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Sample records for intestinal mucosa

  1. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

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    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  2. Histomorphometric evaluation of small intestinal mucosa of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histomorphometric evaluation of small intestinal mucosa of red jungle fowl and commercial broiler from one day to four months of age. ... For the duodenal surface area, the RJF showed a higher value than the CBC at one day old chick, but data was reversed on day 20 posthatch; the data in the remaining days showed no ...

  3. Effect of ochratoxin A on the intestinal mucosa and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues in broiler chickens.

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    Solcan, Carmen; Pavel, Geta; Floristean, Viorel Cezar; Chiriac, Ioan Sorin Beschea; Şlencu, Bogdan Gabriel; Solcan, Gheorghe

    2015-03-01

    The immunotoxic effect of ochratoxin A (OTA) on the intestinal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and its cytotoxic action on the intestinal epithelium were studied in broiler chickens experimentally treated with the toxin. From the 7th day of life, 80 male broiler chickens (Ross 308) were randomly divided into four groups of 20 birds each. The three experimental groups (E1-3) were treated with OTA for 28 days (E1: 50 μg/kg body weight [bw]/day; E2: 20 μg/kg bw/day; E3: 1 μg/kg bw/day) and the fourth group served as control. Histological examination of the intestinal mucosa and immunohistochemical staining for identification of CD4+, CD8+, TCR1 and TCR2 lymphocytes in the duodenum, jejunum and ileocaecal junction were performed, and CD4+/CD8+ and TCR1/TCR2 ratios were calculated. OTA toxicity resulted in decreased body weight gain, poorer feed conversion ratio, lower leukocyte and lymphocyte count, and altered intestinal mucosa architecture. After 14 days of exposure to OTA, immunohistochemistry showed a significant reduction of the lymphocyte population in the intestinal epithelium and the lamina propria. After 28 days of exposure, an increase in the CD4+ and CD8+ values in both the duodenum and jejunum of chickens in Groups E1 and E2 was observed, but the TCR1 and TCR2 lymphocyte counts showed a significant reduction. No significant changes were observed in Group E3. The results indicate that OTA induced a decrease in leukocyte and lymphocyte counts and was cytotoxic to the intestinal epithelium and the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, altering the intestinal barrier and increasing susceptibility to various associated diseases.

  4. Cadmium binding components in the supernatant fraction of the small intestinal mucosa of rats administered cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Shosuke

    1978-01-01

    Cadmium binding protein was isolated by gel filtration from the supernatant fraction of the small intestines of rats continuously administered cadmium for 1, 3, 6, 9, 32 and 96 days. About two-thirds of the total amount of absorbed cadmium was associated with the cytosol of mucosal tissues scraped from the small intestines. Cadmium was almost always bound to proteins, molecular weights of which ranged from 5,400 to 9,800. Cadmium in livers and that in intestinal mucosa were in the same binding state, but as there was some lag period between the induction of the Cd-binding proteins of both tissues, the protein of the small intestinal mucosal cells must have been induced at the mucosa itself by contact with cadmium. The Cd-binding protein of the mucosal cells may play an important role in absorbing cadmium, because no other form of this metal was found in the mucosal cells of the small intestines. (Kobatake, H.)

  5. Survival, Intestinal Mucosa Adhesion, and Immunomodulatory Potential of Lactobacillus plantarum Strains.

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    Santarmaki, Valentini; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Kiourtzidis, Mikis; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Tassou, Chrysoula; Tsakalidou, Effie; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Ypsilantis, Petros

    2017-09-01

    Survival during transit through the gastrointestinal track, intestinal mucosa adhesion, and a potential immunomodulatory effect of Lactobacillus plantarum strains 2035 and ACA-DC 2640 were investigated in a rat model. According to microbiological and multiplex PCR analysis, both strains were detected in feces 24 h after either single-dose or daily administration for 7 days. Intestinal mucosa adhesion of L. plantarum 2035 was noted in the large intestine at 24 h after single-dose administration, while it was not detected at 48 h. Daily dosing, prolonged detection of the strain up to 48 h post-administration, and expanded adhesion to the small intestine. Adhesion of L. plantarum ACA-DC 2640 to the intestinal mucosa after single-dose administration was prolonged and more extended compared to L. plantarum 2035. Daily dosing increased both the levels and the rate of positive cultures of the strains compared to those of the single-dose scheme. In addition, both strains increased total IgG while decreased IgM and IgA serum levels. In conclusion, L. plantarum 2035 and L. plantarum ACA-DC 2640 survived transit through the gastrointestinal track, exhibited transient distinct adhesion to the intestinal mucosa and modulated the systemic immune response.

  6. Experimental study on induction of intestinal metaplasia in the gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu

    1979-01-01

    Attempts were made to learn about an optimal condition for the induction of intestinal metaplasia in the gastric mucosa. The gastric region of 5-week-old female A/HeJ mice or Wistar rats were irradiated with a total of 3,000 rad x-ray. In addition, the effect of immunization by allogenic stomach antigen on the intestinalization was studied in rats irradiated with 500 rads of x-ray daily for 6 times. Disaccharidase and alkaline phosphatase activities appeared but morphological intestinal metaplasia was not observed in A/HeJ mice irradiated with 500 rads x 6 of x-ray. The appearance of marker enzymes of small intestine preceeded that of crypts having a few goblet cell among normal gastric cells in rats irradiated with 500 rads of x-ray. In groups of rats injected with allogenic stomach antigen plus x-irradiation the process of intestinalization was accelerated. The similar results were obtained in rats irradiated with 1,000 rad of x-ray 3 times There was several glands with intestinal metaplasia in the intact pyloric mucosa, but not in the ulcerative mucosa. On the other hand, intestinal metaplasia developed more later in fundic mucosa which was usually atrophy due to the loss of parietal cell mass. There was an intimate association among the parietal cell loss in the fundic gland, a rise in pH value and the development of intestinal metaplasia. In above groups with a smaller divided dose no case of gastric adenocarcinoma was detected during observation period up to 52nd or 80th week. Although a larger divided dose (1,500 rads x 2) was effective in inducing gastric adenocarcinoma (57.1%) but less effective in inducing intestinalization of any kind. No evidence of direct association between intestinalization and cancerization in the glandular stomach was demonstrated in the present study. (author)

  7. Glutamina e turnover do carbono da mucosa intestinal de leitões desmamados Glutamine and carbon turnover of the intestinal mucosa of weaned piglets

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    Fabiana Ribeiro Caldara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi conduzido para verificar a influência da glutamina no turnover do carbono na mucosa intestinal de leitões desmamados. Nove matrizes receberam dietas compostas basicamente de plantas do ciclo fotossintético C4 durante toda a gestação (d‰13C = 17,12 e lactação (d‰13C = -19,26. Os leitões foram desmamados aos 21 dias de idade e 68 deles foram alimentados com ração composta de plantas do ciclo fotossintético C3 (d‰13C = -25,12. Os leitões foram aleatoriamente distribuídos em duas dietas: uma sem suplementação de glutamina; e outra suplementada com 1% de glutamina. Aos 0; 1; 1,5; 2; 2,5; 3; 3,5; 4; 4,5; 5; 5,5; 8; 11; 15, 20; 29 e 46 dias pós-desmame, dois leitões de cada dieta foram abatidos para coleta de amostras da mucosa intestinal, que foram analisadas quanto à composição isotópica de d‰13C e mensurada a velocidade de substituição do carbono no tempo. Os valores da meia-vida do carbono para a mucosa intestinal foram de 6,0 e 3,5 dias para as dietas controle e com glutamina, respectivamente. A glutamina acelerou a velocidade de substituição do carbono na mucosa intestinal, evidenciando sua ação benéfica na recuperação da estrutura do intestino após o desmame.An experiment was carried out to evaluate the influence of glutamine on the carbon turnover in the intestinal mucosa of weaned piglets. Nine matrices received diets predominantly composed by photosintetic cycle C4 plants during the gestation (d‰13C = -17.12 and lactation (d‰13C = -19.26. The piglets were weaned at 21 days of age, and 68 animals were fed rations composed by photosintetic cycle C3 plants (d‰13C = -25.12. The piglets were distributed at random in two treatments: one diet without glutamine supplementation and the other diet supplemented with 1% of glutamine. On days 0; 1; 1.5; 2; 2.5; 3; 3.5; 4; 4.5; 5; 5.5; 8; 11; 15, 20; 29 and 46 after weaning, two piglets from each diet were slaughtered for collection of samples

  8. Benign Lesions in Mucosa Adjacent to Intestinal-Type Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma

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    Blanca Vivanco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to wood dust is a strong risk factor for the development of intestinal-type sinonasal adenocarcinoma (ITAC; however, knowledge on possible precursor lesions or biomarkers is limited. Fifty-one samples of tumor-adjacent mucosa and 19 control samples of mucosa from the unaffected fossa of ITAC patients were evaluated for histological changes and p53 protein expression. Mild dysplasia was observed in 14%, cuboidal metaplasia in 57%, intestinal metaplasia in 8%, squamous metaplasia in 24%, and cylindrocellular hyperplasia in 53% of cases. P53 immunopositivity was generally weak occurring most frequently in squamous metaplasia. Wood dust etiology did not appear of influence on the histological changes, but p53 showed a tendency for higher positivity. Dysplasia adjacent to tumor was indicative of subsequent development of recurrence. In conclusion, precursor lesions do occur in mucosa adjacent to ITAC. This is clinically important, because it may justify the screening of high-risk individuals such as woodworkers.

  9. Immunoproteomic to Identify Antigens in the Intestinal Mucosa of Crohn's Disease Patients

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    Gu, Guosheng; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Wenyong; Zhang, Changle; Ren, Jianan

    2013-01-01

    Incidences of Crohn disease (CD) have increased significantly in the last decade. Immunoproteomics are a promising method to identify biomarkers of different diseases. In the present study, we used immunoproteomics to study proteins of intestinal mucosal lesions and neighboring normal intestinal mucosa of 8 CD patients. Reactive proteins were validated by Western blotting. Approximately 50 protein spots localized in the 4 to 7 pI range were detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, and 6 differentially expressed protein spots between 10 and 100 kDa were identified. Reactive proteins were identified as prohibitin, calreticulin, apolipoprotein A-I, intelectin-1, protein disulfide isomerase, and glutathione s-transferase Pi. Western blotting was conducted on the intestinal mucosa of another 4 CD patients to validate the reactive proteins. We found that intestinal mucosal lesions had high levels of prohibitin expression. Glutathione s-transferase expression was detected in 100% of the intestinal mucosa examined. Thus, we report 6 autoantigens of CD, including 3 new and 3 previously reported autoantigens. Intelectin-1, protein disulfide isomerase, and glutathione-s-transferases may be used as biomarkers for CD pathogenesis. PMID:24358121

  10. Misoprostol in the intestinal lumen protects against radiation injury of the mucosa of the small bowel

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    Delaney, J.P.; Bonsack, M.E.; Felemovicius, I. (Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Systemically administered misoprostol, a PGE analog, has been shown to be an intestinal radioprotector. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of misoprostol into the intestinal lumen can also reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis. The rat small bowel was operatively exteriorized and segmented by means of suture ties. The remainder of the intestine and the rat were shielded in a lead box. Misoprostol was introduced into the lumen in various doses. After 30 min exposure to misoprostol, the isolated, exteriorized, segmented bowel was subjected to 11 Gy X irradiation. Five days later the animals were sacrificed and the intestines harvested for evaluation. Surviving crypt numbers per circumference and mucosal height were the criteria used for quantification of damage. Mucosa exposed to misoprostol at the time of radiation delivery showed significantly increased crypt numbers and mucosal height compared to adjacent saline-filled intestine. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Misoprostol in the intestinal lumen protects against radiation injury of the mucosa of the small bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, J.P.; Bonsack, M.E.; Felemovicius, I.

    1994-01-01

    Systemically administered misoprostol, a PGE analog, has been shown to be an intestinal radioprotector. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of misoprostol into the intestinal lumen can also reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis. The rat small bowel was operatively exteriorized and segmented by means of suture ties. The remainder of the intestine and the rat were shielded in a lead box. Misoprostol was introduced into the lumen in various doses. After 30 min exposure to misoprostol, the isolated, exteriorized, segmented bowel was subjected to 11 Gy X irradiation. Five days later the animals were sacrificed and the intestines harvested for evaluation. Surviving crypt numbers per circumference and mucosal height were the criteria used for quantification of damage. Mucosa exposed to misoprostol at the time of radiation delivery showed significantly increased crypt numbers and mucosal height compared to adjacent saline-filled intestine. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Subversion of human intestinal mucosa innate immunity by a Crohn's disease-associated E. coli.

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    Jarry, A; Crémet, L; Caroff, N; Bou-Hanna, C; Mussini, J M; Reynaud, A; Servin, A L; Mosnier, J F; Liévin-Le Moal, V; Laboisse, C L

    2015-05-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), associated with Crohn's disease, are likely candidate contributory factors in the disease. However, signaling pathways involved in human intestinal mucosa innate host response to AIEC remain unknown. Here we use a 3D model of human intestinal mucosa explant culture to explore the effects of the AIEC strain LF82 on two innate immunity platforms, i.e., the inflammasome through evaluation of caspase-1 status, and NFκB signaling. We showed that LF82 bacteria enter and survive within a few intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, without altering the mucosa overall architecture. Although 4-h infection with a Salmonella strain caused crypt disorganization, caspase-1 activation, and mature IL-18 production, LF82 bacteria were unable to activate caspase-1 and induce IL-18 production. In parallel, LF82 bacteria activated NFκB signaling in epithelial cells through IκBα phosphorylation, NFκBp65 nuclear translocation, and TNFα secretion. In addition, NFκB activation was crucial for the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis upon LF82 infection. In conclusion, here we decipher at the whole-mucosa level the mechanisms of the LF82-induced subversion of innate immunity that, by maintaining host cell integrity, ensure intracellular bacteria survival.

  13. Compartmentalised expression of meprin in small intestinal mucosa: enhanced expression in lamina propria in coeliac disease.

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    Lottaz, Daniel; Buri, Caroline; Monteleone, Giovanni; Rösmann, Sandra; Macdonald, Thomas T; Sanderson, Ian R; Sterchi, Erwin E

    2007-03-01

    Epithelial cells in the human small intestine express meprin, an astacin-like metalloprotease, which accumulates normally at the brush border membrane and in the gut lumen. Therefore, meprin is targeted towards luminal components. In coeliac disease patients, peptides from ingested cereals trigger mucosal inflammation in the small intestine, disrupting epithelial cell differentiation and function. Using in situ hybridisation on duodenal tissue sections, we observed a marked shift of meprin mRNA expression from epithelial cells, the predominant expression site in normal mucosa, to lamina propria leukocytes in coeliac disease. Meprin thereby gains access to the substrate repertoire present beneath the epithelium.

  14. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-[2,3- 3 H]-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO 3 with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter

  15. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  16. Intestinal mucosa is a target tissue for pancreatic polypeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, W.R.; Kramer, J.L.; Frank, B.H.; Gingerich, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were carried out to identify mammalian tissues capable of specifically binding mammalian pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Bovine PP (bPP) radiolabeled with 125 I was purified by HPLC to yield [ 125 I]iodo-(Tyr-27) bPP. The label was injected into three pairs of fasted littermate dogs and allowed to circulate for 5 min. One of the dogs was a control which received an excess of unlabeled porcine PP to provide competition for receptor binding. Unbound bPP was removed by perfusion with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate and the tissue fixed in situ with Karnovsky's fixative. Tissue samples from various organs were removed, weighed, and counted. The entire gastrointestinal tract demonstrated high levels of 125 I after injection of the labeled peptide. The duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were the only tissues to exhibit specific binding of bPP. These tissues (mucosal and muscle layers) from experimental animals exhibited 31-76% higher binding than the corresponding tissues from the control animals. Sections of the gastrointestinal tract were scraped to separate the mucosal layer from the underlying muscle layer. The mucosal layer of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum exhibited 145-162% increases in binding compared to the control animals. The muscle layer of these tissues demonstrated no significant increase. These findings demonstrate that mucosal layer of the small intestine is a target tissue for mammalian PP

  17. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

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    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  18. Intestinal mucosa in diabetes: synthesis of total proteins and sucrase-isomaltase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, W.A.; Perchellet, E.; Malinowski, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of insulin deficiency on nitrogen metabolism in muscle and liver have been extensively studied with recent in vivo demonstration of impaired protein synthesis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Despite the significant contribution of small intestinal mucosa to overall protein metabolism, the effect of insulin deficiency on intestinal protein synthesis have not been completely defined. The authors studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on total protein synthesis by small intestinal mucosa and on synthesis of a single enzyme protein of the enterocyte brush-border membrane sucrase-isomaltase. They used the flood-dose technique to minimize the difficulties of measuring specific radioactivity of precursor phenylalanine and determined incorporation into mucosal proteins and sucrase-isomaltase 20 min after injection of the labeled amino acid. Diabetes did not alter mucosal mass as determined by weight and content of protein and DNA during the 5 days after injection of streptozotocin. Increased rates of sucrase-isomaltase synthesis developed beginning on day 3, and those of total protein developed on day 5. Thus intestinal mucosal protein synthesis is not an insulin-sensitive process

  19. Helicobacter pylori as a crucial factor in intestinal metaplasia development of gastric mucosa

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    Sergii Vernygorodskyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is detected on the surface of gastric epithelium and in goblet cells, predominantly in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis and incomplete intestinal metaplasia (IM. H. pylori infection persistence leads to the formation of gastrointestinal phenotype of IM. H. pylori can be considered as an etiological factor of IM. It inhibits the expression of SOX2 in gastric epithelial cells, hence activating transcription factor CDX2 as a counterpart to MUC5AC gene inhibition and MUC2 gene induction. Thus, in metaplastic cells, programming differentiation after intestinal phenotype will develop. The role of H. pylori in the origin of intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa was defined in this study to elucidate the probable mechanism of cell reprogramming. The activation of CDX2, with simultaneous inactivation and decreased number of genes (e.g., SHH, SOX2, and RUNX3 responsible for gastric differentiation, was identified to cause the appearance of IM.

  20. Effect of Glycine, Pyruvate, and Resveratrol on the Regeneration Process of Postischemic Intestinal Mucosa

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    Lisa Brencher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intestinal ischemia is often caused by a malperfusion of the upper mesenteric artery. Since the intestinal mucosa is one of the most rapidly proliferating organs in human body, this tissue can partly regenerate itself after the onset of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R. Therefore, we investigated whether glycine, sodium pyruvate, and resveratrol can either support or potentially harm regeneration when applied therapeutically after reperfusion injury. Methods. I/R of the small intestine was initiated by occluding and reopening the upper mesenteric artery in rats. After 60 min of ischemia and 300 min of reperfusion, glycine, sodium pyruvate, or resveratrol was administered intravenously. Small intestine regeneration was analyzed regarding tissue damage, activity of saccharase, and Ki-67 positive cells. Additionally, systemic parameters and metabolic ones were obtained at selected periods. Results. Resveratrol failed in improving the outcome after I/R, while glycine showed a partial beneficial effect. Sodium pyruvate ameliorated metabolic acidosis, diminished histopathologic tissue injury, and increased cell proliferation in the small intestine. Conclusion. While glycine could improve in part regeneration but not proliferation, sodium pyruvate seems to be a possible therapeutic agent to facilitate proliferation and to support mucosal regeneration after I/R injury to the small intestine.

  1. Effects of nonpathogenic bacteria on cytokine secretion by human intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borruel, Natalia; Casellas, Francesc; Antolín, María; Llopis, Marta; Carol, Monica; Espíin, Eloy; Naval, Javier; Guarner, Francisco; Malagelada, Juan R

    2003-04-01

    The human intestine harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, and the mucosa is the interface between the immune system and the luminal environment. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether host-bacteria interactions influence mucosal cytokine production. Macroscopically normal colonic specimens were obtained at surgery from eight patients with neoplasm, and inflamed ileal specimens were obtained from two patients with Crohn's disease. Mucosal explants were cultured for 24 h with either nonpathogenic Escherichia coli ECOR-26, Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001, L. casei DN-114 056, L. casei ATCC-334, or Lactobacillus bulgaricus LB-10. Each study included blank wells with no bacteria. Tissue and bacteria viability were confirmed by LDH release and culture. Concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, transforming growth factor beta1, interleukin (IL)-8, and IL-10 was measured in supernatants. In parallel experiments, neutralizing anti-TNFalpha antibody was added to the culture. Co-culture of mucosa with bacteria did not modify LDH release. Co-culture with L. casei strains significantly reduced TNFalpha release, whereas E. coli increased it. These effects were observed both in normal and inflamed mucosa. In combination studies, L. casei DN-114 001 prevented TNFalpha stimulation by E. coli. L. casei DN-114 001 also reduced IL-8 release via a TNFalpha-independent pathway. L. casei DN-114 056 or E. coli increased IL-10 release in the presence of neutralizing anti-TNFalpha. Nonpathogenic bacteria interact with human intestinal mucosa and can induce changes in cytokine production that are strain specific.

  2. Glutamina e turnover do carbono da mucosa intestinal de leitões desmamados

    OpenAIRE

    Caldara,Fabiana Ribeiro; Ducatti,Carlos; Berto,Dirlei Antonio; Denadai,Juliana Célia; Garcia,Rodrigo Garófallo; Ferreira,Viviane Maria Oliveira dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Um experimento foi conduzido para verificar a influência da glutamina no turnover do carbono na mucosa intestinal de leitões desmamados. Nove matrizes receberam dietas compostas basicamente de plantas do ciclo fotossintético C4 durante toda a gestação (d‰13C = 17,12) e lactação (d‰13C = -19,26). Os leitões foram desmamados aos 21 dias de idade e 68 deles foram alimentados com ração composta de plantas do ciclo fotossintético C3 (d‰13C = -25,12). Os leitões foram aleatoriamen...

  3. Modulation of the Interaction of Enteric Bacteria with Intestinal Mucosa by Stress-Related Catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Stress associated with parturition, transport or mixing has long been correlated with enhanced faecal excretion of diarrhoeal zoonotic pathogens in animals such as Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. It may also predispose humans to infection and/or be associated with more severe outcomes. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens to sense and respond to host stress-related catecholamines. This article reviews evidence of the ability of catecholamine hormones to modulate interactions between Gram-negative diarrhoeal pathogens and intestinal mucosa, as well as the molecular mechanisms that may be at work.

  4. Autoradiographic investigation of age-dependent proliferation kinetics in the mucosa of rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Laue, R.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1980-01-01

    Aging of cells depends on mitotic activity which is particularly evident in multicellular organisms. The cell kinetics of the mucosa of the small intestine in a total of 244 Wistar rats aged 6 days, 6 weeks, 6, 12, 23 and 28 months, resp., were studied histoautoradiographically. It could be demonstrated that the regeneration rate of cells per hour in the crypts of the small intestine and the migration velocity of the enterocytes differ in young and old individuals, and that the intermitotic cells have age-dependent properties as well. In addition, it could be proved that intermitotic cells have a non growth fraction, too, which, at an advanced age, decreases only slightly although significantly in terms of statistics. For the easily vulnerable crypt epithelium it is a reserve capacity and ban be included in the proliferating pool if necessary. (author)

  5. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

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    Ozkan Onal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF intraperitoneally (ip for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px, malondyaldehide (MDA, and protein carbonyl (PCO were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy

  6. Effects of intestinal mucosal blood flow and motility on intestinal mucosa.

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    Wang, Yan-Bin; Liu, Jing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-02-07

    To investigate the role of intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF) and motility in the damage of intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with traumatic brain injury. Sixty-four healthy male Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: traumatic brain injury (TBI) group (n=32), rats with traumatic brain injury; and control group (n=32), rats with sham-operation. Each group was divided into four subgroups (n=8) as 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after operation. Intestinal motility was measured by the propulsion ratio of a semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink). IMBF was measured with the laser-Doppler technique. Endotoxin and D-xylose levels in plasma were measured to evaluate the change of intestinal mucosal barrier function following TBI. The level of endotoxin was significantly higher in TBI group than in the control group at each time point (0.382±0.014 EU/mL vs 0.102±0.007 EU/mL, 0.466±0.018 EU/mL vs 0.114±0.021 EU/mL, 0.478±0.029 EU/mL vs 0.112±0.018 EU/mL and 0.412±0.036 EU/mL vs 0.108±0.011 EU/mL, Ppermeability is increased obviously in TBI rats. Decrease of intestinal motility and IMBF occur early in TBI, both are important pathogenic factors for stress-related damage of the intestinal mucosal barrier in TBI.

  7. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and somatostatin in the plasma and sigmoid mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ru; Wang Fuxian

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the possible role and clinical significance of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and somatostatin(SS) in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the VIP and SS in the plasma and sigmoid mucosa were measured by radioimmunoassay in the control group and the IBS group. The VIP concentration in the plasma and sigmoid mucosa of the IBS patients with constipation was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.01), while that of the IBS patients with diarrhea was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). The SS concentration in two sites was significantly elevated in IBS patients of both types and was significantly higher in IBS with constipation than in IBS with diarrhea (P<0.05). Conclusion: The VIP and SS in IBS are abnormal, which might play a role in the pathogenesis of IBS. The plasma and mucosa concenration of VIP and SS in two kinds of IBS patients are significantly different, which indicates that there might be different pathophysiological basis involved in the pathogenesis of the two kinds of IBS patients. (authors)

  8. Qualitative analysis of barium particles coated in small intestinal mucosa of rabbit by using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Suk; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yang Seob; Kim, Jae Kyun; Yoon, Seong Eon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Chung, Dong Jin; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    To qualitatively analysed barium coating status in the intestinal mucosa, we used scanning electron microscopy to observe barium particles coated in the small intestinal mucosa of rabbit, and we attempted to assess the relationship between electron microscopic findings and radiographic densities. Six different combination of barium and methylcellulose suspensions were infused into the resected small intestines of 15 rabbits. Barium powders were mixed with water to make 40% and 70% w/v barium solutions, and also mixed with 0.5% methylcellulose solutions were used as a double contrast agent. After the infusion of barium suspensions, a mammography unit was used to obtain radiographs of the small intestine, and their optical densities were measured by a densitometer. Thereafter, photographs of barium-coated small intestinal mucosa were obtained using a scanning electron microscope (x 8,000), and the number of barium particles in the unit area were measured. To compare the relationship between the electron microscopic findings and optical densities, statistical analysis using Spearman correlation was performed. This study shows that by using scanning electron microscopy, barium particles coated on the small intestinal mucosa can be qualitatively analysed. It also shows that the number of small barium particles measured by scanning electron microscopy is related to optical densities. (author). 14 refs., 2 figs

  9. Direct effect of infliximab on intestinal mucosa sustains mucosal healing: exploring new mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, Valentina; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Boninsegna, Alma; Bibbò, Stefano; Poscia, Andrea; Alfieri, Sergio; Rosa, Fausto; Amato, Arianna; Cammarota, Giovanni; Papa, Alfredo; Sgambato, Alessandro; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Infliximab is effective in inflammatory bowel disease through several mechanisms, possibly acting at the mucosal level. To assess the role of infliximab on intestinal mucosa and whether it contributes to mucosal healing. Human colonic mucosal biopsies were incubated with or without infliximab. Cultured biopsies were evaluated for histological staining, CD68, CD3, E-cadherin and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) expression, and apoptosis. A scratch assay and MTT assay were performed with Caco2 cells in the presence of infliximab and/or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or treated with supernatants obtained from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human intestinal fibroblasts treated with TNF-α and infliximab alone or in association. Infliximab-treated biopsies displayed a better histological appearance, reduced inflammation with an increase of E-cadherin, phospho-ERK and apoptosis. Supernatants showed lower TNF-α, IL-17, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration, with an increase in fibroblast-growth-factor. Motility at scratch assay and proliferation at MTT assay of Caco2 cells displayed differential modulation by TNF-α and infliximab, directly or through supernatants of human intestinal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to them. Infliximab contributes to the mucosal healing process by acting directly at an intestinal mucosal level; infliximab indirectly affects epithelial cell migration and proliferation by acting on both fibroblasts and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification and characterization of insulin receptors in basolateral membranes of dog intestinal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, R.L.; Gilbert, W.R.; Comens, P.G.; Gavin, J.R. III

    1987-01-01

    Little is known about hormonal regulation of substrate transport and metabolism in the mucosal lining of the small intestine. Because insulin regulates these functions in other tissues by binding to its receptor, we have investigated the presence of insulin receptors in canine small intestinal mucosa with basolateral membranes (BLM) and brush border membranes (BBM) prepared by sorbitol density centrifugation. A14-[ 125 I]iodoinsulin was used to study binding and structural characteristics of specific insulin receptors in BLM. Analysis of receptors in BLM identified binding sites with high affinity (Kd 88 pM) and low capacity (0.4 pmol/mg protein) as well as with low affinity (Kd 36 nM) and high capacity (4.7 pmol/mg protein). Binding was time, temperature, and pH dependent, and 125 I-labeled insulin dissociation was enhanced in the presence of unlabeled insulin. Cross-reactivity of these receptors to proinsulin, IGF-II, and IGF-I was 4, 1.8, and less than 1%, respectively. Covalent cross-linking of labeled insulin to BLM insulin receptors with disuccinimidyl suberate revealed a single 135,000-Mr band that was completely inhibited by unlabeled insulin. There was a 16-fold greater specific binding of insulin to BLM (39.0 +/- 2.4%) than to BBM (2.5 +/- 0.6%). These results demonstrate the presence of a highly specific receptor for insulin on the vascular, but not the luminal, surface of the small intestinal mucosa in dogs, and suggest that insulin may play an important role in the regulation of gastrointestinal physiology

  11. Quantitative study of soybean-induced changes in proliferation and programmed cell death in the intestinal mucosa of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, M M; Slazak, P; Zabielski, R; Piastowska, A; Gralak, M A

    2006-11-01

    The use of soybean in human and animal nutrition is limited because of high content of bioactive compounds: enzyme inhibitors, polyphenols, goitrogens, phytates, saponins, sugars, and agglutinins. The damage of intestinal mucosa structure was previously observed in animals fed soybean supplemented diets. Hence, the objectives of the presented study were to compare intensity of epithelium remodeling processes in different intestinal segments, and to evaluate the influence of the 1% of soybean dietary supplementation on the processes in intestinal mucosa. The experiment was performed on 30 Wistar rats fed AIN-93 based diets. Animals were divided randomly into three groups: control (CTRL), with 1% of raw soybean (RS) and with 1% of soaked and boiled soybean (BS). The samples of: duodenum (DUO), proximal jejunum (PROX), mid-jejunum (MID), distal-jejunum (DIST) and ileum (ILE) were collected. The following processes in these samples were evaluated: mitosis (Ki-67), apoptosis (Cpp32), autophagy (MAP I LC3) and DNA damage (p53). Present data show that modification of soybean by soaking and subsequent boiling markedly influences the enterocyte turnover in the small intestine mucosa. Increased mitotic ratio in the intestine of rats fed with boiled soybean masks the negative effects of soybean on the small intestine structure.

  12. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  13. Histological and histochemical changes of the intestinal mucosa at the urothelial-enteric anastomotic site

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    Marcos A. Castro

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The incorporation of bowel segments for urinary tract reconstruction may induce intestinal mucosal changes with the development of metabolic, nutritional, gastrointestinal and carcinogenic complications. The early histological and histochemical changes of the intestinal mucosa in contact with the feces-urine mixture, are evaluated in the present study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve rats (operated group were submitted to a vesico-colonic anastomosis, and 10 rats (control group underwent a sham operation (the colon was opened and immediately sutured. On the operated group, the left colon was divided into 3 equal portions and the middle segment was used for the bladder-colonic anastomosis. After 20 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the entire left colon in each group, as well as the bladder and the vesico-colonic anastomosis in the operated group, was removed. The proximal, middle (anastomotic site in the operated group and sutured portion in the control group and distal colon were used for histological and histochemical studies. RESULTS: Metaplasia, chronic inflammatory process and fibrosis were significantly greater at the anastomotic site compared to the middle segment of the control group. There were no differences in both groups in terms of dysplasia, atrophy and hypertrophy either on the proximal, middle or anastomotic area and distal portion of the left colon. All animals in the operated group showed a reduced presence of sulfomucin and an increase in the sialomucin content. CONCLUSION: The histological changes observed in this study may suggest a precancerous phenomenon.

  14. Effects of glutamine on performance and intestinal mucosa morphometry of broiler chickens vaccinated against coccidiosis

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    Brenda Carla Luquetti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to assess the effects of glutamine as feed additive on performance and intestinal mucosa morphometry of broiler chickens vaccinated against coccidiosis. A total of 400 day-old male chicks were randomly assigned to four treatments (NVNG – no vaccination, no glutamine supplementation; NVG – no vaccination, glutamine supplementation (10 g kg−1; VNG – vaccination, no glutamine supplementation; VG – vaccination, glutamine supplementation replicated four times with 25 birds per replicate. A commercial sprayed-on vaccine against coccidiosis containing Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, E. mivati, and E. tenella was administered at the hatchery. Broiler performance was evaluated from 1-28 days, and morphometric parameters were analyzed at 14, 21, and 28 days of age. Body weight gain and feed intake were negatively affected by vaccination, but not by glutamine. Vaccination increased crypt depth in the duodenum and jejunum at 21 and 28 days. In conclusion, this study showed that glutamine was not able to increase weight gain of broiler chickens, irrespective of whether the animals were vaccinated or not against coccidiosis. Glutamine supplementation was able to improve feed conversion in vaccinated birds suggesting trophic effect on intestinal epithelium improving.

  15. MULTIPHOTON MICROSCOPIC IMAGING OF MOUSE INTESTINAL MUCOSA BASED ON TWO-PHOTON EXCITED FLUORESCENCE AND SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION

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    REN'AN XU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton microscopy (MPM, based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation, enables direct noninvasive visualization of tissue architecture and cell morphology in live tissues without the administration of exogenous contrast agents. In this paper, we used MPM to image the microstructures of the mucosa in fresh, unfixed, and unstained intestinal tissue of mouse. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer such as columnar cells, goblet cells, intestinal glands, and a little collagen fibers were clearly observed in MPM images, and then compared with standard H&E images from paired specimens. Our results indicate that MPM combined with endoscopy and miniaturization probes has the potential application in the clinical diagnosis and in vivo monitoring of early intestinal cancer.

  16. Effects of size of Trichostrongylus colubriformis infections on histopathology of the mucosa along the whole small intestine in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, H; Mallet, S

    1990-11-01

    The influence of population size of Trichostrongylus colubriformis on the structures of the small intestine, especially with regard to the development and origin of an intestinal adaptive response, was examined in experimentally infected rabbits. The effects of low (500 L3) and high (50,000 L3) infection on histological (villous length, mucosa to serosa ratio, crypt surface) and biochemical (protein content, alkaline phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase activities) aspects of the mucosa were assessed along the whole small intestine. The presence of a small number of worms induced only minor mucosal changes, indicating a regenerative response of the intestinal epithelium. The role of a local small population of T. colubriformis in the development of a previously described adaptive response appeared thus to be limited. On the other hand, the 50,000 L3 inoculum was associated with severe lesions of villi, marked crypt hyperplasia and with a major reduction of enzyme activities. The changes were found along the whole length of the small intestine. These results suggest that the generally recognized dose-dependent pathogenicity of the intestinal nematode infections could be ascribed to two different processes: firstly, a greater severity of the lesions; secondly, more extensive damage leading to the disappearance of any adaptive intestinal region.

  17. Increased intestinal permeability correlates with sigmoid mucosa alpha-synuclein staining and endotoxin exposure markers in early Parkinson's disease.

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    Christopher B Forsyth

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder of aging. The pathological hallmark of PD is neuronal inclusions termed Lewy bodies whose main component is alpha-synuclein protein. The finding of these Lewy bodies in the intestinal enteric nerves led to the hypothesis that the intestine might be an early site of PD disease in response to an environmental toxin or pathogen. One potential mechanism for environmental toxin(s and proinflammatory luminal products to gain access to mucosal neuronal tissue and promote oxidative stress is compromised intestinal barrier integrity. However, the role of intestinal permeability in PD has never been tested. We hypothesized that PD subjects might exhibit increased intestinal permeability to proinflammatory bacterial products in the intestine. To test our hypothesis we evaluated intestinal permeability in subjects newly diagnosed with PD and compared their values to healthy subjects. In addition, we obtained intestinal biopsies from both groups and used immunohistochemistry to assess bacterial translocation, nitrotyrosine (oxidative stress, and alpha-synuclein. We also evaluated serum markers of endotoxin exposure including LPS binding protein (LBP. Our data show that our PD subjects exhibit significantly greater intestinal permeability (gut leakiness than controls. In addition, this intestinal hyperpermeability significantly correlated with increased intestinal mucosa staining for E. coli bacteria, nitrotyrosine, and alpha-synuclein as well as serum LBP levels in PD subjects. These data represent not only the first demonstration of abnormal intestinal permeability in PD subjects but also the first correlation of increased intestinal permeability in PD with intestinal alpha-synuclein (the hallmark of PD, as well as staining for gram negative bacteria and tissue oxidative stress. Our study may thus shed new light on PD pathogenesis as well as provide a new method for earlier

  18. Immunological evaluation of the intestinal mucosa of broiler chicks treated with Lactobacillus Spp. and challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis

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    AS Okamoto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at the antibody production by intestinal mucosa of broilers chicks were orally inoculated with Lactobacillus spp. at one and/or 21 days of age, and subsequently challenged with Salmonella enterica, subspecies enterica, serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis. A total number of 288 drug-free broiler chicks was divided into 6 groups (groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, according to age at Lactobacillus spp. inoculation and SE challenge. The intestinal mucosa immune response was determined as the production of immunoglobulin A against S. Enteritidis, and evaluated by the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA technique in intestinal washing fluid. Groups treated with Lactobacillus spp. presented higher IgA production only when the chicks were challenged with S. Enteritidis at 21 days of age. Nevertheless, the expected stimulus for intestinal mucosa antibody production induced by Lactobacillus spp was observed in only some of the treated groups, demonstrating that the protocol utilized in the present experiment resulted in few beneficial effects for chicks, particularly during the first days of life.

  19. Bacillus Coagulans Enhance the Immune Function of the Intestinal Mucosa of Yellow Broilers

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    L Xu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Bacillus coagulans on the growth performance and immune functions of the intestinal mucosa of yellow broilers. Three hundred and sixty one-day-old yellow chicks were randomly allocated to four treatments groups with six replicates of 15 chicks each. The broilers were randomly subjected to one of the following treatments for 28 days: control group (group1, fed a basal diet and three treatments (group 2, 3, 4 fed the basal diet supplemented with 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans , respectively. The results showed that for 28 days, compared with the control diet, the dietary addition of 200 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans significantly decreased the feed/gain ratio (F/G (p<0.05, improved the thymus index, spleen index and bursa index (p<0.05, increased the villus height to crypt depth ratio (V/C in the duodenum (p<0.05, increased the number of secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA positive cells ( p<0.05. The dietary addition of 200 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans promoted a significant increase in Lactobacillus spp. populations and suppressed Escherichia coli replication in cecum, compared with the control (p<0.05. Moreover, the dietary addition of 200 mg/kg Bacillus coagulans also significantly enhanced the levels of interferon alpha (IFNα, toll-like receptor (TLR3, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5(MDA5 in the duodenum (p<0.05. In conclusion, the dietary addition of Bacillus coagulans significantly improved broiler performance, and enhanced the intestinal mucosal barrier and immune function. The optimal dosage of Bacillus coagulans for yellow broilers was determined as 2×108 cfu/kg.

  20. Glutathione redox cycle in small intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood of pediatric celiac disease patients

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    Vesnać Stojiljković

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The celiac disease is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder caused by gluten from wheat, rye or barley. In genetically predisposed persons, gluten induces the immune-mediated inflammation of small intestinal mucosa. Histological lesions include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hypertrophy and villous atrophy, resulting in malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The only treatment for celiac patients is a permanent gluten-free diet (GFD. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress are strongly associated with the celiac disease. Glutathione (GSH is a main detoxifier of endogenous and exogenous ROS in the intestine. In order to explain the role of glutathione redox cycle in celiac patients, we examined the activities of GSH-related antioxidant (AO enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase (GR, as well as the concentration of GSH in small intestinal biopsies and peripheral blood of children affected by the celiac disease. The concentration of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH as markers of oxidative damage was measured in the same samples. The results clearly demonstrate a significant malfunction of GSH redox cycle with a concomitant decrease in the capacity to regenerate GSH and detoxify LOOH in celiac patients, even after several years of GFD. The oral administration of GSH and a diet rich in natural antioxidants, as well as appropriate dietary supplements, could be of great benefit to the patients.A doença celíaca é uma desordem gastrointestinal causada pelo glúten proveniente do trigo, centeio ou cevada. Em pessoas geneticamente predispostas, o glúten induz uma inflamação imune da mucosa do intestino delgado. As lesões histológicas incluem linfocitose intraepitelial, hipertrofia de criptas e atrofia vilosa, resultando em malabsorção de micro- e macronutrientes. O único tratamento para os pacientes celíacos é a restrição permanente de glúten na dieta (GFD.Espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS e o

  1. Butyrate Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Intestinal Cells and Crohn's Mucosa through Modulation of Antioxidant Defense Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ilaria; Luciani, Alessandro; De Cicco, Paola; Troncone, Edoardo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CrD). High levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induce the activation of the redox-sensitive nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB), which in turn triggers the inflammatory mediators. Butyrate decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by the lamina propria mononuclear cells in CrD patients via inhibition of NF-κB activation, but how it reduces inflammation is still unclear. We suggest that butyrate controls ROS mediated NF-κB activation and thus mucosal inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells and in CrD colonic mucosa by triggering intracellular antioxidant defense systems. Intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and colonic mucosa from 14 patients with CrD and 12 controls were challenged with or without lipopolysaccaride from Escherichia Coli (EC-LPS) in presence or absence of butyrate for 4 and 24 h. The effects of butyrate on oxidative stress, p42/44 MAP kinase phosphorylation, p65-NF-κB activation and mucosal inflammation were investigated by real time PCR, western blot and confocal microscopy. Our results suggest that EC-LPS challenge induces a decrease in Gluthation-S-Transferase-alpha (GSTA1/A2) mRNA levels, protein expression and catalytic activity; enhanced levels of ROS induced by EC-LPS challenge mediates p65-NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in Caco-2 cells and in CrD colonic mucosa. Furthermore butyrate treatment was seen to restore GSTA1/A2 mRNA levels, protein expression and catalytic activity and to control NF-κB activation, COX-2, ICAM-1 and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine. In conclusion, butyrate rescues the redox machinery and controls the intracellular ROS balance thus switching off EC-LPS induced inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells and in CrD colonic mucosa. PMID:22412931

  2. Differing patterns of transforming growth factor-beta expression in normal intestinal mucosa and in active celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, P; Pazzaglia, A; Moriondo, M; Azzari, C; Resti, M; Amorosi, A; Vierucci, A

    1999-09-01

    Growth-inhibitory autocrine polypeptides such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta may play a role in the control of normal epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, TGF-beta has a central role in extracellular matrix homeostasis and regulates the immune response at the local level. In this study immunohistochemistry was used to examine the pattern of TGF-beta protein distribution and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine levels of TGF-beta messenger RNA expression in normal intestinal mucosa and in the flat mucosa of children with celiac disease. Small intestinal biopsies were performed in children with active celiac disease and in histologically normal control subjects. Frozen sections were single stained using an anti-TGF-beta monoclonal antibody and were double stained for TGF-beta and T cell, macrophages, and the activation marker CD25. Total RNA was extracted from frozen specimens and competitive quantitative RT-PCR performed for TGF-beta mRNA using internal synthetic standard RNA. In normal intestinal mucosa, by immunohistochemistry, TGF-beta expression was most prominent in the villous tip epithelium, whereas in the lamina propria, weak immunoreactivity was present. The celiac mucosa showed weak and patchy epithelial TGF-beta immunoreactivity. In contrast, an intense staining positivity was present in the lamina propria localized mostly in the subepithelial region where T cells, macrophages, and CD25+ cells were detected by double staining. By quantitative RT-PCR, levels of TGF-beta mRNA transcripts appeared to be increased in celiac intestinal mucosa compared with that in control subjects, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. These observations suggest that TGF-beta expression is associated with differentiated enterocyte function. In celiac disease the lower TGF-beta epithelial cell expression could be a consequence of the preponderance of a less

  3. [Atrophy in the mucosa neighboring an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma by comparing the Sydney vs. OLGA systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Mendoza, Pablo; Hernández-Briseño, Liliana; Casarrubias-Ramírez, Moisés; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Ángeles-Garay, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma causes about 700 000 deaths worldwide per year. Is feasible detect it in earlier stages. The aim of this article is to assess the atrophy in the mucosa neighboring an intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma by comparing the Sydney vs. OLGA systems. Twenty-eight individuals with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma (Lauren) were compared with 32 non-neoplastic cases. Both groups had undergone total gastrectomy. Two pathologists made a consensus-based assessment of the atrophy in non-neoplastic corpus and antral epithelium using the Sydney and OLGA Systems. The mean, median, and distribution of the frequencies were obtained using the measuring and distribution scales of the study variables. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values, both positive and negative, for gastric cancer were calculated through the dichotomy of advanced atrophy-positive and advanced atrophy-negative scales. Twenty-four of the 28 cases with intestinal-type gastric carcinoma showed an advanced atrophy with the OLGA system, with a sensitivity and specificity of 77 and 85 %, respectively. Conversely, 4 of the 28 individuals showed an advanced atrophy with the Sydney system, with a sensitivity and specificity of 14 and 100 %, respectively. The OLGA system has a high sensitivity and specificity (77 y 85 % respectively) for the recognition of preneoplastic changes in the mucosa neighboring a gastric carcinoma.

  4. Dietary glutamine, glutamic acid and nucleotides increase the carbon turnover (δ 13C) on the intestinal mucosa of weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, A B; Berto, D A; Saleh, M A D; Miassi, G M; Ducatti, C

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the influence of dietary glutamine, glutamic acid and nucleotides on duodenal and jejunal carbon turnover, and on mucosa morphometry of piglets weaned at an age of 21 days. The diets were: additive-free diet - control (C); 1% of glutamine (G); 1% of glutamic acid (GA); and 1% of nucleotides (N). In intestinal mucosa morphometry trial, 65 animals were used. At day 0 (baseline), five animals were slaughtered to determine the villus height (VH), crypt depth (CD), VH : CD ratio and villi density (VD). The remaining 60 animals were allocated into a randomized block design with 4×3 factorial arrangement (four diets: C - control, G - glutamine, GA - glutamic acid and N - nucleotides; three slaughter ages: 7, 14 and 21 days post-weaning) with five piglets slaughtered per treatment. In carbon turnover trial, 123 animals were used. At day 0 (baseline), three animals were slaughtered to quantify the δ 13C half-life (T50%) and the 99% carbon substitution (T99%) on intestinal mucosa. The remaining 120 animals were blocked by three weight categories (light, medium and heavy) and, randomly assigned to pen with the same four diets from the previous trial with one piglet slaughtered per weight category per treatment at days 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27 and 49 after weaning. Morphometric analyses have yielded no consistent results regarding the action of the evaluated additives, and few reproducible age-related effects. The N diets determined lower T50% values (5.18 days) and T99% (17.21 days) than G and C diets (T50%=7.29, 7.58 days and T99%=24.22, 25.17 days, respectively) in the duodenal mucosa. In jejunum, the N, GA and G diets determined the lowest T50% means (4.9, 6.2 and 6.7 days, respectively) and T99% means (15.34, 21.10 and 21.84 days, respectively) in comparison with C diets (T50%=7.44 and T99%=24.72 days). The inclusion of the additives in the diets of piglets accelerated the carbon turnover in piglets during the post-weaning period. The

  5. Effect of a soy protein-based diet on ribonucleic acid metabolism in the small intestinal mucosa of goat kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhusen, U; Kuhla, S; Zitnan, R; Wutzke, K D; Huber, K; Moors, S; Voigt, J

    2007-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of soy protein inclusion in milk replacer diets for goat kids on protein, RNA, and DNA contents in small intestinal mucosa, on the importance of RNA biosynthesis from dietary RNA precursors for mucosal RNA synthesis, and on the activities of enzymes involved in nucleotide degradation in small intestinal mucosa. Diets were based on cow's milk. In the control group, 35% of the milk protein was replaced by casein (CN) protein, and in the soy group (SPAA), the same amount of milk protein was replaced by soy protein supplemented with essential AA known to be at lower concentrations in soy than in CN (Thr, Val, Ile, Leu, His, Lys, Met). Diets were isonitrogenous and isoenergetic. At 47 d of age, goats were harvested and samples of proximal, middle, and distal jejunal mucosa were collected 5 h after feeding 15N-labeled RNA from yeast (13 mg/kg of body weight). Growth and feed conversion did not differ between the control and SPAA kids. Mucosal protein concentrations were lower in the SPAA than the control kids. Concentrations of RNA and DNA did not differ between feeding groups, but in all kids mucosal RNA concentrations were higher in proximal than in middle and distal jejunum. Protein:RNA ratios were higher in the control than the SPAA kids and were lowest in proximal jejunum. Activities of alkaline phosphatase in enterocytes were higher in proximal than in middle and distal jejunum. Activities of mucosal xanthine oxidase were highest in distal jejunum and were higher in the SPAA than the control kids, especially in the middle and distal sites. The 15N-enrichment of mucosal RNA was higher in the control than the SPAA kids, especially in distal jejunum, and was lowest in distal jejunum. In contrast, 15N-enrichment of urea in plasma tended to be higher and Gly concentration in plasma was lower in the SPAA than the control kids. Data indicate that protein content and the protein:RNA ratio were lower in jejunal mucosa of

  6. Reduced expression of aquaporins in human intestinal mucosa in early stage inflammatory bowel disease

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    Ricanek P

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structures of AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 were modeled. Results: AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 mRNAs were detected in all parts of the intestinal mucosa. Notably, AQP1 and AQP3 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, and AQP7 and AQP8 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum and the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed localization of AQP3, 7, and 8 at the mucosal epithelium, whereas the expression of AQP1 was mainly confined to the endothelial cells and erythrocytes. The reduction in the level of AQP3, 7, and 8 mRNA was confirmed by immunofluorescence, which also indicated a reduction of apical immunolabeling for AQP8 in the colonic surface epithelium and crypts of the IBD samples. This could indicate loss of epithelial polarity in IBD, leading to disrupted barrier function. Conclusion: AQPs 1 and 8 and the aquaglyceroporins AQPs 3 and 7 are the AQPs predominantly expressed in the lower intestinal tract of humans. Their expression is significantly reduced in patients with IBD, and they are differentially expressed in specific bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The data present a link between gut inflammation and water/solute homeostasis, suggesting that AQPs may play a significant role in IBD pathophysiology. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, aquaporins, aquaglyceroporins

  7. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-01-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with 3 H-cortisone and 14 C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease

  8. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa are more frequent in adolescents and young adults suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Francesca; Marzatico, Alice; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2017-12-01

    Evidence has emerged about the relationship between atopic dermatitis (AD) and autoimmune diseases, but the underlying mechanism of this association is complex and still unclear. Recent epidemiological data from the published work suggest a positive correlation. The aim of this review is to analyze the frequency of co-occurrence of AD and autoimmune diseases. Our systematic review included 22 articles from PubMed describing the reciprocal association between AD and autoimmune diseases. Although not all the studies achieved statistically significant results, patients suffering from autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, such as vitiligo, alopecia areata, celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases, showed a higher risk to have AD as comorbidity. In contrast, patients with rheumatological autoimmune disorders did not show a significant correlation with AD. By analyzing the occurrence of autoimmune disorders in patients with AD, we confirmed a positive correlation between AD and autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, but also with systemic lupus erythematosus, while the association between AD and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis and rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. Further investigations are need to explain the mechanism underlying the observed comorbidity between AD and autoimmune diseases and to develop targeted prevention strategies and treatment. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sandro; El Asmar, Ramzi; Di Pierro, Mariarosaria; Grazia Clemente, Maria; Tripathi, Amit; Sapone, Anna; Thakar, Manjusha; Iacono, Giuseppe; Carroccio, Antonio; D'Agate, Cinzia; Not, Tarcisio; Zampini, Lucia; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about the interaction of gliadin with intestinal epithelial cells and the mechanism(s) through which gliadin crosses the intestinal epithelial barrier. We investigated whether gliadin has any immediate effect on zonulin release and signaling. Both ex vivo human small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to gliadin, and zonulin release and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in the presence and absence of zonulin antagonism. Zonulin binding, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Tight junction occludin and ZO-1 gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When exposed to gliadin, zonulin receptor-positive IEC6 and Caco2 cells released zonulin in the cell medium with subsequent zonulin binding to the cell surface, rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, loss of occludin-ZO1 protein-protein interaction, and increased monolayer permeability. Pretreatment with the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 blocked these changes without affecting zonulin release. When exposed to luminal gliadin, intestinal biopsies from celiac patients in remission expressed a sustained luminal zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability that was blocked by FZI/0 pretreatment. Conversely, biopsies from non-celiac patients demonstrated a limited, transient zonulin release which was paralleled by an increase in intestinal permeability that never reached the level of permeability seen in celiac disease (CD) tissues. Chronic gliadin exposure caused down-regulation of both ZO-1 and occludin gene expression. Based on our results, we concluded that gliadin activates zonulin signaling irrespective of the genetic expression of autoimmunity, leading to increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules.

  11. The effects of glutamine-supplemented diet on the intestinal mucosa of the malnourished growing rat Os efeitos de dieta com suplementação de glutamina sobre a mucosa intestinal do rato desnutrido em crescimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uenis Tannuri

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the blood and plays a key role in the response of the small intestine to systemic injuries. Mucosal atrophy is an important phenomenon that occurs in some types of clinical injury, such as states of severe undernutrition. Glutamine has been shown to exert powerful trophic effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa after small bowel resection or transplant, radiation injury, surgical trauma, ischemic injury and administration of cytotoxic drugs. Since no study has been performed on the malnourished animal, we examined whether glutamine exerts a trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa of the malnourished growing rat. Thirty-five growing female rats (aged 21 days were divided into 4 groups: control - chow diet; malnutrition diet; malnutrition+chow diet; and malnutrition+glutamine-enriched chow diet (2%. For the first 15 days of the experiment, animals in the test groups received a malnutrition diet, which was a lactose-enriched diet designed to induce diarrhea and malnutrition. For the next 15 days, these animals received either the lactose-enriched diet, a regular chow diet or a glutamine-enriched chow diet. After 30 days, the animals were weighed, sacrificed, and a section of the jejunum was taken and prepared for histological examination. All the animals had similar weights on day 1 of experiment, and feeding with the lactose-enriched diet promoted a significant decrease in body weight in comparison to the control group. Feeding with both experimental chow-based diets promoted significant body weight gains, although the glutamine-enriched diet was more effective. RESULTS: The morphological and morphometric analyses demonstrated that small intestinal villous height was significantly decreased in the malnourished group, and this change was partially corrected by the two types of chow-based diet. Crypt depth was significantly increased by malnutrition, and this parameter was partially corrected by the two

  12. Morphologic observation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in the large intestine of Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZhaXi, Yingpai; Wang, Wenhui; Zhang, Wangdong; Gao, Qiang; Guo, Minggang; Jia, Shuai

    2014-07-01

    The structure and distribution of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) throughout the large intestine of 10 Bactrian camels were comparatively studied by anatomical and histological methods. The results showed that Peyer's patches (PPs) were mainly located on the mucosal surfaces of the entire ileocecal orifice, the beginning of the cecum and the first third of the colon. The shape of PPs gradually changed from "scrotiform" to "faviform" along the large intestine with the scrotiform PP as the major type in the ileocecal orifice. The distribution density also gradually decreased from the ileocecal orifice to the colon. The histological observations further revealed that the MALT in the form of PPs or isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF) and lamina propria lymphocytes was mainly present in the lamina propria and submucosa from the entire ileocecal orifice, where the muscularis mucosa is usually incomplete, to the colonic forepart. In addition, lymphoid tissue was much more abundant in the lamina propria and submucosa of the ileocecal orifice as compared to the cecum and colon. Statistically, the MALT of the ileocecal orifice contained a higher number of lymphoid follicles (37.7/10 mm(2) ) than that of the cecum, colon, or rectum (P lymphoid follicles were clearly visible. Together, our data suggest that the ileocecal orifice constitutes the main inductive site for the mucosal immunity in the large intestine of the Bactrian camel; and that scrotiform PPs are likely to the result of long-term adaptation of the Bactrian camel to the harsh living environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Activity of retinene palmitasynthetase and retinene palmitatehydrolase in the small intestine mucosa and membranes of its cells in white rats affected by A-avitaminosis and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutskij, K.M.; Sovtysik, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    A combined action of A-avitaminosis and ionizing radiation on the activity of retinenepalmitatesynthetase and retinenepalmitatehydrolase in the small intestine mucosa and cell membranes of white rats has been investigated. The activity of retinenepalmitatehydrolase has been shown to decrease in the irradiated animals deficient in vitamin A as compared to the control nonirradiated animals. The activity of retinenepalmitatesynthetase affected by a combination of A-avitaminosis and irradiation increases as compared to the control nonirradiated rats both in the small intestine mucosa and its cell membranes

  14. The association between Helicobacter pylori gastritis and lymphoid aggregates, lymphoid follicles and intestinal metaplasia in gastric mucosa of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nursu; Urganci, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Yilmaz, Banu

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the topographic prevalence of lymphoid follicles, lymphoid aggregates, gastric glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia among children with chronic abdominal pain. The association between these lesions and age, type of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori density was also assessed. A total of 358 patients (mean age: 10, 18 ± 3, 26 years; male : female ratio: 0.92) with chronic abdominal pain who had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were included in the study. The endoscopic and histopathological findings were documented. The prevalence of lymphoid follicles, lymphoid aggregates, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia according to the type of gastritis and their relation with H. pylori density were determined. H. pylori was detected in 214 (59.8%) patients. H. pylori- positive patients were found to be significantly older than H. pylori-negative patients (P pylori-positive patients and normal mucosal appearance in H. pylori-negative patients. Panmucosal gastritis both in the corpus and antrum and the prevalence of lymphoid follicles and lymphoid aggregates were more frequent in the H. pylori-positive group (P pylori density, no significant relation was established between intestinal metaplasia, lymphoid lesions and H. pylori density. Lymphoid follicles and lymphoid aggregates in gastric mucosa involving both antrum and corpus significantly correlated with H. pylori infection, H. pylori density and type of gastritis in children. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Demethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome suppresses iNOS induction in an in vitro inflamed human intestinal mucosa model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somchit, Mayura; Changtam, Chatchawan; Kimseng, Rungruedi; Utaipan, Tanyarath; Lertcanawanichakul, Monthon; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Chunglok, Warangkana

    2014-01-01

    It is known that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) plays an integral role during intestinal inflammation, an important factor for colon cancer development. Natural compounds from Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae) have long been a potential source of bioactive materials with various beneficial biological functions. Among them, a major active curcuminoid, demethoxycurcumin (DMC) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages or microglia cells. However, the role of DMC on iNOS expression and NO production in an in vitro inflamed human intestinal mucosa model has not yet been elucidated. This study concerned inhibitory effects on iNOS expression and NO production of DMC in inflamed human intestinal Caco-2 cells. An in vitro model was generated and inhibitory effects on NO production of DMC at 65 μM for 24-96 h were assessed by monitoring nitrite levels. Expression of iNOS mRNA and protein was also investigated. DMC significantly decreased NO secretion by 35-41% in our inflamed cell model. Decrease in NO production by DMC was concomitant with down-regulation of iNOS at mRNA and protein levels compared to proinflammatory cytokine cocktail and LPS-treated controls. Mechanism of action of DMC may be partly due to its potent inhibition of the iNOS pathway. Our findings suggest that DMC may have potential as a therapeutic agent against inflammation-related diseases, especially in the gut.

  16. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in radiation exposed small intestinal mucosa of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwag, Hyon Joo; Lee, Kyoung Ja; Rhee, Chung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes whose main function is the degradation of the extracellular matrix. Several studies have revealed that MMPs and TIMPs are related to the wound healing process and in photoaging caused by ultraviolet irradiation. However, the expressions of MMP and TIMP after irradiation have not, to the best of our knowledge, been studied. This study investigates the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in rat intestinal mucosa following irradiation. The entire abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated using a single dose method. The rats were sacrificed on day 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 14 following irradiation. Histopathological observations were made using hematoxilin and eosin staining. The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined using immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and ELISA. Radiation induced damage, associated with atrophic villi, and infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed from the first postirradiation day, and severe tissue damage was observed on the second and the third postirradiation days. An increase in mitosis and the number of regenerating crypts, as evidence of regeneration, were most noticeable on the fifth postirradiation day. From the immunohistochemistry, the MMP-2 expression was observed from the first postirradiation day, but was most conspicuous on the third and the fifth postirradiation days. The TIMP-2 expression was most conspicuous on the fifth postirradiation day. From the immunoblotting, the MMP-2 expression was strongly positive on the third postirradiation day, and that of TIMP-2 showed a strong positive response on the fifth postirradiation day. In ELISA, tests, the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2. were increased in the postirradiation groups compared to those of the normal controls, and showed a maximum increase on the fifth postirradiation day. These results were statistically significant. The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were increased in the intestinal mucosa of the rats

  17. Combined LDI/SAT test to evaluate intestinal lactose digestion and mucosa permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, H. A.; Klaassen, D.; van der Molen, A. R. H.; Elzinga, H.; Bijsterveld, K.; Boverhof, R.; Stellaard, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucosal damage causes impaired digestive capacity and increased mucosal permeability. Quantification of damage can be used to improve treatment options. Currently, the Lactose Digestion Index (LDI) and the Sugar Absorption Test (SAT) are used for evaluation. The investigation

  18. Emerging molecular insights into the interaction between probiotics and the host intestinal mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Baarlen, van P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria can modulate immune responses in the host gastrointestinal tract to promote health. The genomics era has provided novel opportunities for the discovery and characterization of bacterial probiotic effector molecules that elicit specific responses in the intestinal system.

  19. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  20. Extensive heterotopic gastric mucosa of the small intestine: imaging with {sup 99m}Tc-sodium pertechnetate SPECT/CT enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schapiro, Andrew H.; Trout, Andrew T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lin, Tom K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Frischer, Jason S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Silverman, Ayaka [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Extensive heterotopic gastric mucosa of the small intestine is a rare, but potentially life-threatening condition characterized by multifocal or long-segment heterotopic gastric mucosa within the bowel lumen that is often associated with other anomalies including malrotation and annular pancreas. Although the imaging findings are characteristic, this entity may be unrecognized due to its unusual imaging appearance and rarity. CT or MR enterography and {sup 99m}Tc-sodium pertechnetate scintigraphy can provide complementary information that enables specific diagnosis and accurate assessment of disease extent. We present a case of extensive heterotopic gastric mucosa of the small intestine imaged by simultaneous, combined {sup 99m}Tc-sodium pertechnetate single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT enterography to both familiarize the reader with the condition and describe an imaging strategy that enables specific diagnosis and assists with treatment planning. (orig.)

  1. Expressão das proteínas p53 e Cox-2 em adenocarcinoma intestinal e mucosa adjacente Expression of p53 and Cox-2 proteins in intestinal adenocarcinoma and adjacent mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Felin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar se existe associação entre o estadiamento do tumor e a expressão das proteínas p53 e Ciclooxigenase-2 (Cox-2 em adenocarcinoma de intestino. Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo de 40 blocos de parafina contendo amostras obtidas de ressecção cirúrgica de tecido intestinal anteriormente diagnosticado como adenocarcinoma de intestino humano. O material foi coletado no período entre 1998 e 2003 no Hospital Universitário de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. Como controle, foram utilizadas amostras de áreas não tumorais de mucosa adjacente, referentes a cada caso (n = 40. Utilizamos a imuno-histoquímica para analisar este material quanto à expressão das proteínas p53 e Cox-2. A expressão das proteínas p53 e Cox-2 foi significativamente maior em tecido tumoral quando comparada com mucosa adjacente. Detectamos positividade total para Cox-2 (100%, e parcial (70% para p53 em tecido tumoral. Foi verificada associação significativa entre expressão da proteína p53 e estadiamento segundo Astler-Coller, mas não com a classificação TNM. Quanto à proteína Cox-2, não foi observada associação significativa com estadiamento do tumor de intestino. Os achados sugerem que existe uma tendência entre a expressão da proteína p53 e Cox-2 com o estadiamento do tumor, sendo necessária comprovação com estudos futuros.The objective of this study is to establish a possible association between staging and the expression of p53 and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 proteins in intestinal adenocarcinoma. A retrospective study of 40 embedded paraffins with surgical specimens of intestinal Adenocarcinoma was performed. The samples were collected during 1998 and 2003 at Hospital Universitário de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil. Samples of non-tumoral tissues (n = 40 were used as a negative control. The expression of p53 and Cox-2 was immunohistochemically studied. The expression of p53 and Cox-2 proteins was significantly higher in

  2. Changes of intestinal mucosa in hand-fed rats-model for human coeliac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozáková, Hana; Štěpánková, Renata; Kolínská, Jiřina; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová, Helena

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (1998), s. 336 ISSN 0044-2771. [European Intestinal Transport Group Meeting /15./. Sundvollen, 17.05.1998-21.05.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/96/1256; GA ČR GA311/97/0784; GA MZd IZ3761 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.890, year: 1998

  3. Pathogen control at the intestinal mucosa - H2O2 to the rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaus, U.G.; Hertzberger, R.; Pircalabioru, G.G.; Yousefi, S.P.M.; Branco dos Santos, F.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal infections are a global challenge, connected to malnutrition and inadequate hygiene in developing countries, and to expanding antibiotic resistance in developed countries. In general, a healthy host is capable of fighting off gut pathogens or at least to recover from infections quickly.

  4. Effect of level of alimentation on visceral organ mass and the morphology and Na+, K+ adenosinetriphosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompala, R E; Hoagland, T A

    1987-10-01

    Changes in ovine visceral organ mass and small intestinal mucosa morphology and metabolism due to short-term and prolonged modifications in level of alimentation were studied. Thirty-six lambs were fed for 21 d at either 100 or 50% ad libitum levels of intake. For the next 5 d, lambs either remained on the same intake levels or were switched from 100 or 50% or from 50 to 100% ad libitum intake levels and were subsequently slaughtered. Levels of alimentation the last 5 d before slaughter had a significant effect on weights of the large intestine, small intestine, stomach complex and liver, while only the weight of the liver was affected by 21-d adaptation period. Weights of the heart, lungs, carcass and visceral fat were not affected by level of alimentation. Villus height and mucosal mass at a constant intestinal tissue weight were modified by level of alimentation 5 d before slaughter but static to the previous 21-d nutritional plane. Activity of Na+, K+ ATPase of jejunal mucosa was not influenced by level of alimentation 5 d before slaughter, but was influenced by 21-d adapted level of alimentation. Results from this study are interpreted to indicate that weights of the liver and alimentary tract and small intestinal mucosa development are highly sensitive to changes in level of alimentation.

  5. Salmonella Interaction with and Passage through the Intestinal Mucosa: Through the Lens of the Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallstrom, Kelly; McCormick, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotypes are invasive enteric pathogens spread through fecal contamination of food and water sources, and represent a constant public health threat around the world. The symptoms associated with salmonellosis and typhoid disease are largely due to the host response to invading Salmonella, and to the mechanisms these bacteria employ to survive in the presence of, and invade through the intestinal mucosal epithelia. Surmounting this barrier is required for survival within the host, as well as for further dissemination throughout the body, and subsequent systemic disease. In this review, we highlight some of the major hurdles Salmonella must overcome upon encountering the intestinal mucosal epithelial barrier, and examine how these bacteria surmount and exploit host defense mechanisms.

  6. Salmonella interaction with and passage through the intestinal mucosa: through the lens of the organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eHallstrom

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotypes are invasive enteric pathogens spread through fecal contamination of food and water sources, and represent a constant public health threat around the world. The symptoms associated with salmonellosis and typhoid disease are largely due to the host response to invading Salmonella, and to the mechanisms these bacteria employ to survive in the presence of, and invade through the intestinal mucosal epithelia. Surmounting this barrier is required for survival within the host, as well as for further dissemination throughout the body, and subsequent systemic disease. In this review, we highlight some of the major hurdles Salmonella must overcome upon encountering the intestinal mucosal epithelial barrier, and examine how these bacteria surmount and exploit host defense mechanisms.

  7. Salmonella Interaction with and Passage through the Intestinal Mucosa: Through the Lens of the Organism

    OpenAIRE

    Hallstrom, Kelly; McCormick, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotypes are invasive enteric pathogens spread through fecal contamination of food and water sources, and represent a constant public health threat around the world. The symptoms associated with salmonellosis and typhoid disease are largely due to the host response to invading Salmonella, and to the mechanisms these bacteria employ to survive in the presence of, and invade through the intestinal mucosal epithelia. Surmounting this barrier is required for survival within t...

  8. The protective effects of black garlic extract for blood and intestinal mucosa to irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Do Young; KIm, Joon Sun; Choi, Hyeong Seok [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Hyeok; Park, Won Suk; Min, Byung In [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The radiation has been utilized in a number of fields, even though the use of plenty cause a variety of side effects. This study was confirmed for radiation protective effects of aged garlic to contribute to the prevention of disasters that are radiation exposure. We studied the Complete Blood cell Count(CBC) and the small intestine after feeding aged garlic extract into Sprague Dawley Rat which irradiated X-ray beam 7 and 13 Gy. Garlic extract was administered to the results in the experimental group showed a notable difference in the CBC of platelets (p<0.05), red blood cells (p<0.05) and early damaged white blood cells (p<0.05). In addition, it was confirmed that experimental group's small intestine crypt is more survival than irradiation group significantly. And experimental group has small intestine villi length almost similar to the normal group. result of the aged garlic study will be able to be of great benefit for the radiation relevant emergency management.

  9. The protective effects of black garlic extract for blood and intestinal mucosa to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Do Young; KIm, Joon Sun; Choi, Hyeong Seok; Choi, Jun Hyeok; Park, Won Suk; Min, Byung In

    2016-01-01

    The radiation has been utilized in a number of fields, even though the use of plenty cause a variety of side effects. This study was confirmed for radiation protective effects of aged garlic to contribute to the prevention of disasters that are radiation exposure. We studied the Complete Blood cell Count(CBC) and the small intestine after feeding aged garlic extract into Sprague Dawley Rat which irradiated X-ray beam 7 and 13 Gy. Garlic extract was administered to the results in the experimental group showed a notable difference in the CBC of platelets (p<0.05), red blood cells (p<0.05) and early damaged white blood cells (p<0.05). In addition, it was confirmed that experimental group's small intestine crypt is more survival than irradiation group significantly. And experimental group has small intestine villi length almost similar to the normal group. result of the aged garlic study will be able to be of great benefit for the radiation relevant emergency management

  10. Weight loss and morphometric study of intestinal mucosa in rats after massive intestinal resection: influence of a glutamine-enriched diet Perda de peso e estudo morfométrico da mucosa intestinal de ratos submetidos à ressecção subtotal de intestino delgado: influência do uso de dieta com glutamina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Resende Ribeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-bowel syndrome is responsible for significant metabolic alterations that compromise nutritional status. Glutamine is considered an essential nutrient for enterocytes, so beneficial effects from supplementation of the diet with glutamine are hypothesized. PURPOSE: In this study, the effect of a diet enriched with glutamine was evaluated in rats undergoing extensive small bowel resection, with analysis of postoperative weight loss and intestinal morphometrics of villi height, crypt depth, and thickness of the duodenal and remnant jejunal mucosa. METHODS: Three groups of male Wistar rats were established receiving the following diets: with glutamine, without glutamine, and the standard diet of laboratory ration. All animals underwent an extensive small bowel resection, including the ileocecal valve, leaving a remnant jejunum of only 25 cm from the pylorus that was anastomosed lateral-laterally to the ascendant colon. The animals were weighed at the beginning and end of the experiment (20th postoperative day. Then they were killed and the remnant intestine was removed. Fragments of duodenal and jejunal mucosa were collected from the remnant intestine and submitted to histopathologic exam. The morphometric study of the intestinal mucosa was accomplished using a digital system (KS 300 connected to an optic microscope. Morphometrics included villi height, crypt depth, and the total thickness of intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: The weight loss comparison among the 3 groups showed no significant loss difference. The morphometric studies showed significantly taller duodenal villi in the glutamine group in comparison to the without glutamine group, but not different from the standard diet group. The measurements obtained comparing the 3 groups for villi height, crypt depth, and thickness of the remnant jejunum mucosa were greater in the glutamine-enriched diet group than for the without-glutamine diet group, though not significantly different from with

  11. Expression of the Na+/l- symporter (NIS is markedly decreased or absent in gastric cancer and intestinal metaplastic mucosa of Barrett esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wapnir Irene L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates iodide (I- transport in the thyroid, lactating breast, salivary glands, and stomach. Whereas NIS expression and regulation have been extensively investigated in healthy and neoplastic thyroid and breast tissues, little is known about NIS expression and function along the healthy and diseased gastrointestinal tract. Methods Thus, we investigated NIS expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 155 gastrointestinal tissue samples and by immunoblot analysis in 17 gastric tumors from 83 patients. Results Regarding the healthy Gl tract, we observed NIS expression exclusively in the basolateral region of the gastric mucin-producing epithelial cells. In gastritis, positive NIS staining was observed in these cells both in the presence and absence of Helicobacter pylori. Significantly, NIS expression was absent in gastric cancer, independently of its histological type. Only focal faint NIS expression was detected in the direct vicinity of gastric tumors, i.e., in the histologically intact mucosa, the expression becoming gradually stronger and linear farther away from the tumor. Barrett mucosa with junctional and fundic-type columnar metaplasia displayed positive NIS staining, whereas Barrett mucosa with intestinal metaplasia was negative. NIS staining was also absent in intestinalized gastric polyps. Conclusion That NIS expression is markedly decreased or absent in case of intestinalization or malignant transformation of the gastric mucosa suggests that NIS may prove to be a significant tumor marker in the diagnosis and prognosis of gastric malignancies and also precancerous lesions such as Barrett mucosa, thus extending the medical significance of NIS beyond thyroid disease.

  12. Effects of Probiotics on Intestinal Mucosa Barrier in Patients With Colorectal Cancer after Operation: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dun; Jiang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Lan-Shu; Song, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have found that probiotics or synbiotics can be used in patients with diarrhea or inflammatory bowel disease for the prevention and treatment of some pathologies by improving gastrointestinal barrier function. However, there are few studies availing the use of probiotics in patients with colorectal cancer. To lay the foundation for the study of nutritional support in colorectal cancer patients, a meta-analysis has been carried out to assess the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation. To estimate the efficacy of probiotics on the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer after operation, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials has been conducted. Databases including PubMed, Ovid, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure have been searched to identify suitable studies. Stata 12.0 was used for statistical analysis, and sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Six indicators were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Ratios of lactulose to mannitol (L/M) and Bifidobacterium to Escherichia (B/E), occludin, bacterial translocation, and levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were chosen to evaluate probiotics in protecting the intestinal mucosa barrier in patients with colorectal cancer. Seventeen studies including 1242 patients were selected for meta-analysis, including 5 English studies and 12 Chinese studies. Significant effects were found in ratios of L/M (standardized mean difference = 3.83, P = 0.001) and B/E (standardized mean difference = 3.91, P = 0.000), occludin (standardized mean difference = 4.74, P = 0.000), bacterial translocation (standardized mean difference = 3.12, P = 0.002), and levels of SIgA (standardized mean

  13. The roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in colon tight junction protein expression and intestinal mucosa structure in a mouse model of acute liver failure

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    Lv Sa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP is a common clinical disease and one of the most severe complications of acute liver failure (ALF. Although the mechanism responsible for SBP is unclear, cytokines play an important role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α on the structure of the intestinal mucosa and the expression of tight junction (Zona Occludens 1; ZO-1 protein in a mouse model of ALF. Methods We induced ALF using D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS or GalN/TNF-α and assessed the results using transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR. The effects of administration of anti-TNF-α IgG antibody or anti-TNF-α R1 antibody before administration of GalN/LPS or GalN/TNF-α, respectively, on TNF-α were also assessed. Results Morphological abnormalities in the intestinal mucosa of ALF mice were positively correlated with serum TNF-α level. Electron microscopic analysis revealed tight junction (TJ disruptions, epithelial cell swelling, and atrophy of intestinal villi. Gut bacteria invaded the body at sites where TJ disruptions occurred. Expression of ZO-1 mRNA was significantly decreased in both ALF models, as was the level of ZO-1 protein. Prophylactic treatment with either anti-TNF-α IgG antibody or anti-tumor necrosis factor-a receptor1 (anti-TNF-α R1 antibody prevented changes in intestinal tissue ultrastructure and ZO-1 expression. Conclusion TNF-α affects the structure of the intestinal mucosa, decreases expression of ZO-1, and affects the morphology of the colon in a mouse model of ALF. It also may participate in the pathophysiological mechanism of SBP complicated to ALF.

  14. Nucleotídeos na dieta de frangos de corte e seus efeitos sobre taxa de turnover da mucosa intestinal antes e após lesões causadas por coccidiose Nucleotides in broilers challenged diet and its effects on intestinal mucosa turnover rate before and after injuries caused by coccidiose

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    Vanessa Cristina Pelícia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da dieta suplementada com nucleotídeos sobre taxa de turnover da mucosa intestinal de frangos antes e após lesões causadas por coccidiose por meio de análise isotópica, utilizando a variação do carbono-13 em plantas C3 e C4. Foram utilizados 264 pintos submetidos a dois tratamentos: dieta controle e dieta suplementada com 0,07% nucleotídeos. Os pintos possuíam sinais isotópicos em seus tecidos semelhantes ao de ditas C4. Após o alojamento, para avaliar taxa de turnover da mucosa, as aves receberam dietas predominantemente C3. Com 16 dias de idade, 50% das aves de cada tratamento foram inoculadas com oocistos de Eimeria acervulina e, a partir de 21 dias, para avaliar a taxa de turnover após desafio, as aves passaram a receber dieta predominantemente C4. Amostras de mucosa foram analisadas isotopicamente por espectrometria de massa. Na fase inicial, a suplementação com nucleotídeos propiciou aceleração na troca do carbono na mucosa, com meia-vida de 1,06 e 1,01 dias para dieta controle e com nucleotídeos, respectivamente, acelerando o crescimento intestinal. Na fase de 21 a 42 dias de idade, para os grupos não desafiados com coccidiose, as meias-vidas do carbono foram 1,81 e 1,80 dias para dieta controle e com nucleotídeos, respectivamente, não havendo influência dos tratamentos. Porém, nos grupos desafiados, as meias-vidas foram 1,01 dias no grupo controle e 0,75 dias no que recebeu dieta com nucleotídeos, indicando maior turnover da mucosa nesse último grupo. A adição de nucleotídeos promove aceleração no processo de renovação da mucosa intestinal e na regeneração após danos causados por coccidiose.The objective was to evaluate the effect of nucleotides supplementation diet on the intestinal mucosa turnover rate of broilers before and after injury caused by coccidiosis, through isotopic analysis, using the carbon-13 variation in C³ and C4 plants. It was used 264

  15. Interaction of a self-emulsifying lipid drug delivery system with the everted rat intestinal mucosa as a function of droplet size and surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershanik, T; Benzeno, S; Benita, S

    1998-06-01

    To investigate the interaction of positively charged self-emulsifying oil formulations (SEOF) following aqueous dilution as a function of resulting emulsion droplet charge and size with rat everted intestinal mucosa, adherent mucus layer and Peyer's patches, using cyclosporine A (CsA) as a lipophilic model drug. Droplet size determination (TEM technique) and zeta-potential measurements were used to characterize the resulting emulsions. For the ex vivo interaction study, the well-known rat intestine everted sac technique was used in combination with confocal microscopy. The positively charged oil droplets formed by SEOF dilutions at ratios of 1/50 and 1/10 elicited the stronger interaction with the mucosal surface. The positive charge of the smaller droplets was more readily neutralized, and even reversed in aqueous solutions containing moderate subphysiological mucin concentrations. Parameters such as droplet size, negativity of the epithelial mucosa potential and presence of the mucus layer on the epithelial surface affected drug mucosa uptake and the adhesion of the positively charged droplets to the rat intestinal mucosa. The enhanced electrostatic interactions of positively charged droplets with the mucosal surface are mostly responsible for the preferential uptake of CsA from the positively charged droplets as compared to negatively charged droplets irrespective of the experimental conditions used. The increased uptake of the CsA from the negatively charged oil droplets was consistent with the dilution extent, as expected, whereas in the positively charged droplets, an intermediate droplet size range was identified resulting in optimum drug uptake and clearly suggesting that drug uptake was not consistent with either dilution extent or droplet size.

  16. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Pigs Is Associated with Increased Density of Intestinal Mucosa-Associated Bacteria Including Clostridium perfringens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Mølbak, Lars; Delègue, Camilla Lindholm

    2015-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is associated with changes in the luminal gut microbiota. It is not known whether the mucosa-associated microbiota is affected by NEC and stimulates inflammatory lesions. Objective: We hypothesized that the density of the mucosa-associated microbiota co...

  17. Effectiveness of Aloe vera leaf extract against low level exposure to gamma radiation induced injury in intestinal mucosa of Swiss mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlot, Prashasnika; Saini, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: Human beings can not deny the presence of all sorts of incoming radiations, which are detrimental to life. The small intestine represents one of the major dose limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy because of its high radio sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Aloe vera, a potential radioprotector. Radioprotective efficacy of aloe vera leaf extract in intestinal mucosa in mice (1 g/kg body weight/day) was studied from 6h to day 20 after gamma irradiation (0.5 Gy(. Villus height, goblet cells/villus section, total cells are good parameters for the assessment of radiation damage. The mice selected from inbreed colony were divided into two groups. The first group was given Aloe vera extract orally for 15 consecutive days and served as experimental group. On 15th day, after 30 min of above treatment animals of both the groups were exposed to 0.5 Gy gamma irradiation and autopsied on 6, 12, 24 h and 5, 10, 20 days. Aloe vera pretreatment resulted in a significant increase (p<0.001) in villus height, total cells whereas globlet cells showed a significant decrease (p<0.001) from respective irradiated controls at each autospy day. The results suggest that Aloe vera pretreatment provides protection against radiation-induced alterations in intestinal mucosa of Swiss mice

  18. Supplementation of a Blend of Beneficial Bacteria and Antibodies on Growth Performance, Intestinal Mucosa Morphology and Right Heart Failure of Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica

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    Mohammad Hasan Mehraei Hamzekolaei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early nutrition of chicks with beneficial bacteria might help in occupying the inner surface of the intestinal tract. Interference of pathogens in intestinal microbiota is well known as barrier effect, bacterial interference, and competitive exclusion. Objectives: It was hypothesized that competitive exclusion in Japanese quails with a blend of beneficial bacteria (Aquablend Avian® probiotic would enhance quails’ growth performance and intestinal mucosal morphology. Furthermore, the study was performed at 2100 m above sea level at Shahrekord University, so another hypothesis was the capability of the probiotic for inhibiting right heart failure. Materials and Methods: One hundred fifty-six Japanese quails were divided into 4 groups: 2 groups (Aquablend and control at standard environmental temperature and 2 (Aqua-stress and Cont-stress at cold-hypoxic environmental situation. Aquablend groups received the probiotic in the first 3 days of life in drinking water (0.5 g/100 birds/day. Results: Feed conversion ratio (FCR was significantly reduced at the end of the experiment (day 35 in both Aquablend and aqua-stress groups compared to control and cont-stress groups, respectively (P 0.05. Cont-stress group had higher RV: TV ratio (0.28 and heterophil: lymphocyte (H: L ratio (1.22 than aqua-stress group: (0.25 and (1.20, respectively (P > 0.05. Data regarding to intestinal mucosa morphology was controversial but the probiotic was able to elevate duodenum villi surface (P < 0.05 and also jejunum and ileum lamina propria thickness. Conclusion: Obtained data suggests that addition of Aquablend Avian® probiotic in the first 3 days of life may improve growth performance and some intestinal mucosa characteristics of Japanese quails. Moreover, the probiotic might reduce right heart failure and stress induced by cold-hypoxic situation.

  19. Metabolism of all-trans-retinoic acid and all-trans-retinyl acetate. Demonstration of common physiological metabolites in rat small intestinal mucosa and circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullum, M.E.; Zile, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and metabolism of physiological doses of all-trans-retinoic acid were examined in blood and small intestinal mucosa of vitamin A-depleted rats. A major portion of intrajugularly injected retinoic acid is rapidly (within 2 min) sequestered by tissues; subsequently 13-cis-retinoic acid and polar metabolites are released into circulation. All-trans-retinoic acid appears in small intestinal epithelium within 2 min after dosing and is the major radioactive compound there for at least 2 h. Retinoyl glucuronide and 13-cis-retinoic acid are early metabolites of all-trans-retinoic acid in the small intestine of bile duct-cannulated rats. Retinoyl glucuronide, the major metabolite of retinoic acid intestinal epithelium, in contrast to other polar metabolites, was not detected in circulation. An examination of [ 3 H]retinyl acetate metabolites under steady state conditions in vitamin A-repleted rats demonstrates the occurrence of all-trans-retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid in circulation and in intestinal epithelium, in a pattern similar to that found after injection of retinoic acid into vitamin A-depleted rats. These data establish that all-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, and retinoyl glucuronide are physiological metabolites of vitamin A in target tissues, and therefore are important candidates as mediators of the biological effect of the vitamin

  20. Proteomic View of the Crosstalk between Lactobacillus mucosae and Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Co-culture Revealed by Q Exactive-Based Quantitative Proteomics

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    Edward Alain B. Pajarillo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli are bacteria that are beneficial to host health, but information on communication between Lactobacilli and host cells in the intestine is lacking. In this study, we examined the proteomes of the Lactobacillus mucosae strain LM1, as a model of beneficial bacteria, and the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2 after co-culture. Label-free proteomics demonstrated the high-throughput capability of the technique, and robust characterization of the functional profiles and changes in the bacteria and intestinal cells was achieved in pure and mixed cultures. After co-culture, we identified totals of 376 and 653 differentially expressed proteins in the LM1 and IPEC-J2 proteomes, respectively. The major proteomic changes in the LM1 strain occurred in the functional categories of transcription, general function, and translation, whereas those in IPEC-J2 cells involved metabolic and cellular processes, and cellular component organization/biogenesis. Among them, elongation factor Tu, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphocarrier protein HPr, which are known to be involved in bacterial adhesion, were upregulated in LM1. In contrast, proteins involved in tight junction assembly, actin organization, and genetic information processing (i.e., histones and signaling pathways were significantly upregulated in IPEC-J2 cells. Furthermore, we identified functional pathways that are possibly involved in host–microbe crosstalk and response. These findings will provide novel insights into host–bacteria communication and the molecular mechanism of probiotic establishment in the intestine.

  1. Activation of immune and defense responses in the intestinal mucosa by outer membrane vesicles of commensal and probiotic Escherichia coli strains

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    Maria José eFábrega

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of microbiota in human health is well known. Imbalances in microbiome structure have been linked to several diseases. Modulation of microbiota composition through probiotic therapy is an attempt to harness the beneficial effects of commensal microbiota. Although there is wide knowledge of the responses induced by gut microbiota, the microbial factors that mediate these effects are not well known. Gram-negative bacteria release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs as a secretion mechanism of microbial factors, which have an important role in intercellular communication. Here, we investigated whether OMVs from the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 or the commensal E. coli strain ECOR12 trigger immune responses in various cellular models: (i peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs as a model of intestinal barrier disruption, (ii apical stimulation of Caco-2/PMBCs co-culture as a model of intact intestinal mucosa, and (iii colonic mucosa explants as an ex vivo model. Stimulations with bacterial lysates were also performed. Whereas both OMVs and lysates activated expression and secretion of several cytokines and chemokines in PBMCs, only OMVs induced basolateral secretion and mRNA upregulation of these mediators in the co-culture model. We provide evidence that OMVs are internalized in polarized Caco-2 cells. The activated epithelial cells elicit a response in the underlying immunocompetent cells. The OMVs effects were corroborated in the ex vivo model. This experimental study shows that OMVs are an effective strategy used by beneficial gut bacteria to communicate with and modulate host responses, activating signaling events through the intestinal epithelial barrier.

  2. Methotrexate administration induces differential and selective protein tyrosine nitration and cysteine nitrosylation in the subcellular organelles of the small intestinal mucosa of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Kasthuri; Abraham, Premila

    2016-05-05

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is one of the most frequent dose limiting side effects of methotrexate (MTX), a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug. Peroxynitrite (PON) overproduction is reported to contribute to MTX induced gastrointestinal mucositis. However, the consequence of PON overproduction i.e. protein tyrosine nitration and protein cysteine nitrosylation, the subcellular distribution of these modified proteins and their molecular weights have not been investigated yet. Mucositis was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of 3 consecutive i.p. injections of MTX. Tyrosine nitrated proteins and cysteine nitrosylated proteins were determined in the subcellular organelles fractions of mucosa using immunoprecipitation and western blot. The proteins in the subcellular fractions were separated by 1D electrophoresis, and probed with anti -nitrotyrosine antibody and anti-nitrosocysteine antibody. After MTX treatment, a general increase in protein tyrosine nitration as well as a change in the spectrum of proteins that underwent nitration was observed. The relative densities of the 3 nitrotyrosine protein adducts were as follows: Mitochondria > cytosol > microsomes > nucleus. In the mitochondrial fraction increased nitration of 12 kDa, 25 kDa 29Kda, 47 kDa, and 62Kda proteins, in the cytosol increased nitration of 12 kDa, 19 kDa, 45 kDa, and 60 kDa proteins and in the nuclear fraction increased nitration of 17 kDa, 35 kDa, and 58 kDa proteins was observed. On the other hand, MTX treatment resulted to a general decrease in protein cysteine nitrosylation in all the subcellular fractions. These results suggest that MTX induced, PON mediated small intestinal injury is mediated by differential nitration and nitrosylation of proteins in the subcellular organelles with increased protein tyrosine nitration and decreased cysteine nitrosylation. In addition MTX treatment results in selective nitration and nitrosylation of proteins in the intestinal mucosa. This differential

  3. Temporal and spatial interplay of microbiota and intestinal mucosa drive establishment of immune homeostasis in conventionalized mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidy, El S.; Baarlen, van P.; Derrien, M.; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, D.J.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Levenez, F.; Dore, J.; Dekker, J.; Samsom, J.N.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    During colonization of germfree mice with the total fecal microbial community of their conventionally born and raised siblings (conventionalization), the intestinal mucosal immune system initiates and maintains a balanced immune response. However, the genetic regulation of these balanced,

  4. Morphologic and cytoproliferative patterns of duodenal mucosa in two patients after long-term total parenteral nutrition: changes with oral refeeding and relation to intestinal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironi, L; Paganelli, G M; Miglioli, M; Biasco, G; Santucci, R; Ruggeri, E; Di Febo, G; Barbara, L

    1994-01-01

    The morphologic and cytoproliferative patterns of the duodenal mucosa of two adult patients, one of whom had a short bowel, were evaluated after more than 2 months of postoperative total parenteral nutrition and 2 and 12 months after the resumption of oral alimentation. Morphometric analysis was performed on routinely processed duodenal biopsies. Cell proliferation was evaluated by means of in vitro bromodeoxyuridine uptake. The results were compared with those obtained in five healthy controls. After parenteral nutrition, patients showed significantly lower villus height and crypt depth than those of controls and a normal bromodeoxyuridine labeling index. After 2 months of refeeding, villus and crypt returned to normal, and the labeling index was increased. After 12 months of oral refeeding, labeling index, villus height, and crypt depth were similar to those of controls. The patient with the short bowel showed a number of cells per unit length of villus and crypt significantly greater than those of the controls and of the patient who underwent shorter intestinal resection. In human duodenal mucosa, (1) hypoplasia develops after long-term total parenteral nutrition; (2) mucosal recovery occurs through an increased cell proliferation after oral refeeding; and (3) extensive small bowel resection determines the development of relative hyperplasia.

  5. Cellular cross talk in the small intestinal mucosa: postnatal lymphocytic immigration elicits a specific epithelial transcriptional response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Maltesen, Henrik R; Balmer, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    During the early postnatal period lymphocytes migrate into the mouse small intestine. Migrating infiltrative lymphocytes have the potential to affect the epithelial cells via secreted cytokines. Such cross talk can result in the elicitation of an epithelial transcriptional response. Knowledge about...

  6. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, L. E. M.; Schreurs, C. C. H. M.; Kroes, H.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Deventer, S. J. H.; van Tol, E. A. F.

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co

  7. Effect of Enterococcus faecium EF 55 on morphometry and proliferative activity of intestinal mucosa in broilers infected with Salmonella Enteritidis

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    Ševčíková Zuzana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Enterococcus faecium EF55 on chickens, as well as its influence on proliferative activity of epithelial intestinal cells after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 (SE PT4. Moreover, the length and area of duodenal and jejunal villi of the birds were examined.

  8. Reparo de esôfago cervical de cães com segmento intestinal livre autólogo desprovido de epitélio e de lâmina própria da túnica mucosa Canine cervical esophagus repair using of free autograft intestinal segment without epithelium and lamina propria of the mucosa

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    Patrícia Maria Coletto Freitas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Doze cães foram separados em dois grupos de igual número e submetidos à remoção de um retalho de 3,0 x 3,5cm do esôfago cervical. A abertura foi ocluída com enxerto de segmento intestinal livre autólogo desprovido de epitélio e lâmina própria da túnica mucosa, com pontos simples separados por fio poliglactina 910. Os animais do grupo 1 foram observados durante 15 dias de pós-operatório, e os do grupo 2, durante 30 dias. Observou-se epitelização e discreta estenose no local do enxerto com invasão de tecido conjuntivo denso rico em fibras colágenas. O enxerto de segmento intestinal livre autólogo foi eficiente no reparo de rupturas do esôfago cervical de cães.Twelve dogs were allocated in two groups with same number of animals and submitted to removal of a 3.0 x 3.5cm piece of the cervical esophagus. The incision was occluded with a autograft of free intestinal segment without epithelium and lamina propria of the mucosa, with separate simples points using poliglactina 910 line. Animals of the group 1 were observed for 15 days post-surgery, and the animals from group 2, for 30 days. Epithelization and discreet stenosis in the place of the graft with invasion of dense conjunctive tissue, rich in collagen fibers was noticed. The autograft free intestinal segment was efficient in the repair of ruptures in the cervical segment of the canine esophagous.

  9. Human intestinal mucosa-associated Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains with probiotic properties modulate IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12 gene expression in THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čitar, M; Hacin, B; Tompa, G; Štempelj, M; Rogelj, I; Dolinšek, J; Narat, M; Matijašić, B Bogovič

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are considered one of the permanent genera of the physiological human intestinal microbiota and represent an enormous pool of potential probiotic candidates. Approximately 450 isolates of presumptive Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium strains were obtained from bioptic samples of colonic and ileal mucosa from 15 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. On the basis of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, 20 strains were selected for further taxonomic classification and characterisation, as well as assessment of probiotic properties and safety. Importantly, selected strains showed the capability of colonising different parts of the intestine. The most frequently isolated species was Lactobacillus paracasei followed by Lactobacillus fermentum. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials of human and veterinary importance, however, tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistance was observed in Lactobacillus plantarum and L. fermentum strains. Thirteen strains were able to ferment more than 19 different carbon sources and three out of five tested strains exerted antagonistic activity against several different indicator strains. Two Lactobacillus isolates (L. paracasei L350 and L. fermentum L930 bb) and one Bifidobacterium isolate (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis IM386) fulfilled in vitro selection criteria for probiotic strains and exhibited strong downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12 and upregulation of anti-inflammatory IL-10. The selected strains represent suitable candidates for further studies regarding their positive influence on host health and could play an important role in ameliorating the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Morfometria da mucosa duodenal em frangos de corte submetidos à temperatura ambiente cíclica elevada Intestinal morphometry of the duodenal mucosa in broiler chickens underwent to high cyclic environment temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F.P. Marchini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos da temperatura ambiente cíclica elevada sobre a morfometria da mucosa duodenal e o peso corporal em frangos de corte foram avaliados. Setenta pintos de corte, machos, foram alojados em gaiolas e distribuídos em dois grupos. Um grupo foi submetido diariamente, durante uma hora, à temperatura ambiente cíclica elevada do primeiro até o 42º dia de idade (ambiente ST; e outro foi mantido em conforto térmico (ambiente TN. Cinco frangos de cada grupo foram sacrificados, semanalmente, por deslocamento cervical para mensuração da altura de vilosidades (VI, profundidade das criptas (CR e relação vilo/cripta (VI/CR duodenal. Dez aves de cada grupo foram pesadas semanalmente em balança digital. Utilizou-se delineamento inteiramente ao acaso em esquema fatorial 7x2 (sete idades: um, sete, 14, 21, 28, 35 e 42 dias, e dois ambientes: ST e TN. Os ambientes foram comparados pelo teste de Fisher (PThe effects of high cyclic environment temperature on body weight and morphometry of the duodenal mucosa in broiler chicken were evaluated. Seventy one-day-old male broiler chicks were sheltered in cages and distributed in two groups. One group was daily exposed to high cyclic environment temperature for an hour, from hatching to 42 days of age (group ST, the other one was kept under thermoneutral conditions (group TN. Five chickens of each group were weekly slaughtered by cervical delocation to mesure the villosities height (VI, crypts depth (CR, and villo/crypt ratio (VI/ CR in the duodenum. Ten chickens of each group were weighted weekly on a digital balance. A completely randomized experimental design in a 7x2 factorial arrangement (hatching, seven, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days of age and two environments: ST and TN. The environments were compared by Fisher test (P<0.05 and the effects of days of life by polynomial regression. The ST group had reduction in VI at 14 and 21 days of age (P<0.01, CR at 28 days of age (P<0.05, and in VI/CR at 21

  11. Temporal and spatial interplay of microbiota and intestinal mucosa drive establishment of immune homeostasis in conventionalized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aidy, Sahar; van Baarlen, Peter; Derrien, Muriel; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joël; Dekker, Jan; Samsom, Janneke N; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-09-01

    During colonization of germfree mice with the total fecal microbial community of their conventionally born and raised siblings (conventionalization), the intestinal mucosal immune system initiates and maintains a balanced immune response. However, the genetic regulation of these balanced, appropriate responses to the microbiota is obscure. Here, combined analysis of germfree and conventionalized mice revealed that the major molecular responses could be detected initiating at day 4 post conventionalization, with a strong induction of innate immune functions followed by stimulation of adaptive immune responses and development and expansion of adaptive immune cells at later stages of conventionalization. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mouse developmental and immune-related cellular pathways and processes that were co-mediated by the commensal microbiota and suggests which mechanisms were involved in this reprogramming. The dynamic, region-dependent mucosal responses to the colonizing microbiota revealed potential transcriptional signatures for the control of intestinal homeostasis in healthy mice, which may help to decipher the genetic basis of pathway dysregulation in human intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  12. Identification of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities within the intestinal mucosa of dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifeh, Mohsen; Rajamäki, Minna Marjaana; Syrjä, Pernilla; Mäkitalo, Laura; Kilpinen, Susanne; Spillmann, Thomas

    2018-03-12

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 are zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidases involved in the breakdown and reconstitution of extracellular matrix under both physiological and pathological conditions. Mucosal MMP-2 and -9 activities have been reported to be upregulated in the intestine of humans with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and in animal models of IBD. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of canine chronic enteropathies (CE) is unknown. This study investigated mucosal pro- and active MMP-2 and -9 activities in dogs with CE and healthy dogs using gelatin zymography, and also to determine the association of their activities in dogs with CE with the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI), histopathologic findings, the clinical outcome, and hypoalbuminemia. Intestinal mucosal samples from duodenum, ileum, colon, and cecum were collected from 40 dogs with CE and 18 healthy Beagle dogs. In dogs with CE, the number of samples positive for mucosal pro- and active MMP-2 was significantly higher in the duodenum (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively), ileum (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018, respectively), and colon (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.002, respectively), compared with healthy controls. Mucosal pro-MMP-9-positive samples in the duodenum and colon were significantly more frequent in dogs with CE than in healthy dogs (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.001, respectively). Despite the presence of mucosal samples positive for active MMP-9 in the intestinal segments of dogs with CE, the difference compared to healthy controls did not reach statistical significance. None of the intestinal mucosal samples in healthy dogs showed gelatinolytic activity corresponding to the control bands of active MMP-2 and -9. Mucosal active MMP-9 activities displayed a significant positive association with the severity of neutrophil infiltration in the duodenum (P = 00.040), eosinophils in the cecum (P = 00.037), and the CIBDAI score for ileum samples

  13. Imunofluorescência para neuropeptídeos na mucosa nasal humana: avaliação de técnica para peptídeo intestinal vasoativo (VIP Neuropeptide immunofluorescence in human nasal mucosa: assessment of the technique for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Cedaro de Mendonça

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Os neuropeptídeos são neurotransmissores relevantes na fisiologia nasal e o conhecimento crescente acerca de seu papel na fisiopatologia de doenças nasais abre novas perspectivas. A sua investigação na mucosa nasal humana baseia-se em grande parte em marcação imunológica, método complexo e sujeito a inúmeros fatores de erro. Com o intuito de viabilizar este tipo de pesquisa em nosso meio, um método de imunofluorescência para peptídeo intestinal vasoativo (VIP na mucosa nasal humana é proposto e avaliado. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Oito pacientes submetidos a cirurgia funcional do nariz têm um fragmento de mucosa coletado da concha inferior. O tecido foi fixado em solução de Zamboni (paraformaldeído 4% tamponado e ácido pícrico 0,4%, congelado em nitrogênio líquido e armazenado. Cortes de 14 µm foram realizados e submetidos à reação de imunofluorescência para VIP (Península Laboratories. As imagens microscópicas foram documentadas em fotografia convencional. A especificidade, sensibilidade e reprodutibilidade de execução foram avaliadas. A reprodutibilidade de interpretação de resultados foi avaliada através da comparação de graus de marcação (0 a 4 atribuídos às fotos por seis observadores. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram ser o método suficientemente específico, sensível, além de reprodutível em sua execução. A interpretação de resultados mostrou depender do perfeito esclarecimento do observador no julgamento das imagens de imunofluorescência, mas mostrou uniformidade. CONCLUSÃO: O método proposto foi considerado útil na pesquisa de neuropeptídeos na mucosa nasal humana.Neuropeptides are important neurotransmitters in nasal physiology and the increasing knowledge of their role in nasal diseases brings new therapeutic perspectives. The investigation of human nasal mucosa neuropeptides is based mostly on immunocytochemistry, a complex approach whose resulting

  14. Celecoxib Monotherapy Maintained Small Intestinal Mucosa Better Compared With Loxoprofen Plus Lansoprazole Treatment: A Double-blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shunji; Hanada, Ryuzo; Hayashida, Mari; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Ikushima, Ippei; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare celecoxib with loxoprofen for protection of small intestine. RCT studies report that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib induces fewer small intestinal injuries than nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Loxoprofen is a prodrug nonselective NSAID developed to protect upper gastrointestinal tract. A total of 150 healthy volunteers (40 to 70 y) were enrolled. After medical checkup including laboratory data, subjects were randomly assigned to celecoxib (200 mg daily) or loxoprofen (180 mg daily) plus lansoprazole (15 mg daily). All drugs were prepared using inactive capsules. After randomization, all subjects were first examined by baseline capsule endoscopy (CE). After 14 days, subjects underwent posttreatment CE. We compared baseline and posttreatment CE findings of the 2 groups. All CE data were evaluated blindly by 3 reviewers. Pretreatment and posttreatment laboratory variables were also compared. A total of 74 subjects (49±6 y, F/M: 36/38) were enrolled in celecoxib group and 76 subjects (49±7 y, F/M: 39/37)in loxoprofen group. Five in celecoxib group and 4 in loxoprofen group were excluded from CE analysis mainly due to incomplete CE. The percentage of subjects with at least 1 posttreatment mucosal break was lower in celecoxib group (10%) than in loxoprofen group (49%) (Plansoprazole combination therapy (UMIN: 000007936).

  15. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buda A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Buda,1,* Sonia Facchin,1,* Elisa Dassie,2 Elisabetta Casarin,3 Mark A Jepson,4 Helmut Neumann,5 Giorgia Hatem,1 Stefano Realdon,6 Renata D’Incà,1 Giacomo Carlo Sturniolo,1 Margherita Morpurgo3 1Department of Surgical, Oncological, and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padova, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 3Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 4School of Biochemistry and Wolfson Bioimaging Facility, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; 5Ludwig Demlig Endoscopic Center of Excellence, ESGE Endoscopy Training Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany; 6Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent-labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of

  16. [Clinical significance of studies of microorganisms of the intestinal mucosa by culture biochemical methods and mass fragmentography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, G A; Parfenov, A I; Verkhovtseva, N V; Ruchkina, I N; Kurchavov, V A; Boĭko, N B; Rogatina, E L

    2003-01-01

    This research is a continuation of the series of studies of the parietal microbiota of the bowel tissue samplings by the gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) method [G.A. Ossipov et al.//Journal of the Society of Russian Gastroenterologists, 2001, 1:54-69]. The purpose was to study a number of new microorganisms in view of new data on the composition of their fatty acids (FA) and aldehydes; to confirm the presence of a number of bacteria, fungi and aerobic actinomycetes revealed earlier by FA markers in the composition of the bowel parietal microbiota by their isolation in a pure culture; to amend the estimation of the clinical value of changes in the composition of the human bowel parietal microflora in case of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and antibiotics-associated diarrhea (AAD). We examined 31 patients with IBS with predominating diarrhea, 18 patients with AAD and 3 volunteers (a control group). We studied the blood samples, tissue samplings of the mucous coat of the jejunum, ileum and colon and composition of healthy people's feces. The GCMS method was applied. Morphology of defined strains was controlled by methods of light and scanning electron microscopy. We found a substantial portion of eubacteria among the bowel microorganisms and specific changes of their species in case of IBS and AAD. Taking into account their physiological and biochemical activity, when regulating their concentration one can expect at least the same effect as when regulating the number of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in treatment of intestinal pathologies and other diseases related to bowel dysbacteriosis. The analysis of the feces microbiota using the GCMS method by FA of parietal microorganisms provides reliable data on their number both in feces and in tissue samplings. We found a substantial portion of eubacteria among other bowel microorganisms (27% in the jejunum and 16% in the colon) and specific changes of their species in case of IBS and AAD. The

  17. Biomodelo para la evaluación de cepas atenuadas como candidatos vacunales contra el cólera humano. I. Estudio de la virulencia, capacidad de colonización y adherencia a la mucosa intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Oliva

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available El cólera continúa siendo en muchos países un problema para la salud humana, manteniéndose como una enfermedad epidémica o endémica que afecta tanto a niños como adultos y causa la muerte en casos no tratados. Una vacuna viva oral contra esta enfermedad puede ser la solución. En el presente trabajo se seleccionó y aplicó un biomodelo para la evaluación de cepas atenuadas genéticamente de Vibrio cholerae como candidatas vacunales contra el cólera. La virulencia, capacidad de colonización y adherencia a la mucosa intestinal de las cepas fueron evaluadas mediante el uso de ratones neonatos de 2 a 4 días de nacidos de la línea Balb/c, con un peso entre 1,5-2 g. Los resultados obtenidos con este biomodelo demostraron que las cepas atenuadas genéticamente son no virulentas, colonizan y se adhieren a la mucosa intestinal. Se concluye que el biomodelo utilizado permite la evaluación y selección de cepas candidatas para vacunas vivas orales contra el cólera.

  18. Morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in patients with different clinical variants of irritable bowel syndrome using tetracyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Nagieva S.; Svintsitskyy A.; Kuryk O.; Korendovych I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess histological changes of colonic mucosa in patients with clinically different types of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) before and after the treatment with tetracyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Methods. Adult patients (over 18 years) with confirmed diagnosis of IBS were examined. Biopsy specimens were taken from colon during colonoscopy for the next histological examination. One expert gastrointestinal pathologist assessed all tissue samples....

  19. Hidrolisados protéicos de mucosa intestinal, levedura e proteína isolada de soja em dietas com leite em pó integral para leitões desmamados Hydrolyzed proteins of intestinal mucosa membrane, yeast and isolated soybean protein in diets with dried whole milk to wealing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio João Scandolera

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da substituição parcial do farelo de soja (FS por hidrolisado protéico do conteúdo celular de levedura (HPCCL, proteína isolada de soja (PIS ou hidrolisado protéico de mucosa intestinal de suínos (HPMIS em dietas com leite em pó integral (LPI sobre o desempenho, os níveis séricos de uréia e a incidência de diarréia em leitões desmamados. Foram utilizados 40 leitões desmamados aos 21 dias de idade (20 machos castrados e 20 fêmeas, distribuídos em delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com cinco tratamentos (dietas e oito repetições. As dietas foram fornecidas em três fases, de acordo com a idade dos animais: fase pré-inicial 1 (21 aos 35 dias de idade: dieta à base de milho e farelo de soja (FS; dieta com 15,0% LPI; dieta com 15,0% LPI + 3,5% HPMIS; dieta com 15,0% LPI + 5,0% de PIS; dieta com 15,0% LPI + 5,0% HPCCL. Na fase pré-inicial 2 (36 aos 49 dias de idade, foi mantida a dieta à base de milho e farelo de soja e o LPI foi reduzido para 7,5% em todas as dietas, o HPMIS para 1,5%, a PIS para 4% e o HPCCL foi mantido em 5%. Na fase inicial (50 aos 70 dias de idade, foi mantida a dieta à base de milho e farelo de soja, o LPI foi retirado de todas as dietas e os animais que nas fases pré-inicial 1 e 2 foram alimentados com as dietas contendo LPI e LPI + HPMIS passaram a ser alimentados com a dieta à base de milho e farelo de soja; a PIS foi reduzida para 3% e o HPCCL para 2,5%. No período de 21 a 35 dias, a dieta LPI + PIS proporcionou maior ganho diário de peso e melhor conversão alimentar. Nas fases seguintes, não houve diferença no desempenho entre as dietas. Até cinco dias após o desmame, os animais alimentados com as rações FS e LPI + PIS apresentaram menor índice de diarréia. Os níveis séricos de uréia não foram influenciados pelas dietas. A utilização de PIS, HPMIS e HPCCL em dietas complexas contendo leite em pó pode consistir em alternativa biologicamente viável em dietas para

  20. L-Theanine Administration Modulates the Absorption of Dietary Nutrients and Expression of Transporters and Receptors in the Intestinal Mucosa of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongxian Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available L-theanine has various advantageous functions for human health; whether or not it could mediate the nutrients absorption is unknown yet. The effects of L-theanine on intestinal nutrients absorption were investigated using rats ingesting L-theanine solution (0, 50, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight per day for two weeks. The decline of insulin secretion and glucose concentration in the serum was observed by L-theanine. Urea and high-density lipoprotein were also reduced by 50 mg/kg L-theanine. Jejunal and ileac basic amino acids transporters SLC7a1 and SLC7a9, neutral SLC1a5 and SLC16a10, and acidic SLC1a1 expression were upregulated. The expression of intestinal SGLT3 and GLUT5 responsible for carbohydrates uptake and GPR120 and FABP2 associated with fatty acids transport were inhibited. These results indicated that L-theanine could inhibit the glucose uptake by downregulating the related gene expression in the small intestine of rats. Intestinal gene expression of transporters responding to amino acids absorption was stimulated by L-theanine administration.

  1. AVALIAÇÃO MORFO-HISTOLÓGICA DA MUCOSA INTESTINAL DE COELHOS ALIMENTADOS COM DIFERENTES NÍVEIS E FONTES DE FIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Martins Varela de Arruda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of fiber level and source in diets on the intestinal morphology and histology of duodenum, jejunum and ileum medium portions, it used 40 rabbits New Zealand White race in growing phase, weaned with 35 days of age, allocated in individual cages in the entirely randomized design with 2x2 factorial outline. Samples of duodenum, jejunum and ileum of animals slaughtered at 45 days of age were collected to the present study. It was observed significant interaction of the dietary treatments on the intestinal morphology and histology parameters, being verify that diets with high e low level of fiber with soybean hulls propitiated the greater values of villus height and those diets with high e low level of fiber with alfalfa hay propitiated the bigger values of crypt depth, while the number of goblet cells was larger to the diet with high level of fiber contained soybean hulls. And so there was significant effect of the food quality in terms of fiber components on the extrusion and turnover in intestinal mucous membrane cells, it was evidenced by the greater villus height:crypt depth ratio provided with the diets contained soybean hulls in relation to those diets contained alfalfa hay.

  2. Attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion formation by enteropathogenic E. coli on human intestinal mucosa is dependent on non-LEE effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Molero, Massiel; Berger, Cedric N; Walsham, Alistair D S; Ellis, Samuel J; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Schüller, Stephanie; Frankel, Gad; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2017-10-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) is a human pathogen that causes acute and chronic pediatric diarrhea. The hallmark of EPEC infection is the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions in the intestinal epithelium. Formation of A/E lesions is mediated by genes located on the pathogenicity island locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which encode the adhesin intimin, a type III secretion system (T3SS) and six effectors, including the essential translocated intimin receptor (Tir). Seventeen additional effectors are encoded by genes located outside the LEE, in insertion elements and prophages. Here, using a stepwise approach, we generated an EPEC mutant lacking the entire effector genes (EPEC0) and intermediate mutants. We show that EPEC0 contains a functional T3SS. An EPEC mutant expressing intimin but lacking all the LEE effectors but Tir (EPEC1) was able to trigger robust actin polymerization in HeLa cells and mucin-producing intestinal LS174T cells. However, EPEC1 was unable to form A/E lesions on human intestinal in vitro organ cultures (IVOC). Screening the intermediate mutants for genes involved in A/E lesion formation on IVOC revealed that strains lacking non-LEE effector/s have a marginal ability to form A/E lesions. Furthermore, we found that Efa1/LifA proteins are important for A/E lesion formation efficiency in EPEC strains lacking multiple effectors. Taken together, these results demonstrate the intricate relationships between T3SS effectors and the essential role non-LEE effectors play in A/E lesion formation on mucosal surfaces.

  3. Attaching and effacing (A/E lesion formation by enteropathogenic E. coli on human intestinal mucosa is dependent on non-LEE effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massiel Cepeda-Molero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC is a human pathogen that causes acute and chronic pediatric diarrhea. The hallmark of EPEC infection is the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E lesions in the intestinal epithelium. Formation of A/E lesions is mediated by genes located on the pathogenicity island locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE, which encode the adhesin intimin, a type III secretion system (T3SS and six effectors, including the essential translocated intimin receptor (Tir. Seventeen additional effectors are encoded by genes located outside the LEE, in insertion elements and prophages. Here, using a stepwise approach, we generated an EPEC mutant lacking the entire effector genes (EPEC0 and intermediate mutants. We show that EPEC0 contains a functional T3SS. An EPEC mutant expressing intimin but lacking all the LEE effectors but Tir (EPEC1 was able to trigger robust actin polymerization in HeLa cells and mucin-producing intestinal LS174T cells. However, EPEC1 was unable to form A/E lesions on human intestinal in vitro organ cultures (IVOC. Screening the intermediate mutants for genes involved in A/E lesion formation on IVOC revealed that strains lacking non-LEE effector/s have a marginal ability to form A/E lesions. Furthermore, we found that Efa1/LifA proteins are important for A/E lesion formation efficiency in EPEC strains lacking multiple effectors. Taken together, these results demonstrate the intricate relationships between T3SS effectors and the essential role non-LEE effectors play in A/E lesion formation on mucosal surfaces.

  4. Changes in the Abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii Phylogroups I and II in the Intestinal Mucosa of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Siles, Mireia; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Surís-Valls, Romà; Aldeguer, Xavier; Sabat-Mir, Miriam; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; Garcia-Gil, L Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii comprises 2 phylogroups, whose abundance in healthy and diseased gut and in conjunction with Escherichia coli has not yet been studied. This work aims to determine the contribution of F. prausnitzii phylogroups I and II in intestinal disease and to assess their potential diagnostic usefulness as biomarkers for gut diseases. Total F. prausnitzii, its phylogroups, and E. coli loads were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the 16S rRNA gene on biopsies from 31 healthy controls (H), 45 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 25 patients with ulcerative colitis, 10 patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and 20 patients with colorectal cancer. Data were normalized to total bacterial counts and analyzed according to patients' disease location and clinical characteristics. Lower levels of both total F. prausnitzii and phylogroup I were found in subjects with CD, ulcerative colitis, and colorectal cancer (P bowel disease location. Phylogroup I was lower in active patients with CD, whereas those CD with intestinal resection showed a reduction in phylogroup II. Treatments with mesalazine and immunosuppressants did not result in the recovery of F. prausnitzii phylogroups abundance. F. prausnitzii phylogroup I was depleted in CD, ulcerative colitis, and colorectal cancer, whereas phylogroup II was specifically reduced in CD. Quantification of F. prausnitzii phylogroups and E. coli may help to identify gut disorders and to classify inflammatory bowel disease location.

  5. Avaliação do número de células caliciformes nas criptas da mucosa colônica com e sem trânsito intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Oliveira Mello

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Medir a espessura das criptas e quantificar o número de células caliciformes comparando a mucosa cólica com e sem trânsito intestinal, relacionando-as ao tempo de exclusão. MÉTODOS: Sessenta ratos Wistar, foram distribuídos em três grupos com 20 animais segundo a operação final para a retirada dos cólons, realizadas em seis, 12 ou 18 semanas. Em cada grupo, 15 animais foram submetidos à derivação do trânsito por colostomia proximal no cólon esquerdo e fístula mucosa distal e cinco apenas à laparotomia (controle. Os cólons com e sem trânsito fecal foram removidos, processados, submetidos a cortes histológicos corados pela hematoxilina-eosina. A altura das criptas colônicas e o número de células caliciformes foram mensurados por morfometria computadorizada. Foram utilizados os testes t de Student e Kruskal-Wallis para comparação e análise de variância, estabelecendo-se nível de significância de 5% (p<0,05. RESULTADOS: A altura das criptas diminui nos segmentos sem trânsito fecal (p=0,0001, reduzindo entre seis e 12 semanas de exclusão (p=0,0003, estabilizando-se após este período. O número de células caliciformes nas criptas é menor nos segmentos sem trânsito após 12 e 18 semanas (p=0,0001, porém aumenta com o decorrer do tempo de exclusão (p=0,04 CONCLUSÃO: A exclusão do trânsito intestinal diminui a espessura das criptas colônicas e o número de células caliciformes nos segmentos sem trânsito. Existe aumento do número de células caliciformes com o decorrer do tempo de exclusão.

  6. Protein malnutrition and metronidazole induced intestinal bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... The gastrointestinal tract serves as a potent barrier that prevents luminal bacteria from entering the host. This barrier function is maintained by a well-balanced intestinal flora, an unaltered perme- ability of the intestinal mucosa, and a normal functioning immune system. Furthermore, the intestinal mucosa, in.

  7. [Correlation of the microbiota and intestinal mucosa in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel, irritable eye, and irritable mind syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Illés; Pacella, Elena; Radák, Zsolt

    2014-09-14

    Accumulating clinical evidence supports co-morbidity of irritable bowel, irritable eye and irritable mind symptoms. Furthermore, perturbation of the microbiota-host symbiosis (dysbiosis) is considered a common pathogenic mechanism connecting gastrointestinal, ocular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Consequently, maintaining or restoring microbiota-host symbiosis represents a new approach to treat these symptoms or to prevent their relapses. Current treatment approach assigned a primary role to live probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics to enhance colonization of beneficial bacteria and to strengthen the symbiosis. However, several papers showed major benefits of heat-killed probiotics as compared to their live counterparts on both intestinal and systemic symptoms. Recently, in addition to killing probiotics, in a proof of concept study lysates (fragments) of probiotics in combination with vitamins A, B, D and omega 3 fatty acids were successfully tested. These findings suggested a conceptual change in the approach addressed to both the microbiota and host as targets for intervention.

  8. Multigene analysis unveils distinctive expression profiles of helper T-cell-related genes in the intestinal mucosa that discriminate between ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iboshi, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Akiho, Hirotada; Harada, Naohiko; Nakamuta, Makoto; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-06-01

    Although the involvement of helper T (Th) and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune molecules in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is widely accepted, no discriminatory mucosal expression profiles of these molecules between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) have been clarified. Mucosal expression of 17 cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg were measured by quantitative PCR in endoscopic biopsies from inflamed (40 from UC [UCI] and 20 from CD [CDI]) and noninflamed (47, 22, and 25 from UC, CD, and controls, respectively) colon or ileum. The discriminatory power of these markers to differentiate between the 2 diseases was evaluated by linear discriminant analysis and, unsupervised, principal component analysis. By univariate analysis, many targets were markedly increased in inflamed versus noninflamed areas. However, marker expression was almost comparable between UCI and CDI, with the largest difference in UCI-predominant interleukin (IL) 21 and IL-13 with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.704 and 0.664, respectively. In contrast, combinations of 2 to 7 markers improved UCI versus CDI discrimination with AUC = 0.875 to 0.975. Among these, a 5-maker set (interferon-γ, IL-12 p35, T-bet, GATA3, and IL-21) demonstrated an AUC of 0.949 and a misclassification rate of 8.3%. Principal component analysis also markedly separated UCI and CDI. Inflamed mucosae from UC and CD could be discriminated with high accuracy using combinations of Th cell-related markers. Multigene analysis, possibly reflecting the underlying pathogenesis, is expected to be useful for diagnosis, monitoring and further defining distinctive characteristics in inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Intestinal brucellosis associated with celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery stenosis and with ileum mucosa and submucosa thickening: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaoqian; Zhu, Qingli; Yang, Qian; Li, Wenbo; Wang, Xinning; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Baotong; Li, Zhenghong; Yang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a multisystem infection found worldwide that has a broad range of characteristics, which range from acute fever and hepatomegaly to chronic infections that most commonly affect the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, or skeletal system. Gastrointestinal and splanchnic artery involvements in brucellosis are relatively uncommon. We report a case of brucellosis in an adolescent presenting as intermittent abdominal pain, diarrhea, and fever, with intestinal tract involvement. And stenosis of the celiac artery and the superior mesenteric artery was found after exposed to risk factors of Brucella infection. Splanchnic vessels stenosis and an endothelial lesion may exacerbate the prevalent symptom of abdominal pain, as a form of colic pain, occurring after eating. The patient was diagnosed as brucellosis. The narrowing of the SMA and CA was suspected to be vasculitis secondary to the brucellosis. The patient was treated with minocycline and rifampicin for 12 weeks totally. The gastrointestinal manifestations of brucellosis recovered rapidly under intensive treatment. However, follow-up imaging revealed that the superior mesenteric artery and celiac artery stenosis was unimproved. In brucellosis, gastrointestinal manifestations may be the only observable features of the disease. Splanchnic arterial stenosis is a rare complication of brucellosis. Sonography and computed tomography may be useful for both diagnosis and follow-up.

  10. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) concentrations increase following intestinal ischemia in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niewold, T.A.; Meinen, M.; Meulen, van der J.

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is an intracellular epithelial protein in the intestinal mucosa of many animals. IFABP appears in the circulation following epithelial damage, and in humans, is proven to be a parameter for damage to the mucosa. In this paper, an ELISA test designed for

  11. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  12. Helicobacter pylori and histopathological changes of gastric mucosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori and histopathological changes of gastric mucosa in Uganda population with varying prevalence of stomach cancer. ... Results: The severity of gastritis correlated with the presence of H. pylori in Ganda and Nyarwanda but not in Nkole. Intestinal metaplasia (IM) was observed in Nyarwanda and Nkole and ...

  13. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Clyne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of many enteric diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a duodenal pathogen that adheres to the gastric epithelium and causes gastritis and peptic ulceration. The mechanism by which H pylori causes disease has not yet been elucidated but adherence to the gastric mucosa is thought to be an important virulence determinant of the organism. What is known about adherence of H pylori to the gastric mucosa is summarized. Topics discussed are the mechanism of H pylori adherence; in vitro and in vivo models of H pylori infection; and adherence and potential adhesins and receptors for H pylori.

  14. Relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Ruijuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microecosystem is composed of natural microflora, intestinal epithelial cells, and intestinal mucosal immune system. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a metabolic stress-induced liver injury associated with insulin resistance and genetic susceptibility. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence showing the involvement of imbalanced intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Overgrowth of intestinal microflora, increased permeability of intestinal mucosa, intestinal endotoxemia, and production of inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the development of NAFLD. Further studies on the relationship between intestinal microflora imbalance and the pathogenesis of NAFLD may shed light on the treatment and prevention of NAFLD.

  15. [Chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, T; Navarrete, J; Celestina, A

    1989-01-01

    Much has been written about gastric mucosae behavior and the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to learn something more about these matters in peruvian population. We selected 100 patients with endoscopically no localized lesions between 30 to 70 years of age. We took 8 samples of gastric mucosae in each patient which were carefully examined for the presence of inflammatory changes, settle the line type between antral and fundic mucosae and the frequency of intestinal metaplasia finding. The results showed disagreement between endoscopic and histological findings, so we conclude it is better to diagnose chronic gastritis on the basis of histological parameters. The line between antral and fundic mucosae was of the close type one found in 87% of all cases and it advanced proximally with increasing age. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 46% of the whole number of patients and the rate of occurrence increased in 50% over 50 years age. These findings will let us compare future investigations of gastric mucosae behavior with localized benign or malign lesions.

  16. Efecto de Antígenos de Clostridium perfringens y Ácido Retinoico sobre la Expresión de IgA en la Mucosa Intestinal de Crías de Alpacas (Vicugna pacos)

    OpenAIRE

    Lázaro B., Roberto; Manchego S., Alberto; Pezo C., Danilo; More B., Juan; Castro S., Gina; Siuce M., Juan; Sandoval C., Nieves

    2015-01-01

    El objetivo del estudio fue comparar los niveles de expresión relativa del gen del exón 1 de la IgA en el epitelio intestinal de las crías de alpacas tratadas y no tratadas con antígenos de Clostridium perfringens más ácido holotransretinoico (ATRA) por vía oral. Se muestrearon 32 animales: 14 tratados (6 de 1 día de edad y 8 entre 7 a 14 días de edad) y 18 no tratados (10 de 1 día de edad y 8 entre 7 a 14 días de edad). Los animales fueron sacrificados a la semana del tratamiento, se recolec...

  17. Molecular and cellular biology of small-bowel mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Paul A.; Walters, Julian R.F.

    2001-03-01

    Study of the molecular and cellular biology of the small-intestinal mucosa is providing insights into the remarkable properties of this unique tissue. With its structured pattern of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and its ability to adapt following exposure to luminal nutrients or injury from surgery or pathogens, it functions in a regulated but responsive manner. We review recent publications on factors affecting development, gene expression, cell turnover, and adaptation.

  18. Reduction in oxidative stress levels in the colonic mucosa without fecal stream after the application of enemas containing aqueous Ilex paraguariensis extract Redução dos níveis de estresse oxidativo na mucosa cólica sem trânsito intestinal após aplicação de enemas contendo extrato aquoso de Ilex paraguariensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lorenzetti da Cunha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the antioxidant effects of enemas containing aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis, comparing segments with and without fecal stream and correlating the segments with the duration of intervention. METHODS: Twenty-six Wistar rats were subjected to a diversion of the fecal stream in the left colon by a proximal colostomy and distal mucosal fistula. The rats were distributed randomly into two experimental groups of 13 animals each based on the time of sacrifice after surgical procedure (two or four weeks. Each group was then divided into two experimental subgroups that received either second daily enemas containing 0.9% saline solution or aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis at 0.2g/100g. Colitis was diagnosed by histopathological analysis and the detection of oxidative tissue damage by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the tissue levels of malondialdehyde between colon segments with and without fecal stream in each experimental group, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to verify the variance between the levels of oxidative stress according the duration of the irrigation; both tests determined significance at 5% (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos antioxidantes de clisteres contendo extrato aquoso de Ilex paraguariensis comparando segmentos com e sem trânsito fecal e correlacionando com o tempo de intervenção. MÉTODOS: Vinte e seis ratos Wistar machos foram submetidos à derivação do trânsito no cólon esquerdo pela confecção de colostomia proximal e fístula mucosa distal. Foram divididos de forma randomizada em dois grupos experimentais de 13 animais, de acordo com o sacrifício ser realizado após duas ou quatro semanas do procedimento cirúrgico. Cada grupo foi dividido em dois subgrupos experimentais segundo a aplicação diária ter sido realizada com enemas diários contendo solução fisiológica a 0,9% ou extrato aquoso de Ilex paraguariensis na concentra

  19. Absorption of thiamine and nicotinic acid in the rat intestine during fasting and immobilization stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilyuk, O. G.; Khmelevskiy, Y. V.

    1980-01-01

    By perfusion of isolated sections of intestine with a solution containing thiamine at a concentration of 3.1 micromole, it was established that thiamine absorption in animals fasted for 72 hours decreased by 28 percent, whereas absorption increased by 12 percent in rats after 24 hour immobilization. After immobilization, absorption of label in the intestinal mucosa increased. Na K ATPase activity in the intestinal mucosa decreased by 10 percent during fasting, and it increased with immobilization of the animals. Activity of Na K ATPase in the intestinal mucosa cells determined the absorption rate of thiamine and nicotinic acid at the level of vitamin transport through the plasma membranes of the enterocytes.

  20. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  1. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  2. Composition and diversity of mucosa-associated microbiota along the entire length of the pig gastrointestinal tract; dietary influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jennifer; Daly, Kristian; Moran, Andrew W; Ryan, Sheila; Bravo, David; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2017-04-01

    Mucosa-associated microbial populations of the gastrointestinal tract are in intimate contact with the outer mucus layer. This proximity offers these populations a higher potential, than lumenal microbiota, in exerting effects on the host. Functional characteristics of the microbiota and influences of host-physiology shape the composition and activity of the mucosa-associated bacterial community. We have shown previously that inclusion of an artificial sweetener, SUCRAM, included in the diet of weaning piglets modulates the composition of lumenal-residing gut microbiota and reduces weaning-related gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, using Illumina sequencing we characterised the mucosa-associated microbiota along the length of the intestine of piglets, and determined the effect of SUCRAM supplementation on mucosa-associated populations. There were clear distinctions in the composition of mucosa-associated microbiota, between small and large intestine, concordant with differences in regional oxygen distribution and nutrient provision by the host. There were significant differences in the composition of mucosa-associated compared with lumenal microbiota in pig caecum. Dietary supplementation with SUCRAM affected mucosa-associated bacterial community structure along the length of the intestinal tract. Most notably, there was a substantial reduction in predominant Campylobacter populations proposing that SUCRAM supplementation of swine diet has potential for reducing meat contamination and promoting food safety. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Autoradiographic investigation of proliferative processes of the gastric mucosa of patients suffering from chronic atrophic gastritis, hyperplastic mucous polypi or ulcus ventriculi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbeck, L.; Guetz, H.J.; Wildner, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    A series of pathological changes of the gastric mucosa such as ulcers hyperplastic polypi and intestinal metaplasias are accompanied with an increased 3 H-thymidine incorporation into the mucosa. This disorder of the regulation of DNA synthesis is important as to the diagnosis of stomach cancer, but it is unsuitable as screening test in early recognition

  4. Histopathological findings in the oral mucosa of celiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bardellini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible subjects. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut's involvement in CD, other mucosal surfaces belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are known to be affected. Aim: Assuming that the oral mucosa could reflect the histopathological inflammatory alterations of the intestine in CD patients, this study wishes to assess the pattern of T-cell subsets in the oral mucosa of young adults with CD. Methods: A group of 37 patients (age range 20-38 years; female: male ratio 28:9 with CD were enrolled. Out of 37 patients, 19 patients (group A followed a gluten free diet (GFD -2 patients from less than one year; 6 patients between 1 and 5 years; 11 patients more than 5 years- while 18 patients (group B were still untreated. Fifteen healthy volunteers (age range 18-35 years, female: Male ratio 11:4 served as controls for the CD patients. Ethical approval for the research was granted by the Ethics Committee. Biopsy specimens were taken from normal looking oral mucosa. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, and γδ-chains T cell receptor (TCR. Results: The T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate was significantly (p < 0.0001 increased in group B (both compared with group A and with the control group. Conclusion: This study confirms the oral cavity to be a site of involvement of CD and its possible diagnostic potentiality in this disease.

  5. Increased tissue concentration of neuropeptide Y in the duodenal mucosa in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoelund, K.; Ekman, R. (Lund Univ. (Sweden))

    1989-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is localized to intestinal nerve fibres, of which there are few in normal duodenal mucosa. In the duodenal mucosa of 10 patients with coeliac disease and in a control group of 21 patients with other gastrointestinal symptoms, but with normal function of the small intestine, we studied the frequency of such fibres by immunohistochemistry and the tissue concentration of NPY by radioimmunoassay. Patients with coeliac disease had an increased number of NPY nerve fibres and significantly elevated tissue concentrations compared with the control group. The eluted fractions obtained by high-pressure liquid chromatography of duodenal extracts showed the same immunoreactive components in the two groups. This study therefore suggested proliferation of the peptide-containing nerve system in coeliac disease. The increased NPY levels in the duodenal mucosa may be of functional significance for the disease symptoms. 24 refs.

  6. Antimicrobial compounds of porcine mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenkova, E. A.; Lukinova, E. A.; Fedulova, L. V.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate porcine oral cavity mucosa (OCM), nasal cavity mucosa (NCM), rectal mucosa (RM) and tongue mucosa (TM) as sources of antimicrobial compounds. Ultrafiltrates with MW >30 kDa, MW 5-30 kDa and MW control: for the fraction with MW >30 kDa, the zone of microbial growth inhibition was 7.5 mm, for the MW<5 kDa fraction, it was 7 mm, and for MW 5-30 kDa fraction, it was 4.5 mm. No significant differences were found in high molecular weight proteomic profile, while qualitative and quantitative differences were observed in the medium and low molecular weight areas, especially in OCM and NCM. HPLC showed 221 tissue-specific peptides in OCM, 156 in NCM, 225 in RM, but only 5 in TM. The results observed confirmed porcine mucous tissues as a good source of antimicrobial compounds, which could be an actual alternative for reduction of microbial spoilage of foods.

  7. Antioxidative, DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting peptides from fish protein hydrolysed with intestinal proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Stagsted, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    and pancreatin + mucosa hydrolysates. No DH was obtained for tissues hydrolysed with only intestinal mucosa extract. Preliminary results showed antioxidant activity and intestinal DPP-IV and ACE inhibiting activity in 10 kDa fraction from both belly flap and skin hydrolysates but with a higher antioxidative...... of secondary marine products. The approach in this study is to hydrolyse skin and belly flap tissue from Salmon with the use of mammalian digestive proteases from pancreas and intestinal mucosa and test hydrolysates for antioxidative capacity, intestinal DPP-IV and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE......) inhibiting properties. 10kDa dialysis bags containing 10ml water were added to homogenized fish tissues, which were subsequently hydrolysed for 24 hours at 37˚C and pH 8 with intestinal mucosa extract and/or pancreatin solution from pig. Dialysis bags were then removed and content were analyzed for free...

  8. Lymphoepithelial cyst in jugal mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Marceli Moço [UNESP; Castro, Alvimar Lima de [UNESP; Soubhia, Ana Maria Pires [UNESP; Crivelini, Marcelo Macedo [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    Mouth lymphoepithelial cyst is rare, with few cases reported in literature. The aim of this article is to describe a clinical case, focusing on clinical and diagnostic aspects, treatment and prognosis. The lesion was one year old and had developed as a fibrous nodule in the jugal mucosa of a 71-year-old leucoderma patient. Considering focal inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, fibroma and mucocele as differential diagnosis, excisional biopsy was carried out. A cystic cavity limited by pseudostra...

  9. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  10. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis

  11. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the obstruction along the intestines. Treatment Suction via nasogastric tube Fluids given by vein Surgery for strangulation Sometimes ... nose and placed in the stomach (called a nasogastric tube) or into the intestine. Suction is applied to ...

  12. Radiodiagnosis of early radiation intestinal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodina, G.I.; Abdulkhakova, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray examination of the colon in 102 patients and of the small intestine in 62 was performed during combined radiation therapy of cervical cancer and at different time after its discontinuation. Early radiation functional and morphological changes in the ileum and colon were detected. Radiation changes in the ileac mucosa were noted in 52% of the patients, changes of various degree in the rectal, sigmoid and cecal mucosa were noted in 41.2%. Moderate radiation changes in the ascending, descending and horizontal parts of the colon were noted in 10.7%. Early radiation intestinal injuries in the form of erosions and ulcers were revealed in 5.8% of the patients. In most of the patients radiation intestinal changes were without noticeable clinical manifestations. All these patients could be defined as a group at risk of developing late radiation changes

  13. Foreign Body in Jugal Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Thiago Luís Infanger; Pauna, Henrique Furlan; Hazboun, Igor Moreira; Dal Rio, Ana Cristina; Correa, Maria Elvira Pizzigatti; Nicola, Ester Maria Danielli

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Foreign body in the oral cavity may be asymptomatic for long time and only sometimes it can lead to a typical granulomatous foreign body reaction. Some patients may complain of oral pain and present signs of inflammation with purulent discharge. A granuloma is a distinct, compact microscopic structure composed of epithelioid-shaped macrophages typically surrounded by a rim of lymphocytes and filled with fibroblasts and collagen. Nowadays, the increase of cosmetic invasive procedures such as injection of prosthetic materials in lips and cheeks may lead to unusual forms of inflammatory granulomas. Objectives Describe an unusual presentation of a foreign body reaction in the buccal mucosa due to previous injection of cosmetic agent. Resumed Report A 74-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery to investigate the presence of multiple painless, bilateral nodules in the buccal mucosa, with progressive growth observed during the previous 2 months. The histologic results showed a foreign body inflammatory reaction. Conclusion Oral granulomatosis lesions represent a challenging diagnosis for clinicians and a biopsy may be necessary. Patients may feel ashamed to report previous aesthetic procedures, and the clinicians must have a proactive approach.

  14. Foreign Body in Jugal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano, Thiago Luís Infanger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Foreign body in the oral cavity may be asymptomatic for long time and only sometimes it can lead to a typical granulomatous foreign body reaction. Some patients may complain of oral pain and present signs of inflammation with purulent discharge. A granuloma is a distinct, compact microscopic structure composed of epithelioid-shaped macrophages typically surrounded by a rim of lymphocytes and filled with fibroblasts and collagen. Nowadays, the increase of cosmetic invasive procedures such as injection of prosthetic materials in lips and cheeks may lead to unusual forms of inflammatory granulomas. Objectives Describe an unusual presentation of a foreign body reaction in the buccal mucosa due to previous injection of cosmetic agent. Resumed Report A 74-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery to investigate the presence of multiple painless, bilateral nodules in the buccal mucosa, with progressive growth observed during the previous 2 months. The histologic results showed a foreign body inflammatory reaction. Conclusion Oral granulomatosis lesions represent a challenging diagnosis for clinicians and a biopsy may be necessary. Patients may feel ashamed to report previous aesthetic procedures, and the clinicians must have a proactive approach.

  15. Evidence for a dual function of monocyte-derived mononuclear phagocytes during chronic intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Pool, Lieneke; Frising, Ulrika

    Mononuclear phagocytes derived from tissue-infiltrating monocytes play diverse roles in immunity, ranging from pathogen killing to immune regulation. We and others showed that, upon recruitment to the intestinal mucosa, the differentiation of Ly6Chi monocytes into phagocytes with anti- versus pro...... cells pool in the inflamed intestinal mucosa. However, surprisingly, mice deficient for the chemokine receptor CCR2, which exhibit highly decreased amounts of intestinal MDP, develop an intestinal pathology similar to their wild type littermates. Preliminary experiments using the anti-CD40 colitis model...

  16. Zonulin is not increased in the cardiac and esophageal mucosa of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Thomas; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Kuester, Doerthe; Fry, Lucia; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Human Zonulin, related to the Zonula occludens toxin of Vibrio cholerae, regulates intestinal permeability and is induced in inflammatory disorders of the lower GI tract. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with an impairment of epithelial barrier function. Here, we studied expression of zonulin in the gastroesophageal mucosa of 58 patients with typical reflux symptoms and 27 asymptomatic controls. During endoscopy, multiple biopsies from gastroesophageal mucosa were obtained for routine histopathology (Helicobacter pylori-status, inflammation) and gene expression analysis (immunohistochemistry, ELISA). Patients with GERD presented with typical histopathological alterations like elongation of papillae (P=0.015), basal cell hyperplasia (PZonulin was found to be expressed ubiquitously in gastroesophageal mucosa. Mucosal levels in controls ranged between 2.2 and 3.7 ng/microg total protein. Mean values were significantly higher in antrum (3.3+/-1.7 ng/microg) than cardia (2.7+/-1.2n g/microg) and esophagus (2.2+/-1.3 ng/microg) (Pzonulin expression in gastroesophageal mucosa. In conclusion, despite its established role for intestinal permeability, Zonulin seems not to be involved in the regulation of epithelial barrier function in relation to GERD.

  17. Laser treatment of oral mucosa tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Pasic, Enes

    2011-12-01

    The most common oral solitary pigmented lesion is the dental amalgam tattoo. It occurs as a result of colouring of the tissue by alien pigment which was administered intra or subepidermaly either intentionally or accidentally. The most common material used for the colouring of the oral mucosa is amalgam from amalgam fillings and metal particles from prosthetic restorations which are absorbed accidentally. The oral mucosa tattoos are most often found in the area of the marginal gingiva or the buccal mucosa. The metal particles may accidentally reach the area of the oral mucosa during various dentistry interventions. The therapy most often involves surgical intervention with excisional biopsy while in the recent period the low power laser therapy has provided exceptional results. The aim of the paper was to present the successful removal of the oral mucosa tattoo in a single visit.

  18. Ketogenesis contributes to intestinal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingding; Zhou, Yuning; Rychahou, Piotr; Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark

    2017-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium undergoes a continual process of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, we have shown that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. However, the downstream targets mediating the effects of mTOR in intestinal cells are not known. Here, we show that the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) induces intestinal cell differentiation as noted by the increased expression of differentiation markers (Mucin2 (MUC2), lysozyme, IAP, sucrase-isomaltase, KRT20, villin, Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and p21 Waf1 ). Conversely, knockdown of the ketogenic mitochondrial enzyme hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) attenuated spontaneous differentiation in the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Overexpression of HMGCS2, which we found is localized specifically in the more differentiated portions of the intestinal mucosa, increased the expression of CDX2, thus further suggesting the contributory role of HMGCS2 in intestinal differentiation. In addition, mice fed a ketogenic diet demonstrated increased differentiation of intestinal cells as noted by an increase in the enterocyte, goblet and Paneth cell lineages. Moreover, we showed that either knockdown of mTOR or inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin increases the expression of HMGCS2 in intestinal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a possible cross-talk between mTOR and HMGCS2/βHB signaling in intestinal cells. In contrast, treatment of intestinal cells with βHB or feeding mice with a ketogenic diet inhibits mTOR signaling in intestinal cells. Together, we provide evidence showing that HMGCS2/βHB contributes to intestinal cell differentiation. Our results suggest that mTOR acts cooperatively with HMGCS2/βHB to maintain intestinal homeostasis.

  19. The role of CDX2 in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    a causal role in a large number of diseases and developmental disorders. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronically inflamed mucosa caused by dysregulation of the intestinal immune homeostasis. The aetiology of IBD is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors......, including luminal bacteria. The Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is critical in early intestinal differentiation and has been implicated as a master regulator of the intestinal homeostasis and permeability in adults. When expressed, CDX2 modulates a diverse set of processes including...... of the intestinal homeostasis and further to reveal its potential role in inflammation....

  20. Fibre’s role in animal nutrition and intestinal health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fibre has an important role in the complex interaction between the diet, the endogenous enzymes, the mucosa and the commensal microflora – all of which are considered important in the assimilation of nutrients and a key component for optimal intestinal health.......Dietary fibre has an important role in the complex interaction between the diet, the endogenous enzymes, the mucosa and the commensal microflora – all of which are considered important in the assimilation of nutrients and a key component for optimal intestinal health....

  1. Impairment of intestinal barrier and secretory function as well as egg excretion during intestinal schistosomiasis occur independently of mouse mast cell protease-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rychter, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810584; van Nassauw, L.; Brown, J.K.; van Marck, E.; Knight, P.A.; Miller, H.R.P.; Kroese, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068352247; Timmermans, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Deposition of Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the intestinal mucosa is associated with recruitment of mucosal mast cells (MMC) expressing mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1). We investigated the involvement of mMCP-1 in intestinal barrier disruption and egg excretion by examining BALB/c mice lacking

  2. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

  3. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  4. Cytokines and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines of the intestinal microenvironment largely dictate immunological responses after mucosal insults and the dominance of homeostatic or proinflammatory pathways. This review presents important recent studies on the role of specific cytokines in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. The particular mucosal effects of cytokines depend on their inherent properties but also the cellular origin, type of stimulatory antigens, intermolecular interactions, and the particular immunological milieu. Novel cytokines of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family, including IL-33 and IL-36, have dominant roles in mucosal immunity, whereas more established ones such as IL-18 are constantly enriched with unique properties. Th17 cells are important mucosal constituents, although their profound plasticity, makes the specific set of cytokines they secrete more important than their mere numbers. Finally, various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, and death receptor, 3 demonstrate dichotomous roles with mucosa-protective function in acute injury but proinflammatory effects during chronic inflammation. The role of cytokines in mucosal health and disease is increasingly revealed. Such information not only will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of gut inflammation, but also set the background for development of reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and cytokine-specific therapies.

  5. Dimethyloxalylglycine preserves the intestinal microvasculature and protects against intestinal injury in a neonatal mouse NEC model: role of VEGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Rakhee M; Yan, Xiaocai; Managlia, Elizabeth; Liu, Shirley X L; Marek, Catherine; Tan, Xiao-Di; De Plaen, Isabelle G

    2018-02-01

    BackgroundNecrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating neonatal disease characterized by intestinal necrosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has a critical role in cellular oxygen homeostasis. Here, we hypothesized that prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibition, which stabilizes HIF-1α, protects against NEC by promoting intestinal endothelial cell proliferation and improving intestinal microvascular integrity via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.MethodsTo assess the role of PHD inhibition in a neonatal mouse NEC model, we administered dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) or vehicle to pups before or during the NEC protocol, and determined mortality and incidence of severe intestinal injury. We assessed intestinal VEGF by western blot analysis and quantified endothelial cell and epithelial cell proliferation following immunofluorescence.ResultsDMOG decreased mortality and incidence of severe NEC, increased intestinal VEGF expression, and increased intestinal villus endothelial and epithelial cell proliferation in experimental NEC. Inhibiting VEGFR2 signaling eliminated DMOG's protective effect on intestinal injury severity, survival, and endothelial cell proliferation while sparing DMOG's protective effect on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.ConclusionDMOG upregulates intestinal VEGF, promotes endothelial cell proliferation, and protects against intestinal injury and mortality in experimental NEC in a VEGFR2 dependent manner. DMOG's protective effect on the neonatal intestinal mucosa may be mediated via VEGFR2 dependent improvement of the intestinal microvasculature.

  6. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and 137 Cs γ rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and γ-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome

  7. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  8. “Melanosis” in the small and large intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of pigment in the intestinal mucosa is commonly observed by the endoscopist, especially within the colon, and particularly during investigations for constipation. Pigment may also be detected in the small intestine. Although labeled as melanosis, electron microscopy and X-ray analytical methods have provided evidence that this pigment is not melanin at all, but lipofuscin. Often, herbal remedies or anthracene containing laxatives are often historically implicated, and experimental ...

  9. Intestinal immune response to chicken Coccidiosis in the context of Th1 and Th17 response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidiosis is one of the most economically important diseases of the chickens caused by several different Eimeria spp. The primary target tissue of Eimeria parasites is the intestinal mucosa and coccidiosis infection destroys intestinal epithelium resulting in nutrient malabsorption, body weight lo...

  10. Determination of Intestine Inflammation Markers in Diagnostic Search in Children with Intestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pavlenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prevalence of bowel diseases in children is the second, trailing only the diseases of gastroduodenal zone and growing in recent years. Actual one is the problem of differential diagnosis of functional and inflammatory intestinal diseases using non-invasive methods on the prehospital stage and as a screening. Objective. Comparative analysis of fecal markers of the bowel inflammation (lactoferrine and calprotectine with endoscopy and morphology of intestinal mucosa in children. Matherials and methods. 49 children aged 6–18 years were examined. All patients underwent endoscopic and morphological study of the intestine, coprotest, determination of fecal markers of bowel inflammation (lactoferrin and calprotectine. Results. It is shown that in young children, the intestinal mucosa mainly hadn’t endoscopic changes, coprotest and morphological examination didn’t reveal the signs of inflammation, fecal intestinal inflammation markers were negative (p < 0.05. In the group of older children, moderate or marked catarrhal changes were found endoscopically, coprotest results were typical of inflammation in the intestines, it was morphologically proved the presence of chronic inflammation of the mucous membrane of the colon with signs of atrophy, the results of lactoferrin and calprotectine determination were positive (p < 0.05. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the evaluation of calprotectine and lactoferrin can be used in pediatric patients because of its non-invasiveness as diagnostic screening for the selection of patients for the further endoscopic examination and diagnostic search.

  11. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Anitha Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa.

  12. Endoscopic appearance of irradiated gastric mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sagher, L.I.; Van den Heule, B.; Van Houtte, P.; Engelholm, L.; Balikdjan, D.; Bleiberg, H.

    1979-09-01

    Irradiation of the epigastric area for gastric cancer may induce actinic lesions of the stomach characterized on endoscopic examination by ulcerations, haemorrhagic gastritis, fragility of the mucosa, thickening and congestion of the gastric folds.

  13. Laser Treatment of Oral Mucosa Tattoo

    OpenAIRE

    Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Hadzic, Sanja; Pasic, Enes

    2011-01-01

    The most common oral solitary pigmented lesion is the dental amalgam tattoo. It occurs as a result of colouring of the tissue by alien pigment which was administered intra or subepidermaly either intentionally or accidentally. The most common material used for the colouring of the oral mucosa is amalgam from amalgam fillings and metal particles from prosthetic restorations which are absorbed accidentally. The oral mucosa tattoos are most often found in the area of the marginal gingiva or the ...

  14. The gut microbiota elicits a profound metabolic reorientation in the mouse jejunal mucosa during conventionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aidy, Sahar; Merrifield, Claire A; Derrien, Muriel; van Baarlen, Peter; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Dekker, Jan; Holmes, Elaine; Claus, Sandrine P; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-09-01

    Proper interactions between the intestinal mucosa, gut microbiota and nutrient flow are required to establish homoeostasis of the host. Since the proximal part of the small intestine is the first region where these interactions occur, and since most of the nutrient absorption occurs in the jejunum, it is important to understand the dynamics of metabolic responses of the mucosa in this intestinal region. Germ-free mice aged 8-10 weeks were conventionalised with faecal microbiota, and responses of the jejunal mucosa to bacterial colonisation were followed over a 30-day time course. Combined transcriptome, histology, (1)H NMR metabonomics and microbiota phylogenetic profiling analyses were used. The jejunal mucosa showed a two-phase response to the colonising microbiota. The acute-phase response, which had already started 1 day after conventionalisation, involved repression of the cell cycle and parts of the basal metabolism. The secondary-phase response, which was consolidated during conventionalisation (days 4-30), was characterised by a metabolic shift from an oxidative energy supply to anabolic metabolism, as inferred from the tissue transcriptome and metabonome changes. Detailed transcriptome analysis identified tissue transcriptional signatures for the dynamic control of the metabolic reorientation in the jejunum. The molecular components identified in the response signatures have known roles in human metabolic disorders, including insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study elucidates the dynamic jejunal response to the microbiota and supports a prominent role for the jejunum in metabolic control, including glucose and energy homoeostasis. The molecular signatures of this process may help to find risk markers in the declining insulin sensitivity seen in human type 2 diabetes mellitus, for instance.

  15. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss Intestinal ischemia Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Intestinal Coccidia

    OpenAIRE

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycl...

  17. TNF suppresses acute intestinal inflammation by inducing local glucocorticoid synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph; Berger, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor (α) (TNF) exerts proinflammatory activities in a variety of diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, there is increasing evidence for antiinflammatory actions of TNF. In contrast, glucocorticoids (GCs) are steroid hormones that suppress inflammation, at least in part by regulating the expression and action of TNF. We report that TNF induces extraadrenal production of immunoregulatory GCs in the intestinal mucosa during acute intestinal inflammation. The absence of TNF results in a lack of colonic GC synthesis and exacerbation of dextran sodium sulfate–induced colitis. TNF seems to promote local steroidogenesis by directly inducing steroidogenic enzymes in intestinal epithelial cells. Therapeutic administration of TNF induces GC synthesis in oxazolone-induced colitis and ameliorates intestinal inflammation, whereas inhibition of intestinal GC synthesis abrogates the therapeutic effect of TNF. These data show that TNF suppresses the pathogenesis of acute intestinal inflammation by promoting local steroidogenesis. PMID:20439544

  18. Immunohistochemical study of jejunal graft mucosa cell populations during the initial adaptation phase in the host body in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Stefan; Jonecová, Zuzana; Varga, Ján; Staško, Pavel; Kovalčinová, Barbora; Maretta, Milan; Leško, Dušan; Veselá, Jarmila

    2013-10-01

    The character of the changes in cell populations within the jejunal graft mucosa during the initial adaptation phase in the host body was investigated. 24 adult male Wistar rats underwent intestinal heterotopic allotransplantation. Aorto-aortal and porto-caval anastomoses were performed using the end-to-side microsurgery technique. Graft tissues were compared to the intestinal tissues of the recipients. This study demonstrates that: (1) Distinct injury to the graft mucosa 1h after transplantation was accompanied by significant reduction in numbers of epithelial secretory cell populations. The injury was more intense in the mesenteric portion. Six hours after transplantation the graft mucosa was covered by a continuous epithelium, but the number of goblet and Paneth cells was found to be less than 30% of that in the recipient epithelium. (2) In comparison with recipients, myeloperoxidase-positive cell numbers increased significantly in the graft mucosa 1 h after transplantation. In the epithelial layer, denudation and destruction of villi was associated with a significant reduction in intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers. A significant decrease in mucosal mast cell numbers was detected 6 h after transplantation. They attained only 10% of the number found in the recipients. (3) Time-dependent changes in the graft mucosa revealed that CD163-positive cells increased significantly in the graft mucosa during 6 h after transplantation and reached the level found in the recipients. In contrast, the myeloperoxidase-positive cell population significantly decreased in the graft mucosa within the initial 6 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine presents a huge surface area to the outside environment, a property that is of critical importance for its key functions in nutrient digestion, absorption, and waste disposal. As such, the intestine is constantly exposed to dietary and microbial-derived foreign antigens, to which im...... of the role these subsets play in the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis and inflammation will help to define novel strategies for the treatment of intestinal pathologies and contribute to improved rational design of mucosal vaccines....... immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive...... immune responses. In the intestinal mucosa, DCs are located diffusely throughout the intestinal lamina propria, within gut-associated lymphoid tissues, including Peyer's patches and smaller lymphoid aggregates, as well as in intestinal-draining lymph nodes, including mesenteric lymph nodes...

  20. Effects of synbiotics on intestinal mucosal barrier in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xue

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Probiotics can improve the concentration of colonic probiotics, while synbiotics can improve probiotics concentration and mucosa thickness in colon, decrease L/M ratio and bacterial translocation. Synbiotics shows more protective effects on intestinal mucosal barrier in rats after cecectomy and gastrostomy and the intervention of specific antibiotics.

  1. Immunoelectrophoretic studies on pig intestinal brush border proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Sjöström, H; Norén, O

    1977-01-01

    Brush borders were prepared from pig intestinal mucosa and the membrane proteins solubilized with either Triton X-100 or papain. Proteins, thus released, were used as antigens to raise antisera in rabbits. The immunoglobulin G fractions were isolated and shown by the double layer immunofluorescence...

  2. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF ORAL MUCOSA LEUKOPLAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. KOLENKO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, substantial changes have occurred in the structure of oral mucosa diseases, in particular an increased ratio of precancerous diseases, so that an effective non-invasive detection of any sign of malignancy appears as an urgent and most actual task of dentistry. Aim: To study the proliferative activity of epithelial cells in Ki-67 antigenin patients with leukoplakia of the oral mucosa. Materials and method: A complex clinical and laboratory examination was performed on 155 patients with oral leukoplakia, who addressed the Operative Dentistry Department of the “A.A.Bogomolets” National Medical University of Kiev between 2010 and 2014. All patients have been subjected to a careful clinical examination, which included: dental anamnesis, visual inspection, oral examination and digital palpation of oral mucosa and tongue mucosa, biopsy of leukoplakia lesions for cytological and histological examination. Results: Histological evaluation of the material has been performed according to the WHO (2005 classification of leukoplakia. 10 (14% sites of unaltered mucosa, 10 (14% samples of hyperkeratosis without atypia, 14 (19% biopsy specimens of hyperkeratosis SIN1, 15 (21% – hyperkeratosis SIN2, 10 (14% - SIN3 and 13 (18% cases of squamous cell carcinoma were evidenced. Immunohistochemical investigation evidenced the presence of protein Ki-67 in the nuclei of epithelial cells. In the unmodified epithelium of the oral mucosa, all epithelial cells with stained nuclei are virtually located in the basal layer. Conclusion: Against the general increase of the proliferative activity of epithelial cells with increasing SIN, a characteristic distribution of proliferating cells in the thickness of the epithelium was revealed for each studied group, as follows: in the control group and in leukoplakia without atypia, immunopositive cells are located in the basal layer, in leukoplakia (SIN1, SIN2 and SIN3 – in parabasal position while, in squamous

  3. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  4. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa : autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veld, DCG; Witjes, MJH; Roodenburg, JLN; Sterenborg, HJCM; Papazoglou, TG; Wagnieres, GA

    2001-01-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study auto fluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in

  5. Ectopic intestinal glands after segmental small bowel irradiation in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, C.A.; Eriksson, B.; Johnsson, L.

    1983-01-01

    Following segmental irradiation of the small bowel, 5 of 64 cats demonstrated ectopic intestinal glands in the submucosal tissue. In addition, one of these 5 cats had foci of abnormal glands in the muscularis mucosae. In 2 of the 5 animals, cellular polymorphism, nucleolar irregularity and loss of cellular polarity were present in irradiation-induced ectopic intestinal glands. The review of the literature indicates that intestinal irradiation may induce intestinal adenocarcinomas with metastatic growth. The possibility that ectopic intestinal glands are precancerous lesions in the irradiated cat is discussed. (Auth.)

  6. Involved mechanisms in the radioprotector effect of the insulinic-1 type growth factor (IGF-1) in the mucous of the small intestine; Mecanismos involucrados en el efecto radioprotector del factor de crecimiento tipo insulinico-1 (IGF-1) en la mucosa del intestino delgado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad, N.; Medina, V.; Sambuco, L.; Gutierrez, A.; Nunez, M.; Martin, G.; Cricco, G.; Rivera, E.; Bergoc, R. [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires. Junin 956, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Croci, M.; Crescenti, E. [Instituto de Inmunooncologia, Cordoba 3200, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: rmbergoc@ffyb.uba.ar

    2006-07-01

    The use of radiant therapies in malignant tissues presents the inconvenience of affecting also to the healthy tissues, mainly when these present a high rate of proliferation like in the case of the mucous of the small intestine. The growth factor of insulinic-1 type (IGF-1) it has been pointed out as a possible protector of normal tissues under irradiation conditions. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the IGF-1 like radioprotector of the mucous of the small intestine in mice irradiated with 10 Gy to whole body, determining the histological characteristics of the tissue, the presence of apoptotic cells, the expression of antigen of cellular proliferation (PCNA) and of anti-oxidant enzymes. Four groups of mice were used: control, treated with IGF-1, irradiated and irradiated and treated with IGF-1. The two treated groups were injected subcutaneously with two dose by day of 2.5 {mu}g of IGF-I /0.1ml during four days (days 1 at 4). The two irradiated groups 10 Gy received to whole body the day 2. The day 5 all the animals were sacrificed and cuts of the mucous of the small intestine were obtained. The histological cuts were evaluated by tint with hematoxyline-eosin; the presence of apoptotic cells its were determined by the Tunnel method (Apoptag kit); the expression of PCNA, superoxide dependent dismutase of copper and zinc (CuZnSOD), superoxide dependent dismutase of manganese (MnSOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathion peroxidase (GPX), by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the treatment with IGF-1 preserves the partially histology of the mucous of the intestine, the expression of PCNA and the presence of apoptotic cells in the crypts in front of the irradiation. The CuZnSOD it was expressed mainly in the hairiness and, in smaller measure, in the crypts increase in the group IR+IGF-1. The IGF-1 produced the expression of MnSOD in the crypts and in the intestinal hairiness. The expression of CAT in the hairiness increase

  7. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury augments intestinal mucosal injury and bacterial translocation in jaundiced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksek, Yunus Nadi; Kologlu, Murat; Daglar, Gül; Doganay, Mutlu; Dolapci, Istar; Bilgihan, Ayse; Dolapçi, Mete; Kama, Nuri Aydin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local effects and degree of bacterial translocation related with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat obstructive jaundice model. Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three groups; including Group 1 (jaundice group), Group 2 (jaundice-ischemia group) and Group 3 (ischemia group). All rats had 2 laparotomies. After experimental interventions, tissue samples for translocation; liver and ileum samples for histopathological examination, 25 cm of small intestine for mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels and blood samples for biochemical analysis were obtained. Jaundiced rats had increased liver enzyme levels and total and direct bilirubin levels (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels were found to be high in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion groups (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal damage was more severe in rats with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion after bile duct ligation (p<0.05). Degree of bacterial translocation was also found to be significantly high in these rats (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosa is disturbed more severely in obstructive jaundice with the development of ischemia and reperfusion. Development of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in obstructive jaundice increases bacterial translocation.

  8. Heterotopic gastric mucosa associated with abdominal abscess formation, hypotension, and acute abdominal pain in a puppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobleman, Bridget N; Sinnott, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    To describe the presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa forming an abscess associated with acute abdominal pain and shock in a puppy. A 7-month-old male intact Shih-Tzu was presented to the emergency service for evaluation of a 12-hour history of vomiting and lethargy progressing to weakness. On presentation, the puppy was obtunded and hypotensive. Radiographs revealed an ill-defined mid-ventral abdominal mass. Ultrasound revealed an echogenic, fluid-filled mass associated with the jejunum. The puppy had an exploratory celiotomy and a 2 × 4 cm oval fluid-filled soft tissue mass was found to be intimately associated, but not communicating with, a section of the mid-jejunum. The mass and associated jejunum were removed via enterectomy. Histopathology of the resected mass revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa; bacterial culture of the fluid contained in the mass revealed heavy growth of Escherichia coli. The puppy recovered from surgery, was discharged from the hospital, and has had no further complications from this episode. Heterotopic gastric mucosa is commonly found incidentally on necropsy. When it has been associated with acute gastrointestinal signs, mechanical intestinal obstruction with or without perforation was noted. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to abscess formation and acute abdominal pain in the dog. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  9. [Nasal mucosa in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maciej; Betlejewski, Stanisław

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrinologic disease all over the world. 150 million people suffer from this disease, in Poland about 2 million. The disease on the basis of the onset and pathophysiology may be divided into type I and type II. Pathophysiologic changes include diabetic microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and neuropathy. The most common presentations in head and neck are otitis externa, hypoacusis, vertigo, disequilibrium, xerostomia, dysphagia, fungal and recurrent infections. The changes in nasal mucosa are not very well known. Only few papers concerned the problem. The main complaints of patients regarding the nose are xeromycteria, hyposmia and various degree of decreased patency of the nose. Chronic atrophic rhinitis, septal perforation, ulceration of nasal mucosa, alar necrosis, symptoms of staphylococcal or fungal infection can be found during otolaryngologic examination. The treatment in this group of patients should consist of systemic therapy of diabetes mellitus and on the other hand focal therapy with the use of a solution to moisten the nasal mucosa.

  10. Human papillomavirus infections in the oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautava, Jaana; Syrjänen, Stina

    2011-08-01

    Public awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the causal agent of cervical cancer and of the availability of HPV vaccines has increased. As a result, more patients are asking their dentists about oral HPV infection and its prevention by means of vaccination. Parents of pediatric dental patients also may be concerned when their children have HPV-associated oral lesions, because HPV infection still often is considered a purely sexually transmitted disease. In this review, the authors provide the latest information for dental professionals about HPV infection in the oral mucosa and in general. The authors searched PubMed for all studies regarding HPV infection in the oral mucosa, and they reviewed relevant publications focusing exclusively on HPV infections of the oral cavity. In selecting studies for review, the authors made a clear distinction between studies regarding HPV infections in the mouth and those regarding HPV infection in the oropharynx or in other head and neck sites. HPV can infect oral mucosa. A subgroup of oral cancer clearly is associated with HPV. Oral HPV infection is transmitted sexually but also can be transmitted from mouth to mouth and vertically from an infected mother during delivery. Persistent HPV infection in the oral mucosa might increase the risk of developing oral cancer. Regular and meticulous clinical examination is the dentist's most important tool in detecting HPV-associated changes in the oral mucosae. HPV-associated oral cancer may affect a population younger than that typically affected by HPV-independent oral cancer. Alcohol and tobacco use increase the risk of developing oral cancer, so good practice includes encouraging patients to avoid these habits. The available HPV vaccines cover the HPV genotypes found most commonly in the oral mucosa, but their protective effect against oral cancer remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2011 American Dental Association. All rights reserved.

  11. Subclinical exocrine pancreatic dysfunction resulting from decreased cholecystokinin secretion in the presence of intestinal villous atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousia-Arvanitakis, Sanda; Fotoulaki, Maria; Tendzidou, Kyriaki; Vassilaki, Constantina; Agguridaki, Christina; Karamouzis, Michael

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept that pancreatic dysfunction in patients having gluten sensitivity (celiac disease [CD]) or cow's milk protein enteropathy (CMPE) may result from the lack of pancreatic enzyme stimulation in the absence or decrease of cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion caused by villous atrophy. The following parameters were measured: plasma CCK in response to a fatty meal and human pancreatic fecal elastase in 24 patients with CD while on gluten-free diet and after gluten provocation and in 12 patients with CMPE at diagnosis and after a 6-month period of cow's milk-free diet. Intestinal mucosa morphology was examined by small bowel biopsy. Sixty-three controls having no organic gastrointestinal problems were investigated once at the time of diagnostic evaluation. Fasting CCK, obtained at a time when patients with CD or CMPE had normal intestinal mucosa, was significantly different from postprandial and comparable to that of the control group. Fasting CCK obtained from patients with villous atrophy was also statistically different, but not significantly, from the postprandial. Fasting and postprandial plasma CCK and fecal pancreatic elastase values from patients having normal intestinal mucosa were significantly higher than those obtained from patients with villous atrophy. Significant correlation of intestinal mucosa morphology and CCK with fecal elastase concentration was documented. Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction in individuals having villous atrophy may be the consequence of decreased CCK secretion. Cholecystokinin and pancreatic secretion is restored to normal, with intestinal mucosa regeneration.

  12. Intestinal Epithelial Cells Synthesize Glucocorticoids and Regulate T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Igor; Corazza, Nadia; Dick, Bernhard; Fuhrer, Andrea; Herren, Simon; Jakob, Sabine; Ayuni, Erick; Mueller, Christoph; Brunner, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important steroid hormones with widespread activities in metabolism, development, and immune regulation. The adrenal glands are the major source of GCs and release these hormones in response to psychological and immunological stress. However, there is increasing evidence that GCs may also be synthesized by nonadrenal tissues. Here, we report that the intestinal mucosa expresses steroidogenic enzymes and releases the GC corticosterone in response to T cell activation. T cell activation causes an increase in the intestinal expression of the steroidogenic enzymes required for GC synthesis. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that these enzymes are confined to the crypt region of the intestinal epithelial layer. Surprisingly, in situ–produced GCs exhibit both an inhibitory and a costimulatory role on intestinal T cell activation. In the absence of intestinal GCs in vivo, activation by anti-CD3 injection resulted in reduced CD69 expression and interferon-γ production by intestinal T cells, whereas activation by viral infection led to increased T cell activation. We conclude that the intestinal mucosa is a potent source of immunoregulatory GCs. PMID:15596520

  13. Alterações anatomopatologicas da mucosa gastrica associadas a infecção pelo helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Esther Buzaglo Dantas

    1996-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciencias da Saude Foram comparadas as alterações anátomo-patológicas observadas na mucosa gástrica (inflamação, atividade da gastrite, atrofia, metaplasia intestinal e folículos linfóides) de 64 pacientes portadores de infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori com as alterações presentes na mucosa de 20 pacientes sem infecção. Inflamação, atividade da gastrite e folículos linfóides foram mais freqüentes na mucosa de corpo e...

  14. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL/Lcn2) is upregulated in gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Illemann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. The infection is established early in life and persists lifelong leading to a sustained chronic inflammation. Iron is essential for most living organisms. Bacteria use several mechanisms to acquire iron...... characterized here the pattern of expression of NGAL/Lcn2 in gastric mucosa (45 non-neoplastic and 38 neoplastic tissue samples) and explored the connection between NGAL/Lcn2 expression and H. pylori infection. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high NGAL/Lcn2 expression in normal and gastritis-affected mucosa...... compared to low expression in intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. In normal and gastritis-affected mucosa (n=36 tissue samples), NGAL/Lcn2 was more frequently seen in epithelial cells located at the neck and base of the glands in H. pylori-positive cases than in similar epithelial cells...

  15. VISUAL ASSESSMENT OF THE MUCOSA OF THE COLON IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME IN THE DYNAMICS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Shklyaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The difficulty of its diagnosis related to the lack of specific markers of the disease. This article describes the visual changes of the mucosa of the colon in irritable bowel syndrome in the dynamics of medical and physiotherapy treatment. Materials and methods. Examined and treated 100 patients with endoscopically confirmed diagnosis of IBS. Of which 50 people were receiving pharmacotherapy and 50 –sinusoidal modulated currents — phoresis natural brine. Given the morphological evaluation of the mucosa of the intestine in the dynamics of treatment. Results. In IBS morpho-endoscopically detected dyskinetic disorders, minimal signs of nonspecific inflammation of the mucosa of the colon and primary degenerative manifestations. These changes are reversible and can be used to assess the quality of treatment. The high efficiency of SMC-phoresis natural brine in IBS.

  16. Protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on intestinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Jun-tao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To explore the protective effects of two types of ischemic postconditioning (IP on intestinal mucosa barrier in rabbits with crush injury of the hind limb. Methods: This study was conducted between August and December 2008 in the Department of Trauma Surgery, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. The model of crush injury to the hind limb of rabbits was firstly developed by a 25 kg object with the right hind limbs fixed by wooden splints, and then two types of IP were established, including occluding/opening the common iliac artery and vein alternatively (traditional IP, IP A and binding/loosening the proximum of the injured hind limb alternatively (modified IP, IP B. Thirty-six male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: IP A group, IP B group and control group, with 12 rabbits in each group. The serum levels of diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP were detected at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury. Pathological changes of ileum were examined at 24 hours after injury. Results: The serum levels of I-FABP at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury in both IP A and IP B groups had a significant decrease, compared with control group. DAO levels also showed the same change trend at 2 and 6 hours after injury, but showed no significant difference between two IP groups. No difference in pathological changes of ileum was found among the three groups. Conclusions: IP can protect intestinal mucosa barrier function on the model of hind limb crush injury in rabbits. Meanwhile the modified IP B shows the same protection as the traditional IP A, and is worth applying in clinic. Key words: Ischemic postconditioning; Crush syndrome; Intestinal mucosa

  17. Functional Properties of Lactobacillus mucosae Strains Isolated from Brazilian Goat Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Georgia Maciel Dias; de Abreu, Louricélia Rodrigues; do Egito, Antônio Silvio; Salles, Hévila Oliveira; da Silva, Liana Maria Ferreira; Nero, Luís Augusto; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Dos Santos, Karina Maria Olbrich

    2017-09-01

    The search for probiotic candidates among lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from food may uncover new strains with promising health and technological properties. Lactobacillus mucosae strains attracted recent research attention due to their ability to adhere to intestinal mucus and to inhibit pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract, both related to a probiotic potential. Properties of interest and safety aspects of three Lb. mucosae strains (CNPC006, CNPC007, and CNPC009) isolated from goat milk were investigated employing in vitro tests. The presence of genetic factors related to bile salt hydrolase production (bsh), intestinal adhesion properties (msa, map, mub, and ef-tu), virulence, and biogenic amine production were also verified. All strains exhibited the target map, mub, and ef-tu sequences; the msa gene was detected in CNPC006 and CNPC007 strains. Some of the searched sequences for virulence factors were detected, especially in the CNPC009 strain; all strains carried the hyl gene, related to the production of hyaluronidase. Lb. mucosae CNPC007 exhibited a high survival rate in simulated gastric and enteric conditions. Besides, all strains exhibited the bsh sequence, and CNPC006 and CNPC007 were able to deconjugate salts of glycodeoxycholic acid (GDC). Regarding technological properties for dairy product applications, a relatively higher milk acidification and clotting capacity, diacetyl production, and proteolytic activity were registered for CNPC007 in comparison to the other strains. Collectively, the results aim at Lb. mucosae CNPC007 as a promising probiotic candidate for application in dairy products, deserving further studies to confirm and explore its potential.

  18. Intestinal lineage commitment of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Gibson, Jason D; Miyamoto, Shingo; Sail, Vibhavari; Verma, Rajeev; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Nelson, Craig E; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Generating lineage-committed intestinal stem cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could provide a tractable experimental system for understanding intestinal differentiation pathways and may ultimately provide cells for regenerating damaged intestinal tissue. We tested a two-step differentiation procedure in which ESCs were first cultured with activin A to favor formation of definitive endoderm, and then treated with fibroblast-conditioned medium with or without Wnt3A. The definitive endoderm expressed a number of genes associated with gut-tube development through mouse embryonic day 8.5 (Sox17, Foxa2, and Gata4 expressed and Id2 silent). The intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 gene was also activated in the endodermal cells, whereas the Msi1, Ephb2, and Dcamkl1 intestinal stem cell markers were not. Exposure of the endoderm to fibroblast-conditioned medium with Wnt3A resulted in the activation of Id2, the remaining intestinal stem cell markers and the later gut markers Cdx2, Fabp2, and Muc2. Interestingly, genes associated with distal gut-associated mesoderm (Foxf2, Hlx, and Hoxd8) were also simulated by Wnt3A. The two-step differentiation protocol generated gut bodies with crypt-like structures that included regions of Lgr5-expressing proliferating cells and regions of cell differentiation. These gut bodies also had a smooth muscle component and some underwent peristaltic movement. The ability of the definitive endoderm to differentiate into intestinal epithelium was supported by the vivo engraftment of these cells into mouse colonic mucosa. These findings demonstrate that definitive endoderm derived from ESCs can carry out intestinal cell differentiation pathways and may provide cells to restore damaged intestinal tissue. Copyright © 2010 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral mucosa grafts for urethral reconstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urethral reconstruction has continued to present formidable and enormous challenges for urologic, ... reports reveal that split and full thickness skin grafts from the scrotum, penis, extragenital sites (ureter, saphenous ... Unlike other tissues, oral mucosa grafts are flexible, easy to harvest and trim and have.

  20. Histopathology of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.

    2006-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is a generalized term incorporating a disseminated collection of lymphoid tissues in multiple sites throughout the body. MALT sites that have been/are primarily studied include bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT), gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT),

  1. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg Bennike, Tue; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were...

  2. Ectopic gastric mucosa in the duodenal bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, H.; Oehler, G.; Schulz, A.; Rau, W.S.; Giessen Univ.; Giessen Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The radiological and clinical findings of 12 patients with ectopic gastric mucosa in the duodenal bulb are presented. This is a defined disease with characteristic radiological features: multiple small nodular defects of the contrast medium of 1-3 mm diameter. Histology shows complete heterotopia. Pathogenesis and clinical significance are discussed with reference to the literature on this subject. (orig.) [de

  3. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  4. Intestinal Conditioning After Cardiac Arrest: The Use of Normothermic Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in the Non-Heart-Beating Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxiao; Yao, Danhua; Li, Linlin; Lu, Chunlei; Li, Yousheng; Li, Jieshou

    2016-08-01

    The effect of normothermic extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (NECMO) on small bowel preservation in a clinically relevant large animal model of expected donation after cardiac death (eDCD) was evaluated. Thirty domestic crossbred donor pigs were divided into five groups. The first group served as the live donation (LD) group, the second group served as the donation after cardiac death (DCD) group, and the remaining were further assigned into three subgroups: E1 group (1 h NECMO support), E3 group (3 h NECMO support), and E5 group (5 h NECMO support). Pathology, electron microscopy, energy metabolism, cell apoptosis, and tight junction (TJ) protein expression level of intestinal mucosa and the level of plasma d-lactic acid were evaluated in normal, cardiac death and at the end of extracorporeal support, respectively. The mean arterial pressure and PaO2 were maintained over 60 and 267 mm Hg during NECMO support, respectively. One hour of extracorporeal support could improve the energy status in intestines of the DCD group. Although the histologic damage and apoptosis of the E1 group had no significant difference with those of the LD and DCD groups (P > 0.05), the levels of intestinal mucosa TJ protein decreased (P intestinal mucosa damage and intestinal permeability gradually increased, as well as the content of adenosine triphosphate in intestinal mucosa. The normothermic extracorporeal support for 1 h in DCD is beneficial for improving the energy status and viability of the bowel. However, the integrity of intestinal mucosa was destroyed gradually as extracorporeal support time went by. And the activation of intestinal epithelial apoptosis and hyperoxia might be the factors that lead to intestinal mucosa injury. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Symptoms and signs in individuals with serology positive for celiac disease but normal mucosa

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    Brandt Lena

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody serology is an important tool in the investigation of celiac disease (CD, but does not always correlate with mucosal appearance in the small intestine. Patients with positive CD serology but normal mucosa (Marsh 0 are at increased risk of future CD. In this study we describe a model for identifying and characterizing individuals with normal mucosa but positive CD serology. Such individuals are sometimes referred to as having latent CD. Methods The records of ten Swedish pathology departments were used to identify individuals with biopsies indicating normal duodenal/jejunal mucosa. Using the national personal identification number, these data were linked with CD serology data (antigliadin, antiendomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies; and we thereby identified 3,736 individuals with normal mucosa but positive CD serology. Two independent reviewers then manually reviewed their biopsy reports to estimate comorbidity. We also randomly selected 112 individuals for validation through patient chart review. Results The majority of the 3,736 individuals were females (62%. Children (0–15 years made up 21.4%. The median number of biopsy specimen was 3. Our review of biopsy reports found that other gastrointestinal comorbidity was rare (inflammatory bowel disease: 0.4%; helicobacter pylori infection: 0.2%. Some 22% individuals selected for patient chart review had a relative with CD. The most common symptoms among these individuals were diarrhea (46% and abdominal pain (45%, while 26% had anemia. Although 27% of the individuals selected for validation had been informed about gluten-free diet, only 13% were adhering to a gluten-free diet at the end of follow-up. Conclusion Individuals with positive CD serology but normal mucosa often have CD-like symptoms and a family history of CD.

  6. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier disruption following burn injury.

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    Chuanli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control or 30% total body surface area (TBSA full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg, an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury.

  7. Intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae of Toxoplasma gondii induced acute ileitis in mice harboring a human gut microbiota.

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    Eliane von Klitzing

    Full Text Available Within seven days following peroral high dose infection with Toxoplasma gondii susceptible conventionally colonized mice develop acute ileitis due to an underlying T helper cell (Th -1 type immunopathology. We here addressed whether mice harboring a human intestinal microbiota developed intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae upon ileitis induction.Secondary abiotic mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and associated with a complex human intestinal microbiota following peroral fecal microbiota transplantation. Within three weeks the human microbiota had stably established in the murine intestinal tract as assessed by quantitative cultural and culture-independent (i.e. molecular 16S rRNA based methods. At day 7 post infection (p.i. with 50 cysts of T. gondii strain ME49 by gavage human microbiota associated (hma mice displayed severe clinical, macroscopic and microscopic sequelae indicating acute ileitis. In diseased hma mice increased numbers of innate and adaptive immune cells within the ileal mucosa and lamina propria and elevated intestinal secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, IL-12 and nitric oxide could be observed at day 7 p.i. Ileitis development was accompanied by substantial shifts in intestinal microbiota composition of hma mice characterized by elevated total bacterial loads and increased numbers of intestinal Gram-negative commensals such as enterobacteria and Bacteroides / Prevotella species overgrowing the small and large intestinal lumen. Furthermore, viable bacteria translocated from the inflamed ileum to extra-intestinal including systemic compartments. Notably, pro-inflammatory immune responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract as indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in extra-intestinal (i.e. liver and kidney and systemic compartments including spleen and serum.With respect to the intestinal microbiota composition "humanized" mice display

  8. Denervation of nasal mucosa induced by posterior nasal neurectomy suppresses nasal secretion, not hypersensitivity, in an allergic rhinitis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Hironobu; Kondo, Kenji; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kikuta, Shu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ueha, Rumi; Kagoya, Ryoji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The posterior nasal nerve is the dominant source of the parasympathetic, sympathetic, and sensory fibers that innervate the nasal respiratory mucosa. Therefore, a posterior nasal neurectomy (PNN) is thought to induce denervation of the nasal mucosa and relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic action of PNN remain unknown. To investigate the impact of PNN-induced denervation of the nasal mucosa on allergic rhinitis, we developed a rat model of PNN and examined the effects of PNN on allergic rhinitis in ovalbumin-sensitized rats. This rat model of PNN was characterized by the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides (eg, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and neuropeptide Y) in the nasal respiratory mucosa. These animals exhibited nasal gland and goblet cell hypertrophy in the septal mucosa and atrophy of the submucosal gland in the lateral nasal wall, as well as reduced nasal secretion due to deficient acetylcholine synthesis. In an ovalbumin-sensitized model of allergic rhinitis, PNN also induced the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides in the nasal mucosa and suppressed nasal secretion. However, PNN did not affect mucosal thickening, eosinophil and mast cell infiltration, interleukin-4 and interferon-γ mRNA expression, and allergic symptoms (ie, sneezing and nasal scratching). These results suggest that the peripheral nerves and corresponding neuropeptides regulate nasal secretion, but not hypersensitivity, in allergic rhinitis, and that allergic rhinitis-related mucosal reactions occur in a highly denervated mucosa after PNN. Posterior nasal neurectomy may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperrhinorrhea, but not allergic rhinitis hypersensitivity.

  9. Management of anterior urethral strictures with buccal mucosa: Our ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdelwahab Elkassaby

    2016-03-02

    Mar 2, 2016 ... The oral mucosa is the mucous membrane lining the inner aspect of the mouth. It has two major layers, namely ... epithelium, found almost everywhere else in the oral cavity, includ- ing buccal, labial and alveolar mucosa [5,6]. ..... Biology of oral mucosa and esophagus. J Natl. Cancer Inst 2001;(29):7–15.

  10. Evaluation value of intestinal flora detection for intestinal mucosal inflammation and immune response in patients with ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the evaluation value of intestinal flora detection for intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response in patients with ulcerative colitis. Methods: The patients who were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in Zigong Fifth People’s Hospital between March 2015 and February 2017 were selected as the UC group, and those who were diagnosed with colonic polyps were selected as the control group. Fresh excreta were collected to detect the number of intestinal flora, and the diseased intestinal mucosa tissue was collected to detect the expression of inflammatory response molecules and immune cell transcription factors. Results: enterococcus contents in intestinal tract and TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC group were significantly higher than those of control group while bifidobacteria contents in intestinal tract and SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group; TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC patients with grade II and grade III flora disturbance were significantly higher than those of UC patients with normal flora and grade I flora disturbance while SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of UC patients with normal flora and grade I flora disturbance; TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC patients with grade III flora disturbance were significantly higher than those of UC patients with grade II flora disturbance while SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of UC patients with grade II flora disturbance. Conclusion: The intestinal flora disturbance in patients with ulcerative colitis can result in inflammatory response activation and immune response disorder.

  11. PEG-functionalized microparticles selectively target inflamed mucosa in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, Christian; Schmidt, Carsten; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Fischer, Dagmar; Stallmach, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The systemic therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by oral administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents is characterized by an increased probability of adverse drug reactions. A successful treatment with a simultaneous reduction in adverse events may be achieved by the administration of micro- and nanosized targeted drug delivery systems, which accumulate selectively in inflamed mucosal areas without systemic absorption. We described in a first in vivo study in IBD patients a significantly enhanced, but minor accumulation of non-functionalized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles in ulcerous lesions very recently. The aim of this study was therefore the assessment of an increased targeting potential of different non-, chitosan- and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized PLGA micro- and nanoparticles to inflamed intestinal mucosa compared to healthy mucosa. For the quantification of nano- and microparticles, fluoresceinamine-labeled-PLGA was synthesized by carbodiimide reaction. Fluorescent chitosan-, PEG-, and non-functionalized PLGA micro- and nanoparticles with mean hydrodynamic diameters of 3000 nm and 300 nm were prepared by solvent evaporation technique. The targeting efficiencies in terms of particle translocation and deposition were investigated in Ussing chamber experiments. Healthy and inflamed macrobiopsies were received from routine endoscopic examinations of patients with IBD as well as control patients. One-hundred and one Ussing chamber experiments of patients with IBD (Crohn's disease: n=7 and ulcerative colitis: n=9) as well as healthy control patients (n=5) were performed. Histomorphological and electrophysiological investigations of inflamed mucosal tissues confirmed a significant alteration of mucosal barrier integrity in IBD patients (TER: healthy: 34.1 Ω cm(2); inflamed: 21.6 Ωc m(2); p=0.034). In summary, nanoparticles showed an increased translocation and deposition compared to microparticles in

  12. [Pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Mannagetta, J; Hutarew, G

    2012-09-01

    The oral mucosa contains melanocytes, even though one might not suspect this when examining white subjects. Drug-induced pigmentation is usually irregularly distributed over the oral mucosa; typical causes are contraceptives and tetracyclines. Localized traumatic pigmentation can be due to injuries contaminated by foreign material (dust). Not infrequently an amalgam tattoo can be seen, caused by introduction of amalgam during dental treatment with rotating instruments. Focal melanosis is harmless. Neoplastic pigmentation is rare. Melanotic nevi are small with indistinct borders. Malignant melanoma occurs predominantly on the maxilla or hard palate. Frequently it has already metastasized by the time of diagnosis. Verification by biopsy is essential if a lesion has suddenly appeared, is extensive, elevated, with irregular pigmentation and has no obvious cause.

  13. Leishmaniasis mucosa y otras lesiones destructivas centrofaciales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rodríguez

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Varias enfermedades producen lesiones del área centrofacial. Una de las más frecuentes en nuestro medio es la leishmaniasis destructivas mucosa. Como el INS es un centro de estudio de leishmaniasis, se atendieron pacientes o sus biopsias con afecciones del macizo centrofacial, primariamente remitidas con el diagnóstico clínico de leihsmaniasis mucosa. En un período de 7 años (1987-1993, se estudiaron 134 biopsias de estos pacientes. El diagnóstico de leishmaniasis mucosa fue definitivo en 26 casos, por demostración del amastigote con la coloración de hematoxilina eosina y el mismo diagnóstico se estableció por patrón histopatológico solamente, en 27 casos. Una técnica inmunoenzimática para demostrar los amastigotes no fue satisfactoria. La perforación banal del tabique nasal (52 biopsias es la entidad que el clínico y el patólogo confunden con mayor frecuencia con la leishmaniasis mucosa. Otras entidades demostradas fueron la paracoccidioidomicosis (3, histoplasmosis (2, rinosporidiosis (2. esporotricosis (l, tuberculosis bucal (3, lepra leprornatosa (l, escleroma nasal (2, granulomatosis de Wegener (2, linfomas angiocéntricos (4, aspiración crónica de cocaína (l, y carcinoma escamocelular palatino (1. La biopsia, luego de la historia clínica, es el pilar esencial para identificar y manejar adecuadamente estas lesiones, que pueden originar destrucción facial grave, a veces letal, si no se dispone del diagnóstico preciso y del tratamiento oportuno.

  14. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Acute colonic ileus; Colonic pseudo-obstruction; Idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Ogilvie syndrome; Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Paralytic ileus - pseudo-obstruction

  15. Intestinal myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  16. Enteric Virome Sensing-Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Rebecca N; Krug, Anne B; Eisenächer, Katharina

    2018-03-23

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  17. Enteric Virome Sensing—Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N. Metzger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  18. Butter feeding enhances TNF-alpha production from macrophages and lymphocyte adherence in murine small intestinal microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Yoichi; Hokari, Ryota; Miura, Soichiro; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Oyama, Tokushige; Kurihara, Chie; Nagata, Hiroshi; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2007-11-01

    Dietary fat is known to modulate immune functions. Intake of an animal fat-rich diet has been linked to increased risk of inflammation; however, little is known about how animal fat ingestion directly affects intestinal immune function. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of butter feeding on lymphocyte migration in intestinal mucosa and the changes in adhesion molecules and cytokines involved in this effect. T-lymphocytes isolated from the spleen were fluorescence-labeled and injected into recipient mice. Butter was administered into the duodenum, and villus microvessels of the small intestinal mucosa were observed under an intravital microscope. mRNA expression of adhesion molecules and cytokines in the intestinal mucosa were determined by quantitative PCR. The effect of butter feeding on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA expression of intestinal macrophages was also determined. Intraluminal butter administration significantly increased lymphocyte adherence to intestinal microvessels accompanied by increases in expression levels of adhesion molecules ICAM-1, MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1. This accumulation was significantly attenuated by anti-MAdCAM-1 and anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Butter administration significantly increased TNF-alpha in the lamina proprial macrophages but not interleukin-6. Anti-TNF-alpha treatment attenuated the enhanced expression of adhesion molecules induced by butter administration. T-lymphocyte adherence to microvessels of the small intestinal mucosa was significantly enhanced after butter ingestion. This enhancement is due to increase in expression levels of adhesion molecules of the intestinal mucosa, which is mediated by TNF-alpha from macrophages in the intestinal lamina propria.

  19. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  20. Esterase activity able to hydrolyze dietary antioxidant hydroxycinnamates is distributed along the intestine of mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mette Findal; Kroon, P A; Williamson, G

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids are effective antioxidants and are abundant components of plant cell walls, especially in cereal bran. For example, wheat and rye brans are rich sources of the hydroxycinnamates ferulic acid, sinapic acid, and p-coumaric acid. These phenolics are part of human and animal diets...... hydroxycinnamates are distributed throughout the intestinal tract of mammals. In rats, the cinnamoyl esterase activity in the small intestine is derived mainly from the mucosa, whereas in the large intestine the esterase activity was found predominantly in the luminal microflora. Mucosa cell-free extracts obtained...... and wheat brans. Hydrolysis by intestinal esterase(s) is very likely the major route for release of antioxidant hydroxycinnamic acids in vivo. Udgivelsesdato: 2001-Nov...

  1. Amniotic fluid and development of the immature intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette Viberg

    in demand. Amniotic Fluid (AF) is the natural source of fetal EN throughout gestation in ammals. Fetal AF swallowing stimulates somatic and gastrointestinal growth during fetal development, and modulates the development of the intestinal mucosa. In addition, AF protects the fetus against infections...... gastrointestinal structure and function in preterm pigs”. Accordingly, the aim was to test the effects of enteral administration of AF as MEN during PN, as a supplement to a suboptimal enteral diet, or both in a preterm pig model of NEC. To evaluate the effects of AF, NEC sensitivity, intestinal digestive...... function and innate immunity of the small intestine, and to establish an experimental model to investigate the inflammatory responses of the small intestine to microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) ex vivo. The expression of certain host defense genes was affected by gestational age...

  2. TREM-1 Promotes Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchun Dang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP can cause intestinal barrier dysfunction (IBD, which significantly increases the disease severity and risk of mortality. We hypothesized that the innate immunity- and inflammatory-related protein-triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 contributes to this complication of SAP. Thus, we investigated the effect of TREM-1 pathway modulation on a rat model of pancreatitis-associated IBD. In this study we sought to clarify the role of TREM-1 in the pathophysiology of intestinal barrier dysfunction in SAP. Specifically, we evaluated levels of serum TREM-1 and membrane-bound TREM-1 in the intestine and pancreas from an animal model of experimentally induced SAP. TREM-1 pathway blockade by LP17 treatment may suppress pancreatitis-associated IBD and ameliorate the damage to the intestinal mucosa barrier.

  3. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a dog: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Bicalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare disorder that affects gastrointestinal propulsion. It may be secondary to several pathological conditions or it may develop without a known cause. A 1.2 year-old intact Pug bitch had a history of vomiting and constipation, which were followed by diarrhea and distended abdomen. Hypomotility and dilation of the small intestine, which was filled with gas, were observed during laparotomy. Histologically, full thickness biopsy specimens demonstrated a severe loss and degeneration of leiomyocytes in the inner and outer muscular layers of the intestinal wall, whereas there was a marked hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells in the lamina propria, and extremely thickened muscularis mucosae arranged in bundles oriented in different directions with marked hypertrophy and hyperplasia of leiomyocytes. Distribution of leiomyocytes was further characterized by immunohistochemistry. These findings support the diagnosis of intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a Pug, associated with degeneration and loss of leiomyocytes in the muscular layer.

  4. The Production of the Oral Mucosa of Antiendomysial and Anti—Tissue-Transglutaminase Antibodies in Patients with Celiac Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Compilato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a lifelong, T cell—mediated enteropathy, triggered by the ingestion of gluten and related prolamins in genetically susceptible subjects, resulting in minor intestinal mucosal injury, including villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and subsequent nutrient malabsorption. Although serological tests for antiendomysial (EMA and anti—tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG autoantibodies are used to screen and follow up on patients with CD, diagnostic confirmation is still based on the histological examination of the small intestinal mucosa. Although the small intestinal mucosa is the main site of the gut involved in CD, other mucosal surfaces (such as gastric, rectal, ileal, and esophageal belonging to the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT can also be involved. A site that could be studied less invasively is the mouth, as it is the first part of the gastrointestinal system and a part of the GALT. Indeed, not only have various oral ailments been reported as possible atypical aspects of CD, but it has been also demonstrated that inflammatory changes occur after oral supramucosal application and a submucosal injection of gliadin into the oral mucosa of CD patients. However, to date, only two studies have assessed the capacity of the oral mucosa of untreated CD patients to EMA and anti-tTG antibodies. In this paper, we will review studies that evaluate the capacity of the oral mucosa to produce specific CD autoantibodies. Discrepancies in sensitivity from the two studies have revealed that biopsy is still not an adequate procedure for the routine diagnostic purposes of CD patients, and a more in-depth evaluation on a larger sample size with standardized collection and analysis methods is merited. However, the demonstration of immunological reactivity to the gluten ingestion of the oral mucosa of CD, in terms of IgA EMA and anti-tTG production, needs to be further

  5. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome) What is intestinal failure? Intestinal failure occurs when a significant portion of the small ... intestine does. Who is at risk for intestinal failure? N Babies (usually premature) who have had surgery ...

  6. Colonic chicken skin mucosa: association with juvenile polyps in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, M J; Subramony, C; Bishop, P R; Parker, P H

    2001-03-01

    Chicken skin mucosa is a newly described endoscopic finding associated with colonic neoplasms in adults. Chicken skin mucosa was sought in children with juvenile polyps to determine the prevalence, endoscopic features, and location. An alternative theory is proposed for the pathogenic mechanism of this finding. Children having colonoscopy and polypectomy were prospectively evaluated for the presence of chicken skin mucosa. The location of the polyps was determined at colonoscopy; the size of removed polyps was measured during processing of samples in pathology. Biopsies from colonic chicken skin mucosa were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and mucicarmine. Over a 1-yr period, 27 juvenile polyps were removed from 15 children at colonoscopy. Eleven of 15 children (73%) were found to have polyps with chicken skin mucosa; overall, 43% of the polyps had associated chicken skin mucosa. Chicken skin mucosa-positive polyps were larger than chicken skin mucosa-negative polyps and were only found in the rectosigmoid colon. Lipid-laden macrophages were found in all samples of chicken skin mucosa tested. Chicken skin mucosa is a common finding in children with juvenile polyps. It probably is the result of local mucosal trauma, rather than a preneoplastic lesion.

  7. Intestinal micropatches for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Wong, Jessica; Gogoi, Rohan; Brown, Tyler; Mitragotri, Samir

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a major public health issue that has almost reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Injectable insulin has been typically utilized for the management of this chronic disease. However, lack of patient compliance with injectable formulations has spurred the development of oral insulin formulations, which although appealing, face several delivery challenges. We have developed novel mucoadhesive intestinal patches, several hundred micrometers in dimension (micropatches) that address the challenges of oral insulin delivery. The micropatches adhere to the intestinal mucosa, release their drug load rapidly within 30 min and are effective in lowering blood glucose levels in vivo. When insulin-loaded micropatches were administered with a permeation enhancer and protease inhibitor, a peak efficacy of 34% drop in blood glucose levels was observed within 3 h. Efficacy further improved to 41% when micropatches were administered in multiple doses. Here, we describe the design of micropatches as an oral insulin formulation and report their in vivo efficacy.

  8. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults - diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocić Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disorder, characterized by abnormal dilation of intestinal lymphatic vessels and extensive enteric loss of lymph rich in plasma proteins, lymphocytes and chylomicrons. The main characteristics of the disease are hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, lymphocytopenia, and more rarely, the deficit of liposoluble vitamins and anemia. Except for primary, there are secondary lymphangiectasia, associated with celiac disease, malignant, infective and inflammatory diseases of the small intestine, fibrosis, liver and cardiovascular diseases. Case report. A male, 33 years of age, presented for his medical examination suffering from diarrhea and edema. The diagnosis was established upon the histological examination of a small intestine biopsy during double balloon enteroscopy, which revealed changes only in one segment of the intestine examined. Such a finding was later confirmed by the video endoscopy capsule. Conclusion. The diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia is usually established before the age of 3, but it can also be diagnosed in adults. The diagnosis is based on the histological analysis of the intestinal mucosa biopsy, obtained by endoscopic procedures. The diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is also made upon the exclusion of secondary causes.

  9. Teduglutide reduces need for parenteral support among patients with short bowel syndrome with intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle B; Pertkiewicz, Marek; Messing, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, might restore intestinal structural and functional integrity by promoting growth of the mucosa and reducing gastric emptying and secretion. These factors could increase fluid and nutrient absorption in patients with short bowel syndrome...... with intestinal failure (SBS-IF). We performed a prospective study to determine whether teduglutide reduces parenteral support in patients with SBS-IF....

  10. Bio-physical characteristics of gastrointestinal mucosa of celiac patients: comparison with control subjects and effect of gluten free diet-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanacci Vincenzo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal mucosa is leaky in celiac disease (CD, and this alteration may involve changes in hydrophobicity of the mucus surface barrier in addition to alteration of the epithelial barrier. The aims of our study were i to compare duodenal hydrophobicity as an index of mucus barrier integrity in CD patients studied before (n = 38 and during gluten- free diet (GFD, n = 68, and in control subjects (n = 90, and ii to check for regional differences of hydrophobicity in the gastro-intestinal tract. Methods Hydrophobicity was assessed by measurement of contact angle (CA (Rame Hart 100/10 goniometer generated by a drop of water placed on intestinal mucosal biopsies. Results CA (mean ± SD of distal duodenum was significantly lower in CD patients (56° ± 10° than in control subjects (69° ± 9°, p corpus > rectum > duodenum > oesophagus > ileum. Conclusions We conclude that the hydrophobicity of duodenal mucous layer is reduced in CD patients, and that the resulting decreased capacity to repel luminal contents may contribute to the increased intestinal permeability of CD. This alteration mirrors the severity of the mucosal lesions and is not completely reverted by gluten-free diet. Intestinal hydrophobicity exhibits regional differences in the human intestinal tract.

  11. Effects of colchicine on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid. Ultrastructural, biochemical, and radiochemical studies in fasting rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-01-01

    The involvement of microtubules in the transepithelial transport of exogenous lipid in intestinal absorptive cells has been suggested. Using electronmicroscopic, biochemical, and radiochemical methods, researchers have studied the effects of the antimicrotubular agent colchicine on the intestinal mucosa and on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid of rats in the fasting state. After colchicine treatment, the concentration of triglycerides in intestinal mucosa of rats fasted for 24 h doubled, and electron microscopic studies showed a striking accumulation of lipid particles in absorptive epithelial cells of the tips of jejunal villi. These findings suggest that colchicine interferes with the intestinal transepithelial transport of endogenous lipoproteins. Additional studies, using an intraduodenal pulse injection of [ 14 C]linoleic acid, showed that colchicine does not affect the uptake of fatty acids by intestinal mucosa. However, it had divergent effects on fatty acid esterification, enhancing their incorporation into triglycerides relative to phospholipids, and caused a significant accumulation of endogenous diglycerides, triglycerides, and cholesterol esters within the absorptive intestinal epithelium. Detailed ultrastructural and morphometric studies revealed a decrease of visible microtubules, and a displacement of the smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, it is shown that after colchicine treatment, microvilli appear at the lateral plasma membrane of intestinal absorptive cells, a change not previously reported to our knowledge. Thus, our study shows that colchicine causes significant changes in enterocyte ultrastructure and colchicine perturbs the reesterification of absorbed endogenous fatty acids and their secretion in the form of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the enterocyte

  12. Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yosuke; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Takayama, Shun; Mukai, Rieko; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Majima, Atsushi; Yasuda-Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Fukui, Akifumi; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2018-03-25

    Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ostadrahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is acomplex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumorproperties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates therisk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisiverole in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship betweenconsumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa.Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred totwo hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire(FFQ and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve tofind the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis.Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024.Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honeyamount - 0.533(honey amount2 +1.833×10-5(honey amount7.Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis ingastric mucosa.

  14. Infecciones virales en piel y mucosas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Martínez G., Dra.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Diversos virus pueden infectar la piel y las mucosas de los seres humanos, manifestándose en diferentes patologías, de acuerdo a la edad, género y estado inmunológico. Un grupo importante de éstos tiene capacidad de replicar en células epiteliales, originando cuadros clínicos en los cuales se evidencia la destrucción celular o bien la hiperplasia del tejido infectado. Gran parte de estos virus persisten en células infectadas por años y tienen la capacidad de reactivarse y de manifestar nuevamente enfermedades cutáneas o mucosas. En algunos casos, ésta sólo se expresa de manera subclínica en una excreción del virus por secreciones que son fuente de infección. En los últimos años, los avances en técnicas moleculares han permitido contar con metodologías diagnósticas cada vez más sensibles, específicas y rápidas. Así como también el progreso en el área de vacunas y antivirales nos entrega mayores herramientas profilácticas y terapéuticas.

  15. Elevation of HO-1 Expression Mitigates Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Restores Tight Junction Function in a Rat Liver Transplantation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjin Chi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study was aimed at investigating whether elevation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression could lead to restoring intestinal tight junction (TJ function in a rat liver transplantation model. Methods. Intestinal mucosa injury was induced by orthotopic autologous liver transplantation (OALT on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemin (a potent HO-1 activator and zinc-protoporphyrin (ZnPP, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, were separately administered in selected groups before OALT. The serum and intestinal mucosa samples were collected at 8 hours after the operation for analysis. Results. Hemin pretreatment significantly reduced the inflammation and oxidative stress in the mucosal tissue after OALT by elevating HO-1 protein expression, while ZnPP pretreatment aggravated the OALT mucosa injury. Meanwhile, the restriction on the expression of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin was removed after hemin pretreatment. These molecular events led to significant improvement on intestinal barrier function, which was proved to be through increasing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and reducing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB in intestinal injured mucosa. Summary. Our study demonstrated that elevation of HO-1 expression reduced the OALT-induced intestinal mucosa injury and TJ dysfunction. The HO-1 protective function was likely mediated through its effects of anti-inflammation and antioxidative stress.

  16. Elevation of HO-1 Expression Mitigates Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Restores Tight Junction Function in a Rat Liver Transplantation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinjin; Yao, Weifeng; Xia, Hua; Jin, Yi; Li, Xi; Cai, Jun; Hei, Ziqing

    2015-01-01

    Aims. This study was aimed at investigating whether elevation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression could lead to restoring intestinal tight junction (TJ) function in a rat liver transplantation model. Methods. Intestinal mucosa injury was induced by orthotopic autologous liver transplantation (OALT) on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemin (a potent HO-1 activator) and zinc-protoporphyrin (ZnPP, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor), were separately administered in selected groups before OALT. The serum and intestinal mucosa samples were collected at 8 hours after the operation for analysis. Results. Hemin pretreatment significantly reduced the inflammation and oxidative stress in the mucosal tissue after OALT by elevating HO-1 protein expression, while ZnPP pretreatment aggravated the OALT mucosa injury. Meanwhile, the restriction on the expression of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin was removed after hemin pretreatment. These molecular events led to significant improvement on intestinal barrier function, which was proved to be through increasing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and reducing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) in intestinal injured mucosa. Summary. Our study demonstrated that elevation of HO-1 expression reduced the OALT-induced intestinal mucosa injury and TJ dysfunction. The HO-1 protective function was likely mediated through its effects of anti-inflammation and antioxidative stress. PMID:26064429

  17. Radioprotective effect of captopril on the mouse jejunal mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Se-Chul; Park, Jeong-Mi; Jang, Hong-Seok [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    Captopril, an inhibitor of angiotensin I converting enzyme, has been shown to modify radiation damage and prevent radiation injury of normal tissue in rats and pigs. The present study was carried out to determine whether captopril would reduce radiation changes in the proximal small bowel in mice. Mice were subjected to whole body irradiation with 9 Gy or 15 Gy. Captopril was administered in drinking water at a regimen of 62.5 mg/kg/day (captopril group I) and 125 mg/kg/day (captopril group II), continuously from 7 days before irradiation to the end of each designed experiment. The jejunal damage was evaluated microscopically by crypt count per circumference and by histologic damage grading. Crypt number in the sham-irradiated control was 133 {plus_minus} 6.8/circumference. In both captopril group I and II, crypt numbers and histologic scores were not significantly different from those in the normal group. The 9 Gy and 15 Gy radiation alone groups showed significantly lower crypt counts and histologic scores compared with the sham-irradiated control group (p<0.05). The groups exposed to 9 Gy radiation plus captopril I and II showed significantly higher crypt counts and lower histologic damage scores on the third day, and lower histologic damage scores on the fifth day compared with the 9 Gy radiation alone group (p<0.05). The 15 Gy radiation plus captopril I and II groups had significantly higher crypt counts and lower histologic damage scores on the third day than those of the 15 Gy radiation alone group (p<0.05). All mice of the 15 Gy radiation group succumbed to intestinal radiation death. Our results suggest that captopril provides protection from acute radiation damage to the jejunal mucosa in mice. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Intestinal obstruction in germ-free dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, J B; Robinson, J W; Menge, H; Winistörfer, B

    1981-08-01

    Mechanical occlusions were created in the intestines of four germ-free dogs. At the time of the operation, a control loop of mid-intestine was perfused in vivo and then excised for examinations in vitro, which included the determination of the equilibrium uptake of phenylalanine and of beta-methyl-glucoside, the influx kinetics of phenylalanine and morphometric analysis of the mucosa by microdissection and stereological techniques. Seven days after establishment of the occlusion the abdomen was reopened, and loops above and below the occlusion were perfused, and then excised for the same tests in vitro. Unlike occluded loops of conventional dogs, the intestine of the germ-free animal above the occlusion does not secrete water and electrolytes into the lumen. Its transport properties in vitro do not differ from those of the control loop, and the morphometric analyses reveal only slight changes in villus structure. The loop below the obstruction undergoes marked atrophy, as has been observed in conventional dogs. The results suggest that the copious secretion that occurs above an intestinal obstruction in normal animals is due to the presence of an abundant bacterial population in the obstruction fluid.

  19. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and human gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Cancers of the gastrointestinal tract account for 25 % of all cancers and for 9 % of all causes of cancer death in the world, so gastrointestinal cancers represent a major health problem. In the past decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the interactions between the gastrointestinal content and the onset of neoplasia. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. Probiotics are mono or mixed cultures of live microorganisms that might beneficially affect the host by improving the characteristics of indigenous microflora. Although the effects of probiotic administration has been intensively investigated in vitro, in animal models, in healthy volunteers, and in some human gastrointestinal diseases, very little is still known about the possible cross-interactions among probiotic administration, changes of intestinal flora, and the neoplastic transformation of gastrointestinal mucosa. Theoretically, probiotics are able to reduce cancer risk by a number of mechanisms: (a) binding and degradation of potential carcinogens; (b) quantitative, qualitative and metabolic alterations of the intestinal microflora; (c) production of anti-tumorigenic or anti-mutagenic compounds; (d) competitive action towards pathogenic bacteria; (e) enhancement of the host's immune response; (f) direct effects on cell proliferation. This review will attempt to highlight the literature on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastrointestinal mucosa and in particular on their effects on cell proliferation.

  20. "Melanosis" in the small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-07-21

    Deposition of pigment in the intestinal mucosa is commonly observed by the endoscopist, especially within the colon, and particularly during investigations for constipation. Pigment may also be detected in the small intestine. Although labeled as melanosis, electron microscopy and X-ray analytical methods have provided evidence that this pigment is not melanin at all, but lipofuscin. Often, herbal remedies or anthracene containing laxatives are often historically implicated, and experimental studies in both humans and animal models have also confirmed the intimate relationship with these pharmacological or pseudo-pharmacological remedies. The appearance of melanosis coli during colonoscopy is largely due to pigment granule deposition in macrophages located in the colonic mucosa. The pigment intensity is not uniform, being more intense in the cecum and proximal colon compared to the distal colon. Possibly, this reflects higher luminal concentrations of an offending agent in the proximal compared to distal colon, differential absorption along the length of the colon, or finally, differences in macrophage distribution within the colon. Mucosal lymphoid aggregates normally display a distinct absence of pigment producing a "starry sky" appearance, especially in the rectosigmoid region. Interestingly, some focal, usually sessile, colonic mucosal neoplastic lesions, rather than submucosal lesions, may be better appreciated as pigment deposition may be absent or limited. If detected, removal and further histopathologic analysis of the polyp may be facilitated.

  1. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intestinal folate binding protein (FBP) and folate absorption in the suckling rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.B.; Selhub, J.

    1986-01-01

    The folate in milk is bound to high affinity FBPs but it is unknown whether this binding affects intestinal transport of milk folate in the suckling rat. The authors examined the FBP activity of segments of the GI tract in fed and fasting states. Under fed conditions, the FBP activity in the mucosa of the stomach and proximal small intestine were similar (0.28 and 0.32 pMole folic acid binding/mg protein, N.S.). Both demonstrated less activity than the mucosa of the distal small intestine (1.31 pMole/mg protein, P 3 pteryolmonoglutamate (H 3 PGA) was examined in suckling rats by the intestinal loop model. Unbound H 3 PGA demonstrated greater lumenal disappearance in the proximal segment of the small intestine compared to the distal segment (79% vs. 56%, P 3 PGA demonstrated greater lumenal disappearance in the distal segment (36% vs. 21%, p < .005). That porton of FBP activity in the distal small intestine that disappears with fasting may represent FBP absorbed from the lumen of the intestine. The FBP-bound folate in milk appears to be absorbed in the suckling rat by a mechanism that favors the distal small intestine and is different from the mechanism responsible for absorption of the unbound folate

  3. Steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus elucidated by particle diffusion and peptide permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; García-Díaz, María; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    The mucus lining of the gastrointestinal tract epithelium is recognized as a barrier to efficient oral drug delivery. Recently, a new in vitro model for assessment of drug permeation across intestinal mucosa was established by applying a biosimilar mucus matrix to the surface of Caco-2 cell...

  4. Expression of CD45RB functionally distinguishes intestinal T lymphocytes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, T. ten; The Olle, F.; Berkhout, M.; Bruggeman, J.P.; Vyth-Dreese, F.A.; Slors, J.F.M.; Deventer, S.J.H. van; Velde, A.A. te

    2004-01-01

    The importance of CD45RB expression on T cells was already shown in mice where CD45RB(high) expression determines pathogenic potential. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO on CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa and in the circulation of patients with

  5. Expression of CD45RB functionally distinguishes intestinal T lymphocytes in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hove, Tessa; The Olle, F.; Berkhout, Marloes; Bruggeman, Joost P.; Vyth-Dreese, Florry A.; Slors, J. Frederik M.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; te Velde, Anje A.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of CD45RB expression on T cells was already shown in mice where CD45RB(high) expression determines pathogenic potential. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO on CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa and in the circulation of patients with

  6. Fækal calprotectin er en klinisk anvendelig markør for intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theede, Klaus; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Nordgaard-Lassen, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Faecal calprotectin is a biomarker for inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Faecal calprotectin has the ability to detect inflammatory causes of gastrointestinal symptoms and to distinguish these from irritable bowel syndrome. The test is very sensitive but not specific to any particular...

  7. Intestinal perforation in a two-year-old child with eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agertoft, A; Husby, S; Høst, A

    1991-01-01

    A two-year-old boy underwent a laparatomy for an intestinal perforation due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis. He had marked peripheral blood eosinophilia and a small duodenal biopsy showed heavy eosinophilic infiltration in the mucosa. After 1 1/2 year on a restricted diet, a control duodenal biopsy...

  8. Condyloma acuminatum of the buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rashmi; Pandey, Manoj; Shukla, Mridula; Kumar, Mohan

    2014-06-01

    Condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced disease. It is usually transmitted sexually, and it frequently occurs in the anogenital area. A finding of condyloma acuminatum in the oral cavity is rare. Besides HPV, other risk factors for oral condyloma include chewing betel quid and smoking. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a 2 × 2-cm verrucous white patch on his buccal mucosa. He was habituated to both betel quid and cigarette smoking. A biopsy of the lesion identified it as a verrucous hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium with HPV-related koilocytic changes. The lesion was excised, and further histopathology identified it as condyloma acuminatum. The patient was disease-free 9 months postoperatively. The possibility of condyloma acuminatum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an oral white lesion. The most common treatments are surgical excision, cryosurgery, electrocautery, and laser excision. There is no known role for antiviral therapy.

  9. Lichenoid reaction to carbamazepine in the oral mucosa: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Gabriela; Bruno, Ingrid S; Seo, Juliana; Hirota, Silvio K; Acay, Renata; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions are more common in skin, but they may also occur in the oral mucosa. It is difficult to diagnose these lesions due to their clinical similarity to the idiopathic oral lichen planus lesions. The present article reports a case of lichenoid reaction in oral mucosa associated to the use of carbamazepine, emphasizing the diagnostic process.

  10. How to harvest buccal mucosa from the cheek

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G. Barbagli

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... In1894,Sapezhko,asurgeonfromKiev,Ukraine,wasthefirstto fully describe the use of buccal mucosa from the lip and mouth, in 4 patients requiring urethral surgery for different urethral stricture dis- eases [2,3]. In 1902, Tyrmos, a surgeon from Odessa, Ukraine, also reported the use of buccal mucosa in 2 ...

  11. Effect of acupuncture intervention on the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response balance in animals with ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Fan Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of acupuncture intervention on the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response balance in animals with ulcerative colitis (UC. Methods: Adult, male SPF SD rats were selected and randomly divided into the control group, UC group and acupuncture group, and then the acupuncture intervention was established after the UC animal model was established. 14 d after intervention, the expression of inflammatory mediators and Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cytokines in intestinal mucosa, and the levels of inflammatory mediators and Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cytokines in serum were detected. Results: NF-kB, HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 levels in serum of UC group were significantly higher than those of control group while IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 levels in serum were significantly lower than those of control group; NF-kB, HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as HMGB-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-17 levels in serum of acupuncture group were significantly lower than those of UC group while IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa as well as IL-4, IL-5 and TGF-β1 levels in serum were significantly higher than those of UC group. Conclusions: Acupuncture intervention can regulate the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response of animals with ulcerative colitis.

  12. Ex vivo permeation characteristics of venlafaxine through sheep nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pund, Swati; Rasve, Ganesh; Borade, Ganesh

    2013-01-23

    Venlafaxine, a dual acting antidepressant is a new therapeutic option for chronic depression. Depression is a common mental disorder associated with the abnormalities in neuronal transport in the brain. Since the nose-to-brain pathway has been indicated for delivering drugs to the brain, we analyzed the transport of venlafaxine through sheep nasal mucosa. Transmucosal permeation kinetics of venlafaxine were examined using sheep nasal mucosa mounted onto static vertical Franz diffusion cells. Nasal mucosa was treated with venlafaxine in situ gel (100 μl; 1% w/v) for 7h. Amount of venlafaxine diffused through mucosa was measured using validated RP-HPLC method. After the completion of the study histopathological investigation of mucosa was carried out. Ex vivo studies through sheep nasal mucosa showed sustained diffusion of venlafaxine with 66.5% permeation in 7h. Transnasal transport of venlafaxine followed a non-Fickian diffusion process. Permeability coefficient and steady state flux were found to be 21.11×10(-3) cmh(-1) and 21.118 μg cm(-2)h(-1) respectively. Cumulative amount permeated through mucosa at 7h was found to be 664.8 μg through an area of 3.14 cm(2). Total recovery of venlafaxine at the end of the permeation study was 87.3% of initial dose distributed (i) at the mucosal surface (208.4 μg; 20.8%) and (ii) through mucosa (664.8 μg; 66.5%). Histopathological examinations showed no significant adverse effects confirming that the barrier function of nasal mucosa remains unaffected even after treatment with venlafaxine in situ gel. Permeation through sheep nasal mucosa using in situ gel demonstrated a harmless nasal delivery of venlafaxine, providing new dimension to the treatment of chronic depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of small intestinal enzyme activities and their relationship with some gut regulatory peptides in grazing sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C L; Lang, X; Wu, P J; Casper, D P; Li, F D

    2017-08-01

    Growth depends on an animal's capacity to digest and assimilate ingested nutrients, and insufficient supply and impairment will constrain lamb growth. Eight groups of Alpine Finewool lambs were harvested on 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 d to measure pH and enzymatic activities in the duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum mucosa or digesta. From the duodenum to the ileum the pH of intestinal mucosa and digesta increased, whereas pH changed very little with age. The trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, lactase, and α-amylase activities observed at birth decreased by d 3, followed by a nonuniform enzymatic response in the small intestine. The trypsin activity increased from d 3 to peak, at d 21, followed by a decline. Chymotrypsin activity followed the same general trend but with smaller responses in activities. Trypsin demonstrated greater enzymatic activity than chymotrypsin at the same age. The lipase activity of small intestinal mucosa and digesta changed little with age. The lactase activity was high at birth, decreased by d 3, and then increased, followed by a decrease as lambs approached weaning. α-Amylase activity was similar in the small intestinal mucosa and digesta at birth but increased with age for the duodenum and proximal jejunum. Plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK), secretin, and gastrin were positively correlated ( 0.05). Small intestinal enzymatic activities exist and may be sufficient to enhance lamb growth via appropriate nutrient supplementation.

  14. Effects Aerosol of Industrial Bleach and Detergent Mixture on Mucosa Layer and Lamina Mucosa Conjunctiva in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Vaezi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Today bleach and detergents are being frequently used and some people use their mixture for more cleaning. Because of chemical interaction of bleach and detergent, chlorine gas was released and thereby it could be dangerous for human health. This study examined the effects of exposed toxic mixture of bleach and detergent on the Mucosa layer and Lamina mucosa conjunctiva in the mice. In this study, 42 adult male mice NMRI race weighing 35-40 gr and from age 8 to 10 weeks were divided into 6 experimental groups and one control group. Experimental groups 1-2-3 with the use of chamber, the exposed 20 minutes were exposed to spray the amount 1 cc of mixture of bleach and detergent by nebulizer. Experimental groups 4-5-6 were for 35 minutes to inhale the same amount of material. Mice killed at 24-48-72 hours after exposed and the Mucosa Layer and Lamina mucosa conjunctiva tissue was studied pathology. In the study of microscopic sections prepared of mouse mucosa layer and Lamina mucosa conjunctiva tissue experimental group comparison with the control group, significant decrease was observed in mucosa layer the have (p ≤ 0.001  and significant decrease was observed in the Lamina mucosa have(p ≤ 0. 01,  p ≤ 0.001. As a result, increasing the exposed time of mixing bleach and detergent, as time passed, increasing the tissue damage and changes.

  15. Intestinal microbiome landscaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss

  16. Role of Intestinal Bacteria in Gliadin-Induced Changes in Intestinal Mucosa: Study in Germ-Free Rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cinová, Jana; De Palma, G.; Štěpánková, Renata; Kofroňová, Olga; Kverka, Miloslav; Sanz, Y.; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2011), s. 1-10 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GA303/08/0367; GA ČR GPP304/10/P406; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200710; GA AV ČR KJB500200904; GA MŠk 2B06155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : CELIAC - DISEASE * ALTERED EXPRESSION * MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  17. Atrofia mucosa/translocação bacteriana na sepse experimental em ratos Wistar Mucosal atrophy/bacterial translocation in experimental sepsis in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando José d'Acampora

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avalizar a relação entre lesão mucosa e translocação bacteriana. MÉTODO: Utilizou-se 50 ratos distribuídos em 5 grupos: 1.Controle: injeção de inóculo padrão de Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2.Dreno: injeção do inóculo padrão e drenagem da cavidade abdominal, após 6 horas, 3.Lavado: injeção do inóculo padrão e lavagem da cavidade abdominal, após 6 horas, 4.Lavado + dreno: injeção do inóculo padrão e após 6 horas, drenagem e lavagem da cavidade, 5.Normal: avaliação histológica da parede intestinal normal. Após o óbito, realizou-se hemocultura e cultura peritoneal. Realizou-se medida da espessura total da parede do jejuno e da camada mucosa em vilosidades seccionadas de forma longitudinal. RESULTADOS: Na hemocultura, houve crescimento de Pseudomonas aeruginosa e Escherichia coli em 90% e 52,5% dos animais. Na cultura peritoneal, houve crescimento de P. aeruginosa, E. coli e Klebsiella sp em 87,5%, 85% e 5% dos animais. Quanto a altura da camada mucosa e da parede intestinal, não houve alteração estatisticamente significativa entre os 5 grupos. CONCLUSÃO: A sepse aguda não causou alteração na camada mucosa do intestino delgado e a translocação ocorrida não pode ser considerada como decorrente de uma lesão da mucosa intestinal.PURPOSE: Observe the relation between small intestine's mucosal injury and bacterial translocation. METHODS: 50 adult female rats were distributed in 5 groups: 1. Control: intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2. Drainage: intraperitoneal injection of P. aeruginosa and drainage of the abdominal cavity, after 6 hours, 3. Washed: intraperitoneal injection of P. aeruginosa and washing of the abdominal cavity, after 6 hours, 4. Washed + drainage: intraperitoneal injection of P. aeruginosa plus drainage and washing of the cavity, after 6 hours, 5. Normal: evaluation of the normal intestinal wall. After death, blood and peritoneal cultures were performed. Fragments of

  18. Bile acid receptor TGR5 overexpression is associated with decreased intestinal mucosal injury and epithelial cell proliferation in obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Guang; Xie, Xiao-Li; Yin, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Lei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Na; Zhao, Dong-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Hui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Bile acids stimulate intestinal epithelial proliferation in vitro. We sought to investigate the role of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in the protection of intestinal epithelial proliferation in obstructive jaundice. Intestinal tissues and serum samples were obtained from patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and from bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. Intestinal permeability and morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa were observed. The functions of TGR5 in cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial injury were determined by overexpression or knockdown studies in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Internal biliary drainage was superior to external biliary drainage in recovering intestinal permeability and mucosal histology in patients with obstructive jaundice. In BDL rats, feeding of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased intestinal mucosa injury. The levels of PCNA, a marker of proliferation, increased in response to CDCA feeding and were paralleled by elevated TGR5 expression. CDCA upregulated TGR5 expression and promoted proliferation in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with LPS. Overexpression of TGR5 resulted in increased PCNA, cell viability, EdU incorporation, and the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas knockdown of TGR5 had the opposite effect. Our data indicate that bile acids promote intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and decrease mucosal injury by upregulating TGR5 expression in obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Duodenal mucosa FOXP3 expression in different etiologies of lymphocytic duodenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Luis; Rodríguez-Martín, Laura; Hernando, Mercedes; Jiménez, Marcos; Monteserín, Luz; Alvarez-Cuenllas, Begoña; Ruiz de Morales, Jose M; Calleja, Sara; Vivas, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    In celiac disease there is an increase of lymphocytes expressing FOXP3 in the intestinal mucosa associated with varying degrees of villous atrophy. Our aim was to evaluate FOXP3 expression in duodenal mucosa with lymphocytic enteritis according to aetiology and correlation with lymphocytes T-γδ. We compared three adult patient groups suffering lymphocytic enteritis: celiacs following a gluten-free diet (n=12), first-degree relatives of celiac patients with genetic risks (n=14) and patients with functional dyspepsia (n=14), along with a control group not suffering from duodenal enteritis (n=16). The population of duodenal lymphocytes was analysed by immunohistochemistry assays for CD3+ characterisation and FOXP3 expression. Quantification of lymphocytes T-γδ in duodenal mucosa was performed by flow cytometry in fresh tissue samples. Presence of lymphocytes T-γδ was significantly higher in the group of celiac individuals compared to the group of relatives of these individuals (37.44 vs 5,52: p<0.0001) and the group with functional dyspepsia (37.44 vs 11.76: p=0.008). FOXP3 expression was also significantly higher in the celiac group than in the groups of relatives (18.85 vs 6.31; p=0.001) and functional dyspepsia patients (18.85 vs 7.61; p=0.023). The proportion of lymphocytes T-γδ and FOXP3- expressing lymphocytes was similar in the control group to that in the relatives or functional dyspepsia groups. Lymphocytic enteritis associated to celiac disease shows an increase of FOXP3 expression and lymphocytes T-γδ that is not detected in other etiologies of enteritis.

  20. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  1. Circulating Zonulin Correlates with Density of Enteroviruses and Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells in the Small Bowel Mucosa of Celiac Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Raikkerus, Helerin; Kadaja, Lumme; Talja, Ija; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2017-02-01

    Impaired intestinal integrity, including increased permeability of the small bowel mucosa, has been shown in patients with celiac disease (CD) as well as with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Zonulin (ZO, pre-haptoglobin), a tight junction regulator, plays a particular role in the regulation of intestinal barrier function and in the pathogenesis of the above-mentioned diseases. To investigate whether enteroviruses (EVs) and immunoregulatory cells are associated with intestinal permeability in patients with CD alone and with coexistent T1D. Altogether 80 patients (mean age 10.68 ± 6.69 years) who had undergone small bowel biopsy were studied. Forty patients with functional dyspepsia and normal small bowel mucosa formed the control group. The circulating ZO level in sera was evaluated using ELISA. The densities of EV, FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO+) dendritic cells (DCs) and glutamic acid dexarboxylase (GAD)65+ cells in small bowel mucosa were investigated by immunohistochemistry. The expression analysis of FOXP3, tight junction protein 1 (TJP1), gap junction (GJA1), IDO and CD103 genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. The ZO level was higher in CD patients compared to subjects with a normal small bowel mucosa, particularly in those with Marsh IIIc atrophy (p = 0.01), and correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.63; p = 0.0003) and IDO+ DCs (r = 0.58; p = 0.01) in the small bowel mucosa. The density of GAD65+ epithelial cells was correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.59; p = 0.03) and IDO+ DCs (r = 0.78; p = 0.004) in CD patients. The relative expression of FOXP3 mRNA in the small bowel mucosa tissue was significantly higher in patients with CD, compared to subjects with a normal mucosa, and correlated with the density of EV (r = 0.62; p = 0.017) as well as with the relative expression of IDO mRNA (r = 0.54; p = 0.019). The CD is associated with elevation of the circulating ZO level, the value of which

  2. Soluble Dietary Fiber Can Protect the Gastrointestinal Mucosa Against Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal damage is a serious problem in patients, but effective therapy is not available at present. The effects of feeding conditions and dietary fiber (DF) on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions were examined in mice. NSAIDs (indomethacin, diclofenac, loxoprofen, aspirin) were administered to male mice in various feeding conditions. Gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after NSAID dosing. Regular diets, dietary-fiber-free diet (FFD), and diets supplemented with various types of DF were given to mice. NSAIDs produced marked ulcers and perforations selectively in the gastric antrum when they were administered after feeding of regular diet for 2 h after a 22-h fast. When NSAIDs, except for aspirin, were administered in unfasted conditions, they caused marked lesions in the small intestine. When mice were given FFD, antral ulcers and intestinal lesions induced by indomethacin (30 mg/kg, s.c.) markedly decreased, but when cellulose, an insoluble DF, was added to FFD, the lesions appeared again. The addition of pectin, a soluble DF, to regular diet containing 4.1 % crude fiber significantly inhibited the formation of antral ulcers as well as intestinal lesions caused by indomethacin or diclofenac (100 mg/kg, s.c.). The results indicated that NSAIDs given after feeding of diet produced ulcers selectively in the gastric antrum. The severity of the gastrointestinal lesions depended on the concentration of soluble or insoluble DF in food. Our results suggest that soluble DF such as pectin may be a safe means for protecting the gastrointestinal mucosa against NSAIDs.

  3. Diabetes mellitus and oral mucosa alterations: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Alliny de Souza; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Nassar, Patrícia Oehlmeyer; Massucato, Elaine Maria Sgavioli; Orrico, Silvana Regina Perez

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of oral mucosa alterations in patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify possible risk factors related to oral mucosa alterations. 146 patients with type 2 diabetes and 111 age- and gender-matched healthy controls subjects were consecutively recruited from Araraquara School of Dentistry to answer a structured questionnaire designed to collect demographic data as well as current and former history of diabetes. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was carried out by a stomatologist. A higher prevalence of oral mucosa alterations was found in patients with diabetes than in patients without diabetes (pdiabetes (odds ratio 9.9 IC 5.11-19.16) and smoking habit (odds ratio 3.17 IC 1.42-7.12) increased the odds of oral mucosa alterations significantly. Patients with diabetes mellitus not only showed an increased prevalence of oral mucosa alterations but also a significant percentage of potentially malignant disorders. These findings elucidate the necessity of regular clinical examination to ensure early diagnosis and prompt management of oral mucosa lesions in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The oral mucosa in leprosy: a clinical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice; Neto Pimentel, Dalva Regina; Hirata, Cleonice Hitomi Watashi; de Avelar Alchorne, Maurício Mota

    2006-01-01

    Multibacillary leprosy may involve the oral mucosa, with or without apparent lesions. There are few studies that deal with this issue in the era of multidrug therapy. To assess the frequency of oral mucosa involvement in multibacillary leprosy patients. A transversal study with twenty non-treated multibacillary leprosy patients. The patients were treated in Dracena, São Paulo, between 2000 and 2002. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was carried out. All patients were submitted to jugal mucosa, soft palate and tongue biopsies, in altered or in pre-established sites. The cross-sections were stained by techniques of hematoxilin-eosin and Ziehl-Neelsen. Granuloma and alcohol-acid-resistant bacilli findings determined the specific histopathological involvement. The study involved 19 patients with an average of 2.5 years of disease progression. Specific histopathological involvement occurred in the tongue and soft palate of one lepromatous patient with an apparently normal oral mucosa. (1) Clinical alterations in the oral mucosa does not imply disease involvement, it is necessary to have histopathological confirmation. (2) Apparent specific clinical alterations are rare. (3) The clinically normal oral mucosa can show specific histopathological involvement.

  5. Probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa: effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Francesco; Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella

    2014-10-07

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, accounting for about 10% of newly diagnosed neoplasms. In the last decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the relations between the intestinal microbiota and the onset of both gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal neoplasms. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. The internationally accepted definition of probiotics is live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. The possible effects on the gastrointestinal tract following probiotic administration have been investigated in vitro and in animal models, as well as in healthy volunteers and in patients suffering from different human gastrointestinal diseases. Although several evidences are available on the use of probiotics against the carcinogen Helicobacter pylori, little is still known about the potential cross-interactions among probiotics, the composition and quality of intestinal flora and the neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa. In this connection, a significant role in cell proliferation is played by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine). These small amines are required in both pre-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue to sustain the cell growth and the evidences here provided suggest that probiotics may act as antineoplastic agents in the stomach by affecting also the polyamine content and functions. This review will summarize data on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastric mucosa and in particular on their ability in modulating cell proliferation, paying attention to the polyamine metabolism.

  6. Protein synthesis and intestinal flora in piglets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namioka, Shigeo

    1980-01-01

    Utilization of non-protein nitrogen (NPN) by the flora in piglet colon was studied by administration of 15 N-urea and 15 N-ammonium salt to aseptic piglets and to SPF piglets which had been acclimatized to a clean environment after settling of intestinal flora. Administration of 15 N-urea did not result in 15 N uptake by any tissue-constituting protein at any site of the aseptic piglets, almost all 15 N being excreted into the urine. In contrast, the tissue and skeletal muscle of the SPF piglets showed incorporated 15 N from urea. Urea was converted, by urease of the intestinal flora, into NH 3 , which was absorbed from the mucosa of the intestinal tract to reach the liver where it was synthesized into glutamic acid, followed by conversion into various amino acids. 15 N-ammonium administration produced a significant amount of 15 N even in the tissue protein of the aseptic piglets. After NPN administration, the liver protein-constituting amino acid fraction showed 15 N-labeling of almost all essential, as well as non-essential amino acids. Culture of colonic flora with 15 N-urea revealed 15 N-labeling of all amino acids that constituted bacterial cells, indicating the presence of urea recycling mediated by bacterial urease in single rumen animals.(Chiba, N.)

  7. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Innovative video capsule endoscopy for detection of ubiquitously elongated small intestinal villi in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Heinzow, Hauke Sebastian; Domschke, Wolfram; Meister, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a rare non-familial disorder with multiple gastrointestinal polyps and ectodermal changes. Adenomatous and carcinomatous changes have been reported. Video capsule endoscopy is a useful non-invasive tool to reveal polypoid lesions of the gastrointestinal tract suspicious for malignancy. We report a case of a patient with CCS with excessively elongated intestinal villi resembling dense sea grass under water as well as multiple polyps of the intestinal mucosa r...

  9. Effect of taurine on intestinal recovery following intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhotnik, I; Aranovich, I; Ben Shahar, Y; Bitterman, N; Pollak, Y; Berkowitz, D; Chepurov, D; Coran, A G; Bitterman, A

    2016-02-01

    Taurine (TAU) is a sulfur-containing amino acid that is involved in a diverse array of biological and physiological functions, including bile salt conjugation, osmoregulation, membrane stabilization, calcium modulation, anti-oxidation, and immunomodulation. Several studies have established that treatment with TAU significantly protects cerebral, cardiac and testicular injury from ischemia-reperfusion (IR). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of TAU on intestinal recovery and enterocyte turnover after intestinal IR injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) Sham rats that underwent laparotomy, (2) Sham-TAU rats that underwent laparotomy and were treated with intraperitoneal (IP) TAU (250 mg/kg); (3) IR-rats that underwent occlusion of both superior mesenteric artery and portal vein for 30 min followed by 48 h of reperfusion, and (4) IR-TAU rats that underwent IR and were treated with IP TAU (250 mg/kg) immediately before abdominal closure. Intestinal structural changes, Park's injury score, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 24 h following IR. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, p-ERK and caspase-3 in the intestinal mucosa was determined using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Treatment with TAU resulted in a significant decrease in Park's injury score compared to IR animals. IR-TAU rats also demonstrated a significant increase in mucosal weight in jejunum and ileum, villus height in jejunum and ileum and crypt depth in ileum compared to IR animals. IR-TAU rats also experienced significantly lower apoptotic indices in jejunum and ileum which was accompanied by a higher Bcl-2/Bax ratio compared to IR animals. Treatment with taurine prevents gut mucosal damage and inhibits intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis following intestinal IR in a rat.

  10. Interactions of Giardia sp. with the intestinal barrier: Epithelium, mucus, and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Thibault; Amat, Christina B; Motta, Jean-Paul; Manko, Anna; Buret, André G

    2017-01-02

    Understanding how intestinal enteropathogens cause acute and chronic alterations has direct animal and human health perspectives. Significant advances have been made on this field by studies focusing on the dynamic crosstalk between the intestinal protozoan parasite model Giardia duodenalis and the host intestinal mucosa. The concept of intestinal barrier function is of the highest importance in the context of many gastrointestinal diseases such as infectious enteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and post-infectious gastrointestinal disorders. This crucial function relies on 3 biotic and abiotic components, first the commensal microbiota organized as a biofilm, then an overlaying mucus layer, and finally the tightly structured intestinal epithelium. Herein we review multiple strategies used by Giardia parasite to circumvent these 3 components. We will summarize what is known and discuss preliminary observations suggesting how such enteropathogen directly and/ or indirectly impairs commensal microbiota biofilm architecture, disrupts mucus layer and damages host epithelium physiology and survival.

  11. Renal and intestinal hexose transport in familial glucose-galactose malabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsas, Louis J.; Hillman, Richard E.; Patterson, Joseph H.; Rosenberg, Leon E.

    1970-01-01

    Glucose transport by jejunal mucosa in vitro and kidney in vivo was investigated in a 3 yr old patient with congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption, her family, and 16 normal volunteers. Glucose transport by normal human jejunal mucosa was concentrative, saturable, sodium and energy dependent, and exhibited competitive inhibition. Biopsy specimens from six normal controls and an asymptomatic 5 yr old brother of the proband accumulated glucose to concentrations 16 times that in the incubation medium. The proband's mucosa was unable to concentrate glucose throughout a 60 min incubation period. Both of her parents and a half sister demonstrated impaired glucose transport. Their values fell between normal and those of the proband. Influx of glucose was impaired but efflux of glucose from the mucosa of these three heterozygotes was identical with that in three normal controls. A kinetic analysis indicated a reduced capacity (Vmax), but a normal affinity (Km) for glucose transport by their intestinal mucosa. All subjects accumulated fructose similarly. Renal glucose transport was investigated using renal glucose titration techniques. A partial defect in renal glucose reabsorption was found in the proband. Her brother's titration curve was similar to that of seven normal volunteers. We conclude that familial glucose-galactose malabsorption is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, that heterozygotes for this disorder are detectable and demonstrate a reduced capacity for glucose transport, and that absent intestinal glucose transport is accompanied by partial impairment of renal glucose transport. Images PMID:5415683

  12. Effects of jackbean seed meal on the intestinal mucosa of juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... fish diets. However, production of high quality fishmeal has not met the needs for fish feed production and a future shortage is possible. To forestall this possible situation, investigation of alternative ... of such meals significantly improved growth performance. (Osuigwe et al., 2002). ..... London Academic Press.

  13. Effects of jackbean seed meal on the intestinal mucosa of juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Rainbow trout. (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Aquacult. 161: 27 – 43. D'Mello JPF (1995). Anti-nutritional substances in legume seeds in: JPF D'Mello and C. Devendra (eds.). tropical Legumes in Animal.

  14. Host-pathogen Interaction at the Intestinal Mucosa Correlates With Zoonotic Potential of Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; de Greeff, Astrid; van Rooijen, Willemien J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Streptococcus suis has emerged as an important cause of bacterial meningitis in adults. The ingestion of undercooked pork is a risk factor for human S. suis serotype 2 (SS2) infection. Here we provide experimental evidence indicating that the gastrointestinal tract is an entry site...

  15. Serotonin Immunoreactive Cells and Nerve Fibers in the Mucosa of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hydroxytryptamine) immunoreactivity in the pyloric mucosa of the rat stomach. The immunoreactive elements included the endocrine cells, mast cells and mucosal nerve fibers in the lamina propria. The immunopositive endocrine cells were oval in ...

  16. Autophagy and tight junction proteins in the intestine and intestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-An A. Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium (IE forms an indispensible barrier and interface between the intestinal interstitium and the luminal environment. The IE regulates water, ion and nutrient transport while providing a barrier against toxins, pathogens (bacteria, fungi and virus and antigens. The apical intercellular tight junctions (TJ are responsible for the paracellular barrier function and regulate trans-epithelial flux of ions and solutes between adjacent cells. Increased intestinal permeability caused by defects in the IE TJ barrier is considered an important pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, diarrhea and malnutrition in humans and animals. In fact, defects in the IE TJ barrier allow increased antigenic penetration, resulting in an amplified inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, necrotizing enterocolitis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, the beneficial enhancement of the intestinal TJ barrier has been shown to resolve intestinal inflammation and apoptosis in both animal models of IBD and human IBD. Autophagy (self-eating mechanism is an intracellular lysosome-dependent degradation and recycling pathway essential for cell survival and homeostasis. Dysregulated autophagy has been shown to be directly associated with many pathological processes, including IBD. Importantly, the crosstalk between IE TJ and autophagy has been revealed recently. We showed that autophagy enhanced IE TJ barrier function by increasing transepithelial resistance and reducing the paracellular permeability of small solutes and ions, which is, in part, by targeting claudin-2, a cation-selective, pore-forming, transmembrane TJ protein, for lysosome (autophagy-mediated degradation. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that the inflamed intestinal mucosa in patients with active IBD has increased claudin-2 expression. In addition, inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6

  17. Differentially expressed genes in the caecal and colonic mucosa of Landrace finishing pigs with high and low food conversion ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhen; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Ting; Xing, Kai; Ao, Hong; Chen, Shaokang; Zhang, Fengxia; Zhao, Xitong; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Chuduan

    2017-11-02

    The feed conversion ratio (FCR) is an essential economic trait for pig production, and is directly related to feed efficiency. Studies identifying the differential expression of functional genes involved in biological and molecular mechanisms in the intestine in relation to growth performance are rare. In this study, RNA-Seq was used to identify transcriptomes in caecal and colonic mucosal tissues in order to determine the differential expression of genes from two full-sibling pairs and two half-sibling pairs of Landrace finishing pigs with opposing FCR phenotypes. In total, 138 (comparison of high and low FCR in caecal mucosa), 64 (comparison of high and low FCR in colonic mucosa), and 165 (contrast between the caecal and colonic mucosa) differentially expressed genes were identified. Some of these genes were functionally related to energy and lipid metabolism, particularly short chain fatty acids metabolism, as well as gastrointestinal peristalsis and ion transport. Functional annotation were performed to identify differentially expressed genes, such as GUCA2A, GUCA2B, HSP70.2, NOS2, PCK1, SLCs, and CYPs, which may positively influence feed efficiency in Landrace pigs. These differentially expressed genes need to be further tested for candidate genes that are related to feed efficiency.

  18. Habitual biting of oral mucosa: A conservative treatment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjot Kaur Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic biting of oral mucosa is an innocuous self inflicted injury, commonly seen in children suffering from developmental and psychological problems and has rarely been reported in normal unaffected individuals. The management strategies vary from counseling, prescription of sedatives to different prosthetic shields. The paper highlights the efficacy of a simple approach using soft mouth guard in the management of self inflicted lesions due to habitual biting of oral mucosa in two normal healthy children.

  19. [Endoscopic removal of the gallbladder mucosa after cholecystostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emel'ianov, S I; Fedenko, V V; Barsegian, A A

    2001-01-01

    The authors have developed a new method of radical treatment of patients with acute obstructive cholecystitis after cholecystostomy. The endoscopic removal of the mucosa was proposed using hysteroresectoscope GYI-525-12 (Circon-ACM1). The method was used in 5 elderly patients with high anesthesia risk in whom surgical cholecystectomy was not possible. The removal of the mucosa resulted in the replacement of the gallbladder with the connective tissue giving the effect of radical operation.

  20. Studies on nerve terminations in human mucosa and skin

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliges, Marita

    1997-01-01

    - In spite of their accessibility and important sensory function,the nervous tissue components of human oral and vaginal mucosa and skin have beensubject to very few, if any, systematic investigations. Studies on the innervationof oral tissues have mainly focused on the dental pulp, the periodontium and thegingiva, probably because of specific clinical interest, thus largely neglectingthe mucosa. Genital studies comprise only in a few cases the vagina and when thevagina is i...

  1. Mortality in Kittens Is Associated with a Shift in Ileum Mucosa-Associated Enterococci from Enterococcus hirae to Biofilm-Forming Enterococcus faecalis and Adherent Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anuradha; Borst, Luke; Stauffer, Stephen H.; Suyemoto, Mitsu; Moisan, Peter; Zurek, Ludek

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 15% of foster kittens die before 8 weeks of age, with most of these kittens demonstrating clinical signs or postmortem evidence of enteritis. While a specific cause of enteritis is not determined in most cases, these kittens are often empirically administered probiotics that contain enterococci. The enterococci are members of the commensal intestinal microbiota but also can function as opportunistic pathogens. Given the complicated role of enterococci in health and disease, it would be valuable to better understand what constitutes a “healthy” enterococcal community in these kittens and how this microbiota is impacted by severe illness. In this study, we characterized the ileum mucosa-associated enterococcal community of 50 apparently healthy and 50 terminally ill foster kittens. In healthy kittens, Enterococcus hirae was the most common species of ileum mucosa-associated enterococci and was often observed to adhere extensively to the small intestinal epithelium. These E. hirae isolates generally lacked virulence traits. In contrast, non-E. hirae enterococci, notably Enterococcus faecalis, were more commonly isolated from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness. Isolates of E. faecalis had numerous virulence traits and multiple antimicrobial resistances. Moreover, the attachment of Escherichia coli to the intestinal epithelium was significantly associated with terminal illness and was not observed in any kitten with adherent E. hirae. These findings identify a significant difference in the species of enterococci cultured from the ileum mucosa of kittens with terminal illness compared to the species cultured from healthy kittens. In contrast to prior case studies that associated enteroadherent E. hirae with diarrhea in young animals, these controlled studies identified E. hirae as more often isolated from healthy kittens and adherence of E. hirae as more common and extensive in healthy kittens than in sick kittens. PMID:23966487

  2. Cdc42 and Rab8a are critical for intestinal stem cell division, survival, and differentiation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan

    2012-01-01

    The constant self renewal and differentiation of adult intestinal stem cells maintains a functional intestinal mucosa for a lifetime. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate intestinal stem cell division and epithelial homeostasis are largely undefined. We report here that the small GTPases...... reminiscent of human microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), a devastating congenital intestinal disorder that results in severe nutrient deprivation. Further analysis revealed that Cdc42-deficient stem cells had cell division defects, reduced capacity for clonal expansion and differentiation into Paneth cells...... activity in the intestinal epithelium, where continued cell division takes place. Furthermore, mice haploinsufficient for both Cdc42 and Rab8a in the intestine demonstrated abnormal crypt morphogenesis and epithelial transporter physiology, further supporting their functional interaction. These data...

  3. Glycan recognition at the interface of the intestinal immune system: target for immune modulation via dietary components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kivit, Sander; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E M

    2011-09-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly exposed to the luminal content, which includes micro-organisms and dietary components. Prebiotic non-digestible oligosaccharides may be supplemented to the diet to exert modulation of immune responses in the intestine. Short chain galacto- and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS), functionally mimicking oligosaccharides present in human milk, have been reported to reduce the development of allergy through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and immune system. Nonetheless, the underlying working mechanisms of scGOS/lcFOS are unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells lining the mucosa are known to express carbohydrate (glycan)-binding receptors that may be involved in modulation of the mucosal immune response. This review aims to provide an overview of glycan-binding receptors, in particular galectins, which are expressed by intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells. In addition, their involvement in health and disease will be addressed, especially in food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease, diseases originating from the gastro-intestinal tract. Insight in the recognition of glycans in the intestinal tract may open new avenues for the treatment of intestinal inflammatory diseases by either nutritional concepts or pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of precancerous conditions: atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori gastritis among Chinese and Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X. Y.; van der Hulst, R. W.; Shi, Y.; Xiao, S. D.; Tytgat, G. N.; ten Kate, F. J.

    2001-01-01

    AIM-Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) as precancerous conditions consistently begin in the antrum and are most severe along the lesser curvature. The aim of this study was to investigate discrepancies in the prevalence, the severity of atrophy, and IM in antral mucosa of Helicobacter pylori

  5. Property profiling of biosimilar mucus in a novel mucus-containing in vitro model for assessment of intestinal drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Baldursdóttir, Stefania G; Müllertz, Anette

    2014-01-01

    to establish a more representative in vitro model for the intestinal mucosa. The rheological profile of a biosimilar mucus mixture composed of purified gastric mucin, lipids and protein in buffer was optimized by supplementing with an anionic polymer to display viscoelastic properties and a microstructure...

  6. Quantitative histological analysis of bovine small intestines before and after processing into natural sausage casings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnker, Joris J; Tersteeg, M H G; Berends, B R; Vernooij, J C M; Koolmees, P A

    2008-06-01

    A histological study was undertaken to determine the efficiency in the removal of the mucosa and Peyer's patches by standard processing of bovine intestines into natural sausage casings. The second objective was to calculate the quantity of lymphoid and nervous tissue per consumable sausage. For the histological analysis, intestinal samples were collected from 80 beef cattle during the slaughter process. Fresh and cleaned intestines were compared in analyzing the thickness of the intestinal wall, weight reduction during cleaning, removal of the mucosal layer, and the presence of lymphoid and neural tissue after cleaning. The obtained data indicate a weight reduction of about 50% during standard cleaning procedures, as 90% of the mucosa and 48% of the lymphoid tissue are removed. Based on the quantitative histological image analysis, it was calculated that 1 m of cleaned casings, weighing on average 64 g, contains about 2.8 g of mucosa, 0.3 g of lymphoid tissue, and 0.1 g of neural tissue. Assuming, in a worst-case scenario, that the sausage casing is ingested when consuming 200 g of sausage at one meal, this consumption includes 0.09 g of lymphoid tissue and 0.02 g of neural tissue as part of the sausage casing. These data can be included in a risk assessment on the potentialexposure of consumers to bovine spongiform encephalopathy infectivity after eating sausages in beef casings.

  7. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Christine, E-mail: christine.linard@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet{sup -/-}), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-{gamma}, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-{beta}1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-{gamma}, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-{gamma} level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-{gamma} was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8{sup +} cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  8. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linard, Christine; Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet −/− ), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-γ, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4 + and CD8 + populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-β1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-γ, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-γ level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-γ was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8 + cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  9. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  10. Intestinal parasites and tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Alonso Cedeño-Burbano

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The available evidence was insufficient to affirm that intestinal parasites predispose to developing tuberculous. The studies carried out so far have found statistically insignificant results.

  11. Effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 on mouse systemic immunity and the immune response in the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuanbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei L9,which was isolated from human intestine, was investigated for its immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Results showed that L9 improved systemic immunity by enhancing the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, the proliferation ratio of splenocytes, the IgG level in the serum and the level of IgA in the mucosa. Further, L9induced theTh1-polarized immune response by elevating the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in the mucosa. This effect was confirmed by the enhanced IL-12-inducing activity of macrophages after in vitro stimulation of L9. Also detected was increased expression of TLR-2mRNA in the mucosa. We predict that L9 could enhance innate immunity by activating TLR-2 in the mucosa, and enhance acquired immunity by promoting Th1 polarization through induced production of IL-12 by macrophages.

  12. Remodeling of the residual gastric mucosa after roux-en-y gastric bypass or vertical sleeve gastrectomy in diet-induced obese rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Arapis

    Full Text Available Whereas the remodeling of intestinal mucosa after bariatric surgeries has been the matter of numerous studies to our knowledge, very few reported on the remodeling of the residual gastric mucosa. In this study, we analyzed remodeling of gastric mucosa after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG in rats. Diet-induced obese rats were subjected to RYGB, VSG or sham surgical procedures. All animals were assessed for food intake, body-weight, fasting blood, metabolites and hormones profiling, as well as insulin and glucose tolerance tests before and up to 5 weeks post-surgery. Remodeling of gastric tissues was analyzed by routine histology and immunohistochemistry studies, and qRT-PCR analyses of ghrelin and gastrin mRNA levels. In obese rats with impaired glucose tolerance, VSG and RYGB caused substantial weight loss and rats greatly improved their oral glucose tolerance. The remaining gastric mucosa after VSG and gastric pouch (GP after RYGB revealed a hyperplasia of the mucous neck cells that displayed a strong immunoreactivity for parietal cell H+/K+-ATPase. Ghrelin mRNA levels were reduced by 2-fold in remaining fundic mucosa after VSG and 10-fold in GP after RYGB. In the antrum, gastrin mRNA levels were reduced after VSG in line with the reduced number of gastrin positive cells. This study reports novel and important observations dealing with the remaining gastric mucosa after RYGB and VSG. The data demonstrate, for the first time, a hyperplasia of the mucous neck cells, a transit cell population of the stomach bearing differentiating capacities into zymogenic and peptic cells.

  13. A study of complexity of oral mucosa using fractal geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Shenoi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The oral mucosa lining the oral cavity is composed of epithelium supported by connective tissue. The shape of the epithelial-connective tissue interface has traditionally been used to describe physiological and pathological changes in the oral mucosa. Aim: The aim is to evaluate the morphometric complexity in normal, dysplastic, well-differentiated, and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the oral mucosa using fractal geometry. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 periodic acid–Schiff stained histological images of four groups: normal mucosa, dysplasia, well-differentiated SCC, and moderately differentiated SCC were verified by the gold standard. These images were then subjected to fractal analysis. Statistical Analysis: ANOVA and post hoc test: Bonferroni was applied. Results: Fractal dimension (FD increases as the complexity increases from normal to dysplasia and then to SCC. Normal buccal mucosa was found to be significantly different from dysplasia and the two grades of SCC (P < 0.05. ANOVA of fractal scores of four morphometrically different groups of buccal mucosa was significantly different with F (3,76 = 23.720 and P< 0.01. However, FD of dysplasia was not significantly different from well-differentiated and moderately differentiated SCC (P = 1.000 and P = 0.382, respectively. Conclusion: This study establishes FD as a newer tool in differentiating normal tissue from dysplastic and neoplastic tissue. Fractal geometry is useful in the study of both physiological and pathological changes in the oral mucosa. A new grading system based on FD may emerge as an adjuvant aid in cancer diagnosis.

  14. Úlcera eosinófila de la mucosa oral Eosinophilic ulcer of oral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Bencini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available La Úlcera Eosinófila de la Mucosa Oral, es una entidad poco frecuente, pobremente descrita en la literatura mundial. Se define como una lesión benigna autolimitada que si bien puede presentarse en distintas áreas de la cavidad bucal, presenta una marcada predilección por la mucosa ventral de la lengua. Clínicamente, se presenta como una lesión ulcerada de bordes indurados y sobreelevados. Los hallazgos histopatológicos son característicos y consisten en un infiltrado mixto rico en eosinófilos, acompañado de una población de grandes células mononucleadas. Recientes artículos basados en estudios inmunohistoquimicos, permiten afirmar la presencia de grandes linfocitos atípicos CD30+ y por lo tanto, incluir esta lesión en el espectro de las entidades simuladoras de desordenes linfoproliferativos. A pesar de esto, el mecanismo etiopatogenico permanece oscuro y el trauma local juega un rol todavía no dilucidado; aunque se halla presente en la mayoría de las publicaciones, explicando el fenómeno como un mecanismo reactivo. La importancia de esta lesión, radica en su diagnostico diferencial por su semejanza clínica al carcinoma espinocelular, histoplasmosis, chancro sifilítico, Úlcera tuberculosa, carcinoma epidermoide y otras. En nuestro trabajo se revisa la literatura y se discuten la características clínicas, histopatológicas y alternativas terapéuticas, a partir del artículo de un caso clínico en una paciente joven, que luego de la biopsia escisión como método para el diagnostico de certeza, se produce una recidiva de la lesión; lo que orientó el tratamiento hacia la cirugía combinada con corticoterapia local intralesional, logrando su remisión.Eosinophilic Ulcer of the Oral Mucosa, an entity, poorly deciphers in world-wide literature. It is defined as a self-limited, benign injury that although it can appear in different areas of the buccal cavity it presents a noticeable predilection via the ventral mucosa of the

  15. Effect of polydextrose on intestinal microbes and immune functions in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Francesca; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Siljander-Rasi, Hilkka; Putaala, Heli; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Stowell, Julian; Tuohy, Kieran; Gibson, Glenn; Rautonen, Nina

    2007-07-01

    Dietary fibre has been proposed to decrease risk for colon cancer by altering the composition of intestinal microbes or their activity. In the present study, the changes in intestinal microbiota and its activity, and immunological characteristics, such as cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression in mucosa, in pigs fed with a high-energy-density diet, with and without supplementation of a soluble fibre (polydextrose; PDX) (30 g/d) were assessed in different intestinal compartments. PDX was gradually fermented throughout the intestine, and was still present in the distal colon. Irrespective of the diet throughout the intestine, of the four microbial groups determined by fluorescent in situ hybridisation, lactobacilli were found to be dominating, followed by clostridia and Bacteroides. Bifidobacteria represented a minority of the total intestinal microbiota. The numbers of bacteria increased approximately ten-fold from the distal small intestine to the distal colon. Concomitantly, also concentrations of SCFA and biogenic amines increased in the large intestine. In contrast, concentrations of luminal IgA decreased distally but the expression of mucosal COX-2 had a tendency to increase in the mucosa towards the distal colon. Addition of PDX to the diet significantly changed the fermentation endproducts, especially in the distal colon, whereas effects on bacterial composition were rather minor. There was a reduction in concentrations of SCFA and tryptamine, and an increase in concentrations of spermidine in the colon upon PDX supplementation. Furthermore, PDX tended to decrease the expression of mucosal COX-2, therefore possibly reducing the risk of developing colon cancer-promoting conditions in the distal intestine.

  16. [Characteristics of the intestinal dysbiosis and endotoxemia after hemicolectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, I A; Drozdov, V N; Sil'vestrova, S Iu; Varvanina, G G

    2011-01-01

    The normal intestinal microflora important for maintaining the optimum level of metabolic processes in the human body, the immune system, as well as to create a high colonization resistance against the pathogenic microbes. With aging, changes microbiocaenosis intestine, resulting in an increase in the total number of microbes in the gut and profound changes in the functional properties of microorganisms. Under physiological conditions, the main reservoir of endotoxin in the human body is the intestine. Endotoxins, penetrating through the intestinal mucosa, arrive first at the local (intestinal), and then through the portal system in the liver, are able to initiate it various lesions, including fatty degeneration of the parenchyma. Based on clinical and laboratory studies to determine changes in gut microbiota and the level of endotoxemia in elderly patients in the remote period after undergoing surgery--hemicolectomy. Metabolic activity of microflora in the colon according to the concentrations of short chain fatty acids in the feces of elderly patients in distant periods after hemicolectomy revealed in various degrees of violation of the microbiota of the colon. Violation of gut microbiota leads to endotoxaemia, which has a toxic effect on liver function, level of endotoxin and protein that binds to endotoxin was significantly higher in patients who underwent left-sided hemicolectomy.

  17. Postconditioning attenuates acute intestinal ischemia–reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Sengul

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postconditioning (POC would reduce the detrimental effects of the acute intestinal ischemia–reperfusion (I/R compared to those of the abrupt onset of reperfusion. POC has a protective effect on intestinal I/R injury by inhibiting events in the early minutes of reperfusion in rats. Twenty-four Wistar–Albino rats were subjected to the occlusion of superior mesenteric artery for 30 minutes, then reperfused for 120 minutes, and randomized to the four different modalities of POC: (1 control (no intervention; (2 POC-3 (three cycles of 10 seconds of reperfusion–reocclusion, 1 minute total intervention; (3 POC-6 (six cycles of 10 seconds of reperfusion–reocclusion, 2 minutes total intervention; and (4 sham operation (laparotomy only. The arterial blood samples [0.3 mL total creatine kinase (CK and 0.6 mL malondialdehyde (MDA] and the intestinal mucosal MDA were collected from each after reperfusion. POC, especially POC-6, was effective in attenuating postischemic pathology by decreasing the intestinal tissue MDA levels, serum total CK activity, inflammation, and total histopathological injury scores. POC exerted a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa by reducing the mesenteric oxidant generation, lipid peroxidation, and neutrophil accumulation. The six-cycle algorithm demonstrated the best protection.

  18. Intestinal Coccidiosis in a Patient with Alpha-chain Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kristin; Bird, R. G.; Doe, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    During an ultrastructural study of small-intestinal mucosa from a patient suffering from alpha-chain disease organisms were identified within the epithelial cytoplasm which showed the fine structural features of the coccidian group. Though coccidiosis is well recognized as causing a diarrhoeal and often lethal illness in animals it has been neglected as a cause of disease in man. Thus this finding may be significant and warrants further investigation into its possible role in the pathogenesis of alpha-chain disease. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4131643

  19. Delayed stenosis of the small intestine after cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Seiji; Okuno, Mitsuru; Horibe, Yohei; Ono, Tomohiko; Goto, Naoe; Nakamura, Noriaki; Iwama, Midori; Yamauchi, Osamu; Saito, Koshiro

    2014-12-01

    A man in his 70s experienced cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) due to acute myocardial infarction. He was resuscitated and treated with a multimodal approach, and he fortunately survived CPA without neurological damage. However, abdominal pain and vomiting occurred 45 days after the CPA. Small intestinal endoscopy showed pinhole-like stenosis of the ileum. Although balloon dilation was performed through the scope, his symptoms did not improve. Partial small bowel resection was eventually performed 139 days after the CPA. Pathological findings revealed ischemic changes in the mucosa at two spots. We speculate that an ischemic event occurred in the small bowel during CPA.

  20. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  1. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of p53 in Anticancer Drug Treatment- and Radiation-Induced Injury in Normal Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Shi

    2012-01-01

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, the functional mucosa of the small intestine has the highest capacity for absorption of nutrients and rapid proliferation rates, making it vulnerable to chemoradiotherapy. Recent understanding of the protective role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest in the small intestinal mucosa has led researchers to explore new avenues to mitigate mucosal injury during cancer treatment. A traditional p53 inhibitor and two other molecules that exhibit strong protective effects on normal small intestinal epithelium during anticancer drug treatment and radiation therapy are introduced in this work. The objective of this review was to update current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms and targets that inhibit the side effects induced by chemoradiotherapy

  3. Harvesting oral mucosa for one-stage anterior urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Balwant Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosa has been the most popular substitute material for urethral reconstructive surgery because it is easy to harvest, is easy to access, has a concealed donor site scar, and obviates most of the problems associated with other grafts. However, the success of using oral mucosa for urethral surgery is mainly attributed to the biological properties of this tissue. Herein, the surgical steps of harvesting oral mucosa from the inner cheek are presented with an emphasis on tips and tricks to render the process easier and more reproducible and to prevent intra and post-operative complications. The following steps are emphasized: Nasal intubation, ovoid shape graft, delicate harvesting leaving the muscle intact, donor site closure and removal of submucosal tissue.

  4. [Oral mucosa reaction in patients adapting to removable dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanishvili, A K; Soldatova, L N; Pihur, O L; Mihajlova, E S; Peremyshlenko, A S; Soldatov, V S

    Oral mucosa reaction of prosthetic bed to the removable acrylic dentures was evaluated in 43 patients (12 male and 31 female) aged 56-69 years with partial and full teeth loss in one or both jaws. Patients of the first (control) group (17 patients) were not using additional tools improving fixation of the removable dentures during adaptation period, while patients of the second (main) group (26 patients) used Corega cream for dentures fixation for 30 days follow-up. Oral mucosa assessment was carried out on 3-4 and 28-30 day of dentures use by 3 end points: pain syndrome, moisture level, inflammation of a prosthetic bed. The results proved Corega cream to improve prosthetic bed mucosa condition reducing inflammatory response to polymeric materials of removable dentures basis.

  5. Speech and swallowing outcomes in buccal mucosa carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunila John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal carcinoma is one of the most common malignant neoplasms among all oral cancers in India. Understanding the role of speech language pathologists (SLPs in the domains of evaluation and management strategies of this condition is limited, especially in the Indian context. This is a case report of a young adult with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa with no deleterious habits usually associated with buccal mucosa carcinoma. Following composite resection, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstruction, he developed severe oral dysphagia and demonstrated unintelligible speech. This case report focuses on the issues of swallowing and speech deficits in buccal mucosa carcinoma that need to be addressed by SLPs, and the outcomes of speech and swallowing rehabilitation and prognostic issues.

  6. Glutamine protects intestinal calcium absorption against oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, Luciana; Díaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Pérez, Adriana; Benedetto, Mercedes; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether glutamine (GLN) could block the inhibition of the intestinal Ca 2+ absorption caused by menadione (MEN), and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To do this, one-month old chicks were divided in four groups: 1) controls, 2) MEN treated, 3) GLN treated and 4) GLN treated before or after MEN treatment. Intestinal Ca 2+ absorption as well as protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular Ca 2+ pathway were determined. Glutathione (GSH) and superoxide anion and activity of enzymes of the antioxidant system were evaluated. Apoptosis was measured by the TUNEL technique, the expression of FAS and FASL and the caspase-3 activity. A previous dose of 0.5gGLN/kg of b.w. was necessary to show its protector effect and a dose of 1g/kg of b.w. could restore the intestinal Ca 2+ absorption after MEN treatment. GLN alone did not modify the protein expression of calbindin D 28k and plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase, but blocked the inhibitory effect of the quinone. GLN avoided changes in the intestinal redox state provoked by MEN such as a decrease in the GSH content, and increases in the superoxide anion and in the SOD and CAT activities. GLN abrogated apoptotic effects caused by MEN in intestinal mucosa, as indicated by the reduction of TUNEL (+) cells and the FAS/FASL/caspase-3 pathway. In conclusion, GLN could be an oral nutritional supplement to normalize the redox state and the proliferation/cell death ratio in the small intestine improving the intestinal Ca 2+ absorption altered by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Microcirculation of the nasal mucosa during use of balloon tamponade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, M; Siegert, R

    1997-03-01

    Nasal packings are commonly accepted in the treatment of severe epistaxis. Cuffed catheters are known to cause damage to the nasal mucosa most likely by interfering with tissue perfusion. In this study the effect of different pressure levels on local perfusion of septal mucosa is investigated. In 15 healthy subjects the blood flow in septal mucosa was measured by laser doppler flowmetry by positioning a cuffed epistaxis catheter into the nasal cavity with a laser probe attached to it. Increasing pressure was administered by injecting saline solution while continuously recording intraluminal pressure, perfusion, and filling volume. The local pressure affecting the septal mucosa at the moment of stalling perfusion was determined by subtracting the extranasal cuff pressure from the current intranasal cuff pressure at same inflation volumes. Microcirculation of the septal mucosa stopped when the local pressure exceeded a value of Pmean = 42 mmHg. Individual variations (n = 15) were small (s = 9 mmHg). The intraluminal cuff pressure was measured to be about ten times higher due to the retraction force of the cuff. Spontaneous oscillations of the blood flow were reduced with increasing pressure to the blood vessels. Filling volumes up to 3.2 ml were sufficient to stop perfusion. Cuffed nasal packings stop the blood flow in nasal mucosa even at low local pressures. Depending on the material characteristics of different cuffs the pressure to dilate the cuff may, however, be several times higher than the actual local pressure. This effect may cause problems in the proper use of cuffed catheters. Laser doppler flowmetry proved to be helpful in determining reproducible perfusion values.

  8. Fatty acid-binding protein in liver and small intestine of the preruminant calf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cytosol obtained from differential centrifugation of homogenates from liver and small intestine mucosa was incubated with 1-[ 14 C] oleic acid or 1-[ 14 C] palmitic acid and filtered through Sephadex G-75. Elution profiles for both tissues showed radioactivity in two main peaks, the first corresponding to binding of fatty acid to high molecular weight proteins and the second to a protein fraction with a molecular weight of approximately 12,000 daltons. The low molecular weight fraction had high fatty acid-binding activity, which was greater for oleic than palmitic acid. The findings demonstrate the presence of fatty acid-binding protein in liver and intestinal mucosa of the preruminant calf

  9. Intestinal release and uptake of phenolic antioxidant diferulic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mette Findal; Kroon, P A; Williamson, G

    2001-01-01

    Diferulic acids are potent antioxidants and are abundant structural components of plant cell walls, especially in cereal brans. As such, they are part of many human and animal diets and may contribute to the beneficial effect of cereal brans on health. However, these phenolics are ester-linked to......Diferulic acids are potent antioxidants and are abundant structural components of plant cell walls, especially in cereal brans. As such, they are part of many human and animal diets and may contribute to the beneficial effect of cereal brans on health. However, these phenolics are ester....... In addition, cell-free extracts from human and rat small intestine mucosa exhibited esterase activity towards diferulate esters. Hence, we have shown that esterified diferulates can be released from cereal brans by intestinal enzymes, and that free diferulic acids can be absorbed and enter the circulatory...... system. Our results suggest that the phenolic antioxidant diferulic acids are bioavailable. Udgivelsesdato: 2001-Aug-1...

  10. Systemic and intestinal levels of factor XIII-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christoffer; Kvist, Peter Helding; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2016-01-01

    , indicating a reduction of the M2 phenotype with consequent loss of FXIII-A. No induction of iNOS positive macrophages was observed. Stimulation of naïve monocytes with physiological concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators negatively affected the expression of FXIII-A. Measurements in plasma confirmed...... the loss of both FXIII antigen and activity during active disease. CONCLUSIONS: Intestinal inflammation in UC induces loss of M2 macrophages with subsequent loss of FXIII-A synthesis. The loss of cellular FXIII-A may impact migration and phagocytosis, and hence limit pathogen eradication in UC.......BACKGROUND: Subunit A of coagulation factor XIII (FXIII-A) is important for clot stability and acts in the subsequent wound healing process. Loss of plasma FXIII-A has been reported after surgery, sepsis, and inflammatory conditions. In the intestinal mucosa, FXIII-A is expressed by macrophages...

  11. X-radiation effect on soluble proteins of gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhomlinov, B.F.; Chajka, Ya.P.; Fedorovich, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Using the method of electrophoresis in agar gel soluble proteins of gastric mucosa of rats were separated into 11 fractions. Proteins posessing a proteolytic (pH 1.8) and lipase (pH 7.4) activity were localized within the second and third prealbumin fractions. Soluble proteins of gastric mucosa contain glyco- and lipoproteid complexes. Exposure of rats to 1000 R of X-rays induces quantitative redistribution within the electrophoretic spectrum of soluble proteins and a considerable disturbance of the proteolytic activity of total soluble proteins throughout the entire period of observation (from 10 min to 72h)

  12. Estudio de la mucosa oral en pacientes que emplean colutorios

    OpenAIRE

    Marzal Gamarra, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN 1. Recuerdo histológico de la mucosa oral La cavidad bucal, como toda cavidad orgánica que se comunica con el exterior, esta tapizada por una membrana mucosa de superficie húmeda. La humedad, que es aportada por las glándulas salivales mayores y menores, es necesaria para el mantenimiento de la estructura normal de los tejidos. 2. Colutorios y su utilización en Odontología Los colutorios son preparaciones líquidas destinadas a ser aplicadas sobre los dientes, las...

  13. Effects of positive acceleration exposure on intestinal mucosal barrier and sIgA level in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie QIU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effect of positive acceleration (+Gz on immune barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats. Methods  Thirty two male SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (8 each: Group A (control group, Group B (+5Gz group, Group C (+10Gz group and Group D (repeated exposure group. The animal centrifuge was used to simulate the exposure of acceleration. Group A was no disposed. +5Gz group and +10Gz group were subjected to centrifugal force of +5Gz and +10Gz respectively for 5min; repeated exposure group was continuously exposed to 1.5min under +5Gz value, 2min under +10Gz value and 1.5min under +5Gz. All groups were exposed to the respective acceleration once daily for 5 days. The damage of intestinal mucosa was observed by light microscopy after the experiment was finished, and the content of sIgA in intestinal mucosa was detected by ELISA. Results  Except for group A, intestinal mucosal injury was observed in the other three groups. Group D was shown as the most serious one, followed by group C and group B. Compared with group A, the level of sIgA was significantly lower in other three groups (P<0.05. The level of sIgA in group C was significantly lower than that in group B (P<0.05 and higher than that in group D (P<0.05. Conclusion  +Gz exposure can result in intestinal injury and weaken the function of immune barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.14

  14. Protective effects of butyrate on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yingli; Qian, Jianmin; Lu, Qingyang; Tian, Yaqiang; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Butyrate is normally fermented from undigested fiber by intestinal microflora. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of butyrate and its underlying mechanisms on intestinal injury in a rat model of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to warm ischemia for 45 min by clamping the superior mesenteric artery after treatment with butyrate, followed by 6 and 72 h of reperfusion. Pathologic histology analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence, and Western blot were performed. Butyrate preconditioning markedly improved intestinal injury. The inflammatory factor levels and leukocyte infiltration were attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also maintained the intestinal barrier structures, increased the expression of tight junction proteins, and decreased endotoxin translocation. We conclude that butyrate administration attenuates intestinal I/R injury, which is associated with preservation of intestinal tight junction barrier function and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in the intestinal mucosa. This suggests butyrate as a potential strategy to prevent intestinal I/R injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, M G; De Virgiliis, S; Kang, J S; Macatagney, R; Musu, M P; Di Pierro, M R; Drago, S; Congia, M; Fasano, A

    2003-02-01

    Despite the progress made in understanding the immunological aspects of the pathogenesis of coeliac disease (CD), the early steps that allow gliadin to cross the intestinal barrier are still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether gliadin activates a zonulin dependent enterocyte intracellular signalling pathway(s) leading to increased intestinal permeability. The effect of gliadin on the enterocyte actin cytoskeleton was studied on rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cell cultures by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. Zonulin concentration was measured on cell culture supernatants by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Transepithelial intestinal resistance (Rt) was measured on ex vivo intestinal tissues mounted in Ussing chambers. Incubation of cells with gliadin led to a reversible protein kinase C (PKC) mediated actin polymerisation temporarily coincident with zonulin release. A significant reduction in Rt was observed after gliadin addition on rabbit intestinal mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Pretreatment with the zonulin inhibitor FZI/0 abolished the gliadin induced actin polymerisation and Rt reduction but not zonulin release. Gliadin induces zonulin release in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Activation of the zonulin pathway by PKC mediated cytoskeleton reorganisation and tight junction opening leads to a rapid increase in intestinal permeability.

  16. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  17. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-07-21

    To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P pylori-positive Mongolian patients. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia scores were significantly lower in Mongolian compared to Japanese H. pylori-positive patients (P pylori.

  18. Absorción Intestinal en el Cirrótico.

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Venegas, Salvador Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Planteamos en nuestra Tesis Doctoral los problemas de mayor actualidad en un tema tan conflictivo como es la absorción intestinal en la cirrosis hepática. Nuestro fin es confrontar los datos recogidos por la clínica con aquellos aportados por el estudio anatomopatológico de la mucosa intestinal. Hemos estudiado 45 pacientes cirróticos de los cuales 22 (48%) estaban compensados  y los restantes 23(52%) mostraban descompensación; mal absorci&oacu...

  19. Intestinal paragonimiasis with colonic ulcer and hematochezia in an elderly Taiwanese woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Te; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Barghouth, Ursula; Fan, Chia-Kwung

    2012-12-01

    A 94-year-old female with end-stage renal disease presents with fever, fatigue, and hematochezia. She had previously resided in Hunan Province, China, and Myanmar, and she immigrated to Taiwan 30 years ago. Colonoscopy revealed a colonic ulcer. Biopsy of the colonic ulcer showed ulceration of the colonic mucosa, and many Paragonimus westermani-like eggs were noted. Serum IgG antibody levels showed strong reactivity with P. westermani excretory-secretory antigens by ELISA. Intestinal paragonimiasis was thus diagnosed according to the morphology of the eggs and serologic finding. After treatment with praziquantel, hematochezia resolved. The present case illustrates the extreme manifestations encountered in severe intestinal paragonimiasis.

  20. Elemental diets in the prophylaxis and therapy for intestinal lesions: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounous, G.

    1989-01-01

    The recognition of potentially noxious physiologic substances in the intestinal milieu prompted the use of an elemental semihydrolyzed formula diet in the prophylaxis of experimental acute ischemic enteropathy. Elemental diets have been used in the management of a variety of digestive diseases. An elemental diet protects the intestinal mucosa of rodents from radiation injury and facilitates mucosal healing. Clinical trials have shown the benefits of this form of treatment in the prevention of acute radiation enteropathy and in the therapy for delayed radiation enteropathy and Crohn's disease.90 references

  1. Interactions between intestinal microbiota and innate immune system in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura; Aloi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of an altered immune homeostasis within the intestinal mucosa against the gut microbiota, leading to chronic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Under normal conditions, the immune system defends against pathogens and prevents the passage of excessive intestinal bacteria; regulatory pathways must maintain a low-grade, controlled inflammation in a healthy gut, but also induce a protective response against pathogens. The innate immune system is the first-line defense from microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, immediate response. The immune system constantly controls commensal bacteria and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to sustain immune homeostasis. The discovery that several genes linked to IBD modulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), and genes that mediate autophagy (ie, ATG16L1, IRGM), has highlighted the critical role of host-microbe interactions in controlling intestinal immune homeostasis. Commensal microorganisms actively interact with the intestinal mucosa and influence the activity of the immune system as well as the amplitude of the immune response. In contrast, host factors can influence microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. In this paper, we focus on the mechanisms that mediate host-microbe interactions and how the disruption of this balance leads to chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD.

  2. Effect of irradiation on morphology and motility of canine small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, R.W.; Flatt, A.J.; Prihoda, M.J.; Mitros, F.A.

    1987-12-01

    In addition to severe damage to the intestinal mucosa, there is evidence based on altered transit that irradiation affects intestinal motor function. A single dose of 938 cGy to the intestine of dogs consistently produced an acute intestinal radiation syndrome consisting of vomiting and diarrhea but was not lethal. In the fasting state, the migrating myoelectric complex was uniformly interrupted. After a meal, jejunal myoelectric activity analyzed by a computer program showed a progressive decline in the number, duration, and length of migration of spike bursts. There were occasionally bizarre motility patterns consisting of clusters of migrating spike bursts. Slow waves demonstrated irregular rhythm and nonuniform morphology. They occasionally migrated in an orad direction and at times were totally uncoupled. At 24 hr and four days after irradiation, the muscle and the neural plexus were nearly normal by light microscopy, but the mucosa exhibited severe necrosis. Therefore, irradiation produces profound functional abnormalities in intestinal muscle even though the morphology is minimally altered.

  3. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated [Sar1, Ile8]ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides

  4. Effect of thyme essential oil and selenium on intestine integrity and antioxidant status of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placha, I; Takacova, J; Ryzner, M; Cobanova, K; Laukova, A; Strompfova, V; Venglovska, K; Faix, S

    2014-02-01

    1. This study evaluated the duodenal wall integrity, antioxidant status as well as some immunological parameters of broiler chickens supplemented with 0.5 g Thymus vulgaris essential oil (EO)/kg diet and 0.4 mg Se/kg DM (dry matter) derived from sodium selenite. 2. A total of 192 one-d-old randomly divided chickens of both sexes (Ross 308 hybrid broilers) were divided into 4 treatment groups of 48 birds each. 3. The first group was fed on a nutritionally balanced basal diet (BD). The other three groups received BD supplemented with 0.5 g/kg thyme oil, or 0.4 mg Se/kg DM, or both feed additives together. 4. The results for the evaluated feed additives were (1) thyme oil - decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in duodenal mucosa and kidney, increased immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentration in duodenal mucosa, stimulated phagocytic activity in blood, improved intestinal barrier integrity (2) selenium - increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in blood and liver as well as thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity in duodenal mucosa, liver and in the kidney, (3) EO with selenium - increased thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity in duodenal mucosa. 5. These results demonstrated that thyme oil alone showed more effective potential to improve intestinal barrier integrity and antioxidant status as well as evoking an immune response in chickens, than if diets were supplemented with both thyme oil and selenium.

  5. Mycotoxins and the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Broom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biochemical pathways can yield various compounds that are not considered to be necessary for their growth and are thus referred to as secondary metabolites. These compounds have been found to have wide ranging biological effects and include potent poisons (mycotoxins. Mycotoxins invariably contaminate crops and (thus animal feeds. The intestine is the key link between ingested mycotoxins and their detrimental effects on the animal. Effects on the intestine, or intestinal environment, and immune system have been reported with various mycotoxins. These effects are almost certainly occurring across species. Most, if not all, of the reported effects of mycotoxins are negative in terms of intestinal health, for example, decreased intestinal cell viability, reductions in short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentrations and elimination of beneficial bacteria, increased expression of genes involved in promoting inflammation and counteracting oxidative stress. This challenge to intestinal health will predispose the animal to intestinal (and systemic infections and impair efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients, with the associated effect on animal productivity.

  6. Host-dependent zonulin secretion causes the impairment of the small intestine barrier function after bacterial exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Asmar, Ramzi; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Bamford, Penelope; Berti, Irene; Not, Tarcisio; Coppa, Giovanni V; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio; El Asmar, Rahzi

    2002-11-01

    Enteric infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both food intolerance and autoimmune diseases secondary to the impairment of the intestinal barrier. On the basis of our recent discovery of zonulin, a modulator of small-intestinal tight junctions, we asked whether microorganisms might induce zonulin secretion and increased small-intestinal permeability. Both ex vivo mammalian small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to either pathogenic or nonpathogenic enterobacteria. Zonulin production and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in Ussing chambers and micro-snapwells. Zonula occludens 1 protein redistribution after bacteria colonization was evaluated on cell monolayers. Small intestines exposed to enteric bacteria secreted zonulin. This secretion was independent of either the species of the small intestines or the virulence of the microorganisms tested, occurred only on the luminal aspect of the bacteria-exposed small-intestinal mucosa, and was followed by a decrease in small-intestinal tissue resistance (transepithelial electrical resistance). The transepithelial electrical resistance decrement was secondary to the zonulin-induced tight junction disassembly, as also shown by the disengagement of the protein zonula occludens 1 protein from the tight junctional complex. This zonulin-driven opening of the paracellular pathway may represent a defensive mechanism, which flushes out microorganisms and contributes to the host response against bacterial colonization of the small intestine.

  7. Sustained TL1A (TNFSF15) expression on both lymphoid and myeloid cells leads to mild spontaneous intestinal inflammation and fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Libo; Zhang, Xiaolan; Chen, Jeremy; Ichikawa, Ryan; Wallace, Kori; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai; Targan, Stephan R.; Shih, David Q.

    2013-01-01

    TL1A is a member of the TNF superfamily, and its expression is increased in the mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Moreover, patients with certain TNFSF15 variants over-express TL1A and have a higher risk of developing strictures in the small intestine. Consistently, mice with sustained Tl1a expression in either lymphoid or myeloid cells develop spontaneous ileitis and increased intestinal collagen deposition. Transgenic (Tg) mice with constitutive Tl1a expressio...

  8. Probiotic Mixture Golden Bifido Prevents Neonatal Escherichia coli K1 Translocation via Enhancing Intestinal Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Zeng; Xiaolong He; Santhosh Puthiyakunnon; Hansen Xiao; Zelong Gong; Swapna Boddu; Lecheng Chen; Huiwen Tian; Huiwen Tian; Sheng-He Huang; Sheng-He Huang; Hong Cao

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 sepsis and meningitis is a severe infection characterized by high mortality in neonates. Successful colonization and translocation across the intestinal mucosa have been regarded as the critical steps for E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis. We recently reported that the probiotic mixture, Golden Bifido (containing live Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium, and Streptococcus thermophilus, LBS) has a preventive role against neonatal E. coli K1 bacteremia and men...

  9. Alteration of the Canine Small-Intestinal Lactic Acid Bacterium Microbiota by Feeding of Potential Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, Titta J. K.; Rinkinen, Minna L.; Beasley, Shea S.; Saris, Per E. J.

    2006-01-01

    Five potentially probiotic canine fecal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus fermentum LAB8, Lactobacillus salivarius LAB9, Weissella confusa LAB10, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LAB11, and Lactobacillus mucosae LAB12, were fed to five permanently fistulated beagles for 7 days. The survival of the strains and their potential effects on the indigenous intestinal LAB microbiota were monitored for 17 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) demonstrated that the five fed LAB ...

  10. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Intestinal Histoplasmosis in a Renal Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Taseen A; Salem, George; Kastens, Donald J

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in the United States. Symptomatic gastrointestinal histoplasmosis is a rare entity. We report a case of isolated intestinal histoplasmosis that manifested as severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a renal transplant patient. The patient developed hematochezia, and colonoscopy showed diffuse, extensive areas of cratered, ulcerated mucosa in the entire colon. Biopsy showed prominent mucosal and submucosal infiltrate of plump histiocytes containing intracytoplasmic yeast forms morphologically compatible with florid histoplasmosis.

  11. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Intestinal Histoplasmosis in a Renal Transplant Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Taseen A.; Salem, George; Kastens, Donald J.

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in the United States. Symptomatic gastrointestinal histoplasmosis is a rare entity. We report a case of isolated intestinal histoplasmosis that manifested as severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a renal transplant patient. The patient developed hematochezia, and colonoscopy showed diffuse, extensive areas of cratered, ulcerated mucosa in the entire colon. Biopsy showed prominent mucosal and submucosal infiltrate of plump histiocytes conta...

  12. DNA extraction protocols may influence biodiversity detected in the intestinal microbiome: a case study from wild Prussian carp, Carassius gibelio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashinskaya, Elena N; Andree, Karl B; Simonov, Evgeniy P; Solovyev, Mikhail M

    2017-02-01

    In this investigation, we examined the influence of different DNA extraction protocols on results obtained for intestinal microbiota of Prussian carp. We showed that significant differences were observed in numbers of reads, OTUs, Shannon index and taxonomic composition between two different DNA extraction protocols for intestine of Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio), and differences were also evident between microbial communities in the intestinal mucosa and intestinal content. Statistical analyses of 25 published articles also revealed a significant relationship between methods of DNA extraction and bacterial diversity in fish intestine of freshwater species. Microbial diversity, community structure, proportions of read numbers derived from each OTU and the total number of OTU's obtained by different DNA extraction protocols could lead to a bias in results obtained in some cases, and therefore researchers should be conservative in conclusions about community structures. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...... membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption...

  14. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption......A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...

  15. Atrophic and Metaplastic Progression in the Background Mucosa of Patients with Gastric Adenoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyong Na

    Full Text Available In patients with adenoma, assessing premalignant changes in the surrounding mucosa is important for surveillance. This study evaluated atrophic and metaplastic progression in the background mucosa of adenoma or early gastric cancer (EGC cases.Among 146 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic resection for intestinal-type gastric neoplasia, the adenoma group included 56 patients with low-grade dysplasia and the ECG group included 90 patients with high-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma. For histology, 3 paired biopsies were obtained from the antrum, corpus lesser curvature (CLC, and corpus greater curvature (CGC. Serological atrophy was determined based on pepsinogen A (PGA, progastricsin (PGC, gastrin-17, and total ghrelin levels. Topographic progression of atrophy and/or metaplasia was staged using the operative link on gastritis assessment (OLGA and operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM systems.Rates of moderate-to-marked histological atrophy/metaplasia in patients with adenoma were 52.7%/78.2% at the antrum (vs. 58.8%/76.4% in EGC group, 63.5%/75.0% at the CLC (vs. 60.2%/69.7% in EGC group, and 10.9%/17.9% at the CGC (vs. 5.6%/7.8% in EGC group. Serological atrophy indicated by PGA and PGC occurred in 23.2% and 15.6% of cases in the adenoma and ECG groups, respectively (p = 0.25. Mean serum gastrin-17 concentrations of the adenoma group and EGC group were 10.4 and 9.0 pmol/L, respectively (p = 0.54. Mean serum total ghrelin levels were 216.6 and 209.5 pg/mL, respectively (p = 0.71. Additionally, between group rates of stage III-IV OLGA and OLGIM were similar (25.9% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.90; 41.8% vs. 44.9%, p = 0.71, respectively.Atrophic and metaplastic progression is extensive and severe in gastric adenoma patients. A surveillance strategy for metachronous tumors should be applied similarly for patients with adenoma or EGC.

  16. Haemostasis in freyer's prostatectomy by rectal mucosa reposition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study was an attempt to develop a technique by which complete haemostasis can be achieved on table by reposition of the rectal mucosa in the prostatic fossa and applying traction to the Foley's catheter. Patients and Methods: A total of 170 cases of BPH were operated by Freyer's Suprapubic ...

  17. Ventral onlay graft bulbar urethroplasty using buccal mucosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Wessells

    2016-01-21

    Jan 21, 2016 ... urethritis, and El-Kasaby [3], a pioneer in the use of buccal mucosa for anterior urethroplasty. Bulbar urethral strictures, due to anatom- ical and etiological differences from strictures in the penile urethra, can be treated effectively with very high success rates. In this loca- tion, stricture outcomes are less ...

  18. An overview of oral mucosa condition of shisha smoker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Amtha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shisha is a water pipe that tobacco extract and fruit scented burnt using coal. It produces the smoke through the vessel and inhaled using a hose with good taste. The culture of shisha smoking is popular in Midle East country that curently has been also entering Indonesia. The side effect of shisha smoking habit is still very rare reported. Aim of this study is to describe the oral mucosa condition of shisha user. A preliminary observasional study was conducted at several sisha cafe at South Jakarta. Under informed consent, subject with habit of tobacco and shisha smoker were included. Sociodemographic data (age, gender, duration, frequency of smoking, salivary flow rate and oral mucosa changes were documented. Eighteen subjects were recruited into this study. Most of shisha smoker was also tobacco smoker. Shisha was more practiced by male at  age (15-24 years old. The oral mucosa changes such as keratosis, melanosis, leukoedema, coated tongue, gingivitis and xerostomia were found on subject with habit of tobacco smoking habit only or both shisha and tobacco smoking. In conclusion apparently the shisha smoking habit may casue oral mucosa changes almost the same with tobacco smoking habit

  19. Effects of individual characteristics on healthy oral mucosa autofluorescence spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veld, DCG; Sterenborg, HJCM; Roodenburg, JLN; Witjes, MJH

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy is a tool. for detecting tissue alterations in vivo. In a previous study, we found spectral differences between clinically normal mucosa of different patient groups. These are possibly caused by associated patient characteristics. In the present study, we explore the

  20. Effects of individual characteristics on healthy oral mucosa autofluorescence spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Witjes, Max J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy is a tool. for detecting tissue alterations in vivo. In a previous study, we found spectral differences between clinically normal mucosa of different patient groups. These are possibly caused by associated patient characteristics. In the present study, we explore the

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence of oral mucosa cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliashvili, Z. V.; Medoidze, T. D.; Melikishvili, Z. G.; Gogilashvili, K. T.

    2017-10-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra have been measured for cancer-infused and control mice mucosa tissues. It was established that there is quite a difference between their LIF spectral shapes. These spectral shapes are used to express the diagnostic of different states of tissues: from normal to cancer.

  2. Taste buds in the palatal mucosa of snakes | Berkhoudt | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An examination of the oral mucosa of Crotalus and several Scolecophidia revealed the presence of taste buds. The taste buds in these two divergent groups of snakes are similar in appearance, and correspond to previous descriptions of gustatory organs in other reptiles. Few taste buds were present in any specimen, and ...

  3. Aumento de gengiva queratinizada em mucosa peri-implantar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Milanezi de Almeida

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Estudos recentes são direcionados a explorar a relação da faixa da mucosa queratinizada com a saúde dos tecidos peri-implantares. Quando esta faixa não é suficiente, uma cirurgia para o aumento de mucosa queratinizada pode ser indicada, pois tem sido relatado que a presença ou a reconstrução de tecido queratinizado ao redor de implantes pode facilitar os procedimentos restauradores, promover a estética e ainda permitir a manutenção de uma higienização oral rotineira sem irritação ou desconforto ao paciente. Dentre os procedimentos cirúrgicos disponíveis, a técnica do enxerto gengival livre é consagrada na literatura periodontal para aumento da faixa de mucosa queratinizada. OBJETIVO: Este estudo relata um caso clínico em que foi realizada cirurgia de enxerto gengival livre com objetivo de aumentar a faixa da mucosa queratinizada na região de implantes previamente instalados na maxila, para suporte de prótese tipo protocolo. RELATO DO CASO: Foi realizada a cirurgia de enxerto gengival livre na região anterior da maxila, obtido do palato, na qual haviam sido instalados implantes osseointegrados para suporte de prótese tipo protocolo e a mucosa peri-implantar apresentava-se sem tecido queratinizado e inflamada. Após dois meses de reparação da cirurgia mucogengival, foi possível observar que o enxerto gengival livre favoreceu a saúde peri-implantar e os procedimentos protéticos de moldagem. CONCLUSÃO: Diante dos resultados clínicos, pode-se concluir que o enxerto gengival livre é uma técnica previsível e de fácil realização para aumento da faixa de mucosa queratinizada em mucosa peri-implantar de prótese protocolo.

  4. Repeated mechanical lengthening of intestinal segments in a novel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Steinberger, Doug; Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Chiang, Elvin; Lee, Steven L; Wu, Benjamin M; Dunn, James C Y

    2015-06-01

    Currently, animal models used for mechanical intestinal lengthening utilize a single lengthening procedure prior to analysis or restoration back into continuity. Here we developed a novel surgical model to examine the feasibility of repeated lengthening of intestinal segments. A Roux-en-Y jejunojejunostomy with a blind Roux limb was created in rats. An encapsulated polycaprolactone spring was placed into a 1cm segment of the Roux limb. After 4 weeks, a second encapsulated PCL spring was inserted into a 1cm portion of the lengthened segment. After another 4 weeks, the repeatedly lengthened segments were retrieved for histological analyses. Jejunal segments of the Roux limb were successfully lengthened from 1.0 cm to 2.6 ± 0.7 cm. Four weeks after the second PCL spring placement, 1.0 cm of the previously lengthened segment increased to 2.7 ± 0.8 cm. Stronger mechanical force was required to achieve subsequent re-lengthening. Lengthened and re-lengthened segments had increased smooth muscle thickness and crypt depth when compared to normal jejunal mucosa. Using the Roux-en-Y model, previously lengthened segments of intestine can be successfully re-lengthened. Intestinal segments may be subjected to multiple lengthening procedures to achieve clinically significant length for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wnt Lipidation and Modifiers in Intestinal Carcinogenesis and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Kaemmerer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The wingless (Wnt signaling is suggested as a fundamental hierarchical pathway in regulation of proliferation and differentiation of cells. The Wnt ligands are small proteins of about 40 kDa essentially for regulation and initiation of the Wnt activity. They are secreted proteins requiring acylation for activity in the Wnt signaling cascade and for functional interactivity with transmembrane proteins. Dual lipidation is important for posttranslational activation of the overwhelming number of Wnt proteins and is probably involved in their spatial distribution. The intestinal mucosa, where Wnt signaling is essential in configuration and maintenance, is an established model to study Wnt proteins and their role in carcinogenesis and cancer. The intestinal crypt-villus/crypt-plateau axis, a cellular system with self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation, is tightly coordinated by a Wnt gradient. In the review, some attention is given to Wnt3, Wnt3A, and Wnt2B as important members of the Wnt family to address the role of lipidation and modifiers of Wnt proteins in intestinal carcinogenesis. Wnt3 is an important player in establishing the Wnt gradient in intestinal crypts and is mainly produced by Paneth cells. Wnt2B is characterized as a mitochondrial protein and shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus. Porcupine and ACSL5, a long-chain fatty acid activating enzyme, are introduced as modifiers of Wnts and as interesting strategy to targeting Wnt-driven carcinogenesis.

  6. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-03-28

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m 2 - the human body's largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases.

  7. [Pathogenic aspects of stomach ulcerogenesis in acute intestinal obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyukov, V E; Nguen, K K

    To identify the patterns and the correlation of morphological and functional changes in stomach wall with the dynamics of different types of acute intestinal obstruction. The study was performed on 33 adult mongrel dogs of both genders weighing 17-20 kg. All researches were conducted in accordance with the documents, such as the 'Guide for the Care and Use of laboratory animals of the National Institute of Health (National Institute of Health - NIH, Bethesda, USA)' and 'Rules of work with experimental animals'. The same methods were used to study the morphology of stomach wall in normal conditions and after intestinal obstruction simulation. We used H & E stain, Van Gieson's picrofuchsin staining combined with Mallory. The choice of histochemical methods was determined by the need to study metabolic processes in epithelial cells and gastric mucosa glands. Einarson method for detecting total nucleic acids was used. The last group of methods was statistical analysis. We determined the regularities of structural organization of microcirculation in various parts of the stomach, the correlation of morphological and functional changes in stomach wall with the dynamics of different types of acute intestinal obstruction. Our data indicate proximal-distal gradient of gastric perfusion: the most pronounced vascular network and maximum blood flow are observed in proximal stomach in both normal conditions and acute intestinal obstruction. More tenuous and reduced blood flow was revealed in the antrum, that is morphological basis of the most frequent localization of acute ulcers in this department.

  8. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I sc ), transepithelial potential (V t ) and resistance (R t ) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 μM to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I sc cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H 2 histamine receptor, 2) Ca 2+ signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H + /K + -ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H + /K + -ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  9. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa from cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of colon cancer patients and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 cancer patients and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of 10 of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r=0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy. PMID:24806665

  10. Abnormal thymic stromal lymphopoietin expression in the duodenal mucosa of patients with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancheri, Paolo; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Rescigno, Maria; Giuffrida, Paolo; Fornasa, Giulia; Tsilingiri, Katerina; Pender, Sylvia L F; Papadia, Cinzia; Wood, Eleanor; Pasini, Alessandra; Ubezio, Cristina; Vanoli, Alessandro; Forbes, Alastair; MacDonald, Thomas T; Corazza, Gino R

    2016-10-01

    The short isoform of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine constitutively expressed by epithelial cells, is crucial in preserving immune tolerance in the gut. TSLP deficiency has been implicated in sustaining intestinal damage in Crohn's disease. We explored mucosal TSLP expression and function in refractory and uncomplicated coeliac disease (CD), a T-cell-mediated enteropathy induced by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. TSLP isoforms-long and short-and receptors-TSLPR and interleukin (IL)-7Rα-were assessed by immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and qRT-PCR in the duodenum of untreated, treated, potential and refractory patients with CD. The ability of the serine protease furin or CD biopsy supernatants to cleave TSLP was evaluated by immunoblotting. The production of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 by untreated CD biopsies cultured ex vivo with TSLP isoforms was also assessed. Mucosal TSLP, but not TSLPR and IL-7Rα, was reduced in untreated CD and refractory CD in comparison to treated CD, potential CD and controls. Transcripts of both TSLP isoforms were decreased in active CD mucosa. Furin, which was overexpressed in active CD biopsies, was able to cleave TSLP in vitro. Accordingly, refractory and untreated CD supernatants showed higher TSLP-degrading capacity in comparison to treated CD and control supernatants. In our ex vivo model, both TSLP isoforms significantly downregulated IFN-γ and IL-8 production by untreated CD biopsies. Reduced mucosal TSLP expression may contribute to intestinal damage in refractory and untreated CD. Further studies are needed to verify whether restoring TSLP might be therapeutically useful especially in refractory patients with CD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Study and comparative evaluation of radiation lesions and recovery processes in the large intestine affected by radionuclides of the rare earth group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrent'ev, L.N.

    1975-01-01

    Prolonged chronic irradiation of rat large intestine tissues with various types of β-radiators revealed a definite dependence between the tissue doses, damaging effect and nature of recovery. Alterations in blood vessels and inclusions of microbial flora in the necrotized sites of the tunica mucosa were partly responsible for promoting the duration of inflammatory and recovery processes [ru

  12. Changes in the composition of intestinal fungi and their role in mice with dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xinyun; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Xi; Wu, Na; Jiang, Weiwei; Li, Xia; Li, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yulan

    2015-05-27

    Intestinal fungi are increasingly believed to greatly influence gut health. However, the effects of fungi on intestinal inflammation and on gut bacterial constitution are not clear. Here, based on pyrosequencing method, we reveal that fungal compositions vary in different intestinal segments (ileum, cecum, and colon), prefer different colonization locations (mucosa and feces), and are remarkably changed during intestinal inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-colitis mouse models compare to normal controls: Penicillium, Wickerhamomyces, Alternaria, and Candida are increased while Cryptococcus, Phialemonium, Wallemia and an unidentified Saccharomycetales genus are decreased in the guts of DSS-colitis mice. Fungi-depleted mice exhibited aggravated acute DSS-colitis associated with gain of Hallella, Barnesiella, Bacteroides, Alistipes, and Lactobacillus and loss of butyrate-producing Clostridium XIVa, and Anaerostipes compare with normal control. In contrast, bacteria-depleted mice show attenuated acute DSS-colitis. Mice with severely chronic recurrent DSS-colitis show increased plasma (1,3)-β-D-glucan level and fungal translocation into the colonic mucosa, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen. This work demonstrate the different roles of fungi in acute and chronic recurrent colitis: They are important counterbalance to bacteria in maintaining intestinal micro-ecological homeostasis and health in acutely inflamed intestines, but can harmfully translocate into abnormal sites and could aggravate disease severity in chronic recurrent colitis.

  13. A mucosa-mimetic material for the mucoadhesion testing of thermogelling semi-solids

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Jéssica Bassi; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V.; Bruschi, Marcos L.; Cook, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Mucosa-mimetic materials are synthetic substrates which aim to replace animal tissue in mucoadhesion experiments. One potential mucosa-mimetic material is a hydrogel comprised of N-acryloyl-d-glucosamine and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, which has been investigated as a surrogate for animal mucosae in the mucoadhesion testing of tablets and solution formulations. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of this mucosa-mimetic material in the testing of thermogelling semi-solid formulations, ...

  14. Sevelamer crystals in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract in a teenager with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joseph; Olson, Kristin; Butani, Lavjay

    2016-02-01

    Non-calcium-containing phosphate binders, such as sevelamer preparations, are being increasingly used in patients on dialysis due to their lower association with hypercalcemia and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While minor gastrointestinal side effects are quite common with the use of sevelamer, more serious gastrointestinal toxicities have only rarely been reported. We report a pediatric patient on maintenance dialysis receiving sevelamer hydrochloride who developed severe abdominal pain and a high-grade stricture of the sigmoid colon. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, resulting in a partial colectomy and colostomy. Histopathologic examination showed colonic mucosal injury and characteristic "fish-scale"-like sevelamer hydrochloride crystals within the mucosa. Whether the sevelamer crystals were causal, contributory or purely incidental remains to be clearly elucidated. However, our case raises sufficient concern to warrant additional investigation into whether there is a causal relationship between sevelamer use and intestinal mucosal injury.

  15. In vitro evaluation of the mucin-adhesion ability and probiotic potential of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, V D; Parungao-Balolong, M M; Kang, D-K

    2014-08-01

    In this report, we characterized the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1, focusing on its in vitro mucin-adhesion abilities. Screening assays were used to evaluate LM1. Previous studies on Lact. mucosae species have been performed, but few have examined the ability of this species to adhere to and colonize the intestinal mucosa. Thus, adhesion, aggregation and pathogen inhibition assays of LM1 along with microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) assay were carried out in comparison with another putative probiotic, Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, and the commercial strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Based on MATS assay, the cell surfaces of the lactobacilli strains were found to be hydrophobic and highly electron-donating, but the average hydropathy (GRAVY) index of predicted surface-exposed proteins in the LM1 genome indicated that most were hydrophilic. LM1 showed the highest adhesion, aggregation and hydrophobicity among the strains tested and significantly inhibited the adhesion of Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium KCCM 40253. Correlations among adhesion, aggregation and hydrophobicity, as well as between coaggregation and displacement of E. coli, were observed. Increased adhesion may not always correlate with increased pathogen inhibition due to various strain-specific mechanisms. Nevertheless, LM1 has promising probiotic properties that can be explored further using a genomics approach. Our data on adhesion of LM1 strain showed a significant correlation between adhesion, hydrophobicity of cell surface and autoaggregation. This study gives basic knowledge for the elucidation of the adhesion mechanism of Lactobacillus sp. and prediction of its adherence in specific host models. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Reduction of intestinal mucosal immune function in heat-stressed rats and bacterial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Li, Huanrong; Lu, An; Zhong, Yougang; Hou, Xiaolin; Wang, Ning; Jia, Dan; Zan, Junlan; Zhao, Hong; Xu, Jianqin; Liu, Fenghua

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to further understand the effects and mechanism of heat stress on the intestinal mucosal immune system of the rat, including changes in the intestinal mucosal barrier and immune function and their effects on bacterial translocation. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into control and heat-stress groups. Both groups were housed in a 25°C environment of 60% relative humidity. The heat-stress group was subjected to 40°C for 2 h daily over 3 days. Compared with the control group villi length in the small intestines of the heat-stress group was shortened. Jejunal mucosa were seriously damaged and the number of goblet cells in the epithelia of the duodenum and jejunum was significantly reduced. Electron microscopy revealed intestinal mucosal disorder, a large number of exudates of inflammatory fibrous material, fuzzy tight junction structure between epithelial cells, and cell gap increases in the heat-stress group. Transcription of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10, was significantly reduced, as was that of the intestinal mucosal immune-related proteins TLR2, TLR4, and IgA. The number of CD3(+) T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD8(-) T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) was significantly lower, while the number of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells was significantly increased. The bacteria isolated from the MLNs were Escherichia coli. Heat stress damages rat intestinal mechanical and mucosal immune barriers, and reduces immune function of the intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymphoid tissues, leading to bacterial translocation.

  17. Rebamipide suppresses diclofenac-induced intestinal permeability via mitochondrial protection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Lei; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Chang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Juan; Yao, Qiang; Chen, Mo-Li

    2012-03-14

    To investigate the protective effect and mechanism of rebamipide on small intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice. Diclofenac (2.5 mg/kg) was administered once daily for 3 d orally. A control group received the vehicle by gavage. Rebamipide (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically once a day for 3 d 4 h after diclofenac administration. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by Evans blue and the FITC-dextran method. The ultrastructure of the mucosal barrier was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mitochondrial function including mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-reduced (NADH) levels, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATPase activities were measured. Small intestinal mucosa was collected for assessment of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Compared with the control group, intestinal permeability was significantly increased in the diclofenac group, which was accompanied by broken tight junctions, and significant increases in MDA content and MPO activity. Rebamipide significantly reduced intestinal permeability, improved inter-cellular tight junctions, and was associated with decreases in intestinal MDA content and MPO activity. At the mitochondrial level, rebamipide increased SDH and ATPase activities, NADH level and decreased mitochondrial swelling. Increased intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac can be attenuated by rebamipide, which partially contributed to the protection of mitochondrial function.

  18. Threonine, arginine, and glutamine: Influences on intestinal physiology, immunology, and microbiology in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, C; Rochell, S J; Applegate, T J

    2018-03-01

    Even though the intestine represents a small proportion of body weight in broiler chickens, its requirements for energy and nutrients are high. A healthy broiler intestine has a well-coordinated immune system that must accommodate commensal microbiota while inhibiting the colonization and proliferation of harmful pathogens. Modern commercial intensive practices impose a high sanitary pressure that may exacerbate the progression of intestinal diseases such as coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis. The incidence of these diseases may increase worldwide due to mounting pressure to limit the use of subtherapeutic antibiotics as growth promoters or ionophores for coccidial suppression/prevention in the diets of broilers. For this reason, altering dietary concentrations of some amino acids, particularly trophic amino acids, may be beneficial to modulate the intestinal physiology, immunology, and microbiology of broilers. Trophic amino acids, such as threonine, arginine, and glutamine, play a very important role on the intestinal mucosa and may support increased epithelial turnover rates to improve intestinal recovery following an insult. Furthermore, these amino acids may help to minimize over-activation of the innate immune system, which is the most expensive in terms of nutrients and energy, as well as modulate the intestinal microbiota. The objective of this review is to provide insight into the potential role of trophic amino acids in these processes and report some updated studies of their use in diets for broiler chickens.

  19. Regulation of intestinal immune responses through TLR activation: implications for pro- and prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander eDe Kivit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, allergic gastroenteritis (e.g. eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLR play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation.

  20. Influence of feeding alternative fiber sources on the gastrointestinal fermentation, digestive enzyme activities and mucosa morphology of growing Greylag geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L W; Meng, Q X; Li, D Y; Zhang, Y W; Ren, L P

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this trial was to study the influence of dietary fiber sources on the gastrointestinal fermentation, digestive enzyme activity, and mucosa morphology of growing Greylag geese. In total, 240 Greylag geese (28-day-old) were allocated to 4 treatments (15 pens/treatment) differing in dietary fiber source: corn straw silage (CSS group), steam-exploded corn straw (SECS group), steam-exploded wheat straw (SEWS group), or steam-exploded rice straw (SERS group). At 112 days of age, 15 birds per group were euthanized to collect samples. No difference (P > 0.05) was found on all the gastrointestinal pH values and ammonia-nitrogen concentrations between the groups. The CSS and SERS groups had a lower (P fiber sources resulted in different VFA profiles, especially in the gizzard and ceca. Almost all gastrointestinal protease activities of the CSS group were higher (P  0.05) on the intestinal mucosa morphology. These results suggest that corn straw silage improves protein digestion while steam-exploded straw provides more energy. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Persistence of Colonization of Human Colonic Mucosa by a Probiotic Strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, after Oral Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alander, Minna; Satokari, Reetta; Korpela, Riitta; Saxelin, Maija; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; von Wright, Atte

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the most thoroughly studied probiotic strains. Its advantages in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders are well documented. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate with colonic biopsies the attachment of strain GG to human intestinal mucosae and the persistence of the attachment after discontinuation of GG administration. A whey drink fermented with strain GG was fed to human volunteers for 12 days. Fecal samples were collected before, during, and after consumption. L. rhamnosus GG-like colonies were detected in both fecal and colonic biopsy samples. Strain GG was identified by its characteristic colony morphology, a lactose fermentation test, and PCR. This study showed that strain GG was able to attach in vivo to colonic mucosae and, although the attachment was temporary, to remain for more than a week after discontinuation of GG administration. The results demonstrate that the study of fecal samples alone is not sufficient in evaluating colonization by a probiotic strain. PMID:9872808

  2. Transcriptome signatures in Helicobacter pylori-infected mucosa identifies acidic mammalian chitinase loss as a corpus atrophy marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of gastric cancer cases are believed to be caused by chronic infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, and atrophic corpus gastritis is a predisposing condition to gastric cancer development. We aimed to increase understanding of the molecular details of atrophy by performing a global transcriptome analysis of stomach tissue. Methods Biopsies from patients with different stages of H. pylori infection were taken from both the antrum and corpus mucosa and analyzed on microarrays. The stages included patients without current H. pylori infection, H. pylori-infected without corpus atrophy and patients with current or past H. pylori-infection with corpus-predominant atrophic gastritis. Results Using clustering and integrated analysis, we found firm evidence for antralization of the corpus mucosa of atrophy patients. This antralization harbored gain of gastrin expression, as well as loss of expression of corpus-related genes, such as genes associated with acid production, energy metabolism and blood clotting. The analyses provided detailed molecular evidence for simultaneous intestinal metaplasia (IM) and spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in atrophic corpus tissue. Finally, acidic mammalian chitinase, a chitin-degrading enzyme produced by chief cells, was shown to be strongly down-regulated in corpus atrophy. Conclusions Transcriptome analysis revealed several gene groups which are related to development of corpus atrophy, some of which were increased also in H. pylori-infected non-atrophic patients. Furthermore, loss of acidic chitinase expression is a promising marker for corpus atrophy. PMID:24119614

  3. Protection against increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation induced by intestinal obstruction in mice treated with viable and heat-killed Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, Simone V; Viana, Mirelle L; Santos, Rosana G; Arantes, Rosa M E; Martins, Flaviano S; Nicoli, Jacques R; Machado, José A N; Correia, Maria Isabel T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2011-06-01

    There are substantial evidences suggesting that probiotics can protect the gastrointestinal tract against inflammatory or infectious episodes. The effects of oral treatment with viable or heat-killed cells of Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) on bacterial translocation, intestinal permeability, histological aspect of the ileum, and some immunological parameters were evaluated in a murine intestinal obstruction (IO) model. Bacterial translocation and intestinal permeability in the IO group were significantly higher when compared to a Sham group (p viable and heat-killed S. boulardii prevented these increases, and the data obtained for IO + Sb and IO + heat-killed Sb groups were similar to those observed in the Sham group (p > 0.05). Histological analysis showed preservation of the ileum mucosa in mice that received both forms of the yeast when compared to the lesions observed in the IO group. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-10 and intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) were higher in the animals that received both yeast treatments when compared to those from IO and Sham groups. Oral treatment with viable or heat-killed cells of S. boulardii maintained intestinal integrity and modulated the immune system in a murine IO model, preventing bacterial translocation and intestinal lesions.

  4. Ultrastructural Assessment of the Integrity of the enteric Mucosa of Commercial Turkeys Vaccinated against Coccidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins MRFB

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was evaluated the villus integrity of commercial turkeys submitted to coccidiosis prevention methods and challenged with Eimeria field oocysts, using scanning electron microscopy. Sixty BUT 9 female commercial turkeys were distributed in a completely randomized block design split with two treatments: T1- control diet without vaccinations against coccidiosis and anticoccidial drug, and T2- vaccinated against coccidiosis (commercial vaccine. On d 21 of life, all birds of all treatments were challenged with a mixed-species containing E. meleagrimitis and E. galopavonis, via crop intubation with 1 mL of ~20,000 sporulated oocysts/bird. The size of the inoculum was determined in previous experiments. At 27 and 70 days of age, five birds per treatment were randomly removed to evaluate the intestinal integrity. Duodenum, jejunum and ileum segments were collected and processed according to routine scanning electron microscope. The enteric mucosa integrity of the commercial turkeys subjected to coccidiosis vaccination was reduced when compared to the birds of the control treatment. There was no difference in the performance results, therefore these results cannot be attributed to the vaccination as well as to the ineffectiveness against the challenge that was administered.

  5. Uncomplicated Diverticular Disease: Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Human Gut Mucosa before and after Rifaximin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Cianci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Uncomplicated diverticular disease (UDD is a frequent condition in adults. The pathogenesis of symptoms remains unknown. Bacteria are able to interact with Toll-like receptors (TLRs and to induce inflammation through both innate immunity and T-cell recruitment. We investigated the pattern of TLRs 2 and 4 and the intestinal homing in patients with UDD before and after a course of Rifaximin. Methods. Forty consecutive patients with UDD and 20 healthy asymptomatic subjects were enrolled. Among UDD patients, 20 were assigned to a 2-month course of treatment with Rifaximin 1.2 g/day for 15 days/month and 20 received placebo. Blood sample and colonic biopsies were obtained from patients and controls. The samples were collected and analyzed at baseline and at the end of treatment. Flow cytometry was performed using monoclonal antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD103, TCR-gamma/delta, CD14, TLR2, and TLR4. Results. In UDD, TLR2 and TLR4 expression on immune cell subpopulations from blood and mucosa of the affected colon are altered as compared with controls. Rifaximin treatment induced significant modifications of altered conditions. Conclusions. Our data show the role of TLRs in the development of inflammation in UDD. TLRs distribution is altered in UDD and these alterations are reversed after antibiotic treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02068482.

  6. Diagnosis of intestinal and extra intestinal amoebiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Myriam Consuelo; Quiroz, Damian Arnoldo; Pinilla, Analida Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to carry out a review of the national and international literature as of the XXth century in order to update the advances for the diagnosis of complex odd Entamoeba histolytic / Entamoeba dispar and that of intestinal and extra intestinal amoebiasis that may be of use to the scientific community. As well as to unify the diagnostic criteria of this parasitosis known as a public health problem, and as a consequence of that, optimize the quality of population care. Data source: there was a systematic search for the scientific literature Publisher in Spanish and English since 1960 until today, this selection started on the first semester of 2006 until 2007, in the development of the line on intestinal and extra-intestinal amoebiasis of the Medical School of the National University of Colombia. A retrospective search process was carried out, systematically reviewing the most relevant articles as well as the products of this research line. In deciding how to make this article, there was a continuous search in different data bases such as Medline, SciELO and other bases in the library of the National University of Colombia, as well as other classical books related to the subject. For that purpose the terms amoebiasis, odd Entamoeba histolytic, Entamoeba, diagnosis, epidemiology, dysentery, amoebic liver abscess, were used. Studies selection: titles and abstracts were reviewed to select the original publications and the most representative ones related to this article's subject. Data extraction: the articles were classified according to the subject, the chronology and the authors according to the scientific contribution to solve the problem. Synthesis of the data: in the fi rst instance, a chronological critical analysis was carried out to order and synthesize the progress made in the diagnosis until confirmation of the experts' agreements in the field of amoebiasis was obtained throughout the world. Conclusion: this article summarizes what has taken place

  7. Independent occurence of gastric tumor and intestinal metaplasia by x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Ito, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    The selective occurence of gastric tumors and intestinal metaplasias in the stomach by X-irradiation were described both in mice and rats. The appearance of both lesions was greatly influenced by animal's strains in both species and also by the sex in rats. A few gastric tumors were observed in the animals given a high does with spilt into low doses of X-irradiation. The adequate dose for gastric tumorigenesis may be around 20 Gy in mice and 15 Gy in rats. A good relationship between X-ray dose and incidence of gastric tumor was observed in ICR mice. Frequency of intestinal metaplasia by X-irradiation was much higher in rats compared to that in mice. X-ray dose requested for moderate and induction of intestinal metaplasia was decreased with a dose which was induced erosion and gastric tumor. It has been empirically clarified that an elevation of pH value in the gastric juice is one of the principal factors responsible for the development of intestinal metaplasia in the gastric mucosa among the conditions thus for introduced. In this article, we have introduced the relevant examples about intestinal metaplasia without carcinogenic insult, and the relationship between gastric tumor and intestinal metaplasia were described. The intestinal metaplasia was not always observed within or adjacent to neoplastic gastric glands. A combined treatment of X-ray and MNNG was not effective for gastric tumor and frequency of intestinal metaplasia was inversely related to the incidence of gastric tumors. In conclusion, occurrence of gastric tumor and intestinal metaplasia may be independent, and intestinal metaplasia might not be a prerequite for the occurrence of gastric tumor. (author)

  8. Verruca vulgaris of the buccal mucosa: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aastha Mattoo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral verruca vulgaris is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Verruca vulgaris most frequently occurs on the fingers, toes, soles, and dorsal surfaces of hands and is mostly asymptomatic. Varieties of verrucous and papillary lesions affect the skin as well as oral mucosa which may be either benign or reactive. Common wart is one of the most commonly observed skin growths and a lesion of childhood. Intraoral warts can occur at any age with equal incidence in both genders but are most commonly seen in the third to fifth decade. It is found commonly on the palate followed by lip, tongue, buccal mucosa, and rarely seen on gingiva. Surgical excision with adequate margins is the treatment of choice.

  9. Effects of long-term acid suppressants with ranitidine and omeprazole on gastric mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P C Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Proton pump inhibitors are used widely for gastroesophageal reflux disease and ulcer type dyspepsia. Majority of the patients require long term medication. H2 receptor antagonist are also used for relief of symptoms. Though tachyphylaxis has been reported, symptom response is seen with long term use. The aim of the present study was to study the effects of long-term acid suppressants on gastric antral histology. Methods: Patients who received long-term acid suppressants such as ranitidine and omeprazole for gastroesophageal reflux disease or dyspepsia were included. All of them had an antral biopsy for histology and H. pylori status at baseline, at 6 months and 12 months. Patients on acid suppressants for less than a year or on long-term non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs were excluded from the study. The grading of gastritis was classified as chronic active gastritis, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. Results: Thirty patients received ranitidine and 28 omeprazole. In H. pylori positive group, the median duration of ranitidine and omeprazole were 3 years (1.5 to 8 years and 4 years (1 to 10 years respectively. Two thirds of patients had chronic active gastritis (ranitidine: 35.5%; omeprazole:26.6%; 10 had gastric atrophy (ranitidine: 6.6%; omeprazole:15.5% and 7 had intestinal metaplasia (ranitidine4.4%; omeprazole11.1%. Four of the 10 patients on omeprazole showed progression of histology as against only one of the 13 patients on ranitidine at one year of follow up. In omeprazole pylori negative patients, the median duration of ranitidine and omeprazole was 2.5 years (range 1 to 6 years and 3 years (range 2 to 7 years respectively. Irrespective of the acid suppressants, the baseline histology was either chronic active gastritis (78.5% or gastric atrophy (21.5%. None had intestinal metaplasia. Also there was no progression in histology staging during the follow up. Conclusions: Long-term acid

  10. Glass embedded in labial mucosa for 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanth K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies may be deposited in the oral cavity either by traumatic injury or iatrogenically. Among the commonly encountered iatrogenic foreign bodies are restorative materials like amalgam, obturation materials, broken instruments, needles, etc. Few reports of glass pieces embedded in the soft tissues of the mouth have been published. We report a case where glass pieces had been lodged in the lower labial mucosa for 20 years, with consequent peripheral reactive bone formation.

  11. Paraneoplastic disorders of hair, nails, oral mucosa and pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kavak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this section, paraneoplastic entites of hair, nail, oral mucosa and pigmentation changes have been discussed. Some skin findings are “strong” indicator of a malignancy whereas others are not. Readers will encounter some “coincidental” or “common” entities as well as more “severe” changes for a paraneoplastic sign. In addition, it is crucial that some paraneoplastic lesions may predict for a recurrence of malignancy.

  12. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma arising from the kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Naoya; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Horinaga, Minoru; Hongo, Hiroshi; Ito, Yujiro; Watanabe, Takuro; Masuda, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Primary renal lymphoma is rare, and most are intermediate- and high-grade lymphomas of B-cell lineage, such as diffuse large B-cell or Burkitt lymphoma. We report a case of low-grade B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) arising from the kidney. Only a few cases of primary renal MALT lymphoma have been published. PMID:24554980

  13. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  14. Intestinal failure: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Philip; Lal, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the gut to absorb necessary water, macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein, and fat), micronutrients, and electrolytes sufficient to sustain life and requiring intravenous supplementation or replacement. Acute IF (types 1 and 2) is the initial phase of the illness and may last for weeks to a few months, and chronic IF (type 3) from months to years. The challenge of caring for patients with IF is not merely the management of the underlying condition leading to IF or the correct provision of appropriate nutrition or both but also the prevention of complications, whether thromboembolic phenomenon (for example, venous occlusion), central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection, IF-associated liver disease, or metabolic bone disease. This review looks at recent questions regarding chronic IF (type 3), its diagnosis and management, the role of the multidisciplinary team, and novel therapies, including hormonal treatment for short bowel syndrome but also surgical options for intestinal lengthening and intestinal transplant. PMID:29399329

  15. Small intestine diverticuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Risov, A.

    1991-01-01

    The routine method of contrast matter passage applied to 850 patients with different gastrointestinal diseases proved inefficient to detect any small-intestinal diverticuli. The following modiffications of the method have been tested in order to improve the diagnostic possibilities of the X-ray: study at short intervals, assisted passage, enteroclysm, pharmacodynamic impact, retrograde filling of the ileum by irrigoscopy. Twelve diverticuli of the small-intestinal loops were identified: 5 Meckel's diverticuli, 2 solitary of which one of the therminal ileum, 2 double diverticuli and 1 multiple diverticulosis of the jejunum. The results show that the short interval X-ray examination of the small intestines is the method of choice for identifying local changes in them. The solitary diverticuli are not casuistic scarcity, its occurrence is about 0.5% at purposeful X-ray investigation. The assisted passage method is proposed as a method of choice for detection of the Meckel's diverticulum. 5 figs., 3 tabs. 18 refs

  16. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok

    1992-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome

  17. Small Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  18. The intestinal calcistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main physiological function of vitamin D is maintenance of calcium homeostasis by its effect on calcium absorption, and bone health in association with parathyroid gland. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD is defined as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD levels <20 ng/ml. Do all subjects with VDD have clinical disease according to this definition? We hypothesize that there exist an intestinal calcistat, which controls the calcium absorption independent of PTH levels. It consists of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR on intestinal brush border, which senses calcium in intestinal cells and vitamin D system in intestinal cells. CaSR dampens the generation of active vitamin D metabolite in intestinal cells and decrease active transcellular calcium transport. It also facilitates passive paracellular diffusion of calcium in intestine. This local adaptation adjusts the fractional calcium absorption according the body requirement. Failure of local adaptation due to decreased calcium intake, decreased supply of 25OHD, mutation in CaSR or vitamin D system decreases systemic calcium levels and systemic adaptations comes into the play. Systemic adaptations consist of rise in PTH and increase in active vitamin D metabolites. These adaptations lead to bone resorption and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Not all subjects with varying levels of VDD manifest with secondary hyperparathyroidism and decreased in bone mineral density. We suggest that rise in PTH is first indicator of VDD along with decrease in BMD depending on duration of VDD. Hence, subjects with any degree of VDD with normal PTH and BMD should not be labeled as vitamin D deficient. These subjects can be called subclinical VDD, and further studies are required to assess beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in this subset of population.

  19. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  1. Delivery of bioactive peptides and proteins across oral (buccal) mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, S; Kremer, M; Nagy, K; Squier, C

    2001-06-01

    The identification of an increasing array of highly potent, endogenous peptide and protein factors termed cytokines, that can be efficiently synthesized using recombinant DNA technology, offers exciting new approaches for drug therapy. However, the physico-chemical and biological properties of these agents impose limitations in formulation and development of optimum drug delivery systems as well as on the routes of delivery. Oral mucosa, including the lining of the cheek (buccal mucosa), floor of mouth and underside of tongue (sublingual mucosa) and gingival mucosa, has received much attention in the last decade because it offers excellent accessibility, is not easily traumatized and avoids degradation of proteins and peptides that occurs as a result of oral administration, gastrointestinal absorption and first-pass hepatic metabolism. Peptide absorption occurs across oral mucosa by passive diffusion and it is unlikely that there is a carrier-mediated transport mechanism. The principal pathway is probably via the intercellular route where the major permeability barrier is represented by organized array of neutral lipids in the superficial layers of the epithelium. The relative role of aqueous as opposed to the lipid pathway in drug transport is still under investigation; penetration is not necessarily enhanced by simply increasing lipophilicity, for other effects, such as charge and molecular size, also play an important role in absorption of peptide and protein drugs. Depending on the pharmacodynamics of the peptides, various oral mucosal delivery systems can be designed. Delivery of peptide/protein drugs by conventional means such as solutions has some limitations. The possibility of excluding a major part of drug from absorption by involuntary swallowing and the continuous dilution due to salivary flow limits a controlled release. However these limitations can be overcome by adhesive dosage forms such as gels, films, tablets, and patches. They can localize the

  2. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Intestinal Mechanomorphological Remodeling Induced by Long-Term Low-Fiber Diet in Rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yue; Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua

    2017-01-01

    Short-term feeding with low-fiber diet remodels the mechanomorphological properties in the rabbit small intestine. The aims were to study the effect of feeding low-fiber diet for 5 months on mechanomorphological properties including the collagen fraction in the rabbit intestines. Fifteen rabbits...... were divided into an Intervention group (IG, n = 10) fed a low-fiber diet and a Control group (CG, n = 5) fed a normal diet for 5 months. Five months later, four 10-cm-long segments obtained from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and large intestine were used for histological and mechanical analysis......, respectively. The wall thickness, wall area, mucosa and muscle layer thickness decreased whereas the submucosa layer thickness increased in the IG (p

  4. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  5. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  6. Fibrosing gastrointestinal leiomyositis as a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in an 8-month-old dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C S; Fales-Williams, A J; Reimer, S B; Lotsikas, P J; Haynes, J S

    2007-01-01

    An 8-month-old, female, mixed-breed dog presented to the Iowa State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a 1-month history of vomiting and diarrhea. An exploratory laparotomy was performed revealing markedly distended and fluid-filled small and large intestines that were not obstructed. The clinical condition of the dog did not improve subsequent to exploratory surgery, and it was euthanized. At necropsy, both the small and large intestines were distended (approximately 4 cm in diameter) and fluid-filled, and the wall was thin. The abdominal cavity contained approximately 500 ml of a brownish clear fluid. Microscopic lesions of the intestines were confined to the intestinal tunica muscularis and muscularis mucosae and consisted of locally extensive-to-diffuse replacement of the smooth muscle by fibrous tissue and multifocal infiltration by a moderately dense mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate. A unique finding was the presence of similar microscopic lesions in the tunica muscularis of the urinary bladder and stomach.

  7. Intestinal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abdominal X-ray of patients 1, 3 and 4 demonstrated dilated small bowel loops with fluid levels in keeping with intestinal ... myxoid/vascular pattern characterised by a variable admixture of capillary-calibre blood vessels, .... in the present study had a past history of abdominal trauma or surgery. Ancillary histopathological ...

  8. Small intestine and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    To highlight the recent studies which have enhanced our appreciation of the composition of the microbiota in the human small intestine and its relevance to the health of the host. In the past number of years, the composition of the microorganisms present in our small intestines has been the subject of greater scrutiny than ever before. These investigations have been possible as a consequence of the development and utilization of new molecular tools which have revolutionized the field of microbial ecology and have focused predominantly on the small intestinal microbiota associated with pediatric celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and pouchitis. The impact of invasive procedures, such as small bowel transplant, ileostomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis, on the ileal microbiota has also been investigated. The ever greater appreciation of the link between the small intestinal microbiota and the health status of the host has the potential to lead to the development of new strategies to alter this microbiota in a targeted way to prevent or treat specific disorders.

  9. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ileostomy and your diet Ileostomy - caring for your stoma Ileostomy - changing your pouch Ileostomy - discharge Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge Low-fiber diet Surgical wound care - open Types of ileostomy When you have nausea ...

  10. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... obstruction. Brit. I. Surg. 1998; 85: 1071-1074. The acute abdomen: Intestinal obstruction. In: Primary surgery, Vol. 1. Edited by Maurice King et al. Oxford. Med. PubL, Oxford. 1990; 142-169. Fluids and electrolyte management. In: Essentials of pediatric surgery. Edited by Marc Rowe et al. Mosby,. St. Louis ...

  11. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... localized pocket of pus caused by infection from bacteria. More common in Crohn’s than in colitis, an abscess may form in the intestinal wall—sometimes causing it to bulge out. Visible abscesses, such as those around the anus, look like boils and treatment often involves lancing. Symptoms of ...

  12. Intestinal failure in childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) was one of the first recognised conditions of protracted IF. With the increasing and successful use of long-term PN during the last three decades, several other causes of IF have emerged. Long-term PN and home-PN are the mainstay of therapy, independent of the nature of “Intestinal failure” ...

  13. The effect of probiotics on broiler growth and intestinal morphology when used to prevent Campylobacter jejuni colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Ştef

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to establish the effect of probiotic microorganisms on growth performance and intestinal changes caused by Campylobacter jejuni colonization.In this respect, we used four probiotic microorganisms, namely: Lactobacillus paracasei JR, L. rhamnosus 15b, Y L. lactis and L. lactis FOA.The administration of probiotic microorganisms in different combinations and in different periods of growth does not significantly influence the bioproductive indices of broilers,that is,the total gain, feed intake and FCR (p>0.05. After studying the intestinal mucosa, it was concluded that the four microorganisms administered in broilers’s food determineschanges in the mucosa, inhibiting the development of Campylobacter jejuni,by the presence of smaller caliciform cells and the presence ofreduced leukocyte infiltration in the chorion of the mucosal.

  14. Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT in small intestine associated with amyloidosis: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghui; Cho, Hyun Yee; Ha, Seung Yeon; Chung, Dong Hae; Kim, Na Rae; An, Jung Suk

    2011-05-01

    A 62-yr-old man presented with a 5-yr history of intermittent abdominal distention and pain. These symptoms persisted for several months and subsided without treatment. A diagnosis of suspected small bowel lymphoma was made based on plain radiograph and computerized tomogram findings, and he was referred to our institution for further evaluation. Segmental resection of the small intestine was performed and the diagnosis of marginal zone B-cell lymphoma associated with amyloidosis was made. This is the first case of marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) in the small intestine associated with amyloidosis in Korea.

  15. Effects of Cortisol on the Intestinal Mucosal Immune Response during Cohabitant Challenge with IPNV in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niklasson, Lars; Sundh, Henrik; Olsen, Rolf-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) causes high incidence of disease in salmonids during the first period after SW transfer. During this period as well as during periods of stress, cortisol levels increase and indications of a relationship between IPNV susceptibility and cortisol have been...... response differs from the systemic, but that both are modulated by the stress hormone cortisol....... suggested. The intestine is an entry route and a target tissue for IPNV displaying severe enteritis and sloughing of the mucosa in infected fish. The mechanisms behind effects of the virus on the intestinal tissue and the impact of cortisol on the effect remain unclear. In the present study, Atlantic salmon...

  16. Probiotic Mixture Golden Bifido Prevents Neonatal Escherichia coli K1 Translocation via Enhancing Intestinal Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zeng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis is a severe infection characterized by high mortality in neonates. Successful colonization and translocation across the intestinal mucosa have been regarded as the critical steps for E. coli K1 sepsis and meningitis. We recently reported that the probiotic mixture, Golden Bifido (containing live Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium, and Streptococcus thermophilus, LBS has a preventive role against neonatal E. coli K1 bacteremia and meningitis. However, the interaction between the neonatal gut barrier, probiotics and E. coli K1 is still not elucidated. The present study aims to investigate how LBS exerts its protective effects on neonatal gut barrier during E. coli K1 infection. The beneficial effects of LBS were explored in vitro and in vivo using human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and rat model of neonatal E. coli K1 infection, respectively. Our results showed that stimulation with E. coli K1 was able to cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, which were reflected by E. coli K1-induced intestinal damage and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, reduction of mucin, immunoglobulin A (IgA and tight junction proteins expression, as well as increase in intestinal permeability, all these changes facilitate E. coli K1 intestinal translocation. However, these changes were alleviated when HT-29 cells were treated with LBS before E. coli K1 infection. Furthermore, we found that LBS-treated neonatal rats (without E. coli K1 infection have showed higher production of mucin, ZO-1, IgA, Ki67 in intestinal mucosa as well as lower intestinal permeability than that of non-treated rats, indicating that LBS could accelerate the development of neonatal intestinal defense. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancement of the neonatal intestinal defense to fight against E. coli K1 translocation could be the potential mechanism to elucidate how LBS confers a protective effect against neonatal E

  17. High prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli producing cyclomodulin and genotoxin in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Buc

    Full Text Available Some Escherichia coli strains produce toxins designated cyclomodulins (CMs which interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle of host cells, suggesting a possible link between these bacteria and cancers. There are relatively few data available concerning the colonization of colon tumors by cyclomodulin- and genotoxic-producing E. coli. We did a qualitative and phylogenetic analysis of mucosa-associated E. coli harboring cyclomodulin-encoding genes from 38 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and 31 with diverticulosis. The functionality of these genes was investigated on cell cultures and the genotoxic activity of strains devoid of known CM-encoding gene was investigated. Results showed a higher prevalence of B2 phylogroup E. coli harboring the colibatin-producing genes in biopsies of patients with CRC (55.3% than in those of patients with diverticulosis (19.3%, (p<0.01. Likewise, a higher prevalence of B2 E. coli harboring the CNF1-encoding genes in biopsies of patients with CRC (39.5% than in those of patients with diverticulosis (12.9%, (p = 0.01. Functional analysis revealed that the majority of these genes were functional. Analysis of the ability of E. coli to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells Int-407 indicated that highly adherent E. coli strains mostly belonged to A and D phylogroups, whatever the origin of the strains (CRC or diverticulosis, and that most E. coli strains belonging to B2 phylogroup displayed very low levels of adhesion. In addition, 27.6% (n = 21/76 E. coli strains devoid of known cyclomodulin-encoding genes induced DNA damage in vitro, as assessed by the comet assay. In contrast to cyclomodulin-producing E. coli, these strains mainly belonged to A or D E. coli phylogroups, and exhibited a non significant difference in the distribution of CRC and diverticulosis specimens (22% versus 32.5%, p = 0.91. In conclusion, cyclomodulin-producing E. coli belonging mostly to B2 phylogroup colonize the colonic mucosa of

  18. The pathogenic potential of Campylobacter concisus strains associated with chronic intestinal diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem O Kaakoush

    Full Text Available Campylobacter concisus has garnered increasing attention due to its association with intestinal disease, thus, the pathogenic potential of strains isolated from different intestinal diseases was investigated. A method to isolate C. concisus was developed and the ability of eight strains from chronic and acute intestinal diseases to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells was determined. Features associated with bacterial invasion were investigated using comparative genomic analyses and the effect of C. concisus on host protein expression was examined using proteomics. Our isolation method from intestinal biopsies resulted in the isolation of three C. concisus strains from children with Crohn's disease or chronic gastroenteritis. Four C. concisus strains from patients with chronic intestinal diseases can attach to and invade host cells using mechanisms such as chemoattraction to mucin, aggregation, flagellum-mediated attachment, "membrane ruffling", cell penetration and damage. C. concisus strains isolated from patients with chronic intestinal diseases have significantly higher invasive potential than those from acute intestinal diseases. Investigation of the cause of this increased pathogenic potential revealed a plasmid to be responsible. 78 and 47 proteins were upregulated and downregulated in cells infected with C. concisus, respectively. Functional analysis of these proteins showed that C. concisus infection regulated processes related to interleukin-12 production, proteasome activation and NF-κB activation. Infection with all eight C. concisus strains resulted in host cells producing high levels of interleukin-12, however, only strains capable of invading host cells resulted in interferon-γ production as confirmed by ELISA. These findings considerably support the emergence of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, but more significantly, provide novel insights into the host immune response and an explanation for the heterogeneity

  19. Loss of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC signaling leads to dysfunctional intestinal barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Han

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guanylyl Cyclase C (GCC signaling via uroguanylin (UGN and guanylin activation is a critical mediator of intestinal fluid homeostasis, intestinal cell proliferation/apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. As a mechanism for some of these effects, we hypothesized that GCC signaling mediates regulation of intestinal barrier function.Paracellular permeability of intestinal segments was assessed in wild type (WT and GCC deficient (GCC-/- mice with and without lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge, as well as in UGN deficient (UGN-/- mice. IFNγ and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK levels were determined by real time PCR. Expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs, phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC, and STAT1 activation were examined in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs and intestinal mucosa. The permeability of Caco-2 and HT-29 IEC monolayers, grown on Transwell filters was determined in the absence and presence of GCC RNA interference (RNAi. We found that intestinal permeability was increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT, accompanied by increased IFNγ levels, MLCK and STAT1 activation in IECs. LPS challenge promotes greater IFNγ and STAT1 activation in IECs of GCC-/- mice compared to WT mice. Claudin-2 and JAM-A expression were reduced in GCC deficient intestine; the level of phosphorylated MLC in IECs was significantly increased in GCC-/- and UGN-/- mice compared to WT. GCC knockdown induced MLC phosphorylation, increased permeability in IEC monolayers under basal conditions, and enhanced TNFα and IFNγ-induced monolayer hyperpermeability.GCC signaling plays a protective role in the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier by regulating MLCK activation and TJ disassembly. GCC signaling activation may therefore represent a novel mechanism in maintaining the small bowel barrier in response to injury.

  20. The effect of heat stress on intestinal integrity and Salmonella invasion in broiler birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhenaky, Alhanof; Abdelqader, Anas; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Al-Fataftah, Abdur-Rahman

    2017-12-01

    The intestinal mucosa works as a barrier to protect the internal environment of the animal from bacteria and bacterial toxins found in the gut lumen. Heat stress may harm this function. Therefore, we designed the current experiment to investigate the effect of heat stress on intestinal integrity, physiological and immunological responses and Salmonella invasion in broiler chickens. At 26 days of age, 72 birds were randomly distributed into 3 treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 3 birds per replicate. The three treatments were control treatment; kept at thermoneutral environmental conditions (20 ± 2°C), chronic heat stress treatment (exposed to 30 ± 2°C; 24h/day) and acute heat stress treatment (exposed to 35 ±2°C from 09:00 to 13:00 and kept at 20 ± 1°C from 13:00 to 09:00). The heat stress exposure was conducted for 10 successive days. Compared with the control treatment, birds subject to chronic and acute heat stress had reduced (P stress treatment. Rectal temperature and Δ rectal temperature (°C/h) increased (P stressed birds had increased (P stress impaired intestinal integrity which resulted in increased intestinal permeability to endotoxin, translocation of intestinal pathogens (Salmonella spp.) and serum inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, avoiding thermal dysfunction of intestinal barrier is a significant factor in maintaining welfare, immune status and meat safety of broiler birds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on chief cells prepared from guinea pig stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutliff, V.E.; Raufman, J.P.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin increased cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion in dispersed chief cells from guinea pig gastric mucosa. With each peptide there was a close correlation between the dose-response curve for changes in cellular cAMP and that for changes in pepsinogen secretion. Vasoactive intestinal peptide- (10-28) and secretin- (5-27) had no agonist activity and antagonized the actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. Studies of binding of 125 I-vasoactive intestinal peptide and of 125 -secretin indicated that gastric chief cells possess four classes of binding sites for vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin and that occupation of two of these classes of binding sites correlates with the abilities of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin to increase cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. What function, in any, is mediated by occupation by the other two classes of binding sites remains to be determined

  2. Nlrp9b inflammasome restricts rotavirus infection in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Ding, Siyuan; Wang, Penghua; Wei, Zheng; Pan, Wen; Palm, Noah W; Yang, Yi; Yu, Hua; Li, Hua-Bing; Wang, Geng; Lei, Xuqiu; de Zoete, Marcel R; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Yunjiang; Chen, Haiwei; Zhao, Yujiao; Jurado, Kellie A; Feng, Ningguo; Shan, Liang; Kluger, Yuval; Lu, Jun; Abraham, Clara; Fikrig, Erol; Greenberg, Harry B; Flavell, Richard A

    2017-06-29

    Rotavirus, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and diarrhoea in young children, accounts for around 215,000 deaths annually worldwide. Rotavirus specifically infects the intestinal epithelial cells in the host small intestine and has evolved strategies to antagonize interferon and NF-κB signalling, raising the question as to whether other host factors participate in antiviral responses in intestinal mucosa. The mechanism by which enteric viruses are sensed and restricted in vivo, especially by NOD-like receptor (NLR) inflammasomes, is largely unknown. Here we uncover and mechanistically characterize the NLR Nlrp9b that is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and restricts rotavirus infection. Our data show that, via RNA helicase Dhx9, Nlrp9b recognizes short double-stranded RNA stretches and forms inflammasome complexes with the adaptor proteins Asc and caspase-1 to promote the maturation of interleukin (Il)-18 and gasdermin D (Gsdmd)-induced pyroptosis. Conditional depletion of Nlrp9b or other inflammasome components in the intestine in vivo resulted in enhanced susceptibility of mice to rotavirus replication. Our study highlights an important innate immune signalling pathway that functions in intestinal epithelial cells and may present useful targets in the modulation of host defences against viral pathogens.

  3. Enteric glia promote intestinal mucosal healing via activation of focal adhesion kinase and release of proEGF

    OpenAIRE

    Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Chevalier, Julien; Mahé, Maxime M.; Wedel, Thilo; Urvil, Petri; Derkinderen, Pascal; Savidge, Tor; Neunlist, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing of the gastrointestinal mucosa is essential for the maintenance of gut homeostasis and integrity. Enteric glial cells play a major role in regulating intestinal barrier function, but their role in mucosal barrier repair remains unknown. The impact of conditional ablation of enteric glia on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mucosal damage and on healing of diclofenac-induced mucosal ulcerations was evaluated in vivo in GFAP-HSVtk transgenic mice. A mechanically induced model o...

  4. ESTUDO DA MUCOSA ENTERAL DE RESERVATÓRIOS EM "J" EM CÃES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDRA PEDROSO DE MORAES

    1998-07-01

    present, the best technique used for the surgical treatment of some large intestine diseases involving the whole colon. In order to study the characteristics of the "J" reservoir enteral mucosa, thirty-six dogs underwent surgery. After resection of 5cm of the jejunum caudalis the animals were divided into two equal groups (GI and GII for study-control. In GI, an entero-enteral end-to-end anastomosis was performed; in GII, a "J" reservoir was performed in the cranialis segment of the jejunum and this pouch was anastomosed end-to-end to the jejunun caudalis (similar to GI. On the 21st, 42nd and 63rd postoperative days, six animals of each group were sacrificed for macro and microscopic studies, including cellular counting and the measuring of the enteral mucosa lamina propria. On the 21st day, both groups showed oedema and erythema on macroscopic examination, and necrosis under microscopy in similar numbers. On the 42nd and 63rd days, these alterations decreased or disappeared in GI and persisted in GII. Only in the latter group, on macroscopy, ulcers were observed on the 21st day (2 dogs and on the 42nd day (1 dog. In both groups there was no significant difference as to the incidence of abscess under microscopy. On the 21st day there was an increase of the volumetric density of neutrophils polymorph, macrophages, eosinophils, plasma cells and lymphocites in both groups. All the cells, except the eosinophils, showed a significant enlargement of the volumetric density in GII on the 63rd day. The transversal diameter of lamina propria, except for the villi height, was significantly larger in GII on the 63rd postoperative day. It was concluded that the enteral mucosa of the "J" reservoir in dogs shows alterations of the normal pattern of macroscopy and microscopy, including the volumetric density enlargement of the inflammatory cells.

  5. Avaliação histomorfométrica e ultra-estrutural da mucosa do cólon menor eqüino submetido a distensão Histomorphometric and ultrastructural evaluation of the mucosa of the equine small colon subjected to distention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael R. Faleiros

    2007-09-01

    histomorphometry and scan electronic microscopy (SEM. Sixteen horses were used. In the distended group (DG, nine of them were subjected to distention of the small colon by a surgically implanted intraluminal balloon that was inflated with a pressure of 40mm Hg during 4 hours. In the sham-operated group (SG, the balloon was implanted but not inflated. Full-thickness intestinal samples were collected before and after obstruction and after 1.5 and 12 hours of decompression. By SEM, it was observed that the mucosa turned flat and smooth after distention and returned to the wrinkled original appearance after decompression. Twelve hours after decompression the mucosa had a more irregular appearance with points of fragmentation. There was a reduction in mucosa thickness after distention, returning to basal values after decompression. Instead of the fact that there were changes in appearance and thickness, it was concluded that the mucosa could borne up the compression caused by distention returning to the original characteristics without major lesions.

  6. Dimensions of the healthy gingiva and peri-implant mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpaiola, Andrea; Cecchinato, Denis; Toia, Marco; Bressan, Eriberto; Speroni, Stefano; Lindhe, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To determine the dimensions of the soft tissue cuff present at various aspects of teeth and to compare these dimensions to those of the mucosa surrounding single implants. Fifty volunteers were recruited that were ≥25 years of age and exhibited no signs of (i) untreated caries; (ii) loss of periodontal tissue support in the incisor, canine, and premolar regions; (iii) systemic or local disease. Furthermore, among the 50 patients recruited (iV), 27 had one single implant in the maxilla with teeth present mesial and/or distal to the implant. Probing pocket depth (PPD) and transmucosal sounding depth (TS) were assessed by five experienced, carefully calibrated examiners and with the use of a periodontal probe at the proximal (mesial, distal) and flat (facial, buccal and palatal/lingual) surfaces of all teeth/implants. The width of the keratinized mucosa (KM) was also determined. It was demonstrated that (i) PPD and TS were greater at proximal than at flat surfaces at both tooth and implant sites. In addition, both PPD and TS were deeper at implant than at tooth sites. The TS values documented that the cuff of healthy soft tissue that surrounded a tooth varied between 2 mm at flat surfaces and 4 mm at proximal surfaces, while at implant sites, the mucosa at proximal as well as flat surfaces was 1-1.5 mm greater. The probing pocket depth (PPD) and the transmucosal sounding depth (TS) values were greater at proximal than at flat, that is, facial/palatal (lingual) surfaces at tooth sites and frequently also at implant sites. Furthermore, the PPD and the TS dimensions were greater at implant than at adjacent tooth sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Seguimiento multidisciplinario en el control del penfigoide de membranas mucosas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Jeremias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El término penfigoide de membranas mucosas designa un grupo de enfermedades vesículo-bulosas autoinmunes crónicas, que afectan predominantemente mucosas. El presente artículo describe dos casos clínicos de penfigoide de membranas mucosas con compromiso gingival y tuvo como objetivo resaltar la importancia de un correcto diagnóstico de la lesión y discutir la conducta terapéutica. Fueron realizados diversos exámenes complementares como, examen de Nikolsky, biopsia incisional, investigación de células LE y de anticuerpos antinucleares, además de la evaluación de médicos especializados en dermatología y oftalmología. Fue fundamental la substitución de dentífricos, la orientación nutricional y psicológica, el cuidado con la higiene, además del uso de corticoides tópicos. Hubo periodos de remisión y exacerbación del cuadro clínico durante el seguimiento, fue necesario el ajuste en la terapéutica y refuerzo en los cuidados con la higiene bucal. Es muy importante la interacción multidisciplinaria en la atención de estos casos para el control del tratamiento y seguimiento, además de reforzar todas las orientaciones y cuidados en lo que se refiere a la salud bucal y cautela en el uso de corticoides.

  8. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M C; Lemos, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common exogenous pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa occurring mainly by inadvertent placement of amalgam particles into soft tissues. The diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is simple, usually based on clinical findings associated with presence or history of amalgam fillings removal. Intraoral X-rays may be helpful in detecting amalgam-related radiopacity. In cases where amalgam tattoo cannot be differentiated from other causes of oral pigmentation, a biopsy should be performed. This article deals with an extensive amalgam tattoo lesion which required a biopsy for a definitive diagnosis.

  9. Estudio Histofuncional de la Mucosa Nasal en los Laringectomizados.

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto Cortijo, José María

    2017-01-01

    1. Hemos estudiado 21 enfermos laringoectomizados a los cuales hemos practicado un examen histofuncional de su mucosa nasal. Dichos enfermos han sido estudiados en un intervalo que comprende desde los 20 días después de la intervención a los 53 meses y 8 días en el último de los casos presentados. 2. En los casos estudiados con menor intervalo desde la laringectomía hemos encontrado una agudeza olfatoria normal con el olfatómetro de Elsberg...

  10. Distribution of some elements in human colon mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drashkovich, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of Co, Zn, Fe, Cr and Sb were determined in human colon mucosa as a function of pathalogical alterations during development of colitis Chronica, Colitis Ulcerosa, Adenoma Tubulare and Adenocarcinoma. The sample (0.00023-0.00087 kg in weight) from 80 patients were taken during rectosigmoidoscopy by teflon coated forceps and were deep frozen (T=244 deg. K) and liophilysed. A thermal neutron fluxes 0.54-1.85x10 17 n/m 2 .s for 3 days and 4096-channel analyser with a Ge(Li) detector

  11. Dietary fibres modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chunlong; Zhang, Lingli; He, Xiangyu; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-05-01

    Dietary fibres have been shown to affect early-life microbiota colonization in the large intestine of suckling piglets, however, much less is known as to whether they also modulate the composition and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary fibres on the abundance, composition, and activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in suckling piglets. Piglets were fed a control diet or creep feeds containing alfalfa, wheat bran, or pure cellulose, respectively, from postnatal day 7 to 22. Large intestinal digesta and mucosa samples were collected for quantitative analysis of bacterial group-specific 16S ribosomal RNA- and butyrate production-related genes, and digesta samples for quantification of short-chain fatty acids. The alfalfa diet increased (P butyrate production (butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase, butyrate kinase), and butyrate concentration compared to the wheat bran diet in the digesta of the proximal colon. In the distal colonic digesta, animals fed the alfalfa diet had the highest number of butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene copies (P butyrate concentration, albeit not significant (P > 0.05), compared to other groups. In the distal colonic mucosa, the cellulose diet increased (P butyrate-producing bacteria in the large intestine of suckling piglets, and that a moderate supplementation of alfalfa and cellulose may benefit early-life gut health through the delivery of butyrate to the mucosa.

  12. Gliadin induces an increase in intestinal permeability and zonulin release by binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Karen M; Lu, Ruliang; Brownley, Julie; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Thomas, Karen; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Tamiz, Amir; Alkan, Sefik; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah; Antalis, Toni; Vogel, Stefanie N; Fasano, Alessio

    2008-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gliadin, a component of the grain protein gluten. Gliadin induces an MyD88-dependent zonulin release that leads to increased intestinal permeability, a postulated early element in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. We aimed to establish the molecular basis of gliadin interaction with intestinal mucosa leading to intestinal barrier impairment. Alpha-gliadin affinity column was loaded with intestinal mucosal membrane lysates to identify the putative gliadin-binding moiety. In vitro experiments with chemokine receptor CXCR3 transfectants were performed to confirm binding of gliadin and/or 26 overlapping 20mer alpha-gliadin synthetic peptides to the receptor. CXCR3 protein and gene expression were studied in intestinal epithelial cell lines and human biopsy specimens. Gliadin-CXCR3 interaction was further analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, laser capture microscopy, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunoprecipitation/Western blot analysis. Ex vivo experiments were performed using C57BL/6 wild-type and CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestines to measure intestinal permeability and zonulin release. Affinity column and colocalization experiments showed that gliadin binds to CXCR3 and that at least 2 alpha-gliadin 20mer synthetic peptides are involved in this binding. CXCR3 is expressed in mouse and human intestinal epithelia and lamina propria. Mucosal CXCR3 expression was elevated in active celiac disease but returned to baseline levels following implementation of a gluten-free diet. Gliadin induced physical association between CXCR3 and MyD88 in enterocytes. Gliadin increased zonulin release and intestinal permeability in wild-type but not CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestine. Gliadin binds to CXCR3 and leads to MyD88-dependent zonulin release and increased intestinal permeability.

  13. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  14. A mucosa-mimetic material for the mucoadhesion testing of thermogelling semi-solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jéssica Bassi; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Bruschi, Marcos L; Cook, Michael T

    2017-08-07

    Mucosa-mimetic materials are synthetic substrates which aim to replace animal tissue in mucoadhesion experiments. One potential mucosa-mimetic material is a hydrogel comprised of N-acryloyl-d-glucosamine and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, which has been investigated as a surrogate for animal mucosae in the mucoadhesion testing of tablets and solution formulations. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of this mucosa-mimetic material in the testing of thermogelling semi-solid formulations, which transition from solution to gel upon warming. Two methods for assessing mucoadhesion have been used; tensile testing and a flow-through system, which allow for investigation under dramatically different conditions. It was found that the mucosa-mimetic material was a good surrogate for buccal mucosa using both testing methods. This material may be used to replace animal tissue in these experiments, potentially reducing the number of laboratory animals used in studies of this type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative evaluation of eosinophils in normal mucosa, dysplastic mucosa and oral squamous cell carcinoma with hematoxylin-eosin, Congo red, and EMR1 immunohistochemical staining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayyed Mohammad; Deyhimi, Parviz; Homayouni, Solmaz

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant lesion of the oral cavity, and it involves various molecular mechanisms. The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma is influenced by the host immune cells, such as eosinophils. The present study was conducted to compare the presence of eosinophils in normal mucosa, dysplastic mucosa, and oral squamous cell carcinoma by -hematoxylin- eosin staining, Congo red staining, and epidermal growth factor-like (EGF-like) module containing a mucin-like hormone receptor1 (EMR1) immunohistochemical marker. In this cross-sectional study, 60 paraffinized samples were selected, consisting of 20 normal mucosae, 20 dysplastic mucosae, and 20 squamous cell carcinoma samples. After confirmation of the diagnosis, the mean number of eosinophils was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin, Congo red, and immunohystochemical staining techniques. The data were analyzed by SPSS-10 software using the Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman tests. The results showed that the number of eosinophils in dysplastic mucosa was significantly higher than the number in normal mucosa, and the number of eosinophils in squamous cell carcinoma was significantly higher than the number in dysplastic mucosa in all staining techniques (pCongo red and hematoxylin - eosin (H&E) staining techniques were used (p<0.001). It can be argued that eosinophil contributes to the identification of lesions that have a higher potential of malignant transformation. Moreover, eosinophil can be suggested as an indicator in the differentiation of oral lesions in cases with borderline diagnosis and in targeted molecular therapy.

  16. Buccal mucosa urethroplasty in a reoperative and reconstructive challenge hypospadias: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrettin Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal mucosa graft is usually used in a second operation. A buccal mucosa graft from the lower lip was used for large fistula reconstruction in one patients. The patient previously had been operated on several times at another center. The use of the buccal mucosa graft for urethral reconstruction in complex urethroplasties is a successful method with a low incidence of complications.

  17. Phase II Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    treatment, EVPOME (Group 1), or standard of care, the palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft (Group 2). The study population will include non- smoking adults...nor prevents microbial infection, fluid loss, and foreign material contamination and relapse secondary to wound contracture. Oral mucosa is in... smoking subjects (ages 18 and older) in need of additional keratinized oral mucosa and provided recruitment materials to local dentists. This resulted

  18. Effects of two alfalfa preparations with different particle sizes on the gastric mucosa in weanlings

    OpenAIRE

    Vondran, Sarah; Venner, Monica; Vervuert, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Feeding alfalfa hay is often recommended for its buffering components, like protein and calcium, to prevent lesions of the gastric mucosa in horses. Until now, there has been no information regarding the influence of alfalfa particle size on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of feeding two alfalfa preparations with different particle sizes (alfalfa chaff vs alfalfa pellets) in comparison with grass hay on the gastric mucosa in weanling horses...

  19. Immunoreactivity of granular cell lesions of skin, mucosa, and jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Zarbo, R J; Courtney, R M; Crissman, J D

    1989-10-01

    Granular cell lesions from many different sites share similar light and electron microscopic features. Immunologically, however, these lesions do not appear to be a homogenous group. This study determines the extent of immunologic heterogeneity of granular cell lesions from a wide variety of sites in skin, mucosa, and jaw. Thirty-one granular cell lesions (26 granular cell tumors [GCT] and five other granular cell lesions) from 18 different sites were evaluated immunohistochemically for keratins, vimentin, desmin, muscle actin, ACT, HLA-DR, and S-100 protein. Paraffin-embedded sections were utilized with an avidin-biotin complex immunoperoxidase technique. Except for ameloblastomas, all lesions were negative for keratin and positive for vimentin. All lesions were negative for desmin and actin. Positive ACT reactivity was found in one of seven GCT of tongue, a colonic lesion, a nose lesion, and a granular cell ameloblastic fibroma. All lesions were positive for HLA-DR except a few in which fixation appeared inadequate. S-100 immunoreactivity was found in all lesions except the congenital epulis, a GCT of the skin of the nose, a colonic lesion, and the odontogenic tumors. The antigenic profile of GCT of skin and mucosa is consistent with Schwann cell origin. However, some GCT and other granular cell lesions appear to be derived from macrophages, epithelial cells, or other cells. The expression of HLA-DR by granular cells is believed to be unrelated to cellular origin but rather to some common immunologic function.

  20. Heterotopic gastric mucosa involving the gallbladder and biliary tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, Carmen; Berrocal, Teresa; Gorospe, Luis; Prieto, Consuelo [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hospital Infantil ' ' La Paz' ' , Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Gamez, Manuel [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital Infantil ' ' La Paz' ' , Madrid (Spain)

    2003-02-01

    A case of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the common bile duct, cystic duct and gallbladder is reported in a 3-year-old girl with abdominal pain and jaundice. Abdominal US and CT showed dilatation of the biliary tree and a well-defined mass in the common bile duct that narrowed its lumen. The gallbladder was contracted in both examinations. The common bile duct and the gallbladder were resected and a choledochojejunostomy was performed. Although gastric heterotopy has been described throughout the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract, it is a very uncommon finding in the gallbladder and extremely rare in the biliary tree. A firm diagnosis of gastric heterotopia is based on the presence of fundal mucosa replete with parietal and chief cells. To our knowledge, this is the fifth reported case of heterotopic gastric tissue within the common bile duct, and the first to describe the US and CT findings. A relevant literature review and brief outline of the histological and radiological features are included in the discussion. (orig.)

  1. [Hemorrhagic stress lesions in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Incidence and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, D; Stojanović, D; Kalaba, J

    1995-01-01

    We have observed 428 patients with hemorrhages of the upper gastrointestinal tract; 7% of patients with stress lesions of the gastroduodenal mucosa being the cause of hemorrhages (4.9% were erosional stress hemorrhages and 2.1% were stress ulcera). Surgery is the most common cause of stress hemorrhages of the stomach and duodenum. They occur during the first 5 days after the surgery, whereas 70.59% (n = 12) occur during the first 72 hours. The localization of erosional hemorrhages of the stomach mucosa is mostly diffuse and that is why they are numerous (78.6% of the third degree) and hemorrhages are mostly heavy (the case with stress hemorrhages). Chronic peptic ulcera, especially duodenal (62.5% duodenal ulcera and 37.5% stomach ulcera) present an expressed risk factor for the occurrence of hemorrhagic erosions under the influence of the stress factor. The most common localization of the stress hemorrhagic ulcus is duodenum (66.7%) which is a potential danger for occurrence of the heaviest arterial hemorrhages. After major surgeries and during postoperative periods patients must be preventively protected by "antiulcus therapy" (especially patients with ulcera).

  2. Tomographic mapping of the hard palate and overlying mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquezan, Mariana; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Freitas, Amanda Osorio Ayres de; Baratieri, Carolina; Alves Junior, Matheus; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Goncalves; Araujo, Monica Tirre de Souza, E-mail: marianamarquezan@gmail.com [Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-01-15

    The aim of this study was to measure the thickness of the hard palate and its overlying mucosa using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for purposes of miniscrew placement. The sample comprised 36 CBCT scans of patients aged 12 to 52 years from a database of the Orthodontics Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Paracoronal views of the palatal region were reconstructed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm posterior to the incisive foramen. In each reconstruction measurements were taken at the suture, 3 mm and 6 mm bilaterally to it. Wilcoxon's test verified the differences between the selected regions. Total bone height decreased from the anterior to the posterior region. In cross sections 4, 16 and 24, bone height decreased from the suture laterally to the 3 mm region and then increased in the 6 mm region. The cortical thickness does not seem to be a concern because it presented a mean thickness of at least 1 mm at all sites evaluated. The measurements of the mucosa thickness decreased from lateral to median and from anterior to posterior regions. The most suitable areas for miniscrew placement in the palate are located 4 mm posterior to the incisive foramen, in the median or paramedian regions 3 mm adjacent to the suture. (author)

  3. Tomographic mapping of the hard palate and overlying mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Marquezan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the thickness of the hard palate and its overlying mucosa using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, for purposes of miniscrew placement. The sample comprised 36 CBCT scans of patients aged 12 to 52 years from a database of the Orthodontics Department of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Paracoronal views of the palatal region were reconstructed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 mm posterior to the incisive foramen. In each reconstruction measurements were taken at the suture, 3 mm and 6 mm bilaterally to it. Wilcoxon's test verified the differences between the selected regions. Total bone height decreased from the anterior to the posterior region. In cross sections 4, 16 and 24, bone height decreased from the suture laterally to the 3 mm region and then increased in the 6 mm region. The cortical thickness does not seem to be a concern because it presented a mean thickness of at least 1 mm at all sites evaluated. The measurements of the mucosa thickness decreased from lateral to median and from anterior to posterior regions. The most suitable areas for miniscrew placement in the palate are located 4 mm posterior to the incisive foramen, in the median or paramedian regions 3 mm adjacent to the suture.

  4. [Oral medicine 8. Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepman, K P; van der Meij, E H; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-01-01

    Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa is a potentially malignant disorder, which means that there is an elevated risk oftransformation into a squamous cell carcinoma. The term oral leukoplakia is a clinical diagnosis for a predominantly white lesion which is not immediately recognizable as another well definable lesion which is white in appearance. Oral leukoplakia is generally an asymptomatic disorder of the mucosa with a prevalence of less than 2 per cent in the adult population. Tobacco usage is considered to be the most important etiological factor. Malignant transformation into a squamous cell carcinoma occurs in about I per cent per year. A patient with oral leukoplakia is generally referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, who takes a biopsy for a definitive histopathological diagnosis. The outcome of the histopathological study, which may vary from hyperkeratosis to invasive squamous cell carcinoma, will determine the treatment. It is preferable that every leukoplakia is removed to reduce the risk of malignant transformation. Long term follow-up is indicated. Follow-up may in some cases be performed by the general dental practitioner.

  5. Gene expression for carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes in human nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Alice S; Bryant, Bruce; Zhai, Wenwu; Solomon, Colin; Shusterman, Dennis

    2003-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is physiologically important in the reversible hydration reaction of CO(2); it is expressed in a number of isoforms (CA I-XIV) with varying degrees of enzymatic activity. In nasal chemesthesis, CA inhibition decreases the electrophysiologic response to CO(2), a common irritant test compound. CA enzymatic activity has been demonstrated in the human nasal mucosa using enzyme histochemical methods, but no systematic study of nasal mucosal CA isoenzyme gene expression has been published. We examined CA gene expression in superficial nasal mucosal scrapings from 15 subjects (6 females; 6 allergic rhinitics; age range, 21-56 years). Both non-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed using primers for each gene coding for the 11 catalytically active CA isoenzymes and the housekeeping gene GADPH. Amplification products of GADPH and 10 of the 11 CA genes were detected in the specimens (CA VA was not detected). Relative expression of the CA genes was quantified using real-time PCR. Averaged across subjects, the relative abundance of the CA isoenzyme transcripts is as follows: CA XII > CA II > CA VB > CA IV > CA IX > CA III > CA XIV > CA I > CA VI > CA VII. Limited qualitative validation of gene expression was obtained by immunohistochemistry for CA I, CA II and CA IV. We also observed inter-individual variability in the expression of CA isoenzymes in human nasal mucosa, potentially contributing to differences in nasal chemosensitivity to CO(2) between individuals

  6. Cardiac mucosa at the gastro-oesophageal junction: indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease? Data from a prospective central European multicentre study on histological and endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis (histoGERD trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Cord; Schneider, Nora I; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; Schmack, Bertram; Bordel, Hartmut; Höfler, Bernd; Eherer, Andreas J; Wolf, Eva-Maria; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The origin and significance of cardiac mucosa at the gastro-oesophageal junction are controversial. In the prospective Central European multicentre histoGERD trial, we aimed to assess the prevalence of cardiac mucosa, characterized by the presence of glands composed of mucous cells without parietal cells, and to relate its presence to features related to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). One thousand and seventy-one individuals (576 females and 495 males; median age 53 years) were available for analysis. Overall, in biopsy specimens systematically taken from above and below the gastro-oesophageal junction, cardiac mucosa was observed in 713 (66.6%) individuals. Its presence was associated with patients' symptoms and/or complaints (P = 0.0025), histological changes of the squamous epithelium (P < 0.001) indicative of GORD, intestinal metaplasia (P < 0.001), and an endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis (P < 0.001). No association with an endoscopic diagnosis of Barrett's oesophagus or with gastric pathology, particularly Helicobacter infection, was observed. Cardiac mucosa is a common finding in biopsy specimens taken from the gastro-oesophageal junction. Its association with reflux symptoms, histological changes indicating GORD and the endoscopic diagnosis of oesophagitis suggests that injury and repair related to GORD contribute to its development and/or expansion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Treatment outcome of 40 patients with early stage nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Li Yexiong; Liu Qingfeng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features and prognosis of patients with stage I E /II E nongastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Methods: Between 2000 and 2006, 40 patients with previously untreated nongrastric MALT lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed. The primary site of lymphoma was the intestinal tract in 10 patients, the orbit in 9, the thyroid in 8, the lung in 5, the Waldeyer ring in 2, and the others organs in 6. At diagnosis, 27 patients had stage I E , and 13 had stage II E disease. Seventeen patients were treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, 18 with chemotherapy without radiotherapy, and 5 with surgery alone. The median age was 54 years. The ratio of male to female was 2: 1. Results: With a median follow-up of 58 months, the estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 86% and 82%, respectively. The 5-year OS and PFS rates were 92% and 85% for stage I E , 76% and 82% for stage II E disease, respectively (χ 2 =3.66, P =0. 060; χ 2 =1.04, P=0. 300). The 5-year OS and PFS rates were both 100% for patients with MALT lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa. None of the 17 patients with radiotherapy had locoregional relapse, whereas 3 of 23 (13%) patients without radiotherapy had locoregional relapse. Conclusions: Patients with stage I E nongastric MALT lymphoma have a favorable prognosis. Radiotherapy is still a standard care for early stage disease. The treatment outcome of patients with MALT lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa is even better. (authors)

  8. Aberrant Gene Expression Profile of Unaffected Colon Mucosa from Patients with Unifocal Colon Polyp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jingjing; Ma, Lili; Yang, Jiayin; Xu, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate gene expression profiles in unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue from patients with unifocal colon polyp to investigate the potential mucosa impairment in normal-appearing colon mucosa from these patients. Material/Methods Colon polyp patients were prospectively recruited. We obtained colon biopsies from the normal-appearing sites and polyp tissue through colonoscopy. Gene expression analysis was performed using microarrays. Gene ontology and clustering were evaluated by bioinformatics. Results We detected a total of 711 genes (274 up-regulated and 437 down-regulated) in polyp tissue and 256 genes (170 up-regulated and 86 down-regulated) in normal-appearing colon mucosa, with at least a 3-fold of change compared to healthy controls. Heatmapping of the gene expression showed similar gene alteration patterns between unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue. Gene ontology analyses confirmed the overlapped molecular functions and pathways of altered gene expression between unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue from patients with unifocal colon polyp. The most significantly altered genes in normal-appearing tissues in polyp patients include immune response, external side of plasma membrane, nucleus, and cellular response to zinc ion. Conclusions Significant gene expression alterations exist in unaffected colon mucosa from patients with unifocal colon polyp. Unaffected colon mucosa and polyp tissue share great similarity and overlapping of altered gene expression profiles, indicating the potential possibility of recurrence of colon polyps due to underlying molecular abnormalities of colon mucosa in these patients. PMID:26675397

  9. Significance of the width of keratinized mucosa on peri-implant health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Chiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In implant therapy, the adequate state of peri-implant tissue health and soft-tissue aesthetics is the essential criterion of restorative success. The need for keratinized mucosa for the maintenance of peri-implant health and soft-tissue integration remains a debated issue. The aim of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the current literature concerning the significance of keratinized mucosa with respect to the clinical parameters of monitoring oral hygiene practice and tissue status. The published studies revealed that there were conflicting results with regard to the influence of keratinized mucosa on plaque score and soft-tissue inflammation. Most studies showed that the amount of soft-tissue recession was significantly increased at implant sites with narrow keratinized mucosa, but the amount of keratinized mucosa had little effect on deepening of peri-implant pockets. The evidence related to the effect of keratinized mucosa on the changes of attachment or bone levels is limited, and conclusions could not be drawn at present. Further, this review found that a band of keratinized mucosa was not absolutely necessary for the maintenance of peri-implant tissue, whereas lack of adequate keratinized mucosa around the implant might impede proper oral hygiene performance and compromise the aesthetic results. In conclusion, because there is a wide variety of clinical features in patients pursuing implant therapy, individual consideration of treatment strategies for the patient with minimal keratinized mucosa is recommended.

  10. Canine oral mucosa evaluation as a potential autograft tissue for the treatment of unresponsive keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Rose L; Smith, Jodi D; Ben-Shlomo, Gil

    2018-01-01

    Labial mucosa transplantation for the treatment of canine keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) has been reported recently. Postoperative alleviation of clinical signs was noted and assumed to be the result of labial salivary glands providing lubrication to the ocular tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of minor salivary glands (MSG) in the canine oral mucosa. Oral mucosal biopsies were collected from six dogs that died (n = 1) or were euthanized (n = 5) for reasons unrelated to this study. The breeds included were two Doberman Pinschers, one Labrador Retriever, one Portuguese Water Dog, one German Shepherd Dog, and one mixed canine. Three were spayed females, and three were castrated males with the median age of 9 years (range, 6-13 years). Samples were obtained by an 8-mm punch biopsy at the following locations of the canine oral cavity: upper rostral labial mucosa at midline, lower rostral labial mucosa at midline, upper labial mucosa near the commissure, lower labial mucosa near the commissure, and buccal mucosa approximately 1 cm caudal to the commissure. Samples were routinely processed with hematoxylin and eosin, and periodic acid-Schiff stains. Samples were evaluated by light microscopy. At the selected locations, no MSG or other secreting cells were detected. Minor salivary glands are not associated with alleviation of canine KCS symptoms following labial mucosa transplantation. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism leading to the transient improvement of KCS symptoms in canine patients following labial mucosa transplantation. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Amniotic fluid and development of the immature intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette Viberg

    in demand. Amniotic Fluid (AF) is the natural source of fetal EN throughout gestation in ammals. Fetal AF swallowing stimulates somatic and gastrointestinal growth during fetal development, and modulates the development of the intestinal mucosa. In addition, AF protects the fetus against infections......Premature birth is a health concern worldwide as it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality of the newborn. In the most developed countries, improved neonatal care has allowed for the survival of ever smaller premature infants and raised the survival rates of infants born very...... and maintains homeostasis in the amnion sac through anti-inflammatory mechanisms. The growth promoting and protective effects of AF in utero are ascribed to bioactive proteins including growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides, which may exert similar beneficial effects ex utero...

  12. Histological and mucin histochemical study of the small intestine of the Persian squirrel (Sciurus anomalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tootian, Zahra; Sadeghinezhad, Javad; Sheibani, Mohammad Taghi; Fazelipour, Simin; De Sordi, Nadia; Chiocchetti, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the histological and mucin histochemical properties of the small intestine of the Persian squirrel (Sciurus anomalus). This species is widely distributed in the Middle East and can be found as a companion animal. The histological studies revealed that the plicae circulares were not visible in the tunica mucosa. The maximum height and width of the villi were observed in the duodenum, which then decreased toward the ileum. The muscularis mucosa was scattered, whereas the tunica submucosa was composed of dense connective tissue. The lymphatic nodules were seen in the submucosa of the distal part of the jejunum and ileum, and Brunner's glands were embedded in the initial portion of the duodenum. The tunica muscularis was significantly thicker in the ileum, and the circular muscle layer was thicker than the longitudinal muscle layer throughout the entire length of the small intestine. The mucin histochemistry, which was examined using the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and alcian blue (AB) (pH 1.0 and 2.5) and also PAS-AB (pH 2.5) and aldehyde fuchsin-AB (pH 2.5) techniques coupled with methylation and saponification reaction for some sections, showed that the small intestine mucous content included both carboxylated and sulfated acidic mucins with few neutral mucins. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the histological and histochemical characteristics of the gastrointestinal tracts of exotic mammals and provide data for comparison with other mammals.

  13. Small intestinal cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, L S; Fasco, M J

    1991-01-01

    Small intestinal cytochromes P450 (P450) provide the principal, initial source of biotransformation of ingested xenobiotics. The consequences of such biotransformation are detoxification by facilitating excretion, or toxification by bioactivation. P450s occur at highest concentrations in the duodenum, near the pylorus, and at decreasing concentrations distally--being lowest in the ileum. Highest concentrations occur from midvillus to villous tip, with little or none occurring in the crypts of Lieberkuehn. Microsomal P4503A, 2C8-10, and 2D6 forms have been identified in human small intestine, and P450s 2B1, possibly 2B2, 2A1, and 3A1/2 were located in endoplasmic reticulum of rodent small intestine, while P4502B4 has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from rabbit intestine. Some evidence indicates a differential distribution of P450 forms along the length of the small intestine and even along the villus. Rat intestinal P450s are inducible by xenobiotics--with phenobarbital (PB) inducing P4502B1, 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) inducing P4501A1, and dexamethasone inducing two forms of P4503A. Induction is most effectively achieved by oral administration of the agents, and is rapid--aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) was increased within 1 h of administration of, for example, 3-MC. AHH, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD), and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) have been used most frequently as substrates to characterize intestinal P450s. Dietary factors affect intestinal P450s markedly--iron restriction rapidly decreased intestinal P450 to beneath detectable values; selenium deficiency acted similarly but was less effective; Brussels sprouts increased intestinal AHH activity 9.8-fold, ECOD activity 3.2-fold, and P450 1.9-fold; fried meat and dietary fat significantly increased intestinal EROD activity; a vitamin A-deficient diet increased, and a vitamin A-rich diet decreased intestinal P450 activities; and excess cholesterol in the diet increased intestinal

  14. Intestinal metaplasia in patients with duodenogastric reflux and high total bile acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinol Jimenez, Felipe; Paniagua Estevez, Manuel; Perez Sanchez, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic and cancerous action of bile acids on gastric mucosa is a very interesting subject within the gastroduodenal diseases due to they are able to alter the membrane, the cellular metabolism, to give rise to a inflammatory process, to increase the proliferation, the cell apoptosis and the DNA damage, that according to its intensity and persistence, favor the appearance of failures and mutations in cell replication. With the discovery and characterization of Helicobacter pylori it is considered that according to its intensity and the time of persistence in gastric mucosa provokes damages with failures and cellular mutations. In this sense, a prospective and descriptive study was conducted in the Institute of Gastroenterology in patients presenting with duodenogastric and high total bile acids to know the association between the intestinal metaplasia and the presence or not of Helicobacter pylori. Metaplasia was present in the 48.7 % of the 39 study patients, that there was a statistically significant association (p< 0.05) in Helicobacter pylori distribution in patients with and without intestinal metaplasia; that patients with duodenogastric reflux, despite of a histological lesion also had a greater frequency of negative results as regards the presence of Helicobacter pylori. In samples with histological diagnosis of severe and atrophic chronic gastritis, 75 %, respectively, had Helicobacter pylori and in consequence, there was a significant association between presence or not of microorganism and the chronic gastritis intensity. Intestinal metaplasia location was higher in antral region (84.3 %) and also with a higher ratio of microorganism positivity. In patients with duodenogastric reflux, presence of Helicobacter pylori don't seems to be associated with intense degrees of intestinal metaplasia, although the microorganism is present in all categories, but when there is not Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia to tend to develop in its less severe

  15. Protective effect of lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dan; Fang Lichao; Chen Bingbo; Wei Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and iso-malto-oligosaccharide (IMO) on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea(AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 5 days. The synbiotics was orally administered to the AAD rats daily at three different strengths for 7 days. The intestinal flora and intestinal mucus SIgA levels were determined on d6, d9 and d13. The histopathological changes of ileal mucosa were studied on d13. Results: In the prepared AAD model rats (on d6) there were lower intestinal mucus SIgA levels and intestinal flora disorders were demonstrated. The intestinal floras of the rats administering synbiotics were readjusted to the similar pattern of healthy rats with bacterial translocation corrected on d13 and the levels of SIgA were not significantly different from of the control (P>0.05). The histopathological picture was basically normal in the treated models on d13. Conclusion: The synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide possessed good protective effect on the intestinal mucosal barrier in lincomycin induced rat models of AAD. (authors)

  16. Lipo sarcoma in small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Iglesias, J.; Pineyro Gutierrez, A.; Taroco Medeiros, L.; Fein Kolodny, C.; Navarrete Pedocchi, H.

    1987-01-01

    A case is presented by primitive liposarcoma in small intestine , an extensive bibliographical review foreigner and national in this case. It detach the exceptional of the intestinal topography of the liposarcomas; and making stress in the relative value of the computerized tomography and ultrasonography in the diagnose of the small intestine tumors . As well as in the sarcomas of another topography, chemo and radiotherapy associated to the exeresis surgery, it can be of benefit [es

  17. Chlorogenic acid decreases intestinal permeability and increases expression of intestinal tight junction proteins in weaned rats challenged with LPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ruan

    Full Text Available Chlorogenic acid, a natural phenolic acid present in fruits and plants, provides beneficial effects for human health. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether chlorogenic acid (CHA could improve the intestinal barrier integrity for weaned rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge. Thirty-two weaned male Sprague Dawley rats (21 ± 1 d of age; 62.26 ± 2.73 g were selected and randomly allotted to four treatments, including weaned rat control, LPS-challenged and chlorogenic acid (CHA supplemented group (orally 20 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg body. Dietary supplementation with CHA decreased (P<0.05 the concentrations of urea and albumin in the serum, compared to the LPS-challenged group. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α were lower (P<0.05 in the jejunal and colon of weaned rats receiving CHA supplementation, in comparison with the control group. CHA supplementation increased (P<0.05 villus height and the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the jejunal and ileal mucosae under condictions of LPS challenge. CHA supplementation decreased (P<0.05 intestinal permeability, which was indicated by the ratio of lactulose to mannitol and serum DAO activity, when compared to weaned rats with LPS challenge. Immunohistochemical analysis of tight junction proteins revealed that ZO-1 and occludin protein abundances in the jejunum and colon were increased (P<0.05 by CHA supplementation. Additionally, results of immunoblot analysis revealed that the amount of occludin in the colon was also increased (P<0.05 in CHA-supplemented rats. In conclusion, CHA decreases intestinal permeability and increases intestinal expression of tight junction proteins in weaned rats challenged with LPS.

  18. Hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, P A

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, with overall mortality exceeding 40% even with treatment. Effective efforts for screening and prevention are most likely to succeed in patient groups identified as high risk for colorectal cancer, most notably the hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes. In these syndromes, benign polyps develop throughout the intestinal tract prior to the development of colorectal cancer, marking the patient and associated family for precancer diagnosis followed by either close surveillance or preventive treatment. This review article was undertaken to discuss the most recent developments in the knowledge of hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes, emphasizing the clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment relative to preventing the development of cancer. The most common of the hereditary polyposis syndromes is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which is characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomatous polyps in the colon followed at an early age by colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer can be prevented in this autosomal dominant condition by prophylactic colectomy, though a risk for other tumors, including periampullary cancers, remains throughout life. Variant of FAP associated with fewer and smaller polyps (hereditary flat adenoma syndrome), or even CNS tumors (Turcot's syndrome) also carry this high risk of colorectal cancer. Hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes such as juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (also autosomal dominant) are characterized by less frequent polyps. Though these are generally benign polyps, they are also associated with a significant risk of colorectal and other cancers. Other polyposis syndromes, including neurofibromatosis and Cowden's disease, do not carry this increased risk of colorectal cancer, and therefore affect different treatment strategies. Analysis of genetic factors responsible for these and other hereditary syndromes with

  19. IL-33 and the intestine: The good, the bad, and the inflammatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, Zerina; Schill, Ellen Merrick; Bolock, Alexa M; Good, Misty

    2017-12-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family that has been widely studied since its discovery in 2005 for its dichotomous functions in homeostasis and inflammation. IL-33, along with its receptor suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2), has been shown to modulate both the innate and adaptive immune system. Originally, the IL-33/ST2 signaling axis was studied in the context of inducing type 2 immune responses with the expression of ST2 by T helper 2 (T H 2) cells. However, the role of IL-33 is not limited to T H 2 responses. Rather, IL-33 is a potent activator of T H 1 cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), regulatory T (Treg) cells, and CD8 + T cells. The intestine is uniquely important in this discussion, as the intestinal epithelium is distinctively positioned to interact with both pathogens and the immune cells housed in the mucosa. In the intestine, IL-33 is expressed by the pericryptal fibroblasts and its expression is increased particularly in disease states. Moreover, IL-33/ST2 signaling aberrancy is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Accordingly, for this review, we will focus on the role of IL-33 in the regulation of intestinal immunity, involvement in intestinal disease, and implication in potential therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Activation of AMPK inhibits cholera toxin stimulated chloride secretion in human and murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailín C Rogers

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal chloride secretion through chloride channels, such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, is one of the major molecular mechanisms underlying enterotoxigenic diarrhea. It has been demonstrated in the past that the intracellular energy sensing kinase, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, can inhibit CFTR opening. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of AMPK can abrogate the increased chloride flux through CFTR occurring during cholera toxin (CTX mediated diarrhea. Chloride efflux was measured in isolated rat colonic crypts using real-time fluorescence imaging. AICAR and metformin were used to activate AMPK in the presence of the secretagogues CTX or forskolin (FSK. In order to substantiate our findings on the whole tissue level, short-circuit current (SCC was monitored in human and murine colonic mucosa using Ussing chambers. Furthermore, fluid accumulation was measured in excised intestinal loops. CTX and forskolin (FSK significantly increased chloride efflux in isolated colonic crypts. The increase in chloride efflux could be offset by using the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin. In human and mouse mucosal sheets, CTX and FSK increased SCC. AICAR and metformin inhibited the secretagogue induced rise in SCC, thereby confirming the findings made in isolated crypts. Moreover, AICAR decreased CTX stimulated fluid accumulation in excised intestinal segments. The present study suggests that pharmacological activation of AMPK effectively reduces CTX mediated increases in intestinal chloride secretion, which is a key factor for intestinal water accumulation. AMPK activators may therefore represent a supplemental treatment strategy for acute diarrheal illness.

  1. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempe, J.M.; Cousins, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of zinc absorption has not been delineated, but kinetic studies show that both passive and carrier-mediated processes are involved. The authors have identified a low molecular mass zinc-binding protein in the soluble fraction of rat intestinal mucosa that could function as an intracellular zinc carrier. The protein was not detected in liver or pancreas, suggesting a role specific to the intestine. The protein binds zinc during transmucosal zinc transport and shows signs of saturation at higher luminal zinc concentrations, characteristics consistent with a role in carrier-mediated zinc absorption. Microsequence analysis of the protein purified by gel-filtration HPCL and SDS/PAGE showed complete identity within the first 41 N-terminal amino acids with the deduced protein sequence of cysteine-rich intestinal protein. These investigators showed that the gene for this protein is developmentally regulated in neonates during the suckling period, conserved in many vertebrate species, and predominantly expressed in the small intestine. Cysteine-rich intestinal protein contains a recently identified conserved sequence of histidine and cysteine residues, the LIM motif, which our results suggest confers metal-binding properties that are important for zinc transport and/or functions of this micronutrient

  2. Intestinal bacteria condition dendritic cells to promote IgA production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C Massacand

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin (Ig A represents the predominant antibody isotype produced at the intestinal mucosa, where it plays an important role in limiting the penetration of commensal intestinal bacteria and opportunistic pathogens. We show in mice that Peyer's Patch-derived dendritic cells (PP-DC exhibit a specialized phenotype allowing the promotion of IgA production by B2 cells. This phenotype included increased expression of the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL, and receptors for the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP. The ability of PP-DC to promote anti-CD40 dependent IgA was partially dependent on retinoic acid (RA and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta, whilst BAFF and APRIL signaling were not required. Signals delivered by BAFF and APRIL were crucial for CD40 independent IgA production, although the contribution of B2 cells to this pathway was minimal. The unique ability of PP-DC to instruct naïve B cells to differentiate into IgA producing plasma cells was mainly imparted by the presence of intestinal commensal bacteria, and could be mimicked by the addition of LPS to the culture. These data indicate that exposure to pathogen-associated molecular patterns present on intestinal commensal bacteria condition DC to express a unique molecular footprint that in turn allows them to promote IgA production.

  3. NOD-Like Receptors in Intestinal Homeostasis and Epithelial Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Marianna; Yeretssian, Garabet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a dynamic physical barrier segregating the luminal content from the underlying mucosal tissue. Following injury, the epithelial integrity is restored by rapid migration of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) across the denuded area in a process known as wound healing. Hence, through a sequence of events involving restitution, proliferation and differentiation of IECs the gap is resealed and homeostasis reestablished. Relapsing damage followed by healing of the inflamed mucosa is a hallmark of several intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While several regulatory peptides, growth factors and cytokines stimulate restitution of the epithelial layer after injury, recent evidence in the field underscores the contribution of innate immunity in controlling this process. In particular, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play critical roles in sensing the commensal microbiota, maintaining homeostasis, and regulating intestinal inflammation. Here, we review the process of intestinal epithelial tissue repair and we specifically focus on the impact of NLR-mediated signaling mechanisms involved in governing epithelial wound healing during disease. PMID:24886810

  4. Bacterial Signaling at the Intestinal Epithelial Interface in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia I. Coleman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract provides a compartmentalized interface with an enormous repertoire of immune and metabolic activities, where the multicellular structure of the mucosa has acquired mechanisms to sense luminal factors, such as nutrients, microbes, and a variety of host-derived and microbial metabolites. The GI tract is colonized by a complex ecosystem of microorganisms, which have developed a highly coevolved relationship with the host’s cellular and immune system. Intestinal epithelial pattern recognition receptors (PRRs substantially contribute to tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. The role of bacteria-derived signals in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and repair has been addressed in mouse models deficient in PRRs and signaling adaptors. While critical for host physiology and the fortification of barrier function, the intestinal microbiota poses a considerable health challenge. Accumulating evidence indicates that dysbiosis is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous GI tract diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and colorectal cancer (CRC. Aberrant signal integration at the epithelial cell level contributes to such diseases. An increased understanding of bacterial-specific structure recognition and signaling mechanisms at the intestinal epithelial interface is of great importance in the translation to future treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize the growing understanding of the regulation and function of the intestinal epithelial barrier, and discuss microbial signaling in the dynamic host–microbe mutualism in both health and disease.

  5. Bacterial overgrowth and inflammation of small intestine after carboxymethylcellulose ingestion in genetically susceptible mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Ung, Victoria; Sydora, Beate C; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Doerffel, Yvonne; Verstraelen, Hans; Fedorak, Richard N

    2009-03-01

    Detergents and emulsifiers added to food may destroy the mucus barrier, which normally isolates bacteria from the intestinal wall, and lead to chronic bowel inflammation in susceptible persons. We investigated the influence of 2% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the biostructure of the intestinal microbiota in IL-10 gene-deficient mice. Twenty to 27-week-old IL-10 gene-deficient mice received either 2% CMC solution (n = 7) or water (n = 6) orally for 3 weeks. Intestinal bacteria were investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization in paraffin-fixed sections of the intestine. CMC-treated IL-10 gene-deficient mice demonstrated a massive bacterial overgrowth, distention of spaces between villi, with bacteria filling these spaces, adherence of bacteria to the mucosa, and migration of bacteria to the bottom of the crypts of Lieberkuehn. Leukocytes migrated into the intestinal lumen in 4 of the 7 CMC mice. The changes were similar to those observed in Crohn's disease in humans and were absent in control animals. CMC induces bacterial overgrowth and small bowel inflammation in susceptible animals. Because of its ubiquity in products and its unrestricted use in food of the industrial world, CMC is an ideal suspect to account for the rise of IBD in the 20th century.

  6. Ischemia and reperfusion of rat small intestine using pentoxyfilline and prostaglandin E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, José Lacerda; Inoye, Celso Maschaschi; Aydos, Ricardo Dutra; Silva, Iandara Schettert; Falcão, Gustavo Ribeiro; Marks, Guido; Pereira, Daniel Martins

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the small intestinal tissue alterations in rats submitted to ischemia and tissue reperfusion using pentoxyfilline or prostaglandin E1. Thirty five Wistar rats were used, distributed into group control (A) n=10 were submitted to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion during 60 minutes and no one drug have been utilized. In the group pentoxyfilline (B) n=10 have been utilized during tissue ischemia and reperfusion as well as prostaglandin E1 (C) n=10, but separately. In the group sham (D) n=5, the animals were submitted to surgical. After euthanasia of the animals, a segment of the small intestine was cut, stained by hematoxilin-eosin and histological analysis according to Chiu criteria. Histological results showed that using pentoxyflline or prostaglandin E1 the results during tissue reperfusion were better, since the levels of criteria from Chiu that predominated were level 2 and 3, indicating less tissue damage in comparison to the control group (group A) that showed levels 4 and 5, what means more severe histological tissue alterations. Use of pentoxyfilline or prostaglandin E1 promoted a beneficial effect during intestinal reperfusion, demonstrated by less severe histological lesions in the small intestine mucosa of rats submitted to ischemia and tissue reperfusion when helped by the drugs.

  7. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) with simultaneous intestinal Giardia sp., Spironucleus sp., and trichomonad infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Barbara J; Stockdale Walden, Heather D; Kondo, Hirotaka

    2013-11-01

    A commercial facility producing hamsters with a history of infection by dwarf tapeworm (Hymenolepis nana) submitted 15 animals for necropsy and postmortem parasitological and microscopic examination. No tapeworms were detected grossly or microscopically. Fecal examination including gastrointestinal mucosal smears demonstrated mixed intestinal bacteria and low numbers of Giardia sp. Histologic examination of small intestine demonstrated filling of the small intestinal crypts by large numbers of 7-9 µm × 3 µm, rod to crescent or teardrop-shaped flagellates consistent with Spironucleus sp. These organisms had two 1-µm, basophilic, oval nuclei and multiple superficial flagella-like structures. Much larger 10-15 µm × 8-10 µm, oval to pear-shaped organisms were also present in lower numbers and usually located with the crypts. These larger flagellates had multiple flagella and a basophilic rod-shaped nucleus. The larger flagellates included Giardia sp., which had an intimate interface with the surface of the mucosal epithelium, bilaterally symmetry, and binucleation. Lower numbers of trichomonads were also present and were distinguished by an undulating surface membrane and a single nucleus. The mucosa was hyperplastic and moderately inflamed. Although the tapeworm infection was resolved, diagnosis of multiple intestinal flagellates by fecal examination is complicated by the varying sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of different types of fecal analysis for different flagellate types. Key differences in the morphology and location of the different types of flagellates as observed by histology of intestinal tissues provide important additional diagnostic information to distinguish trichomonads, Spironucleus sp., and Giardia sp.

  8. The Neuromodulation of the Intestinal Immune System and Its Relevance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Verheijden, Simon; Bosmans, Goele; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    One of the main tasks of the immune system is to discriminate and appropriately react to "danger" or "non-danger" signals. This is crucial in the gastrointestinal tract, where the immune system is confronted with a myriad of food antigens and symbiotic microflora that are in constant contact with the mucosa, in addition to any potential pathogens. This large number of antigens and commensal microflora, which are essential for providing vital nutrients, must be tolerated by the intestinal immune system to prevent aberrant inflammation. Hence, the balance between immune activation versus tolerance should be tightly regulated to maintain intestinal homeostasis and to prevent immune activation indiscriminately against all luminal antigens. Loss of this delicate equilibrium can lead to chronic activation of the intestinal immune response resulting in intestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In order to maintain homeostasis, the immune system has evolved diverse regulatory strategies including additional non-immunological actors able to control the immune response. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates a bidirectional link between the two systems in which the brain modulates the immune response via the detection of circulating cytokines and via direct afferent input from sensory fibers and from enteric neurons. In the current review, we will highlight the most recent findings regarding the cross-talk between the nervous system and the mucosal immune system and will discuss the potential use of these neuronal circuits and neuromediators as novel therapeutic tools to reestablish immune tolerance and treat intestinal chronic inflammation.

  9. Intestinal Development and Function of Broiler Chickens on Diets Supplemented with Clinoptilolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. J. Wu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of natural clinoptilolite (NCLI and modified clinoptilolite (MCLI on broiler performance, gut morphology, intestinal length and weight, and gut digestive enzyme activity. A total of 240 d-old male chicks were randomly assigned to 3 treatments, each of which comprised 8 pens of 10 chicks per pen. Birds in the control group were fed the basal diet, while those in the experimental groups were fed diets supplemented with NCLI at 2% (NCLI group, or MCLI at 2% (MCLI group, respectively, for 42 d. Compared with the control, supplementation with NCLI or MCLI had no significant (p>0.05 effects on productive parameters from d 1 to 42. Supplementation with NCLI or MCLI had no influence on the relative length and weight of small intestine at d 1 to 21. But supplementation with NCLI or MCLI significantly reduced the relative weight of duodenum. Supplementation with MCLI and NCLI was associated with greater (p0.05 influence on the crypt depth in the jejunal and ileal mucosa compared with those in the controls. The addition of either NCLI or MCLI to the diet improved the activities of total protease, and amylase in the small intestinal contents. In conclusion, supplementation with NCLI or MCLI in diets improved intestinal morphology, increased the intestinal length and weigh and gut digestive enzyme activity.

  10. Intestinal and gastric permeability in children with eosinophilic esophagitis and reflux esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Aldrich J T; Persad, Sujata; Slae, Mordechai; Abdelradi, Amr; Kluthe, Cheryl; Shirton, Leanne; Danchuk, Ronda; Persad, Rabin; Meddings, Jon; Huynh, Hien Q

    2015-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic and immune-mediated entity that leads to a characteristic inflammation of esophageal mucosa. Patients complain of dysphagia and reflux-like symptoms. As many as 80% of patients with EoE may also have a history of atopy, and patients with asthma and eczema have previously been shown to have increased intestinal permeability. This study was designed to assess small intestinal and gastric permeability in patients with EoE and to see whether it differed from healthy individuals and patients with reflux esophagitis (RE). Gastric and small intestinal permeability was measured using sugar probe tests containing lactulose, mannitol, and sucrose. Lactulose-to-mannitol (L/M) ratios in the patient's urine were a measure for intestinal permeability, and total sucrose was a measure for gastric permeability. We analyzed samples from 23 patients with EoE, 20 RE, 14 normal upper endoscopy with gastrointestinal symptoms, and 26 healthy controls. All of the 4 groups had L/M ratios less than the upper limit of normal (<0.025). There was no statistically significant difference in gastric permeability between the 4 groups (L/M P = 0.26, sucrose P = 0.46). Our data suggest that an alteration in gastric and intestinal permeability does not play a role in EoE or RE pathogenesis.

  11. Long-term Renewable Human Intestinal Epithelial Stem Cells as Monolayers: A Potential for Clinical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew; Rouch, Joshua D; Jabaji, Ziyad; Khalil, Hassan A; Solorzano, Sergio; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G.; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current culture schema for human intestinal stem cells (hISCs) frequently rely on a 3D culture system using Matrigel™, a laminin-rich matrix derived from murine sarcoma that is not suitable for clinical use. We have developed a novel 2D culture system for the in vitro expansion of hISCs as an intestinal epithelial monolayer without the use of Matrigel. Methods Cadaveric duodenal samples were processed to isolate intestinal crypts from the mucosa. Crypts were cultured on a thin coat of type I collagen or laminin. Intestinal epithelial monolayers were supported with growth factors to promote self-renewal or differentiation of the hISCs. Proliferating monolayers were sub-cultured every 4–5 days. Results Intestinal epithelial monolayers were capable of long-term cell renewal. Less differentiated monolayers expressed high levels of gene marker LGR5, while more differentiated monolayers had higher expressions of CDX2, MUC2, LYZ, DEF5, and CHGA. Furthermore, monolayers were capable of passaging into a 3D culture system to generate spheroids and enteroids. Conclusion This 2D system is an important step to expand hISCs for further experimental studies and for clinical cell transplantation. PMID:26995514

  12. Intestinal parasites : associations with intestinal and systemic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavala, Gerardo A; García, Olga P; Camacho, Mariela; Ronquillo, Dolores; Campos-Ponce, Maiza; Doak, Colleen; Polman, Katja; Rosado, Jorge L

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Evaluate associations between intestinal parasitic infection with intestinal and systemic inflammatory markers in school-aged children with high rates of obesity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Plasma concentrations of CRP, leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured as systemic inflammation markers and

  13. Experimental model of traumatic ulcer in the cheek mucosa of rats Modelo experimental de úlcera traumática em mucosa jugal de ratos

    OpenAIRE

    Galyléia Meneses Cavalcante; Renata Janaína Sousa de Paula; Leonardo Peres de Souza; Fabrício Bitu Sousa; Mário Rogério Lima Mota; Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes Alves

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish an experimental model of traumatic ulcer in rat cheek mucosa for utilization in future alternative therapy studies. METHODS: A total of 60 adult male rats (250 - 300g) were used. Ulceration of the left cheek mucosa was provoked by abrasion using a nº 15 scalpel blade. The animals were observed for 10 days, during which they were weighed and their ulcers were measured. The histological characteristics were analyzed and scored according to the ulcer phase. In the statistic...

  14. Synovial Sarcoma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T. S. Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma (SS is a rare malignant neoplasm that arises most commonly in joint capsules and articular tendons, but its relationship to the synovium is not always obvious. Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft tissue tumor representing 5.6% to 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. They are termed SS because of their histologic resemblance to the synovium, but they rarely involve a synovial structure and are thought to arise from pluripotential mesenchymal cells. The tumor usually occurs in close association with tendon sheaths, bursae, and joint capsules, primarily in the para-articular regions of the extremities, with approximately 9% occurring in the head and neck region. Synovial sarcoma has been reported rarely in the oral cavity. We report a very rare case of Synovial sarcoma of the buccal mucosa in a 24-year-old male patient.

  15. Langerhans cells and subsets of lymphocytes in the nasal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellquist-Dahl, B; Olsen, K E; Irander, K

    1991-01-01

    Langerhans cells and different lymphocytes were studied in the nasal mucosa of 39 woodwork teachers and a control group of 14 healthy subjects. Ten of the woodwork teachers were sensitized as determined by skin prick test. A panel of different monoclonal antibodies was applied on the frozen nasal...... mucosal specimens. Intraepithelial CD1-positive dendritic cells were found in all specimens. However, there was no difference between the number of these Langerhans cells found in the study group and the number found in the controls. In every specimen the intraepithelial lymphocyte population...... was dominated by T lymphocytes, and there were relatively few B cells. Similarly the ratio between CD4- and CD8-positive lymphocytes in the study group and the controls was the same. In all specimens there was a dominance of T suppressor/cytotoxic cells compared with T helper/inducer cells. The study confirms...

  16. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M. C; Lemos Jr, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Tatuagens por amálgama são lesões pigmentadas, exógenas, de frequente ocorrência na mucosa bucal, que resultam da introdução acidental de partículas de amálgama nos tecidos moles. O diagnóstico da tatuagem por amálgama é simples, geralmente, baseado em achados clínicos, complementado pela história recente ou pregressa de remoção de restauração por amálgama. Radiografias intraorais podem ser úteis na detecção de radiopacidade, associadas à partícula de amálgama. Nos casos em que as tatuagens p...

  17. Morphology of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in odontocetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda M O; Guimarães, Juliana P; Vergara-Parente, Jociery E; Carvalho, Vitor L; Carolina, Ana; Meirelles, O; Marmontel, Miriam; Oliveira, Bruno S S P; Santos, Silvanise M; Becegato, Estella Z; Evangelista, Janaina S A M; Miglino, Maria Angelica

    2016-09-01

    This study describes the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) in odontocetes from the Brazilian coast and freshwater systems. Seven species were evaluated and tissue samples were analyzed by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Laryngeal tonsil was a palpable oval mass located in the larynx, composed of a lymphoepithelial complex. Dense collections of lymphocytes were found in the skin of male fetus and calf. Clusters of lymphoid tissue were found in the uterine cervix of a reproductively active juvenile female and along the pulmonary artery of an adult female. Lymphoid tissues associated with the gastrointestinal tract were characterized by diffusely arranged or organized lymphocytes. The anal tonsil was composed of an aggregate of lymphoid tissue occurring exclusively in the anal canal, being composed of squamous epithelium branches. MALT was present in different tissues and organic systems of cetaceans, providing constant protection against mucosal pathogens present in their environment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Age distribution of transepithelial water loss in human nasal mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Masato; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Hirose, Takashi; Iwasaki, Yoko; Murakami, Atsushi; Matsunaga, Mayumi; Watanabe, Kensuke

    2006-10-01

    Dry nose is a common complaint in the elderly. Age distribution of transepithelial water loss of human nasal mucosa (TEWL) value was evaluated in this study. Eighty-eight volunteers (50 men and 30 women) ranging from 10 to 75 years old were recruited for this study. Measurement of TEWL was performed on the inferior nasal turbinate. TEWL was measured with an evaporation meter applying Fick's law (Tewameter TM 300; Courage and Khazaka, Cologne, Germany). TEWL value tends to increase in order of age, indicating that the barrier function of epithelium may decline with age. The measurement of transepithelial water loss should be contributed to assess the efficiency of nasal mucosal barrier disorders in the elderly.

  19. [Dual effects of glucocorticoids on the gastric mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podvigina, T T; Filaretova, L P

    2014-01-01

    In this review we systematise and analyze data of literature about the effect of glucocorticoids on the gastric mucosa. There are convincing results that show the adaptive gastoprotective nature of endogenous glucocorticoids, which are produced during acute stress-induced activation of the HPA axis. The role glucocorticoid hormones play in the effect of chronic stress remains little-studied. We have seen that after single administration of glucocorticoids, there can arise gastroprotective and ulcerogenic effects. Although. the question about the effect of therapy using glucocorticoid hormones on gastric ulceration is being debated, the data confirm the ulcerogenic influence that large doses of these hormones have on experimental animals. The initial gastroprotective effect that glucocorticoid hormones have, even after their single administration can be transformed into an ulcerogenic effect with a prolongation of the hormonal action, but not of the hormone dose. We are discussing the possible mechanism behind the transformation.

  20. Myoepithelial carcinoma of buccal mucosa: A rare tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Lata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoepithelial carcinoma is a rare neoplasm of salivary glands that account for < 1% of all salivary gland tumors. The most common sites of involvement are major salivary glands mainly parotid gland. Intraorally, it can arise from minor salivary glands; palate is the most common site of occurrence. It also occurs in nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity and larynx in head and neck region. Myoepithelial tumors were first described in 1943. Their malignant variant, myoepithelial carcinoma, was first reported by Stromeyer et al., in 1975, characterized by distinct morphologic heterogeneity and an infiltrative growth pattern into adjacent tissues. Here, we report a rare case of a 55-year-old female with myoepithelial carcinoma of buccal mucosa. It was also rare because of unusual location of tumor. Our patient was treated with wide local resection and remained free of disease for 15 months.

  1. A dose-surviving fraction curve for mouse colonic mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Thames, H.D. Jr.; Withers, H.R.; Mason, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A dose-surviving fraction curve representing the response of the mouse colonic mucosa to single doses of 137 Cs gamma radiation was obtained from the results of a multifraction in vivo colony assay. Construction of the curve required an estimated of the average number of clonogens initially present per colonic crypt. The estimated clonogen count (88) was determined by a statistical method based on the use of doses per fraction common to different fractionation protocols. Parameters for the LQ and TC models of cell survival were obtained by weighted least-squares fits to the data. A comparison of the survival characteristics of cells from the mouse colonic and jejunal crypts suggested that the epithelium of the colon is less radiosensitive than that of the jejunum. (author)

  2. The Effect of Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang on Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells in Postinfectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxue Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang (TXYF on intestinal mucosal mast cells in rats with postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS. Design. PI-IBS rat models were established using a multistimulation paradigm. Then, rats were treated with TXYF intragastrically at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 g·kg−1·d−1 for 14 days, respectively. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR scores and fecal water content (FWC. Mast cell counts and the immunofluorescence of tryptase and c-Fos in intestinal mucosa were measured; and serum IL-1β, TNF-α, and histamine levels were determined. Results. AWR reactivity and FWC which were significantly increased could be observed in PI-IBS rats. Remarkably increased mast cell activation ratio in intestinal mucosa, together with increased serum TNF-α and histamine levels, could also be seen in PI-IBS rats; furthermore, PI-IBS-induced changes in mast cell activation and level of serum TNF-α and histamine could be reversed by TXYF treatment. Meanwhile, tryptase and c-Fos expression were also downregulated. Conclusion. TXYF improves PI-IBS symptoms by alleviating behavioral hyperalgesia and antidiarrhea, the underlying mechanism of which involves the inhibitory effects of TXYF on activating mucosal mast cells, downregulating tryptase and c-Fos expression, and reducing serum TNF-α and histamine levels.

  3. [Effects of panthenol-glutamine on intestine of rats with burn injury and its dose-effect relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Zhao, Yun; Qi, Hua-bing; Yi, Dong; Wang, Feng-jun; Wang, Shi-liang; Peng, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To study the effects of the panthenol-glutamine on intestinal damage and motor function of intestine in rats with burn injury as well as its dose-effect relationship. (1) Experiment 1. Ninety SD rats were divided into groups A-I according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. Rats in groups A-I were inflicted with 30% TBSA full-thickness burn and fed by gavage with panthenol and glutamine at post injury hour (PIH) 4, in the whole dosage of 1.00 and 4, 0.50 and 4, 0.25 and 4, 1.00 and 2, 0.50 and 2, 0.25 and 2, 1.00 and 1, 0.50 and 1, 0.25 and 1 g·kg(-1)·d(-1). The feeding was carried out twice a day to achieve the total dosage in 7 days. On drug withdrawal day, blood and intestinal tissue were harvested to detect the intestinal propulsion index, diamine oxidase (DAO) activity in serum, and the content of acetylcholine and intestinal mucosa protein. The best proportion of panthenol and glutamine was screened. (2) Experiment 2. Seventy SD rats were divided into normal control (NC), burn (B), burn+panthenol (B+P), burn+glutamine (B+G), and burn+low, moderate, or high dose of panthenol-glutamine (B+LPG, B+MPG, B+HPG) groups according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. Rats in the latter 6 groups were inflicted with 30% TBSA full-thickness burn. Rats in the latter 5 groups were fed by gavage with panthenol and (or) glutamine at PIH 4. Rats in group B+P were fed with panthenol for 1 g·kg(-1)·d(-1), rats in group B+G with glutamine for 4 g·kg(-1)·d(-1), rats in groups B+LPG, B+MPG, and B+HPG with panthenol and glutamine in the dosage of 0.50 and 2, 1.00 and 4, 2.00 and 8 g·kg(-1)·d(-1). The feeding was carried out twice a day to achieve the total dosage for 7 days. The indexes and time point for observation were the same as those of experiment 1. Meanwhile, the pathological change in intestine was observed. The same process was carried out in the rats of group NC. Data were processed with factorial designed analysis of

  4. Mucin phenotypic expression and p53 gene abnormality of gastric super-minute well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: re-evaluation with relationship between histogenesis of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and intestinal metaplasia in distal stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Tanizaki, Takayuki

    2005-09-01

    Although the gastric well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in the distal stomach has been thought to develop via a intestinal metaplasia-carcinoma sequence, there are some disproofs from new mucin examinations for minute-size lesions in same type carcinoma. The current study was performed and pointed out the new findings for the solution to the problem according to the point described above. 12 super-minute lesions (less than 1 mm in maximum diameter) of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in distal stomach (SMCa), which were detected from the pathological examinations of 210 surgically resected stomach specimens, and the mucosa adjacent to these carcinoma lesions, were examined by immunohistochemical mucin stainings (MUC2 and CD-10: intestinal phenotype, 45M1 and MUC6: gastric phenotype) and p53-overexpression. And the analyses of the replication error of the microsatellites in chromosome 17 related p53 gene (TP53 and D17S786) (RER-p53MS) were performed in SMCa lesions, adjacent mucosa to each lesion and other gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, because all SMCa lesions showed p53-overexpression immunohistochemically, described below. 1. The carcinoma cells in all SMCa lesions were positive for 45M1 and p53. On the other hand, no positive carcinoma cells for MUC6 were seen although the pyloric glands and the remnant pyloric gland in the SMCa lesions in the same slides were positive for MUC6. Ten lesions (83%) had intestinal phenotypic mucin (10 lesions: MUC2 (+), 4 lesions: CD10 (+)). Two lesions (17%) were positive for only 45M1 (gastric phenotypic mucin). 2. All of the mucosa adjacent to SMCa showed intestinal metaplasia (complete type: 7 regions, incomplete type: 5 regions). 3. RER-p53MS was confirmed in 42% (5/12 regions) of SMCa, in 42% (5/12 regions) of the mucosa adjacent to SMCa and 14% (6/42 regions) of the other intestinal metaplasia mucosa. Most of the super-minute well-differentiated adenocarcinoma lesions in the distal stomach, which had both

  5. Mucin phenotypic expression and p53 gene abnormality of gastric super-minute well-differentiated adenocarcinoma: Re-evaluation with relationship between histogenesis of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and intestinal metaplasia in distal stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Toshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gastric well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in the distal stomach has been thought to develop via a intestinal metaplasia-carcinoma sequence, there are some disproofs from new mucin examinations for minute-size lesions in same type carcinoma. The current study was performed and pointed out the new findings for the solution to the problem according to the point described above. Methods 12 super-minute lesions (less than 1 mm in maximum diameter of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in distal stomach (SMCa, which were detected from the pathological examinations of 210 surgically resected stomach specimens, and the mucosa adjacent to these carcinoma lesions, were examined by immunohistochemical mucin stainings (MUC2 and CD-10: intestinal phenotype, 45M1 and MUC6: gastric phenotype and p53-overexpression. And the analyses of the replication error of the microsatellites in chromosome 17 related p53 gene (TP53 and D17S786 (RER-p53MS were performed in SMCa lesions, adjacent mucosa to each lesion and other gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, because all SMCa lesions showed p53-overexpression immunohistochemically, decribed below. Results 1. The carcinoma cells in all SMCa lesions were positive for 45M1 and p53. On the other hand, no positive carcinoma cells for MUC6 were seen although the pyloric glands and the remnant pyloric gland in the SMCa lesions in the same slides were positive for MUC6. Ten lesions (83% had intestinal phenotypic mucin (10 lesions: MUC2 (+, 4 lesions: CD10 (+. Two lesions (17% were positive for only 45M1 (gastric phenotypic mucin. 2. All of the mucosa adjacent to SMCa showed intestinal metaplasia (complete type: 7 regions, incomplete type: 5 regions. 3. RER-p53MS was confirmed in 42% (5/12 regions of SMCa, in 42% (5/12 regions of the mucosa adjacent to SMCa and 14% (6/42 regions of the other intestinal metaplasia mucosa. Conclusion Most of the super-minute well-differentiated adenocarcinoma

  6. Effect of acute, slightly increased intra-abdominal pressure on intestinal permeability and oxidative stress in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Leng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH is known as a common, serious complication in critically ill patients. Bacterial translocation and permeability changes are considered the pathophysiological bases for IAH-induced enterogenic endotoxemia and subsequent multiorgan failure. Nevertheless, the effects of slightly elevated intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs on the intestinal mucosa and the associated mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS: To investigate the acute effects of different nitrogen pneumoperitoneum grades on colonic mucosa, male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups with different IAPs (0 [control], 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mmHg, n = 6/group. During 90 min of exposure, we dynamically monitored the heart rate and noninvasive hemodynamic parameters. After gradual decompression, arterial blood gas analyses were conducted. Thereafter, structural injuries to the colonic mucosa were identified using light microscopy. Colon permeability was determined using the expression of tight junction proteins, combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD-4 absorption. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance was determined based on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidant enzymes. RESULTS: IAH significantly affected the histological scores of the colonic mucosa, tight junction protein expression, mucosal permeability, and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance. Interestingly, elevations of IAP that were lower than the threshold for IAH also showed a similar, undesirable effect. In the 8 mmHg group, mild hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypoxemia occurred, accompanied by reduced blood and abdominal perfusion pressures. Mild microscopic inflammatory infiltration and increased MDA levels were also detected. Moreover, an 8-mm Hg IAP markedly inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins, although no significant differences in FD-4 permeability were observed between the 0- and 8-mmHg groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to slightly

  7. Prolapsed gastric mucosa through gastrojejunostomy (Report of 3 cases with review of the literature)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Deok

    1984-01-01

    The radiologic findings of prolapsed gastric mucosa through gastrojejunostomy stoma after gastrectomy is very characteristic, but recurrent gastric cancer, retrograde jejunogastric intussusception, and Hofmeister defect should be differentiated from it because of their similar postoperative upper gastrointestinal series findings. The author reports 3 cases of prolapsed gastric mucosa through gastrojejunostomy stoma after Hofmeister's gastrectomy with brief review of the literature

  8. Fate and ultra-structural features of chicken skin mucosa around juvenile polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hodhod, M A; Soliman, A A; Hamdy, A M; Abdel-Rahim, A A; Abdel-Hamid, F K

    2011-03-01

    Chicken skin mucosa (CSM) is a common finding around juvenile polyps in children. Its ultrastructural features and fate after polypectomy are not yet clear. The aim was to study ultra-structural features and outcome of this CSM compared to that of the polyps and distant endoscopically normal mucosa. From 240 children with juvenile polyps, 45 needed a second colonoscopy. Thirty six patients showing CSM represented the cohort of this study. One polyp only was studied in each patient. The histologic features of the CSM were compared to normal and polyp mucosa. The fate of CSM was evaluated in the second colonoscopy. The mean numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes, as well as lamina propria inflammatory cellular infiltrates were significantly higher in polyp mucosa than in CSM. Goblet cells were significantly higher in CSM compared to normal mucosa with marked depletion in the polyp mucosa. The muscularis mucosae thickness was significantly higher in CSM compared to polyps (ppolyp showed the most intense mucosal inflammatory reaction. CSM with the unique thickening of muscularis mucosae especially around larger polyps almost disappeared after polypectomy. So these results suggest that CSM is a benign compensatory reaction induced by the mechanical effect of the polyp.

  9. A silver tattoo of the nasal mucosa after silver nitrate cautery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayall, F; Wild, D

    1996-06-01

    We report a silver tattoo of the nasal mucosa that occurred after silver nitrate cautery for nasal bleeding. This type of tattoo is a very rare potential mimic of melanoma and appears not to have been described before. It has similar features to an amalgam tattoo of the oral mucosa on histology and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX).

  10. Inicial nasal mucosa detachment using piezoelectric device in the Le Fort I osteotomy: A technical note

    OpenAIRE

    Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi; Kaba, Shajadi Carlos Pardo; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Horikawa, Fernando Kendi

    2013-01-01

    In maxillary Le Fort I type osteotomy the detachment of the nasal mucosa should be done carefully. Piezoelectric surgery contributed much to increase the safety of osteotomies, despite the initial advantage of minimizing the risk of injury in nervous tissue, mainly in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy; we use the piezoelectric device for the initial detachment of the nasal mucosa in the maxillary osteotomy.

  11. Genome sequence of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1, isolated from piglet feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Hee; Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Shin, Yu-Ri; Chae, Jong Pyo; Kim, Geun-Bae; Ham, Jun-Sang; Chun, Jongsik; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2012-09-01

    Lactobacillus mucosae LM1, isolated from stool samples of a healthy piglet, displays good in vitro mucin adhesion and antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. To elucidate its antimicrobial effects and to find its epithelial cell and mucin adhesion genes, the genomic sequence of L. mucosae LM1 was investigated.

  12. Oral mucosa and lung cancer: Are genetic changes in the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... been shown to be associated with genetic defects and with a significant increase in cancer incidence.[10]. Collection of oral epithelial cells for cytogenetic and molecular biology studies as a pain‑free, quick and noninvasive technique. As the oral mucosa is the most accessible region of the airway mucosa, ...

  13. A novel method for delineation of oral mucosa for radiotherapy dose-response studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Jamie A; Welsh, Liam C; Gulliford, Sarah L; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    There is currently no standard method for delineating the oral mucosa and most attempts are oversimplified. A new method to obtain anatomically accurate contours of the oral mucosa surfaces was developed and applied to 11 patients. This is expected to represent an opportunity for improved toxicity modelling of oral mucositis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent progress in host immunity to avian coccidiosis: IL-17 family cytokines as sentinels of the intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wongi; Kim, Woo H; Lillehoj, Erik P; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2013-11-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to immune protection against coccidiosis are complex and include multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunities. Innate immunity is mediated by various subpopulations of immune cells that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through their pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) leading to the secretion of soluble factors with diverse functions. Adaptive immunity, which is important in conferring protection against subsequent reinfections, involves subtypes of T and B lymphocytes that mediate antigen-specific immune responses. Recently, global gene expression microarray analysis has been used in an attempt to dissect this complex network of immune cells and molecules during avian coccidiosis. These new studies emphasized the uniqueness of the innate immune response to Eimeria infection, and directly led to the discovery of previously uncharacterized host genes and proteins whose expression levels were modulated following parasite infection. Among these is the IL-17 family of cytokines. This review highlights recent progress in IL-17 research in the context of host immunity to avian coccidiosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Plant Polyphenols Stimulate Adhesion to Intestinal Mucosa and Induce Proteome Changes in the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Delsoglio, Marta; Brix, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    pathways, such as glycolysis, nucleotide metabolism and stress response as well as being known moonlighting or surface-associated proteins. Conclusion: The five plant phenolics found in various foods stimulate the adhesive capacity of NCFM in diverse ways and elicited relative abundancy changes of specific......Scope: Plant phenolics, known to exert beneficial effects on human health, were supplemented to cultures of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) to assess their effect on its adhesive capacity and the abundancy of individual proteins. Methods and results: The presence...

  16. Gene expression profiles of the small intestinal mucosa of dogs repeatedly infected with the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Kouguchi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data set presented in this article is related to a previous research article entitled “ The timing of worm exclusion in dogs repeatedly infected with the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis” (Kouguchi et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes the genes >2-fold up- or down-regulated in the first- and repeated-infection groups compared to the healthy controls group. The gene expression profiles were generated using the Agilent-021193 Canine (V2 Gene Expression Microarray (GPL15379. The raw and normalized microarray data have been deposited with the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE105098. Keywords: E. multilocularis, Microarray, Dog, Echinococcosis, Vaccine

  17. Interactions between bacteria and the intestinal mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on epithelium cells influence mucosal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms governing the ability of bacteria to adhere to and colonize human and animal hosts in health and disease are still incompletely understood. Throughout the extensive mucosal surfaces of the body that are in contact with the external environment, epithelial cells represent the first po...

  18. Study of dose effect relationship at low doses for non quantitative reactions of skin intestinal mucosa and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the biological reactions observed in animal experiments or in clinical studies are non quantitative and they only allow assessing an inequality between the effects produced by different irradiations. The method used in non quantitative studies is actually based on the relative contribution of irreparable events and reparable to the cell killing. It provides for the cell population involved in non quantitative biological effects some data which can be expressed in term of a cell survival curve. Such data can be useful in Radiation therapy particularly for maximizing the difference between biological effects by a proper choice of the fraction size. The initial part of the cell survival curve, within the range of doses actually used appears to be a straight exponential. This should allow the extrapolation to very low doses in the range of interest to Radiation Protection

  19. Hippo signalling directs intestinal fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Bouteiller, Marie Catherine M; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2015-01-01

    Hippo signalling has been associated with many important tissue functions including the regulation of organ size. In the intestinal epithelium differing functions have been proposed for the effectors of Hippo signalling, YAP and TAZ1. These are now shown to have a dual role in the intestinal epit...

  20. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Martino, Antonio [Trauma Center, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Di Pietto, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Department ' Magrassi-Lanzara' , Section of Radiology, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation.

  1. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stefania; Scaglione, Mariano; Tortora, Giovanni; Martino, Antonio; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation

  2. The octapetide NAP alleviates intestinal and extra-intestinal anti-inflammatory sequelae of acute experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimesaat, Markus M; Giladi, Eliezer; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Gozes, Illana

    2018-03-01

    The octapeptide NAP has been shown to exert neuroprotective properties and reduce neuro-inflammatory responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate if NAP provides anti-inflammatory effects in acute murine colitis. To address this, C57BL/6 j mice were challenged with 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium from day 0 until day 6 to induce colitis, either treated intraperitoneally with NAP or placebo (NaCl 0.9%) from day 1 until day 6 post-induction (p.i.) and subjected to in depth macroscopic, microscopic and immunological evaluations. Whereas NAP application did not alleviate macroscopic (i.e. clinical) sequelae of colitis, lower numbers of apoptotic, but higher counts of proliferating/regenerating colonic epithelial cells could be observed in NAP as compared to placebo treated mice at day 7 p.i. Furthermore, lower numbers of adaptive immune cells such as T lymphocytes and regulatory T cells were abundant in the colonic mucosa and lamina propria upon NAP versus placebo treatment that were accompanied by less colonic secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ and nitric oxide at day 7 p.i. In mesenteric lymph nodes, pro-inflammatory IFN-γ, TNF and IL-6 concentrations were increased in placebo, but not NAP treated mice at day 7 p.i., whereas interestingly, elevated anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels could be observed in NAP treated mice only. The assessed anti-inflammatory properties of NAP were not restricted to the intestinal tract, given that in extra-intestinal compartments such as the kidneys, IFN-γ levels increased in placebo, but not NAP treated mice upon colitis induction. NAP induced effects were accompanied by distinct changes in intestinal microbiota composition, given that colonic luminal loads of bifidobacteria, regarded as anti-inflammatory, "health-promoting" commensal species, were two orders of magnitude higher in NAP as compared to placebo treated mice and even naive controls. In conclusion, NAP alleviates intestinal and extra-intestinal

  3. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... the regulation and function of DMBT1 in intestinal epithelial cells, which form the primary immunological barrier for invading pathogens. We report that intestinal epithelial cells up-regulate DMBT1 upon proinflammatory stimuli (e.g., TNF-alpha, LPS). We demonstrate that DMBT1 is a target gene...... for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...

  4. Regulation of DMBT1 via NOD2 and TLR4 in intestinal epithelial cells modulates bacterial recognition and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; End, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cell layers are constantly exposed to a complex resident microflora. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by pathogen binding. This report describes...... for the intracellular pathogen receptor NOD2 via NF-kappaB activation. DMBT1 is strongly up-regulated in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease patients with wild-type, but not with mutant NOD2. We show that DMBT1 inhibits cytoinvasion of Salmonella enterica and LPS- and muramyl dipeptide-induced NF...... the regulation and function of DMBT1 in intestinal epithelial cells, which form the primary immunological barrier for invading pathogens. We report that intestinal epithelial cells up-regulate DMBT1 upon proinflammatory stimuli (e.g., TNF-alpha, LPS). We demonstrate that DMBT1 is a target gene...

  5. Intestinal upregulation of melanin-concentrating hormone in TNBS-induced enterocolitis in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M Geiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, an evolutionarily conserved appetite-regulating neuropeptide, has been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Expression of MCH is upregulated in inflamed intestinal mucosa in humans with colitis and MCH-deficient mice treated with trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS develop an attenuated form of colitis compared to wild type animals. Zebrafish have emerged as a new animal model of IBD, although the majority of the reported studies concern zebrafish larvae. Regulation MCH expression in the adult zebrafish intestine remains unknown. METHODS: In the present study we induced enterocolitis in adult zebrafish by intrarectal administration of TNBS. Follow-up included survival analysis, histological assessment of changes in intestinal architecture, and assessment of intestinal infiltration by myeloperoxidase positive cells and cytokine transcript levels. RESULTS: Treatment with TNBS dose-dependently reduced fish survival. This response required the presence of an intact microbiome, since fish pre-treated with vancomycin developed less severe enterocolitis. At 6 hours post-challenge, we detected a significant influx of myeloperoxidase positive cells in the intestine and upregulation of both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Most importantly, and in analogy to human IBD and TNBS-induced mouse experimental colitis, we found increased intestinal expression of MCH and its receptor in TNBS-treated zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together these findings not only establish a model of chemically-induced experimental enterocolitis in adult zebrafish, but point to effects of MCH in intestinal inflammation that are conserved across species.

  6. Neuron-macrophage crosstalk in the intestine: a ‘microglia’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eVerheijden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal macrophages are strategically located in different layers of the intestine, including the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa, where they perform complex tasks to maintain intestinal homeostasis. As the gastrointestinal tract is continuously challenged by foreign antigens, macrophage activation should be tightly controlled to prevent chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Unraveling the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific control of macrophage activation is crucial to get more insight into intestinal immune regulation. Two recent reports provide unanticipated evidence that the enteric nervous system acts as a critical regulator of macrophage function in the myenteric plexus. Both studies clearly illustrate that enteric neurons reciprocally interact with intestinal macrophages and are actively involved in shaping their phenotype. This concept has striking parallels with the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal signals maintain microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, in a quiescent, anti-inflammatory state. This inevitably evokes the perception that the ENS and CNS share mechanisms of neuroimmune interaction. In line, intestinal macrophages, both in the muscularis externa and (submucosa, express high levels of CX3CR1, a feature that was once believed to be unique for microglia. CX3CR1 is the sole receptor of fractalkine (CX3CL1, a factor mainly produced by neurons in the CNS to facilitate neuron-microglia communication. The striking parallels between resident macrophages of the brain and intestine might provide a promising new line of thought to get more insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling macrophage activation in the gut.

  7. Human-derived probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains differentially reduce intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuying; Fatheree, Nicole Y; Mangalat, Nisha; Rhoads, Jon Marc

    2010-11-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) is a probiotic that inhibits the severity of enteric infections and modulates the immune system. Human-derived L. reuteri strains DSM17938, ATCC PTA4659, ATCC PTA 5289, and ATCC PTA 6475 have demonstrated strain-specific immunomodulation in cultured monocytoid cells, but information about how these strains affect inflammation in intestinal epithelium is limited. We determined the effects of the four different L. reuteri strains on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in small intestinal epithelial cells and in the ileum of newborn rats. IPEC-J2 cells (derived from the jejunal epithelium of a neonatal piglet) and IEC-6 cells (derived from the rat crypt) were treated with L. reuteri. Newborn rat pups were gavaged cow milk formula supplemented with L. reuteri strains in the presence or absence of LPS. Protein and mRNA levels of cytokines and histological changes were measured. We demonstrate that even though one L. reuteri strain (DSM 17938) did not inhibit LPS-induced IL-8 production in cultured intestinal cells, all strains significantly reduced intestinal mucosal levels of KC/GRO (∼IL-8) and IFN-γ when newborn rat pups were fed formula containing LPS ± L. reuteri. Intestinal histological damage produced by LPS plus cow milk formula was also significantly reduced by all four strains. Cow milk formula feeding (without LPS) produced mild gut inflammation, evidenced by elevated mucosal IFN-γ and IL-13 levels, a process that could be suppressed by strain 17938. Other cytokines and chemokines were variably affected by the different strains, and there was no toxic effect of L. reuteri on intestinal cells or mucosa. In conclusion, L. reuteri strains differentially modulate LPS-induced inflammation. Probiotic interactions with both epithelial and nonepithelial cells in vivo must be instrumental in modulating intrinsic anti-inflammatory effects in the intestine. We suggest that the terms anti- and proinflammatory be used only

  8. Distinct expression patterns of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine implicate functional diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufeng Chen

    Full Text Available ICK/MRK (intestinal cell kinase/MAK-related kinase, MAK (male germ cell-associated kinase, and MOK (MAPK/MAK/MRK-overlapping kinase are closely related serine/threonine protein kinases in the protein kinome. The biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of the ICK/MAK/MOK family are still largely elusive. Despite significant similarities in their catalytic domains, they diverge markedly in the sequence and structural organization of their C-terminal non-catalytic domains, raising the question as to whether they have distinct, overlapping, or redundant biological functions. In order to gain insights into their biological activities and lay a fundamental groundwork for functional studies, we investigated the spatio-temporal distribution patterns and the expression dynamics of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine. We found that ICK/MAK/MOK proteins display divergent expression patterns along the duodenum-to-colon axis and during postnatal murine development. Furthermore, they are differentially partitioned between intestinal epithelium and mesenchyme. A significant increase in the protein level of ICK, but not MAK, was induced in human primary colon cancer specimens. ICK protein level was up-regulated whereas MOK protein level was down-regulated in mouse intestinal adenomas as compared with their adjacent normal intestinal mucosa. These data suggest distinct roles for ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the regulation of intestinal neoplasia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the expressions of ICK/MAK/MOK proteins in the intestinal tract can be differentially and dynamically regulated, implicating a significant functional diversity within this group of protein kinases.

  9. [Effects of secretory and osmotic diarrhea on rats intestinal function and morphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima de Mon, Margarita; Cioccia, Anna M; González, Eduardo; Hevia, Patricio

    2002-03-01

    In order to compare intestinal morphology and function, diarrhea was produced in rats using laxatives in the diet. The 14 day study included two groups of rats with diarrhea (osmotic or secretory), two groups without diarrhea but with a degree of malnutrition which was similar to that seen in the rats with diarrhea (malnourished without diarrhea) and a well-nourished group (control). The inclusion of laxatives(lactose or bisoxatin acetate) cause a reduction in food intake, diarrhea an malnutrition. It also caused a reduction in dietary protein and fat digestibility which was proportional to the severity of diarrhea and more pronounced in secretory diarrhea. In the malnourished rats without diarrhea, malnutrition did not affect their absorptive function. Both in the rats with secretory and osmotic diarrhea an intestinal hypertrophy was observed. This hypertrophy was proportional to the severity of diarrhea and independent of its aetiology. In the intestines of the rats with both types of diarrhea there was inflammation, a greater number of mitotic figures but the flattening of the villi seen in the malnourished rats without diarrhea was not seen. In osmotic diarrhea there was, in addition, a patchy damage of the surface of the jejunal mucosa and an increment in the number of goblet cells, indicating a more severe intestinal deterioration. Since despite this greater deterioration, these rats absorbed more protein and fat we concluded that the alterations in intestinal morphology seen in this study was not predictive of intestinal function. The study also showed that diarrhea had a trophic effect on the intestine which did not occur in malnourished rats without diarrhea.

  10. Celiac disease and intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus (Barrett's esophagus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maieron, Roberto; Elli, Luca; Marino, Marco; Floriani, Irene; Minerva, Francesco; Avellini, Claudio; Falconieri, Giovanni; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Zilli, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies on celiac patients demonstrated that exposure to gliadin alters the motility of the upper gastrointestinal tract, leading to increased acid reflux. No literature is available regarding the possible presence of specialized intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus as a consequence of chronic reflux in adult celiac patients. Our purpose was to evaluate endoscopically and histologically the esophagi of a group of untreated celiac patients. We studied 60 celiac patients, 13 men and 47 women (mean age, 40 +/- 14 [SD] years; range, 18-80 years), at their first endoscopy (following a normal diet). The distal esophagus was evaluated and multiple biopsies were taken. Hematoxylin-eosin and alcian blue stainings were performed. A group of nonceliac, age- and sex-matched patients was used as a control. We found intestinal metaplasia in the distal esophagus of 16 of 60 (26.6%) celiacs (mean age, 45 +/- 13 years; range, 27-75 years), in comparison with a control-group prevalence of 10.9% (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4-11.2%). Among the celiac group with metaplasia, only one patient had reflux-like symptoms. None had esophagitis. In conclusion, we observed an increased prevalence of esophageal metaplasia in patients with celiac disease. This finding could be the result of motor abnormalities leading to chronic acid reflux, combined with a mucosa which is sensitive to gliadin.

  11. Modulation of Intestinal Microbiome Prevents Intestinal Ischemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bertacco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Butyrate protects against ischemic injury to the small intestine by reducing inflammation and maintaining the structure of the intestinal barrier, but is expensive, short-lived, and cannot be administered easily due to its odor. Lactate, both economical and more palatable, can be converted into butyrate by the intestinal microbiome. This study aimed to assess in a rat model whether lactate perfusion can also protect against intestinal ischemia.Materials and Methods: Rat intestinal segments were loaded in an in vitro bowel perfusion device, and water absorption or secretion was assessed based on fluorescence of FITC-inulin, a fluorescent marker bound to a biologically inert sugar. Change in FITC concentration was used as a measure of ischemic injury, given the tendency of ischemic cells to retain water. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections at light level microscopy were examined to evaluate intestinal epithelium morphology. Comparisons between the data sets were paired Student t-tests or ANOVA with p < 0.05 performed on GraphPad.Results: Lactate administration resulted in a protective effect against intestinal ischemia of similar magnitude to that observed with butyrate. Both exhibited approximately 1.5 times the secretion exhibited by control sections (p = 0.03. Perfusion with lactate and methoxyacetate, a specific inhibitor of lactate-butyrate conversion, abolished this effect (p = 0.09. Antibiotic treatment also eliminated this effect, rendering lactate-perfused sections similar to control sections (p = 0.72. Perfusion with butyrate and methoxyacetate did not eliminate the observed increased secretion, which indicates that ischemic protection was mediated by microbial conversion of lactate to butyrate (p = 0.71.Conclusions: Lactate's protective effect against intestinal ischemia due to microbial conversion to butyrate suggests possible applications in the transplant setting for reducing ischemic injury and ameliorating intestinal

  12. TACTICS OF BIOCENOSIS-SAVING THERAPY BY USE ANTIBIOTICS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Mazankova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 50 children aged from 3 to 67 months with acute intestinal infections receiving antibiotic therapy, were clinically and microbiologically examined using gas-liquid chromatographic test with the measurement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs in coprofiltrates. The influence on the biocenosis is assessed upon treatment with an-tidiarrhoeal medication Gelatin tannat (Adiarin, which acts by forming a protective film on the surface of intestinal mucosa preventing loss of body fluids and microbial toxins. 20 children in the control group received antibiotics, sorbents, probiotics. The study has proved the clinical effect of Gelatin tannat, resulting in reduction of time to normalization of diarrhea and intoxication for 2 days, and data on the probiotic effect of the drug, similar to that of probiotics in the control group which expands the indications for the use of Gelatin tannat for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea.  

  13. Crosstalk between Entamoeba histolytica and the human intestinal tract during amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruyère, Elisabeth; Thibeaux, Roman; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillén, Nancy

    2017-12-07

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the microbial agent of amoebiasis - an infection that is endemic worldwide and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. As the disease develops, virulent E. histolytica deplete the mucus layer, interact with the intestinal epithelium, and then degrade the colonic mucosa and disrupt the extracellular matrix (ECM). Our research demonstrated that virulent parasites with an invasive phenotype display rapid, highly specific changes in their transcriptome (notably for essential factors involved in carbohydrate metabolism and the processing of glycosylated residues). Moreover, combined activation of parasite and host lytic enzymes leads to the destruction of the intestinal parenchyma. Together, these enzymes degrade the mucus layer and the ECM, and trigger the inflammatory response essential to the development of amoebiasis.

  14. Reactive localised inflammatory hyperplasia of the oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awange, D O; Wakoli, K A; Onyango, J F; Chindia, M L; Dimba, E O; Guthua, S W

    2009-02-01

    To document the histopathological pattern and distribution of reactive localised inflammatory hyperplastic lesions of the oral mucosa diagnosed at the University of Nairobi Dental Hospital over a 14 year period. A retrospective, cross-sectional descriptive study. Division of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, histopathology laboratory, School of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi. A total of 3135 oral biopsies were accessioned in the oral diagnostic histopathological Laboratory registry over a period of 14 years from March 1991 to December 2005. Three hundred and thirty three cases were histopathologically diagnosed as reactive inflammatory hyperplasias of the oral mucosa. This constituted 10.6% of the total oral biopsy specimens analysed during this period. Fibrous epulis was the most common histological sub-type with 129 cases (38.7%) followed by pyogenic granuloma with 94 (28.3%) cases. Six (1.8%) cases were peripheral giant cell granuloma and three cases (0.9%) were those of denture irritation hyperplasia. The age distribution ranged from 2 to 78 years (mean = 30.5 years) with a peak at 20-29 years. Gender distribution showed that 107 (32%) cases occurred in males and 226 (68%) cases females. Similar trends were observed in most of the histological sub-types. Fibrous epulis occurred in 41 male (31.8%) cases and in 88 (68.2%) females with an age range of 2 to 78 years (mean = 30.5 years). As for the pyogenic granuloma, 26 (27.7%) lesions occurred in males and 68 (72.3%) in females with an age range of 2 to 75 years (mean = 30.1 years). Among all the histopathological sub-types it was shown that 223 (67.0%) cases were fibrous, 104 (31.2%) vascular and six (1.8%) peripheral giant cell granuloma. Gingival lesions were the most common with 257 (77.2%) cases followed by 28 (8.4%) in the tongue, 16 (4.8%) lips, 15 (4.5%) cheek, six (1.8%) palate and the rest on the floor of the mouth and other mucosal sites. The duration of these lesions was recorded in 182 (54

  15. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  16. Effect of arginine and glutamine supplementation, dietary soluble fibre level and n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio on rabbit performance and intestinal health

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Morcillo, María Rebeca

    2017-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis doctoral ha sido estudiar la capacidad que tienen varios nutrientes de mejorar la salud intestinal de los gazapos. Para lograr este objetivo general, se llevaron a cabo tres objetivos principales. El primer objetivo consistió en describir la evolución con la edad de la microbiota intestinal, el sistema inmune y la morfología de la mucosa tras el destete. Para ello se destetaron 100 gazapos de 20 camadas a los 26 d de edad con un peso de 429 ± 57 g y se sacrificó 1 a...

  17. Effects of garlic oil and two of its major organosulfur compounds, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide, on intestinal damage in rats injected with endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Y.-H.; Jen, L.-N.; Su, H.-Y.; Lii, C.-K.; Sheen, L.-Y.; Liu, C.-T.

    2006-01-01

    Garlic and its active components are known to possess antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects. The present study investigated the effects of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds on endotoxin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. Wistar rats received by gavage 50 or 200 mg/kg body weight garlic oil (GO), 0.5 mmol/kg body weight diallyl disulfide or diallyl trisulfide, or the vehicle (corn oil; 2 ml/kg body weight) every other day for 2 weeks before being injected with endotoxin (i.p., 5 mg/kg body weight). Control rats were administered with corn oil and were injected with sterile saline. Samples for the measurement of proinflammatory cytokines were collected 3 h after injection, and all other samples were collected 18 h after injection. The low dose of GO suppressed endotoxin-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, ulceration, and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05). The high dose of GO significantly lowered the peripheral level of nitrate/nitrite and endotoxin-induced iNOS activity in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05) but worsened intestinal mucosal damage accompanied by elevated peripheral proinflammatory cytokines. Diallyl trisulfide but not diallyl disulfide showed similar toxic effect as that of high-dose GO. These results suggest the preventive effect and possible toxicity of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds in endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation and intestinal damage

  18. Effects of the ionising radiations on the structure and the function of the intestinal epithelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haton, C.

    2005-06-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly radio-sensitive tissue and damage may occur following either accidental or therapeutic exposure. the deleterious actions of ionizing radiation are linked to the formation of sometimes overwhelming quantities of reactive oxygen species (R.O.S.). Production of R.O.S. is both direct and indirect from the secondary effects of irradiation. A better comprehension of the underlying mechanisms of injury will lead to more adapted therapeutic approaches to limit the harmful effects of irradiation. The homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium is regulated by three factors: proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. these three factors were studied using the cell model, HT29, in order to analyze modulations of this balance after irradiation. our results, in agreement with other data, showed the establishment of mitotic delay. This arrest of proliferation was followed by apoptosis to be the major mechanism leading to cell death in this model. thus, for the first time, we have shown that irradiated intestinal epithelial cells preserve their capacity to differentiate. This indicates, although indirectly, that intestinal cells have and preserve an intrinsic capacity restore a functional epithelium. R.O.S. are considered as intermediates between the physical nature of radiations and biological responses. It seems essential to understand anti-oxidant mechanisms used by the cell for defence against the deleterious effects of R.O.S post exposure. This study of several anti-oxidant defence mechanisms of intestinal mucosa, was carried out in vivo in the mouse at different times following abdominal irradiation. We observed an early mitochondrial response in the hours following irradiation revealing this organelle as a particular target. We demonstrated a strong alteration of anti-oxidant capacity as revealed by a decrease in S.O.D.s, catalase and an increase of the G.P.X.s and M.T.s. A part of these modifications appeared to depend on an

  19. Assessment of intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation employing nuclear methods in murine mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Rafaela M.; Takenaka, Isabella K.T.M.; Barros, Patricia A.V.; Moura, Livia P.; Contarini, Sara M.L.; Amorim, Juliana M.; Castilho, Raquel O.; Leite, Camila M.A.; Cardoso, Valbert N.; Diniz, Simone Odilia F. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, Mg (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Mucositis affects approximately 80% of patients who receive chemotherapy combinations. The lesions are painful, restrict food intake and make patients more susceptible to systemic infections. Some agents and strategies are being studied for controlling mucositis, none of them is used in clinical practice. In Minas Gerais, many studies have addressed the popular use of the plant Arrabidaea chica in the form of tea, to treat intestinal cramps and diarrhea, the main symptoms of mucositis. Objective: To evaluate the potential of Arrabidaea chica extract in the management of the integrity of the intestinal mucosa, using the experimental model of gut mucositis induced by 5-Fluorouracila (5-FU). Methods: The UFMG Ethics Committee for Animal Experimentation (CETEA/UFMG) approved this study (nº 411/2015). Male BALB/c mice between 6-8 weeks of age were randomly divided into four groups (n=9) as follows: 1. Control (CTL) - oral administration of saline solution (10 days); 2. A. chica (AC) - oral administration of A. chica extract (10 days); 3. Mucositis (MUC) - underwent mucositis (5-FU) (10 days); 4. Mucositis + A. chica (MUC+ AC) - underwent mucositis and received oral administration of A. chica extract (10 days). At the 7{sup th} day, mice in the MUC and MUC + AC groups received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection containing 300 mg/kg 5-FU, whereas the animals of the CTL and AC groups received a saline IP injection. After 72 hours (10{sup th} experimental day), intestinal permeability was determined by measuring the radioactivity diffusion in the blood after oral administration of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) and bacterial translocation was determined by measuring the radioactivity diffusion in the blood after oral administration of E. coli labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc). After 4 hours, the mice were euthanized and assessed for intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and

  20. Effects of sodium hydrosulfide on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Chen, Di; Liu, Beibei; Xie, Xuemeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Yang, Guangtian

    2013-07-19

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can lead to intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Increasing studies have indicated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is in favor of a variety of tissue I/R injury. The purpose of this study was to explore whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H2S donor, can protect intestinal mucosa after CPR and its potential mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest induced by transcutaneous electrical epicardium stimulation and then resuscitated successfully. A bolus of either NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or placebo (NaCl 0.9%) was blindly injected 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous injection of NaHS (2mg/kg/h) or placebo for 3h. Intestinal and plasma samples were collected for assessments 24h after CPR. We found that NaHS can markedly alleviate cardiac arrest induced intestinal mucosal injury. Rats treated with NaHS showed a lower malondialdehyde content, higher superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content in intestine after CPR. Increased intestinal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly decreased by NaHS after CPR. Moreover, a reduced intestinal apoptotic cells after CPR were evident when pretreated with NaHS. Further studies indicated that NaHS enhances the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in intestine after CPR. Our data demonstrated that NaHS treatment before CPR induces intestinal mucosal protection 24h post-resuscitation. The protective effects may be through oxidative stress reduction, inflammation alleviation, apoptosis inhibition and HIF-1α activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mecanismos específicos de patogenicidade de protozoários de mucosa: Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia e Trichomonas vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Brum Vieira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica e Giardia lamblia são protozoários que podem parasitar a mucosa intestinal, causando principalmente diarreia. Trichomonas vaginalis coloniza a mucosa vaginal causando tricomonose, a doença sexualmente transmissível não viral mais comum no mundo. Embora coletivamente estes parasitos infectem mais de um bilhão de pessoas a cada ano, seus mecanismos de patogenicidade ainda não estão totalmente esclarecidos. Assim, esta revisão reúne os principais mecanismos envolvidos na patogenicidade destes protozoários, bem como os fatores do microambiente que podem interferir no sucesso da colonização. A patogênese da E. histolytica envolve adesão, lise, fagocitose de células epiteliais e bactérias, invasão tecidual por ação de enzimas e evasão da resposta imune do hospedeiro. A lectina Gal/GalNAc, os amebaporos e as cisteína proteases são as principais moléculas envolvidas nesses processos. O estabelecimento da giardiose depende de diversos mecanismos patogênicos e de virulência desenvolvidos pela G. lamblia, tais como as moléculas envolvidas na adesão, encistamento e variação antigênica. Para o sucesso da colonização da mucosa vaginal, o T. vaginalis expressa moléculas como as adesinas de superfície, lipofosfoglicanos e galectina, envolvidas na adesão às células epiteliais vaginais e alteração da expressão gênica, tanto do parasito como do hospedeiro.

  2. Role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzeri, Erika; Usai, Paolo

    2017-06-14

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is widespread worldwide thanks to their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects. However, even more attention is placed upon the recurrence of digestive system complications in the course of their use. Recent data suggests that the complications of the lower gastro-intestinal tract may be as frequent and severe as those of the upper tract. NSAIDs enteropathy is due to enterohepatic recycling of the drugs resulting in a prolonged and repeated exposure of the intestinal mucosa to the compound and its metabolites. Thus leading to so-called topical effects, which, in turn, lead to an impairment of the intestinal barrier. This process determines bacterial translocation and toxic substances of intestinal origin in the portal circulation, leading to an endotoxaemia. This condition could determine a liver inflammatory response and might promote the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, mostly in patients with risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and a high fat diet, which may induce a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis. This alteration of gut microbiota may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its related disorders in two ways: firstly causing a malfunction of the tight junctions that play a critical role in the increase of intestinal permeability, and then secondly leading to the development of insulin resistance, body weight gain, lipogenesis, fibrogenesis and hepatic oxidative stress.

  3. Effects of β-conglycinin on growth performance, immunoglobulins and intestinal mucosal morphology in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xichun; Geng, Fangfang; Wu, Jinjie; Kou, Yanan; Xu, Shuliang; Sun, Zhikuo; Feng, Shibin; Ma, Liangyou; Luo, Ying

    2014-01-01

    One of the main causes of allergic reactions in young animals is β-conglycinin, an antigenic glycoprotein found in soya beans. Therefore, the objective of the study was to investigate the effects of a prior immunisation with β-conglycinin on growth performance, serum immunoglobulin levels and intestinal histology in piglets. Forty piglets (7 d of age) were randomly divided into four groups of ten piglets each. Piglets of Groups Im and Im+S were immunised twice by hypodermic injection with β-conglycinin at 500 μg/kg body weight (BW) at day 7 and 21 of age. At day 23, Groups Im+S and S were intramuscularly injected with 5000 μg β-conglycinin per kg BW. The piglets of Group C received a physiological saline solution by hypodermic injection. All piglets were weaned at the age of 23 d and blood samples were taken on days 7, 21 and 35. At the end of the trial, five piglets per group were slaughtered and the intestine was collected for evaluating mucosal histology. Compared to Group C, in Group S the average daily gain (ADG), feed intake and gain:feed ratio were decreased (p < 0.01), and serum levels of IgG and IgE were increased (p < 0.01). Furthermore, in this group the structure of duodenal and jejunal mucosa was severely damaged. But in Groups Im and Im+S the ADG was increased (p < 0.05), serum IgE levels were decreased (p < 0.01) and the intestinal mucosa was not damaged. The results suggest that prior immunisation with β-conglycinin can increase ADG and serum IgG levels and decrease serum IgE levels. Therefore, this method is also potentially able to protect the structural integrity of the intestinal mucosal epithelia and alleviate allergic reactions in piglets.

  4. Colon mucosa of patients both with spondyloarthritis and Crohn's disease is enriched with macrophages expressing the scavenger receptor CD163

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demetter, P.; de Vos, M.; van Huysse, J. A.; Baeten, D.; Ferdinande, L.; Peeters, H.; Mielants, H.; Veys, E. M.; de Keyser, F.; Cuvelier, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease is associated with an increased number of macrophages in ileal and colonic mucosa. Data on macrophages in gut mucosa of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To investigate macrophages and other antigen presenting cells in gut mucosa from patients

  5. Giardia duodenalis Infection Reduces Granulocyte Infiltration in an In Vivo Model of Bacterial Toxin-Induced Colitis and Attenuates Inflammation in Human Intestinal Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, James A.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L. Patrick; Hirota, Simon A.; Beck, Paul L.; Buret, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the develo...

  6. Distended glands or overreplacement of ampullary mucosa at the papilla of Vater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Koichi; Ootaka, Masahiko; Yamasaki, Shigetaka; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kenro; Takase, Masaru; Nobukawa, Bunsei; Suzuki, Fujihiko

    2004-01-01

    The role of the ampullary mucosa, especially its distended glands at the papilla of Vater, has not been fully explored. Twenty-nine pancreatoduodenectomized specimens from pancreatobiliary diseases and 44 autopsied cases, as controls, were studied histopathologically and immunohistochemically. In 12 out of the 29 pancreatoduodenectomized cases the ampullary mucosa was in contact with the duodenal mucosa just at the outlet of the ampulla. In the remaining 17 cases, the ampullary mucosa overgrew beyond the ostium, replacing a portion of the surrounding duodenal mucosa, termed "distended glands," which measured an average of 1532 microm in length. The muscularis mucosae of the duodenum and the Oddi's sphincter muscle merged in an "end-to-end, sharp-angled" manner at the ostium in the former, whereas this occurred in an "end-to-side, less sharp, rather right-angled" manner in the latter. Immunohistochemically, the distended glands in some cases showed negative/weakly positive staining for anti-carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and a high proliferation index evaluated using Ki67. In the autopsied materials, distended glands were found in 24 out of the 44 cases. Distended glands of the ampullary mucosa were frequently found and only grew on the Oddi's sphincter muscle extension. They may represent not only malignant change but also an adaptive phenomenon for bile and pancreatic juice flow.

  7. Resection and Primary Closure of Edematous Glossoepiglottic Mucosa in a Dog Causing Laryngeal Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabbing, Kevin J; Seaman, Jeffrey A

    An approximately 22 mo old male neutered English bulldog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea with suspected brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS). Laryngoscopic exam revealed diffuse, severe edema and static displacement of redundant glossoepiglottic (GE) mucosa causing complete obstruction of the larynx and epiglottic entrapment. Static displacement of the GE mucosa was observed and determined to be the overriding component of dyspnea in this patient with BOAS. Resection and primary closure with two separate, simple continuous sutures of the GE mucosa were performed. Resection and primary closure of the GE mucosa resolved the acute onset of dyspnea in this patient. Surgical correction of the stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules were performed under the same anesthetic procedure. Static displacement of the GE mucosa may occur in patients with BOAS. Surgical resection and closure of the GE mucosa resolved this patient's dyspnea and is recommended in airway obstruction. It remains to be determined if primary closure and subsequent tensioning or scar tissue of the GE mucosa results in further complications related to restricted epiglottic movement.

  8. Ex vivo comparative study on three sinus lift tools for transcrestal detaching maxillary sinus mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfeng; Hu, Pin; Han, Yishi; Fan, Jiadong; Dong, Xinming; Ren, Huan; Yang, Chunhao; Shi, Tingting; Xia, Dong

    2017-07-04

    The objective of this study was to comparatively evaluate 3 different sinus lift tools, namely umbrella-shaped sinus lift curette YSL-04, our recently designed probe-improved sinus lift curettes, and our newly invented elevator 014, using our previous developed goat ex vivo models for direct visualizing the effectiveness of detaching sinus mucosa in real time. Goat ex vivo models for direct visualizing the effectiveness of detaching sinus mucosa in real time were generated according to our previously developed protocol. The effectiveness for each tool was evaluated through the length of sinus mucosa detached in mesial and distal directions or buccal and palatal directions, and the space volume created by detaching maxillary sinus mucosa in mesial, distal, buccal and palatal directions. The results showed that all 3 sinus lift tools could transcrestally detach the maxillary sinus mucosa and create extra space under the elevated sinus floor on the goat ex vivo sinus models. Moreover, our newly invented elevator 014 had advantages over the other 2 in term of the capability to detach the sinus mucosa. Our newly invented elevator 014 might be a promising tool for detaching maxillary sinus mucosa in transcrestal maxillary sinus floor elevation.

  9. MicroRNA profiling of the intestine during hypothermic circulatory arrest in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Bin; Liang, Meng-Ya; Chen, Guang-Xian; Yang, Xiao; Qin, Han; Yao, Jian-Ping; Feng, Kang-Ni; Wu, Zhong-Kai

    2015-02-21

    To perform a profiling analysis of changes in intestinal microRNA (miRNA) expression during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA). A total of eight piglets were randomly divided into HCA and sham operation (SO) groups. Under general anesthesia, swine in the HCA group were subjected to hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass at 24 °C followed by 80 min of circulatory arrest, and the reperfusion lasted for 180 min after cross-clamp removal. The counterparts in the SO group were only subjected to median sternotomy. Histopathological analysis was used to detect mucosal injury, and Pick-and-Mix custom miRNA real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panels containing 306 unique primer sets were utilized to assay unpooled intestinal samples harvested from the two groups. The intestinal mucosa of the animals that were subjected to 24 °C HCA exhibited representative ischemic reperfusion injury of grade 2 or 3 according to the Chiu score. Such intestinal mucosal injuries, with the subepithelial space and epithelial layer lifting away from the lamina propria, were accompanied by shortened and irregular villi. On the contrary, the intestinal mucosa remained normal in the sham-operated animals. In total, twenty-five miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two groups (15 upregulated and 10 downregulated in the HCA group). Among these, eight miRNAs (miR-122, miR-221-5p, miR-31, miR-421-5p, miR-4333, miR-499-3p, miR-542 and let-7d-3p) were significantly dysregulated (four higher and four lower). The expression of miR-122 was significantly (5.37-fold) increased in the HCA group vs the SO group, indicating that it may play a key role in HCA-induced mucosal injury. Exposure to HCA caused intestinal miRNA dysregulation and barrier dysfunction in swine. These altered miRNAs might be related to the protection or destruction of the intestinal barrier.

  10. Differences between polydioxanone and poliglactin in intestinal anastomoses – a comparative study of intestinal anastomoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Marques dos Santos

    2017-10-01

    laparotomia nos grupos A e B (10 ratos cada, com transecção do íleo a 5 e 10 centímetros proximalmente à válvula ileocecal; no grupo A, a anastomose foi realizada com 4 suturas de mucosa separadas com uso de polidioxanona; no grupo B, a anastomose foi realizada com poliglactina; no grupo C (5 ratos, foi realizada apenas a laparotomia e manipulação do íleo. Transcorridos 21 dias, os ratos foram anestesiados e submetidos à eutanásia. Os espécimes foram enviados para estudo histopatológico e análise de resistência à tração. A análise estatística foi efetuada com a aplicação dos testes de Tukey e de t de Student, com significância de p < 0,05. Resultados: Os resultados demonstraram que, na análise de resistência à tração, não foram observadas diferenças significativas entre os materiais. A análise histológica revelou diferenças significativas entre padrões de cicatrização, em que polidioxanona causou menos fibrose versus poliglactina. Conclusão: : Polidioxanona causou menos fibrose versus poliglactina em anastomoses intestinais realizadas em ratos. Keywords: Anastomosis, surgical, Polydioxanone, Polyglactin 910, Rats, Small intestine, Palavras-chave: Anastomose cirúrgica, Polidioxanona, Poliglactina 910, Ratos, Intestino delgado

  11. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Shojaeian, Reza; Dehghanian, Paria; Hajian, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a multisystemic disorder in which impaired intestinal motor activity causes recurrent symptoms of intestinal obstruction in the absence of mechanical occlusion, associated with bladder distention without distal obstruction of the urinary tract. MMIHS and prune belly syndrome may overlap in most of the clinical features and discrimination of these two entities is important because the prognosis, management and consulting with parents are completely different. MMIHS outcome is very poor and in this article we present two neonates with MMIHS that both died in a few days. PMID:23729700

  12. INFANTS’ INTESTINAL COLICS. MODERN DATA

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    N.I. Ursova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes modern data on infants’ intestinal colics. Peculiarities of nutrition, intestinal microbiocenose in healthy infants, methods of colcs’ correction are discussed. Author describes the principles of probiotics choice based on their clinical effectiveness in infants. Milk formula «Nan Comfort» can be useful in prophylaxis and treatment of functional disorders of gastrointestinal tract in children.Key words: infants, gastrointestinal tract, anatomy, physiology, intestinal colics, nutrition, probiotics.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (2: 125–131

  13. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium Std fimbriae bind terminal alpha(1,2)fucose residues in the cecal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessa, Daniela; Winter, Maria G; Jakomin, Marcello; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2009-02-01

    The std operon encodes a fimbrial adhesin of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium that is required for attachment to intestinal epithelial cells and for cecal colonization in the mouse. To study the mechanism by which this virulence factor contributes to colonization we characterized its binding specificity. Std-mediated binding to human colonic epithelial (Caco-2) cells could be abrogated by removing N-linked glycans. Adherence of Std fimbriated S. Typhimurium to Caco-2 cells could be blocked by co-incubation with H type 2 oligosaccharide (Fucalpha1-2Galbeta1-4GlcNAc) or by pretreatment of cells with alpha1-2 fucosidase. In contrast, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with neuraminidase or co-incubation with the type 2 disaccharide precursor (Galbeta1-4GlcNAc) did not reduce adherence of Std fimbriated S. Typhimurium. Binding of purified Std fimbriae to Fucalpha1-2Galbeta1-4GlcNAc in a solid phase binding assay was competitively inhibited by Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for Fucalpha1-2 moieties. Purified Std fimbriae and UEA both bound to a receptor localized in the mucus layer of the murine cecum. These data suggest that the std operon encodes an adhesin that binds an alpha1-2 fucosylated receptor(s) present in the cecal mucosa.

  14. HIV enteropathy: HAART reduces HIV-induced stem cell hyperproliferation and crypt hypertrophy to normal in jejunal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Philip A; Kapembwa, Moses S; Belmonte, Liliana; Tudor, Gregory; Kotler, Donald P; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Griffin, George E

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the structural and kinetic response of small intestinal crypt epithelial cells including stem cells to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Crypt size and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were quantified using morphometric techniques. Crypt length was measured by counting the number of enterocytes along one side of a number of crypts in each biopsy specimen and the mean crypt length was calculated. Proliferating crypt cells were identified with MIB-1 monoclonal antibody, and the percentage of crypt cells in proliferation was calculated at each cell position along the length of the crypt (proliferation index). Data were obtained from 9 HIV-positive test patients co-infected with microsporidia, 34 HIV-positive patients receiving HAART and 13 control cases. Crypt length was significantly greater in test patients than in controls, but crypt length in patients receiving HAART was normal. The proliferation index was greater in test subjects than in controls in stem and transit cell compartments, and was decreased in patients treated with HAART only in the stem cell region of the crypt. Villous atrophy in HIV enteropathy is attributed to crypt hypertrophy and encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. HAART restores normal crypt structure by inhibition of HIV-driven stem cell hyperproliferation at the crypt bases.

  15. Regeneration of Vocal Fold Mucosa Using Tissue-Engineered Structures with Oral Mucosal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioko Fukahori

    Full Text Available Scarred vocal folds result in irregular vibrations during phonation due to stiffness of the vocal fold mucosa. To date, a completely satisfactory corrective procedure has yet to be achieved. We hypothesize that a potential treatment option for this disease is to replace scarred vocal folds with organotypic mucosa. The purpose of this study is to regenerate vocal fold mucosa using a tissue-engineered structure with autologous oral mucosal cells.Animal experiment using eight beagles (including three controls.A 3 mm by 3 mm specimen of canine oral mucosa was surgically excised and divided into epithelial and subepithelial tissues. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated and cultured separately. The proliferated epithelial cells were co-cultured on oriented collagen gels containing the proliferated fibroblasts for an additional two weeks. The organotypic cultured tissues were transplanted to the mucosa-deficient vocal folds. Two months after transplantation, vocal fold vibrations and morphological characteristics were observed.A tissue-engineered vocal fold mucosa, consisting of stratified epithelium and lamina propria, was successfully fabricated to closely resemble the normal layered vocal fold mucosa. Laryngeal stroboscopy revealed regular but slightly small mucosal waves at the transplanted site. Immunohistochemically, stratified epithelium expressed cytokeratin, and the distributed cells in the lamina propria expressed vimentin. Elastic Van Gieson staining revealed a decreased number of elastic fibers in the lamina propria of the transplanted site.The fabricated mucosa with autologous oral mucosal cells successfully restored the vocal fold mucosa. This reconstruction technique could offer substantial clinical advantages for treating intractable diseases such as scarring of the vocal folds.

  16. Feeding Regulates the Expression of Pancreatic Genes in Gastric Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita De Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ineffective short-term control of feeding behavior compromises energy homeostasis and can lead to obesity. The gastrointestinal tract secretes several regulatory peptides. However, little is known about the stomach peptide contribution to the acute regulation of intake. In an attempt to identify new gastric signals, the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE method was used for the transcription profiling of stomach mucosa in 7 groups of mice: fasting and sacrificed 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours after a low-fat (LF or high-fat (HF ad libitum meal. In total, 35 genes were differentially modulated by LF and HF meals compared to fasting, including 15 mRNAs coding for digestive enzymes/secretory proteins, and 10 novel transcripts. Although the basic expression profile did not undergo substantial variations, both LF and HF meals influenced the transcription. This study represents the first global analysis of stomach transcriptome as induced by different nutritional stimuli. Further studies including the characterization of novel genes may help to identify new targets for the therapy and prevention of obesity.

  17. Acute effect of gamma irradiation on the gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, A.; Dorval, E.D.; Rogers, J.E.; O'Connell, L.; Durakovic, A.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the gastric mucosa has been studied in a primate model by evaluating endoscopically the rate of healing of gastric biopsies. Six male rhesus monkeys were subjected to fiberoptic gastroscopies performed under general anesthesia before and after total body exposure to Cobalt-60 (800 rads). Gastric biopsies were taken 3 hours and 2, 7, and 9 days after irradiation and examined using light microscopy. Gastric biopsies were found to heal in 3 days before irradiation; in contrast, they were still present 7 and 9 days after the biopsies in irradiated animals. Microscopic examination of the biopsies taken outside of the ulcer craters did not demonstrate any significant changes of the gastric surface epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that a gastric ulcer develops at the site of each endoscopic biopsy in irradiated monkeys whereas complete healing is observed in non-irradiated animals. The cause of this observation is unclear but it could be due to radiation induced suppression of the mitotic activity and of the cell renewal of gastric surface epithelial cells

  18. CT appearances of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessar, P.; Norton, A.; Rohatiner, A.Z.S.; Lister, T.A.; Reznek, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a low-grade lymphoma that differs from high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma both clinically and histologically. The CT appearances of MALT lymphoma are described. Of 40 patients referred with biopsy-proven MALT lymphoma, only seven had not had gastrectomy or chemotherapy prior to CT examination. The CT scans of these seven cases were analysed for the degree and extent of gastric wall thickening, enlargement of abdominal and extra-abdominal lymph nodes, and presence of extranodal disease. In all patients the stomach was distended with oral contrast medium and scans performed at narrow collimation, after intravenous administration of 20 mg hyoscine butylbromide. In six patients focal thickening of the gastric wall was 1 cm or less. One patient had thickening of over 4 cm. There was no enlargement of abdominal or extra-abdominal lymph nodes or extension to adjacent organs. Thus on CT, at presentation, MALT lymphoma results in minimal gastric wall thickening, unlike high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which typically causes bulky gastric disease, nodal enlargement and extension into adjacent organs. CT is therefore of limited value in monitoring response to treatment. With disease greater than minimal thickening, transformation to a higher grade should be considered. (orig.)

  19. CT findings of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weidong; Guan Yubao; Li Chuanxing; Wu Peihong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT findings of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Methods: The CT examinations of 12 patients with pathologically proven pulmonary MALT lymphoma were reviewed retrospectively. Evaluated imaging findings included number, distribution, shape, attenuation and other associated findings of each lesion were evaluated. Results: Thirty-two pulmonary lesions, including consolidations, masses, nodules and lesions with ground glass attenuation, were identified in 12 patients. Multiple lesions were founded in 10 of 12 patients and solitary lesion in 2 patients. Multiple lesions found in one lung in 2 patients, and multiple lesions found in both lungs in 8 patients. Ten cases demonstrated 21 consolidation lesions with air bronchogram, and one of the ten cases demonstrated two lesions with airway dilatation. Three cases demonstrated 5 masses or nodular lesions, 3 of these 5 lesions showed air bronchogram. Two cases demonstrated 6 ground glass attenuation lesions. One case showed mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy. Conclusion: Pulmonary MALT lymphoma usually appears as multiple bilateral consolidations, masses, nodules with air bronchogram or lesions with ground- glass attenuation at CT imaging. The imaging findings described above and with an indolent clinical course may suggest the diagnosis of pulmonary MALT lymphoma. (authors)

  20. Variation in activity of pepsin extracted from buffalo stomach mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firdous, S.; Javed, A.; Miraj, S.; Ejaz, N.

    2013-01-01

    Pepsin was extracted from the buffalo's mucosa in an acidic medium by incubating at 40 degree C for 48 h and dried in an air blanket at 50 degree C. Conditions for the maximum yield M pepsin were optimized. Changes in pH, temperature and incubation time affect the yield of pepsin, It has been noted that the time of the year in which extractions were made under optimized conditions was an important factor which affected the yield as well as activity of pepsin. Studies showed that maximum yield 11.5% was in February 2009 and minimum 10.3% in May 2009. It was further studied that the activity of the pepsin extracted in February was higher i.e 110 U/mg as compared to the activity of the enzyme extracted during the month of May which was 102.6 U/mg. The purpose of the study was to consider the conditions of the slaughter houses to attain maximum yield of pepsin with maximum activity. (author)