive acceleration (+Gz on immune barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats. Methods  Thirty two male SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (8 each: Group A (control group, Group B (+5Gz group, Group C (+10Gz group and Group D (repeated exposure group. The animal centrifuge was used to simulate the exposure of acceleration. Group A was no disposed. +5Gz group and +10Gz group were subjected to centrifugal force of +5Gz and +10Gz respectively for 5min; repeated exposure group was continuously exposed to 1.5min under +5Gz value, 2min under +10Gz value and 1.5min under +5Gz. All groups were exposed to the respective acceleration once daily for 5 days. The damage of intestinal mucosa was observed by light microscopy after the experiment was finished, and the content of sIgA in intestinal mucosa was detected by ELISA. Results  Except for group A, intestinal mucosal injury was observed in the other three groups. Group D was shown as the most serious one, followed by group C and group B. Compared with group A, the level of sIgA was significantly lower in other three groups (P<0.05. The level of sIgA in group C was significantly lower than that in group B (P<0.05 and higher than that in group D (P<0.05. Conclusion  +Gz exposure can result in intestinal injury and weaken the function of immune barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.14

  17. Microvilli of the intestinal mucosal cells of Rousettus aegyptiacus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microvilli in the small intestine of the bat are very long and slender when compared with those in the rat. This morphology results in the absorption surface per unit area in the bat being three times greater than in the rat. No difference could be observed between the thickness of the plasma membrane of the microvilli and ...

  18. A polyphenol-enriched diet and Ascaris suum infection modulate mucosal immune responses and gut microbiota composition in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew R.; Krych, Lukasz; Ahmad, Hajar Fauzan

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols are a class of bioactive plant secondary metabolites that are thought to have beneficial effects on gut health, such as modulation of mucosal immune and inflammatory responses and regulation of parasite burdens. Here, we examined the interactions between a polyphenol-rich diet....... suum for 14 days to assess parasite establishment, acquisition of local and systemic immune responses and effects on the gut microbiome. Despite in vitro anthelmintic activity of GP-extracts, numbers of parasite larvae in the intestine were not altered by GP-supplementation. However, the bioactive diet...... the subsequent host response to helminth infection. Our results suggest an influence of diet on immune function which may potentially be exploited to enhance immunity to helminths....

  19. Intestinal glutathione: determinant of mucosal peroxide transport, metabolism, and oxidative susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aw, Tak Yee

    2005-01-01

    The intestine is a primary site of nutrient absorption and a critical defense barrier against dietary-derived mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidants. Accumulation of oxidants like peroxidized lipids in the gut lumen can contribute to impairment of mucosal metabolic pathways, enterocyte dysfunction independent of cell injury, and development of gut pathologies, such as inflammation and cancer. Despite this recognition, we know little of the pathways of intestinal transport, metabolism, and luminal disposition of dietary peroxides in vivo or of the underlying mechanisms of lipid peroxide-induced genesis of intestinal disease processes. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the determinants of intestinal absorption and metabolism of peroxidized lipids. I will review experimental evidence from our laboratory and others (Table 1) supporting the pivotal role that glutathione (GSH) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) play in mucosal transport and metabolism of lipid hydroperoxides and how reductant availability can be compromised under chronic stress such as hypoxia, and the influence of GSH on oxidative susceptibility, and redox contribution to genesis of gut disorders. The discussion is pertinent to understanding dietary lipid peroxides and GSH redox balance in intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the significance of luminal GSH in preserving the integrity of the intestinal epithelium

  20. Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid-enriched Butter After 24 hours of Intestinal Mucositis Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Patrícia Aparecida Vieira de; Generoso, Simone de Vasconcelos; Andrade, Maria Emília Rabelo; da Gama, Marco Antonio Sundfeld; Lopes, Fernando Cesar Ferraz; de Sales E Souza, Éricka Lorenna; Martins, Flaviano Dos Santos; Miranda, Sued Eustáquio Mendes; Fernandes, Simone Odília Antunes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2017-01-01

    Mucositis is the most common side effect due to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It refers to the inflammation of intestinal mucous membranes, and it is associated with complications such as diarrhea, weight loss, and increased intestinal permeability (IP). This study was designed to evaluate the effect of diet containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched butter on intestinal damage and inflammatory response after 24 h of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced mucositis. Mice were divided into four groups: CTL; CLA; 5-FU, and CLA 5-FU, and they were fed for 31 days. On the 30th experimental day, mucositis was induced by unique injection of 300 mg/kg of 5-FU. After 24 h (31st experimental day), IP was evaluated; ileum and fecal material were collected to determine cytokine level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). The 5-FU group showed an increase in IP and MPO activity (CTL vs. 5-FU: P butter exacerbating the 5-FU-induced intestinal damage. Safety concerns regarding the use of CLA require further investigation.

  1. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, L. E. M.; Schreurs, C. C. H. M.; Kroes, H.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Deventer, S. J. H.; van Tol, E. A. F.

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co

  2. Regulation of Mucosal Immune Responses – The Missing Link in IBD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles O Elson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD remains unknown, a major working hypothesis is that it represents a dysregulated immune response to common enteric bacterial antigens. Until recently there has been a relative dearth of experimental models to study this hypothesis. However, exciting developments in experimental models of colitis, including spontaneous, transgenic and knockout mice, now allow this and other hypotheses to be tested. The regulation of mucosal immune responses is not well understood in the normal animal, much less in those with chronic intestinal inflammation. Clearly the CD4 Th1 and Th2 pathways are important in the host response to microbial pathogens, and recent data indicate that the intestinal mucosa seems to be a site of preferential Th2 responses toward exogenous antigens. Deletion of certain cytokine genes involved in maintaining this Th1/Th2 balance (interleukin [IL]-2, IL-10 resulted in colitis, although deletion of others (IL-4, interferon-gamma that are also involved did not. Whether these cytokine gene deletions cause a dysregulation of the mucosal immune response has yet to be shown. However, the importance of regulation can be demonstrated in a model in which a normal CD4+ T cell subset (CD45Rbhigh is transferred into syngeneic severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome recipients. This results in a striking colitis over the ensuing weeks with chronic diarrhea and wasting of the animals. If the reciprocal CD4+ subset (CD45Rblow is co-transferred or if whole CD4+ T cells are transferred no colitis ensues. Therefore, T cells capable of causing colitis are present in normal animals but are prevented from doing so by immunoregulatory mechanisms. The antigens that drive the colitis in several of these models (IL-2 knockout mouse, human leukocyte antigen B27/β2M transgenic rat appear to be those of the normal enteric bacterial flora because germ-free animals do not get the disease. Spontaneously

  3. Mucosal immune response in broilers following vaccination with inactivated influenza and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal and systemic immunity were observed in broilers vaccinated with mannosylated chitosan adjuvated (MCA) inactivated A/Turkey/Virginia/158512/2002 (H7N2) and administered with and without recombinant Bacillus subtilis to elicit heterologous influenza strain protection. Previously, mucosal immu...

  4. Activation-Induced TIM-4 Expression Identifies Differential Responsiveness of Intestinal CD103+ CD11b+ Dendritic Cells to a Mucosal Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry L Hilligan

    Full Text Available Macrophage and dendritic cell (DC populations residing in the intestinal lamina propria (LP are highly heterogeneous and have disparate yet collaborative roles in the promotion of adaptive immune responses towards intestinal antigen. Under steady-state conditions, macrophages are efficient at acquiring antigen but are non-migratory. In comparison, intestinal DC are inefficient at antigen uptake but migrate to the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN where they present antigen to T cells. Whether such distinction in the roles of DC and macrophages in the uptake and transport of antigen is maintained under immunostimulatory conditions is less clear. Here we show that the scavenger and phosphatidylserine receptor T cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin (TIM-4 is expressed by the majority of LP macrophages at steady-state, whereas DC are TIM-4 negative. Oral treatment with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT induces expression of TIM-4 on a proportion of CD103+ CD11b+ DC in the LP. TIM-4+ DC selectively express high levels of co-stimulatory molecules after CT treatment and are detected in the mLN a short time after appearing in the LP. Importantly, intestinal macrophages and DC expressing TIM-4 are more efficient than their TIM-4 negative counterparts at taking up apoptotic cells and soluble antigen ex vivo. Taken together, our results show that CT induces phenotypic changes to migratory intestinal DC that may impact their ability to take up local antigens and in turn promote the priming of mucosal immunity.

  5. Developmental Profiles of Mucosal Immunity in Pre-school Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ewing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of attending pre-school on mucosal immunity. Children 3.5 to 5 years of age who attended pre-school were observed for a 10 month period. Demographic information was collected on previous childcare experiences, the home environment and clinical information relating to the child and the family. A daily illness log was kept for each child. A multivariate longitudinal analysis of the relation between immunoglobulins in saliva and age, gender, childcare experience, pre-school exposure, number of siblings, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, atopy and hospitalisation was conducted. There was a positive association of higher IgA levels with the winter season and with children being older than 4 years (<.001, having attended childcare prior to commencing pre-school (<.05, and having been exposed to ETS at home (<.05. Lower IgA levels were associated with being atopic (<.05. Higher IgG levels were associated with exposure to ETS (<.001, while lower levels were associated to having atopy. Higher IgM levels were associated with previous childcare experience (<.01 whilst having been hospitalised was associated with having low salivary IgM levels (<.01. Lagged analyses demonstrated that immunological parameters were affected by the number of respiratory infections in the preceding 2 months.

  6. Immunization of Mice with Lactobacillus casei Expressing a Beta-Intimin Fragment Reduces Intestinal Colonization by Citrobacter rodentium ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, P. C. D.; da Silva, J. B.; Piazza, R. M. F.; Eckmann, L.; Ho, P. L.; Oliveira, M. L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in children from developing countries. Intimate adhesion of the bacteria to intestinal cells occurs via binding of the adhesin intimin to the TIR receptor exposed on cell surfaces. Here, Lactobacillus casei expressing a fragment of β-intimin (L. casei-Intcv) was tested as mucosal vaccines in mice against intestinal colonization with the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Oral or sublingual immunization of C57BL/6 mice ...

  7. Mucosal Immunity and B Cells in Teleosts: Effect of Vaccination and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, David; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe E; Tort, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against these threats, acting as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also functioning as an active immune tissue. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues (MALTs), which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills, and nose, have been described in fish. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as their regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues, are still not well known in most fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs) are key players in the immune response that takes place in those MALTs. The existence of IgT as a mucosal specialized Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring specific responses after infection or vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most fish species. The vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review, we will summarize the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and Igs in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccination on B-cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a limited number of studies have been published regarding stress in mucosa and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes.

  8. VSL#3 probiotic upregulates intestinal mucosal alkaline sphingomyelinase and reduces inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Isaac; Madsen, Karen L; Tejpar, Qassim; Sydora, Beate C; Sherbaniuk, Richard; Cinque, Benedetta; Di Marzio, Luisa; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Desimone, Claudio; Fedorak, Richard N

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alkaline sphingomyelinase, an enzyme found exclusively in bile and the intestinal brush border, hydrolyzes sphingomyelin into ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, thereby inducing epithelial apoptosis. Reduced levels of alkaline sphingomyelinase have been found in premalignant and malignant intestinal epithelia and in ulcerative colitis tissue. Probiotic bacteria can be a source of sphingomyelinase. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of VSL#3 probiotic therapy on mucosal levels of alkaline sphingomyelinase, both in a mouse model of colitis and in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Interleukin-10 gene-deficient (IL10KO) and wild type control mice were treated with VSL#3 (109 colony-forming units per day) for three weeks, after which alkaline sphingomyelinase activity was measured in ileal and colonic tissue. As well, 15 patients with ulcerative colitis were treated with VSL#3 (900 billion bacteria two times per day for five weeks). Alkaline sphingomyelinase activity was measured through biopsies and comparison of ulcerative colitis disease activity index scores obtained before and after treatment. RESULTS: Lowered alkaline sphingomyelinase levels were seen in the colon (P=0.02) and ileum (P=0.04) of IL10KO mice, as compared with controls. Treatment of these mice with VSL#3 resulted in upregulation of mucosal alkaline sphingomyelinase activity in both the colon (P=0.04) and the ileum (P=0.01). VSL#3 treatment of human patients who had ulcerative colitis decreased mean (± SEM) ulcerative colitis disease activity index scores from 5.3±1.8946 to 0.70±0.34 (P=0.02) and increased mucosal alkaline sphingomyelinase activity. CONCLUSION: Mucosal alkaline sphingomyelinase activity is reduced in the intestine of IL10KO mice with colitis and in humans with ulcerative colitis. VSL#3 probiotic therapy upregulates mucosal alkaline sphingomyelinase activity. PMID:18354751

  9. Use of atropine to reduce mucosal eversion during intestinal resection and anastomosis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrodnia, Marta; Hauptman, Joe; Walshaw, Richard

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether atropine altered the degree of mucosal eversion during jejunal resection and anastomosis in the dog. Part I: Prospective, blinded, randomized, controlled study using a therapeutic dose (0.04 mg/kg systemic) of atropine. Part II: Prospective, unblinded, assigned, controlled study using a pharmacologic (0.04 mg/kg local arterial) dose of atropine. Part I: Twenty-two young adult female Beagle dogs used during a nonsurvival third-year veterinary student surgical laboratory (small intestinal resection and anastomosis). Part II: Ten young adult female Beagle dogs used immediately after completion of a nonsurvival third-year veterinary student orthopedic surgical laboratory. Part I: Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either atropine (0.04 mg/kg), or an equal volume of saline, given intramuscularly (premedication) and again intravenously prior to intestinal resection. Part II: In each dog, atropine (0.04 mg/kg)/saline was alternately given in the proximal/distal jejunum. Part I: There was no clinically or statistically significant difference between systemic atropine and saline solution on the degree of jejunal mucosal eversion after resection. Part II: There was a statistically significant decrease in jejunal mucosal eversion with atropine compared with saline solution when injected into a local jejunal artery. Systemic atropine (0.04 mg/kg) does not alter the degree of jejunal mucosal eversion during resection and anastomosis. Jejunal intraarterial atropine (0.04 mg/kg) reduced jejunal mucosal eversion during resection and anastomosis. The clinical usefulness and consequences of jejunal arterial atropine administration to reduce mucosal eversion remain to be determined. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  10. Enteric glia promote intestinal mucosal healing via activation of focal adhesion kinase and release of proEGF

    OpenAIRE

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Chevalier, Julien; Mahé, Maxime M.; Wedel, Thilo; Urvil, Petri; Derkinderen, Pascal; Savidge, Tor; Neunlist, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing of the gastrointestinal mucosa is essential for the maintenance of gut homeostasis and integrity. Enteric glial cells play a major role in regulating intestinal barrier function, but their role in mucosal barrier repair remains unknown. The impact of conditional ablation of enteric glia on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mucosal damage and on healing of diclofenac-induced mucosal ulcerations was evaluated in vivo in GFAP-HSVtk transgenic mice. A mechanically induced model o...

  11. Role of toll like receptors in irritable bowel syndrome: differential mucosal immune activation according to the disease subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Belmonte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder whose pathogenesis is not completely understood. Its high prevalence and the considerable effects on quality of life make IBS a disease with high social cost. Recent studies suggest that low grade mucosal immune activation, increased intestinal permeability and the altered host-microbiota interactions that modulate innate immune response, contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS. However, the understanding of the precise molecular pathophysiology remains largely unknown. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: In this study our objective was to evaluate the TLR expression as a key player in the innate immune response, in the colonic mucosa of IBS patients classified into the three main subtypes (with constipation, with diarrhea or mixed. TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR while TLRs protein expression in intestinal epithelial cells was specifically assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. Mucosal inflammatory cytokine production was investigated by the multiplex technology. Here we report that the IBS-Mixed subgroup displayed a significant up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 in the colonic mucosa. Furthermore, these expressions were localized in the epithelial cells, opening new perspectives for a potential role of epithelial cells in host-immune interactions in IBS. In addition, the increased TLR expression in IBS-M patients elicited intracellular signaling pathways resulting in increased expression of the mucosal proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL1β. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide the first evidence of differential expression of TLR in IBS patients according to the disease subtype. These results offer further support that microflora plays a central role in the complex pathophysiology of IBS providing novel pharmacological targets for this chronic gastrointestinal disorder according to bowel habits.

  12. Cellular and mucosal immune reactions to mental and cold stress: Associations with gender and cardiovascular reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, G.; Carroll, D.; Ring, C.; Drayson, M.

    2002-01-01

    To examine gender differences in immune reactions to stress and relationships between immune and cardiovascular reactivity, measures of cellular and mucosal immunity and cardiovascular activity were recorded in 77 men and 78 women at rest and in response to active (mental arithmetic) and passive

  13. Mucosal Immunity and B Cells in Teleosts: Effect of Vaccination and Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, David; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe E.; Tort, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against those threats and they act as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also function as immunologically active tissues. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues have been described in fish, which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills and nose. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as its regulation and the factors that influe...

  14. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  15. Neutrophil interactions with epithelial-expressed ICAM-1 enhances intestinal mucosal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, J C; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, A C; Weber, D A; Neish, A S; Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A

    2016-09-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. Although epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 has an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing.

  16. Regulation of Intestinal Homeostasis by Innate Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple...

  17. PPS nanoparticles as versatile delivery system to induce systemic and broad mucosal immunity after intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Armando; van der Vlies, André J; Martino, Mikael M; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Simeoni, Eleonora

    2011-01-17

    Degradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs, 50 nm) based on polypropylene sulfide (PPS) were conjugated to thiolated antigen and adjuvant proteins by reversible disulfide bonds and evaluated in mucosal vaccination. Ovalbumin was used as a model antigen, and antigen-conjugated NPs were administered intranasally in the mouse. We show penetration of nasal mucosae, transit via M cells, and uptake by antigen-presenting cells in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Ovalbumin-conjugated NPs induced cytotoxic T lymphocytic responses in lung and spleen tissues, as well as humoral response in mucosal airways. Co-conjugation of the TLR5 ligand flagellin further enhanced humoral responses in the airways as well as in the distant vaginal and rectal mucosal compartments and induced cellular immune responses with a Th1 bias, in contrast with free flagellin. The PPS NP platform thus appears interesting as a platform for intranasally-administered mucosal vaccination for inducing broad mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Systemic and mucosal immune responses to rhesus rotavirus vaccine MMU 18006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losonsky, G A; Rennels, M B; Lim, Y; Krall, G; Kapikian, A Z; Levine, M M

    1988-06-01

    Thirty-four children 3 to 20 months of age ingested either 10(5), 10(4) or 10(3) plaque-forming units of rhesus rotavirus vaccine, MMU 18006, which possesses human rotavirus serotype 3 neutralization antigen. Immune responses were evaluated by a plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assay to rotavirus serotypes 1, 2 and 3 and by a serum IgG, IgM and IgA and fecal IgA class-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Homotypic PRN antibody seroconversions to serotype 3 rotavirus were detected in 31 of 34 children (91%), whereas rises in heterotypic PRN antibody to human rotavirus serotypes 1 or 2 were found in only 3 of 21 (14%) (p less than 0.00000001). Thirty of the 34 vaccinated children (88%) had at least one class of rotavirus-specific serum antibody detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A rotavirus-specific IgA coproantibody response was seen in 11 of 16 children (69%) following vaccination. Two children who had no evidence of PRN antibody to serotype 3 after vaccination had evidence of both a fecal and a serum rotavirus-specific IgA response, suggesting that in these children the response to the vaccine was primarily mucosal. These data show that orally administered rhesus rotavirus vaccine MMU 18006 elicits local intestinal immunity but produces primarily a homotypic serum neutralization response as measured by plaque reduction neutralization assays.

  20. Effect of Polysaccharides from on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier of Lipopolysaccharide Challenged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of polysaccharide from Acanthopanax senticosus (ASPS in preventing lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced intestinal injury, 18 mice (at 5 wk of age were assigned to three groups with 6 replicates of one mouse each. Mice were administrated by oral gavage with or without ASPS (300 mg/kg body weight for 14 days and were injected with saline or LPS at 15 days. Intestinal samples were collected at 4 h post-challenge. The results showed that ASPS ameliorated LPS-induced deterioration of digestive ability of LPS-challenged mice, indicated by an increase in intestinal lactase activity (45%, p<0.05, and the intestinal morphology, as proved by improved villus height (20.84%, p<0.05 and villus height:crypt depth ratio (42%, p<0.05, and lower crypt depth in jejunum (15.55%, p<0.05, as well as enhanced intestinal tight junction proteins expression involving occludin-1 (71.43%, p<0.05. ASPS also prevented intestinal inflammation response, supported by decrease in intestinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (22.28%, p<0.05 and heat shock protein (HSP70 (77.42%, p<0.05. In addition, intestinal mucus layers were also improved by ASPS, as indicated by the increase in number of goblet cells (24.89%, p<0.05 and intestinal trefoil peptide (17.75%, p<0.05. Finally, ASPS facilitated mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor (100%, p<0.05 and its receptor (200%, p<0.05 gene. These results indicate that ASPS can prevent intestinal mucosal barrier injury under inflammatory conditions, which may be associated with up-regulating gene mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor and its receptor.

  1. Fish innate immunity against intestinal helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, B S; Bosi, G; DePasquale, J A; Manera, M; Giari, L

    2016-03-01

    Most individual fish in farmed and wild populations are infected with parasites. Upon dissection of fish, helminths from gut are often easily visible. Enteric helminths include several species of digeneans, cestodes, acanthocephalans and nematodes. Some insights into biology, morphology and histopathological effects of the main fish enteric helminths taxa will be described here. The immune system of fish, as that of other vertebrates, can be subdivided into specific and aspecific types, which in vivo act in concert with each other and indeed are interdependent in many ways. Beyond the small number of well-described models that exist, research focusing on innate immunity in fish against parasitic infections is lacking. Enteric helminths frequently cause inflammation of the digestive tract, resulting in a series of chemical and morphological changes in the affected tissues and inducing leukocyte migration to the site of infection. This review provides an overview on the aspecific defence mechanisms of fish intestine against helminths. Emphasis will be placed on the immune cellular response involving mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, rodlet cells and mucous cells against enteric helminths. Given the relative importance of innate immunity in fish, and the magnitude of economic loss in aquaculture as a consequence of disease, this area deserves considerable attention and support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of Mucosal Immune Response, Tolerance and Proliferation in Mice Colonized by the Mucin-Degrader Akkermansia muciniphila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel eDerrien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells of the mammalian intestine are covered with a mucus layer that prevents direct contact with intestinal microbes but also constitutes a substrate for mucus-degrading bacteria. To study the effect of mucus degradation on the host-response, germ-free mice were colonized with Akkermansia muciniphila. This anaerobic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia is specialized in the degradation of mucin, the glycoprotein present in mucus, and found in high numbers in the intestinal tract of human and other mammalian species. Efficient colonization of A. muciniphila was observed with highest numbers in the cecum, where most mucin is produced. In contrast, following colonization by Lactobacillus plantarum, a facultative anaerobe belonging to the Firmicutes that ferments carbohydrates, similar cell-numbers were found at all intestinal sites. Whereas A. muciniphila was located closely associated with the intestinal cells, L. plantarum was exclusively found in the lumen. The global transcriptional host response was determined in intestinal biopsies and revealed a consistent, site-specific and unique modulation of about 750 genes in mice colonized by A. muciniphila and over 1500 genes after colonization by L. plantarum. Pathway reconstructions showed that colonization by A. muciniphila altered mucosal gene expression profiles towards increased expression of genes involved in immune responses and cell fate determination, while colonization by L. plantarum led to up-regulation of lipid metabolism. These indicate that the colonizers induce host responses that are specific per intestinal location. In conclusion, we propose that A. muciniphila modulates pathways involved in establishing homeostasis for basal metabolism and immune tolerance towards commensal microbiota.

  3. Food allergens and mucosal immune systems with special reference to recognition of food allergens by gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Kaminogawa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy, triggered by an aberrant immune response elicited by orally ingested food allergens, is generated through a complicated mechanism because the allergen interacts with the mucosal immune system (the gut- associated lymphoid tissue, GALT and the resulting immune response affects the generation of allergy. This review will describe the process by which antigens or allergens are recognized by the GALT and the characteristic immune responses induced thereafter. Orally administered antigens induce distinct immune responses in the Peyer's patches, lamina propria and the intestinal epithelium. In addition to these local immune responses in the gut, ingested antigens are known to affect systemic immunity. These may induce a suppressed state of systemic immune responsiveness, which is called oral tolerance, or in some cases they may elicit a systemic IgE antibody response which may lead to allergic reactions. Information on the regions on food allergens recognized by T cells and IgE antibodies is important in understanding the fates of food allergens after being recognized by the GALT. The structure of T and B cell epitopes on food allergens and the possibility of modulation of allergic reactions by amino-acid substituted analogs of allergen- derived peptides will also be discussed.

  4. The Immune System Bridges the Gut Microbiota with Systemic Energy Homeostasis: Focus on TLRs, Mucosal Barrier, and SCFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiljar, Martina; Merkler, Doron; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the development and regulation of the immune system and the metabolism of the host. Germ-free animals have altered immunity with increased susceptibility to immunologic diseases and show metabolic alterations. Here, we focus on two of the major immune-mediated microbiota-influenced components that signal far beyond their local environment. First, the activation or suppression of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) by microbial signals can dictate the tone of the immune response, and they are implicated in regulation of the energy homeostasis. Second, we discuss the intestinal mucosal surface is an immunologic component that protects the host from pathogenic invasion, is tightly regulated with regard to its permeability and can influence the systemic energy balance. The short chain fatty acids are a group of molecules that can both modulate the intestinal barrier and escape the gut to influence systemic health. As modulators of the immune response, the microbiota-derived signals influence functions of distant organs and can change susceptibility to metabolic diseases.

  5. The Immune System Bridges the Gut Microbiota with Systemic Energy Homeostasis: Focus on TLRs, Mucosal Barrier, and SCFAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiljar, Martina; Merkler, Doron; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for the development and regulation of the immune system and the metabolism of the host. Germ-free animals have altered immunity with increased susceptibility to immunologic diseases and show metabolic alterations. Here, we focus on two of the major immune-mediated microbiota-influenced components that signal far beyond their local environment. First, the activation or suppression of the toll-like receptors (TLRs) by microbial signals can dictate the tone of the immune response, and they are implicated in regulation of the energy homeostasis. Second, we discuss the intestinal mucosal surface is an immunologic component that protects the host from pathogenic invasion, is tightly regulated with regard to its permeability and can influence the systemic energy balance. The short chain fatty acids are a group of molecules that can both modulate the intestinal barrier and escape the gut to influence systemic health. As modulators of the immune response, the microbiota-derived signals influence functions of distant organs and can change susceptibility to metabolic diseases. PMID:29163467

  6. Intact but not denatured ovine serum immunoglobulins positively modulate mucosal immune mediators in the growing rat challenged with Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Prabhu; Moughan, Paul J

    2013-09-28

    Immunoglobulins are major glycoproteins that modulate the immune response of gut-associated lymphoid tissue. In the present study, we sought to determine whether orally administered ovine serum immunoglobulins modulate selected indices of mucosal immune function and immune mediators in the growing rat challenged with Salmonella enteritidis. Rats were fed a casein-based basal control diet (BD; unchallenged). Three groups of rats were challenged orally with 1 x 10(7) viable S. enteritidis on day 15 of the study and were fed the BD, the BD containing freeze-dried ovine immunoglobulins (FDOI), or the BD containing autoclaved ovine immunoglobulins (AOI; negative control diet). The rats were randomly allocated to one of the four groups (n 15) and consumed their diet for 18 d. In all of the intestinal segments, the challenged rats fed either the BD or AOI diet produced higher (Pimmunoglobulin fraction positively modulated some selected indices of mucosal immune function and its mediators in growing rats challenged with S. enteritidis.

  7. Intestinal surfactant permeation enhancers and their interaction with enterocyte cell membranes in a mucosal explant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) are agents aimed to improve oral delivery of therapeutic drugs with poor bioavailability. The main permeability barrier for oral delivery is the intestinal epithelium, and PEs act to increase the paracellular and/or transcellular passage of drugs. Transcellular....... In the present work, the interaction of the surfactants lauroyl-L-carnitine, 1-decanoyl-rac-glycerol, and nonaethylene glycol monododecyl ether with the intestinal epithelium was studied in organ cultured pig jejunal mucosal explants. As expected, at 2 mM, these agents rapidly permeabilized the enterocytes...... for the fluorescent polar tracer lucifer yellow, but surprisingly, they all also blocked both constitutive -and receptor-mediated pathways of endocytosis from the brush border, indicating a complete arrest of apical membrane trafficking. At the ultrastructural level, the PEs caused longitudinal fusion of brush border...

  8. The Adaptive Response to Intestinal Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Hibernation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carey, Hannah V

    2006-01-01

    .... Specific Aim 2 examines consequences of intestinal oxidative stress during hibernation including seasonal changes in NF-kB activation in intestine, seasonal changes in the intestinal mucosal immune...

  9. Diet and host-microbial crosstalk in postnatal intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitya; Walker, W Allan

    2015-01-01

    Neonates face unique challenges in the period following birth. The postnatal immune system is in the early stages of development and has a range of functional capabilities that are distinct from the mature adult immune system. Bidirectional immune-microbial interactions regulate the development of mucosal immunity and alter the composition of the microbiota, which contributes to overall host well-being. In the past few years, nutrition has been highlighted as a third element in this interaction that governs host health by modulating microbial composition and the function of the immune system. Dietary changes and imbalances can disturb the immune-microbiota homeostasis, which might alter susceptibility to several autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Major changes in cultural traditions, socioeconomic status and agriculture are affecting the nutritional status of humans worldwide, which is altering core intestinal microbial communities. This phenomenon is especially relevant to the neonatal and paediatric populations, in which the microbiota and immune system are extremely sensitive to dietary influences. In this Review, we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding early-life nutrition, its effects on the microbiota and the consequences of diet-induced perturbation of the structure of the microbial community on mucosal immunity and disease susceptibility.

  10. Review article: Associations between immune activation, intestinal permeability and the irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricon, J; Meleine, M; Gelot, A; Piche, T; Dapoigny, M; Muller, E; Ardid, D

    2012-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, markedly impairing patients' quality of life. Drug development for IBS treatment has been hampered by the lack of understanding of IBS aetiology. In recent years, numerous data have emerged that suggest the involvement of immune activation in IBS, at least in a subset of patients. To determine whether immune activation and intestinal permeabilisation are more frequently observed in IBS patients compared with healthy controls. The scientific bibliography was searched using the following keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, inflammation, immune activation, permeabilisation, intestine, assay, histology and human. The retrieved studies, including blood, faecal and histological studies, were analysed to provide a comprehensive and structured overview of the available data including the type of assay, type of inflammatory marker investigated or intestinal segment studied. Immune activation was more frequently observed in IBS patients than in healthy controls. An increase in the number of mast cells and lymphocytes, an alteration in cytokine levels and intestinal permeabilisation were reported in IBS patients. No consistent changes in the numbers of B cells or enterochromaffin cells or in mucosal serotonin production were demonstrated. The changes observed were modest and often heterogeneous among the studied population. Only appropriate interventions improving irritable bowel syndrome symptoms could highlight and confirm the role of immune activation in this pathophysiology. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. HIV enteropathy and aging: gastrointestinal immunity, mucosal epithelial barrier, and microbial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyin; Kotler, Donald P

    2014-07-01

    Despite decreases in morbidity and mortality as a result of antiretroviral therapy, gastrointestinal dysfunction remains common in HIV infection. Treated patients are at risk for complications of 'premature' aging, such as cardiovascular disease, osteopenia, neurocognitive decline, malignancies, and frailty. This review summarizes recent observations in this field. Mucosal CD4 lymphocytes, especially Th17 cells, are depleted in acute HIV and simian immune deficiency virus (SIV) infections, although other cell types also are affected. Reconstitution during therapy often is incomplete, especially in mucosa. Mucosal barrier function is affected by both HIV infection and aging and includes paracellular transport via tight junctions and uptake through areas of apoptosis; other factors may affect systemic antigen exposure. The resultant microbial translocation is associated with systemic immune activation in HIV and SIV infections. There is evidence of immune activation and microbial translocation in the elderly. The immune phenotypes of immunosenescence in HIV infection and aging appear similar. There are several targets for intervention; blockage of residual mucosal virus replication, preventing antigen uptake, modulating the microbiome, improving T cell recovery, combining therapies aimed at mucosal integrity, augmenting mucosal immunity, and managing traditional risk factors for premature aging in the general population. Aging may interact with HIV enteropathy to enhance microbial translocation and immune activation.

  12. Milk fermentation products of L. helveticus R389 activate calcineurin as a signal to promote gut mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perdigón Gabriela

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Fermented milks containing probiotic bacteria are a way of delivering bioactive constituents to targets in the gastrointestinal tract. We reported previously that the fermentation of milk at constant pH 6 by L. helveticus R389 increased its content of peptide fractions, and the oral administration of the non-bacterial fraction (FMSpH6 to mice increased total secretory IgA in the intestinal lumen and enhanced the number of IgA and various cytokines producing cells as well as the secretion of IL-6 by small intestine epithelial cells. We also demonstrated that this FMSpH6 was effective for the prevention of Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice. In this work, we studied in mice the impact of the oral administration of the supernatant of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 on the gut physiology by measuring parameters such as calcium channels and E-cadherin expression, the activation of the biological signal calcineurin and mast and goblet cells, as a way to determine some mechanisms involved in the immunomodulating effects of the milk fermentation products, observed in previous studies. We analyzed the impact of the supernatant of milk fermented by L. helveticus R389 at pH6-controlled on the expression of calcineurin and on the reinforcement of the ephitelial barrier, measuring parameters such as calcium channels and E-cadherin expression and in the reinforcement of the non-specific immunity determining mast cells and goblet cells associated to the gut. Results We observed an enhanced expression of TRPV6 channels in the duodenum, indicating an improved capacity for dietary Ca2+ uptake. We demonstrated an enhanced expression of calcineurin in the small intestine, able to upregulate immune parameters such as IL-2 and TNF production, with an increase in the number of these cytokines secreting cells. We determined an increase in the number of mucosal mast cells and goblet cells, which would mean an improved state of mucosal surveillance

  13. Influencing mucosal homeostasis and immune responsiveness : The impact of nutrition and pharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Land, Belinda; Schijf, Marcel A.; Martin, Rocio; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M.

    Both nutrition and orally ingested drugs pass the gastrointestinal mucosa and may affect the balance between the mucosal immune system and microbial community herein, i.e. affecting composition of the microbial community as well as the status of local immune system that controls microbial

  14. Enhancement of mucosal immune responses by chimeric influenza HA/SHIV virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lizheng; Lu Xiaoyan; Kang, S.-M.; Chen Changyi; Compans, Richard W.; Yao Qizhi

    2003-01-01

    To enhance mucosal immune responses using simian/human immunodeficiency virus-like particles (SHIV VLPs), we have produced novel phenotypically mixed chimeric influenza HA/SHIV VLPs and used them to immunize C57BL/6J mice intranasally. Antibody and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses as well as cytokine production in both systemic and mucosal sites were compared after immunization with SHIV VLPs or chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. By using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the levels of serum IgG and mucosal IgA to the HIV envelope protein (Env) were found to be highest in the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Furthermore, the highest titer of serum neutralizing antibody against HIV Env was found with the group immunized with chimeric HA/SHIV VLPs. Analysis of the IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicated that a T H 1-oriented immune response resulted from these VLP immunizations. HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice also showed significantly higher CTL responses than those observed in SHIV VLP-immunized mice. Moreover, a MHC class I restricted T-cell activation ELISPOT assay showed a mixed type of T H 1/T H 2 cytokines in the HA/SHIV VLP-immunized mice, indicating that the chimeric VLPs can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the HIV Env protein at multiple mucosal and systemic sites. The results indicate that incorporation of influenza HA into heterotypic VLPs may be highly effective for targeting vaccines to mucosal surfaces

  15. IgT, a primitive immunoglobulin class specialized in mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-An; Salinas, Irene; Li, Jun; Parra, David; Bjork, Sarah; Xu, Zhen; LaPatra, Scott E; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2011-01-01

    Teleost fish are the most primitive bony vertebrates that contain immunoglobulins. In contrast to mammals and birds, these species are devoid of immunoglobulin A (IgA) or a functional equivalent. This observation suggests that specialization of immunoglobulin isotypes into mucosal and systemic responses took place during tetrapod evolution. Challenging that paradigm, here we show that IgT, an immunoglobulin isotype of unknown function, acts like a mucosal antibody. We detected responses of rainbow trout IgT to an intestinal parasite only in the gut, whereas IgM responses were confined to the serum. IgT coated most intestinal bacteria. As IgT and IgA are phylogenetically distant immunoglobulins, their specialization into mucosal responses probably occurred independently by a process of convergent evolution. PMID:20676094

  16. Intestinal innate antiviral immunity and immunobiotics: beneficial effects against rotavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Villena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract are the main portal entry of pathogens such as rotavirus (RVs, which is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe and a major cause of severe acute intestinal infection in livestock animals. The interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and immune cells with RVs have been studied for several years, and now it is known that the innate immune responses triggered by this virus can have both beneficial and detrimental effects for the host. It was demonstrated that natural RVs infection in infants and experimental challenges in mice result in the intestinal activation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs like Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and striking secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators that can lead to increased local tissue damage and immunopathology. Therefore, modulating desregulated intestinal immune responses triggered by PRRs activation are a significant promise for reducing the burden of RVs diseases. The ability of immunoregulatory probiotic microorganisms (immunobiotics to protect against intestinal infections such as those caused by RVs, are among the oldest effects studied for these important group of beneficial microbes. In this review, we provide an update of the current status on the modulation of intestinal antiviral innate immunity by immunobiotics, and their beneficial impact on RVs infection. In addition, we describe the research of our group that demonstrated the capacity of immunobiotic strains to beneficially modulated TLR3-triggered immune response in IECs, reduce the disruption of intestinal homeostasis caused by intraepithelial lymphocytes, and improve the resistance to RVs infections.

  17. Intestinal Innate Antiviral Immunity and Immunobiotics: Beneficial Effects against Rotavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Julio; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria Guadalupe; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract are the main portal entry of pathogens such as rotavirus (RV), which is a leading cause of death due to diarrhea among young children across the globe and a major cause of severe acute intestinal infection in livestock animals. The interactions between intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and immune cells with RVs have been studied for several years, and now, it is known that the innate immune responses triggered by this virus can have both beneficial and detrimental effects for the host. It was demonstrated that natural RV infection in infants and experimental challenges in mice result in the intestinal activation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and striking secretion of proinflammatory mediators that can lead to increased local tissue damage and immunopathology. Therefore, modulating desregulated intestinal immune responses triggered by PRRs activation are a significant promise for reducing the burden of RV diseases. The ability of immunoregulatory probiotic microorganisms (immunobiotics) to protect against intestinal infections, such as those caused by RVs, is among the oldest effects studied for these important group of beneficial microbes. In this review, we provide an update of the current status on the modulation of intestinal antiviral innate immunity by immunobiotics and their beneficial impact on RV infection. In addition, we describe the research of our group that demonstrated the capacity of immunobiotic strains to beneficially modulated TLR3-triggered immune response in IECs, reduce the disruption of intestinal homeostasis caused by intraepithelial lymphocytes, and improve the resistance to RV infections.

  18. Luminal and mucosal-associated intestinal microbiota in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Ian M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested a role for an altered intestinal microbiota in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the association between specific enteric bacterial groups and IBS. The aim of this study was to investigate the fecal and mucosal-associated microbiota using two independent techniques in intestinal samples from diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS and healthy controls. Methods Fecal and colonic mucosal biopsy samples were obtained from 10 D-IBS patients and 10 healthy controls. Colonic tissue was collected during a un-sedated un-prepped flexible sigmoidoscopy. Fecal and tissue samples were processed immediately upon collection for culture under aerobic and anaerobic conditions or frozen for further molecular analysis. DNA was extracted from all frozen samples and used to enumerate specific bacterial groups using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Results Culture analysis of intestinal samples demonstrated a significant reduction in the concentration of aerobic bacteria in fecal samples from D-IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (1.4 × 107 vs. 8.4 × 108 CFUs/g feces, P = 0.002. qPCR analysis demonstrated a significant 3.6 fold increase (P = 0.02 in concentrations of fecal Lactobacillus species between D-IBS patients and healthy controls. Conclusions Our culture and molecular data indicate that quantitative differences exist in specific bacterial groups in the microbiota between D-IBS and healthy subjects.

  19. Induction of HIV-1-specific mucosal immune responses following intramuscular recombinant adenovirus serotype 26 HIV-1 vaccination of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Lindsey R; Liu, Jinyan; Li, Hualin; Johnson, Jennifer A; Walsh, Stephen R; Kleinjan, Jane A; Engelson, Brian A; Peter, Lauren; Abbink, Peter; Milner, Danny A; Golden, Kevin L; Viani, Kyle L; Stachler, Matthew D; Chen, Benjamin J; Pau, Maria G; Weijtens, Mo; Carey, Brittany R; Miller, Caroline A; Swann, Edith M; Wolff, Mark; Loblein, Hayley; Seaman, Michael S; Dolin, Raphael; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-02-15

    Defining mucosal immune responses and inflammation to candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines represents a current research priority for the HIV-1 vaccine field. In particular, it is unclear whether intramuscular immunization can elicit immune responses at mucosal surfaces in humans. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated systemic and mucosal immune responses to a candidate adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vectored HIV-1 envelop (Env) vaccine in baseline Ad26-seronegative and Ad26-seropositive healthy volunteers. Systematic mucosal sampling with rectal Weck-Cel sponges and rectal biopsies were performed. Intramuscular immunization elicited both systemic and mucosal Env-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the majority of subjects. Individuals with preexisting Ad26-specific neutralizing antibodies had vaccine-elicited immune responses comparable to those of subjects who were Ad26 seronegative. We also observed no increase in activated total or vector-specific mucosal CD4+ T lymphocytes following vaccination by either histopathology or flow cytometry. These data demonstrate that a single intramuscular administration of this Ad26-vectored HIV-1 Env vaccine elicited both systemic and mucosal immune responses in humans. Induction of antigen-specific humoral and cellular mucosal immunity was not accompanied by a detectable increase in mucosal inflammation. NCT01103687. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Improved capacity to evaluate changes in intestinal mucosal surface area using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Chasen J; Cowles, Robert A

    2017-07-01

    Quantification of intestinal mucosal growth typically relies on morphometric parameters, commonly villus height, as a surrogate for presumed changes in mucosal surface area (MSA). We hypothesized that using mathematical modeling based on multiple unique measurements would improve discrimination of the effects of interventions on MSA compared to standard measures. To determine the ability of mathematical modeling to resolve differences in MSA, a mouse model with enhanced serotonin (5HT) signaling known to stimulate mucosal growth was used. 5-HT signaling is potentiated by targeting the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) molecule. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-treated wild-type (WT-SSRI), SERT-knockout (SERTKO), and wild-type C57Bl/6 (WT) mice were used. Distal ileal sections were H&E-stained. Villus height (VH), width (VW), crypt width (CW), and bowel diameter were used to calculate surface area enlargement factor (SEF) and MSA. VH alone for SERTKO and SSRI was significantly increased compared to WT, without a difference between SERTKO and WT-SSRI. VW and CW were significantly decreased for both SERTKO and WT-SSRI compared to WT, and VW for WT-SSRI was also decreased compared to SERTKO. These changes increased SEF and MSA for SERTKO and WT-SSRI compared to WT. Additionally, SEF and MSA were significantly increased for WT-SSRI compared to SERTKO. Mathematical modeling provides a valuable tool for differentiating changes in intestinal MSA. This more comprehensive assessment of surface area does not appear to correlate linearly with standard morphometric measures and represents a more comprehensive method for discriminating between therapies aimed at increasing functional intestinal mucosa. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cellular and mucosal immune responses in the respiratory tract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: This experiment was conducted to evaluate the cellular and mucosal responses in the respiratory tract of. Nigerian goats vaccinated intranasally with recombinant Mannheimia hemolytica bacterine. Twenty one goats were divided into five groups, five goats each in three vaccinated groups while three goats each ...

  2. The Microbiome Activates CD4 T-cell–mediated Immunity to Compensate for Increased Intestinal PermeabilitySummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Edelblum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Despite a prominent association, chronic intestinal barrier loss is insufficient to induce disease in human subjects or experimental animals. We hypothesized that compensatory mucosal immune activation might protect individuals with increased intestinal permeability from disease. We used a model in which intestinal barrier loss is triggered by intestinal epithelial-specific expression of constitutively active myosin light chain kinase (CA-MLCK. Here we asked whether constitutive tight junction barrier loss impacts susceptibility to enteric pathogens. Methods: Acute or chronic Toxoplasma gondii or Salmonella typhimurium infection was assessed in CA-MLCK transgenic or wild-type mice. Germ-free mice or those lacking specific immune cell populations were used to investigate the effect of microbial-activated immunity on pathogen translocation in the context of increased intestinal permeability. Results: Acute T gondii and S typhimurium translocation across the epithelial barrier was reduced in CA-MLCK mice. This protection was due to enhanced mucosal immune activation that required CD4+ T cells and interleukin 17A but not immunoglobulin A. The protective mucosal immune activation in CA-MLCK mice depended on segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB, because protection against early S typhimurium invasion was lost in germ-free CA-MLCK mice but could be restored by conventionalization with SFB-containing, not SFB-deficient, microbiota. In contrast, chronic S typhimurium infection was more severe in CA-MLCK mice, suggesting that despite activation of protective mucosal immunity, barrier defects ultimately result in enhanced disease progression. Conclusions: Increased epithelial tight junction permeability synergizes with commensal bacteria to promote intestinal CD4+ T-cell expansion and interleukin 17A production that limits enteric pathogen invasion. Keywords: Barrier Function, Tight Junction, Microbiota, CD4 T Cell, Mucosal Immunity

  3. HIV Infection and Compromised Mucosal Immunity: Oral Manifestations and Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Samantha E; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces account for the vast majority of HIV transmission. In adults, HIV transmission occurs mainly by vaginal and rectal routes but rarely via oral route. By contrast, pediatric HIV infections could be as the result of oral route by breastfeeding. As such mucosal surfaces play a crucial role in HIV acquisition, and spread of the virus depends on its ability to cross a mucosal barrier. HIV selectively infects, depletes, and/or dysregulates multiple arms of the human immune system particularly at the mucosal sites and causes substantial irreversible damage to the mucosal barriers. This leads to microbial products translocation and subsequently hyper-immune activation. Although introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to significant reduction in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients, viral replication persists. As a result, antigen presence and immune activation are linked to "inflammaging" that attributes to a pro-inflammatory environment and the accelerated aging process in HIV patients. HIV infection is also associated with the prevalence of oral mucosal infections and dysregulation of oral microbiota, both of which may compromise the oral mucosal immunity of HIV-infected individuals. In addition, impaired oral immunity in HIV infection may predispose the patients to periodontal diseases that are associated with systemic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to examine existing evidence regarding the role of innate and cellular components of the oral cavity in HIV infection and how HIV infection may drive systemic hyper-immune activation in these patients. We will also discuss current knowledge on HIV oral transmission, HIV immunosenescence in relation to the oral mucosal alterations during the course of HIV infection and periodontal disease. Finally, we discuss oral manifestations associated with HIV infection and how HIV infection and ART influence the oral microbiome. Therefore

  4. Effects of β-conglycinin on growth performance, immunoglobulins and intestinal mucosal morphology in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xichun; Geng, Fangfang; Wu, Jinjie; Kou, Yanan; Xu, Shuliang; Sun, Zhikuo; Feng, Shibin; Ma, Liangyou; Luo, Ying

    2014-01-01

    One of the main causes of allergic reactions in young animals is β-conglycinin, an antigenic glycoprotein found in soya beans. Therefore, the objective of the study was to investigate the effects of a prior immunisation with β-conglycinin on growth performance, serum immunoglobulin levels and intestinal histology in piglets. Forty piglets (7 d of age) were randomly divided into four groups of ten piglets each. Piglets of Groups Im and Im+S were immunised twice by hypodermic injection with β-conglycinin at 500 μg/kg body weight (BW) at day 7 and 21 of age. At day 23, Groups Im+S and S were intramuscularly injected with 5000 μg β-conglycinin per kg BW. The piglets of Group C received a physiological saline solution by hypodermic injection. All piglets were weaned at the age of 23 d and blood samples were taken on days 7, 21 and 35. At the end of the trial, five piglets per group were slaughtered and the intestine was collected for evaluating mucosal histology. Compared to Group C, in Group S the average daily gain (ADG), feed intake and gain:feed ratio were decreased (p < 0.01), and serum levels of IgG and IgE were increased (p < 0.01). Furthermore, in this group the structure of duodenal and jejunal mucosa was severely damaged. But in Groups Im and Im+S the ADG was increased (p < 0.05), serum IgE levels were decreased (p < 0.01) and the intestinal mucosa was not damaged. The results suggest that prior immunisation with β-conglycinin can increase ADG and serum IgG levels and decrease serum IgE levels. Therefore, this method is also potentially able to protect the structural integrity of the intestinal mucosal epithelia and alleviate allergic reactions in piglets.

  5. Strong mucosal immune responses in SIV infected macaques contribute to viral control and preserved CD4+ T-cell levels in blood and mucosal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Tina; Schulte, Reiner; Sauermann, Ulrike; Ibing, Wiebke; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    2011-04-11

    Since there is still no protective HIV vaccine available, better insights into immune mechanism of persons effectively controlling HIV replication in the absence of any therapy should contribute to improve further vaccine designs. However, little is known about the mucosal immune response of this small unique group of patients. Using the SIV-macaque-model for AIDS, we had the rare opportunity to analyze 14 SIV-infected rhesus macaques durably controlling viral replication (controllers). We investigated the virological and immunological profile of blood and three different mucosal tissues and compared their data to those of uninfected and animals progressing to AIDS-like disease (progressors). Lymphocytes from blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and duodenal and colonic biopsies were phenotypically characterized by polychromatic flow cytometry. In controllers, we observed higher levels of CD4+, CD4+CCR5+ and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cells as well as lower immune activation in blood and all mucosal sites compared to progressors. However, we could also demonstrate that immunological changes are distinct between these three mucosal sites.Intracellular cytokine staining demonstrated a significantly higher systemic and mucosal CD8+ Gag-specific cellular immune response in controllers than in progressors. Most remarkable was the polyfunctional cytokine profile of CD8+ lymphocytes in BAL of controllers, which significantly dominated over their blood response. The overall suppression of viral replication in the controllers was confirmed by almost no detectable viral RNA in blood and all mucosal tissues investigated. A strong and complex virus-specific CD8+ T-cell response in blood and especially in mucosal tissue of SIV-infected macaques was associated with low immune activation and an efficient suppression of viral replication. This likely afforded a repopulation of CD4+ T-cells in different mucosal compartments to almost normal levels. We conclude, that a robust SIV

  6. Gastric mucosal smooth muscles may explain oscillations in glandular pressure: role of vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnerstad, I; Ekblad, E; Sundler, F; Holm, L

    1998-02-01

    Oscillating (3-7 cycles/min) high pressures in gastric glands during acid secretion suggest the existence of rhythmically contracting mucosal muscles. The aim of this study was to study vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the gastrointestinal tract, in relation to mucosal muscles, glandular pressure, and blood flow. Rat, dog, and human mucosae were examined immunocytochemically for smooth muscle actin and VIP. Glandular pressure was measured using microelectrodes, red blood cell velocity (V[RBC]) was measured using a cross-correlation technique, and blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry in exposed gastric mucosa of thiobutabarbital sodium-anesthetized rats. Actin immunostaining showed muscle strands arising from muscularis mucosae, extending toward the gastric pits. VIP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were found in close relation to these muscles. VIP, administered intra-arterially close to the stomach (2 microg/kg bolus, followed by 10 microg x kg[-1] x h[-1]), significantly decreased glandular pressure from 18.2 +/- 1.6 to 8.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg and almost eliminated the pressure oscillations. VIP infusion also abolished the oscillations in V(RBC) and significantly increased blood flow by approximately 35%. Contracting mucosal muscles may be responsible for oscillations in glandular pressure and possibly also in V(RBC). VIP probably relaxes these muscles.

  7. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S; Tzeng, Alice; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF) mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  8. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esi S Lamousé-Smith

    Full Text Available The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  9. Mucoadhesive formulation of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae reduces intestinal injury from 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marcelino de Ávila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal mucositis induced during cancer treatment is considered a serious dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Frequently, interruption of the cancer treatment due to this pathology leads to a reduction in cure rates, increase of treatment costs and decrease life quality of the patient. Natural products such as Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae, represent a potential alternative for the treatment of mucositis given its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, B. pilosa glycolic extract was formulated (BPF with poloxamer, a mucoadhesive copolymer, was used for treatment of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced mucositis in mice. As expected, animals only treated with 5-FU (200 mg/kg presented marked weight loss, reduction of intestinal villi, crypts and muscular layer, which was associated with severe disruption of crypts, edema, inflammatory infiltrate and vacuolization in the intestinal tissue, as compared to the control group and healthy animals only treated with BPF. On the other hand, the treatment of intestinal mucositis-bearing mice with BPF (75, 100 or 125 mg/kg managed to mitigate clinical and pathologic changes, noticeably at 100 mg/kg. This dose led to the restoration of intestinal proliferative activity through increasing Ki-67 levels; modulated the expression of Bax, Bcl2 and p53 apoptotic markers protecting intestinal cells from cell death. Moreover, this treatment regulated lipid peroxidation and inflammatory infiltration. No acute toxic effects were observed with this formulation. This work demonstrated that BPF was safe and effective against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice. Additional studies are already in progress to further characterize the mechanisms involved in the protective effects of this technological formulation toward the development of a new medicine for the prevention and treatment of intestinal injury in patients undergoing chemotherapy/radiotherapy.

  10. Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) lowers body weight and affects intestinal innate immunity through influencing intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Bin, Peng; Ren, Wenkai; Gao, Wei; Liu, Gang; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Li, Yinghui; Yao, Kang; Huang, Ruilin; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2017-06-13

    Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG), a precursor of glutamate and a critical intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, shows beneficial effects on intestinal function. However, the influence of AKG on the intestinal innate immune system and intestinal microbiota is unknown. This study explores the effect of oral AKG administration in drinking water (10 g/L) on intestinal innate immunity and intestinal microbiota in a mouse model. Mouse water intake, feed intake and body weight were recorded throughout the entire experiment. The ileum was collected for detecting the expression of intestinal proinflammatory cytokines and innate immune factors by Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction. Additionally, the ileal luminal contents and feces were collected for 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the microbial composition. The intestinal microbiota in mice was disrupted with an antibiotic cocktail. The results revealed that AKG supplementation lowered body weight, promoted ileal expression of mammalian defensins of the alpha subfamily (such as cryptdins-1, cryptdins-4, and cryptdins-5) while influencing the intestinal microbial composition (i.e., lowering the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio). In the antibiotic-treated mouse model, AKG supplementation failed to affect mouse body weight and inhibited the expression of cryptdins-1 and cryptdins-5 in the ileum. We concluded that AKG might affect body weight and intestinal innate immunity through influencing intestinal microbiota.

  11. Mucosal T cells in gut homeostasis and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    van Wijk, Femke; Cheroutre, Hilde

    2010-01-01

    The antigen-rich environment of the gut interacts with a highly integrated and specialized mucosal immune system that has the challenging task of preventing invasion and the systemic spread of microbes, while avoiding excessive or unnecessary immune responses to innocuous antigens. Disruption of the mucosal barrier and/or defects in gut immune regulatory networks may lead to chronic intestinal inflammation as seen in inflammatory bowel disease. The T-cell populations of the intestine play a c...

  12. Neuroimmune interaction and the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijden, Simon; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2018-01-01

    Many essential gastrointestinal functions, including motility, secretion, and blood flow, are regulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), both through intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. Recently identified neuroimmune mechanisms, in particular the interplay between enteric neurons and muscularis macrophages, are now considered to be essential for fine-tuning peristalsis. These findings shed new light on how intestinal immune cells can support enteric nervous function. In addition, both intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms control intestinal immune homeostasis in different layers of the intestine, mainly by affecting macrophage activation through neurotransmitter release. In this mini-review, we discuss recent insights on immunomodulation by intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic innervation, with a particular focus on intestinal macrophages. In addition, we discuss the relevance of these novel mechanisms for intestinal immune homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions, mainly focusing on motility disorders (gastroparesis and postoperative ileus) and inflammatory disorders (colitis).

  13. Probiotic Enhanced Intestinal Immunity in Broilers against Subclinical Necrotic Enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesong Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Along with banning of antibiotics, necrotic enteritis (NE, especially subclinical NE (SNE whereby no clinical signs are present in chicks, has become one of the most threatening problems in poultry industry. Therefore, increasing attention has been focused on research and application of effective probiotic strains, as an alternative to antibiotics, to prevent SNE in broilers. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii BS15 on the prevention of SNE in broilers. Specifically, assessment determined the growth performance and indexes related to intestinal mucosal immunity in the ileum and cecal tonsil of broilers. A total of 300 1-day-old Cobb 500 chicks were randomly distributed into the following 5 groups: control group (fed with basal diet + de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe liquid medium [normal diet], SNE group (normal diet, BS15 group (basal diet + 1 × 106 colony-forming units BS15/g as fed [BS15 diet], treatment group (normal diet [days 1–28] + BS15 diet [days 29–42], and prevention group (BS15 diet [days 1–28] + normal diet [days 29–42] throughout a 42-day experimental period. SNE infection was treated for all chicks in the SNE, BS15, treatment, and prevention groups. The present results demonstrated that BS15 supplementation of feeds in BS15 and prevention groups exerted a positive effect on preventing negative influences on growth performance; these negative influences included low body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio caused by SNE. Although no changes were detected in all determined indexes in cecal tonsils, BS15-treated broilers were free from SNE-caused damage in villi in the ileum. BS15 inhibited SNE-caused decrease in immunoglobulins in the ileum. In the lamina propria of ileum, T cell subsets of lymphocytes influenced by SNE were also controlled by BS15. BS15 affected antioxidant abilities of the ileum and controlled SNE-induced mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis by

  14. Reciprocal Interactions of the Intestinal Microbiota and Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Craig L.; Elson, Charles O.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates set the stage for evolution of an advanced symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. The defining features of specificity and memory that characterize adaptive immunity have afforded vertebrates mechanisms for efficiently tailoring immune responses to diverse types of microbes, whether to promote mutualism or host defense. These same attributes carry risk for immune-mediated diseases that are increasingly linked to the intestinal microbiota. Understanding how the adaptive immune system copes with the remarkable number and diversity of microbes that colonize the digestive tract, and how it integrates with more primitive innate immune mechanisms to maintain immune homeostasis, holds considerable promise for new approaches to modulate immune networks in order to treat and prevent disease. PMID:22972296

  15. Bile acid receptor TGR5 overexpression is associated with decreased intestinal mucosal injury and epithelial cell proliferation in obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Guang; Xie, Xiao-Li; Yin, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Lei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Na; Zhao, Dong-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Hui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Bile acids stimulate intestinal epithelial proliferation in vitro. We sought to investigate the role of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in the protection of intestinal epithelial proliferation in obstructive jaundice. Intestinal tissues and serum samples were obtained from patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and from bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. Intestinal permeability and morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa were observed. The functions of TGR5 in cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial injury were determined by overexpression or knockdown studies in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Internal biliary drainage was superior to external biliary drainage in recovering intestinal permeability and mucosal histology in patients with obstructive jaundice. In BDL rats, feeding of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased intestinal mucosa injury. The levels of PCNA, a marker of proliferation, increased in response to CDCA feeding and were paralleled by elevated TGR5 expression. CDCA upregulated TGR5 expression and promoted proliferation in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with LPS. Overexpression of TGR5 resulted in increased PCNA, cell viability, EdU incorporation, and the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas knockdown of TGR5 had the opposite effect. Our data indicate that bile acids promote intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and decrease mucosal injury by upregulating TGR5 expression in obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporal and spatial interplay of microbiota and intestinal mucosa drive establishment of immune homeostasis in conventionalized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aidy, Sahar; van Baarlen, Peter; Derrien, Muriel; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joël; Dekker, Jan; Samsom, Janneke N; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-09-01

    During colonization of germfree mice with the total fecal microbial community of their conventionally born and raised siblings (conventionalization), the intestinal mucosal immune system initiates and maintains a balanced immune response. However, the genetic regulation of these balanced, appropriate responses to the microbiota is obscure. Here, combined analysis of germfree and conventionalized mice revealed that the major molecular responses could be detected initiating at day 4 post conventionalization, with a strong induction of innate immune functions followed by stimulation of adaptive immune responses and development and expansion of adaptive immune cells at later stages of conventionalization. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mouse developmental and immune-related cellular pathways and processes that were co-mediated by the commensal microbiota and suggests which mechanisms were involved in this reprogramming. The dynamic, region-dependent mucosal responses to the colonizing microbiota revealed potential transcriptional signatures for the control of intestinal homeostasis in healthy mice, which may help to decipher the genetic basis of pathway dysregulation in human intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  17. Mucosal priming of the murine immune system against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 using Lactococcus lactis expressing the type III secretion system protein EspB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Loos, M; Vanrompay, D; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), particularly E. coli serotype O157:H7, has been responsible for multiple human outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome worldwide. Humans become infected by direct or indirect contact with faeces of asymptomatic EHEC shedding ruminants. Currently there is no human or animal vaccine available against EHEC infection. EHEC use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to colonize the intestine and therefore eliciting mucosal immunity against T3SS proteins could be a potential vaccination strategy. To develop such a mucosal vaccine, EspB - a significant member of the T3SS - was intracellularly expressed in Lactococcus lactis (LL-EspB) and this strain was used to immunize BALB/c mice orally. Ten days post-immunization, no specific antibody response was detected in serum or faeces of immunized mice. However, statistically significant (PT3SS protein, EspB. Nevertheless, an optimized EspB expression in L. lactis may be required to improve the mucosal immune response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Downregulation of mucosal mast cell activation and immune response in diarrhoea-irritable bowel syndrome by oral disodium cromoglycate: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Beatriz; Ramos, Laura; Martínez, Cristina; Guilarte, Mar; González-Castro, Ana M; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; de Torres, Inés; Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Salvo-Romero, Eloisa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Guagnozzi, Danila; Azpiroz, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background and goal Diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) exhibits intestinal innate immune and mucosal mast cell (MC) activation. MC stabilisers have been shown to improve IBS symptoms but the mechanism is unclear. Our primary aim was to investigate the effect of oral disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on jejunal MC activation and specific innate immune signalling pathways in IBS-D, and secondarily, its potential clinical benefit. Study Mucosal MC activation (by ultrastructural changes, tryptase release and gene expression) and innate immune signalling (by protein and gene expression) were quantified in jejunal biopsies from healthy (HS; n = 16) and IBS-D subjects after six months of either treatment with DSCG (600 mg/day, IBS-D-DSCG group; n = 18) or without treatment (IBS-D-NT group; n = 25). All IBS-D patients recorded abdominal pain and bowel habits at baseline and in the last 10 days prior to jejunal sampling. Results IBS-D-NT exhibited significant MC activation and over-expression of immune-related genes as compared to HS, whereas in IBS-D-DSCG MC activity and gene expression were similar to HS. Furthermore, DSCG significantly reduced abdominal pain and improved stool consistency. Conclusion Oral DSCG modulates mucosal immune activity and improves gut symptoms in IBS-D patients. Future placebo-controlled clinical trials are needed for confirmation of clinical benefit of DSCG for IBS-D. PMID:29026603

  19. Intestinal epithelial cell-specific RARα depletion results in aberrant epithelial cell homeostasis and underdeveloped immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijon, H B; Suarez-Lopez, L; Diaz, O E; Das, S; De Calisto, J; Yaffe, M B; Pittet, M J; Mora, J R; Belkaid, Y; Xavier, R J; Villablanca, E J

    2017-11-15

    Retinoic acid (RA), a dietary vitamin A metabolite, is crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. RA acts on intestinal leukocytes to modulate their lineage commitment and function. Although the role of RA has been characterized in immune cells, whether intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) rely on RA signaling to exert their immune-regulatory function has not been examined. Here we demonstrate that lack of RA receptor α (RARα) signaling in IECs results in deregulated epithelial lineage specification, leading to increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells. Mechanistically, lack of RARα resulted in increased KLF4 + goblet cell precursors in the distal bowel, whereas RA treatment inhibited klf4 expression and goblet cell differentiation in zebrafish. These changes in secretory cells are associated with increased Reg3g, reduced luminal bacterial detection, and an underdeveloped intestinal immune system, as evidenced by an almost complete absence of lymphoid follicles and gut resident mononuclear phagocytes. This underdeveloped intestinal immune system shows a decreased ability to clear infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Collectively, our findings indicate that epithelial cell-intrinsic RARα signaling is critical to the global development of the intestinal immune system.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 15 November 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.91.

  20. Dietary inhibitors of histone deacetylases in intestinal immunity anc homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilderink, R.; Verseijden, C.; de Jonge, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are integral players in homeostasis of immunity and host defense in the gut and are under influence of the intestinal microbiome. Microbial metabolites and dietary components, including short chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate, SCFAs), have an

  1. Reciprocal Interactions of the Intestinal Microbiota and Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Craig L.; Elson, Charles O.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2012-01-01

    Emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates set the stage for evolution of an advanced symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. The defining features of specificity and memory that characterize adaptive immunity have afforded vertebrates mechanisms for efficiently tailoring immune responses to diverse types of microbes, whether to promote mutualism or host defense. These same attributes carry risk for immune-mediated diseases that are increasingly linked to the intest...

  2. Systematic review of mucosal immunity induced by oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines against virus shedding following oral poliovirus challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Hird

    Full Text Available Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV may be used in mass vaccination campaigns during the final stages of polio eradication. It is also likely to be adopted by many countries following the coordinated global cessation of vaccination with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV after eradication. The success of IPV in the control of poliomyelitis outbreaks will depend on the degree of nasopharyngeal and intestinal mucosal immunity induced against poliovirus infection. We performed a systematic review of studies published through May 2011 that recorded the prevalence of poliovirus shedding in stool samples or nasopharyngeal secretions collected 5-30 days after a "challenge" dose of OPV. Studies were combined in a meta-analysis of the odds of shedding among children vaccinated according to IPV, OPV, and combination schedules. We identified 31 studies of shedding in stool and four in nasopharyngeal samples that met the inclusion criteria. Individuals vaccinated with OPV were protected against infection and shedding of poliovirus in stool samples collected after challenge compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary odds ratio [OR] for shedding 0.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08-0.24. In contrast, IPV provided no protection against shedding compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary OR 0.81 [95% CI 0.59-1.11] or when given in addition to OPV, compared with individuals given OPV alone (summary OR 1.14 [95% CI 0.82-1.58]. There were insufficient studies of nasopharyngeal shedding to draw a conclusion. IPV does not induce sufficient intestinal mucosal immunity to reduce the prevalence of fecal poliovirus shedding after challenge, although there was some evidence that it can reduce the quantity of virus shed. The impact of IPV on poliovirus transmission in countries where fecal-oral spread is common is unknown but is likely to be limited compared with OPV.

  3. Homing of immune cells: role in homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ailsa L; Ng, Siew C; Mann, Elizabeth; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar; Bernardo, David; Knight, Stella C

    2010-11-01

    Rather like a satellite navigation system directing a vehicle to a particular destination defined by post-code, immune cells have homing molecules or "immune post-codes" enabling them to be recruited to specific organs, such as the intestine or skin. An efficient system would be designed such that the site of entry of an antigen influences the homing of effector T cells back to the appropriate organ. For example, to mount an immune response against an intestinal pathogen, T cells with a propensity to home to the gut to clear the infection would be induced. In health, there is such a sophisticated and finely tuned system in operation, enabling an appropriate balance of immune activity in different anatomical compartments. In disease states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is characterized by intestinal inflammation and often an inflammatory process involving other organs such as skin, joints, liver, and eye, there is accumulating evidence that there is malfunction of this immune cell trafficking system. The clinical importance of dysregulated immune cell trafficking in IBD is reflected in recently proven efficacious therapies that target trafficking pathways such as natalizumab, an α4 integrin antibody, and Traficet-EN, a chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) antagonist. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the homing of immune cells to different tissues, in particular the intestine, and focus on alterations in immune cell homing pathways in IBD. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the immune post-code system would assist in achieving the goal of tissue-specific immunotherapy.

  4. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

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    Rodrick J Chiodini

    Full Text Available Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem

  5. Potential Role of Probiotics in Mechanism of Intestinal Immunity

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    Imran Rashid Rajput and Wei Fen Li*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are nonpathogenic bacteria exert a constructive influence on health or physiology of the host. Effect of probiotics in the intestinal defense against variety of diseases is well known. The probiotics are involved in the mechanism of intestinal defense, support as antagonist against pathogens, improve intestinal epithelial layer and boost the innate as well as adaptive immunity. However these responses are also exerted by intestinal components. The intestinal components as well as probiotics play a reciprocal role to enhance the immune response of the individual. The possibilities of mechanism of action include the stimulation of epithelial cells, activation of dendritic cells via toll-like receptors (TLRs, conversely produce cytokines. These observations reviewed together advocate that specific immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria should be focusing on mechanism of action via antigen presenting cells (APC.

  6. Protective effect of Holothurian intestine against indomethacin induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xuejing; Zhang, Cuiping; Gao, Hua; Niu, Qinghui; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Zibin

    2017-06-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Holothurian intestines (HI) on NSAIDs-induced gastric mucosal damage and the possible mechanism. At first, 60 male Wistar rats were induced of gastric lesions with indomethacin (IDM, 30 mg kg-1). The rats were pretreated for 15 consecutive days with saline, sucralfate, or HI (0.4 g kg-1d-1, 0.8 g kg-1d-1 and 1.6 g kg-1d-1) prior to IDM treatment, followed by evaluations of macroscopic damage and microscopic features; and investigation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress parameters, gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total hexosamine in tissues. The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 mRNA in the gastric tissue were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Pathological gastric ulcer indexes, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, TNF-α) and lipid peroxidation were significantly decreased in HI-treated groups, whereas the levels of protective factors (TGF-β, GSH, SOD activity and PGE2) were significantly elevated especially in the group with HI 1.6 g kg-1d-1 ( P < 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HI groups ( P < 0.05). The study investigates that holothurian intestines may act as a kind of marine medicine which have protective effect on IDM-induced gastric ulcer, which could be a dietary preventive agent for the prevention of gastric damage.

  7. Murine immunization with CS21 pili or LngA major subunit of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) elicits systemic and mucosal immune responses and inhibits ETEC gut colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengxian; Iqbal, Junaid; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2017-04-01

    CS21 pili of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most prevalent ETEC colonization factors. CS21 major subunit, LngA, mediates ETEC adherence to intestinal cells, and contributes to ETEC pathogenesis in a neonatal mouse infection model. The objectives of this work were to evaluate LngA major subunit purified protein and CS21 purified pili on immunogenicity and protection against ETEC colonization of mice intestine. Recombinant LngA purified protein or purified CS21 pili from E9034A ETEC strain were evaluated for immunogenicity after immunization of C57BL/6 mice. Specific anti-LngA antibodies were detected from mice serum, feces, and intestine fluid samples by ELISA assays. Protection against gut colonization was evaluated on immunized mice orally challenged with wild type E9034A ETEC strain and by subsequent quantification of bacterial colony forming units (CFU) recovered from feces. Recombinant LngA protein and CS21 pili induced specific humoral and mucosal anti-LngA antibodies in the mouse model. CS21 combined with CT delivered intranasally as well as LngA combined with incomplete Freund adjuvant delivered intraperitoneally inhibited ETEC gut colonization in a mouse model. In conclusion, both LngA purified protein and CS21 pili from ETEC are highly immunogenic and may inhibit ETEC intestinal shedding. Our data on immunogenicity and immunoprotection indicates that CS21 is a suitable vaccine candidate for a future multivalent vaccine against ETEC diarrhea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-02-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caernohabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing studies of pathogenesis that use this simple model system, we hope to illustrate some of the basic principles of epithelial immunity that may also be of relevance in higher order hosts. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Novel mucosal DNA-MVA HIV vaccination in which DNA-IL-12 plus Cholera Toxin B subunit (CTB) cooperates to enhance cellular systemic and mucosal genital tract immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Maeto, Cynthia Alejandra; Rodríguez, Ana María; Holgado, María Pía; Falivene, Juliana; Gherardi, Maria Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Induction of local antiviral immune responses at the mucosal portal surfaces where HIV-1 and other viral pathogens are usually first encountered remains a primary goal for most vaccines against mucosally acquired viral infections. Exploring mucosal immunization regimes in order to find optimal vector combinations and also appropriate mucosal adjuvants in the HIV vaccine development is decisive. In this study we analyzed the interaction of DNA-IL-12 and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) after thei...

  10. Modulation of immune development and function by intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Srinivasan, Naren; Maloy, Kevin J

    2014-11-01

    The immune system must constantly monitor the gastrointestinal tract for the presence of pathogens while tolerating trillions of commensal microbiota. It is clear that intestinal microbiota actively modulate the immune system to maintain a mutually beneficial relation, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis are not fully understood. Recent advances have begun to shed light on the cellular and molecular factors involved, revealing that a range of microbiota derivatives can influence host immune functions by targeting various cell types, including intestinal epithelial cells, mononuclear phagocytes, innate lymphoid cells, and B and T lymphocytes. Here, we review these findings, highlighting open questions and important challenges to overcome in translating this knowledge into new therapies for intestinal and systemic immune disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stress, Nutrition, and Intestinal Immune Responses in Pigs — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Kyu Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern livestock production became highly intensive and large scaled to increase production efficiency. This production environment could add stressors affecting the health and growth of animals. Major stressors can include environment (air quality and temperature, nutrition, and infection. These stressors can reduce growth performance and alter immune systems at systemic and local levels including the gastrointestinal tract. Heat stress increases the permeability, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in the gut. Nutritional stress from fasting, antinutritional compounds, and toxins induces the leakage and destruction of the tight junction proteins in the gut. Fasting is shown to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deoxynivalenol increases the recruitment of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and the level of lymphocytes in the gut. Pathogenic and viral infections such as Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus can lead to loosening the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, supplementation of Lactobacillus or Saccharaomyces reduced infectious stress by ETEC. It was noted that major stressors altered the permeability of intestinal barriers and profiles of genes and proteins of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mucosal system in pigs. However, it is not sufficient to fully explain the mechanism of the gut immune system in pigs under stress conditions. Correlation and interaction of gut and systemic immune system under major stressors should be better defined to overcome aforementioned obstacles.

  12. [Effect of perioperative intestinal probiotics on intestinal flora and immune function in patients with colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dajian; Chen, Xiaowu; Wu, Jinhao; Ju, Yongle; Feng, Jing; Lu, Guangsheng; Ouyang, Manzhao; Ren, Baojun; Li, Yong

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effect of perioperative application of intestinal probiotics to substitute oral intestinal antimicrobial agents on intestinal flora and immune function in surgical patients with colorectal cancer. Sixty patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective laparoscopic radical surgery were randomized to receive preoperative bowel preparation using oral intestinal antimicrobial agents (n=20) or using oral intestinal probiotics (Jinshuangqi Tablets, 2.0 g, 3 times daily) since the fifth day before the operation and at 24 h after the operation for 7 consecutive days. Upon admission and 7 days after the operation, fecal samples and fasting peripheral venous blood were collected from the patients to examine the intestinal flora and serum levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IgA, IgG, and IgM, NK cell activity, T lymphocytes subsets CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio. At 7 days after the operation, the patients receiving probiotics showed significantly increased counts of intestinal Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus (Pprobiotics group compared with those in patients with conventional intestinal preparation (Pprobiotics to replace preoperative oral intestinal antimicrobial agents can effectively correct intestinal flora imbalance and improve the immune function of surgical patients with colorectal cancer.

  13. Protective effect of lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dan; Fang Lichao; Chen Bingbo; Wei Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and iso-malto-oligosaccharide (IMO) on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea(AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 5 days. The synbiotics was orally administered to the AAD rats daily at three different strengths for 7 days. The intestinal flora and intestinal mucus SIgA levels were determined on d6, d9 and d13. The histopathological changes of ileal mucosa were studied on d13. Results: In the prepared AAD model rats (on d6) there were lower intestinal mucus SIgA levels and intestinal flora disorders were demonstrated. The intestinal floras of the rats administering synbiotics were readjusted to the similar pattern of healthy rats with bacterial translocation corrected on d13 and the levels of SIgA were not significantly different from of the control (P>0.05). The histopathological picture was basically normal in the treated models on d13. Conclusion: The synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide possessed good protective effect on the intestinal mucosal barrier in lincomycin induced rat models of AAD. (authors)

  14. Protection of pigs against genital Chlamydia trachomatis challenge by parenteral or mucosal DNA immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schautteet, Katelijn; De Clercq, Evelien; Jönsson, Yannick; Lagae, Stefanie; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2012-04-16

    The current study evaluates combined aerosol-vaginal delivery of a MOMP-based Chlamydia trachomatis (serovar E) DNA vaccine in a pig genital challenge model. Most non-replicating antigens are rather poor mucosal immunogens in comparison to replicating antigens. Therefore, a mucosal administered DNA vaccine, which actually mimics a live vaccine, could be promising. Protection was promoted by plasmids encoding the porcine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (pcDNA3.1zeo::GM-CSF), the Escherichia coli thermo-labile enterotoxin (LT) subunit A (plasmid PJV2004::LTa) and subunit B (plasmid PJV2005::LTb). Mucosal C. trachomatis DNA vaccination induced significant protection against genital C. trachomatis challenge although the infection could not be eradicated. Intradermal immunization was significantly less efficient in protecting experimentally infected pigs. Protection was correlated with efficient T cell priming and significantly higher serum IgA titers following primo vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Free Total Rhubarb Anthraquinones Protect Intestinal Injury via Regulation of the Intestinal Immune Response in a Rat Model of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxia Xiong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucosal immune barrier dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Rhubarb is a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine as a laxative in China. It markedly protects pancreatic acinar cells from trypsin-induced injury in rats. Free total rhubarb anthraquinones (FTRAs isolated and extracted from rhubarb display the beneficial effects of antibacteria, anti-inflammation, antivirus, and anticancer. The principal aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FTRAs on the protection of intestinal injury and modification of the intestinal barrier function through regulation of intestinal immune function in rats with SAP. We established a rat model of SAP by injecting 3.5% sodium taurocholate (STC, 350 mg/kg into the biliopancreatic duct via retrograde injection and treated the rats with FTRAs (36 or 72 mg/kg or normal saline (control immediately and 12 h after STC injection. Then, we evaluated the protective effect of FTRAs on intestinal injury by pathological analysis and determined the levels of endotoxin (ET, interleukin 1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO, myeloperoxidase (MPO, capillary permeability, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors 3 (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD domain (ASC, casepase-1, secretary immunoglobulin A (SIgA, regulatory T cells (Tregs, and the ratio of Th1/Th2 in the blood and/or small intestinal tissues or mesenteric lymph node (MLN cells. Moreover, the chemical profile of FTRAs was analyzed by HPLC-UV chromatogram. The results showed that FTRAs significantly protected intestinal damage and decreased the levels of ET, IL-1β, TNF-α, and NO in the blood and TNF-α, IL-1β, and protein extravasation in the intestinal tissues in SAP rats. Furthermore, FTRAs significantly decreased the expressions of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1, the number of Tregs and the ratio of Th1/Th2, while

  16. Pathogen invasion changes the intestinal microbiota composition and induces innate immune responses in the zebrafish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Zou, Song-Song; Zhai, Li-Juan; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Fu-Miao; An, Li-Guo; Yang, Gui-Wen

    2017-12-01

    Numerous bacteria are harbored in the animal digestive tract and are impacted by several factors. Intestinal microbiota homeostasis is critical for maintaining the health of an organism. However, how pathogen invasion affects the microbiota composition has not been fully clarified. The mechanisms for preventing invasion by pathogenic microorganisms are yet to be elucidated. Zebrafish is a useful model for developmental biology, and studies in this organism have gradually become focused on intestinal immunity. In this study, we analyzed the microbiota of normal cultivated and infected zebrafish intestines, the aquarium water and feed samples. We found that the predominant bacteria in the zebrafish intestine belonged to Gammaproteobacteria (67%) and that feed and environment merely influenced intestinal microbiota composition only partially. Intestinal microbiota changed after a pathogenic bacterial challenge. At the genus level, the abundance of some pathogenic intestinal bacteria increased, and these genera included Halomonas (50%), Pelagibacterium (3.6%), Aeromonas (2.6%), Nesterenkonia (1%), Chryseobacterium (3.4‰), Mesorhizobium (1.4‰), Vibrio (1‰), Mycoplasma (0.7‰) and Methylobacterium (0.6‰) in IAh group. However, the abundance of some beneficial intestinal bacteria decreased, and these genera included Nitratireductor (0.8‰), Enterococcus (0.8‰), Brevundimonas (0.7‰), Lactococcus (0.7‰) and Lactobacillus (0.4‰). Additionally, we investigated the innate immune responses after infection. ROS levels in intestine increased in the early stages after a challenge and recovered subsequently. The mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptide genes lectin, hepcidin and defensin1, were upregulated in the intestine after pathogen infection. These results suggested that the invasion of pathogen could change the intestinal microbiota composition and induce intestinal innate immune responses in zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Alami Chentoufi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2 are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed.

  18. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  19. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Araújo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/- and wild-type (APOE+/+ C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86 were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM or phosphate buffered saline (PBS by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection. Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001 in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05 were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge.

  20. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, C.V.; Lazzarotto, C.R.; Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de; Ribeiro, R.A.; Bertolini, L.R.; Lima, A.A.M.; Brito, G.A.C.; Oriá, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE -/- ) and wild-type (APOE +/+ ) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE -/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE +/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE -/- -challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge

  1. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, C.V. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lazzarotto, C.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; Oliveira Alves, L.A. de [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Ribeiro, R.A. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Bertolini, L.R. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular e do Desenvolvimento, Universidade de Fortaleza, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Lima, A.A.M. [Laboratório de Doenças Infecciosas, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Brito, G.A.C. [Laboratório da Inflamação e Câncer, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Oriá, R.B. [Laboratório da Biologia da Cicatrização, Ontogenia e Nutrição de Tecidos, INCT - Instituto de Biomedicina do Semiárido Brasileiro, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-04-28

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE{sup -/-}) and wild-type (APOE{sup +/+}) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE{sup -/-} mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE{sup +/+} mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE{sup -/-}-challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU

  2. Review: Gp-340/DMBT1 in mucosal innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Mollenhauer, Jan; Holmskov, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    ) is secreted into broncho-alveolar surface lining fluid whereas DMBT(SAG) is present in the saliva. The two molecules were shown to be identical and both interact with and agglutinate several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including Streptococcus mutans, a bacterium responsible for caries in the oral...... proteins, including serum and secretory IgA, C1q, lactoferrin, MUC5B and trefoil factor 2 (TFF2), all molecules with involvement in innate immunity and/or wound-healing processes. Recent generation of Dmbt1-deficient mice has provided the research field of DMBT1 with a model that allows research...

  3. Mucosal immune system of the gastrointestinal tract: maintaining balance between the good and the bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Bani; Magnusson, Maria K; Öhman, Lena

    2017-11-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) is a unique organ inhabited by a range of commensal microbes, while also being exposed to an overwhelming load of antigens in the form of dietary antigens on a daily basis. The GI tract has dual roles in the body, in that it performs digestion and uptake of nutrients while also carrying out the complex and important task of maintaining immune homeostasis, i.e., keeping the balance between the good and the bad. It is equally important that we protect ourselves from reacting against the good, meaning that we stay tolerant to harmless food, commensal bacteria and self-antigens, as well as react with force against the bad, meaning induction of immune responses against harmful microorganisms. This complex task is achieved through the presence of a highly efficient mucosal barrier and a specialized multifaceted immune system, made up of a large population of scattered immune cells and organized lymphoid tissues termed the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This review provides an overview of the primary components of the human mucosal immune system and how the immune responses in the GI tract are coordinated and induced.

  4. Intestinal bacteria and the regulation of immune cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David A; Artis, David

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine is colonized by an estimated 100 trillion bacteria. Some of these bacteria are essential for normal physiology, whereas others have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple inflammatory diseases including IBD and asthma. This review examines the influence of signals from intestinal bacteria on the homeostasis of the mammalian immune system in the context of health and disease. We review the bacterial composition of the mammalian intestine, known bacterial-derived immunoregulatory molecules, and the mammalian innate immune receptors that recognize them. We discuss the influence of bacterial-derived signals on immune cell function and the mechanisms by which these signals modulate the development and progression of inflammatory disease. We conclude with an examination of successes and future challenges in using bacterial communities or their products in the prevention or treatment of human disease.

  5. Induction of influenza-specific mucosal immunity by an attenuated recombinant Sendai virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuc-vy L Le

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogens initiate infection at the mucosal surfaces; therefore, induction of mucosal immune responses is a first level of defense against infection and is the most powerful means of protection. Although intramuscular injection is widely used for vaccination and is effective at inducing circulating antibodies, it is less effective at inducing mucosal antibodies.Here we report a novel recombinant, attenuated Sendai virus vector (GP42-H1 in which the hemagglutinin (HA gene of influenza A virus was introduced into the Sendai virus genome as an additional gene. Infection of CV-1 cells by GP42-H1 resulted in cell surface expression of the HA protein. Intranasal immunization of mice with 1,000 plaque forming units (pfu of GP42-H1 induced HA-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, fecal pellet extracts and saliva. The HA-specific antibody titer induced by GP42-H1 closely resembles the titer induced by sublethal infection by live influenza virus; however, in contrast to infection by influenza virus, immunization with GP42-H1 did not result in disease symptoms or the loss of body weight. In mice that were immunized with GP42-H1 and then challenged with 5LD(50 (1250 pfu of influenza virus, no significant weight loss was observed and other visual signs of morbidity were not detected.These results demonstrate that the GP42-H1 Sendai virus recombinant is able to confer full protection from lethal infection by influenza virus, supporting the conclusion that it is a safe and effective mucosal vaccine vector.

  6. Sublingual Vaccination Induces Mucosal and Systemic Adaptive Immunity for Protection against Lung Tumor Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Anthony, Scott M.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge...

  7. Systems Modeling of Interactions between Mucosal Immunity and the Gut Microbiome during Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew; Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Philipson, Casandra; Hoops, Stefan; Howard, Brad; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and result in an exuberant inflammatory response, leading to nosocomial diarrhea, colitis and even death. To better understand the dynamics of mucosal immunity during C. difficile infection from initiation through expansion to resolution, we built a computational model of the mucosal immune response to the bacterium. The model was calibrated using data from a mouse model of C. difficile infection. The model demonstrates a crucial role of T helper 17 (Th17) effector responses in the colonic lamina propria and luminal commensal bacteria populations in the clearance of C. difficile and colonic pathology, whereas regulatory T (Treg) cells responses are associated with the recovery phase. In addition, the production of anti-microbial peptides by inflamed epithelial cells and activated neutrophils in response to C. difficile infection inhibit the re-growth of beneficial commensal bacterial species. Computational simulations suggest that the removal of neutrophil and epithelial cell derived anti-microbial inhibitions, separately and together, on commensal bacterial regrowth promote recovery and minimize colonic inflammatory pathology. Simulation results predict a decrease in colonic inflammatory markers, such as neutrophilic influx and Th17 cells in the colonic lamina propria, and length of infection with accelerated commensal bacteria re-growth through altered anti-microbial inhibition. Computational modeling provides novel insights on the therapeutic value of repopulating the colonic microbiome and inducing regulatory mucosal immune responses during C. difficile infection. Thus, modeling mucosal immunity-gut microbiota interactions has the potential to guide the development of targeted fecal transplantation therapies in the context of precision medicine interventions. PMID:26230099

  8. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  9. The effect of preseason training on mucosal immunity in male basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbayjani, M; Nikbakht, H; Rasaee, M J

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of pre season training on restring level and acute response of mucosal immunity in male basketball players. Twenty male basketball players performed 8 weeks progressive exercise training, consisting of interval and continuous parts. Five mL un-stimulated saliva was collected from each subject before, immediately and one hour after the end of one bout of exercise to exhaustion on treadmill at the beginning of the first week and end of 8 weeks to determine the acute responses. At the beginning of each 2 weeks (resting state) induced changes in basal mucosal immunity was evaluated. The concentration of sIgA and total protein was measured by the ELISA and Bradford methods respectively. One bout exercise training at beginning of first week decreased significantly sIgA level but not at the end of 8th week. Total protein did not change significantly at 1st week after exercise, but at eight week significantly increased and remained at high level until one hour after exercise. sIgA to total protein ratio at first week significantly decreased and remained constant one hour after exercise. At the eight week sIgA decreased significantly immediately after exercise and remained low until one hour after exercise. The comparison of sIgA and total protein levels indicates significant decrease after eight weeks training. These results suggest that repetition of single bout of exercise training have a cumulative effect on the mucosal immune system.

  10. Effects of sodium hydrosulfide on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Chen, Di; Liu, Beibei; Xie, Xuemeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Yang, Guangtian

    2013-07-19

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can lead to intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Increasing studies have indicated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is in favor of a variety of tissue I/R injury. The purpose of this study was to explore whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H2S donor, can protect intestinal mucosa after CPR and its potential mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest induced by transcutaneous electrical epicardium stimulation and then resuscitated successfully. A bolus of either NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or placebo (NaCl 0.9%) was blindly injected 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous injection of NaHS (2mg/kg/h) or placebo for 3h. Intestinal and plasma samples were collected for assessments 24h after CPR. We found that NaHS can markedly alleviate cardiac arrest induced intestinal mucosal injury. Rats treated with NaHS showed a lower malondialdehyde content, higher superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content in intestine after CPR. Increased intestinal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly decreased by NaHS after CPR. Moreover, a reduced intestinal apoptotic cells after CPR were evident when pretreated with NaHS. Further studies indicated that NaHS enhances the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in intestine after CPR. Our data demonstrated that NaHS treatment before CPR induces intestinal mucosal protection 24h post-resuscitation. The protective effects may be through oxidative stress reduction, inflammation alleviation, apoptosis inhibition and HIF-1α activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary Animal Plasma Proteins Improve the Intestinal Immune Response in Senescent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Lluïsa; Garcia-Just, Alba; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Moretó, Miquel; Pérez-Bosque, Anna

    2017-12-11

    Increased life expectancy has promoted research on healthy aging. Aging is accompanied by increased non-specific immune activation (inflammaging) which favors the appearance of several disorders. Here, we study whether dietary supplementation with spray-dried animal plasma (SDP), which has been shown to reduce the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in rodents challenged by S. aureus enterotoxin B (SEB), and can also prevent the effects of aging on immune system homeostasis. We first characterized GALT in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAMP8) at different ages (compared to mice resistant to accelerated senescence; SAMR1). Second, we analyzed the SDP effects on GALT response to an SEB challenge in SAMP8 mice. In GALT characterization, aging increased the cell number and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches (all, p response to the SEB challenge, young mice showed increased expression of intestinal IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as lymphocyte recruitment and activation (all, p immune response of senescent mice to the SEB challenge was weak, since SEB did not change cell recruitment or the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes. Mice supplemented with SDP showed improved capacity to respond to the SEB challenge, similar to the response of the young mice. These results indicate that senescent mice have an impaired mucosal immune response characterized by unspecific GALT activation and a weak specific immune response. SDP supplementation reduces non-specific basal immune activation, allowing for the generation of specific responses.

  12. Model systems to analyze the role of miRNAs and commensal microflora in bovine mucosal immune system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guanxiang; Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Guan, Le Luo; Griebel, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Information is rapidly accumulating regarding the role of miRNAs as key regulators of immune system development and function. It is also increasingly evident that miRNAs play an important role in host-pathogen interactions through regulation of both innate and acquired immune responses. Little is known, however, about the specific role of miRNAs in regulating normal development of the mucosal immune system, especially during the neonatal period. Furthermore, there is limited knowledge regarding the possible role the commensal microbiome may play in regulating mucosal miRNAs expression, although evidence is emerging that a variety of enteric pathogens influence miRNA expression. The current review focuses on recent information that miRNAs play an important role in regulating early development of the bovine mucosal immune system. A possible role for the commensal microbiome in regulating mucosal development by altering miRNA expression is also discussed. Finally, we explore the potential advantages of using the newborn calf as a model to determine how interactions between developmental programming, maternal factors in colostrum, and colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by commensal bacteria may alter mucosal miRNA expression and immune development. Identifying the key factors that regulate mucosal miRNA expression is critical for understanding how the balance between protective immunity and inflammation is maintained to ensure optimal gastrointestinal tract function and health of the whole organism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Type 3 muscarinic receptors contribute to intestinal mucosal homeostasis and clearance of nippostrongylus brasiliensis through induction of Th2 cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite increased appreciation for the role of nicotinic receptors in the modulation of and response to inflammation, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to mucosal homeostasis, clearance of enteric pathogens, and modulation of immune cell function remains relatively undefined. Uninfected and N...

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor preserves intestinal mucosal barrier function and alters gut microbiota in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosal barrier (IMB enables the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. In this study, we explored the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF on IMB function and gut microbiota in mice. BDNF gene knock-out mice (the BDNF+/− group and wild-type mice (the BDNF+/+ group were selected. The gut microbiota of these mice was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE assay. The ultrastructure of the ileum and the colonic epithelium obtained from decapitated mice were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The protein expression of epithelial tight junction proteins, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 and occludin was detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The protein expression of claudin-1 and claudin-2 was determined by Western blotting. The DGGE band patterns of gut microbiota in the BDNF+/− group were significantly different from that in the BDNF+/+ group, which indicated that the BDNF expression alters the gut microbiota in mice. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the BDNF+/− group presented no significant difference in the ultrastructure of ileal epithelium; however, a significant difference was observed in the colonic epithelial barrier, manifested by decreased microvilli, widening intercellular space and bacterial invasion. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the expression of ZO-1 and occludin in the BDNF+/− group was significantly decreased. The expression of claudin-1 in the BDNF+/− group was significantly reduced, while the expression of claudin-2 was elevated. These findings indicate that BDNF preserves IMB function and modulates gut microbiota in mice.

  15. Endocine™, N3OA and N3OASq; three mucosal adjuvants that enhance the immune response to nasal influenza vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Falkeborn

    Full Text Available Annual outbreaks of seasonal influenza are controlled or prevented through vaccination in many countries. The seasonal vaccines used are either inactivated, currently administered parenterally, or live-attenuated given intranasally. In this study three mucosal adjuvants were examined for the influence on the humoral (mucosal and systemic and cellular influenza A-specific immune responses induced by a nasally administered vaccine. We investigated in detail how the anionic Endocine™ and the cationic adjuvants N3OA and N3OASq mixed with a split inactivated influenza vaccine induced influenza A-specific immune responses as compared to the vaccine alone after intranasal immunization. The study showed that nasal administration of a split virus vaccine together with Endocine™ or N3OA induced significantly higher humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the non-adjuvanted vaccine. N3OASq only significantly increased the cell-mediated immune response. Furthermore, nasal administration of the influenza vaccine in combination with any of the adjuvants; Endocine™, N3OA or N3OASq, significantly enhanced the mucosal immunity against influenza HA protein. Thus the addition of these mucosal adjuvants leads to enhanced immunity in the most relevant tissues, the upper respiratory tract and the systemic circulation. Nasal influenza vaccination with an inactivated split vaccine can therefore provide an important mucosal immune response, which is often low or absent after traditional parenteral vaccination.

  16. Characterising the mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental human hookworm infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Gaze

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal cytokine response of healthy humans to parasitic helminths has never been reported. We investigated the systemic and mucosal cytokine responses to hookworm infection in experimentally infected, previously hookworm naive individuals from non-endemic areas. We collected both peripheral blood and duodenal biopsies to assess the systemic immune response, as well as the response at the site of adult worm establishment. Our results show that experimental hookworm infection leads to a strong systemic and mucosal Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13 and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β response, with some evidence of a Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2 response. Despite upregulation after patency of both IL-15 and ALDH1A2, a known Th17-inducing combination in inflammatory diseases, we saw no evidence of a Th17 (IL-17 response. Moreover, we observed strong suppression of mucosal IL-23 and upregulation of IL-22 during established hookworm infection, suggesting a potential mechanism by which Th17 responses are suppressed, and highlighting the potential that hookworms and their secreted proteins offer as therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.

  17. Gene-based neonatal immune priming potentiates a mucosal adenoviral vaccine encoding mycobacterial Ag85B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guixiang; Rady, Hamada F; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-12-07

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health hazard worldwide, with neonates and young infants potentially more susceptible to infection than adults. BCG, the only vaccine currently available, provides some protection against tuberculous meningitis in children but variable efficacy in adults, and is not safe to use in immune compromised individuals. A safe and effective vaccine that could be given early in life, and that could also potentiate subsequent booster immunization, would represent a significant advance. To test this proposition, we have generated gene-based vaccine vectors expressing Ag85B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and designed experiments to test their immunogenicity and protective efficacy particularly when given in heterologous prime-boost combination, with the initial DNA vaccine component given soon after birth. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines elicited Th1-based immune responses against Ag85B in neonatal mice but did not protect them from subsequent aerosol challenge with virulent Mtb H37Rv. Recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding Ag85B, given via the intranasal route at six weeks of age, generated moderate immune responses and were poorly protective. However, neonatal DNA priming following by mucosal boosting with recombinant adenovirus generated strong immune responses, as evidenced by strong Ag85B-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, both in the lung-associated lymph nodes and the spleen, by the quality of these responding cells (assessed by their capacity to secrete multiple antimicrobial factors), and by improved protection, as indicated by reduced bacterial burden in the lungs following pulmonary TB challenge. These results suggest that neonatal immunization with gene-based vaccines may create a favorable immunological environment that potentiates the pulmonary mucosal boosting effects of a subsequent heterologous vector vaccine encoding the same antigen. Our data indicate that immunization early in life with mycobacterial

  18. Potential role of the intestinal microbiota of the mother in neonatal immune education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnet-Hughes, Anne; Perez, Pablo F; Doré, Joël; Leclerc, Marion; Levenez, Florence; Benyacoub, Jalil; Serrant, Patrick; Segura-Roggero, Iris; Schiffrin, Eduardo J

    2010-08-01

    Mucosal dendritic cells are at the heart of decision-making processes that dictate immune reactivity to intestinal microbes. They ensure tolerance to commensal bacteria and a vigorous immune response to pathogens. It has recently been demonstrated that the former involves a limited migration of bacterially loaded dendritic cells from the Peyer's patches to the mesenteric lymph nodes. During lactation, cells from gut-associated lymphoid tissue travel to the breast via the lymphatics and peripheral blood. Here, we show that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and breast milk cells contain bacteria and their genetic material during lactation. Furthermore, we show an increased bacterial translocation from the mouse gut during pregnancy and lactation and the presence of bacterially loaded dendritic cells in lactating breast tissue. Our observations show bacterial translocation as a unique physiological event, which is increased during pregnancy and lactation. They suggest endogenous transport of intestinally derived bacterial components within dendritic cells destined for the lactating mammary gland. They also suggest neonatal immune imprinting by milk cells containing commensal-associated molecular patterns.

  19. Humoral intestinal immunity against Encephalitozoon cuniculi (Microsporidia) infection in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sak, Bohumil; Ditrich, Oleg

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1/2 (2005), s. 158-162 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : microsporidiosis * intestinal immunity * Encephalitozoon cuniculi Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.138, year: 2005

  20. Human Circulating Antibody-Producing B Cell as a Predictive Measure of Mucosal Immunity to Poliovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Dey

    Full Text Available The "gold standard" for assessing mucosal immunity after vaccination with poliovirus vaccines consists in measuring virus excretion in stool after challenge with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV. This testing is time and resource intensive, and development of alternative methods is a priority for accelerating polio eradication. We therefore evaluated circulating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs as a potential means to evaluate mucosal immunity to poliovirus vaccine.199 subjects, aged 10 years, and previously immunized repeatedly with OPV, were selected. Subjects were assigned to receive either a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV, bivalent OPV (bOPV, or no vaccine. Using a micro-modified whole blood-based ELISPOT assay designed for field setting, circulating poliovirus type-specific IgA- and IgG-ASCs, including gut homing α4β7+ ASCs, were enumerated on days 0 and 7 after booster immunization. In addition, serum samples collected on days 0, 28 and 56 were tested for neutralizing antibody titers against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3. Stool specimens were collected on day 28 (day of bOPV challenge, and on days 31, 35 and 42 and processed for poliovirus isolation.An IPV dose elicited blood IgA- and IgG-ASC responses in 84.8 to 94.9% of subjects, respectively. In comparison, a bOPV dose evoked corresponding blood ASC responses in 20.0 to 48.6% of subjects. A significant association was found between IgA- and IgG-ASC responses and serum neutralizing antibody titers for poliovirus type 1, 2, 3 (p<0.001. In the IPV group, α4β7+ ASCs accounted for a substantial proportion of IgA-ASCs and the proportion of subjects with a positive α4β7+ IgA-ASC response to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 was 62.7%, 89.8% and 45.8%, respectively. A significant association was observed between virus excretion and α4β7+ IgA- and/or IgG-ASC responses to poliovirus type 3 among immunized children; however, only a weak association was found for type 1 poliovirus

  1. Cross-protective mucosal immunity mediated by memory Th17 cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Jiang, B; Guo, Y; Li, W; Tian, Y; Sonnenberg, G F; Weiser, J N; Ni, X; Shen, H

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of the current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced, and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology, and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong T-helper type 17 (Th17) responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4 + T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by interleukin-17A (IL-17A) blockade. Transfer of memory CD4 + T cells from IL-17A-knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells had a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype-independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells.

  2. A polyphenol-enriched diet and Ascaris suum infection modulate mucosal immune responses and gut microbiota composition in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Williams

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are a class of bioactive plant secondary metabolites that are thought to have beneficial effects on gut health, such as modulation of mucosal immune and inflammatory responses and regulation of parasite burdens. Here, we examined the interactions between a polyphenol-rich diet supplement and infection with the enteric nematode Ascaris suum in pigs. Pigs were fed either a basal diet or the same diet supplemented with grape pomace (GP, an industrial by-product rich in polyphenols such as oligomeric proanthocyanidins. Half of the animals in each group were then inoculated with A. suum for 14 days to assess parasite establishment, acquisition of local and systemic immune responses and effects on the gut microbiome. Despite in vitro anthelmintic activity of GP-extracts, numbers of parasite larvae in the intestine were not altered by GP-supplementation. However, the bioactive diet significantly increased numbers of eosinophils induced by A. suum infection in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and modulated gene expression in the jejunal mucosa of infected pigs. Both GP-supplementation and A. suum infection induced significant and apparently similar changes in the composition of the prokaryotic gut microbiota, and both also decreased concentrations of isobutyric and isovaleric acid (branched-chain short chain fatty acids in the colon. Our results demonstrate that while a polyphenol-enriched diet in pigs may not directly influence A. suum establishment, it significantly modulates the subsequent host response to helminth infection. Our results suggest an influence of diet on immune function which may potentially be exploited to enhance immunity to helminths.

  3. A polyphenol-enriched diet and Ascaris suum infection modulate mucosal immune responses and gut microbiota composition in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych, Lukasz; Fauzan Ahmad, Hajar; Nejsum, Peter; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols are a class of bioactive plant secondary metabolites that are thought to have beneficial effects on gut health, such as modulation of mucosal immune and inflammatory responses and regulation of parasite burdens. Here, we examined the interactions between a polyphenol-rich diet supplement and infection with the enteric nematode Ascaris suum in pigs. Pigs were fed either a basal diet or the same diet supplemented with grape pomace (GP), an industrial by-product rich in polyphenols such as oligomeric proanthocyanidins. Half of the animals in each group were then inoculated with A. suum for 14 days to assess parasite establishment, acquisition of local and systemic immune responses and effects on the gut microbiome. Despite in vitro anthelmintic activity of GP-extracts, numbers of parasite larvae in the intestine were not altered by GP-supplementation. However, the bioactive diet significantly increased numbers of eosinophils induced by A. suum infection in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, and modulated gene expression in the jejunal mucosa of infected pigs. Both GP-supplementation and A. suum infection induced significant and apparently similar changes in the composition of the prokaryotic gut microbiota, and both also decreased concentrations of isobutyric and isovaleric acid (branched-chain short chain fatty acids) in the colon. Our results demonstrate that while a polyphenol-enriched diet in pigs may not directly influence A. suum establishment, it significantly modulates the subsequent host response to helminth infection. Our results suggest an influence of diet on immune function which may potentially be exploited to enhance immunity to helminths. PMID:29028844

  4. Dietary Animal Plasma Proteins Improve the Intestinal Immune Response in Senescent Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluïsa Miró

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased life expectancy has promoted research on healthy aging. Aging is accompanied by increased non-specific immune activation (inflammaging which favors the appearance of several disorders. Here, we study whether dietary supplementation with spray-dried animal plasma (SDP, which has been shown to reduce the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT in rodents challenged by S. aureus enterotoxin B (SEB, and can also prevent the effects of aging on immune system homeostasis. We first characterized GALT in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAMP8 at different ages (compared to mice resistant to accelerated senescence; SAMR1. Second, we analyzed the SDP effects on GALT response to an SEB challenge in SAMP8 mice. In GALT characterization, aging increased the cell number and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches (all, p < 0.05, as well as the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α in intestinal mucosa (both, p < 0.05. With respect to GALT response to the SEB challenge, young mice showed increased expression of intestinal IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as lymphocyte recruitment and activation (all, p < 0.05. However, the immune response of senescent mice to the SEB challenge was weak, since SEB did not change cell recruitment or the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes. Mice supplemented with SDP showed improved capacity to respond to the SEB challenge, similar to the response of the young mice. These results indicate that senescent mice have an impaired mucosal immune response characterized by unspecific GALT activation and a weak specific immune response. SDP supplementation reduces non-specific basal immune activation, allowing for the generation of specific responses.

  5. The Impact of Western Diet and Nutrients on the Microbiota and Immune Response at Mucosal Interfaces

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    Donjete Statovci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings point toward diet having a major impact on human health. Diets can either affect the gut microbiota resulting in alterations in the host’s physiological responses or by directly targeting the host response. The microbial community in the mammalian gut is a complex and dynamic system crucial for the development and maturation of both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Therefore, the complex interaction between available nutrients, the microbiota, and the immune system are central regulators in maintaining homeostasis and fighting against invading pathogens at mucosal sites. Westernized diet, defined as high dietary intake of saturated fats and sucrose and low intake of fiber, represent a growing health risk contributing to the increased occurrence of metabolic diseases, e.g., diabetes and obesity in countries adapting a westernized lifestyle. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and asthma are chronic mucosal inflammatory conditions of unknown etiology with increasing prevalence worldwide. These conditions have a multifactorial etiology including genetic factors, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses. Their increased prevalence cannot solely be attributed to genetic considerations implying that other factors such as diet can be a major contributor. Recent reports indicate that the gut microbiota and modifications thereof, due to a consumption of a diet high in saturated fats and low in fibers, can trigger factors regulating the development and/or progression of both conditions. While asthma is a disease of the airways, increasing evidence indicates a link between the gut and airways in disease development. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review on the impact of westernized diet and associated nutrients on immune cell responses and the microbiota and how these can influence the pathology of IBD and asthma.

  6. Regulation of T-cell Responses in the Inflamed Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Van Leeuwen (Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The intestinal immune system protects the mucosal surfaces from pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand it maintains tolerance towards dietary antigens and non-pathogenic microorganisms. The immune system continuously tailors these inflammatory and tolerogenic

  7. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailbala Singh

    Full Text Available Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  8. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S; Anthony, Scott M; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  9. The Effect of Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang on Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells in Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxue Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang (TXYF on intestinal mucosal mast cells in rats with postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS. Design. PI-IBS rat models were established using a multistimulation paradigm. Then, rats were treated with TXYF intragastrically at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 g·kg−1·d−1 for 14 days, respectively. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR scores and fecal water content (FWC. Mast cell counts and the immunofluorescence of tryptase and c-Fos in intestinal mucosa were measured; and serum IL-1β, TNF-α, and histamine levels were determined. Results. AWR reactivity and FWC which were significantly increased could be observed in PI-IBS rats. Remarkably increased mast cell activation ratio in intestinal mucosa, together with increased serum TNF-α and histamine levels, could also be seen in PI-IBS rats; furthermore, PI-IBS-induced changes in mast cell activation and level of serum TNF-α and histamine could be reversed by TXYF treatment. Meanwhile, tryptase and c-Fos expression were also downregulated. Conclusion. TXYF improves PI-IBS symptoms by alleviating behavioral hyperalgesia and antidiarrhea, the underlying mechanism of which involves the inhibitory effects of TXYF on activating mucosal mast cells, downregulating tryptase and c-Fos expression, and reducing serum TNF-α and histamine levels.

  10. The Ocular Conjunctiva as a Mucosal Immunization Route: A Profile of the Immune Response to the Model Antigen Tetanus Toxoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belij, Sandra; Marinkovic, Emilija; Stojicevic, Ivana; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Stein, Elisabeth; Bintner, Nora; Stojanovic, Marijana

    2013-01-01

    Background In a quest for a needle-free vaccine administration strategy, we evaluated the ocular conjunctiva as an alternative mucosal immunization route by profiling and comparing the local and systemic immune responses to the subcutaneous or conjunctival administration of tetanus toxoid (TTd), a model antigen. Materials and methods BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized either subcutaneously with TTd alone or via the conjunctiva with TTd alone, TTd mixed with 2% glycerol or TTd with merthiolate-inactivated whole-cell B. pertussis (wBP) as adjuvants. Mice were immunized on days 0, 7 and 14 via both routes, and an evaluation of the local and systemic immune responses was performed two weeks after the last immunization. Four weeks after the last immunization, the mice were challenged with a lethal dose (2 × LD50) of tetanus toxin. Results The conjunctival application of TTd in BALB/c mice induced TTd-specific secretory IgA production and skewed the TTd-specific immune response toward a Th1/Th17 profile, as determined by the stimulation of IFNγ and IL-17A secretion and/or the concurrent pronounced reduction of IL-4 secretion, irrespective of the adjuvant. In conjunctivaly immunized C57BL/6 mice, only TTd administered with wBP promoted the establishment of a mixed Th1/Th17 TTd-specific immune response, whereas TTd alone or TTd in conjunction with glycerol initiated a dominant Th1 response against TTd. Immunization via the conjunctiva with TTd plus wBP adjuvant resulted in a 33% survival rate of challenged mice compared to a 0% survival rate in non-immunized animals (p<0.05). Conclusion Conjunctival immunization with TTd alone or with various adjuvants induced TTd-specific local and systemic immune responses, predominantly of the Th1 type. The strongest immune responses developed in mice that received TTd together with wBP, which implies that this alternative route might tailor the immune response to fight intracellular bacteria or viruses more effectively. PMID

  11. The ocular conjunctiva as a mucosal immunization route: a profile of the immune response to the model antigen tetanus toxoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talin Barisani-Asenbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a quest for a needle-free vaccine administration strategy, we evaluated the ocular conjunctiva as an alternative mucosal immunization route by profiling and comparing the local and systemic immune responses to the subcutaneous or conjunctival administration of tetanus toxoid (TTd, a model antigen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized either subcutaneously with TTd alone or via the conjunctiva with TTd alone, TTd mixed with 2% glycerol or TTd with merthiolate-inactivated whole-cell B. pertussis (wBP as adjuvants. Mice were immunized on days 0, 7 and 14 via both routes, and an evaluation of the local and systemic immune responses was performed two weeks after the last immunization. Four weeks after the last immunization, the mice were challenged with a lethal dose (2 × LD50 of tetanus toxin. RESULTS: The conjunctival application of TTd in BALB/c mice induced TTd-specific secretory IgA production and skewed the TTd-specific immune response toward a Th1/Th17 profile, as determined by the stimulation of IFNγ and IL-17A secretion and/or the concurrent pronounced reduction of IL-4 secretion, irrespective of the adjuvant. In conjunctivaly immunized C57BL/6 mice, only TTd administered with wBP promoted the establishment of a mixed Th1/Th17 TTd-specific immune response, whereas TTd alone or TTd in conjunction with glycerol initiated a dominant Th1 response against TTd. Immunization via the conjunctiva with TTd plus wBP adjuvant resulted in a 33% survival rate of challenged mice compared to a 0% survival rate in non-immunized animals (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Conjunctival immunization with TTd alone or with various adjuvants induced TTd-specific local and systemic immune responses, predominantly of the Th1 type. The strongest immune responses developed in mice that received TTd together with wBP, which implies that this alternative route might tailor the immune response to fight intracellular bacteria or viruses more

  12. Gold nanoparticles conjugating recombinant influenza hemagglutinin trimers and flagellin enhanced mucosal cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhu, Wandi; Luo, Yuan; Wang, Bao-Zhong

    2018-04-09

    The immunogenicity of subunit vaccines can be augmented by formulating them into nanoparticles. We conjugated recombinant trimetric influenza A/Aichi/2/68(H3N2) hemagglutinin (HA) onto functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) surfaces in a repetitive, oriented configuration. To further improve the immunogenicity, we generated Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist flagellin (FliC)-coupled AuNPs as particulate adjuvants. Intranasal immunizations with an AuNP-HA and AuNP-FliC particle mixture elicited strong mucosal and systemic immune responses that protected hosts against lethal influenza challenges. Compared with the AuNP-HA alone group, the addition of AuNP-FliC improved mucosal B cell responses as characterized by elevated influenza specific IgA and IgG levels in nasal, tracheal, and lung washes. AuNP-HA/AuNP-FliC also stimulated antigen-specific interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4 + cell proliferation and induced strong effector CD8 + T cell activation. Our results indicate that intranasal co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant-displaying AuNPs enhanced vaccine efficacy by inducing potent cellular immune responses. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Noninvasive Sampling of Mucosal Lining Fluid for the Quantification of In Vivo Upper Airway Immune-mediator Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Helene Mygind; Chawes, Bo L.; Thorsen, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes noninvasive sampling of undisturbed upper airway mucosal lining fluid. It also details the extraction procedure used prior to the analysis of immune mediators in fluid eluates for the study of the airway topical immune signature, without the need for stimulation procedures...

  14. Intestinal helminth coinfection is associated with mucosal lesions and poor response to therapy in American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo-Coutinho, Rilza Beatriz G; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Madeira, Maria F; Cataldo, Jamyra Iglesias; Schubach, Armando O; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; de Mello, Cintia Xavier; Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-02-01

    The most severe clinical form of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) due to Leishmania braziliensis is mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), characterized by destructive lesions in the facial mucosa. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 109 ATL patients from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, where ATL is caused by L. braziliensis, to evaluate the influence of intestinal parasite coinfections in the clinical course of ATL. Parasitological stool examination (PSE) was performed with samples from all patients by the sedimentation, Kato-Katz and Baermann-Moraes methods. The diagnosis of ATL was made from lesion biopsies by direct observation of amastigotes in Giemsa-stained imprints, isolation of Leishmania promastigotes or histopathological examination. All patients were treated with meglumine antimoniate. Patients with positive PSE had a frequency of mucosal lesions significantly higher than those with negative PSE (p<0.005). The same was observed for infections with helminths in general (p<0.05), with nematodes (p<0.05) and with Ascaris lumbricoides (p<0.05), but not for protozoan infections. Patients with intestinal parasites had poor response to therapy (therapeutic failure or relapse) significantly more frequently than the patients with negative stool examination (p<0.005). A similar difference (p<0.005) was observed between patients with positive and negative results for intestinal helminths, but not for intestinal protozoa. Patients with positive PSE took significantly longer to heal than those with negative PSE (p<0.005). A similar difference was observed for intestinal helminth infections (p<0.005), but not for protozoan infections. Our results indicate a deleterious influence of intestinal helminth infections in the clinical course of ATL and evidence for the first time an association between ML and these coinfections, particularly with nematodes and A. lumbricoides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitamin D signaling in intestinal innate immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Vassil; White, John H

    2017-09-15

    The lumen of the gut hosts a plethora of microorganisms that participate in food assimilation, inactivation of harmful particles and in vitamin synthesis. On the other hand, enteric flora, a number of food antigens, and toxins are capable of triggering immune responses causing inflammation, which, when unresolved, may lead to chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is important, therefore, to contain the gut bacteria within the lumen, control microbial load and composition, as well as ensure adequate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic threats. There is growing evidence that vitamin D signaling has impacts on all these aspects of intestinal physiology, contributing to healthy enteric homeostasis. VD was first discovered as the curative agent for nutritional rickets, and its classical actions are associated with calcium absorption and bone health. However, vitamin D exhibits a number of extra-skeletal effects, particularly in innate immunity. Notably, it stimulates production of pattern recognition receptors, anti-microbial peptides, and cytokines, which are at the forefront of innate immune responses. They play a role in sensing the microbiota, in preventing excessive bacterial overgrowth, and complement the actions of vitamin D signaling in enhancing intestinal barrier function. Vitamin D also favours tolerogenic rather than inflammogenic T cell differentiation and function. Compromised innate immune function and overactive adaptive immunity, as well as defective intestinal barrier function, have been associated with IBD. Importantly, observational and intervention studies support a beneficial role of vitamin D supplementation in patients with Crohn's disease, a form of IBD. This review summarizes the effects of vitamin D signaling on barrier integrity and innate and adaptive immunity in the gut, as well as on microbial load and composition. Collectively, studies to date reveal that vitamin D signaling has widespread effects

  16. Neonatal sublingual vaccination with Salmonella proteins and adjuvant cholera toxin or CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induces mucosal and systemic immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wang, Chih-Chien; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Keh-Gong; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2008-03-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common enteric pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. A vaccine that can induce systemic and mucosal immune responses by a simple, noninvasive pathway and provide protection against this mucosal pathogen is needed. Newborn BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated daily for the first 3 days with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) only, or SSP combined with adjuvant CpG or cholera toxin (CT). A booster vaccination was given 7 weeks after the last treatment. Serum and saliva antibody responses, cytokine profiles of spleen cells, survival rate, and intestinal morphology after live S enteritidis challenge were investigated. Saliva-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were markedly enhanced by neonatal sublingual vaccination with SSP together with adjuvant CpG or CT. Whereas vaccination with SSP and CpG enhanced spleen cell interferon-gamma production and serum-specific IgG2a antibody responses, vaccination with SSP and CT increased spleen cell interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, and interferon-gamma production and serum-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses. Vaccination with SSP and CpG or CT protected against intestinal necrosis and was associated with a higher survival rate after oral challenge with live S enteritidis. The vaccinated mice with higher specific IgG and saliva-specific secretory IgA antibody levels had a better survival rate. Neonatal sublingual vaccination with adjuvant CpG or CT can induce both mucosal and systemic immunity and may play a crucial role in protection against enteric pathogens.

  17. Induction of HIV-1–Specific Mucosal Immune Responses Following Intramuscular Recombinant Adenovirus Serotype 26 HIV-1 Vaccination of Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Lindsey R.; Liu, Jinyan; Li, Hualin; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Walsh, Stephen R.; Kleinjan, Jane A.; Engelson, Brian A.; Peter, Lauren; Abbink, Peter; Milner, Danny A.; Golden, Kevin L.; Viani, Kyle L.; Stachler, Matthew D.; Chen, Benjamin J.; Pau, Maria G.; Weijtens, Mo; Carey, Brittany R.; Miller, Caroline A.; Swann, Edith M.; Wolff, Mark; Loblein, Hayley; Seaman, Michael S.; Dolin, Raphael; Barouch, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Defining mucosal immune responses and inflammation to candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines represents a current research priority for the HIV-1 vaccine field. In particular, it is unclear whether intramuscular immunization can elicit immune responses at mucosal surfaces in humans. Methods In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated systemic and mucosal immune responses to a candidate adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vectored HIV-1 envelop (Env) vaccine in baseline Ad26-seronegative and Ad26-seropositive healthy volunteers. Systematic mucosal sampling with rectal Weck-Cel sponges and rectal biopsies were performed. Results Intramuscular immunization elicited both systemic and mucosal Env-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the majority of subjects. Individuals with preexisting Ad26-specific neutralizing antibodies had vaccine-elicited immune responses comparable to those of subjects who were Ad26 seronegative. We also observed no increase in activated total or vector-specific mucosal CD4+ T lymphocytes following vaccination by either histopathology or flow cytometry. Conclusions These data demonstrate that a single intramuscular administration of this Ad26-vectored HIV-1 Env vaccine elicited both systemic and mucosal immune responses in humans. Induction of antigen-specific humoral and cellular mucosal immunity was not accompanied by a detectable increase in mucosal inflammation. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01103687. PMID:25165165

  18. Innate immunity in HIV-1 infection: epithelial and non-specific host factors of mucosal immunity- a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayananta, W; Weinberg, A; Malamud, D; Moyes, D; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Ghosh, S

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between HIV-1 and epithelial cells represents a critical aspect in mucosal HIV-1 transmission. Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity cover subepithelial tissues, which contain virus-susceptible host cells including CD4(+) T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. Oral epithelia are among the sites of first exposure to both cell-free and cell-associated virus HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. However, oral mucosa is considered to be naturally resistant to HIV-1 transmission. Oral epithelial cells have been shown to play a crucial role in innate host defense. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what degree these local innate immune factors contribute to HIV-1 resistance of the oral mucosa. This review paper addressed the following issues that were discussed at the 7th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS held in Hyderabad, India, during November 6-9, 2014: (i) What is the fate of HIV-1 after interactions with oral epithelial cells?; (ii) What are the keratinocyte and other anti-HIV effector oral factors, and how do they contribute to mucosal protection?; (iii) How can HIV-1 interactions with oral epithelium affect activation and populations of local immune cells?; (iv) How can HIV-1 interactions alter functions of oral epithelial cells? © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The intestinal microbiota modulates the anticancer immune effects of cyclophosphamide.

    OpenAIRE

    Viaud S; Saccheri F; Mignot G; Yamazaki T; Daill\\xere R; Hannani D; Enot DP; Pfirschke C; Engblom C; Pittet MJ; Schlitzer A; Ginhoux F; Apetoh L; Chachaty E; Woerther PL

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide is one of several clinically important cancer drugs whose therapeutic efficacy is due in part to their ability to stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. Studying mouse models, we demonstrate that cyclophosphamide alters the composition of microbiota in the small intestine and induces the translocation of selected species of Gram+ bacteria into secondary lymphoid organs. There, these bacteria stimulate the generation of a specific subset of “pathogenic” T helper 17 (pTh17) cel...

  20. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Guerrant. 2007. Heavy cryptosporidial infections in children in northeast Brazil: comparison of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum...Asgharpour, C. T. Ng, D. P. Calfee, R. L. Guerrant, V. Maro, S. Ole-Nguyaine, and J. F. Shao. 2005. Short report: asymptomatic Cryptosporidium hominis ...JAN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection 5a

  1. The relationship between mucosal immunity, nasopharyngeal carriage, asymptomatic transmission and the resurgence of Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher; Rohani, Pejman; Thea, Donald M

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of whooping cough in the US has been rising slowly since the 1970s, but the pace of this has accelerated sharply since acellular pertussis vaccines replaced the earlier whole cell vaccines in the late 1990s. A similar trend occurred in many other countries, including the UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and Spain, following the switch to acellular vaccines. The key question is why. Two leading theories (short duration of protective immunologic persistence and evolutionary shifts in the pathogen to evade the vaccine) explain some but not all of these shifts, suggesting that other factors may also be important. In this synthesis, we argue that sterilizing mucosal immunity that blocks or abbreviates the duration of nasopharyngeal carriage of Bordetella pertussis and impedes person-to-person transmission (including between asymptomatically infected individuals) is a critical factor in this dynamic. Moreover, we argue that the ability to induce such mucosal immunity is fundamentally what distinguishes whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccines and may be pivotal to understanding much of the resurgence of this disease in many countries that adopted acellular vaccines. Additionally, we offer the hypothesis that observed herd effects generated by acellular vaccines may reflect a modification of disease presentation leading to reduced potential for transmission by those already infected, as opposed to inducing resistance to infection among those who have been exposed. PMID:28928960

  2. The interplay between the gut immune system and microbiota in health and disease: nutraceutical intervention for restoring intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Gut immune system is daily exposed to a plethora of antigens contained in the environment as well as in food. Both secondary lymphoid tissue, such as Peyer's patches, and lymphoid follicles (tertiary lymphoid tissue) are able to respond to antigenic stimuli releasing cytokines or producing antibodies (secretory IgA). Intestinal epithelial cells are in close cooperation with intraepithelial lymphocytes and possess Toll-like receptors on their surface and Nod-like receptors (NLRs) which sense pathogens or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Intestinal microbiota, mainly composed of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, generates tolerogenic response acting on gut dendritic cells and inhibiting the T helper (h)-17 cell anti-inflammatory pathway. This is the case of Bacteroides fragilis which leads to the production of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, from both T regulatory cells and lamina propria macrophages. Conversely, segmented filamentous bacteria rather induce Th17 cells, thus promoting intestinal inflammation. Intestinal microbiota and its toxic components have been shown to act on both Nod1 and Nod2 receptors and their defective signaling accounts for the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In IBD a loss of normal tolerance to intestinal microbiota seems to be the main trigger of mucosal damage. In addition, intestinal microbiota thanks to its regulatory function of gut immune response can prevent or retard neoplastic growth. In fact, chronic exposure to environmental microorganisms seems to be associated with low frequency of cancer risk. Major nutraceuticals or functional foods employed in the modulation of intestinal microbiota are represented by prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids, amino acids and polyphenols. The cellular and molecular effects performed by these natural products in terms of modulation of the intestinal microbiota and mostly attenuation of the inflammatory pathway are described.

  3. Comparison of mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses and subsequent protection in mice orally inoculated with a homologous or a heterologous rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, N; Burns, J W; Bracy, L; Greenberg, H B

    1994-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide, and vaccination is probably the most effective way to control the disease. Most current live virus vaccine candidates are based on the host range-restricted attenuation of heterologous animal rotaviruses in humans. The protective efficacy of these vaccine candidates has been variable. To better understand the nature of the heterologous rotavirus-induced active immune response, we compared the differences in the mucosal and systemic immune responses generated by heterologous (nonmurine) and homologous (murine) rotaviruses as well as the ability of these infections to produce subsequent protective immunity in a mouse model. Sucking mice were orally inoculated with a heterologous simian or bovine rotavirus (strain RRV or NCDV) or a homologous murine rotavirus (wild-type or tissue culture-adapted) strain EHP at various doses. Six weeks later, mice were challenged with a virulent murine rotavirus (wild-type strain ECW) and the shedding of viral antigen in feces was quantitated. Levels of rotavirus-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fecal IgA prior to challenge were measured and correlated with subsequent viral shedding or protection. Heterologous rotavirus-induced active protection was highly dependent on the strain and dose of the virus tested. Mice inoculated with a high dose (10(7) PFU per mouse) of RRV were completely protected, while the protection was diminished in animals inoculated with NCDV or lower doses of RRV. The ability of a heterologous rotavirus to stimulate a detectable intestinal IgA response correlated with the ability of the virus to generate protective immunity. Serum IgG titer did not correlate with protection. Homologous rotavirus infection, on the other hand, was much more efficient at inducing both mucosal and systemic immune responses as well as protection regardless of the virulence of the virus strain or the size of the immunizing dose.

  4. Protective immunity against Naegleria fowleri infection on mice immunized with the rNfa1 protein using mucosal adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyoung; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Hee-kyoung; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    The free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes a fatal disease called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. Of the pathogenic mechanism of N. fowleri concerning host tissue invasion, the adherence of amoeba to hose cells is the most important. We previously cloned the nfa1 gene from N. fowleri. The protein displayed immunolocalization in the pseudopodia, especially the food-cups structure, and was related to the contact-dependent mechanism of the amoebic pathogenicity in N. fowleri infection. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) have been used as potent mucosal adjuvants via the parenteral route of immunization in most cases. In this study, to examine the effect of protective immunity of the Nfa1 protein for N. fowleri infection with enhancement by CTB or LTB adjuvants, intranasally immunized BALB/c mice were infected with N. fowleri trophozoites for the development of PAM. The mean time to death of mice immunized with the Nfa1 protein using LTB or CTB adjuvant was prolonged by 5 or 8 days in comparison with that of the control mice. In particular, the survival rate of mice immunized with Nfa1 plus CTB was 100% during the experimental period. The serum IgG levels were significantly increased in mice immunized with Nfa1 protein plus CTB or LTB adjuvants. These results suggest that the Nfa1 protein, with CTB or LTB adjuvants, induces strong protective immunity in mice with PAM due to N. fowleri infection.

  5. Postirradiation intestinal mucosal kinetics in Indian desert gerbil (Meriones hurrianae Jerdon) after internal 32P β-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandchahal, K.; Bhatiya, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal kinetics was studied in Indian desert gerbil injected with 32 P at the dose rate of 2.593 kBq per g body weight. The total cell population, mitotic figures, pycnotic nuclei and necrotic cells in the crypt section were counted at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days. The minimum values for total cell population and mitotic figures were obtained on day 1 when pycnotic nuclei and necrotic cells were highest. On day 3 partial recovery was seen in all the parameters studied and by day 14 recovery was complete. (author)

  6. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2012-11-01

    The intestine is a unique tissue where an elaborate balance is maintained between tolerance and immune responses against a variety of environmental factors such as food and the microflora. In a healthy individual, the microflora stimulates innate and adaptive immune systems to maintain gut homeostasis. However, the interaction of environmental factors with particular genetic backgrounds can lead to dramatic changes in the composition of the microflora (i.e. dysbiosis). Many of the specific commensal-bacterial products and the signaling pathways they trigger have been characterized. The role of T(h)1, T(h)2 and T(h)17 cells in inflammatory bowel disease has been widely investigated, as has the contribution of epithelial cells and subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages. To date, multiple regulatory cells in adaptive immunity, such as regulatory T cells and regulatory B cells, have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inappropriate innate and adaptive immune responses to commensal bacteria. Additionally, regulatory myeloid cells have recently been identified that prevent intestinal inflammation by inhibiting T-cell proliferation. An increasing body of evidence has shown that multiple regulatory mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of gut homeostasis.

  7. Intestinal immunity in hypopituitary dwarf mice: effects of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Darcy, Justin; Cai, Chuan; Jin, Junfei; Bartke, Andrzej; Cao, Deliang

    2018-03-02

    Hypopituitary dwarf mice demonstrate advantages of longevity, but little is known of their colon development and intestinal immunity. Herein we found that Ames dwarf mice have shorter colon and colonic crypts, but larger ratio of mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) over body weight than age-matched wild type (WT) mice. In the colonic lamina propria (cLP) of juvenile Ames mice, more inflammatory neutrophils (Ā: 0.15% vs. 0.03% in WT mice) and monocytes (Ā: 7.97% vs. 5.15%) infiltrated, and antigen presenting cells CD11c+ dendritic cells (Ā: 1.39% vs. 0.87%), CD11b+ macrophages (Ā: 3.22% vs. 0.81%) and gamma delta T (γδ T) cells (Ā: 5.56% vs. 1.35%) were increased. In adult Ames dwarf mice, adaptive immune cells, such as IL-17 producing CD4+ T helper (Th17) cells (Ā: 8.3% vs. 4.7%) were augmented. In the MLNs of Ames dwarf mice, the antigen presenting and adaptive immune cells also altered when compared to WT mice, such as a decrease of T-regulatory (Treg) cells in juvenile Ames mice (Ā: 7.7% vs.10.5%), but an increase of Th17 cells (Ā: 0.627% vs.0.093%). Taken together, these data suggest that somatotropic signaling deficiency influences colon development and intestinal immunity.

  8. [Relationship between intestinal mucosal inflammation and mental disorders in patients with irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jing-xin; Han, Mai; Duan, Li-ping; Han, Ya-jing; Ge, Ying; Huang, Yue-qin

    2012-08-28

    without mental disorder (6 (4,8) vs 2 (1,5), P = 0.018). The number of mast cells from distal ileum in the IBS patients with mood disorder were significantly higher than that in those without mental disorders ((18.3 ± 3.2)/HP vs (15.4 ± 3.1)/HP, P = 0.032). Mental disorders in the IBS patients may be associated with intestinal mucosal inflammation. The activation of IDO may cause the comorbidity of IBS with anxiety disorder while the activation of mast cells probably leads to the comorbidity of IBS with mood disorder.

  9. Predictive computational modeling of the mucosal immune responses during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adria Carbo

    Full Text Available T helper (Th cells play a major role in the immune response and pathology at the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection. There is a limited mechanistic understanding regarding the contributions of CD4+ T cell subsets to gastritis development during H. pylori colonization. We used two computational approaches: ordinary differential equation (ODE-based and agent-based modeling (ABM to study the mechanisms underlying cellular immune responses to H. pylori and how CD4+ T cell subsets influenced initiation, progression and outcome of disease. To calibrate the model, in vivo experimentation was performed by infecting C57BL/6 mice intragastrically with H. pylori and assaying immune cell subsets in the stomach and gastric lymph nodes (GLN on days 0, 7, 14, 30 and 60 post-infection. Our computational model reproduced the dynamics of effector and regulatory pathways in the gastric lamina propria (LP in silico. Simulation results show the induction of a Th17 response and a dominant Th1 response, together with a regulatory response characterized by high levels of mucosal Treg cells. We also investigated the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ activation on the modulation of host responses to H. pylori by using loss-of-function approaches. Specifically, in silico results showed a predominance of Th1 and Th17 cells in the stomach of the cell-specific PPARγ knockout system when compared to the wild-type simulation. Spatio-temporal, object-oriented ABM approaches suggested similar dynamics in induction of host responses showing analogous T cell distributions to ODE modeling and facilitated tracking lesion formation. In addition, sensitivity analysis predicted a crucial contribution of Th1 and Th17 effector responses as mediators of histopathological changes in the gastric mucosa during chronic stages of infection, which were experimentally validated in mice. These integrated immunoinformatics approaches

  10. CCR2 mediates Helicobacter pylori-induced immune tolerance and contributes to mucosal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Zhang, Min; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Huffnagle, Gray B; Kao, John Y

    2017-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that H. pylori infection leads to increased induction of regulatory T cells in local and systemic immune compartments. Here, we investigate the role of CCR2 in the tolerogenic programing of dendritic cells in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. CCR2 deficient (CCR2KO) mice and wild-type (Wt) mice infected with H. pylori SS1 strain were analyzed by qPCR and FACS analysis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DC on day 6 from CCR2KO and Wt mice cocultured with or without H. pylori were examined to determine the impact of CCR2 signaling on dendritic cells function by qPCR, ELISA, and FACS analyses. Acute H. pylori infection was associated with a threefold increase in CCR2 mRNA expression in the gastric mucosa. H. pylori-infected CCR2KO mice exhibited a higher degree of mucosal inflammation, that is, increased gastritis scores and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, but lower degree of H. pylori gastric colonization compared to infected Wt mice. Peripheral H. pylori-specific immune response measured in the CCR2KO spleen was characterized by a higher Th17 response and a lower Treg response. In vitro, CCR2KO bone marrow-derived DC was less mature and shown a lower Treg/Th17 ratio. Moreover, blockade of CCR2 signaling by MCP-1 neutralizing antibody inhibited H. pylori-stimulated bone marrow-derived DC maturation. Our results indicate that CCR2 plays an essential role in H. pylori-induced immune tolerance and shed light on a novel mechanism of CCR2-dependent DC Treg induction, which appears to be important in maintaining mucosal homeostasis during H. pylori infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Partial Enteral Nutrition Preserves Elements of Gut Barrier Function, Including Innate Immunity, Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (IAP) Level, and Intestinal Microbiota in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao; Bi, Jingcheng; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-08-03

    Lack of enteral nutrition (EN) during parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to higher incidence of infection because of gut barrier dysfunction. However, the effects of partial EN on intestina linnate immunity, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and microbiota remain unclear. The mice were randomized into six groups to receive either standard chow or isocaloric and isonitrogenous nutritional support with variable partial EN to PN ratios. Five days later, the mice were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. Bacterial translocation, the levels of lysozyme, mucin 2 (MUC2), and IAP were analyzed. The composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Compared with chow, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) resulted in a dysfunctional mucosal barrier, as evidenced by increased bacterial translocation (p < 0.05), loss of lysozyme, MUC2, and IAP, and changes in the gut microbiota (p < 0.001). Administration of 20% EN supplemented with PN significantly increased the concentrations of lysozyme, MUC2, IAP, and the mRNA levels of lysozyme and MUC2 (p < 0.001). The percentages of Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes were significantly lower in the 20% EN group than in the TPN group (p < 0.001). These changes were accompanied by maintained barrier function in bacterial culture (p < 0.05). Supplementation of PN with 20% EN preserves gut barrier function, by way of maintaining innate immunity, IAP and intestinal microbiota.

  12. Enteric Virome Sensing-Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Rebecca N; Krug, Anne B; Eisenächer, Katharina

    2018-03-23

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  13. Enteric Virome Sensing—Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N. Metzger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  14. Intestine immune homeostasis after alcohol and burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoling; Hammer, Adam M; Rendon, Juan L; Choudhry, Mashkoor A

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic injury remains one of the most prevalent reasons for patients to be hospitalized. Burn injury accounts for 40,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually, resulting in a large burden on both the health and economic system and costing millions of dollars every year. The complications associated with postburn care can quickly cause life-threatening conditions including sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction and failure. In addition, alcohol intoxication at the time of burn injury has been shown to exacerbate these problems. One of the biggest reasons for the onset of these complications is the global suppression of the host immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. It has been hypothesized that infections after burn and other traumatic injury may stem from pathogenic bacteria from within the host's gastrointestinal tract. The intestine is the major reservoir of bacteria within the host, and many studies have demonstrated perturbations of the intestinal barrier after burn injury. This article reviews the findings of these studies as they pertain to changes in the intestinal immune system after alcohol and burn injury.

  15. Nasal Lipopolysaccharide Challenge and Cytokine Measurement Reflects Innate Mucosal Immune Responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep Dhariwal

    Full Text Available Practical methods of monitoring innate immune mucosal responsiveness are lacking. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a component of the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria and a potent activator of Toll-like receptor (TLR-4. To measure LPS responsiveness of the nasal mucosa, we administered LPS as a nasal spray and quantified chemokine and cytokine levels in mucosal lining fluid (MLF.We performed a 5-way cross-over, single blind, placebo-controlled study in 15 healthy non-atopic subjects (n = 14 per protocol. Doses of ultrapure LPS (1, 10, 30 or 100μg/100μl or placebo were administered by a single nasal spray to each nostril. Using the recently developed method of nasosorption with synthetic adsorptive matrices (SAM, a series of samples were taken. A panel of seven cytokines/chemokines were measured by multiplex immunoassay in MLF. mRNA for intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 was quantified from nasal epithelial curettage samples taken before and after challenge.Topical nasal LPS was well tolerated, causing no symptoms and no visible changes to the nasal mucosa. LPS induced dose-related increases in MLF levels of IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL8 (IL-8 and CCL3 (MIP-1α (AUC at 0.5 to 10h, compared to placebo, p<0.05 at 30 and 100μg LPS. At 100μg LPS, IL-10, IFN-α and TNF-α were also increased (p<0.05. Dose-related changes in mucosal ICAM-1 mRNA were also seen after challenge, and neutrophils appeared to peak in MLF at 8h. However, 2 subjects with high baseline cytokine levels showed prominent cytokine and chemokine responses to relatively low LPS doses (10μg and 30μg LPS.Topical nasal LPS causes dose-dependent increases in cytokines, chemokines, mRNA and cells. However, responsiveness can show unpredictable variations, possibly because baseline innate tone is affected by environmental factors. We believe that this new technique will have wide application in the study of the innate immune responses of the respiratory mucosa.Ultrapure LPS was used

  16. Mucosal Expression of Type 2 and Type 17 Immune Response Genes Distinguishes Ulcerative Colitis From Colon-Only Crohn's Disease in Treatment-Naive Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael J; Karns, Rebekah; Vallance, Jefferson E; Bezold, Ramona; Waddell, Amanda; Collins, Margaret H; Haberman, Yael; Minar, Phillip; Baldassano, Robert N; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Baker, Susan S; Kellermayer, Richard; Noe, Joshua D; Griffiths, Anne M; Rosh, Joel R; Crandall, Wallace V; Heyman, Melvin B; Mack, David R; Kappelman, Michael D; Markowitz, James; Moulton, Dedrick E; Leleiko, Neal S; Walters, Thomas D; Kugathasan, Subra; Wilson, Keith T; Hogan, Simon P; Denson, Lee A

    2017-05-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of the type 2 immune response in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC)-few data are available from treatment-naive patients. We investigated whether genes associated with a type 2 immune response in the intestinal mucosa are up-regulated in treatment-naive pediatric patients with UC compared with patients with Crohn's disease (CD)-associated colitis or without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and whether expression levels are associated with clinical outcomes. We used a real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction array to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns in rectal mucosal samples from 138 treatment-naive pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease, as well as those from 49 children without IBD (controls), enrolled in a multicenter prospective observational study from 2008 to 2012. Results were validated in real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of rectal RNA from an independent cohort of 34 pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease and 17 controls from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. We measured significant increases in mRNAs associated with a type 2 immune response (interleukin [IL]5 gene, IL13, and IL13RA2) and a type 17 immune response (IL17A and IL23) in mucosal samples from patients with UC compared with patients with colon-only CD. In a regression model, increased expression of IL5 and IL17A mRNAs distinguished patients with UC from patients with colon-only CD (P = .001; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.72). We identified a gene expression pattern in rectal tissues of patients with UC, characterized by detection of IL13 mRNA, that predicted clinical response to therapy after 6 months (odds ratio [OR], 6.469; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.553-26.94), clinical response after 12 months (OR, 6.125; 95% CI, 1.330-28.22), and remission after 12 months (OR, 5

  17. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Linda J.; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P.; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M.; Furness, John B.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1−/− duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption. PMID:27735854

  18. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Linda J; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M; Furness, John B

    2016-10-10

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1 , and in Trpa1 -deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1 -/- duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  19. Initiation of ART during early acute HIV infection preserves mucosal Th17 function and reverses HIV-related immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schuetz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI subjects (Fiebig (F stage I-V with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation.

  20. Effects of dietary Ergosan on cutaneous mucosal immune response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhzadeh, Najmeh; Karimi Pashaki, Atefeh; Nofouzi, Katayoon; Heidarieh, Marzieh; Tayefi-Nasrabadi, Hossein

    2012-03-01

    The effects of dietary Ergosan on the growth performance and mucosal immunity in rainbow trout skin were investigated. 60 rainbow trout (100-110 g) were randomly assigned to 2 groups in triplicates and fed one of the experimental diet formulated with 5 g kg⁻¹ Ergosan or control diet for 50 days. Results showed that on the 45th day of feeding trial, Ergosan supplementation significantly enhanced the growth performance compared to control group. Various enzyme activities, namely lysozyme, protease, alkaline phosphatase and esterase in treatment group were also enhanced on the 45th and 50th day. Skin mucus in Ergosan-fed fish showed the agglutination of erythrocytes while in control group, no visible agglutination was shown. In addition, skin mucus in treatment group showed strong antibacterial activity against Yersinia ruckeri. In conclusion, the major immune components of rainbow trout mucus that are involved in the non-specific immunity were enhanced by administration of Ergosan in 5 g kg⁻¹. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mucosal/submucosal blood flow in the small intestine in pigs determined by local washout of 133Xe and microsphere techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Olsen, J; Sejrsen, P

    1990-01-01

    In 11 anaesthetized pigs a laparotomy was performed and the mucosal and submucosal blood flow rate in the small intestine of the pig was determined by a local application of 133Xe and by 6.5-microns radioactive microspheres. The 133Xe washout plotted in a semilogarithmic diagram showed a multiexp......In 11 anaesthetized pigs a laparotomy was performed and the mucosal and submucosal blood flow rate in the small intestine of the pig was determined by a local application of 133Xe and by 6.5-microns radioactive microspheres. The 133Xe washout plotted in a semilogarithmic diagram showed...

  2. Changes in the Soluble Mucosal Immune Environment during Genital Herpes Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Marla J.; Madan, Rebecca P.; Shust, Gail; Carpenter, Colleen A.; Torres, N. Merna; Cho, Sylvia; Khine, Hnin; Huang, Meei-Li; Corey, Lawrence; Kim, Mimi; Herold, Betsy C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Genital tract secretions provide variable inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) ex vivo. We hypothesize that the anti-HSV activity may prevent the spread of virus from the more commonly affected sites, such as the external genitalia, to the upper genital tract. Methods The antimicrobial activity of cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) and concentrations of mucosal immune mediators were measured in ten HIV-seronegative women with an active external herpetic lesion and compared to ten HIV-seronegative women who were HSV-1 and HSV-2 seronegative. Samples were obtained at the time of a symptomatic external lesion (day 0), following one week of oral acyclovir (ACV) (day 7), and one week after completing treatment (day 14). Controls were evaluated at parallel intervals. Results The anti-HSV activity was higher in CVL obtained from cases compared to controls at presentation (Day 0) (54.3% vs. 28%), fell to similar levels on Day 7, and then rebounded on Day 14 (69% vs. 25%). The anti-HSV activity correlated positively and significantly with the concentrations of several inflammatory proteins; the concentrations of these proteins tended to be higher in cases compared to controls and followed a similar temporal pattern. Conclusions Increases in inflammatory immune mediators and anti-HSV activity were detected in CVL at the time of clinical outbreaks and following completion of a short course of ACV. These mucosal responses may protect against HSV spread, but could facilitate HIV infection and contribute to the clinical observation that, independent of clinical lesions, HSV-2 is a risk factor for HIV acquisition. PMID:22820806

  3. MICROECOLOGY OF NASOPHARYNGEAL MUCOSAL MEMBRANES AND ESTIMATION OF FACTORS OF MUCOSAL AND LYMPHOCYTIC IMMUNITY IN RECRUITS DURING THE FORMATION OF ORGANIZED TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Nikiforov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of nasopharyngeal mucosa by opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria in practically healthy people during the formation of the close group has been accompanied by a dysfunction of mucosal immunity, imbalanceof cytokine profile, insolvency of antioxidant system, increasing endointoxication. Adequate changes of serum immunoglobulins level in patients with nasopharyngeal dysbiosis allow to conclude of usefulness of the pre-emptive vaccination and using drugs with immunomodulatory effect which reliably satisfy body’s need for antioxidants.

  4. VSL#3 Probiotic Upregulates Intestinal Mucosal Alkaline Sphingomyelinase and Reduces Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Soo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alkaline sphingomyelinase, an enzyme found exclusively in bile and the intestinal brush border, hydrolyzes sphingomyelin into ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, thereby inducing epithelial apoptosis. Reduced levels of alkaline sphingomyelinase have been found in premalignant and malignant intestinal epithelia and in ulcerative colitis tissue. Probiotic bacteria can be a source of sphingomyelinase.

  5. Role of NKT cells in the digestive system. IV. The role of canonical natural killer T cells in mucosal immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Lymphocytes that combine features of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells are named natural killer T (NKT) cells. The majority of NKT cells in mice bear highly conserved invariant Valpha chains, and to date two populations of such canonical NKT cells are known in mice: those that express Valpha14 and those that express Valpha7.2. Both populations are selected by nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex class I-like antigen-presenting molecules expressed by hematopoietic cells in the thymus: CD1d for Valpha14-expressing NKT cells and MR1 for those cells expressing Valpha7.2. The more intensely studied Valpha14 NKT cells have been implicated in diverse immune reactions, including immune regulation and inflammation in the intestine; the Valpha7.2 expressing cells are most frequently found in the lamina propria. In humans, populations of canonical NKT cells are found to be highly similar in terms of the expression of homologous, invariant T cell antigen-receptor alpha-chains, specificity, and function, although their frequency differs from those in the mouse. In this review, we will focus on the role of both of these canonical NKT cell populations in the mucosal tissues of the intestine.

  6. Immune and Genetic Correlates of Vaccine Protection Against Mucosal Infection by SIV in Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letvin, Norman L; Rao, Srinivas S; Montefiori, David C; Seaman, Michael S; Sun, Yue; Lim, So-Yon; Yeh, Wendy W; Asmal, Mohammed; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shen, Ling; Whitney, James B; Seoighe, Cathal; Lacerda, Miguel; Keating, Sheila; Norris, Philip J; Hudgens, Michael G; Gilbert, Peter B; Buzby, Adam P; Mach, Linh V; Zhang, Jinrong; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Shaw, George M; Schmidt, Stephen D; Todd, John-Paul; Dodson, Alan; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J

    2011-05-04

    The RV144 vaccine trial in Thailand demonstrated that an HIV vaccine could prevent infection in humans and highlights the importance of understanding protective immunity against HIV. We used a nonhuman primate model to define immune and genetic mechanisms of protection against mucosal infection by the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). A plasmid DNA prime/recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boost vaccine regimen was evaluated for its ability to protect monkeys from infection by SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 isolates after repeat intrarectal challenges. Although this prime-boost vaccine regimen failed to protect against SIVmac251 infection, 50% of vaccinated monkeys were protected from infection with SIVsmE660. Among SIVsmE660-infected animals, there was about a one-log reduction in peak plasma virus RNA in monkeys expressing the major histocompatibility complex class I allele Mamu-A*01, implicating cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the control of SIV replication once infection is established. Among Mamu-A*01-negative monkeys challenged with SIVsmE660, no CD8(+) T cell response or innate immune response was associated with protection against virus acquisition. However, low levels of neutralizing antibodies and an envelope-specific CD4(+) T cell response were associated with vaccine protection in these monkeys. Moreover, monkeys that expressed two TRIM5 alleles that restrict SIV replication were more likely to be protected from infection than monkeys that expressed at least one permissive TRIM5 allele. This study begins to elucidate the mechanisms of vaccine protection against immunodeficiency viruses and highlights the need to analyze these immune and genetic correlates of protection in future trials of HIV vaccine strategies.

  7. The Design of New Adjuvants for Mucosal Immunity to Neisseria meningitidis B in Nasally Primed Neonatal Mice for Adult Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the value of detoxified Shiga toxins Stx1 and Stx2 (toxoids of Escherichia coli as mucosal adjuvants in neonatal mice for immunogenicity against the outer membrane proteins (OMPs of Neisseria meningitidis B. Mucosal immunization has been shown to be effective for the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in both the systemic and mucosal compartments. Systemic antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, and IgA and mucosal IgM and IgA were measured by ELISA using an N. meningitidis as an antigen. In addition, IFN-γ and IL-6 production were measured after stimulated proliferation of immune cells. Intranasal administration elicited a higher anti-OMP IgA response in both saliva and vaginal fluids. Our results suggest that both Stx1 and Stx2 toxoids are effective mucosal adjuvants for the induction of Ag-specific IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies. The toxoids significantly enhanced the IgG and IgM response against OMPs with a potency equivalent to CT, with the response being characterized by both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, and increased IFN-gamma production. Additionally, bactericidal activity was induced with IgG and IgM antibodies of high avidity. These results support the use of the new toxoids as potent inducing adjuvants that are particularly suitable for mucosal immunization.

  8. Gastrointestinal immune responses in HIV infected subjects

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    LRR Castello-Branco

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The gut associated lymphoid tissue is responsible for specific responses to intestinal antigens. During HIV infection, mucosal immune deficiency may account for the gastrointestinal infections. In this review we describe the humoral and cellular mucosal immune responses in normal and HIV-infected subjects.

  9. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kovšca Janjatovic

    2010-02-01

    jejunal and ileal cell subsets tested were significantly increased (at P<0.5 or lower in both principal groups (vaccinated or levamisole primed-vaccinated of pigs, compared to those recorded in the control non-vaccinated pigs. Based on the histomorphometric quantification of porcine intestinal immune cells from the GALT compartments tested, it is possible to differentiate the responses of pigs immunized by an experimental mucosal vaccine from those of non-immunized pigs.

  10. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovsca Janjatović, A; Lacković, G; Bozić, F; Kezić, D; Popović, M; Valpotić, H; Harapin, I; Pavicić, Z; Njari, B; Valpotić, I

    2010-02-11

    ileal cell subsets tested were significantly increased (at Ppigs, compared to those recorded in the control non-vaccinated pigs. Based on the histomorphometric quantification of porcine intestinal immune cells from the GALT compartments tested, it is possible to differentiate the responses of pigs immunized by an experimental mucosal vaccine from those of non-immunized pigs.

  11. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

  12. Bacillus Coagulans Enhance the Immune Function of the Intestinal Mucosa of Yellow Broilers

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    L Xu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Bacillus coagulans on the growth performance and immune functions of the intestinal mucosa of yellow broilers. Three hundred and sixty one-day-old yellow chicks were randomly allocated to four treatments groups with six replicates of 15 chicks each. The broilers were randomly subjected to one of the following treatments for 28 days: control group (group1, fed a basal diet and three treatments (group 2, 3, 4 fed the basal diet supplemented with 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans , respectively. The results showed that for 28 days, compared with the control diet, the dietary addition of 200 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans significantly decreased the feed/gain ratio (F/G (p<0.05, improved the thymus index, spleen index and bursa index (p<0.05, increased the villus height to crypt depth ratio (V/C in the duodenum (p<0.05, increased the number of secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA positive cells ( p<0.05. The dietary addition of 200 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans promoted a significant increase in Lactobacillus spp. populations and suppressed Escherichia coli replication in cecum, compared with the control (p<0.05. Moreover, the dietary addition of 200 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans also significantly enhanced the levels of interferon alpha (IFNα, toll-like receptor (TLR3, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5(MDA5 in the duodenum (p<0.05. In conclusion, the dietary addition of Bacillus coagulans significantly improved broiler performance, and enhanced the intestinal mucosal barrier and immune function. The optimal dosage of Bacillus coagulans for yellow broilers was determined as 2×108 cfu/kg.

  13. Low lactase activity in a small-bowel biopsy specimen : Should dietary lactose intake be restricted in children with small intestinal mucosal damage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, HA; Vonk, RJ; Gonera-de Jong, GBC; Priebe, MG; Antoine, JM; Stellaard, F; Sauer, PJJ

    Objective. Small intestinal mucosal damage can result in decreased lactase activity (LA). When LA is low in a small-bowel biopsy (SBB) specimen, a reduction of dietary lactose intake is usually advised. This is often done by reducing dietary dairy products, which also reduces the intake of calcium,

  14. The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on small intestinal barrier function and mucosal gene transcription; A randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujagic, Zlatan; Vos, De Paul; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Govers, Coen; Pieters, Harm J.H.M.; Wit, De Nicole J.W.; Bron, Peter A.; Masclee, Ad A.M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains on in-vivo small intestinal barrier function and gut mucosal gene transcription in human subjects. The strains were selected for their differential effects on TLR signalling and tight junction protein

  15. The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on small intestinal barrier function and mucosal gene transcription; a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujagic, Zlatan; de Vos, Paul; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Govers, Coen; Pieters, Harm-Jan H M; de Wit, Nicole J. W.; Bron, Peter A.; Masclee, Ad A M; Troost, Freddy J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains on in-vivo small intestinal barrier function and gut mucosal gene transcription in human subjects. The strains were selected for their differential effects on TLR signalling and tight junction protein

  16. Effect of ecoimmunonutrition supports on maintenance of integrity of intestinal mucosal barrier in severe acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gui-fang; Lu, Zheng; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhao-shen; Gong, Yan-fang

    2006-04-20

    One of the major causes of death in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is severe infection owing to bacterial translocation. Some clinical studies suggested that ecoimmunonutrition (EIN) as a new strategy had better treatment effect on SAP patients. But the experiment studies on the precise mechanism of the effect of EIN were less reported. In this study, we mainly investigated the effects of EIN on bacterial translocation in SAP model of dogs. SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct in healthy hybrid dogs. The SAP dogs were supported with either parenteral nutrition (PN) or elemental enteral nutrition (EEN) or EIN. The levels of serum amylase, serum aminotransferase and plasma endotoxin were detected before and after pancreatitis induction. On the 7th day after nutrition supports, peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, and pancreas were collected for bacterial culture with standard techniques to observe the incidence of bacterial translocation. Pathology changes of pancreas were analyzed by histopathologic grading and scoring of the severity of pancreas, and the degree of intestinal mucosal damage was assessed by measuring mucosal thickness, villus height, and crypt depth of ileum. Compared with PN and EEN, EIN significantly decreased the levels of serum amylase, serum aminotransferase, plasma endotoxin, and the incidence of bacterial translocation. Furthermore, compared with the others, the histology scores of inflammation in pancreas and the ileum injury (ileum mocosa thickness, villus height, and crypt depth) were significantly alleviated by EIN (P dogs. Early EIN was safe and more effective treatment for SAP dogs.

  17. Enhanced mucosal immune responses against tetanus toxoid using novel delivery system comprised of chitosan-functionalized gold nanoparticles and botanical adjuvant: characterization, immunogenicity, and stability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhate, Ganesh; Gautam, Manish; Gairola, Sunil; Jadhav, Suresh; Pokharkar, Varsha

    2014-11-01

    Approaches based on combined use of delivery systems and adjuvants are being favored to maximize efficient mucosal delivery of antigens. Here, we describe a novel delivery system comprised of chitosan-functionalized gold nanoparticles (CsAuNPs) and saponin-containing botanical adjuvant; Asparagus racemosus extract (ARE) for oral delivery of tetanus toxoid (TT). A significant increase in TT-specific IgG (34.53-fold) and IgA (43.75-fold) was observed when TT-CsAuNPs were formulated with ARE (TT-ARE-CsAuNPs). The local IgA immune responses for TT also showed a significant increase (106.5-fold in intestine washes and 99.74-fold in feces) with ARE-based formulations as compared with plain TT group. No effect of ARE was observed on size, charge, and loading properties of CsAuNPs. Additionally, no effect of ARE and CsAuNPs was observed on antigenicity and secondary structure of TT as determined by fluorescence, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The stability studies demonstrated excellent stability profile of formulation at recommended storage conditions. The study establishes the possible role of immunomodulatory adjuvants in particulate delivery systems for mucosal delivery of vaccines. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Differences in gastric mucosal microbiota profiling in patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using pyrosequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Byung Kwon; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Seon Young; Kim, Kyung Mo; Choi, Bo Youl; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Jihyun F

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important role in the early stage of cancer development. However, various bacteria that promote the synthesis of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may be involved in the later stages. We aimed to determine the microbial composition of gastric mucosa from the patients with chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer using 454 GS FLX Titanium. Gastric mucosal biopsy samples were collected from 31 patients during endoscopy. After the extraction of genomic DNA, variable region V5 of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified. PCR products were sequenced using 454 high-throughput sequencer. The composition, diversity, and richness of microbial communities were compared between three groups. The composition of H. pylori-containing Epsilonproteobacteria class appeared to be the most prevalent, but the relative increase in the Bacilli class in the gastric cancer group was noticed, resulting in a significant difference compared with the chronic gastritis group. By analyzing the Helicobacter-dominant group at a family level, the relative abundance of Helicobacteraceae family was significantly lower in the gastric cancer group compared with chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia groups, while the relative abundance of Streptococcaceae family significantly increased. In a UPGMA clustering of Helicobacter-dominant group based on UniFrac distance, the chronic gastritis group and gastric cancer group were clearly separated, while the intestinal metaplasia group was distributed in between the two groups. The evenness and diversity of gastric microbiota in the gastric cancer group was increased compared with other groups. In Helicobacter predominant patients, the microbial compositions of gastric mucosa from gastric cancer patients are significantly different to chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia patients. These alterations of gastric microbial composition may play an important, as-yet-undetermined role in

  19. Protein-coated nanoparticles are internalized by the epithelial cells of the female reproductive tract and induce systemic and mucosal immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available The female reproductive tract (FRT includes the oviducts (fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix and vagina. A layer of columnar epithelium separates the endocervix and uterus from the outside environment, while the vagina is lined with stratified squamous epithelium. The mucosa of the FRT is exposed to antigens originating from microflora, and occasionally from infectious microorganisms. Whether epithelial cells (ECs of the FRT take up (sample the lumen antigens is not known. To address this question, we examined the uptake of 20-40 nm nanoparticles (NPs applied vaginally to mice which were not treated with hormones, epithelial disruptors, or adjuvants. We found that 20 and 40 nm NPs are quickly internalized by ECs of the upper FRT and within one hour could be observed in the lymphatic ducts that drain the FRT, as well as in the ileac lymph nodes (ILNs and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs. Chicken ovalbumin (Ova conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova when administered vaginally reaches the internal milieu in an immunologically relevant form; thus vaginal immunization of mice with NP-Ova induces systemic IgG to Ova antigen. Most importantly, vaginal immunization primes the intestinal mucosa for secretion of sIgA. Sub-cutaneous (s.c boosting immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA further elevates the systemic (IgG1 and IgG2c as well as mucosal (IgG1 and sIgA antibody titers. These findings suggest that the modes of antigen uptake at mucosal surfaces and pathways of antigen transport are more complex than previously appreciated.

  20. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine

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    Linda J. Fothergill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM. The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM, and were greatly diminished in Trpa1−/− duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  1. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course......The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-14

    To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14(th) day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats' activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin.

  4. Systemic and Terminal Ileum Mucosal Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization With the Ty21a Typhoid Vaccine in HumansSummary

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    Jayaum S. Booth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Systemic cellular immunity elicited by the Ty21a oral typhoid vaccine has been extensively characterized. However, very limited data are available in humans regarding mucosal immunity at the site of infection (terminal ileum [TI]. Here we investigated the host immunity elicited by Ty21a immunization on terminal ileum–lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC and peripheral blood in volunteers undergoing routine colonoscopy. Methods: We characterized LPMC-T memory (TM subsets and assessed Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi–specific responses by multichromatic flow cytometry. Results: No differences were observed in cell yields and phenotypes in LPMC CD8+-TM subsets following Ty21a immunization. However, Ty21a immunization elicited LPMC CD8+ T cells exhibiting significant S Typhi–specific responses (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17A, and/or CD107a in all major TM subsets (T-effector/memory [TEM], T-central/memory, and TEM-CD45RA+, although each TM subset exhibited unique characteristics. We also investigated whether Ty21a immunization elicited S Typhi–specific multifunctional effectors in LPMC CD8+ TEM. We observed that LPMC CD8+ TEM responses were mostly multifunctional, except for those cells exhibiting the characteristics associated with cytotoxic responses. Finally, we compared mucosal with systemic responses and made the important observation that LPMC CD8+ S Typhi–specific responses were unique and distinct from their systemic counterparts. Conclusions: This study provides the first demonstration of S Typhi–specific responses in the human terminal ileum mucosa and provides novel insights into the generation of mucosal immune responses following oral Ty21a immunization. Keywords: Lamina Propria Mononuclear Cells, Multifunctional T Cells, CD8+-T Memory Cells, Typhoid, Vaccines

  5. Stage-specific excretory-secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti--putative links to host's intestinal mucosal defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W

    2011-09-01

    In a search for molecules involved in the interaction between intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed MS to identify excretory-secretory proteins from Strongyloides ratti. In the excretory-secretory proteins of the parasitic female stage, we detected, in addition to other peptides, peptides homologous with the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein (HSP)-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (∼ 19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (∼ 18 kDa), with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified, and the genomic organization was analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by quantitative real-time-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. Sequence analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences showed that the two proteins share a conserved α-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17s showed the highest homology with the deduced small HSP sequence of the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to strong IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocyte-macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose-dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released interleukin-10 but not tumor necrosis factor-α in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting the possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  6. Immune Development and Intestinal Microbiota in Celiac Disease

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    Tamara Pozo-Rubio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy, triggered by dietary wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye in genetically susceptible individuals. The etiology of this disorder is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. The major genetic risk factor for CD is represented by HLA-DQ genes, which account for approximately 40% of the genetic risk; however, only a small percentage of carriers develop the disease. Gluten is the main environmental factor responsible for the signs and symptoms of the disease, but exposure to gluten does not fully explain the manifestation of CD. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that environmental factors other than gluten might play a role in disease development, including early feeding practices (e.g., breast milk versus formula and duration of breastfeeding, infections, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition. Herein, we review what is known about the influence of dietary factors, exposure to infectious agents, and intestinal microbiota composition, particularly in early life, on the risk of developing CD, as well as the possible dietary strategies to induce or increase gluten tolerance.

  7. Effects of byproducts on intestinal microbiota and the immune modulation

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    Da Yoon Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although the efficacy of Rubus coreanus (RC byproducts as a feed additive has been recognized, its effects on intestinal microorganisms and the immune system are still unknown. Methods Six-week-old male rats were treated with 0.5% RC (T1, 1.0% RC (T2, and 1.5% RC (T3 for 4 weeks. Results We found that treatment with RC byproducts significantly increased the daily gain of body weight and feed intake. Treg-cell differentiation was enhanced in the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen from the rats fed with RC byproducts. Illumina sequencing showed that bacteria in the phylum Firmicutes decreased and while those in the phylum Bacteroidetes increased in RC-treated groups. Particularly, the pathogenic microorganisms in the family Peptococcaceae decreased, and the non-pathogenic families Lachnospiraceae and S24-7 increased. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the RC byproducts increased the lactic acid bacteria Bifidobacterium spp., Oscillospira spp., Leuconostoc citreum, and Weissella cibaria in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion RC byproducts may be effective in immunomodulation by affecting intestinal microorganisms.

  8. The Mucosal Innate Immune Response in Primary Human Papillomavirus Infection: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardella, Barbara; Iacobone, Anna Daniela; Musacchi, Valentina; Calvino, Isabel Giacoma; De Amici, Mara; Torre, Cristina; Bogliolo, Stefano; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the mucosal immune response in women affected by primary human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, in comparison with HPV-negative women with no previous history of HPV. A case-control study comparing the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoferrin (LF) between 19 HPV-positive and 19 HPV-negative women matched for age. Plasmatic and cervicovaginal levels of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) exhibiting MPO and LF receptors were measured using cytofluorimetric analysis and expressed as mean of percentages. Cervicovaginal levels of MPO-/LF- PMN were lower among HPV-negative women, with a mean rate of 18.81% (SD, 21.38), as opposed to a mean rate of 35.56% (SD, 21.02) (P = 0.020) in HPV-positive women. A similar significant difference was not proven in plasma. The mean rates of plasmatic levels of MPO-/LF- PMN were 36.21% (SD, 16.87) and 36.93% (SD, 10.54) (P = 0.875) in cases and controls, respectively. All patients were evaluated 1 year later, and only 6 cases became negative. The presence of MPO-/LF- PMN has been considered as a marker of lower rate of apoptosis of HPV-infected cells. This could explain why HPV-positive women are less capable to deal with a primary infection.

  9. Induction of systemic and mucosal immunity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection by a novel nanoemulsion adjuvant vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun HW

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available HongWu Sun,1,* Chao Wei,1,* BaoShuai Liu,1 HaiMing Jing,1 Qiang Feng,2 YaNan Tong,1 Yun Yang,1 LiuYang Yang,1 QianFei Zuo,1 Yi Zhang,1 QuanMing Zou,1 Hao Zeng1 1National Engineering Research Center of Immunological Products, Department of Microbiology and Biochemical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Third Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, 2Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Education, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The Gram-positive bacterial pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA can cause infections in the bloodstream, endocardial tissue, respiratory tract, culture-confirmed skin, or soft tissue. There are currently no effective vaccines, and none are expected to become available in the near future. An effective vaccine capable of eliciting both systemic and mucosal immune responses is also urgently needed. Here, we reported a novel oil-in-water nanoemulsion adjuvant vaccine containing an MRSA recombination protein antigen, Cremophor EL-35® as a surfactant, and propylene glycol as a co-surfactant. This nanoemulsion vaccine, whose average diameter was 31.34±0.49 nm, demonstrated good protein structure integrity, protein specificity, and good stability at room temperature for 1 year. The intramuscular systemic and nasal mucosal immune responses demonstrated that this nanoemulsion vaccine could improve the specific immune responses of immunoglobulin (IgG and related subclasses, such as IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b, as well as IgA, in the serum after Balb/c mice intramuscular immunization and C57 mice nasal immunization. Furthermore, this nanoemulsion vaccine also markedly enhanced the interferon-γ and interleukin-17A cytokine cell immune response, improved the survival ratio, and reduced bacterial colonization. Taken together, our results show that this novel nanoemulsion vaccine has great potential and is a

  10. Immunization of mice with Lactobacillus casei expressing a beta-intimin fragment reduces intestinal colonization by Citrobacter rodentium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, P C D; da Silva, J B; Piazza, R M F; Eckmann, L; Ho, P L; Oliveira, M L S

    2011-11-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in children from developing countries. Intimate adhesion of the bacteria to intestinal cells occurs via binding of the adhesin intimin to the TIR receptor exposed on cell surfaces. Here, Lactobacillus casei expressing a fragment of β-intimin (L. casei-Int(cv)) was tested as mucosal vaccines in mice against intestinal colonization with the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Oral or sublingual immunization of C57BL/6 mice with L. casei-Int(cv) induced anti-Int(cv) IgA in feces but no IgG in sera. Conversely, anti-Int(cv) IgG was induced in the sera of mice after sublingual immunization with purified Int(cv). All vaccines were able to decrease C. rodentium recovery from feces. However, this reduction was more evident and sustained over time in mice immunized with L. casei-Int(cv) by the sublingual route. These mice also displayed an increase in interleukin 6 (IL-6) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by spleen cells 10 days after infection. Additionally, oral or sublingual immunization of C3H/HePas mice, which are highly susceptible to C. rodentium infection, with L. casei-Int(cv) induced anti-Int(cv) antibodies and significantly increased survival after challenge. Immunohistological analysis of colon sections revealed that C. rodentium was located in deep fractions of the tissue from C3H/HePas mice immunized with L. casei whereas superficial staining was observed in colon sections from mice immunized with L. casei-Int(cv.) The results indicate that vaccines composed of L. casei expressing intimin may represent a promising approach and that the C3H/HePas infection model with C. rodentium can be used to evaluate potential vaccines against EPEC.

  11. Immunization of Mice with Lactobacillus casei Expressing a Beta-Intimin Fragment Reduces Intestinal Colonization by Citrobacter rodentium ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, P. C. D.; da Silva, J. B.; Piazza, R. M. F.; Eckmann, L.; Ho, P. L.; Oliveira, M. L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a common cause of diarrhea in children from developing countries. Intimate adhesion of the bacteria to intestinal cells occurs via binding of the adhesin intimin to the TIR receptor exposed on cell surfaces. Here, Lactobacillus casei expressing a fragment of β-intimin (L. casei-Intcv) was tested as mucosal vaccines in mice against intestinal colonization with the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Oral or sublingual immunization of C57BL/6 mice with L. casei-Intcv induced anti-Intcv IgA in feces but no IgG in sera. Conversely, anti-Intcv IgG was induced in the sera of mice after sublingual immunization with purified Intcv. All vaccines were able to decrease C. rodentium recovery from feces. However, this reduction was more evident and sustained over time in mice immunized with L. casei-Intcv by the sublingual route. These mice also displayed an increase in interleukin 6 (IL-6) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by spleen cells 10 days after infection. Additionally, oral or sublingual immunization of C3H/HePas mice, which are highly susceptible to C. rodentium infection, with L. casei-Intcv induced anti-Intcv antibodies and significantly increased survival after challenge. Immunohistological analysis of colon sections revealed that C. rodentium was located in deep fractions of the tissue from C3H/HePas mice immunized with L. casei whereas superficial staining was observed in colon sections from mice immunized with L. casei-Intcv. The results indicate that vaccines composed of L. casei expressing intimin may represent a promising approach and that the C3H/HePas infection model with C. rodentium can be used to evaluate potential vaccines against EPEC. PMID:21900533

  12. Secretion of biologically active pancreatitis-associated protein I (PAP) by genetically modified dairy Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 in the prevention of intestinal mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rodrigo D; Breyner, Natalia; Menezes-Garcia, Zelia; Rodrigues, Nubia M; Lemos, Luisa; Maioli, Tatiane U; da Gloria Souza, Danielle; Carmona, Denise; de Faria, Ana M C; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Azevedo, Vasco; de Azevedo, Marcela S

    2017-02-13

    Mucositis is one of the most relevant gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions in humans, generated by the use of chemotherapy drugs, such as 5-fluoracil (5-FU). 5-FU-induced mucositis affects 80% of patients undergoing oncological treatment causing mucosal gut dysfunctions and great discomfort. As current therapy drugs presents limitations in alleviating mucositis symptoms, alternative strategies are being pursued. Recent studies have shown that the antimicrobial pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) has a protective role in intestinal inflammatory processes. Indeed, it was demonstrated that a recombinant strain of Lactococcus lactis expressing human PAP (LL-PAP) could prevent and improve murine DNBS-induced colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes severe inflammation of the colon. Hence, in this study we sought to evaluate the protective effects of LL-PAP on 5-FU-induced experimental mucositis in BALB/c mice as a novel approach to treat the disease. Our results show that non-recombinant L. lactis NZ9000 have antagonistic activity, in vitro, against the enteroinvasive gastrointestinal pathogen L. monocytogenes and confirmed PAP inhibitory effect against Opportunistic E. faecalis. Moreover, L. lactis was able to prevent histological damage, reduce neutrophil and eosinophil infiltration and secretory Immunoglobulin-A in mice injected with 5-FU. Recombinant lactococci carrying antimicrobial PAP did not improve those markers of inflammation, although its expression was associated with villous architecture preservation and increased secretory granules density inside Paneth cells in response to 5-FU inflammation. We have demonstrated for the first time that L. lactis NZ9000 by itself, is able to prevent 5-FU-induced intestinal inflammation in BALB/c mice. Moreover, PAP delivered by recombinant L. lactis strain showed additional protective effects in mice epithelium, revealing to be a promising strategy to treat intestinal mucositis.

  13. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens. PMID:25978818

  14. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasaka, Masahiro; Asari, Daisuke; Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens.

  15. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Fukasaka

    Full Text Available A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic and IgA (mucosal antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens.

  16. Induction of specific immunoglobulin A in the small intestine, colon-rectum, and vagina measured by a new method for collection of secretions from local mucosal surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Haneberg, B; Kendall, D; Amerongen, H M; Apter, F M; Kraehenbuhl, J P; Neutra, M R

    1994-01-01

    In order study patterns of local antibody responses following mucosal immunization of mice via different routes, a method for collection of secretions directly from mucosal surfaces was developed. Mice were immunized on days 0, 10, 17, and 24 by administration of cholera toxin into the oral cavity, stomach, colon-rectum, or vagina. At sacrifice on day 32, absorbent wicks were placed in the oral cavity and, via an applicator tube, into the vagina and distal colon-rectum and along the entire sm...

  17. Only small fractions of soluble ß-glucan modulate the mucosal immune system in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Przybylska, Dominika Alicja; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    is to understand the effect of β-glucan induced modulation in carp in relation to tissue regeneration, mucosal immunity and host-pathogen interactions. Expression profiles of immune related genes will be measured in fresh water specie – common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). The methodology of the project involves...... the usage of real-time quantitative PCR to quantify expression of genes of interest (IL-1β, IL-10, TNF-α, IL-6). This study will provide further understanding on the effect of β-glucan as a modulator which could improve fish welfare and health as well as having an economic potential production...

  18. Mucosal immunization with live attenuated Francisella novicida U112ΔiglB protects against pulmonary F. tularensis SCHU S4 in the Fischer 344 rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee L Signarovitz

    Full Text Available The need for an efficacious vaccine against Francisella tularensis is a consequence of its low infectious dose and high mortality rate if left untreated. This study sought to characterize a live attenuated subspecies novicida-based vaccine strain (U112ΔiglB in an established second rodent model of pulmonary tularemia, namely the Fischer 344 rat using two distinct routes of vaccination (intratracheal [i.t.] and oral. Attenuation was verified by comparing replication of U112ΔiglB with wild type parental strain U112 in F344 primary alveolar macrophages. U112ΔiglB exhibited an LD(50>10(7 CFU compared to the wild type (LD(50 = 5 × 10(6 CFU i.t.. Immunization with 10(7 CFU U112ΔiglB by i.t. and oral routes induced antigen-specific IFN-γ and potent humoral responses both systemically (IgG2a>IgG1 in serum and at the site of mucosal vaccination (respiratory/intestinal compartment. Importantly, vaccination with U112ΔiglB by either i.t. or oral routes provided equivalent levels of protection (50% survival in F344 rats against a subsequent pulmonary challenge with ~25 LD(50 (1.25 × 10(4 CFU of the highly human virulent strain SCHU S4. Collectively, these results provide further evidence on the utility of a mucosal vaccination platform with a defined subsp. novicida U112ΔiglB vaccine strain in conferring protective immunity against pulmonary tularemia.

  19. Correlation of NOX1 and NOX2 expression in ulcerative colitis tissue with intestinal mucosal oxidative stress response and barrier function injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of NOX1 and NOX2 expression in ulcerative colitis tissue with intestinal mucosal oxidative stress response and barrier function injury. Methods: A total of 69 patients who were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in Yan’an People’s Hospital between May 2015 and March 2017 were selected as the UC group of the research, and 78 patients who were diagnosed with colon polyps were selected as the polyps group of the research. The ulcerative colitis lesion and polyp lesion were collected to detect the expression of NOX1 and NOX2, the generation of oxygen free radicals as well as the contents of apoptosis molecules and mucosal barrier molecules. Results: The mRNA expression and protein expression of NOX1 and NOX2 in the intestinal mucosa of UC group were significantly higher than those of polyps group; LPO, MDA, AOPP, NO, PDCD5 and Bax levels in intestinal mucosa of UC group were significantly higher than those of polyps group and positively correlated with the mRNA expression and protein expression of NOX1 and NOX2 while Bcl-2, Cdx1, Cdx2, galectin-1, galectin-3, OCLN, cingulin and ZO-1 levels were significantly lower than those of polyps group and negatively correlated with the mRNA expression and protein expression of NOX1 and NOX2. Conclusion: The high expression of NOX1 and NOX2 in ulcerative colitis tissue can activate the intestinal mucosal oxidative stress response and result in the intestinal mucosal barrier function injury.

  20. Stimulation of airway and intestinal mucosal secretion by natural coumarin CFTR activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eYang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR cause lethal hereditary disease cystic fibrosis (CF that involves extensive destruction and dysfunction of serous epithelium. Possible pharmacological therapy includes correction of defective intracellular processing and abnormal channel gating. In a previous study, we identified five natural coumarin potentiators of Δ508-CFTR including osthole, imperatorin, isopsoralen, praeruptorin A and scoparone. The present study was designed to determine the activity of these coumarine compounds on CFTR activity in animal tissues as a primary evaluation of their therapeutic potential. In the present study, we analyzed the affinity of these coumarin potentiators in activating wild-type CFTR and found that they are all potent activators. Osthole showed the highest affinity with Kd values <50 nmol/L as determined by Ussing chamber short-circuit current assay. Stimulation of rat colonic mucosal secretion by osthole was tested by the Ussing chamber short-circuit current assay. Osthole reached maximal activation of colonic Cl- secretion at 5 mol/L. Stimulation of mouse tracheal mucosal secretion was analyzed by optical measurement of single gland secretion. Fluid secretion rate of tracheal single submucosal gland stimulated by osthole at 10mol/L was 3-fold more rapid than that in negative control. In both cases the stimulated secretions were fully abolished by CFTRinh-172. In conclusion, the effective stimulation of Cl– and fluid secretion in colonic and tracheal mucosa by osthole suggested the therapeutic potential of natural coumarine compounds for the treatment of cystic fibrosis and other CFTR-related diseases.

  1. SEVERAL MUCOSAL VACCINATION ROUTES CONFER IMMUNITY AGAINST ENTERIC REDMOUTH DISEASE IN RAINBOW TROUT, BUT THE PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS ARE DIFFERENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    Vaccination is a keystone in prophylactic strategies preventing outbreaks of fish pathogenic bacterial diseases in aquaculture. The first commercial fish vaccine consisted of a bacterin of Yersinia ruckeri serotype O1 biotype 1. The vaccine has been very successful and has been used for more than...... 35 years. A vast experience has been gained concerning the applications of the vaccine, which can be utilized through several mucosal immunization routes such as bath, oral and anal application, all resulting in significantly increased survival compared to un-vaccinated control groups during bath...... challenge experiments. Little is known regarding the nature of the protective immune response. We have shown that even low titers of Y. ruckeri specific antibodies confer protective immunity in vivo, and shown that is possible to pass immunity to naïve fish by passing serum containing Y. ruckeri specific...

  2. Respiratory macrophages regulate CD4 T memory responses to mucosal immunization with recombinant adenovirus-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Ramirez, Elizabeth; Tram, Cynthia; Kampen, Rachel M; Tillman, Melanie R; Schwendener, Reto A; Xing, Zhou; Halperin, Scott A; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory immunization is an attractive way to generate systemic and mucosal protective memory responses that are required for preventing mucosally transmitted infections. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for controlling memory T cell responses remain incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the role of respiratory macrophage (MΦ) in regulating CD4 T cell responses to recombinant adenovirus-based (rAd) vaccines. We demonstrated that rAd intranasal (i.n.) vaccination induced migration and accumulation of respiratory MΦ and circulatory monocytes in the mediastinal lymph nodes and lung parenchyma. Under the influence of respiratory MΦ CD4 T cells exhibited slow proliferation kinetics and an increased tendency of generating central memory, as opposed to effector memory, CD4 T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Correspondingly, depletion of MΦ using clodronate-containing liposome prior to i.n. immunization significantly enhanced CD4 T cell proliferation and increased the frequency of CD4 memory T cells in the airway lumen, demonstrating that MΦ initially serve as a negative regulator in limiting generation of mucosal tissue-resident memory CD4 T cells. However, clodronate-containing liposome delivery following i.n. immunization markedly reduced the frequencies of memory CD4 T cells in the airway lumen and spleen, indicating that respiratory MΦ and potentially circulating monocytes are critically required for maintaining long-term memory CD4 T cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that rAd-induced mucosal CD4 T memory responses are regulated by respiratory MΦ and/or monocytes at multiple stages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Systemic BCG immunization induces persistent lung mucosal multifunctional CD4 T(EM cells which expand following virulent mycobacterial challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryan A Kaveh

    Full Text Available To more closely understand the mechanisms of how BCG vaccination confers immunity would help to rationally design improved tuberculosis vaccines that are urgently required. Given the established central role of CD4 T cells in BCG induced immunity, we sought to characterise the generation of memory CD4 T cell responses to BCG vaccination and M. bovis infection in a murine challenge model. We demonstrate that a single systemic BCG vaccination induces distinct systemic and mucosal populations of T effector memory (T(EM cells in vaccinated mice. These CD4+CD44(hiCD62L(loCD27⁻ T cells concomitantly produce IFN-γ and TNF-α, or IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α and have a higher cytokine median fluorescence intensity MFI or 'quality of response' than single cytokine producing cells. These cells are maintained for long periods (>16 months in BCG protected mice, maintaining a vaccine-specific functionality. Following virulent mycobacterial challenge, these cells underwent significant expansion in the lungs and are, therefore, strongly associated with protection against M. bovis challenge. Our data demonstrate that a persistent mucosal population of T(EM cells can be induced by parenteral immunization, a feature only previously associated with mucosal immunization routes; and that these multifunctional T(EM cells are strongly associated with protection. We propose that these cells mediate protective immunity, and that vaccines designed to increase the number of relevant antigen-specific T(EM in the lung may represent a new generation of TB vaccines.

  4. Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling plays an essential role in the homeostasis of the intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Amlan; Wilmanski, Jeanette; Forsman, Huamei; Hrncir, Tomas; Hao, Liming; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2010-01-01

    A healthy intestinal tract is characterized by controlled homeostasis due to the balanced interaction between commensal bacteria and the host mucosal immune system. Human and animal model studies have supported the hypothesis that breakdown of this homeostasis may underlie the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). However it is not well understood how intestinal microflora stimulate the intestinal mucosal immune system and how such activation is regulated. Using a spontaneous, c...

  5. Effect of the administration of a fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 on intestinal microbiota and gut associated immune cells of nursing mice and after weaning until immune maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmuega Esteban

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial colonization of the intestine after birth is an important step for the development of the gut immune system. The acquisition of passive immunity through breast-feeding may influence the pattern of bacterial colonization in the newborn. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the administration of a probiotic fermented milk (PFM containing yogurt starter cultures and the probiotic bacteria strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 to mothers during nursing or their offspring, on the intestinal bacterial population and on parameters of the gut immune system. Results Fifteen mice of each group were sacrificed at ages 12, 21, 28 and 45 days. Large intestines were taken for determination of intestinal microbiota, and small intestines for the study of secretory-IgA (S-IgA in fluid and the study of IgA+ cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and goblet cells on tissue samples. The consumption of the PFM either by the mother during nursing or by the offspring after weaning modified the development of bifidobacteria population in the large intestine of the mice. These modifications were accompanied with a decrease of enterobacteria population. The administration of this PFM to the mothers improved their own immune system and this also affected their offspring. Offspring from mice that received PFM increased S-IgA in intestinal fluids, which mainly originated from their mother's immune system. A decrease in the number of macrophages, dendritic cells and IgA+ cells during the suckling period in offspring fed with PFM was observed; this could be related with the improvement of the immunity of the mothers, which passively protect their babies. At day 45, the mice reach maturity of their own immune system and the effects of the PFM was the stimulation of their mucosal immunity. Conclusion The present work shows the beneficial effect of the administration of a PFM not only to the mothers during the suckling period but also to

  6. Comparative analysis of mucosal immunity to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in Jiangquhai porcine lean strain and DLY piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, L Z; Wu, Y Z; Bai, F F; William, K K; Feng, Z X; Liu, M J; Yao, J T; Zhang, X; Shao, G Q

    2014-07-07

    The Jiangquhai porcine lean strain (JQHPL) is a new pork meat-type strain that has been developed in recent years from the parent lines Duroc, Fengjing, and Jiangquhai pigs (DurocxFengjing pigxJiangquhai pig). Enzootic pneumonia (EP) in pigs induced by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) is a chronic respiratory disease of pigs, generating high economic losses in the swine industry. Here, we investigated the degree of resistance to M. hyopneumoniae for the Jiangquhai porcine lean strain and the Duroc x Landrace x Yorkshire (DLY) pigs, which are Western commercial pigs that have been introduced in China. A total of 209 DLY piglets and 221 JQHPL piglets from 19 Landrace x Yorkshire and 22 JQHPL M. hyopneumoniae positive gestating sows with different expected dates of confinement were selected and raised in the same M. hyopneumoniae positive farrowing barn. When the oldest suckling piglets were 37 days old, nasal swabs were collected from all the piglets (ranging from 4 to 37 days old) to detect the M. hyopneumoniae pathogen using n-PCR and M. hyopneumoniae specific SIgA using ELISA. Positive M. hyopneumoniae infection rates in both the strains increased with age; however, positive rates for JQHPL were lower compared to DLY at 14 to 35 days old. The level of the specific SIgA rose rapidly in JQHPL respiratory tracts, particularly in piglets 21 to 35 days in age compared to DLY piglets of the same age; however, the level of the specific SIgA in DLY also marginally increased. In conclusion, JQHPL pigs exhibits higher resistance to M. hyopneumoniae compared to DLY. It is possible that this characteristic is caused by the faster and stronger mucosal immunity phenotype of the JQHPL strain.

  7. Use of mucolytic agents and guaran HEPART (HP-7000) for the detection of mucosal villi in double contrast barium studies of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desaga, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to enhance the visualisation of mucosal villi by double contrast barium studies of the small bowel. Prior to the radiological examination a 2-day pretreatment with the mucolytic agents acetylcysteine or carbocisteine was effected. Double contrast studies were performed with a high-molecular fraction of guaran HEPART (HP-7000), a hydrocolloidal isolated from the seed endosperm of C. tetragonolobus added into contrast-medium and distention medium. Compared to double contrast studies without mucolytic therapy, this procedure results in a better transparency and demonstration of the mucosal villi shown by a granular pattern in the radiographs. High quality visualisation of intestinal villi was achieved in all patients studied. A 2-day pretreatment with carbocisteine or acetylcysteine and the use of guaran in the double contrast barium study of the small bowel results in a greatly enhanced visualisation of mucosal villi. (orig.) [de

  8. Primary murine mucosal response during cephalosporin-induced intestinal colonization by Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Antoni P A; van de Kamer, Denise; Willems, Rob J L

    2018-02-27

    Hospitalized patients are often administered antibiotics that perturb the gastrointestinal commensal microbiota, leading to outgrowth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, like multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium, subsequent spread, and eventually infections. However, the events that occur at the initial stage of intestinal colonization and outgrowth by multidrug-resistant E. faecium within the antibiotic-treated host have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we describe and visualize that only 6 hr after cephalosporin treatment of mice, the Muc-2 mucus layer is reduced and E-cadherin junctions were altered. In contrast, the cadherin-17 junctions were unaffected in antibiotic treated mice during E. faecium colonization or in untreated animals. E. faecium was capable to colonize the mouse colon already within 6 hr after inoculation, and agglutinated at the apical side of the intestinal epithelium. During the primary stage of gastrointestinal colonization the number of IgA + cells and CD11b + IgA + cells increased in the lamina propria of the colon and mediated an elevated IgA response upon E. faecium colonization. © 2018 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Western diet enhances intestinal tumorigenesis in Min/+ mice, associating with mucosal metabolic and inflammatory stress and loss of Apc heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niku, Mikael; Pajari, Anne-Maria; Sarantaus, Laura; Päivärinta, Essi; Storvik, Markus; Heiman-Lindh, Anu; Suokas, Santeri; Nyström, Minna; Mutanen, Marja

    2017-01-01

    Western-type diet (WD) is a risk factor for colorectal cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the interaction of WD and heterozygous mutation in the Apc gene on adenoma formation and metabolic and immunological changes in the histologically normal intestinal mucosa of Apc Min/+ (Min/+) mice. The diet used was high in saturated fat and low in calcium, vitamin D, fiber and folate. The number of adenomas was twofold higher in the WD mice compared to controls, but adenoma size, proliferation or apoptosis did not differ. The ratio of the Min to wild-type allele was higher in the WD mice, indicating accelerated loss of Apc heterozygosity (LOH). Densities of intraepithelial CD3ε + T lymphocytes and of mucosal FoxP3 + regulatory T cells were higher in the WD mice, implying inflammatory changes. Western blot analyses from the mucosa of the WD mice showed suppressed activation of the ERK and AKT pathways and a tendency for reduced activation of the mTOR pathway as measured in phosphoS6/S6 levels. The expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 was up-regulated in both mRNA and protein levels. Gene expression analyses showed changes in oxidation/reduction, fatty acid and monosaccharide metabolic pathways, tissue organization, cell fate and regulation of apoptosis. Together, our results suggest that the high-risk Western diet primes the intestine to tumorigenesis through synergistic effects in energy metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress, which culminate in the acceleration of LOH of the Apc gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interactions between intestinal microbiota and innate immune system in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura; Aloi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of an altered immune homeostasis within the intestinal mucosa against the gut microbiota, leading to chronic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Under normal conditions, the immune system defends against pathogens and prevents the passage of excessive intestinal bacteria; regulatory pathways must maintain a low-grade, controlled inflammation in a healthy gut, but also induce a protective response against pathogens. The innate immune system is the first-line defense from microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, immediate response. The immune system constantly controls commensal bacteria and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to sustain immune homeostasis. The discovery that several genes linked to IBD modulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), and genes that mediate autophagy (ie, ATG16L1, IRGM), has highlighted the critical role of host-microbe interactions in controlling intestinal immune homeostasis. Commensal microorganisms actively interact with the intestinal mucosa and influence the activity of the immune system as well as the amplitude of the immune response. In contrast, host factors can influence microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. In this paper, we focus on the mechanisms that mediate host-microbe interactions and how the disruption of this balance leads to chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD.

  11. Prime-boost strategies in mucosal immunization affect local IgA production and the type of Th response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eFiorino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Combinations of different delivery routes for priming and boosting represent vaccination strategies that can modulate magnitude, quality, and localization of the immune response. A murine model was used to study T cell clonal expansion following nasal or subcutaneous priming, and secondary immune responses after boosting by either homologous or heterologous routes. T cell primary activation was studied by using the adoptive transfer model of ovalbumin-specific transgenic CD4+ T cells. Both nasal and subcutaneous immunization efficiently elicited, in the respective draining lymph nodes, primary clonal expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that disseminated towards distal lymph nodes (mesenteric and iliac and the spleen. After boosting, a very high serum IgG response was induced in all groups independent of the combination of immunization routes used, while significant levels of local IgA were detected only in mice boosted by the nasal route. Mucosal priming drove a stronger Th1 polarization than the systemic route, as shown by serum IgG subclass analysis. IFN-gamma production was observed in splenocytes of all groups, while prime-boost vaccine combinations that included the mucosal route, yielded higher levels of IL-17. Memory lymphocytes were identified in both spleen and draining lymph nodes in all immunized mice, with the highest number of IL-2 producing cells detected in mice primed and boosted by the nasal route. This work shows the critical role of immunization routes in modulating quality and localization of immune responses, in prime-boost vaccine strategies.

  12. Effect of polydextrose on intestinal microbes and immune functions in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Francesca; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Siljander-Rasi, Hilkka; Putaala, Heli; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Stowell, Julian; Tuohy, Kieran; Gibson, Glenn; Rautonen, Nina

    2007-07-01

    Dietary fibre has been proposed to decrease risk for colon cancer by altering the composition of intestinal microbes or their activity. In the present study, the changes in intestinal microbiota and its activity, and immunological characteristics, such as cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression in mucosa, in pigs fed with a high-energy-density diet, with and without supplementation of a soluble fibre (polydextrose; PDX) (30 g/d) were assessed in different intestinal compartments. PDX was gradually fermented throughout the intestine, and was still present in the distal colon. Irrespective of the diet throughout the intestine, of the four microbial groups determined by fluorescent in situ hybridisation, lactobacilli were found to be dominating, followed by clostridia and Bacteroides. Bifidobacteria represented a minority of the total intestinal microbiota. The numbers of bacteria increased approximately ten-fold from the distal small intestine to the distal colon. Concomitantly, also concentrations of SCFA and biogenic amines increased in the large intestine. In contrast, concentrations of luminal IgA decreased distally but the expression of mucosal COX-2 had a tendency to increase in the mucosa towards the distal colon. Addition of PDX to the diet significantly changed the fermentation endproducts, especially in the distal colon, whereas effects on bacterial composition were rather minor. There was a reduction in concentrations of SCFA and tryptamine, and an increase in concentrations of spermidine in the colon upon PDX supplementation. Furthermore, PDX tended to decrease the expression of mucosal COX-2, therefore possibly reducing the risk of developing colon cancer-promoting conditions in the distal intestine.

  13. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System - A Crosstalk in Crohn's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby supporting the hypothesis that chronic intestinal inflammation arises from an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora in genetically susceptible individuals. Given that CD patients display changes in their gut microbiota composition, collectively termed "dysbiosis," the question raises whether the altered microbiota composition is a cause of disease or rather a consequence of the inflammatory state of the intestinal environment. This review will focus on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system during intestinal inflammation, thereby unraveling the role of the microbiota in CD pathogenesis.

  14. Activation of IGF-1/IGFBP-3 signaling by berberine improves intestinal mucosal barrier of rats with acute endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Yuan, Xiaoming; Zhou, Guangrong; Feng, Aiwen

    2018-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) play a role in the maintenance of gut mucosal barrier function. Nevertheless, IGF-I/IGFBP-3 and tight junction protein (TJP) expression in small intestinal mucosa are often impaired during endotoxemia. In this model of acute endotoxemia, the regulatory effect of berberine on IGF-I/IGFBP-3 and TJP expression in ileal mucosa was evaluated. The findings revealed systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) suppressed mRNA and protein expression of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, but berberine ameliorated their production. LPS injection inhibited occludin and claudin-1 protein generation, and this inhibitory effect of LPS was abolished by berberine. Inhibition of IGF-I/IGFBP-3 signaling by AG1024 or siRNAs reduced berberine-induced occludin and claudin-1 production. Additionally, GW9662 was found to repress berberine-induced IGF-I/IGFBP-3 expression, indicating of a cross-link between PPARγ and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 axis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of plasma CGRP and NPY level changes on intestinal mucosal barrier injury after scald in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lijian; Zhu Qingxian; He Ming; Zhang Hongyan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of plasma CGRP and NPY levels changes immediately after scald in rats. Methods: Thirty-two rat models of 30% TBSA III degree scald were prepared. Eight animals each were sacrificed at 3, 6,12 and 24 hrs; taking blood samples for determination of plasma CGRP, NPY levels and 5 cm of ileum for pathologic study. As controls, eight animals without scald were treated in the same way. Results: Plasma CGRP levels were decreased significantly after scald, reaching bottom value at 12 hr and remained lower than those in controls at 24 hr (p 0.05). Plasma levels of CGRP were negatively correlated to plasma NPY levels (p<0.01). Ileum mucosal injuries presented as edema, congestion with necrosis and slough of epithelium were most marked at 12 hr. Conclusion: Plasma CGRP and NPY levels changed significantly after scald and were mutually negatively correlated. Post-scald intestinal mucosa barrier injuries were possibly related to the changes of levels of those vasoactive peptides

  16. Humoral immunity induced by mucosal and/or systemic SIV-specific vaccine platforms suggest novel combinatorial approaches for enhancing responses

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Tuero, Iskra; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Musich, Thomas; Pegu, Poonam; Valentin, Antonio; Sui, Yongjun; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Venzon, David J.; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Pilkington, Guy R.; Liyanage, Namal P.M.; Demberg, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial HIV/SIV vaccine approaches targeting multiple arms of the immune system might improve protective efficacy. We compared SIV-specific humoral immunity induced in rhesus macaques by five vaccine regimens. Systemic regimens included ALVAC-SIVenv priming and Env boosting (ALVAC/Env); DNA immunization; and DNA plus Env co-immunization (DNA&Env). RepAd/Env combined mucosal replication-competent Ad-env priming with systemic Env boosting. A Peptide/Env regimen, given so...

  17. Relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Ruijuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microecosystem is composed of natural microflora, intestinal epithelial cells, and intestinal mucosal immune system. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a metabolic stress-induced liver injury associated with insulin resistance and genetic susceptibility. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence showing the involvement of imbalanced intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Overgrowth of intestinal microflora, increased permeability of intestinal mucosa, intestinal endotoxemia, and production of inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the development of NAFLD. Further studies on the relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and the pathogenesis of NAFLD may shed light on the treatment and prevention of NAFLD.

  18. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  19. The role of innate signaling in the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity in the intestine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.; Loonen, L.M.P.; Karczewski, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the intestine innate recognition of microbes is achieved through pattern recognition receptor (PRR) families expressed in immune cells and different cell lineages of the intestinal epithelium. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) families

  20. Adaptive Immunity-Dependent Intestinal Hypermotility Contributes to Host Defense against Giardia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Yolanda S.; Gillin, Frances D.; Eckmann, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Humans infected with Giardia exhibit intestinal hypermotility, but the underlying mechanisms and functional significance are uncertain. Here we show in murine models of giardiasis that small-intestinal hypermotility occurs in a delayed fashion relative to peak parasite burden, is dependent on adaptive immune defenses, and contributes to giardial clearance.

  1. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Effects of dietary raffinose on growth, non-specific immunity, intestinal morphology and microbiome of juvenile hybrid sturgeon (Acipenser baeri Brandt ♀ × A. schrenckii Brandt ♂).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guanling; Xing, Wei; Li, Tieliang; Ma, Zhihong; Liu, Caixia; Jiang, Na; Luo, Lin

    2018-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the efficacy of raffinose on the growth, non-specific immunity, intestinal morphology and microbiota of juvenile hybrid sturgeon, (Acipenser baeri Brandt ♀ × A. schrenckii Brandt ♂). Hybrid sturgeons were divided into 2 groups and each group was fed with diets supplemented with or without raffinose for 56 days. Hybrid sturgeon fed diet supplemented with raffinose had significantly higher final body weight (FBW), specific growth rate (SGR), and weight gain ratio (WGR) than fish fed the control diet (P  0.05). Compared with the control diet, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) and respiratory burst (NBT) activitives were significantly higher in sturgeon fed the raffinose supplemented diet (P < 0.05). The increasing of intestinal villi area and mucosal folds were observed in intestinal tract of sturgeon when they fed the raffinose supplemented diet. Meanwhile, the residual bait of intestinal tract was relatively lower in sturgeon with raffinose treatment. High-throughput sequencing revealed that majority of reads derived from the sturgeon digesta were constituted by members of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria. Shannon's diversity index existed significant difference among dietary treatments indicating that the overall microbial community was modified to a large extent by dietary raffinose. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with raffinose is capable of improving hybrid sturgeon growth performances and intestinal morphology, modifying the intestinal microbial composition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Use of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae and Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae to treat intestinal mucositis in mice: Toxico-pharmacological evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Caroline Cunha Bastos

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies towards the development of an effective treatment for intestinal mucositis have been reported, since this condition represents a major problem in clinical oncology practice due to cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy. However standardized protocols and universally accepted treatment options are yet to be established. Objectives: Given above, this study evaluated the protective effects of a mucoadhesive formulation containing both Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae (BP and curcuminoids from Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae (CL on intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluoruoacil (5-FU in mice. Results: As expected, animals only treated with 5-FU (200 mg/kg showed a significant reduction of 60.3 and 42.4% in villi and crypts size, respectively, when compared to control. On the other hand, the proposed therapeutic/prophylactic treatment with mucoadhesive formulations managed to reduce histopathologic changes in mice bearing mucositis, especially at 125 mg/kg BP + 15 mg/kg CL dose. The formulation promoted an increase of 275.5% and 148.7% for villi and crypts size, respectively. Moreover, chemotherapy-related weight loss was reduced by 7.4% following the treatment. In addition, an increase of 10 and 30.5% in red and white blood cells was observed when compared to 5-FU group. Furthermore, treatments with the mucoadhesive formulation containing BP/CL up modulated Ki-67 and Bcl-2 expression while reduced pro-apoptotic regulator Bax. The formulation also modulated inflammatory response triggered by 5-FU through reduction of 68% of myeloperoxidase activity and a 4-fold increase in anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels. In parallel, the oxidative stress via lipid peroxidation was reduced as indicated by decrease of 63% of malondialdehyde concentrations. Additionally, the new formulation presented low acute oral systemic toxicity, being classified in the category 5 (2000 mg/kg < LD50 < 5000 mg/kg of the Globally Harmonized

  4. Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: A Key Tissue Inside the Mucosal Immune System of Hens Immunized with Escherichia coli F4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Peralta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin Y (IgY is the predominant antibody found in hen’s (Gallus domesticus egg yolk. This antibody, developed against several microorganisms in hen egg yolk, has been successfully used as an alternative to immunoglobulins from mammals for use in immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E.coli F4 is the main etiological agent associated with swine neonatal diarrhea, and it causes notable economic losses in swine production. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between humoral immune response and the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT in laying hens intramuscularly immunized with E. coli F4. Adult laying Shaver hens were immunized with a bacterin based on an inactivated lysate E. coli F4 strain that was originally isolated from neonatal piglet diarrhea, following a recommended schedule. The percentage of B lymphocytes in blood and spleen homogenates was determined by flow cytometry. Villi histomorphometry and the size of germinal centers (GC activated in GALT and the spleen were measured in histological samples either stained with hematoxylin/eosin or through immunofluorescence. Antibody and isotype-specific antibodies in serum and egg yolk were measured using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Secretory and serum immunoglobulin A (IgA were measured by ELISA tests. Laying hen with intramuscular immunization with E. coli F4 lysate, activated both mucosal and systemic protection. Mucosal protection was provided through B lymphocytes, and most of them were activated on Peyer’s patches and esophageal tonsils, in GALT. Furthermore, increased B lymphocyte number in the lamina propria of the gut, and increased intraepithelial plasmatic cell number, produced high levels of mucosal IgA. Activated B lymphocytes interacted with absorptive cells, immune cells, and microbiota in the gut, producing signals that were translated into a powerful physical defense by

  5. Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: A Key Tissue Inside the Mucosal Immune System of Hens Immunized with Escherichia coli F4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Maria F; Magnoli, Alejandra; Alustiza, Fabrisio; Nilson, Armando; Miazzo, Raúl; Vivas, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) is the predominant antibody found in hen's ( Gallus domesticus ) egg yolk. This antibody, developed against several microorganisms in hen egg yolk, has been successfully used as an alternative to immunoglobulins from mammals for use in immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E.coli) F 4 is the main etiological agent associated with swine neonatal diarrhea, and it causes notable economic losses in swine production. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between humoral immune response and the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in laying hens intramuscularly immunized with E. coli F 4 . Adult laying Shaver hens were immunized with a bacterin based on an inactivated lysate E. coli F 4 strain that was originally isolated from neonatal piglet diarrhea, following a recommended schedule. The percentage of B lymphocytes in blood and spleen homogenates was determined by flow cytometry. Villi histomorphometry and the size of germinal centers (GC) activated in GALT and the spleen were measured in histological samples either stained with hematoxylin/eosin or through immunofluorescence. Antibody and isotype-specific antibodies in serum and egg yolk were measured using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Secretory and serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) were measured by ELISA tests. Laying hen with intramuscular immunization with E. coli F 4 lysate, activated both mucosal and systemic protection. Mucosal protection was provided through B lymphocytes, and most of them were activated on Peyer's patches and esophageal tonsils, in GALT. Furthermore, increased B lymphocyte number in the lamina propria of the gut, and increased intraepithelial plasmatic cell number, produced high levels of mucosal IgA. Activated B lymphocytes interacted with absorptive cells, immune cells, and microbiota in the gut, producing signals that were translated into a powerful physical defense by producing

  6. Impact of the Gut Microbiota on Intestinal Immunity Mediated by Tryptophan Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Xu, Kang; Liu, Hongnan; Liu, Gang; Bai, Miaomiao; Peng, Can; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences the health of the host, especially with regard to gut immune homeostasis and the intestinal immune response. In addition to serving as a nutrient enhancer, L-tryptophan (Trp) plays crucial roles in the balance between intestinal immune tolerance and gut microbiota maintenance. Recent discoveries have underscored that changes in the microbiota modulate the host immune system by modulating Trp metabolism. Moreover, Trp, endogenous Trp metabolites (kynurenines, serotonin, and melatonin), and bacterial Trp metabolites (indole, indolic acid, skatole, and tryptamine) have profound effects on gut microbial composition, microbial metabolism, the host's immune system, the host-microbiome interface, and host immune system–intestinal microbiota interactions. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the regulation of intestinal immunity by Trp metabolites (as ligands of AhR), which is beneficial for immune homeostasis. Among Trp metabolites, AhR ligands consist of endogenous metabolites, including kynurenine, kynurenic acid, xanthurenic acid, and cinnabarinic acid, and bacterial metabolites, including indole, indole propionic acid, indole acetic acid, skatole, and tryptamine. Additional factors, such as aging, stress, probiotics, and diseases (spondyloarthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer), which are associated with variability in Trp metabolism, can influence Trp–microbiome–immune system interactions in the gut and also play roles in regulating gut immunity. This review clarifies how the gut microbiota regulates Trp metabolism and identifies the underlying molecular mechanisms of these interactions. Increased mechanistic insight into how the microbiota modulates the intestinal immune system through Trp metabolism may allow for the identification of innovative microbiota-based diagnostics, as well as appropriate nutritional supplementation of Trp to prevent or alleviate intestinal inflammation

  7. Mucosal Immunity and Protective Efficacy of Intranasal Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Is Improved by Chitosan Nanoparticle Delivery in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Dhakal

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Annually, swine influenza A virus (SwIAV causes severe economic loss to swine industry. Currently used inactivated SwIAV vaccines administered by intramuscular injection provide homologous protection, but limited heterologous protection against constantly evolving field viruses, attributable to the induction of inadequate levels of mucosal IgA and cellular immune responses in the respiratory tract. A novel vaccine delivery platform using mucoadhesive chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs administered through intranasal (IN route has the potential to elicit strong mucosal and systemic immune responses in pigs. In this study, we evaluated the immune responses and cross-protective efficacy of IN chitosan encapsulated inactivated SwIAV vaccine in pigs. Killed SwIAV H1N2 (δ-lineage antigens (KAg were encapsulated in chitosan polymer-based nanoparticles (CNPs-KAg. The candidate vaccine was administered twice IN as mist to nursery pigs. Vaccinates and controls were then challenged with a zoonotic and virulent heterologous SwIAV H1N1 (γ-lineage. Pigs vaccinated with CNPs-KAg exhibited an enhanced IgG serum antibody and mucosal secretory IgA antibody responses in nasal swabs, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluids, and lung lysates that were reactive against homologous (H1N2, heterologous (H1N1, and heterosubtypic (H3N2 influenza A virus strains. Prior to challenge, an increased frequency of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, and recall IFN-γ secretion by restimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in CNPs-KAg compared to control KAg vaccinates were observed. In CNPs-KAg vaccinated pigs challenged with heterologous virus reduced severity of macroscopic and microscopic influenza-associated pulmonary lesions were observed. Importantly, the infectious SwIAV titers in nasal swabs [days post-challenge (DPC 4] and BAL fluid (DPC 6 were significantly (p < 0.05 reduced in CNPs-KAg vaccinates but not in KAg vaccinates when compared

  8. Evaluation of humoral, mucosal, and cellular immune responses following co-immunization of HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins expressed by Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Sunil K; Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Samal, Sweety; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Zhu, Xiaoping; Samal, Siba K

    2015-01-01

    The combination of multiple HIV antigens in a vaccine can broaden antiviral immune responses. In this study, we used NDV vaccine strain LaSota to generate rNDV (rLaSota/optGag) expressing human codon optimized p55 Gag protein of HIV-1. We examined the effect of co-immunization of rLaSota/optGag with rNDVs expressing different forms of Env protein gp160, gp120, gp140L [a version of gp140 that lacked cytoplasmic tail and contained complete membrane-proximal external region (MPER)] and gp140S (a version of gp140 that lacked cytoplasmic tail and distal half of MPER) on magnitude and breadth of humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses in guinea pigs and mice. Our results showed that inclusion of rLaSota/optGag with rNDVs expressing different forms of Env HIV Gag did not affect the Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses in guinea pigs and that the potent immune responses generated against Env persisted for at least 13 weeks post immunization. The highest Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses were observed with gp140S+optGag group. The neutralizing antibody responses against HIV strains BaL.26 and MN.3 induced by gp140S+optGag and gp160+optGag were higher than those elicited by other groups. Inclusion of Gag with gp160, gp140S and gp140L enhanced the level of Env-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells in mice. Inclusion of Gag with gp160 and gp140L also resulted in increased Env-specific CD4(+) T cells. The level of Gag-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells was also enhanced in mice immunized with Gag along with gp140S and gp120. These results indicate lack of antigen interference in a vaccine containing rNDVs expressing Env and Gag proteins.

  9. Diamine oxidase as a marker of intestinal mucosal injury and the effect of soluble dietary fiber on gastrointestinal tract toxicity after intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudome, Ian; Kobayashi, Michiya; Dabanaka, Ken; Maeda, Hiromichi; Okamoto, Ken; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Baba, Ryoko; Kumagai, Nana; Oba, Koji; Fujita, Mamoru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    The level of plasma diamine oxidase (DAO) activity is associated with the maturation and integrity of small intestinal mucosa. This study in rats investigated whether a decreased level of plasma DAO could reflect the severity of mucosal injury due to intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. The beneficial effect of soluble dietary fiber (SDF) on preventing diarrhea after 5-FU treatment was also examined. To induce diarrhea, 5-FU (50 mg/kg/day for four days) was administered via the tail vein with or without SDF supplementation. After 5-FU treatment, the majority of rats developed moderate to severe diarrhea, and levels of plasma DAO activity significantly decreased compared to those of control group (P < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy revealed disarrangement of the small intestinal villi. Contrarily, the rats supplemented with SDF had diarrhea less frequently (50.0 vs. 91.7 %, P = 0.025) on day five, and DAO activity levels were significantly higher than in those rats administered 5-FU alone (8.25 ± 5.34 vs. 5.50 ± 4.32, P = 0.023). In conclusion, plasma DAO activity decreases in response to severe intestinal mucosal injury after 5-FU treatment, and SDF supplementation might be a practical and useful treatment for reducing the intestinal toxicity of 5-FU.

  10. Human G Protein–Coupled Receptor Gpr-9-6/Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 Is Selectively Expressed on Intestinal Homing T Lymphocytes, Mucosal Lymphocytes, and Thymocytes and Is Required for Thymus-Expressed Chemokine–Mediated Chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Brian A.; Agace, William W.; Campbell, James J.; Heath, Heidi M.; Parent, David; Roberts, Arthur I.; Ebert, Ellen C.; Kassam, Nasim; Qin, Shixin; Zovko, Maria; LaRosa, Gregory J.; Yang, Li-Li; Soler, Dulce; Butcher, Eugene C.; Ponath, Paul D.; Parker, Christina M.; Andrew, David P.

    1999-01-01

    TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein–coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti–GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory α4β7high intestinal trafficking CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In addition, all intestinal lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes express GPR-9-6. In contrast, GPR-9-6 is not displayed on cutaneous lymphocyte antigen–positive (CLA+) memory CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, which traffic to skin inflammatory sites, or on other systemic α4β7−CLA− memory CD4/CD8 lymphocytes. The majority of thymocytes also express GPR-9-6, but natural killer cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils are GPR-9-6 negative. Transcripts of GPR-9-6 and TECK are present in both small intestine and thymus. Importantly, the expression profile of GPR-9-6 correlates with migration to TECK of blood T lymphocytes and thymocytes. As migration of these cells is blocked by anti–GPR-9-6 mAb 3C3, we conclude that GPR-9-6 is the principal chemokine receptor for TECK. In agreement with the nomenclature rules for chemokine receptors, we propose the designation CCR-9 for GPR-9-6. The selective expression of TECK and GPR-9-6 in thymus and small intestine implies a dual role for GPR-9-6/CCR-9, both in T cell development and the mucosal immune response. PMID:10544196

  11. Human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/CC chemokine receptor 9 is selectively expressed on intestinal homing T lymphocytes, mucosal lymphocytes, and thymocytes and is required for thymus-expressed chemokine-mediated chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, B A; Agace, W W; Campbell, J J; Heath, H M; Parent, D; Roberts, A I; Ebert, E C; Kassam, N; Qin, S; Zovko, M; LaRosa, G J; Yang, L L; Soler, D; Butcher, E C; Ponath, P D; Parker, C M; Andrew, D P

    1999-11-01

    TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory alpha4beta7(high) intestinal trafficking CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In addition, all intestinal lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes express GPR-9-6. In contrast, GPR-9-6 is not displayed on cutaneous lymphocyte antigen-positive (CLA(+)) memory CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, which traffic to skin inflammatory sites, or on other systemic alpha4beta7(-)CLA(-) memory CD4/CD8 lymphocytes. The majority of thymocytes also express GPR-9-6, but natural killer cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils are GPR-9-6 negative. Transcripts of GPR-9-6 and TECK are present in both small intestine and thymus. Importantly, the expression profile of GPR-9-6 correlates with migration to TECK of blood T lymphocytes and thymocytes. As migration of these cells is blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 mAb 3C3, we conclude that GPR-9-6 is the principal chemokine receptor for TECK. In agreement with the nomenclature rules for chemokine receptors, we propose the designation CCR-9 for GPR-9-6. The selective expression of TECK and GPR-9-6 in thymus and small intestine implies a dual role for GPR-9-6/CCR-9, both in T cell development and the mucosal immune response.

  12. Mucosal Immunization with Newcastle Disease Virus Vector Coexpressing HIV-1 Env and Gag Proteins Elicits Potent Serum, Mucosal, and Cellular Immune Responses That Protect against Vaccinia Virus Env and Gag Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Sunil K; Manoharan, Vinoth; Bhattarai, Bikash; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Samal, Siba K

    2015-07-21

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) avirulent strain LaSota was used to coexpress gp160 Env and p55 Gag from a single vector to enhance both Env-specific and Gag-specific immune responses. The optimal transcription position for both Env and Gag genes in the NDV genome was determined by generating recombinant NDV (rNDV)-Env-Gag (gp160 located between the P and M genes and Gag between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Gag-Env (Gag located between the P and M genes and gp160 between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Env/Gag (gp160 followed by Gag located between the P and M genes), and rNDV-Gag/Env (Gag followed by gp160 located between the P and M genes). All the recombinant viruses replicated at levels similar to those seen with parental NDV in embryonated chicken eggs and in chicken fibroblast cells. Both gp160 and Gag proteins were expressed at high levels in cell culture, with gp160 found to be incorporated into the envelope of NDV. The Gag and Env proteins expressed by all the recombinants except rNDV-Env-Gag self-assembled into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus-like particles (VLPs). Immunization of guinea pigs by the intranasal route with these rNDVs produced long-lasting Env- and Gag-specific humoral immune responses. The Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses and Gag-specific humoral immune responses were higher in rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag than in the other recombinants. rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag were also more efficient in inducing cellular as well as protective immune responses to challenge with vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Env and Gag in mice. These results suggest that vaccination with a single rNDV coexpressing Env and Gag represents a promising strategy to enhance immunogenicity and protective efficacy against HIV. A safe and effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses is needed to control HIV-1. In this study, we showed that coexpression of Env and Gag proteins of HIV-1 performed using a single

  13. Regulation of intestinal immune responses through TLR activation: implications for pro- and prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander eDe Kivit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, allergic gastroenteritis (e.g. eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLR play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation.

  14. Antibiotic-Driven Dysbiosis Mediates Intraluminal Agglutination and Alternative Segregation of Enterococcus faecium from the Intestinal Epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Top, Janetta; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R; Kemperman, Hans; Rogers, Malbert R C; Paganelli, Fernanda L; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The microbiota of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract is a complex ecosystem of bacterial communities that continuously interact with the mucosal immune system. In a healthy host, the mucosal immune system maintains homeostasis in the intestine and prevents invasion of pathogenic

  15. Specific modulation of mucosal immune response, tolerance and proliferation in mice colonized with A. muciniphila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derrien, M.M.N.; Baarlen, van Peter; Hooiveld, Guido; Norin, Elisabeth; Muller, Michael; Vos, de Willem

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the mammalian intestine are covered with a mucus layer that prevents direct contact with intestinal microbes but also constitutes a substrate for mucus-degrading bacteria. To study the effect of mucus degradation on the host response, germ-free mice were colonized with

  16. Indian Hedgehog Suppresses a Stromal Cell–Driven Intestinal Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Florien Westendorp

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We show that epithelium-derived Indian Hedgehog signals exclusively to fibroblasts in the intestine. Loss of Ihh leads to a rapid immune response with up-regulation of fibroblast-derived CXCL12, and migration of immune cells into the lamina propria.

  17. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaning and transport stress can have a negative impact on the piglet's immune system and intestinal microbiota. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of a yeast product on innate immunity and microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract following stress of weaning and trans...

  18. Mucosal immunity in HIV infection: what can be done to restore gastrointestinal-associated lymphoid tissue function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael D; Asmuth, David M

    2014-06-01

    This review describes the impact of HIV infection on gut-associated lymphoid tissue, the mechanisms for persistent gut-associated lymphoid tissue dysfunction despite effective antiretroviral therapy, and potential strategies to restore gut-associated lymphoid tissue function and promote immune reconstitution. Recent studies indicate that unresolved microbial translocation and intestinal dysbiosis may continue to promote enteropathy as well as HIV-associated and non-HIV-associated conditions in many HIV patients who otherwise maintain therapeutic control of systemic viral replication. Several novel therapeutic approaches to reduce intestinal inflammation and mitigate microbial translocation may hold promise for restoring gastrointestinal health and thereby increasing the efficacy of immune reconstitution in HIV-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy.

  19. The effect of academic exam stress on mucosal and cellular airway immune markers among healthy and allergic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Ana F; Rosenfield, David; Oberdörster, Eva; Vogel, Pia D; Ritz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that psychological stress can exacerbate allergies, but relatively little is known about the effect of stress on mucosal immune processes central to allergic pathophysiology. In this study, we quantified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and interleukin-4 concentrations in saliva (S) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) during final exams and at midsemester among 23 healthy and 21 allergic rhinitis individuals. IFN-γs decreased during exams for both groups while VEGF(EBC) increased (and increases in VEGFs were a trend). Elevated negative affect ratings predicted higher VEGF(EBC) in allergic individuals. IFN-γ(EBC) increased in healthy individuals early during exams and then decreased, while allergic individuals showed a decrease in IFN-γ(EBC) throughout final exams. These findings suggest that psychological stress can suppress cellular immune function among allergic individuals while increasing VEGF. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Enhancement of Antituberculosis Immunity in a Humanized Model System by a Novel Virus-Vectored Respiratory Mucosal Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yushi; Lai, Rocky; Afkhami, Sam; Haddadi, Siamak; Zganiacz, Anna; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Ashkar, Ali A; Kaushic, Charu; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Xing, Zhou

    2017-07-01

    The translation of preclinically promising novel tuberculosis vaccines to ultimate human applications has been challenged by the lack of animal models with an immune system equivalent to the human immune system in its genetic diversity and level of susceptibility to tuberculosis. We have developed a humanized mice (Hu-mice) tuberculosis model system to investigate the clinical relevance of a novel virus-vectored (VV) tuberculosis vaccine administered via respiratory mucosal or parenteral route. We find that VV vaccine activates T cells in Hu-mice as it does in human vaccinees. The respiratory mucosal route for delivery of VV vaccine in Hu-mice, but not the parenteral route, significantly reduces the humanlike lung tuberculosis outcomes in a human T-cell-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the Hu-mouse can be used to predict the protective efficacy of novel tuberculosis vaccines/strategies before they proceed to large, expensive human trials. This new vaccine testing system will facilitate the global pace of clinical tuberculosis vaccine development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Oral immunization with rotavirus VP7 expressed in transgenic potatoes induced high titers of mucosal neutralizing IgA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuzhang; Li Jintao; Mou Zhirong; Fei Lei; Ni Bing; Geng Miao; Jia Zhengcai; Zhou Wei; Zou Liyun; Tang Yan

    2003-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are a common cause of severe diarrhea in young children, resulting in nearly one million deaths worldwide annually. Rotavirus VP7 was the rotavirus neutralizing protein. Previous study reported that VP7 DNA vaccine can induce high levels of IgG in mice but cannot protect mice against challenge (Choi, A.H., Basu, M., Rae, M.N., McNeal, M.M., Ward, R.L., 1998. Virology 250, 230-240). We found that rotavirus VP7 could maintain its neutralizing immunity when it was transformed into the potato genome. Mice immunized with the transformed tubers successfully elicited serum IgG and mucosal IgA specific for VP7. The mucosal IgA titer was as high as 1000, while serum IgG titer was only 600. Neutralizing assays indicated that IgA could neutralize rotavirus. These results indicate the potential usefulness of plants for production and delivery of edible rotavirus vaccines

  2. The relationship between mucosal immunity, nasopharyngeal carriage, asymptomatic transmission and the resurgence of Bordetella pertussis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Gill

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of whooping cough in the US has been rising slowly since the 1970s, but the pace of this has accelerated sharply since acellular pertussis vaccines replaced the earlier whole cell vaccines in the late 1990s. A similar trend occurred in many other countries, including the UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and Spain, following the switch to acellular vaccines. The key question is why. Two leading theories (short duration of protective immunologic persistence and evolutionary shifts in the pathogen to evade the vaccine explain some but not all of these shifts, suggesting that other factors may also be important. In this synthesis, we argue that sterilizing mucosal immunity that blocks or abbreviates the duration of nasopharyngeal carriage of Bordetella pertussis and impedes person-to-person transmission (including between asymptomatically infected individuals is a critical factor in this dynamic. Moreover, we argue that the ability to induce such mucosal immunity is fundamentally what distinguishes whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccines and may be pivotal to understanding much of the resurgence of this disease in many countries that adopted acellular vaccines. Additionally, we offer the hypothesis that observed herd effects generated by acellular vaccines may reflect a modification of disease presentation leading to reduced potential for transmission by those already infected, as opposed to inducing resistance to infection among those who have been exposed.

  3. Dual RNAseq shows the human mucosal immunity protein, MUC13, is a hallmark of Plasmodium exoerythrocytic infection

    KAUST Repository

    LaMonte, Gregory

    2017-10-03

    The exoerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium malaria infection is a critical window for prophylactic intervention. Using a genome-wide dual RNA sequencing of flow-sorted infected and uninfected hepatoma cells we identify the human mucosal immunity gene, Mucin13 (MUC13), as strongly upregulated during Plasmodium exoerythrocytic hepatic-stage infection. We confirm that MUC13 expression is upregulated in hepatoma cell lines and primary hepatocytes. In immunofluorescence assays, host MUC13 protein expression distinguishes infected cells from adjacent uninfected cells and shows similar colocalization with parasite biomarkers such as UIS4 and HSP70. We further show that localization patterns are species independent, distinguishing both P. berghei and P. vivax infected cells, and that MUC13 can be used to identify compounds that inhibit parasite replication in hepatocytes across all Human-infecting Plasmodium species. This data presents a novel interface of host-parasite interactions in Plasmodium, in that a component of host mucosal immunity is reprogrammed to assist the progression of infection.

  4. Persistent changes in circulating and intestinal γδ T cell subsets, invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in children and adults with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Margaret R; Elliott, Louise; Hussey, Seamus; Mahmud, Nasir; Kelly, Jacinta; Doherty, Derek G; Feighery, Conleth F

    2013-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets), natural killer cells, CD56(+) T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity.

  5. Persistent changes in circulating and intestinal γδ T cell subsets, invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in children and adults with coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Dunne

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease is a chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The only current therapy is a lifelong gluten free diet. While much work has focused on the gliadin-specific adaptive immune response in coeliac disease, little is understood about the involvement of the innate immune system. Here we used multi-colour flow cytometry to determine the number and frequency of γδ T cells (Vδ1, Vδ2 and Vδ3 subsets, natural killer cells, CD56(+ T cells, invariant NKT cells, and mucosal associated invariant T cells, in blood and duodenum from adults and children with coeliac disease and healthy matched controls. All circulating innate lymphocyte populations were significantly decreased in adult, but not paediatric coeliac donors, when compared with healthy controls. Within the normal small intestine, we noted that Vδ3 cells were the most abundant γδ T cell type in the adult epithelium and lamina propria, and in the paediatric lamina propria. In contrast, patients with coeliac disease showed skewing toward a predominant Vδ1 profile, observed for both adult and paediatric coeliac disease cohorts, particularly within the gut epithelium. This was concurrent with decreases in all other gut lymphocyte subsets, suggesting a specific involvement of Vδ1 cells in coeliac disease pathogenesis. Further analysis showed that γδ T cells isolated from the coeliac gut display an activated, effector memory phenotype, and retain the ability to rapidly respond to in vitro stimulation. A profound loss of CD56 expression in all lymphocyte populations was noted in the coeliac gut. These findings demonstrate a sustained aberrant innate lymphocyte profile in coeliac disease patients of all ages, persisting even after elimination of gluten from the diet. This may lead to impaired immunity, and could potentially account for the increased incidence of autoimmune co-morbidity.

  6. Recombinant interleukin 6 with M cell-targeting moiety produced in Lactococcus lactis IL1403 as a potent mucosal adjuvant for peroral immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Shan; Piao, Da-Chuan; Jiang, Tao; Bok, Jin-Duck; Cho, Chong-Su; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2015-04-15

    Development and application of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants are important to improve immunization efficiency in oral vaccine. Here, we report a novel mucosal adjuvant, IL-6-CKS9, a recombinant cytokine generated by conjugating an M cell-targeting peptide (CKS9) with c-terminus of the murine interleukin 6 (IL-6), which facilitated enhancement of mucosal immune response. Lactococcus lactis IL1403, a food-grade strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which is widely used in dairy industry, was used as a host cell to express and secrete the IL-6-CKS9 for a mucosal vaccine adjuvant. The recombinant L. lactis IL1403 secreting IL-6-CKS9 was orally administered with a model antigen protein, M-BmpB (Brachyspira membrane protein B conjugated with CKS9), to BALB/c mice for mucosal immunization. ELISA analyses showed consistent enhancement tendencies in induction of anti-M-BmpB antibody levels both with mucosal (IgA) and systemic (IgG) immune responses in IL-6-CKS9-LAB treated group compared with other groups tested by conducting two separated mice immunization assays. In addition, we characterized that the oral administration of model protein antigen with live LAB producing IL-6-CKS9 could induce both Th1 and Th2 type immune responses by analysis of the specific anti-BmpB IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes in the sera and also investigated possible oral tolerance in our vaccine strategy. Collectively, our results showed successful production and secretion of recombinant murine IL-6 with M cell-targeting moiety (IL-6-CKS9) from L. lactis IL1403 and demonstrated the live recombinant LAB producing IL-6-CKS9 could have a potential to be used as an efficient adjuvant for peroral vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Human immunity to rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneaux, P J

    1995-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important cause of severe gastro-enteritis in infants and young children. However, the determinants of protective immunity are poorly understood. Human immunity to rotavirus can be acquired passively or actively. It may be humoral or cell-mediated, protective or non-protective, homotypic or heterotypic and mucosal or systemic, or any combination of these. Mucosal immunity is protective against rotavirus illness, but not against infection, whereas systemic immunity reflects exposure, but probably has little if any role in protection. Both local and cell-mediated immunity are likely to be important in protection. However, there is no agreement as to a reliable surrogate marker of small intestinal protective immunity, and little is known about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in man, especially infants. Passive mucosal immunity, but not systemic immunity, may contribute to protection in breast-fed infants, and in those at increased risk of serious illness who have been given oral immunoglobulin, either as prophylaxis or therapeutically. Animal and adult studies may have only limited relevance to those who are at greatest risk of serious illness. However, it is probably from such studies that hypotheses about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in the protection of infants against rotavirus infection in man remain unclear, and this continues to hinder vaccine research.

  8. Clinical, Immune, and Microbiome Traits of Gingivitis and Peri-implant Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schincaglia, G P; Hong, B Y; Rosania, A; Barasz, J; Thompson, A; Sobue, T; Panagakos, F; Burleson, J A; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A; Diaz, P I

    2017-01-01

    Tissues surrounding dental implants and teeth develop clinical inflammation in response to microbial stimuli. However, the literature suggests that differences exist in the microbial insult and inflammatory responses leading to gingivitis and peri-implant mucositis. In this pilot study, the authors use for the first time a systems biology approach to comprehensively evaluate clinical parameters, selected inflammatory markers, and the microbiome of subject-matched tooth and implant sites during native inflammation and in response to experimental plaque accumulation. Fifteen subjects with 2 posterior implants and corresponding contralateral teeth were examined at enrollment; at day 0, after reinstitution of gingival/mucosal health; at days 7, 14, and 21, during stent-mediated oral hygiene (OH) abstention; and at day 42, after resumption of OH. The subgingival microbiome was evaluated via 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 8 selected inflammatory markers measured in crevicular fluid. Comparison of teeth and implants via general linear models based on orthogonal polynomials showed similar responses in clinical parameters, inflammatory mediators, and proportions of individual microbial taxa during OH abstention. Implants, however, accumulated less plaque and underwent more heterogeneous shifts in microbiome structure. A multilevel, within-group, sparse partial least squares analysis of covariation of microbial, inflammatory, and clinical parameters throughout all study visits found inflammation around teeth and implants positively correlated with IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta and with the proportions of Selenomonas, Prevotella, and 5 species-level phylotypes. Gingivitis, however, showed a stronger positive correlation with lactoferrin and IL-1ra and a stronger negative correlation with Rothia. Peri-implant mucositis, on the contrary, correlated positively with certain microbial taxa not associated with gingivitis by a previous study or the current one. In summary, differences

  9. An endogenous nanomineral chaperones luminal antigen and peptidoglycan to intestinal immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J.; Thomas-McKay, Emma; Thoree, Vinay; Robertson, Jack; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A.; Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Grime, Geoffrey W.; Kirkby, Karen J.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Donaldson, David S.; Williams, Ifor R.; Rios, Daniel; Girardin, Stephen E.; Haas, Carolin T.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F. A.; Laman, Jon D.; Tanriver, Yakup; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert; Thompson, Richard P. H.; Pele, Laetitia C.

    2015-05-01

    In humans and other mammals it is known that calcium and phosphate ions are secreted from the distal small intestine into the lumen. However, why this secretion occurs is unclear. Here, we show that the process leads to the formation of amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles that trap soluble macromolecules, such as bacterial peptidoglycan and orally fed protein antigens, in the lumen and transport them to immune cells of the intestinal tissue. The macromolecule-containing nanoparticles utilize epithelial M cells to enter Peyer's patches, small areas of the intestine concentrated with particle-scavenging immune cells. In wild-type mice, intestinal immune cells containing these naturally formed nanoparticles expressed the immune tolerance-associated molecule ‘programmed death-ligand 1’, whereas in NOD1/2 double knockout mice, which cannot recognize peptidoglycan, programmed death-ligand 1 was undetected. Our results explain a role for constitutively formed calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the gut lumen and show how this helps to shape intestinal immune homeostasis.

  10. Enrichment of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) diet with palm fruit extracts and probiotics: Effects on skin mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezuela, Rebeca; Guardiola, Francisco A; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    Fish skin mucus contains numerous immune substances still poorly studied. To date, there are no studies regarding the possible influence of dietary supplements on such important substances. In the present work, a commercial diet used as control diet was enriched with: 1) probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens (Pdp11 diet, 10(9) cfu g(-1)); 2) probiotic Bacillus sp. (Bacillus diet, 10(9) ufc g(-1)); 3) aqueous date palm fruits extracts (DPE diet, 4%), and 4) a combination of Pdp11 + Bacillus sp + aqueous DPE (Mix diet). After 2 and 4 weeks of the feeding trial, enzymatic activities (proteases, antiproteases and peroxidases), IgM levels and terminal carbohydrates abundance were determined in skin mucus. In addition, the expression of certain immune related genes was evaluated in the skin. Our results demonstrated the significant alteration of the terminal carbohydrate abundance in skin mucus. Carbohydrates more affected by experimental diets were N-acetyl-galactosamine, N-acetyl-glucosamine, galactose, mannose, glucose and fucose. IgM, peroxidase activity and protease were also significantly higher in fish fed enriched diets. For last, an important up-regulation on the immune related gene studied on the skin was also detected. Present findings provide robust evidence that fish skin mucosal immunity can be improved by the diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term evaluation of mucosal and systemic immunity and protection conferred by different polio booster vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuhong; Daniell, Henry

    2017-09-25

    Oral polio vaccine (OPV) and Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) have distinct advantages and limitations. IPV does not provide mucosal immunity and introduction of IPV to mitigate consequences of circulating vaccine-derived polio virus from OPV has very limited effect on transmission and OPV campaigns are essential for interrupting wild polio virus transmission, even in developed countries with a high coverage of IPV and protected sewer systems. The problem is magnified in many countries with limited resources. Requirement of refrigeration for storage and transportation for both IPV and OPV is also a major challenge in developing countries. Therefore, we present here long-term studies on comparison of a plant-based booster vaccine, which is free of virus and cold chain with IPV boosters and provide data on mucosal and systemic immunity and protection conferred by neutralizing antibodies. Mice were primed subcutaneously with IPV and boosted orally with lyophilized plant cells containing 1μg or 25μg polio viral protein 1 (VP1), once a month for three months or a single booster one year after the first prime. Our results show that VP1-IgG1 titers in single or double dose IPV dropped to background levels after one year of immunization. This decrease correlated with >50% reduction in seropositivity in double dose and cells expressing VP1 can be stored without losing efficacy, eliminating cold chain. Virus-free, cold-chain free vaccine is ready for further clinical development. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Endocrine Control of Mucosal Immunity in the Female Reproductive Tract: Impact of Environmental Disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, B.; Patel, M.; Fahey, J.; Wira, C.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the human female reproductive tract (FRT) with its multiple levels of hormonally controlled immune protection has only begun to be understood. Dissecting the functions and roles of the immune system in the FRT is complicated by the differential hormonal regulation of its distinct anatomical structures that vary throughout the menstrual cycle. Although many fundamental mechanisms of steroid regulation of reproductive tract immune function have been determined, the effects of exogenous synthetic steroids or endocrine disruptors on immune function and disease susceptibility in the FRT have yet to be evaluated in detail. There is increasing evidence that environmental or synthetic molecules can alter normal immune function. This review provides an overview of the innate and adaptive immune systems, the current status of immune function in the FRT and the potential risks of environmental or pharmacological molecules that may perturb this system. PMID:22289638

  13. M cell-targeting strategy facilitates mucosal immune response and enhances protection against CVB3-induced viral myocarditis elicited by chitosan-DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Yue, Yan; Fan, Xiangmei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-07-31

    Efficient delivery of antigen to mucosal associated lymphoid tissue is a first and critical step for successful induction of mucosal immunity by vaccines. Considering its potential transcytotic capability, M cell has become a more and more attractive target for mucosal vaccines. In this research, we designed an M cell-targeting strategy by which mucosal delivery system chitosan (CS) was endowed with M cell-targeting ability via conjugating with a CPE30 peptide, C terminal 30 amino acids of clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and then evaluated its immune-enhancing ability in the context of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-specific mucosal vaccine consisting of CS and a plasmid encoding CVB3 predominant antigen VP1. It had shown that similar to CS-pVP1, M cell-targeting CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine appeared a uniform spherical shape with about 300 nm diameter and +22 mV zeta potential, and could efficiently protect DNA from DNase I digestion. Mice were orally immunized with 4 doses of CPE30-CS-pVP1 containing 50 μg pVP1 at 2-week intervals and challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with CS-pVP1 vaccine, CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine had no obvious impact on CVB3-specific serum IgG level and splenic T cell immune responses, but significantly increased specific fecal SIgA level and augmented mucosal T cell immune responses. Consequently, much milder myocarditis and lower viral load were witnessed in CPE30-CS-pVP1 immunized group. The enhanced immunogenicity and immunoprotection were associated with the M cell-targeting ability of CPE30-CS-pVP1 which improved its mucosal uptake and transcytosis. Our findings indicated that CPE30-CS-pVP1 may represent a novel prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis, and this M cell-targeting strategy indeed could be applied as a promising and universal platform for mucosal vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mucosal immunity and upper respiratory tract infections during a 24-week competitive season in young ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orysiak, Joanna; Witek, Konrad; Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Morawin, Barbara; Malczewska-Lenczowska, Jadwiga; Sitkowski, Dariusz

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and their associations with resting saliva and blood immune and endocrine parameters in ice hockey players. Twenty-seven participants (age 16.5 ± 0.5 years) completed the 24-week study period. The counts/concentrations of immune and endocrine markers were compared between healthy-prone athletes (≤2 episodes of URTI during the study period) and illness-prone athletes (≥3 episodes of URTI) and between the URTI state (when athletes had infections) and the healthy state (the time without URTI). There were no differences in concentration/counts of saliva and blood immune and endocrine parameters between the illness-prone and illness-free athletes. Athletes had significantly lower sIgA, sIgA1 and sIgA2 concentrations (sIgA: 119.88 ± 66.88, 144.10 ± 75.0 µg/ml; sIgA1: 90.2 ± 40.64, 108.44 ± 29.8 U; sIgA2: 67.58 ± 30.1, 80.3 ± 25.61 U, respectively) and significantly higher WBC, neutrophil, monocyte and eosinophil count values and IL-1ra concentration at the time when they had symptoms of URTI than in the period without symptoms of infections. There were no differences in salivary cortisol concentration between the period of URTI symptoms and the period without URTI symptoms. In conclusion, we observed lower concentrations of salivary immunoglobulins and higher levels of blood immune parameters during URTI in athletes, which may confirm the suppression of mucosal immunity and initiation responses to pathogenic infections by innate immunity.

  15. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cell Interactions with Commensal and Pathogenic Bacteria: Potential Role in Antimicrobial Immunity in the Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Ghazarian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are unconventional CD3+CD161high T lymphocytes that recognize vitamin B2 (riboflavin biosynthesis precursor derivatives presented by the MHC-I related protein, MR1. In humans, their T cell receptor is composed of a Vα7.2-Jα33/20/12 chain, combined with a restricted set of Vβ chains. MAIT cells are very abundant in the liver (up to 40% of resident T cells and in mucosal tissues, such as the lung and gut. In adult peripheral blood, they represent up to 10% of circulating T cells, whereas they are very few in cord blood. This large number of MAIT cells in the adult likely results from their gradual expansion with age following repeated encounters with riboflavin-producing microbes. Upon recognition of MR1 ligands, MAIT cells have the capacity to rapidly eliminate bacterially infected cells through the production of inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-17 and cytotoxic effector molecules (perforin and granzyme B. Thus, MAIT cells may play a crucial role in antimicrobial defense, in particular at mucosal sites. In addition, MAIT cells have been implicated in diseases of non-microbial etiology, including autoimmunity and other inflammatory diseases. Although their participation in various clinical settings has received increased attention in adults, data in children are scarce. Due to their innate-like characteristics, MAIT cells might be particularly important to control microbial infections in the young age, when long-term protective adaptive immunity is not fully developed. Herein, we review the data showing how MAIT cells may control microbial infections and how they discriminate pathogens from commensals, with a focus on models relevant for childhood infections.

  16. An adenovirus vectored mucosal adjuvant augments protection of mice immunized intranasally with an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Diana M; Moraes, Mauro P; Liao, Xiaofen; Dias, Camila C; Tulman, Edan R; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Rood, Debra; Grubman, Marvin J; Silbart, Lawrence K

    2013-04-26

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes severe morbidity and economic losses to the livestock industry in many countries. The oral and respiratory mucosae are the main ports of entry of FMDV, so the stimulation of local immunity in these tissues may help prevent initial infection and viral spread. E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) has been described as one of the few molecules that have adjuvant activity at mucosal surfaces. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of replication-defective adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vectors encoding either of two LT-based mucosal adjuvants, LTB or LTR72. These vectored adjuvants were delivered intranasally to mice concurrent with an Ad5-FMDV vaccine (Ad5-A24) to assess their ability to augment mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses to Ad5-A24 and protection against FMDV. Mice receiving Ad5-A24 plus Ad5-LTR72 had higher levels of mucosal and systemic neutralizing antibodies than those receiving Ad5-A24 alone or Ad5-A24 plus Ad5-LTB. The vaccine plus Ad5-LTR72 group also demonstrated 100% survival after intradermal challenge with a lethal dose of homologous FMDV serotype A24. These results suggest that Ad5-LTR72 could be used as an important tool to enhance mucosal and systemic immunity against FMDV and potentially other pathogens with a common route of entry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Retinoic Acid and Its Role in Modulating Intestinal Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnewski, Paulo; Das, Srustidhar; Parigi, Sara M; Villablanca, Eduardo J

    2017-01-13

    Vitamin A (VA) is amongst the most well characterized food-derived nutrients with diverse immune modulatory roles. Deficiency in dietary VA has not only been associated with immune dysfunctions in the gut, but also with several systemic immune disorders. In particular, VA metabolite all-trans retinoic acid ( at RA) has been shown to be crucial in inducing gut tropism in lymphocytes and modulating T helper differentiation. In addition to the widely recognized role in adaptive immunity, increasing evidence identifies at RA as an important modulator of innate immune cells, such as tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Here, we focus on the role of retinoic acid in differentiation, trafficking and the functions of innate immune cells in health and inflammation associated disorders. Lastly, we discuss the potential involvement of at RA during the plausible crosstalk between DCs and ILCs.

  18. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarlen, Peter; Wells, Jerry M; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-05-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels of success. Composition of microbiota, probiotic strain identity, and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Here, we review the mechanisms of immunomodulating capacities of specific probiotic strains, the responses they can induce in the host, and how microbiota and genetic differences between individuals may co-influence host responses and immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus with Genital Tract Mucosal Immune Factors In HIV-Infected Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Niall; Huber, Ashley; Lo, Yungtai; Castle, Philip E.; Kemal, Kimdar; Burk, Robert D.; Strickler, Howard D.; Einstein, Mark H.; Young, Mary; Anastos, Kathryn; Herold, Betsy C.

    2015-01-01

    Problem High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is prevalent in HIV-infected women and may be associated with mucosal changes that promote HIV replication. Method of Study Innate immune molecules, antimicrobial activity, HIV RNA, and HPV DNA genotypes were measured in a cross-sectional study of 128 HIV-infected women categorized into HPV-16 (n=8), other HR-HPV (n=41), and non-HR-HPV controls (n=79). Results Compared to controls, HR-HPV groups had higher plasma viral loads (p=0.004), lower CD4 cells (p=0.02), more genital tract HIV RNA (p=0.03), greater number of different HPV types (p<0.001), higher cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) IL-1α (p=0.03) and human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) (p=0.049), and less anti-HIVBal activity (p=0.03). HPV-16 remained significantly associated with higher HBD2 (p=0.03), higher IL-1α (p=0.009), and lower anti-HIVBaL activity (p=0.03) compared to controls after adjusting for plasma viral load and CD4 T cell count. Conclusion HR-HPV is associated with mucosal changes in HIV-infected women that could adversely impact genital tract health. PMID:26685115

  20. Commensal bacteria (normal microflora), mucosal immunity and chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlaskalová, Helena; Štěpánková, Renata; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Tučková, Ludmila; Cukrowska, B.; Lodinová-Žádníková, R.; Kozáková, Hana; Rossmann, Pavel; Bártová, J.; Sokol, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 93, - (2004), s. 97-108 ISSN 0165-2478 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/01/0933; GA ČR GA310/02/1470; GA AV ČR IAA5020101; GA AV ČR IAA5020205; GA AV ČR IAA5020210; GA AV ČR IBS5020203; GA MZd NK6742; GA MZd NI7525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : mucosal microbiota * intestina barrier * germ-free animal Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.136, year: 2004

  1. Critical Role for the Adenosine Pathway in Controlling Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Immune Activation and Inflammation in Gut Mucosal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianyu; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Gillespie, Delbert G; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B; Raehtz, Kevin D; Rinaldo, Charles R; Apetrei, Cristian; Jackson, Edwin K; Macatangay, Bernard J C; Pandrea, Ivona

    2015-09-01

    The role of the adenosine (ADO) pathway in human immunodeficiency virus type 1/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1/SIV) infection remains unclear. We compared SIVsab-induced changes of markers related to ADO production (CD39 and CD73) and breakdown (CD26 and adenosine deaminase) on T cells from blood, lymph nodes, and intestine collected from pigtailed macaques (PTMs) and African green monkeys (AGMs) that experience different SIVsab infection outcomes. We also measured ADO and inosine (INO) levels in tissues by mass spectrometry. Finally, we assessed the suppressive effect of ADO on proinflammatory cytokine production after T cell receptor stimulation. The baseline level of both CD39 and CD73 coexpression on regulatory T cells and ADO levels were higher in AGMs than in PTMs. Conversely, high INO levels associated with dramatic increases in CD26 expression and adenosine deaminase activity were observed in PTMs during chronic SIV infection. Immune activation and inflammation markers in the gut and periphery inversely correlated with ADO and directly correlated with INO. Ex vivo administration of ADO significantly suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production by T cells in both species. In conclusion, the opposite dynamics of ADO pathway-related markers and contrasting ADO/INO levels in species with divergent proinflammatory responses to SIV infection support a key role of ADO in controlling immune activation/inflammation in nonprogressive SIV infections. Changes in ADO levels predominately occurred in the gut, suggesting that the ADO pathway may be involved in sparing natural hosts of SIVs from developing SIV-related gut dysfunction. Focusing studies of the ADO pathway on mucosal sites of viral replication is warranted. The mechanisms responsible for the severe gut dysfunction characteristic of progressive HIV and SIV infection in humans and macaques are not completely elucidated. We report that ADO may play a key role in controlling immune activation

  2. Unexpected High Digestion Rate of Cooked Starch by the Ct-Maltase-Glucoamylase Small Intestine Mucosal α-Glucosidase Subunit.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Amy Hui-Mei; Nichols, Buford L; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Avery, Stephen E; Sim, Lyann; Rose, David R; Naim, Hassan Y; Hamaker, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    For starch digestion to glucose, two luminal α-amylases and four gut mucosal α-glucosidase subunits are employed. The aim of this research was to investigate, for the first time, direct digestion capability of individual mucosal α-glucosidases on cooked (gelatinized) starch. Gelatinized normal maize starch was digested with N- and C-terminal subunits of recombinant mammalian maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) of varying amounts and digestion periods. Without the aid of α-...

  3. Mucosal and systemic immune responses in humans after primary and booster immunizations with orally administered invasive and noninvasive live attenuated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret, J F; Favre, D; Wegmüller, B; Herzog, C; Que, J U; Cryz, S J; Lang, A B

    1999-07-01

    The mucosal and systemic immune responses after primary and booster immunizations with two attenuated live oral vaccine strains derived from a noninvasive (Vibrio cholerae) and an invasive (Salmonella typhi) enteric pathogen were comparatively evaluated. Vaccination with S. typhi Ty21a elicited antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses specific for S. typhi O9, 12 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as well as significant increases in levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies to the same antigen in serum. A strong systemic CD4(+) T-helper type 1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was also induced. In contrast to results with Ty21a, no evidence of a CMI response was obtained after primary immunization with V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR in spite of the good immunogenicity of the vaccine. Volunteers who received a single dose of CVD 103-HgR primarily developed an IgM ASC response against whole vaccine cells and purified V. cholerae Inaba LPS, and seroconversion of serum vibriocidal antibodies occurred in four of five subjects. Serum IgG anti-cholera toxin antibody titers were of lower magnitude. For both live vaccines, the volunteers still presented significant local immunity 14 months after primary immunization, as revealed by the elevated baseline antibody titers at the time of the booster immunization and the lower ASC, serum IgG, and vibriocidal antibody responses after the booster immunization. These results suggest that local immunity may interfere with colonization of the gut by both vaccine strains at least up to 14 months after basis immunization. Interestingly, despite a low secondary ASC response, Ty21a was able to boost both humoral (anti-LPS systemic IgG and IgA) and CMI responses. Evidence of a CMI response was also observed for one of three volunteers given a cholera vaccine booster dose. The direct comparison of results with two attenuated live oral vaccine strains in human volunteers clearly showed that the capacity of the vaccine strain to colonize specific

  4. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Wells, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels

  5. The Gut's Little Brain in Control of Intestinal Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2013-01-01

    The gut immune system shares many mediators and receptors with the autonomic nervous system. Good examples thereof are the parasympathetic (vagal) and sympathetic neurotransmitters, for which many immune cell types in a gut context express receptors or enzymes required for their synthesis. For some

  6. Comparative study of the in situ immune response in oral and nasal mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, M R; Morgado, F N; Valete-Rosalino, C M; Martins, A C; Moreira, J; Quintella, L P; de Oliveira Schubach, A; Conceição-Silva, F

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal Leishmaniasis (ML) may occur in both nasal and oral mucosa. However, despite the impressive tissue destruction, little is known about the oral involvement. To compare some changes underlying inflammation in oral and nasal ML, we performed immunohistochemistry on mucosal tissue of 20 patients with ML (nasal [n = 12]; oral [n = 8] lesions) and 20 healthy donors using antibodies that recognize inflammatory markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD22, CD68, neutrophil elastase, CD1a, CLA, Ki67, Bcl-2, NOS2, CD62E, Fas and FasL). A significantly larger number of cells, mainly T cells and macrophages, were observed in lesions than in healthy tissue. In addition, high nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression was associated with a reduced detection of parasites, highlighting the importance of NOS2 for parasite elimination. Oral lesions had higher numbers of neutrophils, parasites, proliferating cells and NOS2 than nasal lesions. These findings, together with the shorter duration of oral lesions and more intense symptoms, suggest a more recent inflammatory process. It could be explained by lesion-induced oral cavity changes that lead to eating difficulties and social stigma. In addition, the frequent poor tooth conservation and gingival inflammation tend to amplify tissue destruction and symptoms and may impair and confuse the correct diagnosis, thus delaying the onset of specific treatment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Lack of host gut microbiota alters immune responses and intestinal granuloma formation during schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzscheiter, M; Layland, L E; Loffredo-Verde, E; Mair, K; Vogelmann, R; Langer, R; Wagner, H; Prazeres da Costa, C

    2014-02-01

    Fatalities from schistosome infections arise due to granulomatous, immune-mediated responses to eggs that become trapped in host tissues. Schistosome-specific immune responses are characterized by initial T helper type 1 (Th1) responses and our previous studies demonstrated that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88)-deficient mice failed to initiate such responses in vivo. Paradoxically, schistosomal antigens fail to stimulate innate cells to release proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. Since Schistosoma mansoni infection is an intestinal disease, we hypothesized that commensal bacteria could act as bystander activators of the intestinal innate immune system to instigate Th1 responses. Using a broad spectrum of orally administered antibiotics and anti-mycotics we analysed schistosome-infected mice that were simultaneously depleted of gut bacteria. After depletion there was significantly less inflammation in the intestine, which was accompanied by decreased intestinal granuloma development. In contrast, liver pathology remained unaltered. In addition, schistosome-specific immune responses were skewed and faecal egg excretion was diminished. This study demonstrates that host microbiota can act as a third partner in instigating helminth-specific immune responses. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  8. The Commensal Microbiota Drives Immune Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Finlay, Barton Brett

    2012-01-01

    For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use t...

  9. Intestinal absorption of dinitrophenyl-lysine and effect of immunization with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Fumio; Shimura, Junko; Shimazaki, Shigeki; Hosoya, Norimasa

    1983-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of dinitrophenyl-lysine (DNP-lys) was studied with a special interest on the role of the immune system in the absorption of small molecules which are recognized as nonself. [ 3 H]-DNP- lys was rapidly absorbed by ligated intestinal loops in situ via a saturable and unique route. When [ 3 H]-DNP-lys was preincubated with the immume serum obtained from rats immunized with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA), the [ 3 H]-DNP-lys absorption was depressed. The absorption of [ 3 H]-DNP-lys in DNP-BSA-immunized rats was depressed compared to the control. The results obtained suggest that the immune system play a role in avoiding the absorption of small molecules with antigenicity. (author)

  10. Antimicrobial peptides in the female reproductive tract: a critical component of the mucosal immune barrier with physiological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Victoria L; Winkle, Sean; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2015-01-01

    At the interface of the external environment and the mucosal surface of the female reproductive tract (FRT) lies a first-line defense against pathogen invasion that includes antimicrobial peptides (AMP). Comprised of a unique class of multifunctional, amphipathic molecules, AMP employ a wide range of functions to limit microbial invasion and replication within host cells as well as independently modulate the immune system, dampen inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis. The role of AMP in barrier defense at the level of the skin and gut has received much attention as of late. Given the far reaching implications for women's health, maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, and sexually transmissible and polymicrobial diseases, we herein review the distribution and function of key AMP throughout the female reproductive mucosa and assess their role as an essential immunological barrier to microbial invasion throughout the reproductive cycle of a woman's lifetime. A comprehensive search in PubMed/Medline was conducted related to AMP general structure, function, signaling, expression, distribution and barrier function of AMP in the FRT, hormone regulation of AMP, the microbiome of the FRT, and AMP in relation to implantation, pregnancy, fertility, pelvic inflammatory disease, complications of pregnancy and assisted reproductive technology. AMP are amphipathic peptides that target microbes for destruction and have been conserved throughout all living organisms. In the FRT, several major classes of AMP are expressed constitutively and others are inducible at the mucosal epithelium and by immune cells. AMP expression is also under the influence of sex hormones, varying throughout the menstrual cycle, and dependent on the vaginal microbiome. AMP can prevent infection with sexually transmissible and opportunistic pathogens of the female reproductive tissues, although emerging understanding of vaginal dysbiosis suggests induction of a unique AMP profile with increased

  11. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium delivering DNA vaccine encoding duck enteritis virus UL24 induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and conferred good protection against challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orally delivered DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV were developed using live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207 as a carrier and Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB as a mucosal adjuvant. DNA vaccine plasmids pVAX-UL24 and pVAX-LTB-UL24 were constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 resulting SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 and SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 respectively. After ducklings were orally inoculated with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 or SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24, the anti-DEV mucosal and systemic immune responses were recorded. To identify the optimum dose that confers maximum protection, we used different doses of the candidate vaccine SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 during oral immunization. The strongest mucosal and systemic immune responses developed in the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 (1011 CFU immunized group. Accordingly, oral immunization of ducklings with SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 showed superior efficacy of protection (60-80% against a lethal DEV challenge (1000 LD50, compared with the limited survival rate (40% of ducklings immunized with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24. Our study suggests that the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 can be a candidate DEV vaccine.

  12. Impact of Enterobius vermicularis infection and mebendazole treatment on intestinal microbiota and host immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chin-An; Liang, Chao; Lin, Chia-Li; Hsiao, Chiung-Tzu; Peng, Ching-Tien; Lin, Hung-Chih; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies on the association of enterobiasis and chronic inflammatory diseases have revealed contradictory results. The interaction of Enterobius vermicularis infection in particular with gut microbiota and induced immune responses has never been thoroughly examined. Methodology/Findings In order to answer the question of whether exposure to pinworm and mebendazole can shift the intestinal microbial composition and immune responses, we recruited 109 (30 pinworm-negative, 79 ...

  13. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System – A Crosstalk in Crohn’s Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby supporting the hypothesis that chronic intestinal inflammation arises from an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora in genetically susceptible individuals. Given that CD patients display changes in their gut microbiota composition, collectively termed “dysbiosis,” the question raises whether the altered microbiota composition is a cause of disease or rather a consequence of the inflammatory state of the intestinal environment. This review will focus on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system during intestinal inflammation, thereby unraveling the role of the microbiota in CD pathogenesis. PMID:26441993

  14. Mechanism for maintaining homeostasis in the immune system of the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshie; Yoshioka, Noriko; Nakata, Kazue; Nishizawa, Takashi; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2009-11-01

    Every organism possesses a mechanism for maintaining homeostasis. We have focused on the immune system as a system that helps maintain homeostasis of the body, and particularly on the intestine as the largest organ of immunity in the body. We have also focused our research on the mechanism that responds to foreign substances in the intestine, especially the toll-like receptors (TLR). The activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) signal transduction as a response to TLR in the intestine is believed to contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of the body through the homeostasis of the intestine. Furthermore, significant findings were reported in which signal transduction from TLR4 was essential for the maintenance and regulation of the intestine. These results strongly suggest the possibility that homeostasis in the intestine is maintained by TLR4, and signaling by TLR4 after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) probably has a role in regulating homeostasis. It is expected that the prevention and treatment of various diseases using TLR4 will continue to develop. As LPS is a substance that enhances the activity of TLR4, it will also attract attention as a valuable substance in its own right.

  15. Life and death at the mucosal-luminal interface: New perspectives on human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootjans, Joep; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Buurman, Wim A; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Derikx, Joep P M

    2016-03-07

    Intestinal ischemia is a frequently observed phenomenon. Morbidity and mortality rates are extraordinarily high and did not improve over the past decades. This is in part attributable to limited knowledge on the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in man, the paucity in preventive and/or therapeutic options and the lack of early diagnostic markers for intestinal ischemia. To improve our knowledge and solve clinically important questions regarding intestinal IR, we developed a human experimental intestinal IR model. With this model, we were able to gain insight into the mechanisms that allow the human gut to withstand short periods of IR without the development of severe inflammatory responses. The purpose of this review is to overview the most relevant recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of human intestinal IR, as well as the (potential) future clinical implications.

  16. Evaluation of an intranasal virosomal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus in mice: effect of TLR2 and NOD2 ligands on induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shafique

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: RSV infection remains a serious threat to newborns and the elderly. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent RSV infection. A mucosal RSV vaccine would be attractive as it could induce mucosal as well as systemic antibodies, capable of protecting both the upper and lower respiratory tract. Previously, we reported on a virosomal RSV vaccine for intramuscular injection with intrinsic adjuvant properties mediated by an incorporated lipophilic Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand. However, it has not been investigated whether this virosomal RSV vaccine candidate would be suitable for use in mucosal immunization strategies and if additional incorporation of other innate receptor ligands, like NOD2-ligand, could further enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To explore if intranasal (IN immunization with a virosomal RSV vaccine, supplemented with TLR2 and/or NOD2-ligands, is an effective strategy to induce RSV-specific immunity. METHODS: We produced RSV-virosomes carrying TLR2 (Pam3CSK4 and/or NOD2 (L18-MDP ligands. We tested the immunopotentiating properties of these virosomes in vitro, using TLR2- and/or NOD2-ligand-responsive murine and human cell lines, and in vivo by assessing induction of protective antibody and cellular responses upon IN immunization of BALB/c mice. RESULTS: Incorporation of Pam3CSK4 and/or L18-MDP potentiates the capacity of virosomes to activate (antigen-presenting cells in vitro, as demonstrated by NF-κB induction. In vivo, incorporation of Pam3CSK4 in virosomes boosted serum IgG antibody responses and mucosal antibody responses after IN immunization. While L18-MDP alone was ineffective, incorporation of L18-MDP in Pam3CSK4-carrying virosomes further boosted mucosal antibody responses. Finally, IN immunization with adjuvanted virosomes, particularly Pam3CSK4/L18-MDP-adjuvanted-virosomes, protected mice against infection with RSV, without priming for enhanced

  17. Effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 on mouse systemic immunity and the immune response in the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuanbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei L9,which was isolated from human intestine, was investigated for its immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Results showed that L9 improved systemic immunity by enhancing the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, the proliferation ratio of splenocytes, the IgG level in the serum and the level of IgA in the mucosa. Further, L9induced theTh1-polarized immune response by elevating the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in the mucosa. This effect was confirmed by the enhanced IL-12-inducing activity of macrophages after in vitro stimulation of L9. Also detected was increased expression of TLR-2mRNA in the mucosa. We predict that L9 could enhance innate immunity by activating TLR-2 in the mucosa, and enhance acquired immunity by promoting Th1 polarization through induced production of IL-12 by macrophages.

  18. State of Antiendotoxic Immunity Antiendotoxin and Metabolic Intoxication in Acute Intestinal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Odinets

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the comparative analysis of antiendotoxic immunity parameters and free-radical oxidation in the blood of 34 patients with acute intestinal infections of rotavirus and rotavirus-bacterial etiology depending on the severity of the disease and its duration.

  19. The intestinal microbiota and host immune interactions in the critically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuijt, T.J.; Poll, van der T.; Vos, de W.M.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors a complex population of microbes that play a fundamental role in the development of the immune system and human health. Besides an important local contribution in the host defense against infections, it has become increasingly clear that intestinal bacteria also

  20. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) regulate intestinal immunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; LaCasse, Eric C; Seidelin, Jakob B

    2014-01-01

    -linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP2), in which 20% of patients develop severe intestinal inflammation. In addition, 4% of males with early-onset IBD also have inactivating mutations in XIAP. Therefore, the IAPs play a greater role in gut homeostasis, immunity and IBD development than previously suspected...

  1. Stories of love and hate: innate immunity and host-microbe crosstalk in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstiel, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular techniques have enabled a deep view into the structure and function of the host's immune system and the stably associated commensal intestinal flora. This review outlines selected aspects of the interplay of innate immune recognition and effectors that shape the ecological niches for the intestinal microbiota. Several studies have demonstrated a pivotal role of innate immune receptor pathways (NOD-like receptors and Toll-like receptors) for the maintenance of microbial communities in the gut. Genetic deficiencies in these pathways have been associated with increased susceptibility to inflammation that in animal models can be transmitted via direct contact or by stool transplantation in the absence of abundant pathogens. The genetic architecture of the human host shapes the diversity and function of its stably associated intestinal microflora. Innate immune receptors such as NOD2 or the inflammasome component NOD-like receptor, pyrin-domain containing 6 play a major role in licensing the microbiota under physiological conditions. Understanding the symbiotic interplay in the intestinal tract should help develop procedures and therapeutic interventions aiming at the identification and restoration of disturbed microbiota states. Indeed, these states may be the missing trigger factor for the manifestation of a multitude of civilization disorders including inflammatory bowel disease and gastrointestinal cancer.

  2. DISTURBANCE OF METABOLIC ACTIVITY OF INTESTINAL MICROFLORA AND LOCAL IMMUNITY OF ROTAVIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Martynova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the research on metabolic activity of intestinal microflora and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA content in coprofiltrate of rotavirus infection patients depending on disease course. It is established that a long-lasting clinical oppression of metabolic processes of microbiocenosis and local immunity deficiency define a rough course of rotavirus infection. 

  3. DISTURBANCE OF METABOLIC ACTIVITY OF INTESTINAL MICROFLORA AND LOCAL IMMUNITY OF ROTAVIRUS INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    G. P. Martynova; N. V. Kogan; I. A. Solovyeva

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the research on metabolic activity of intestinal microflora and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) content in coprofiltrate of rotavirus infection patients depending on disease course. It is established that a long-lasting clinical oppression of metabolic processes of microbiocenosis and local immunity deficiency define a rough course of rotavirus infection. 

  4. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Bivalent mucosal peptide vaccines administered using the LCP carrier system stimulate protective immune responses against Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kai; Ebensen, Thomas; Chandrudu, Saranya; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan; Olive, Colleen; Guzman, Carlos A

    2017-11-01

    Despite the broad knowledge about the pathogenicity of Streptococcus pyogenes there is still a controversy about the correlate of protection in GAS infections. We aimed in further improving the immune responses stimulated against GAS comparing different vaccine formulations including bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) and BPPCysMPEG, a derivative of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide (MALP-2), as adjuvants, respectively, to be administered with and without the universal T helper cell epitope P25 along with the optimized B cell epitope J14 of the M protein and B and T cell epitopes of SfbI. Lipopeptide based nano carrier systems (LCP) were used for efficient antigen delivery across the mucosal barrier. The stimulated immune responses were efficient in protecting mice against a respiratory challenge with a lethal dose of a heterologous S. pyogenes strain. Moreover, combination of the LCP based peptide vaccine with c-di-AMP allowed reduction of antigen dose at the same time maintaining vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The commensal microbiota drives immune homeostasis

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    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use to keep our immune system healthy, as opposed to trying to correct the immune imbalances caused by dysbiosis, may prove to be a more astute and efficient way of treating immune-mediated disease.

  7. Induction of Mucosal and Systemic Immunity to a Recombinant Simian Immunodeficiency Viral Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, T.; Bergmeier, L. A.; Panagiotidi, C.; Tao, L.; Brookes, R.; Klavinskis, L. S.; Walker, P.; Walker, J.; Ward, R. G.; Hussain, L.; Gearing, A. J. H.; Adams, S. E.

    1992-11-01

    Heterosexual transmission through the cervico-vaginal mucosa is the principal route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Africa and is increasing in the United States and Europe. Vaginal immunization with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) had not yet been studied in nonhuman primates. Immune responses in macaques were investigated by stimulation of the genital and gut-associated lymphoid tissue with a recombinant, particulate SIV antigen. Vaginal, followed by oral, administration of the vaccine elicited three types of immunity: (i) gag protein p27-specific, secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the vaginal fluid, (ii) specific CD4^+ T cell proliferation and helper function in B cell p27-specific IgA synthesis in the genital lymph nodes, and (iii) specific serum IgA and IgG, with CD4^+ T cell proliferative and helper functions in the circulating blood.

  8. Mucosal immunization with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors protects against influenza virus challenge in mice.

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    Judith M Fontana

    Full Text Available Recent reports highlight the potential for integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLV to be developed as vaccines due to their ability to elicit cell-mediated and humoral immune responses after intramuscular administration. Differently from their integrase-competent counterpart, whose utility for vaccine development is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis, IDLV possess a mutation in their integrase gene that prevents genomic integration. Instead, they are maintained as episomal DNA circles that retain the ability to stably express functional proteins. Despite their favorable profile, it is unknown whether IDLV elicit immune responses after intranasal administration, a route that could be advantageous in the case of infection with a respiratory agent. Using influenza as a model, we constructed IDLV expressing the influenza virus nucleoprotein (IDLV-NP, and tested their ability to generate NP-specific immune responses and protect from challenge in vivo. We found that administration of IDLV-NP elicited NP-specific T cell and antibody responses in BALB/c mice. Importantly, IDLV-NP was protective against homologous and heterosubtypic influenza virus challenge only when given by the intranasal route. This is the first report demonstrating that IDLV can induce protective immunity after intranasal administration, and suggests that IDLV may represent a promising vaccine platform against infectious agents.

  9. New mechanism of oral immunity to mucosal candidiasis in hyper-IgE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, H R; Baker, O; Freeman, A F; Jang, W S; Holland, S M; Li, R A; Edgerton, M; Gaffen, S L

    2011-07-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC, thrush) is an opportunistic infection caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans. An understanding of immunity to Candida has recently begun to unfold with the identification of fungal pattern-recognition receptors such as C-type lectin receptors, which trigger protective T-helper (Th)17 responses in the mucosa. Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES/Job's syndrome) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency characterized by dominant-negative mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is downstream of the Th17-inductive cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-23, and hence patients with HIES exhibit dramatic Th17 deficits. HIES patients develop oral and mucocutaneous candidiasis, supporting a protective role for Th17 cells in immunity to OPC. However, the Th17-dependent mechanisms of antifungal immunity in OPC are still poorly defined. An often unappreciated aspect of oral immunity is saliva, which is rich in antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) and exerts direct antifungal activity. In this study, we show that HIES patients show significant impairment in salivary AMPs, including β-defensin 2 and Histatins. This tightly correlates with reduced candidacidal activity of saliva and concomitantly elevated colonization with Candida. Moreover, IL-17 induces histatins in cultured salivary gland cells. This is the first demonstration that HIES is associated with defective salivary activity, and provides a mechanism for the severe susceptibility of these patients to OPC.

  10. Interactions between bacteria and the intestinal mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on epithelium cells influence mucosal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms governing the ability of bacteria to adhere to and colonize human and animal hosts in health and disease are still incompletely understood. Throughout the extensive mucosal surfaces of the body that are in contact with the external environment, epithelial cells represent the first po...

  11. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors.

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    Tomohiro Kawahara

    Full Text Available Human rotavirus (RV infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1, which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in

  12. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Tomohiro; Makizaki, Yutaka; Oikawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Maeda, Ayako; Shimakawa, Masaki; Komoto, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Kyoko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Human rotavirus (RV) infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1), which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in mice administered

  13. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael L.; Thymann, Thomas; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    strong downregulation of genes related to inflammation and innate immune response to microbiota and marked upregulation of genes related to amino acid metabolism, in particular threonine, glucose transport systems, and cell cycle in 5-day-old ANTI pigs. In a follow-up experiment, 5 days of antibiotics......Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad......-spectrum antibiotic treatment improves NEC resistance and intestinal structure, function, and immunity in neonates. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were fed 3 days of parenteral nutrition followed by 2 days of enteral formula. Immediately after birth, they were assigned to receive either antibiotics (oral...

  14. The Role of Sphingolipids on Innate Immunity to Intestinal Salmonella Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Chen

    2017-08-07

    Salmonella spp. remains a major public health problem for the whole world. To reduce the use of antimicrobial agents and drug-resistant Salmonella , a better strategy is to explore alternative therapy rather than to discover another antibiotic. Sphingolipid- and cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains attract signaling proteins and orchestrate them toward cell signaling and membrane trafficking pathways. Recent studies have highlighted the crucial role of sphingolipids in the innate immunity against infecting pathogens. It is therefore mandatory to exploit the role of the membrane sphingolipids in the innate immunity of intestinal epithelia infected by this pathogen. In the present review, we focus on the role of sphingolipids in the innate immunity of intestinal epithelia against Salmonella infection, including adhesion, autophagy, bactericidal effect, barrier function, membrane trafficking, cytokine and antimicrobial peptide expression. The intervention of sphingolipid-enhanced foods to make our life healthy or pharmacological agents regulating sphingolipids is provided at the end.

  15. Eyedrop Vaccination Induced Systemic and Mucosal Immunity against Influenza Virus in Ferrets.

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    Sangchul Yoon

    Full Text Available We investigated eyedrop vaccination (EDV in pre-clinical development for immunological protection against influenza and for potential side effects involving ocular inflammation and the central nervous system (CNS. Live attenuated influenza EDV, CA07 (H1N1, PZ-4 (H1N2 and Uruguay (H3N2, induced both systemic and mucosal virus-specific antibody responses in ferrets. In addition, EDV resulted in a clinically significant protection against viral challenge, and suppression of viral replication in nasal secretion and lung tissue. Regarding safety, we found that administered EDV flow through the tear duct to reach the base of nasal cavity, and thus do not contact the olfactory bulb. All analyses for potential adverse effects due to EDV, including histological and functional examinations, did not reveal significant side effects. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EDV as effective, while being a safe administration route with minimum local side effects, CNS invasion, or visual function disturbance.

  16. Mucosal immunization with PspA (Pneumococcal surface protein A-adsorbed nanoparticles targeting the lungs for protection against pneumococcal infection.

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    Tasson C Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Burden of pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high despite the availability of conjugate vaccines. Mucosal immunization targeting the lungs is an attractive alternative for the induction of local immune responses to improve protection against pneumonia. Our group had previously described the development of poly(glycerol adipate-co-ω-pentadecalactone (PGA-co-PDL polymeric nanoparticles (NPs adsorbed with Pneumococcal surface protein A from clade 4 (PspA4Pro within L-leucine microcarriers (nanocomposite microparticles-NCMPs for mucosal delivery targeting the lungs (NP/NCMP PspA4Pro. NP/NCMP PspA4Pro was now used for immunization of mice. Inoculation of this formulation induced anti-PspA4Pro IgG antibodies in serum and lungs. Analysis of binding of serum IgG to intact bacteria showed efficient binding to bacteria expressing PspA from clades 3, 4 and 5 (family 2, but no binding to bacteria expressing PspA from clades 1 and 2 (family 1 was observed. Both mucosal immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro and subcutaneous injection of the protein elicited partial protection against intranasal lethal pneumococcal challenge with a serotype 3 strain expressing PspA from clade 5 (PspA5. Although similar survival levels were observed for mucosal immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro and subcutaneous immunization with purified protein, NP/NCMP PspA4Pro induced earlier control of the infection. Conversely, neither immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro nor subcutaneous immunization with purified protein reduced bacterial burden in the lungs after challenge with a serotype 19F strain expressing PspA from clade 1 (PspA1. Mucosal immunization with NP/NCMP PspA4Pro targeting the lungs is thus able to induce local and systemic antibodies, conferring protection only against a strain expressing PspA from the homologous family 2.

  17. HIC1 links retinoic acid signalling to group 3 innate lymphoid cell-dependent regulation of intestinal immunity and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignano, Frann; Korinek, Vladimir; Underhill, T. Michael

    2018-01-01

    The intestinal immune system must be able to respond to a wide variety of infectious organisms while maintaining tolerance to non-pathogenic microbes and food antigens. The Vitamin A metabolite all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) has been implicated in the regulation of this balance, partially by regulating innate lymphoid cell (ILC) responses in the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of atRA-dependent intestinal immunity and homeostasis remain elusive. Here we define a role for the transcriptional repressor Hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1, ZBTB29) in the regulation of ILC responses in the intestine. Intestinal ILCs express HIC1 in a vitamin A-dependent manner. In the absence of HIC1, group 3 ILCs (ILC3s) that produce IL-22 are lost, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection with the bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Thus, atRA-dependent expression of HIC1 in ILC3s regulates intestinal homeostasis and protective immunity. PMID:29470558

  18. A Probiotic Adjuvant Lactobacillus rhamnosus Enhances Specific Immune Responses after Ocular Mucosal Immunization with Chlamydial Polymorphic Membrane Protein C.

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    Aleksandra Inic-Kanada

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the development of chlamydia vaccines, using live-attenuated or ultraviolet light-inactivated chlamydia, are paving the way for new possibilities to oppose the societal challenges posed by chlamydia-related diseases, such as blinding trachoma. An effective subunit vaccine would mitigate the risks associated with the use of a whole-cell vaccine. Our rationale for the design of an efficient subunit vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct is based on the membrane proteins involved in the initial Ct-host cell contact and on the route of immunization that mimics the natural infection process (i.e., via the ocular mucosa. The first aim of our study was to characterize the specific conjunctival and vaginal immune responses following eye drop immunization in BALB/c mice, using the N-terminal portion of the Ct serovar E polymorphic membrane protein C (N-PmpC as the subunit vaccine antigen. Second, we aimed to examine the adjuvant properties of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LB when formulated with N-PmpC. N-PmpC applied alone stimulated the production of N-PmpC- and Ct serovar B-specific antibodies in serum, tears and vaginal washes, whereas the combination with LB significantly enhanced these responses. The N-PmpC/LB combination initiated a T cell response characterized by an elevated percentage of CD25+ T cells and CD8+ effector T cells, enhanced CD4+ T-helper 1 skewing, and increased regulatory T cell responses. Together, these results show that eye drop vaccination with combined use of N-PmpC and a live probiotic LB stimulates specific cellular and humoral immune responses, not only locally in the conjunctiva but also in the vaginal mucosa, which could be a promising approach in Ct vaccine development.

  19. Lack of mucosal immune reconstitution during prolonged treatment of acute and early HIV-1 infection.

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    Saurabh Mehandru

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available During acute and early HIV-1 infection (AEI, up to 60% of CD4(+ T cells in the lamina propria of the lower gastrointestinal (GI tract are lost as early as 2-4 wk after infection. Reconstitution in the peripheral blood during therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is well established. However, the extent of immune reconstitution in the GI tract is unknown.Fifty-four AEI patients and 18 uninfected control participants underwent colonic biopsy. Forty of the 54 AEI patients were followed after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (18 were studied longitudinally with sequential biopsies over a 3-y period after beginning HAART, and 22 were studied cross sectionally after 1-7 y of uninterrupted therapy. Lymphocyte subsets, markers of immune activation and memory in the peripheral blood and GI tract were determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In situ hybridization was performed in order to identify persistent HIV-1 RNA expression. Of the patients studied, 70% maintained, on average, a 50%-60% depletion of lamina propria lymphocytes despite 1-7 y of HAART. Lymphocytes expressing CCR5 and both CCR5 and CXCR4 were persistently and preferentially depleted. Levels of immune activation in the memory cell population, CD45RO+ HLA-DR+, returned to levels seen in the uninfected control participants in the peripheral blood, but were elevated in the GI tract of patients with persistent CD4+ T cell depletion despite therapy. Rare HIV-1 RNA-expressing cells were detected by in situ hybridization.Apparently suppressive treatment with HAART during acute and early infection does not lead to complete immune reconstitution in the GI mucosa in the majority of patients studied, despite immune reconstitution in the peripheral blood. Though the mechanism remains obscure, the data suggest that there is either viral or immune-mediated accelerated T cell destruction or, possibly, alterations in T cell homing to the GI tract. Although clinically

  20. Modification of Intestinal Microbiota and Its Consequences for Innate Immune Response in the Pathogenesis of Campylobacteriosis

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    Wycliffe Omurwa Masanta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in the world, and thus one of the most important public health concerns. The initial stage in its pathogenesis after ingestion is to overcome colonization resistance that is maintained by the human intestinal microbiota. But how it overcomes colonization resistance is unknown. Recently developed humanized gnotobiotic mouse models have provided deeper insights into this initial stage and host’s immune response. These studies have found that a fat-rich diet modifies the composition of the conventional intestinal microbiota by increasing the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria loads while reducing the Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes loads creating an imbalance that exposes the intestinal epithelial cells to adherence. Upon adherence, deoxycholic acid stimulates C. jejuni to synthesize Campylobacter invasion antigens, which invade the epithelial cells. In response, NF-κB triggers the maturation of dendritic cells. Chemokines produced by the activated dendritic cells initiate the clearance of C. jejuni cells by inducing the actions of neutrophils, B-lymphocytes, and various subsets of T-cells. This immune response causes inflammation. This review focuses on the progress that has been made on understanding the relationship between intestinal microbiota shift, establishment of C. jejuni infection, and consequent immune response.

  1. Modification of intestinal microbiota and its consequences for innate immune response in the pathogenesis of campylobacteriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanta, Wycliffe Omurwa; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan; Tareen, Abdul Malik; Lugert, Raimond; Groß, Uwe; Zautner, Andreas E

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in the world, and thus one of the most important public health concerns. The initial stage in its pathogenesis after ingestion is to overcome colonization resistance that is maintained by the human intestinal microbiota. But how it overcomes colonization resistance is unknown. Recently developed humanized gnotobiotic mouse models have provided deeper insights into this initial stage and host's immune response. These studies have found that a fat-rich diet modifies the composition of the conventional intestinal microbiota by increasing the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria loads while reducing the Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes loads creating an imbalance that exposes the intestinal epithelial cells to adherence. Upon adherence, deoxycholic acid stimulates C. jejuni to synthesize Campylobacter invasion antigens, which invade the epithelial cells. In response, NF- κ B triggers the maturation of dendritic cells. Chemokines produced by the activated dendritic cells initiate the clearance of C. jejuni cells by inducing the actions of neutrophils, B-lymphocytes, and various subsets of T-cells. This immune response causes inflammation. This review focuses on the progress that has been made on understanding the relationship between intestinal microbiota shift, establishment of C. jejuni infection, and consequent immune response.

  2. Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Action of Probiotics and Synbiotics in Treating Pediatric Intestinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Campos, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    The pediatric population is continually at risk of developing infectious and inflammatory diseases. The treatment for infections, particularly gastrointestinal conditions, focuses on oral or intravenous rehydration, nutritional support and, in certain case, antibiotics. Over the past decade, the probiotics and synbiotics administration for the prevention and treatment of different acute and chronic infectious diseases has dramatically increased. Probiotic microorganisms are primarily used as treatments because they can stimulate changes in the intestinal microbial ecosystem and improve the immunological status of the host. The beneficial impact of probiotics is mediated by different mechanisms. These mechanisms include the probiotics’ capacity to increase the intestinal barrier function, to prevent bacterial transferation and to modulate inflammation through immune receptor cascade signaling, as well as their ability to regulate the expression of selected host intestinal genes. Nevertheless, with respect to pediatric intestinal diseases, information pertaining to these key mechanisms of action is scarce, particularly for immune-mediated mechanisms of action. In the present work, we review the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of action of probiotics and synbiotics that affect the immune system. PMID:29303974

  3. Molecular Control of Innate Immune Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection by Intestinal let-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    The microRNA (miRNA) let-7 is an important miRNA identified in Caenorhabditis elegans and has been shown to be involved in the control of innate immunity. The underlying molecular mechanisms for let-7 regulation of innate immunity remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for intestinal let-7 in the regulation of innate immunity. Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 decreased let-7::GFP expression. Intestine- or neuron-specific activity of let-7 was required for its function in the regulation of innate immunity. During the control of innate immune response to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection, SDZ-24 was identified as a direct target for intestinal let-7. SDZ-24 was found to be predominantly expressed in the intestine, and P. aeruginosa PA14 infection increased SDZ-24::GFP expression. Intestinal let-7 regulated innate immune response to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection by suppressing both the expression and the function of SDZ-24. Knockout or RNA interference knockdown of sdz-24 dampened the resistance of let-7 mutant to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. Intestinal overexpression of sdz-24 lacking 3’-UTR inhibited the susceptibility of nematodes overexpressing intestinal let-7 to P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. In contrast, we could observed the effects of intestinal let-7 on innate immunity in P. aeruginosa PA14 infected transgenic strain overexpressing sdz-24 containing 3’-UTR. In the intestine, certain SDZ-24-mediated signaling cascades were formed for nematodes against the P. aeruginosa PA14 infection. Our results highlight the crucial role of intestinal miRNAs in the regulation of the innate immune response to pathogenic infection. PMID:28095464

  4. Immunization with the conjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇ against Salmonella typhi induces Vi-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Fabio; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Rondini, Simona; Pozzi, Gianni; Martin, Laura B; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-09-21

    Typhoid fever is a public health problem, especially among young children in developing countries. To address this need, a glycoconjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇, composed of the polysaccharide antigen Vi covalently conjugated to the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM₁₉₇, is under development. Here, we assessed the antibody and cellular responses, both local and systemic, following subcutaneous injection of Vi-CRM₁₉₇. The glycoconjugate elicited Vi-specific serum IgG titers significantly higher than unconjugated Vi, with prevalence of IgG1 that persisted for at least 60 days after immunization. Vi-specific IgG, but not IgA, were present in intestinal washes. Lymphocytes proliferation after restimulation with Vi-CRM₁₉₇ was observed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. These data confirm the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ and demonstrate that the vaccine-specific antibody and cellular immune responses are present also in the intestinal tract, thus strengthening the suitability of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ as a promising candidate vaccine against Salmonella Typhi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytokines and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines of the intestinal microenvironment largely dictate immunological responses after mucosal insults and the dominance of homeostatic or proinflammatory pathways. This review presents important recent studies on the role of specific cytokines in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. The particular mucosal effects of cytokines depend on their inherent properties but also the cellular origin, type of stimulatory antigens, intermolecular interactions, and the particular immunological milieu. Novel cytokines of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family, including IL-33 and IL-36, have dominant roles in mucosal immunity, whereas more established ones such as IL-18 are constantly enriched with unique properties. Th17 cells are important mucosal constituents, although their profound plasticity, makes the specific set of cytokines they secrete more important than their mere numbers. Finally, various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, and death receptor, 3 demonstrate dichotomous roles with mucosa-protective function in acute injury but proinflammatory effects during chronic inflammation. The role of cytokines in mucosal health and disease is increasingly revealed. Such information not only will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of gut inflammation, but also set the background for development of reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and cytokine-specific therapies.

  6. Consumption of Oxidized Soybean Oil Increased Intestinal Oxidative Stress and Affected Intestinal Immune Variables in Yellow-feathered Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Liang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of oxidized soybean oil in the diet of young chickens on growth performance and intestinal oxidative stress, and indices of intestinal immune function. Corn-soybean-based diets containing 2% mixtures of fresh and oxidized soybean oil provided 6 levels (0.15, 1.01, 3.14, 4.95, 7.05, and 8.97 meqO2/kg of peroxide value (POV in the diets. Each dietary treatment, fed for 22 d, had 6 replicates, each containing 30 birds (n = 1,080. Increasing POV levels reduced average daily feed intake (ADFI of the broilers during d 1 to 10, body weight and average daily gain at d 22 but did not affect overall ADFI. Concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA increased in plasma and jejunum as POV increased but total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC declined in plasma and jejunum. Catalase (CAT activity declined in plasma and jejunum as did plasma glutathione S-transferase (GST. Effects were apparent at POV exceeding 3.14 meqO2/kg for early ADFI and MDA in jejunum, and POV exceeding 1.01 meqO2/kg for CAT in plasma and jejunum, GST in plasma and T-AOC in jejunum. Relative jejunal abundance of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB P50 and NF-κB P65 increased as dietary POV increased. Increasing POV levels reduced the jejunal concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A and cluster of differentiation (CD 4 and CD8 molecules with differences from controls apparent at dietary POV of 3.14 to 4.95 meqO2/kg. These findings indicated that growth performance, feed intake, and the local immune system of the small intestine were compromised by oxidative stress when young broilers were fed moderately oxidized soybean oil.

  7. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection alters intestinal immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiangwu; Xiao, Zhiming; Liu, Fen; Chen, Shuai; Tang, Wuliang; Zhang, Decai; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in humans and piglets. However, research regarding alterations of intestinal immunity following ETEC infection remains limited and the results controversial. The present study investigated the effects of ETEC on the expression levels of pro‑inflammatory cytokines and innate immune regulators from plasma cells, goblet cells and Paneth cells, and the activation of toll‑like receptor 4-nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, in a mouse model infected with a porcine isolated ETEC strain. ETEC infection significantly reduced the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines in the mouse jejunum (Pinfection significantly affected the expression of immune regulators of plasma cells, goblet cells and Paneth cells in the mouse intestine (Pimmunity via the NF‑κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, ETEC colonization affects intestinal immunity as observed in a mouse model. This study provides a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in animals and humans.

  8. Unexpected high digestion rate of cooked starch by the Ct-maltase-glucoamylase small intestine mucosal α-glucosidase subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Hui-Mei Lin

    Full Text Available For starch digestion to glucose, two luminal α-amylases and four gut mucosal α-glucosidase subunits are employed. The aim of this research was to investigate, for the first time, direct digestion capability of individual mucosal α-glucosidases on cooked (gelatinized starch. Gelatinized normal maize starch was digested with N- and C-terminal subunits of recombinant mammalian maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM and sucrase-isomaltase (SI of varying amounts and digestion periods. Without the aid of α-amylase, Ct-MGAM demonstrated an unexpected rapid and high digestion degree near 80%, while other subunits showed 20 to 30% digestion. These findings suggest that Ct-MGAM assists α-amylase in digesting starch molecules and potentially may compensate for developmental or pathological amylase deficiencies.

  9. Norovirus Narita 104 Virus-Like Particles Expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana Induce Serum and Mucosal Immune Responses

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    Lolita George Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Narita 104 virus is a human pathogen belonging to the norovirus (family Caliciviridae genogroup II. Noroviruses cause epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. To explore the potential of developing a plant-based vaccine, a plant optimized gene encoding Narita 104 virus capsid protein (NaVCP was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana using a tobacco mosaic virus expression system. NaVCP accumulated up to approximately 0.3 mg/g fresh weight of leaf at 4 days postinfection. Initiation of hypersensitive response-like symptoms followed by tissue necrosis necessitated a brief infection time and was a significant factor limiting expression. Transmission electron microscopy of plant-derived NaVCP confirmed the presence of fully assembled virus-like particles (VLPs. In this study, an optimized method to express and partially purify NaVCP is described. Further, partially purified NaVCP was used to immunize mice by intranasal delivery and generated significant mucosal and serum antibody responses. Thus, plant-derived Narita 104 VLPs have potential for use as a candidate subunit vaccine or as a component of a multivalent subunit vaccine, along with other genotype-specific plant-derived VLPs.

  10. Discovery of J Chain in African Lungfish (Protopterus dolloi, Sarcopterygii) Using High Throughput Transcriptome Sequencing: Implications in Mucosal Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchi, Luca; Larragoite, Erin; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    J chain is a small polypeptide responsible for immunoglobulin (Ig) polymerization and transport of Igs across mucosal surfaces in higher vertebrates. We identified a J chain in dipnoid fish, the African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) by high throughput sequencing of the transcriptome. P. dolloi J chain is 161 aa long and contains six of the eight Cys residues present in mammalian J chain. Phylogenetic studies place the lungfish J chain closer to tetrapod J chain than to the coelacanth or nurse shark sequences. J chain expression occurs in all P. dolloi immune tissues examined and it increases in the gut and kidney in response to an experimental bacterial infection. Double fluorescent in-situ hybridization shows that 88.5% of IgM+ cells in the gut co-express J chain, a significantly higher percentage than in the pre-pyloric spleen. Importantly, J chain expression is not restricted to the B-cell compartment since gut epithelial cells also express J chain. These results improve our current view of J chain from a phylogenetic perspective. PMID:23967082

  11. The role of innate immune responses in the outcome of interspecies competition for colonization of mucosal surfaces.

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    Elena S Lysenko

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Since mucosal surfaces may be simultaneously colonized by multiple species, the success of an organism may be determined by its ability to compete with co-inhabitants of its niche. To explore the contribution of host factors to polymicrobial competition, a murine model was used to study the initiation of colonization by Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Both bacterial species, which occupy a similar microenvironment within the nasopharynx, persisted during colonization when given individually. Co-colonization, however, resulted in rapid clearance of S. pneumoniae from the upper respiratory tract, associated with increased recruitment of neutrophils into paranasal spaces. Systemic depletion of either neutrophil-like cells or complement was sufficient to eliminate this competitive effect, indicating that clearance was likely due to enhanced opsonophagocytic killing. The hypothesis that modulation of opsonophagocytic activity was responsible for host-mediated competition was tested using in vitro killing assays with elicited neutrophil-like cells. Components of H. influenzae (but not S. pneumoniae stimulated complement-dependent phagocytic killing of S. pneumoniae. Thus, the recruitment and activation of neutrophils through selective microbial pattern recognition may underlie the H. influenzae-induced clearance of S. pneumoniae. This study demonstrates how innate immune responses may mediate competitive interactions between species and dictate the composition of the colonizing flora.

  12. Long-term persistence of systemic and mucosal immune response to HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine in preteen/adolescent girls and young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petäjä, T; Pedersen, C; Andersen, Anne Poder

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is one key intervention for cervical cancer prevention. This follow-up study assessed the persistence of the systemic and mucosal immune responses together with the safety profile of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered...... of transudation or exudation of serum IgG antibodies through the cervical epithelium. The HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine had a clinically acceptable safety profile. In conclusion, this follow-up study shows that the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine administered to preteen/adolescents girls and young women...... induces long-term systemic and mucosal immune response and has a clinically acceptable safety profile up to four years after the first vaccine dose....

  13. Fine and ultrafine particles of the diet: influence on the mucosal immune response and association with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomer, Miranda C E; Thompson, Richard P H; Powell, Jonathan J

    2002-02-01

    Crohn's disease is a modern Western disease characterised by transmural inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. It is of unknown aetiology, but evidence suggests that it results from a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Bacterial-sized microparticles (0.1-1.0 microm) are potent adjuvants in model antigen-mediated immune responses and are increasingly associated with disease. Microparticles of TiO2 and aluminosilicate accumulate in macrophages of human gut-associated lymphoid tissue where the earliest signs of lesions in Crohn's disease are observed. Dietary microparticles are of endogenous or exogenous origin. Endogenous microparticles dominate and are calcium phosphate (most probably hydroxyapatite), which precipitates in the lumen of the mid-distal gastrointestinal tract due to secretion of Ca and phosphate in the succus entericus. Exogenous dietary microparticles are contaminants (soil and/or dust) and food additives. TiO2, for example, is a food colourant, and aluminosilicates are anti-caking agents, although some aluminosilicates occur as natural contaminants. Food additives alone account for ingestion of approximately 10(12) particles/person per d. Possible mechanisms for the role of exogenous and endogenous dietary microparticles in promoting toleragenic or immune responses of gastrointestinal mucosal phagocytosis are discussed. In a double-blind randomised pilot study we have shown that a diet low in Ca and exogenous microparticles appears to alleviate the symptoms of ileal Crohn's disease, with a significant (P= 0.002) improvement in the Crohn's disease activity index. A multi-centre trial and further mechanistic studies at the cellular level are underway.

  14. Gut symbiotic microbes imprint intestinal immune cells with the innate receptor SLAMF4 which contributes to gut immune protection against enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabinian, Allison; Sinsimer, Daniel; Tang, May; Jang, Youngsoon; Choi, Bongkum; Laouar, Yasmina; Laouar, Amale

    2018-05-01

    Interactions between host immune cells and gut microbiota are crucial for the integrity and function of the intestine. How these interactions regulate immune cell responses in the intestine remains a major gap in the field. We have identified the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule family member 4 (SLAMF4) as an immunomodulator of the intestinal immunity. The aim is to determine how SLAMF4 is acquired in the gut and what its contribution to intestinal immunity is. Expression of SLAMF4 was assessed in mice and humans. The mechanism of induction was studied using GFP tg bone marrow chimaera mice, lymphotoxin α and TNLG8A-deficient mice, as well as gnotobiotic mice. Role in immune protection was revealed using oral infection with Listeria monocytogenes and Cytobacter rodentium . SLAMF4 is a selective marker of intestinal immune cells of mice and humans. SLAMF4 induction occurs directly in the intestinal mucosa without the involvement of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Gut bacterial products, particularly those of gut anaerobes, and gut-resident antigen-presenting cell (APC) TNLG8A are key contributors of SLAMF4 induction in the intestine. Importantly, lack of SLAMF4 expression leads the increased susceptibility of mice to infection by oral pathogens culminating in their premature death. SLAMF4 is a marker of intestinal immune cells which contributes to the protection against enteric pathogens and whose expression is dependent on the presence of the gut microbiota. This discovery provides a possible mechanism for answering the long-standing question of how the intertwining of the host and gut microbial biology regulates immune cell responses in the gut. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Xenobiotic Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Intestinal Barrier Function and Innate Immunity

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    Harmit S. Ranhotra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis for the regulation of the intestinal barrier is a very fertile research area. A growing body of knowledge supports the targeting of various components of intestinal barrier function as means to treat a variety of diseases, including the inflammatory bowel diseases. Herein, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of key xenobiotic receptor regulators of barrier function, highlighting recent advances, such that the field and its future are succinctly reviewed. We posit that these receptors confer an additional dimension of host-microbe interaction in the gut, by sensing and responding to metabolites released from the symbiotic microbiota, in innate immunity and also in host drug metabolism. The scientific evidence for involvement of the receptors and its molecular basis for the control of barrier function and innate immunity regulation would serve as a rationale towards development of non-toxic probes and ligands as drugs.

  16. Influence of Hesperidin on the Systemic and Intestinal Rat Immune Response

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    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, widely found in edible plants, influence the immune system. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory properties of hesperidin, the predominant flavanone in oranges, have not been deeply studied. To establish the effect of hesperidin on in vivo immune response, two different conditions of immune system stimulations in Lewis rats were applied. In the first experimental design, rats were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus Bordetella pertussis toxin and alum as the adjuvants, and orally given 100 or 200 mg/kg hesperidin. In the second experimental design, rats were orally sensitized with OVA together with cholera toxin and fed a diet containing 0.5% hesperidin. In the first approach, hesperidin administration changed mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte (MLNL composition, increasing the TCRαβ+ cell percentage and decreasing that of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, hesperidin enhanced the interferon (IFN-γ production in stimulated MLNL. In the second approach, hesperidin intake modified the lymphocyte composition in the intestinal epithelium (TCRγδ+ cells and the lamina propria (TCRγδ+, CD45RA+, natural killer, natural killer T, TCRαβ+CD4+, and TCRαβ+CD8+ cells. Nevertheless, hesperidin did not modify the level of serum anti-OVA antibodies in either study. In conclusion, hesperidin does possess immunoregulatory properties in the intestinal immune response, but this effect is not able to influence the synthesis of specific antibodies.

  17. Extracellular vesicles regulate immune responses and cellular function in intestinal inflammation and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Triet M; Mascarenhas, Lorraine A; Sumagin, Ronen

    2018-02-02

    Tightly controlled communication among the various resident and recruited cells in the intestinal tissue is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis, re-establishment of the barrier function and healing responses following injury. Emerging evidence convincingly implicates extracellular vesicles (EVs) in facilitating this important cell-to-cell crosstalk by transporting bioactive effectors and genetic information in healthy tissue and disease. While many aspects of EV biology, including release mechanisms, cargo packaging, and uptake by target cells are still not completely understood, EVs contribution to cellular signaling and function is apparent. Moreover, EV research has already sparked a clinical interest, as a potential diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tool. The current review will discuss the function of EVs originating from innate immune cells, namely, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages, as well as intestinal epithelial cells in healthy tissue and inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract. Our discussion will specifically emphasize the contribution of EVs to the regulation of vascular and epithelial barrier function in inflamed intestines, wound healing, as well as trafficking and activity of resident and recruited immune cells.

  18. Pathobiology of Salmonella, intestinal microbiota, and the host innate immune response

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    Renato Lima Santos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is a relevant pathogen under a clinical and public health perspective. Therefore, there has been a significant scientific effort to learn about pathogenic determinants of this pathogen. The clinical relevance of the disease, associated with the molecular tools available to study Salmonella as well as suitable animal models for salmonellosis, have provided optimal conditions to drive the scientific community to generate a large expansion of our knowledge about the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enterocolitis that took place during the past two decades. This research effort has also generated a wealth of information on the host immune mechanisms that complements gaps in the fundamental research in this area. This review focus on how the interaction between Salmonella, the microbiota and intestinal innate immunity leads to disease manifestation. As a highly successful enteropathogen, Salmonella actively elicits a robust acute intestinal inflammatory response from the host, which could theoretically lead to the pathogen demise. However, Salmonella has evolved redundant molecular machineries that renders this pathogen highly adapted to the inflamed intestinal environment, in which Salmonella is capable of outcompete resident commensal organisms. The adaptation of Salmonella to the inflamed intestinal lumen associated with the massive inflammatory response that leads to diarrhea, generate perfect conditions for transmission of the pathogen. These conditions illustrate the complexity of the co-evolution and ecology of the pathogen, commensals and the host.

  19. Pathobiology of salmonella, intestinal microbiota, and the host innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renato Lima

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is a relevant pathogen under a clinical and public health perspective. Therefore, there has been a significant scientific effort to learn about pathogenic determinants of this pathogen. The clinical relevance of the disease, associated with the molecular tools available to study Salmonella as well as suitable animal models for salmonellosis, have provided optimal conditions to drive the scientific community to generate a large expansion of our knowledge about the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enterocolitis that took place during the past two decades. This research effort has also generated a wealth of information on the host immune mechanisms that complements gaps in the fundamental research in this area. This review focus on how the interaction between Salmonella, the microbiota and intestinal innate immunity leads to disease manifestation. As a highly successful enteropathogen, Salmonella actively elicits a robust acute intestinal inflammatory response from the host, which could theoretically lead to the pathogen demise. However, Salmonella has evolved redundant molecular machineries that renders this pathogen highly adapted to the inflamed intestinal environment, in which Salmonella is capable of outcompete resident commensal organisms. The adaptation of Salmonella to the inflamed intestinal lumen associated with the massive inflammatory response that leads to diarrhea, generate perfect conditions for transmission of the pathogen. These conditions illustrate the complexity of the co-evolution and ecology of the pathogen, commensals, and the host.

  20. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System – A Crosstalk in Crohn’s Disease Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby sup...

  1. Postnatal development of intestinal immune system in piglets: implications for the process of weaning

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes , Christopher; Bailey , Michael; Haverson , Karin; Harris , Cecilla; Jones , Philip; Inman , Charlotte; Pié , Sandrine; Oswald , Isabelle; Williams , Barbara; Akkermans , Antoon; Sowa , Eveline; Rothkötter , Hermann-Josef; Miller , Bevis

    2004-01-01

    International audience; European-wide directives are in place to establish a sustainable production of pigs without using production enhancers and chemotherapeutics. Thus, an economically-viable pig production is now only possible when the physiological mechanisms of defense against pathogens and tolerance against nutrients and commensal bacteria in the intestinal immune system are taken into account. During the postnatal period the piglet is facing first the time large amounts of new antigen...

  2. The Starting Lineup: Key Microbial Players in Intestinal Immunity and Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Catherine Reading; Nicola Catherine Reading; Dennis L. Kasper; Dennis L. Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of microbiota inhabiting the intestine is increasingly apparent. Delicate balance of numerous bacterial species can affect development of the immune system, how susceptible a host is to pathogenic organisms, and the auto-inflammatory state of the host. In the last decade, with the increased use of germ-free mice, gnotobiotic mice, and animal models in which a germ-free animal has been colonized with a foreign microbiota such as humanized mice, it has been possible to deline...

  3. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the ‘multibiome’ to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine...

  4. Heat Shock Protein 70 Enhances Mucosal Immunity against Human Norovirus When Coexpressed from a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanmei; Duan, Yue; Wei, Yongwei; Liang, Xueya; Niewiesk, Stefan; Oglesbee, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus (NoV) accounts for 95% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine available to combat human NoV as it is not cultivable and lacks a small-animal model. Recently, we demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing human NoV capsid protein (rVSV-VP1) induced strong immunities in mice (Y. Ma and J. Li, J. Virol. 85:2942–2952, 2011). To further improve the safety and efficacy of the vaccine candidate, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was inserted into the rVSV-VP1 backbone vector. A second construct was generated in which the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene was inserted in place of HSP70 as a control for the double insertion. The resultant recombinant viruses (rVSV-HSP70-VP1 and rVSV-Luc-VP1) were significantly more attenuated in cell culture and viral spread in mice than rVSV-VP1. At the inoculation dose of 1.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 triggered significantly higher vaginal IgA than rVSV-VP1 and significantly higher fecal and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-Luc-VP1, although serum IgG and T cell responses were similar. At the inoculation dose of 5.0 × 106 PFU, rVSV-HSP70-VP1 stimulated significantly higher T cell, fecal, and vaginal IgA responses than rVSV-VP1. Fecal and vaginal IgA responses were also significantly increased when combined vaccination of rVSV-VP1 and rVSV-HSP70 was used. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) insertion of an additional gene (HSP70 or Luc) into the rVSV-VP1 backbone further attenuates the VSV-based vaccine in vitro and in vivo, thus improving the safety of the vaccine candidate, and (ii) HSP70 enhances the human NoV-specific mucosal and T cell immunities triggered by a VSV-based human NoV vaccine. IMPORTANCE Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for more than 95% of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there is no vaccine for this virus. Development of a live attenuated vaccine for human NoV has not been possible because it is

  5. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naïve to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

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    Sergio Serrano-Villar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, soluble CD14 (sCD14 and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively, with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease

  6. Comparison of the intestinal mucosal microbiota in dogs diagnosed with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease and dogs with food-responsive diarrhea before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenyak, Katja; Isaiah, Anitha; Heilmann, Romy M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Burgener, Iwan A

    2018-02-01

    We report the first study to evaluate the intestinal mucosal microbiota of dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and dogs with food-responsive diarrhea (FRD) before and after treatment. It was hypothesized that differences in the microbial composition exist between both disease groups and within groups pre- vs. post-treatment. Duodenal and colonic biopsies were obtained endoscopically from 24 dogs (15 FRD, 9 IBD) before and after treatment. The intestinal microbiota was evaluated by Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The global bacterial composition did not differ between IBD and FRD dogs, nor between treatment status. However, several bacterial taxa showed a difference in abundance. Comparing disease groups, an unclassified genus of Neisseriaceae was abundant in the duodenum in the IBD group, whereas Bilophila occurred more frequently in the duodenum and Burkholderia in the colon of FRD dogs. Comparing the microbiota pre- and post-treatment revealed Enterococcus, Corynebacterium and Proteobacteria to be enriched in the duodenum of FRD dogs pre-treatment, while Bacteroides was abundant in the colon post-treatment. In dogs with IBD, Bacteroides also reached significant abundance in the colon post-treatment. In conclusion, some differences in individual bacterial taxa were identified between IBD and FRD dogs and between treatment status. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Dena H S; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-05-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity.

  8. L-Glutamine and L-arginine protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection via intestinal innate immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Ren, Wenkai; Fang, Jun; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Guan, Guiping; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Jie; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Chen, Shuai; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) or arginine (Arg) supplementation is beneficial for intestinal health; however, whether Gln or Arg may confer protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is not known. To address this, we used an ETEC-infected murine model to investigate the protective effects of Gln and Arg. Experimentally, we pre-treated mice with designed diet of Gln or Arg supplementation prior to the oral ETEC infection and then assessed mouse mortality and intestinal bacterial burden. We also determined the markers of intestinal innate immunity in treated mice, including secretory IgA response (SIgA), mucins from goblet cells, as well as antimicrobial peptides from Paneth cells. ETEC colonized in mouse small intestine, including duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and inhibited the mRNA expression of intestinal immune factors, such as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), cryptdin-related sequence 1C (CRS1C), and Reg3γ. We found that dietary Gln or Arg supplementation decreased bacterial colonization and promoted the activation of innate immunity (e.g., the mRNA expression of pIgR, CRS1C, and Reg3γ) in the intestine of ETEC-infected mice. Our results suggest that dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation may inhibit intestinal ETEC infection through intestinal innate immunity.

  9. Role of γδ T cells in mucosal intranet

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    Masafumi Yamamoto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraepithelial γδ T cells appear to be an essential regulatory T cell subset for the induction and regulation of humoral and cellular immune responses in the mucosa-associated tissues. These cells form a mucosal internet and intranet with epithelial cells which lead to a reciprocal regulation for activation and cell growth. Removal of the TORS gene (γδ-/- mice results in a reduction of epithelial cell turnover and downregulates the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on epithelial cells. Epithelial cells are capable of producing interleukin (IL-7 and stem cell factor which can activate mucosal γδ T cells expressing IL-7R and c-kit. Further, cell surface immunoregulatory molecules expressed on epithelial cells inhibit the proliferation and cytokine synthesis of γδ T cells stimulated via the TOR-OD3 complex. Thus, direct cell-to-cell interactions between mucosal γδ T cells and epithelial cells occur via their secreted cytokines and their cell surface immunoregulatory molecules to maintain the homeostatic regulation of the mucosal immune system. γδ-/- mice possess significantly lower numbers of immunoglobulin A (IgA producing cells in mucosa- associated tissues, including intestinal lamina propria and salivary glands, when compared with normal control mice. Furthermore, the levels of antigen- specific IgA B cell responses in γδ-/- mice decreased when they were immunized orally. Mucosal γδ T cells possess an ability to maintain an IgA response in the presence of systemic tolerance. These results clearly indicate that γδ T cells play an important role in the regulation of antigen-specific mucosal IgA responses. Taken together, a triad mucosal lymphocytes intranet which connects among γδ T cells, αβ T cells and IgA B cells is necessary for the induction and regulation of IgA antibody responses in mucosal areas.

  10. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  11. Feeding an elemental diet vs a milk-based formula does not decrease intestinal mucosal growth in infant pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoll, Barbara; Price, Pamela T; Reeds, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously showed that the level of enteral nutrient intake determines the rate of intestinal growth in piglets. Our objective was to determine whether providing enteral nutrition in the form of elemental nutrients (glucose, amino acids, lipid [ED]) rather than cow's milk formula (...

  12. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  13. Supplemental dietary L-arginine attenuates intestinal mucosal disruption during a coccidial vaccine challenge in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary arginine (Arg) supplementation on intestinal barrier integrity in broiler chickens undergoing coccidial challenge. The design of this study was a randomized complete block employing a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement (n = 8) with 3 level of Arg (1.11,...

  14. Effects of adding butyric acid to PN on gut-associated lymphoid tissue and mucosal immunoglobulin A levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Satoshi; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Omata, Jiro; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Noguchi, Midori; Saitoh, Daizoh; Koyama, Isamu

    2011-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) causes intestinal mucosal atrophy, gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) atrophy and dysfunction, leading to impaired mucosal immunity and increased susceptibility to infectious complications. Therefore, new PN formulations are needed to maintain mucosal immunity. Short-chain fatty acids have been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on the intestinal mucosa. We examined the effects of adding butyric acid to PN on GALT lymphocyte numbers, phenotypes, mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels, and intestinal morphology in mice. Male Institute of Cancer Research mice (n = 103) were randomized to receive either standard PN (S-PN), butyric acid-supplemented PN (Bu-PN), or ad libitum chow (control) groups. The mice were fed these respective diets for 5 days. In experiment 1, cells were isolated from Peyer's patches (PPs) to determine lymphocyte numbers and phenotypes (αβTCR(+), γδTCR(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), B220(+) cells). IgA levels in small intestinal washings were also measured. In experiment 2, IgA levels in respiratory tract (bronchoalveolar and nasal) washings were measured. In experiment 3, small intestinal morphology was evaluated. Lymphocyte yields from PPs and small intestinal, bronchoalveolar, and nasal washing IgA levels were all significantly lower in the S-PN group than in the control group. Bu-PN moderately, but significantly, restored PP lymphocyte numbers, as well as intestinal and bronchoalveolar IgA levels, as compared with S-PN. Villous height and crypt depth in the small intestine were significantly decreased in the S-PN group vs the control group, however Bu-PN restored intestinal morphology. A new PN formula containing butyric acid is feasible and would ameliorate PN-induced impairment of mucosal immunity.

  15. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    -68 (MHV-68) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily and represents a useful murine model for this category of infections, in which new vaccination strategies may initially be evaluated. Two attenuated variants of MHV-68 have successfully been used as vaccines, but the oncogenic potential......-based vaccines are substantially more immunogenic than DNA vaccines and can be applied to induce mucosal immunity. Here we show that a significant reduction of the late viral load in the spleens, at 60 days post-infection, was achieved when immunizing mice both intranasally and subcutaneously with adenoviral...... vectors encoding both M2 and M3. Additionally we show that M3 immunization prevented the usual development of virus-induced splenomegaly at 2-3 weeks post-infection. This is the first time that immunization with a non-replicating vaccine has lead to a significantly reduced viral load at time points beyond...

  16. PO and ID BCG vaccination in humans induce distinct mucosal and systemic immune responses and CD4+T cell transcriptomal molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoft, D F; Xia, M; Zhang, G L; Blazevic, A; Tennant, J; Kaplan, C; Matuschak, G; Dube, T J; Hill, H; Schlesinger, L S; Andersen, P L; Brusic, V

    2017-08-30

    Protective efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) may be affected by the methods and routes of vaccine administration. We have studied the safety and immunogenicity of oral (PO) and/or intradermal (ID) administration of BCG in healthy human subjects. No major safety concerns were detected in the 68 healthy adults vaccinated with PO and/or ID BCG. Although both PO and ID BCG could induce systemic Th1 responses capable of IFN-γ production, ID BCG more strongly induced systemic Th1 responses. In contrast, stronger mucosal responses (TB-specific secretory IgA and bronchoalveolar lavage T cells) were induced by PO BCG vaccination. To generate preliminary data comparing the early gene signatures induced by mucosal and systemic BCG vaccination, CD4 + memory T cells were isolated from subsets of BCG vaccinated subjects pre- (Day 0) and post-vaccination (Days 7 and 56), rested or stimulated with BCG infected dendritic cells, and then studied by Illumina BeadArray transcriptomal analysis. Notably, distinct gene expression profiles were identified both on Day 7 and Day 56 comparing the PO and ID BCG vaccinated groups by GSEA analysis. Future correlation analyses between specific gene expression patterns and distinct mucosal and systemic immune responses induced will be highly informative for TB vaccine development.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 30 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.67.

  17. Resiniferatoxin modulates the Th1 immune response and protects the host during intestinal nematode infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Carrillo, J L; Contreras-Cordero, J F; Muñoz-López, J L; Maldonado-Tapia, C H; Muñoz-Escobedo, J J; Moreno-García, M A

    2017-09-01

    In the early stage of the intestinal phase of Trichinella spiralis infection, the host triggers a Th1-type immune response with the aim of eliminating the parasite. However, this response damages the host which favours the survival of the parasite. In the search for novel pharmacological strategies that inhibit the Th1 immune response and assist the host against T. spiralis infection, a recent study showed that resiniferatoxin had anti-inflammatory activity contributed to the host in T. spiralis infection. In this study, we evaluated whether RTX modulates the host immune response through the inhibition of Th1 cytokines in the intestinal phase. In addition, it was determined whether the treatment with RTX affects the infectivity of T. spiralis-L1 and the development of the T. spiralis life cycle. Our results show that RTX decreased serum levels of IL-12, INF-γ, IL-1β, TNF-α and parasite burden on muscle tissue. It was observed that T. spiralis-L1 treated with RTX decreased their infectivity affecting the development of the T. spiralis life cycle in mouse. These results demonstrate that RTX is able to inhibit the production of Th1 cytokines, contributing to the defence against T. spiralis, which places it as a potential drug modulator of the immune response. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus supplementation on immune responses, intestinal structure and microbiota in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Li, Zhui; Lv, Zengpeng; Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Hong; Guo, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of Kluyveromyces marxianus on immune responses, intestinal structure and microbiota in broilers, 840 1-d-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into seven groups (eight replicates) and were fed basal diets without or with 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 g/kg of K. marxianus (2.0×1010 CFU/g). Serum and intestine samples were collected at 21 d of age. The results showed that increasing K. marxianus addition linearly reduced feed conversion ratio but linearly elevated relative thymus weight, as well as quadratically increased serum lysozyme and IgG levels, with the medium dose (1.0 g/kg) being the most effective. The ratio of villus height to crypt depth of jejunum and ileum, ileal villus height and sucrase activity, as well as the mRNA expression of ileal mucin-2, claudin-1 and sodium glucose cotransporter 1 linearly responded to the increasing K. marxianus addition. Supplemental K. marxianus at low (0.5 g/kg), medium (1.5 g/kg) and high (2.5 g/kg) dose all decreased the abundance of phylum Cyanobacteria, increased the abundance of phylum Firmicutes and genus Lactobacillus in ileum. The high dose of K. marxianus addition also reduced the abundance of order Rickettsiales and Pseudomonadales along with species Acinetobacter junii. Ileal bacterial communities between K. marxianus-treated and untreated groups formed distinctly different clusters. In summary, K. marxianus supplementation benefits feed efficiency and immune function, as well as intestinal structure in broilers, which might be attributed to the improved ileal microbial structure. Supplemental K. marxianus at high dose (2.5 g/kg) was more effective for feed efficiency and intestinal health of broilers, while the innate immunity was optimized at a medium dose (1.0 g/kg).

  19. Immune deficiency vs. immune excess in inflammatory bowel diseases-STAT3 as a rheo-STAT of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have provided many genetic alterations, conferring susceptibility to multifactorial polygenic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Yet, how specific genetic alterations functionally affect intestinal inflammation often remains elusive. It is noteworthy that a large overlap of genes involved in immune deficiencies with those conferring inflammatory bowel disease risk has been noted. This has provided new arguments for the debate on whether inflammatory bowel disease arises from either an excess or a deficiency in the immune system. In this review, we highlight the functional effect of an inflammatory bowel disease-risk allele, which cannot be deduced from genome-wide association studies data alone. As exemplified by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), we show that a single gene can have a plethora of effects in various cell types of the gut. These effects may individually contribute to the restoration of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand or pave the way for excessive immunopathology on the other, as an inflammatory "rheo-STAT". © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-11-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the 'multibiome' to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine. Furthermore, we discuss new insights into multibiome-host interactions in the context of host-protective immunity and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. Finally, we provide reasons to account for the multibiome in experimental design, analysis and in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intranasal immunization with a formalin-inactivated human influenza A virus whole-virion vaccine alone and intranasal immunization with a split-virion vaccine with mucosal adjuvants show similar levels of cross-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuoka, Sumiko; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Haredy, Ahmad M; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Akagi, Takami; Akashi, Mitsuru; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Mori, Yasuko; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2012-07-01

    The antigenicity of seasonal human influenza virus changes continuously; thus, a cross-protective influenza vaccine design needs to be established. Intranasal immunization with an influenza split-virion (SV) vaccine and a mucosal adjuvant induces cross-protection; however, no mucosal adjuvant has been assessed clinically. Formalin-inactivated intact human and avian viruses alone (without adjuvant) induce cross-protection against the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. However, it is unknown whether seasonal human influenza formalin-inactivated whole-virion (WV) vaccine alone induces cross-protection against strains within a subtype or in a different subtype of human influenza virus. Furthermore, there are few reports comparing the cross-protective efficacy of the WV vaccine and SV vaccine-mucosal adjuvant mixtures. Here, we found that the intranasal human influenza WV vaccine alone induced both the innate immune response and acquired immune response, resulting in cross-protection against drift variants within a subtype of human influenza virus. The cross-protective efficacy conferred by the WV vaccine in intranasally immunized mice was almost the same as that conferred by a mixture of SV vaccine and adjuvants. The level of cross-protective efficacy was correlated with the cross-reactive neutralizing antibody titer in the nasal wash and bronchoalveolar fluids. However, neither the SV vaccine with adjuvant nor the WV vaccine induced cross-reactive virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity. These results suggest that the intranasal human WV vaccine injection alone is effective against variants within a virus subtype, mainly through a humoral immune response, and that the cross-protection elicited by the WV vaccine and the SV vaccine plus mucosal adjuvants is similar.

  2. Traditional Herbal Medicine, Rikkunshito, Induces HSP60 and Enhances Cytoprotection of Small Intestinal Mucosal Cells as a Nontoxic Chaperone Inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Tamaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of small intestinal ulcers associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has become a topic with recent advances of endoscopic technology. However, the pathogenesis and therapy are not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of Rikkunshito (TJ-43, a traditional herbal medicine, on expression of HSP60 and cytoprotective ability in small intestinal cell line (IEC-6. Effect of TJ-43 on HSP60 expression in IEC-6 cells was evaluated by immunoblot analysis. The effect of TJ-43 on cytoprotective abilities of IEC-6 cells against hydrogen peroxide or indomethacin was studied by MTT assay, LDH-release assay, caspase-8 activity, and TUNEL. HSP60 was significantly induced by TJ-43. Cell necrosis and apoptosis were significantly suppressed in IEC-6 cells pretreated by TJ-43 with overexpression of HSP60. Our results suggested that HSP60 induced by TJ-43 might play an important role in protecting small intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and necrosis in vitro.

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum strains can enhance human mucosal and systemic immunity and prevent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced reduction in T regulatory Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de Paul; Mujagic, Zlatan; Haan, de Bart J.; Siezen, Roland J.; Bron, Peter A.; Meijerink, Marjolein; Wells, Jerry M.; Masclee, Ad A.M.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Faas, Marijke M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    Orally ingested bacteria interact with intestinal mucosa and may impact immunity. However, insights in mechanisms involved are limited. In this randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, healthy human subjects were given Lactobacillus plantarum supplementation (strain TIFN101, CIP104448, or

  4. Lactobacillus plantarum Strains Can Enhance Human Mucosal and Systemic Immunity and Prevent Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Induced Reduction in T Regulatory Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Paul; Mujagic, Zlatan; de Haan, Bart J.; Siezen, Roland J.; Bron, Peter A.; Meijerink, Marjolein; Wells, Jerry M.; Masclee, Ad A. M.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Faas, Marijke M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    Orally ingested bacteria interact with intestinal mucosa and may impact immunity. However, insights in mechanisms involved are limited. In this randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, healthy human subjects were given Lactobacillus plantarum supplementation (strain TIFN101, CIP104448, or

  5. The several elements of intestinal innate immune system at the beginning of the life of broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, U; Kum, S; Nazligul, A; Gules, O; Aka, E; Zorlu, S; Yildiz, M

    2016-07-01

    Functional capacity of digestive system and intestinal adaptive immunity are immature at hatching of broiler chicks. Therefore, intestinal innate immunity after hatching is vital to young chicks. The purpose of this study was to investigate expression and tissue distributions of several elements of the innate immune system (i.e., TLR2, TLR4, CD83, and MHC class II expressing cells) in the intestine of one-day-old chicks. For this purpose, ileum and cecum were examined the under different conditions, which included the control and 1, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h after injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and phosphate buffered saline. The findings indicated that regardless of the antigenic stimulation, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 expressing cells were present in the intestinal tissues of one-day-old chicks. We noticed that the intestinal segments have different TLR expression levels after LPS stimulation. Dendritic cells were identified, and they left the intestinal tissue after LPS treatment. MHC class II molecules were diffusely present in both the ileum and cecum. This study demonstrates that the intestinal tissue of one-day-old chicks has remarkable defensive material, including histological properties and several elements of the innate immune system. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:604-614, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in HIV Infection: Analysis of Impaired Mucosal Immune Response to Candida albicans in Mice Expressing the HIV-1 Transgene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis de Repentigny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IL-17-producing Th17 cells are of critical importance in host defense against oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC. Speculation about defective Th17 responses to oral C. albicans infection in the context of HIV infection prompted an investigation of innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in transgenic mice expressing the genome of HIV-1 in immune cells and displaying an AIDS-like disease. Defective IL-17 and IL-22-dependent mucosal responses to C. albicans were found to determine susceptibility to OPC in these transgenic mice. Innate phagocytes were quantitatively and functionally intact, and individually dispensable for control of OPC and to prevent systemic dissemination of Candida to deep organs. CD8+ T-cells recruited to the oral mucosa of the transgenic mice limited the proliferation of C. albicans in these conditions of CD4+ T-cell deficiency. Therefore, the immunopathogenesis of OPC in the context of HIV infection involves defective T-cell-mediated immunity, failure of crosstalk with innate mucosal immune effector mechanisms, and compensatory cell responses, which limit Candida infection to the oral mucosa and prevent systemic dissemination.

  7. How the Intricate Interaction among Toll-Like Receptors, Microbiota, and Intestinal Immunity Can Influence Gastrointestinal Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Frosali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut is able to maintain tolerance to microbial and food antigens. The intestine minimizes the number of harmful bacteria by shaping the microbiota through a symbiotic relationship. In healthy human intestine, a constant homeostasis is maintained by the perfect regulation of microbial load and the immune response generated against it. Failure of this balance may result in various pathological conditions. Innate immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs, may be considered an interface among intestinal epithelial barrier, microbiota, and immune system. TLRs pathway, activated by pathogens, is involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious and inflammatory diseases. The alteration of the homeostasis between physiologic and pathogenic bacteria of intestinal flora causes a condition called dysbiosis. The breakdown of homeostasis by dysbiosis may increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases. It is evident that environment, genetics, and host immunity form a highly interactive regulatory triad that controls TLR function. Imbalanced relationships within this triad may promote aberrant TLR signaling, critically contributing to acute and chronic intestinal inflammatory processes, such as in IBD, colitis, and colorectal cancer. The study of interactions between different components of the immune systems and intestinal microbiota will open new horizons in the knowledge of gut inflammation.

  8. Subversion of human intestinal mucosa innate immunity by a Crohn's disease-associated E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarry, A; Crémet, L; Caroff, N; Bou-Hanna, C; Mussini, J M; Reynaud, A; Servin, A L; Mosnier, J F; Liévin-Le Moal, V; Laboisse, C L

    2015-05-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), associated with Crohn's disease, are likely candidate contributory factors in the disease. However, signaling pathways involved in human intestinal mucosa innate host response to AIEC remain unknown. Here we use a 3D model of human intestinal mucosa explant culture to explore the effects of the AIEC strain LF82 on two innate immunity platforms, i.e., the inflammasome through evaluation of caspase-1 status, and NFκB signaling. We showed that LF82 bacteria enter and survive within a few intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, without altering the mucosa overall architecture. Although 4-h infection with a Salmonella strain caused crypt disorganization, caspase-1 activation, and mature IL-18 production, LF82 bacteria were unable to activate caspase-1 and induce IL-18 production. In parallel, LF82 bacteria activated NFκB signaling in epithelial cells through IκBα phosphorylation, NFκBp65 nuclear translocation, and TNFα secretion. In addition, NFκB activation was crucial for the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis upon LF82 infection. In conclusion, here we decipher at the whole-mucosa level the mechanisms of the LF82-induced subversion of innate immunity that, by maintaining host cell integrity, ensure intracellular bacteria survival.

  9. Shifts in Host Mucosal Innate Immune Function Are Associated with Ruminal Microbial Succession in Supplemental Feeding and Grazing Goats at Different Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhen Jiao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal microbiota may play an important role in regulating host mucosal innate immune function. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that age (non-rumination, transition and rumination and feeding type [Supplemental feeding (S vs. Grazing (G] could alter ruminal microbial diversity and maturation of host mucosal innate immune system in goat kids. MiSeq sequencing was applied to investigate ruminal microbial composition and diversity, and RT-PCR was used to test expression of immune-related genes in ruminal mucosa. Results showed that higher (P < 0.05 relative abundances of Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Methanobrevibacter.gottschalkii, Neocallimastix, Anoplodinium–Diplodinium, and Polyplastron, and lower relative abundance of Methanosphaera (P = 0.042 were detected in the rumen of S kids when compared to those in G kids. The expression of genes encoding TLRs, IL1α, IL1β and TICAM2 was down-regulated (P < 0.01, while expression of genes encoding tight junction proteins was up-regulated (P < 0.05 in the ruminal mucosa of S kids when compared to that in G kids. Moreover, irrespective of feeding type, relative abundances of ruminal Prevotella, Fibrobacter, Ruminococcus, Butyrivibrio, Methanobrevibacter, Neocallimastix, and Entodinium increased with age. The expression of most genes encoding TLRs and cytokines increased (P < 0.05 from day 0 to 7, while expression of genes encoding tight junction proteins declined with age (P < 0.05. This study revealed that the composition of each microbial domain changed as animals grew, and these changes might be associated with variations in host mucosal innate immune function. Moreover, supplementing goat kids with concentrate could modulate ruminal microbial composition, enhance barrier function and decrease local inflammation. The findings provide useful information in interpreting microbiota and host interactions, and developing nutritional strategies to improve the

  10. Immunopathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease: how genetics link barrier dysfunction and innate immunity to inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Minesh; Ahmed, Shifat; Dryden, Gerald

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) comprise a distinct set of clinical symptoms resulting from chronic or relapsing immune activation and corresponding inflammation within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Diverse genetic mutations, encoding important aspects of innate immunity and mucosal homeostasis, combine with environmental triggers to create inappropriate, sustained inflammatory responses. Recently, significant advances have been made in understanding the interplay of the intestinal epithelium, mucosal immune system, and commensal bacteria as a foundation of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Complex interactions between specialized intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal immune cells determine different outcomes based on the environmental input: the development of tolerance in the presence of commensal bacterial or the promotion of inflammation upon recognition of pathogenic organisms. This article reviews key genetic abnormalities involved in inflammatory and homeostatic pathways that enhance susceptibility to immune dysregulation and combine with environmental triggers to trigger the development of chronic intestinal inflammation and IBD.

  11. Bacterial-derived uracil as a modulator of mucosal immunity and gut-microbe homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Ha, Eun-Mi; You, Hyejin; Kim, Boram; Kim, Min-Ji; Kwon, Youngjoo; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2013-05-09

    All metazoan guts are subjected to immunologically unique conditions in which an efficient antimicrobial system operates to eliminate pathogens while tolerating symbiotic commensal microbiota. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process are only partially understood. Here, we show that bacterial-derived uracil acts as a ligand for dual oxidase (DUOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species generation in Drosophila gut and that the uracil production in bacteria causes inflammation in the gut. The acute and controlled uracil-induced immune response is required for efficient elimination of bacteria, intestinal cell repair, and host survival during infection of nonresident species. Among resident gut microbiota, uracil production is absent in symbionts, allowing harmonious colonization without DUOX activation, whereas uracil release from opportunistic pathobionts provokes chronic inflammation. These results reveal that bacteria with distinct abilities to activate uracil-induced gut inflammation, in terms of intensity and duration, act as critical factors that determine homeostasis or pathogenesis in gut-microbe interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunological commonalities and distinctions between airway and digestive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Nochi, Tomonori; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    Airway and digestive tissues are the frontlines of the body's defense, being continuously exposed to the outside environment and encountering large numbers of antigens and microorganisms. To achieve immunosurveillance and immunological homeostasis in the harsh environments of the mucosal surfaces, the mucosal immune system tightly regulates a state of opposing but harmonized immune activation and quiescence. Recently, accumulating evidence has revealed that although the respiratory and intestinal immune systems share common mucosa-associated immunological features that are different from those of the systemic immune system, they also show distinctive immunological phenotypes, functions, and developmental pathways. We describe here the common and distinct immunological features of respiratory and intestinal immune systems and its application to the development of mucosal vaccines.

  13. [Acute intestinal infections: current and upcoming vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Paul; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2013-01-01

    Currently, only a few licensed vaccines against intestinal infections are available. Existing vaccines have shown good efficacy when used by travelers in industrialized countries. However, these vaccines have lower efficacy in endemic areas with high prevalence of enteric pathogens. Current vaccines are too expensive to be efficiently distributed in endemic countries. Immune correlates of protection are not well defined for current licensed vaccines. A better understanding of protection mechanisms at the intestinal mucosal surfaces should allow the development of more efficient vaccines. Gut physiology and microbial composition play an important role in both physical integrity and immunological status of the gastro-intestinal tract. These parameters can partially explain the disparities observed in current vaccines efficiency. Several next-generation vaccines combined or not with adjuvant able to promote a strong mucosal response in the intestine, are under preclinical and clinical investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Diversity and functions of intestinal mononuclear phagocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joeris, Thorsten; Müller-Luda, K; Agace, William Winston

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal lamina propria (LP) contains a diverse array of mononuclear phagocyte (MNP) subsets, including conventional dendritic cells (cDC), monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages (mφ) that collectively play an essential role in mucosal homeostasis, infection and inflammation. In the curr......The intestinal lamina propria (LP) contains a diverse array of mononuclear phagocyte (MNP) subsets, including conventional dendritic cells (cDC), monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages (mφ) that collectively play an essential role in mucosal homeostasis, infection and inflammation....... In the current review we discuss the function of intestinal cDC and monocyte-derived MNP, highlighting how these subsets play several non-redundant roles in the regulation of intestinal immune responses. While much remains to be learnt, recent findings also underline how the various populations of MNP adapt...

  15. GM-CSF: a role in immune and inflammatory reactions in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2010-12-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that promotes myeloid cell development and maturation, and dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. Growing evidence supports the notion that GM-CSF has a major role in some inflammatory and autoimmune reactions and in the host's response to pulmonary infection, but few studies have addressed its functions and importance in the GI tract. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of GM-CSF can result in clinical improvement in patients with Crohn's disease. Mice deficient in GM-CSF (GM-CSF(-/-) ) developed more severe intestinal and systemic infection after an enteric infection, and more severe colitis in response to enteric exposure to dextran sodium sulfate. Both the severity of infection and colitis were largely prevented by GM-CSF administration. Such studies indicate that GM-CSF has an important role in the regulation of intestinal immune and inflammatory responses.

  16. Improvement of Intestinal Immune Cell Function by Lactic Acid Bacteria for Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Kamiya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB form a major component of gut microbiota and are often used as probiotics for fermented foods, such as yoghurt. In this study, we aimed to evaluate immunomodulatory activity of LAB, especially that of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ME-552 (ME552 and Streptococcus thermophilus ME-553 (ME553. In vivo/in vitro assay was performed in order to investigate their effects on T cell function. After oral administration of ME553 to C57BL/6 mice, the amount of both interferon γ (IFN-γ and interleukin 17 (IL-17 produced by cluster of differentiation (CD 4+ T cells from Peyer’s patches (PPs were significantly enhanced. On the other hand, ME552 only up-regulated the production of IL-17 from PP cells. The extent of induction for IFN-γ production differed between ME552 and ME553. These results suggest that LAB modulate T cell effector functions and mucosal immunity.

  17. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in intestinal immune defense against the lumen-dwelling protozoan parasite Giardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Barbara J; Palm, J E Daniel; Housley, Michael P; Smith, Jennifer R; Andersen, Yolanda S; Martin, Martin G; Hendrickson, Barbara A; Johansen, Finn-Eirik; Svärd, Staffan G; Gillin, Frances D; Eckmann, Lars

    2006-11-01

    The polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) is conserved in mammals and has an avian homologue, suggesting evolutionarily important functions in vertebrates. It transports multimeric IgA and IgM across polarized epithelia and is highly expressed in the intestine, yet little direct evidence exists for its importance in defense against common enteric pathogens. In this study, we demonstrate that pIgR can play a critical role in intestinal defense against the lumen-dwelling protozoan parasite Giardia, a leading cause of diarrheal disease. The receptor was essential for the eradication of Giardia when high luminal IgA levels were required. Clearance of Giardia muris, in which IgA plays a dominant role, was severely compromised in pIgR-deficient mice despite significant fecal IgA output at 10% of normal levels. In contrast, eradication of the human strain Giardia lamblia GS/M, for which adaptive immunity is less IgA dependent in mice, was unaffected by pIgR deficiency, indicating that pIgR had no physiologic role when lower luminal IgA levels were sufficient for parasite elimination. Immune IgA was greatly increased in the serum of pIgR-deficient mice, conferred passive protection against Giardia, and recognized several conserved giardial Ags, including ornithine carbamoyltransferase, arginine deiminase, alpha-enolase, and alpha- and beta-giardins, that are also detected in human giardiasis. Corroborative observations were made in mice lacking the J chain, which is required for pIgR-dependent transepithelial IgA transport. These results, together with prior data on pIgR-mediated immune neutralization of luminal cholera toxin, suggest that pIgR is essential in intestinal defense against pathogenic microbes with high-level and persistent luminal presence.

  18. Mucosal immunity induced by adenovirus-based H5N1 HPAI vaccine confers protection against a lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Seok; Lee, Jiyeung; Ahn, So Shin; Byun, Young-Ho; Seong, Baik Lin; Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Choi, Young Ki; Na, Yun Jeong; Hwang, Inhwan; Sung, Young Chul; Lee, Chang Geun

    2009-01-01

    Development of effective vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses is a global public health priority. Considering the difficulty in predicting HPAI H5N1 pandemic strains, one strategy used in their design includes the development of formulations with the capacity of eliciting broad cross-protective immunity against multiple viral antigens. To this end we constructed a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus-based avian influenza virus vaccine (rAdv-AI) expressing the codon-optimized M2eX-HA-hCD40L and the M1-M2 fusion genes from HPAI H5N1 human isolate. Although there were no significant differences in the systemic immune responses observed between the intramuscular prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IM/IM) and the intranasal prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IN/IM), IN/IM induced more potent CD8 + T cell and antibody responses at mucosal sites than the IM/IM vaccination, resulting in more effective protection against lethal H5N2 avian influenza (AI) virus challenge. These findings suggest that the strategies used to induce multi-antigen-targeted mucosal immunity, such as IN/IM delivery of rAdv-AI, may be a promising approach for developing broad protective vaccines that may be more effective against the new HPAI pandemic strains.

  19. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... growth marked by weight and villus/crypt ratio was significantly reduced in the TPN group compared with the EN group, and CDCA treatment increased both parameters. These results suggest that decreased circulating FGF19 during TPN may contribute to PNALD. Moreover, we show that enteral CDCA not only...

  20. A strong adjuvant based on glycol-chitosan-coated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles potentiates mucosal immune responses against the recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis fusion antigen CTH522

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Fabrice; Erbo Wern, Jeanette; Gavins, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immunity with vaccines is attractive for the immunological protection against pathogen entrance directly at the site of infection. An example is infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), which is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world......)-modified LPNs were engineered using an oil-in-water single emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanoparticle design was optimized in a highly systematic way by using a quality-by-design approach to define the optimal operating space and to gain maximal mechanistic information about the GC coating...

  1. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyeon Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of generalized edema and proteinuria. Her renal function deteriorated rapidly. Serum immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal ranges. An autoantibody examination showed negative for antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Histologic examination of a renal biopsy specimen revealed that all of the glomeruli had severe crescent formations with no immune deposits. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy with cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone. Fifteen days later, she experienced massive recurrent hematochezia. Angiography revealed an active contrast extravasation in a branch of the distal ileal artery. We selectively embolized with a permanent embolic agent. On the 45th hospital day, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Brain computed tomography showed intracerebral hemorrhage. We report a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhage.

  2. Impact of organic and conventional carrots on intestinal and peripheral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Brasili, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    ) were grown in three ORG (O1, O2 and O3) and one CV cropping system (D-CV). Italian carrots (Maestro and Excelso varieties) were grown in one ORG and one CV field for each variety. Immune phenotypes of blood, spleen and intestinal lymphocytes, and cytokine serum levels were analyzed in mice fed...... the different carrots for 30 days. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed in mice fed the Danish carrots. The consumption of the ‘more organic’ O2 and O3 carrots induced some changes in lymphocyte populations, including an increase in regulatory T cells. In Italian carrots more dif