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Sample records for intestinal homeostasis relation

  1. The role of CDX2 in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    a causal role in a large number of diseases and developmental disorders. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronically inflamed mucosa caused by dysregulation of the intestinal immune homeostasis. The aetiology of IBD is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors......, including luminal bacteria. The Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is critical in early intestinal differentiation and has been implicated as a master regulator of the intestinal homeostasis and permeability in adults. When expressed, CDX2 modulates a diverse set of processes including...... of the intestinal homeostasis and further to reveal its potential role in inflammation....

  2. Neuroimmune regulation during intestinal development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2017-02-01

    Interactions between the nervous system and immune system are required for organ function and homeostasis. Evidence suggests that enteric neurons and intestinal immune cells share common regulatory mechanisms and can coordinate their responses to developmental challenges and environmental aggressions. These discoveries shed light on the physiology of system interactions and open novel perspectives for therapy designs that target underappreciated neurological-immunological commonalities. Here we highlight findings that address the importance of neuroimmune cell units (NICUs) in intestinal development, homeostasis and disease.

  3. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  4. Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Negroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host’s internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  5. Dietary inhibitors of histone deacetylases in intestinal immunity anc homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilderink, R.; Verseijden, C.; de Jonge, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are integral players in homeostasis of immunity and host defense in the gut and are under influence of the intestinal microbiome. Microbial metabolites and dietary components, including short chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate, SCFAs), have an

  6. Microenvironmental regulation of stem cells in intestinal homeostasis and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2011-01-01

    The identification of intestinal stem cells as well as their malignant counterparts, colon cancer stem cells, has undergone rapid development in recent years. Under physiological conditions, intestinal homeostasis is a carefully balanced and efficient interplay between stem cells, their progeny and

  7. MicroRNAs at the epicenter of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcheva, Antoaneta

    2017-03-01

    Maintaining intestinal homeostasis is a key prerequisite for a healthy gut. Recent evidence points out that microRNAs (miRNAs) act at the epicenter of the signaling networks regulating this process. The fine balance in the interaction between gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial cells, and the host immune system is achieved by constant transmission of signals and their precise regulation. Gut microbes extensively communicate with the host immune system and modulate host gene expression. On the other hand, sensing of gut microbiota by the immune cells provides appropriate tolerant responses that facilitate the symbiotic relationships. While the role of many regulatory proteins, receptors and their signaling pathways in the regulation of the intestinal homeostasis is well documented, the involvement of non-coding RNA molecules in this process has just emerged. This review discusses the most recent knowledge about the contribution of miRNAs in the regulation of the intestinal homeostasis. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Wine consumption and intestinal redox homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasi, Fiorella; Deiana, Monica; Guina, Tina; Gamba, Paola; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella; Poli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Regular consumption of moderate doses of wine is an integral part of the Mediterranean diet, which has long been considered to provide remarkable health benefits. Wine׳s beneficial effect has been attributed principally to its non-alcoholic portion, which has antioxidant properties, and contains a wide variety of phenolics, generally called polyphenols. Wine phenolics may prevent or delay the progression of intestinal diseases characterized by oxidative stress and inflammation, especially because they reach higher concentrations in the gut than in other tissues. They act as both free radical scavengers and modulators of specific inflammation-related genes involved in cellular redox signaling. In addition, the importance of wine polyphenols has recently been stressed for their ability to act as prebiotics and antimicrobial agents. Wine components have been proposed as an alternative natural approach to prevent or treat inflammatory bowel diseases. The difficulty remains to distinguish whether these positive properties are due only to polyphenols in wine or also to the alcohol intake, since many studies have reported ethanol to possess various beneficial effects. Our knowledge of the use of wine components in managing human intestinal inflammatory diseases is still quite limited, and further clinical studies may afford more solid evidence of their beneficial effects. PMID:25009781

  9. Neuroimmune interaction and the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijden, Simon; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2018-01-01

    Many essential gastrointestinal functions, including motility, secretion, and blood flow, are regulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), both through intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. Recently identified neuroimmune mechanisms, in particular the interplay between enteric neurons and muscularis macrophages, are now considered to be essential for fine-tuning peristalsis. These findings shed new light on how intestinal immune cells can support enteric nervous function. In addition, both intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms control intestinal immune homeostasis in different layers of the intestine, mainly by affecting macrophage activation through neurotransmitter release. In this mini-review, we discuss recent insights on immunomodulation by intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic innervation, with a particular focus on intestinal macrophages. In addition, we discuss the relevance of these novel mechanisms for intestinal immune homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions, mainly focusing on motility disorders (gastroparesis and postoperative ileus) and inflammatory disorders (colitis).

  10. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

  11. Hedgehog Signaling and Maintenance of Homeostasis in the Intestinal Epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büller, Nikè V. J. A.; Rosekrans, Sanne L.; Westerlund, Jessica; van den Brink, Gijs R.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of the rapidly renewing intestinal epithelium depends on a balance between cell proliferation and loss. Indian hedgehog (Ihh) acts as a negative feedback signal in this dynamic equilibrium. We discuss recent evidence that Ihh may be one of the key epithelial signals that indicates

  12. Microbiota-Produced Succinate Improves Glucose Homeostasis via Intestinal Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zitoun, Carine; Duchampt, Adeline; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Mithieux, Gilles

    2016-07-12

    Beneficial effects of dietary fiber on glucose and energy homeostasis have long been described, focusing mostly on the production of short-chain fatty acids by the gut commensal bacteria. However, bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also produces large amounts of succinate and, to date, no study has focused on the role of succinate on host metabolism. Here, we fed mice a fiber-rich diet and found that succinate was the most abundant carboxylic acid in the cecum. Dietary succinate was identified as a substrate for intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN), a process that improves glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, dietary succinate improved glucose and insulin tolerance in wild-type mice, but those effects were absent in mice deficient in IGN. Conventional mice colonized with the succinate producer Prevotella copri exhibited metabolic benefits, which could be related to succinate-activated IGN. Thus, microbiota-produced succinate is a previously unsuspected bacterial metabolite improving glycemic control through activation of IGN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Innate Immune Activation in Intestinal Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host prot...

  14. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, Katarzyna M.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence...... dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis....

  15. MicroRNAs and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runtsch, Marah C; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is a unique site in which a large portion of our immune system and the 10(14) commensal organisms that make up the microbiota reside in intimate contact with each other. Despite the potential for inflammatory immune responses, this complex interface contains host immune cells and epithelial cells interacting with the microbiota in a manner that promotes symbiosis. Due to the complexity of the cell types and microorganisms involved, this process requires elaborate regulatory mechanisms to ensure mutualism and prevent disease. While many studies have described critical roles for protein regulators of intestinal homeostasis, recent reports indicate that non-coding RNAs are also major contributors to optimal host-commensal interactions. In particular, there is emerging evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) have evolved to fine tune host gene expression networks and signaling pathways that modulate cellular physiology in the intestinal tract. Here, we review our present knowledge of the influence miRNAs have on both immune and epithelial cell biology in the mammalian intestines and the impact this has on the microbiota. We also discuss a need for further studies to decipher the functions of specific miRNAs within the gut to better understand cellular mechanisms that promote intestinal homeostasis and to identify potential molecular targets underlying diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer.

  16. Intestinal bile acid receptors are key regulators of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Lestavel, Sophie; Staels, Bart; Collet, Xavier

    2017-08-01

    In addition to their well-known function as dietary lipid detergents, bile acids have emerged as important signalling molecules that regulate energy homeostasis. Recent studies have highlighted that disrupted bile acid metabolism is associated with metabolism disorders such as dyslipidaemia, intestinal chronic inflammatory diseases and obesity. In particular, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with quantitative and qualitative modifications in bile acid metabolism. Bile acids bind and modulate the activity of transmembrane and nuclear receptors (NR). Among these receptors, the G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (TGR5) and the NR farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are implicated in the regulation of bile acid, lipid, glucose and energy homeostasis. The role of these receptors in the intestine in energy metabolism regulation has been recently highlighted. More precisely, recent studies have shown that FXR is important for glucose homeostasis in particular in metabolic disorders such as T2D and obesity. This review highlights the growing importance of the bile acid receptors TGR5 and FXR in the intestine as key regulators of glucose metabolism and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  17. Intestinal stromal cells in mucosal immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, B M J; Simmons, A

    2013-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that non-hematopoietic stromal cells of the intestine have multiple roles in immune responses and inflammation at this mucosal site. Despite this, many still consider gut stromal cells as passive structural entities, with past research focused heavily on their roles in fibrosis, tumor progression, and wound healing, rather than their contributions to immune function. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of stromal cells in intestinal immunity, highlighting the many immunological axes in which stromal cells have a functional role. We also consider emerging data that broaden the potential scope of their contribution to immunity in the gut and argue that these so-called "non-immune" cells are reclassified in light of their diverse contributions to intestinal innate immunity and the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis.

  18. Intestinal bacteria and the regulation of immune cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David A; Artis, David

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine is colonized by an estimated 100 trillion bacteria. Some of these bacteria are essential for normal physiology, whereas others have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple inflammatory diseases including IBD and asthma. This review examines the influence of signals from intestinal bacteria on the homeostasis of the mammalian immune system in the context of health and disease. We review the bacterial composition of the mammalian intestine, known bacterial-derived immunoregulatory molecules, and the mammalian innate immune receptors that recognize them. We discuss the influence of bacterial-derived signals on immune cell function and the mechanisms by which these signals modulate the development and progression of inflammatory disease. We conclude with an examination of successes and future challenges in using bacterial communities or their products in the prevention or treatment of human disease.

  19. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2012-11-01

    The intestine is a unique tissue where an elaborate balance is maintained between tolerance and immune responses against a variety of environmental factors such as food and the microflora. In a healthy individual, the microflora stimulates innate and adaptive immune systems to maintain gut homeostasis. However, the interaction of environmental factors with particular genetic backgrounds can lead to dramatic changes in the composition of the microflora (i.e. dysbiosis). Many of the specific commensal-bacterial products and the signaling pathways they trigger have been characterized. The role of T(h)1, T(h)2 and T(h)17 cells in inflammatory bowel disease has been widely investigated, as has the contribution of epithelial cells and subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages. To date, multiple regulatory cells in adaptive immunity, such as regulatory T cells and regulatory B cells, have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inappropriate innate and adaptive immune responses to commensal bacteria. Additionally, regulatory myeloid cells have recently been identified that prevent intestinal inflammation by inhibiting T-cell proliferation. An increasing body of evidence has shown that multiple regulatory mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of gut homeostasis.

  20. Intestinal antimicrobial peptides during homeostasis, infection and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana R Muniz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, including defensins and cathelicidins, constitute an arsenal of innate regulators of paramount importance in the gut. The intestinal epithelium is exposed to myriad of enteric pathogens and these endogenous peptides are essential to fend off microbes and protect against infections. It is becoming increasingly evident that AMPs shape the composition of the commensal microbiota and help maintain intestinal homeostasis. They contribute to innate immunity, hence playing important functions in health and disease. AMP expression is tightly controlled by the engagement of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their impairment is linked to abnormal host responses to infection and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In this review, we provide an overview of the mucosal immune barriers and the intricate crosstalk between the host and the microbiota during homeostasis. We focus on the AMPs and pay particular attention to how PRRs promote their secretion in the intestine. Furthermore, we discuss their production and main functions in three different scenarios, at steady state, throughout infection with enteric pathogens and IBD.

  1. Rhubarb Supplementation Promotes Intestinal Mucosal Innate Immune Homeostasis through Modulating Intestinal Epithelial Microbiota in Goat Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jinzhen; Wu, Jian; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuanshe; Zhong, Rongzhen; Tan, Zhiliang

    2018-01-31

    The abuse and misuse of antibiotics in livestock production pose a potential health risk globally. Rhubarb can serve as a potential alternative to antibiotics, and several studies have looked into its anticancer, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to test the effects of rhubarb supplementation to the diet of young ruminants on innate immune function and epithelial microbiota in the small intestine. Goat kids were fed with a control diet supplemented with or without rhubarb (1.25% DM) and were slaughtered at days 50 and 60 of age. Results showed that the supplementation of rhubarb increased ileal villus height (P = 0.036), increased jejujal and ileal anti-inflammatory IL-10 production (P immune function were accompanied by shifts in ileal epithelial bacterial ecosystem in favor of Blautia, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Pseudomonas, and with a decline in the relative abundance of Staphylococcus (P immune homeostasis by modulating intestinal epithelial microbiota during the early stages of animal development.

  2. IRF8 dependent classical dendritic cells are essential for intestinal T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, K.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, E. K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 dependent DCs have reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8ab+ andCD4+CD8...... dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis....

  3. CLMP-Mediated Regulation of Intestinal Homeostasis in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    family including Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) and CAR-Like Membrane Protein (CLMP) (1, 2). Unlike...months 1-3): CLMP regulation of intestinal epithelial cells barrier properties CLMP is structurally related to Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor...the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) structurally related to Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor and has been reported to play a role in intestine

  4. Vitamin D signaling in intestinal innate immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Vassil; White, John H

    2017-09-15

    The lumen of the gut hosts a plethora of microorganisms that participate in food assimilation, inactivation of harmful particles and in vitamin synthesis. On the other hand, enteric flora, a number of food antigens, and toxins are capable of triggering immune responses causing inflammation, which, when unresolved, may lead to chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is important, therefore, to contain the gut bacteria within the lumen, control microbial load and composition, as well as ensure adequate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic threats. There is growing evidence that vitamin D signaling has impacts on all these aspects of intestinal physiology, contributing to healthy enteric homeostasis. VD was first discovered as the curative agent for nutritional rickets, and its classical actions are associated with calcium absorption and bone health. However, vitamin D exhibits a number of extra-skeletal effects, particularly in innate immunity. Notably, it stimulates production of pattern recognition receptors, anti-microbial peptides, and cytokines, which are at the forefront of innate immune responses. They play a role in sensing the microbiota, in preventing excessive bacterial overgrowth, and complement the actions of vitamin D signaling in enhancing intestinal barrier function. Vitamin D also favours tolerogenic rather than inflammogenic T cell differentiation and function. Compromised innate immune function and overactive adaptive immunity, as well as defective intestinal barrier function, have been associated with IBD. Importantly, observational and intervention studies support a beneficial role of vitamin D supplementation in patients with Crohn's disease, a form of IBD. This review summarizes the effects of vitamin D signaling on barrier integrity and innate and adaptive immunity in the gut, as well as on microbial load and composition. Collectively, studies to date reveal that vitamin D signaling has widespread effects

  5. Microbiota-Produced Succinate Improves Glucose Homeostasis via Intestinal Gluconeogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zitoun, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary fiber on glucose and energy homeostasis have long been described, focusing mostly on the production of short-chain fatty acids by the gut commensal bacteria. However, bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also produces large amounts of succinate and, to date...... homeostasis. Accordingly, dietary succinate improved glucose and insulin tolerance in wild-type mice, but those effects were absent in mice deficient in IGN. Conventional mice colonized with the succinate producer Prevotella copri exhibited metabolic benefits, which could be related to succinate-activated IGN...

  6. Enteric Virome Sensing-Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Rebecca N; Krug, Anne B; Eisenächer, Katharina

    2018-03-23

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  7. Enteric Virome Sensing—Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N. Metzger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  8. Microbial Activities and Intestinal Homeostasis: A Delicate Balance Between Health and DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Ohland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept that the intestinal microbiota modulates numerous physiologic processes, including immune development and function, nutrition and metabolism, and pathogen exclusion, is relatively well established in the scientific community. The molecular mechanisms driving these various effects and the events leading to the establishment of a “healthy” microbiome are slowly emerging. This review brings into focus important aspects of microbial/host interactions in the intestine and discusses key molecular mechanisms controlling health and disease states. We discuss the evidence of how microbes interact with the host and one another and their impact on intestinal homeostasis. Keywords: Bacterial Communication, Bowel Disease, Host-Microbe Interactions, Inflammatory, Microbiome

  9. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  10. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Mechanism for maintaining homeostasis in the immune system of the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshie; Yoshioka, Noriko; Nakata, Kazue; Nishizawa, Takashi; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Chie; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2009-11-01

    Every organism possesses a mechanism for maintaining homeostasis. We have focused on the immune system as a system that helps maintain homeostasis of the body, and particularly on the intestine as the largest organ of immunity in the body. We have also focused our research on the mechanism that responds to foreign substances in the intestine, especially the toll-like receptors (TLR). The activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) signal transduction as a response to TLR in the intestine is believed to contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of the body through the homeostasis of the intestine. Furthermore, significant findings were reported in which signal transduction from TLR4 was essential for the maintenance and regulation of the intestine. These results strongly suggest the possibility that homeostasis in the intestine is maintained by TLR4, and signaling by TLR4 after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) probably has a role in regulating homeostasis. It is expected that the prevention and treatment of various diseases using TLR4 will continue to develop. As LPS is a substance that enhances the activity of TLR4, it will also attract attention as a valuable substance in its own right.

  12. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: ► Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. ► Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. ► Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. ► Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  13. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Shin [Research Institute of Genetic Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hae-Young [Molecular Inflammation Research Center for Aging Intervention (MRCA), College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Mi-Ae, E-mail: mayoo@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  14. Mucosal innate immune cells regulate both gut homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Continuous exposure of intestinal mucosal surfaces to diverse microorganisms and their metabolites reflects the biological necessity for a multifaceted, integrated epithelial and immune cell-mediated regulatory system. The development and function of the host cells responsible for the barrier function of the intestinal surface (e.g., M cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and columnar epithelial cells) are strictly regulated through both positive and negative stimulation by the luminal microbiota. Stimulation by damage-associated molecular patterns and commensal bacteria-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns provokes the assembly of inflammasomes, which are involved in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Mucosal immune cells located beneath the epithelium play critical roles in regulating both the mucosal barrier and the relative composition of the luminal microbiota. Innate lymphoid cells and mast cells, in particular, orchestrate the mucosal regulatory system to create a mutually beneficial environment for both the host and the microbiota. Disruption of mucosal homeostasis causes intestinal inflammation such as that seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we review the recent research on the biological interplay among the luminal microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal innate immune cells in both healthy and pathological conditions. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Microbiota-Dependent Crosstalk Between Macrophages and ILC3 Promotes Intestinal Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortha, Arthur; Chudnovskiy, Aleksey; Hashimoto, Daigo; Bogunovic, Milena; Spencer, Sean P.; Belkaid, Yasmine; Merad, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and tissue-resident myeloid cells promote immune responses that maintain intestinal homeostasis in the host. However, the cellular cues that translate microbial signals into intestinal homeostasis remain unclear. Here, we show that deficient granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production altered mononuclear phagocyte effector functions and led to reduced regulatory T cell (Treg) numbers and impaired oral tolerance. We observed that RORγt+ innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are the primary source of GM-CSF in the gut and that ILC-driven GM-CSF production was dependent on the ability of macrophages to sense microbial signals and produce interleukin-1β. Our findings reveal that commensal microbes promote a crosstalk between innate myeloid and lymphoid cells that leads to immune homeostasis in the intestine. PMID:24625929

  16. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Wells, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels

  17. Regulation of Intestinal Homeostasis by Innate Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple...

  18. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarlen, Peter; Wells, Jerry M; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-05-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels of success. Composition of microbiota, probiotic strain identity, and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Here, we review the mechanisms of immunomodulating capacities of specific probiotic strains, the responses they can induce in the host, and how microbiota and genetic differences between individuals may co-influence host responses and immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An innately dangerous balancing act: intestinal homeostasis, inflammation, and colitis-associated cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by dysregulated immune responses to the intestinal microbiota, and by chronic intestinal inflammation. Several recent studies demonstrate the importance of innate microbial recognition by immune and nonimmune cells in the gut. Paradoxically, either diminished or exacerbated innate immune signaling may trigger the breakdown of intestinal homeostasis, leading to IBD and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). This dichotomy may reflect divergent functional roles for immune sensing in intestinal epithelial cells and leukocytes, which may vary with distinct disease mechanisms. PMID:20679404

  20. Innate immune signalling at the intestinal epithelium in homeostasis and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Johanna; Hornef, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium—which constitutes the interface between the enteric microbiota and host tissues—actively contributes to the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis and defends against pathogenic microbes. The recognition of conserved microbial products by cytosolic or transmembrane pattern recognition receptors in epithelial cells initiates signal transduction and influences effector cell function. However, the signalling pathways, effector molecules and regulatory mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood, and the functional outcome is poorly defined. This review analyses the complex and dynamic role of intestinal epithelial innate immune recognition and signalling, on the basis of results in intestinal epithelial cell-specific transgene or gene-deficient animals. This approach identifies specific epithelial cell functions within the diverse cellular composition of the mucosal tissue, in the presence of the complex and dynamic gut microbiota. These insights have thus provided a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the intestinal epithelium in innate immunity during homeostasis and disease. PMID:22801555

  1. Si-Jun-Zi Decoction Treatment Promotes the Restoration of Intestinal Function after Obstruction by Regulating Intestinal Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal obstruction is a common disease requiring abdominal surgery with significant morbidity and mortality. Currently, an effective medical treatment for obstruction, other than surgical resection or decompression, does not exist. Si-Jun-Zi Decoction is a famous Chinese medicine used to replenish qi and invigorate the functions of the spleen. Modern pharmacological studies show that this prescription can improve gastrointestinal function and strengthen immune function. In this study, we investigated the effects of a famous Chinese herbal formula, Si-Jun-Zi Decoction, on the restoration of intestinal function after the relief of obstruction in a rabbit model. We found that Si-Jun-Zi Decoction could reduce intestinal mucosal injury while promoting the recovery of the small intestine. Further, Si-Jun-Zi Decoction could regulate the intestinal immune system. Our results suggest that Si-Jun-Zi Decoction promotes the restoration of intestinal function after obstruction by regulating intestinal homeostasis. Our observations indicate that Si-Jun-Zi Decoction is potentially a therapeutic drug for intestinal obstruction.

  2. Homing of immune cells: role in homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ailsa L; Ng, Siew C; Mann, Elizabeth; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar; Bernardo, David; Knight, Stella C

    2010-11-01

    Rather like a satellite navigation system directing a vehicle to a particular destination defined by post-code, immune cells have homing molecules or "immune post-codes" enabling them to be recruited to specific organs, such as the intestine or skin. An efficient system would be designed such that the site of entry of an antigen influences the homing of effector T cells back to the appropriate organ. For example, to mount an immune response against an intestinal pathogen, T cells with a propensity to home to the gut to clear the infection would be induced. In health, there is such a sophisticated and finely tuned system in operation, enabling an appropriate balance of immune activity in different anatomical compartments. In disease states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is characterized by intestinal inflammation and often an inflammatory process involving other organs such as skin, joints, liver, and eye, there is accumulating evidence that there is malfunction of this immune cell trafficking system. The clinical importance of dysregulated immune cell trafficking in IBD is reflected in recently proven efficacious therapies that target trafficking pathways such as natalizumab, an α4 integrin antibody, and Traficet-EN, a chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) antagonist. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the homing of immune cells to different tissues, in particular the intestine, and focus on alterations in immune cell homing pathways in IBD. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the immune post-code system would assist in achieving the goal of tissue-specific immunotherapy.

  3. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Regulation and plasticity of intestinal stem cells during homeostasis and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, Joep; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the fastest renewing tissue in mammals and has a large flexibility to adapt to different types of damage. Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar (CBC) cells act as stem cells during homeostasis and are essential during regeneration. Upon perturbation, the activity of CBCs is

  5. Eating Disorders and the Intestinal Microbiota: Mechanisms of Energy Homeostasis and Behavioral Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenny, Elaine M; Bulik-Sullivan, Emily C; Tang, Quyen; Bulik, Cynthia M; Carroll, Ian M

    2017-08-01

    We reviewed and evaluated recently published scientific studies that explored the role of the intestinal microbiota in eating disorders. Studies have demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota is a contributing factor to both host energy homeostasis and behavior-two traits commonly disrupted in patients with eating disorders. To date, intestinal microbiota research in eating disorders has focused solely on anorexia nervosa (AN). Initial studies have reported an atypical intestinal microbial composition in patients with AN compared to healthy controls. However, the impact of these AN-associated microbial communities on host metabolism and behavior remains unknown. The intriguing pattern of findings in patients with AN encourages further investigation of the intestinal microbiota in eating disorders. Elucidating the specific role(s) of these microbial communities may yield novel ideas for augmenting current clinical therapies to promote weight gain, decrease gastrointestinal distress, and even reduce psychological symptomatology.

  6. Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling plays an essential role in the homeostasis of the intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Amlan; Wilmanski, Jeanette; Forsman, Huamei; Hrncir, Tomas; Hao, Liming; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2010-01-01

    A healthy intestinal tract is characterized by controlled homeostasis due to the balanced interaction between commensal bacteria and the host mucosal immune system. Human and animal model studies have supported the hypothesis that breakdown of this homeostasis may underlie the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). However it is not well understood how intestinal microflora stimulate the intestinal mucosal immune system and how such activation is regulated. Using a spontaneous, c...

  7. Intestine immune homeostasis after alcohol and burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoling; Hammer, Adam M; Rendon, Juan L; Choudhry, Mashkoor A

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic injury remains one of the most prevalent reasons for patients to be hospitalized. Burn injury accounts for 40,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually, resulting in a large burden on both the health and economic system and costing millions of dollars every year. The complications associated with postburn care can quickly cause life-threatening conditions including sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction and failure. In addition, alcohol intoxication at the time of burn injury has been shown to exacerbate these problems. One of the biggest reasons for the onset of these complications is the global suppression of the host immune system and increased susceptibility to infection. It has been hypothesized that infections after burn and other traumatic injury may stem from pathogenic bacteria from within the host's gastrointestinal tract. The intestine is the major reservoir of bacteria within the host, and many studies have demonstrated perturbations of the intestinal barrier after burn injury. This article reviews the findings of these studies as they pertain to changes in the intestinal immune system after alcohol and burn injury.

  8. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on the intestinal homeostasis in a computer controlled model of the large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Ateequr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection are frequent complications of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Probiotic bacteria are used as therapeutic and preventive agents in these disorders, but the exact functional mechanisms and the mode of action are poorly understood. The effects of clindamycin and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (containing the 8 bacterial strains Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus consecutively or in combination were investigated and compared to controls without therapy using a standardized human fecal microbiota in a computer-controlled in vitro model of large intestine. Microbial metabolites (short chain fatty acids, lactate, branched chain fatty acids, and ammonia and the intestinal microbiota were analyzed. Results Compared to controls and combination therapy, short chain fatty acids and lactate, but also ammonia and branched chain fatty acids, were increased under probiotic therapy. The metabolic pattern under combined therapy with antibiotics and probiotics had the most beneficial and consistent effect on intestinal metabolic profiles. The intestinal microbiota showed a decrease in several indigenous bacterial groups under antibiotic therapy, there was no significant recovery of these groups when the antibiotic therapy was followed by administration of probiotics. Simultaneous application of anti- and probiotics had a stabilizing effect on the intestinal microbiota with increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Conclusions Administration of VSL#3 parallel with the clindamycin therapy had a beneficial and stabilizing effect on the intestinal metabolic homeostasis by decreasing toxic metabolites and protecting the endogenic microbiota from destruction. Probiotics could be a reasonable

  9. Communication between B-Cells and Microbiota for the Maintenance of Intestinal Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuying Liu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestine is populated with an extremely dense and diverse bacterial community. Commensal bacteria act as an important antigenic stimulus producing the maturation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. The production of immunoglobulin (Ig A by B-cells in the GALT is one of the immune responses following intestinal colonization of bacteria. The switch of B-cells from IgM to IgA-producing cells in the Peyer’s patches and neighboring lamina propria proceeds by T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent mechanisms. Several grams of secretory IgA (SIgA are released into the intestine each day. SIgA serves as a first-line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric toxins and pathogenic microorganisms. SIgA has a capacity to directly quench bacterial virulence factors, influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota, and promote the transportation of antigens across the intestinal epithelium to GALT and down-regulate proinflammatory responses associated with the uptake of highly pathogenic bacteria and potentially allergenic antigens. This review summarizes the reciprocal interactions between intestinal B cells and bacteria, specifically, the formation of IgA in the gut, the role of intestinal IgA in the regulation of bacterial communities and the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, and the effects of probiotics on IgA levels in the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Crosstalk between the intestinal microbiota and the innate immune system in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Dagenais, Maryse; Saleh, Maya

    2013-09-01

    : Inflammatory bowel diseases are a set of complex and chronic disorders that arise in genetically predisposed individuals due to a lack of tolerance to the gut microflora. Although the intestinal microbiota is required for the proper development of the host and the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, its dysbiosis is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases pathogenesis. In this review, we focus the discussion on the crosstalk between the innate immune system and the microbiota. We examine new findings from genetic and functional studies investigating the critical role of the intestinal epithelial cell layer and the processes that maintain its integrity in health and disease. We further explore the mechanisms of the mucosal innate immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, and innate-like lymphocytes in mediating immunological tolerance at the steady state or pathogenic inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. The Xenobiotic Transporter Mdr1 Enforces T Cell Homeostasis in the Presence of Intestinal Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Kayama, Hisako; Chen, Mei Lan; Delmas, Amber; Sun, Amy; Kim, Sang Yong; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; McKevitt, Kelly; Beck, Amanda P; Jackson, Cody B; Crynen, Gogce; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Lacey, Precious N; Martinez, Gustavo J; Izard, Tina; Lorenz, Robin G; Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Cominelli, Fabio; Abreu, Maria T; Hommes, Daniel W; Koralov, Sergei B; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Sundrud, Mark S

    2017-12-19

    CD4 + T cells are tightly regulated by microbiota in the intestine, but whether intestinal T cells interface with host-derived metabolites is less clear. Here, we show that CD4 + T effector (Teff) cells upregulated the xenobiotic transporter, Mdr1, in the ileum to maintain homeostasis in the presence of bile acids. Whereas wild-type Teff cells upregulated Mdr1 in the ileum, those lacking Mdr1 displayed mucosal dysfunction and induced Crohn's disease-like ileitis following transfer into Rag1 -/- hosts. Mdr1 mitigated oxidative stress and enforced homeostasis in Teff cells exposed to conjugated bile acids (CBAs), a class of liver-derived emulsifying agents that actively circulate through the ileal mucosa. Blocking ileal CBA reabsorption in transferred Rag1 -/- mice restored Mdr1-deficient Teff cell homeostasis and attenuated ileitis. Further, a subset of ileal Crohn's disease patients displayed MDR1 loss of function. Together, these results suggest that coordinated interaction between mucosal Teff cells and CBAs in the ileum regulate intestinal immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NOD-Like Receptors in Intestinal Homeostasis and Epithelial Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Marianna; Yeretssian, Garabet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a dynamic physical barrier segregating the luminal content from the underlying mucosal tissue. Following injury, the epithelial integrity is restored by rapid migration of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) across the denuded area in a process known as wound healing. Hence, through a sequence of events involving restitution, proliferation and differentiation of IECs the gap is resealed and homeostasis reestablished. Relapsing damage followed by healing of the inflamed mucosa is a hallmark of several intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While several regulatory peptides, growth factors and cytokines stimulate restitution of the epithelial layer after injury, recent evidence in the field underscores the contribution of innate immunity in controlling this process. In particular, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) play critical roles in sensing the commensal microbiota, maintaining homeostasis, and regulating intestinal inflammation. Here, we review the process of intestinal epithelial tissue repair and we specifically focus on the impact of NLR-mediated signaling mechanisms involved in governing epithelial wound healing during disease. PMID:24886810

  14. Rorγt+ innate lymphoid cells in intestinal homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Domingo, Patricia; Cupedo, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) combine innate and adaptive immune functions and are part of the first line of defense against mucosal infections. ILC are set apart from adaptive lymphocytes by their independence on RAG genes and the resulting absence of specific antigen receptors. In this review, we will discuss the biology and function of intestinal ILC that express the nuclear hormone receptor Rorγt (encoded by the Rorc gene) and highlight their role in intestinal homeostasis and immunity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The role of innate signaling in the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jerry M; Loonen, Linda M P; Karczewski, Jurgen M

    2010-01-01

    In the intestine innate recognition of microbes is achieved through pattern recognition receptor (PRR) families expressed in immune cells and different cell lineages of the intestinal epithelium. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) families are emerging as key mediators of immunity through their role as maturation factors of immune cells and triggers for the production of cytokines and chemokines and antimicrobial factors. At the mucosal surface chronic activation of the immune system is avoided through the epithelial production of a glycocalyx, steady-state production of antimicrobial factors as well as the selective expression and localization of PRRs. Additionally, the polarization of epithelial TLR signaling and suppression of NF-kappaB activation by luminal commensals appears to contribute to the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity. Several studies have demonstrated that TLR signaling in epithelial cells contributes to a range of homeostatic mechanisms including proliferation, wound healing, epithelial integrity, and regulation of mucosal immune functions. The intestinal epithelium appears to have uniquely evolved to maintain mucosal tolerance and immunity, and future efforts to further understand the molecular mechanisms of intestinal homeostasis may have a major impact on human health. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Intestinal Microbiota Influences Non-intestinal Related Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Opazo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The human body is colonized by millions of microorganisms named microbiota that interact with our tissues in a cooperative and non-pathogenic manner. These microorganisms are present in the skin, gut, nasal, oral cavities, and genital tract. In fact, it has been described that the microbiota contributes to balancing the immune system to maintain host homeostasis. The gut is a vital organ where microbiota can influence and determine the function of cells of the immune system and contributes to preserve the wellbeing of the individual. Several articles have emphasized the connection between intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease with dysbiosis or an imbalance in the microbiota composition in the gut. However, little is known about the role of the microbiota in autoimmune pathologies affecting other tissues than the intestine. This article focuses on what is known about the role that gut microbiota can play in the pathogenesis of non-intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Grave's diseases, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, we discuss as to how metabolites derived from bacteria could be used as potential therapies for non-intestinal autoimmune diseases.

  17. HIC1 links retinoic acid signalling to group 3 innate lymphoid cell-dependent regulation of intestinal immunity and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignano, Frann; Korinek, Vladimir; Underhill, T. Michael

    2018-01-01

    The intestinal immune system must be able to respond to a wide variety of infectious organisms while maintaining tolerance to non-pathogenic microbes and food antigens. The Vitamin A metabolite all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) has been implicated in the regulation of this balance, partially by regulating innate lymphoid cell (ILC) responses in the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of atRA-dependent intestinal immunity and homeostasis remain elusive. Here we define a role for the transcriptional repressor Hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1, ZBTB29) in the regulation of ILC responses in the intestine. Intestinal ILCs express HIC1 in a vitamin A-dependent manner. In the absence of HIC1, group 3 ILCs (ILC3s) that produce IL-22 are lost, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection with the bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Thus, atRA-dependent expression of HIC1 in ILC3s regulates intestinal homeostasis and protective immunity. PMID:29470558

  18. Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling plays an essential role in homeostasis of the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Amlan; Wilmanski, Jeanette; Forsman, Huamei; Hrncir, Tomas; Hao, Liming; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2011-01-01

    A healthy intestinal tract is characterized by controlled homeostasis due to the balanced interaction between commensal bacteria and the host mucosal immune system. Human and animal model studies have supported the hypothesis that breakdown of this homeostasis may underlie the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not well understood how intestinal microflora stimulate the intestinal mucosal immune system and how such activation is regulated. Using a spontaneous, commensal bacteria-dependent colitis model in IL-10-deficient mice, we investigated the role of TLR and their negative regulation in intestinal homeostasis. In addition to IL-10(-/-) MyD88(-/-) mice, IL-10(-/-) TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced colitis compared to IL-10(-/-) mice, indicating that TLR4 signaling plays an important role in inducing colitis. Interestingly, the expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, is dependent on intestinal commensal flora, as IRAK-M expression was reduced in mice re-derived into a germ-free environment, and introduction of commensal bacteria into germ-free mice induced IRAK-M expression. IL-10(-/-) IRAK-M(-/-) mice exhibited exacerbated colitis with increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression. Therefore, this study indicates that intestinal microflora stimulate the colitogenic immune system through TLR and negative regulation of TLR signaling is essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  20. NLRP3 inflammasome plays a key role in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Simon A; Ng, Jeffrey; Lueng, Alan; Khajah, Maitham; Parhar, Ken; Li, Yan; Lam, Victor; Potentier, Mireille S; Ng, Kelvin; Bawa, Misha; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Rioux, Kevin P; Ghosh, Subrata; Xavier, Ramnik J; Colgan, Sean P; Tschopp, Jurg; Muruve, Daniel; MacDonald, Justin A; Beck, Paul L

    2011-06-01

    Attenuated innate immune responses to the intestinal microbiota have been linked to the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Recent genetic studies have revealed that hypofunctional mutations of NLRP3, a member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) superfamily, are associated with an increased risk of developing CD. NLRP3 is a key component of the inflammasome, an intracellular danger sensor of the innate immune system. When activated, the inflammasome triggers caspase-1-dependent processing of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β and IL-18. In the current study we sought to assess the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis through its regulation of innate protective processes. To investigate this role, Nlrp3(-/-) and wildtype mice were assessed in the dextran sulfate sodium and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid models of experimental colitis. Nlrp3(-/-) mice were found to be more susceptible to experimental colitis, an observation that was associated with reduced IL-1β, reduced antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, and reduced protective growth factor TGF-β. Macrophages isolated from Nlrp3(-/-) mice failed to respond to bacterial muramyl dipeptide. Furthermore, Nlrp3-deficient neutrophils exhibited reduced chemotaxis and enhanced spontaneous apoptosis, but no change in oxidative burst. Lastly, Nlrp3(-/-) mice displayed altered colonic β-defensin expression, reduced colonic antimicrobial secretions, and a unique intestinal microbiota. Our data confirm an essential role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis and provide biological insight into disease mechanisms associated with increased risk of CD in individuals with NLRP3 mutations. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  1. Microbiota-inducible Innate Immune, Siderophore Binding Protein Lipocalin 2 is Critical for Intestinal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishal; Yeoh, Beng San; Chassaing, Benoit; Zhang, Benyue; Saha, Piu; Xiao, Xia; Awasthi, Deepika; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Dikshit, Madhu; Gewirtz, Andrew; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-07-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is a multifunctional innate immune protein whose expression closely correlates with extent of intestinal inflammation. However, whether Lcn2 plays a role in the pathogenesis of gut inflammation is unknown. Herein, we investigated the extent to which Lcn2 regulates inflammation and gut bacterial dysbiosis in mouse models of IBD. Lcn2 expression was monitored in murine colitis models and upon microbiota ablation/restoration. WT and Lcn2 knockout ( Lcn2 KO) mice were analyzed for gut bacterial load, composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and, their colitogenic potential by co-housing with Il-10 KO mice. Acute (dextran sodium sulfate) and chronic (IL-10R neutralization and T-cell adoptive transfer) colitis was induced in WT and Lcn2 KO mice with or without antibiotics. Lcn2 expression was dramatically induced upon inflammation and was dependent upon presence of a gut microbiota and MyD88 signaling. Use of bone-marrow chimeric mice revealed non-immune cells are the major contributors of circulating Lcn2. Lcn2 KO mice exhibited elevated levels of entA -expressing gut bacteria burden and, moreover, a broadly distinct bacterial community relative to WT littermates. Lcn2 KO mice developed highly colitogenic T-cells and exhibited exacerbated colitis upon exposure to DSS or neutralization of IL-10. Such exacerbated colitis could be prevented by antibiotic treatment. Moreover, exposure to the microbiota of Lcn2 KO mice, via cohousing, resulted in severe colitis in Il-10 KO mice. Lcn2 is a bacterially-induced, MyD88-dependent, protein that play an important role in gut homeostasis and a pivotal role upon challenge. Hence, therapeutic manipulation of Lcn2 levels may provide a strategy to help manage diseases driven by alteration of the gut microbiota.

  2. Temporal and spatial interplay of microbiota and intestinal mucosa drive establishment of immune homeostasis in conventionalized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aidy, Sahar; van Baarlen, Peter; Derrien, Muriel; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; Hooiveld, Guido; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joël; Dekker, Jan; Samsom, Janneke N; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-09-01

    During colonization of germfree mice with the total fecal microbial community of their conventionally born and raised siblings (conventionalization), the intestinal mucosal immune system initiates and maintains a balanced immune response. However, the genetic regulation of these balanced, appropriate responses to the microbiota is obscure. Here, combined analysis of germfree and conventionalized mice revealed that the major molecular responses could be detected initiating at day 4 post conventionalization, with a strong induction of innate immune functions followed by stimulation of adaptive immune responses and development and expansion of adaptive immune cells at later stages of conventionalization. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mouse developmental and immune-related cellular pathways and processes that were co-mediated by the commensal microbiota and suggests which mechanisms were involved in this reprogramming. The dynamic, region-dependent mucosal responses to the colonizing microbiota revealed potential transcriptional signatures for the control of intestinal homeostasis in healthy mice, which may help to decipher the genetic basis of pathway dysregulation in human intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  3. The Drosophila MAPK p38c regulates oxidative stress and lipid homeostasis in the intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveta Chakrabarti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signaling cassette has been implicated in stress and immunity in evolutionarily diverse species. In response to a wide variety of physical, chemical and biological stresses p38 kinases phosphorylate various substrates, transcription factors of the ATF family and other protein kinases, regulating cellular adaptation to stress. The Drosophila genome encodes three p38 kinases named p38a, p38b and p38c. In this study, we have analyzed the role of p38c in the Drosophila intestine. The p38c gene is expressed in the midgut and upregulated upon intestinal infection. We showed that p38c mutant flies are more resistant to infection with the lethal pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila but are more susceptible to the non-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora 15. This phenotype was linked to a lower production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the gut of p38c mutants, whereby the transcription of the ROS-producing enzyme Duox is reduced in p38c mutant flies. Our genetic analysis shows that p38c functions in a pathway with Mekk1 and Mkk3 to induce the phosphorylation of Atf-2, a transcription factor that controls Duox expression. Interestingly, p38c deficient flies accumulate lipids in the intestine while expressing higher levels of antimicrobial peptide and metabolic genes. The role of p38c in lipid metabolism is mediated by the Atf3 transcription factor. This observation suggests that p38c and Atf3 function in a common pathway in the intestine to regulate lipid metabolism and immune homeostasis. Collectively, our study demonstrates that p38c plays a central role in the intestine of Drosophila. It also reveals that many roles initially attributed to p38a are in fact mediated by p38c.

  4. The Drosophila MAPK p38c regulates oxidative stress and lipid homeostasis in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sveta; Poidevin, Mickaël; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cassette has been implicated in stress and immunity in evolutionarily diverse species. In response to a wide variety of physical, chemical and biological stresses p38 kinases phosphorylate various substrates, transcription factors of the ATF family and other protein kinases, regulating cellular adaptation to stress. The Drosophila genome encodes three p38 kinases named p38a, p38b and p38c. In this study, we have analyzed the role of p38c in the Drosophila intestine. The p38c gene is expressed in the midgut and upregulated upon intestinal infection. We showed that p38c mutant flies are more resistant to infection with the lethal pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila but are more susceptible to the non-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora 15. This phenotype was linked to a lower production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the gut of p38c mutants, whereby the transcription of the ROS-producing enzyme Duox is reduced in p38c mutant flies. Our genetic analysis shows that p38c functions in a pathway with Mekk1 and Mkk3 to induce the phosphorylation of Atf-2, a transcription factor that controls Duox expression. Interestingly, p38c deficient flies accumulate lipids in the intestine while expressing higher levels of antimicrobial peptide and metabolic genes. The role of p38c in lipid metabolism is mediated by the Atf3 transcription factor. This observation suggests that p38c and Atf3 function in a common pathway in the intestine to regulate lipid metabolism and immune homeostasis. Collectively, our study demonstrates that p38c plays a central role in the intestine of Drosophila. It also reveals that many roles initially attributed to p38a are in fact mediated by p38c.

  5. Iron homeostasis related genes in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross Jeferson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for plants. However, excess iron is toxic, leading to oxidative stress and decreased productivity. Therefore, plants must use finely tuned mechanisms to keep iron homeostasis in each of their organs, tissues, cells and organelles. A few of the genes involved in iron homeostasis in plants have been identified recently, and we used some of their protein sequences as queries to look for corresponding genes in the rice (Oryza sativa genome. We have assigned possible functions to thirty-nine new rice genes. Together with four previously reported sequences, we analyzed a total of forty-three genes belonging to five known protein families: eighteen YS (Yellow Stripe, two FRO (Fe3+-chelate reductase oxidase, thirteen ZIP (Zinc regulated transporter / Iron regulated transporter Protein, eight NRAMP (Natural Resistance - Associated Macrophage Protein, and two Ferritin proteins. The possible cellular localization and number of potential transmembrane domains were evaluated, and phylogenetic analysis performed for each gene family. Annotation of genomic sequences was performed. The presence and number of homologues in each gene family in rice and Arabidopsis is discussed in light of the established iron acquisition strategies used by each one of these two plants.

  6. Gliadin affects glucose homeostasis and intestinal metagenome in C57BL6 mice fed a high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Li; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Bahl, Martin Iain

    limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gliadin on glucose homeostasis and intestinal ecology in the mouse. Forty male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet containing either 4% gliadin or no gliadin for 22 weeks. Gliadin consumption significantly increased the HbA1c level over...... time, with a borderline significance of higher HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) after 22 weeks. Sequencing of the V3 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that gliadin altered the abundance of 81 bacterial taxa, separating the intestinal microbial profile...

  7. Molecular ecological network analysis reveals the effects of probiotics and florfenicol on intestinal microbiota homeostasis: An example of sea cucumber

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Gang; Peng, Mo; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin

    2017-01-01

    Animal gut harbors diverse microbes that play crucial roles in the nutrition uptake, metabolism, and the regulation of host immune responses. The intestinal microbiota homeostasis is critical for health but poorly understood. Probiotics Paracoccus marcusii DB11 and Bacillus cereus G19, and antibiotics florfenicol did not significantly impact species richness and the diversity of intestinal microbiota of sea cucumber, in comparison with those in the control group by high-throughput sequencing....

  8. Transforming growth factor-β2 and endotoxin interact to regulate homeostasis via interleukin-8 levels in the immature intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per Torp; Østergaard, Mette Viberg

    2014-01-01

    plays an important role and hypothesize that transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) acts in synergy with bacterial LPS to control IL-8 levels, thereby supporting intestinal homeostasis. Preterm pigs were fed colostrum (containing TGF-β2) or infant formula with or without antibiotics (COLOS, n = 27; ANTI...

  9. Synbiotic approach restores intestinal homeostasis and prolongs survival in leukaemic mice with cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels, Laure B; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Claus, Sandrine P; Le Roy, Caroline I; Grangette, Corinne; Pot, Bruno; Martinez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Cani, Patrice D; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome that includes muscle wasting and inflammation. As gut microbes influence host immunity and metabolism, we investigated the role of the gut microbiota in the therapeutic management of cancer and associated cachexia. A community-wide analysis of the caecal microbiome in two mouse models of cancer cachexia (acute leukaemia or subcutaneous transplantation of colon cancer cells) identified common microbial signatures, including decreased Lactobacillus spp. and increased Enterobacteriaceae and Parabacteroides goldsteinii/ASF 519. Building on this information, we administered a synbiotic containing inulin-type fructans and live Lactobacillus reuteri 100-23 to leukaemic mice. This treatment restored the Lactobacillus population and reduced the Enterobacteriaceae levels. It also reduced hepatic cancer cell proliferation, muscle wasting and morbidity, and prolonged survival. Administration of the synbiotic was associated with restoration of the expression of antimicrobial proteins controlling intestinal barrier function and gut immunity markers, but did not impact the portal metabolomics imprinting of energy demand. In summary, this study provided evidence that the development of cancer outside the gut can impact intestinal homeostasis and the gut microbial ecosystem and that a synbiotic intervention, by targeting some alterations of the gut microbiota, confers benefits to the host, prolonging survival and reducing cancer proliferation and cachexia.

  10. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2017-01-06

    A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

  11. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, MK; Caldwell, JM; Wang, YH; Chaplin, DD; Lee, EH; Jang, MH; Woo, SY; Seoh, JY; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, ME

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double–deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3–deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer’s patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t–positive (ROR-γt+) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell–activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β–deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA+ cells and ROR-γt+ ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  12. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate enhances the epithelial barrier function and maintains intestinal homeostasis through integrin-p38 MAPK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Segawa

    Full Text Available Probiotics exhibit beneficial effects on human health, particularly in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis in a complex manner notwithstanding the diversity of an intestinal flora between individuals. Thus, it is highly probable that some common molecules secreted by probiotic and/or commensal bacteria contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and protect the intestinal epithelium from injurious stimuli. To address this question, we aimed to isolate the cytoprotective compound from a lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 which possess the ability to induce cytoprotective heat shock proteins in mouse small intestine. L. brevis was incubated in MRS broth and the supernatant was passed through with a 0.2-µm filter. Caco2/bbe cells were treated with the culture supernatant, and HSP27 expression was evaluated by Western blotting. HSP27-inducible components were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and HPLC. Finally, we identified that the HSP27-inducible fraction was polyphosphate (poly P, a simple repeated structure of phosphates, which is a common product of lactobacilli and other bacteria associated with intestinal microflora without any definitive physiological functions. Then, poly P was synthesized by poly P-synthesizing enzyme polyphosphate kinase. The synthesized poly P significantly induced HSP27 from Caco2/BBE cells. In addition, Poly P suppressed the oxidant-induced intestinal permeability in the mouse small intestine and pharmacological inhibitors of p38 MAPK and integrins counteract its protective effect. Daily intrarectal administration of poly P (10 µg improved the inflammation grade and survival rate in 4% sodium dextran sulfate-administered mice. This study, for the first time, demonstrated that poly P is the molecule responsible for maintaining intestinal barrier actions which are mediated through the intestinal integrin β1-p38 MAPK.

  13. Effect of Ozone on Intestinal Epithelial Homeostasis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Sukhotnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The positive effects of ozone therapy have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The mechanisms of this positive effect of ozone therapy are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the use of ozone may potentiate the gut intestinal mucosal homeostasis in a rat model. Methods: Adult rats weighing 250–280 g were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1 Control rats were given 2 mL of water by gavage and intraperitoneally (IP for 5 days; 2 O3-PO rats were treated with 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture by gavage and 2 mL of water IP for 5 days; 3 O3-IP rats were treated with 2 mL of water by gavage and 2 mL of ozone/oxygen mixture IP for 5 days. Rats were sacrificed on day 6. Bowel and mucosal weight, mucosal DNA and protein, villus height and crypt depth, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated following sacrifice. Results: The group of O3-IP rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal villus height and crypt depth, a greater enterocyte proliferation index in jejunum, and lower enterocyte apoptosis in ileum compared to control animals. Oral administration of the ozone/oxygen mixture resulted in a less significant effect on cell turnover. Conclusions: Treatment with an ozone/oxygen mixture stimulates intestinal cell turnover in a rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of ozone resulted in a more significant intestinal trophic effect than oral administration.

  14. Atg9 antagonizes TOR signaling to regulate intestinal cell growth and epithelial homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jung-Kun; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Cheng-Wen; Liao, Hsiao-Man; Hung, Chin-Chun; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2017-11-16

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival under various stress conditions. Autophagy-related gene 9 (Atg9) encodes a multipass transmembrane protein thought to act as a membrane carrier for forming autophagosomes. However, the molecular regulation and physiological importance of Atg9 in animal development remain largely unclear. Here, we generated Atg9 null mutant flies and found that loss of Atg9 led to shortened lifespan, locomotor defects, and increased susceptibility to stress. Atg9 loss also resulted in aberrant adult midgut morphology with dramatically enlarged enterocytes. Interestingly, inhibiting the TOR signaling pathway rescued the midgut defects of the Atg9 mutants. In addition, Atg9 interacted with PALS1-associated tight junction protein (Patj), which associates with TSC2 to regulate TOR activity. Depletion of Atg9 caused a marked decrease in TSC2 levels. Our findings revealed an antagonistic relationship between Atg9 and TOR signaling in the regulation of cell growth and tissue homeostasis.

  15. Gliadin affects glucose homeostasis and intestinal metagenome in C57BL/6 mice fed and high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Li; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Dietary gluten and its component gliadin are well-known environmental triggers of celiac disease and important actors in type-1 diabetes, and are reported to induce alterations in the intestinal microbiota. However, research on the impact of gluten on type-2 diabetes in non-celiac subjects is more...... limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gliadin on glucose homeostasis and intestinal ecology in the mouse. Forty male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet containing either 4% gliadin or no gliadin for 22 weeks. Gliadin consumption significantly increased the HbA1c level over...

  16. Intestinal microbiota in health and disease: role of bifidobacteria in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Rafael; Suárez, Adolfo; Clemente, Marta G; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2014-11-07

    The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as "microbiota" and their collective genomes as "microbiome". The colon is the most densely populated organ in the human body, although other parts, such as the skin, vaginal mucosa, or respiratory tract, also harbour specific microbiota. This microbial community regulates some important metabolic and physiological functions of the host, and drives the maturation of the immune system in early life, contributing to its homeostasis during life. Alterations of the intestinal microbiota can occur by changes in composition (dysbiosis), function, or microbiota-host interactions and they can be directly correlated with several diseases. The only disease in which a clear causal role of a dysbiotic microbiota has been demonstrated is the case of Clostridium difficile infections. Nonetheless, alterations in composition and function of the microbiota have been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, or irritable bowel syndrome), as well as extra-intestinal pathologies, such as those affecting the liver, or the respiratory tract (e.g., allergy, bronchial asthma, and cystic fibrosis), among others. Species of Bifidobacterium genus are the normal inhabitants of a healthy human gut and alterations in number and composition of their populations is one of the most frequent features present in these diseases. The use of probiotics, including bifidobacteria strains, in preventive medicine to maintain a healthy intestinal function is well documented. Probiotics are also proposed as therapeutic agents for gastrointestinal disorders and other pathologies. The World Gastroenterology Organization recently published potential clinical applications for several probiotic formulations, in which species of lactobacilli are predominant. This review is focused on probiotic preparations containing Bifidobacterium strains, alone or in combination with other bacteria, which have been tested

  17. Intestinal microbiota in health and disease: Role of bifidobacteria in gut homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Rafael; Suárez, Adolfo; Clemente, Marta G; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. The colon is the most densely populated organ in the human body, although other parts, such as the skin, vaginal mucosa, or respiratory tract, also harbour specific microbiota. This microbial community regulates some important metabolic and physiological functions of the host, and drives the maturation of the immune system in early life, contributing to its homeostasis during life. Alterations of the intestinal microbiota can occur by changes in composition (dysbiosis), function, or microbiota-host interactions and they can be directly correlated with several diseases. The only disease in which a clear causal role of a dysbiotic microbiota has been demonstrated is the case of Clostridium difficile infections. Nonetheless, alterations in composition and function of the microbiota have been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases (inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, or irritable bowel syndrome), as well as extra-intestinal pathologies, such as those affecting the liver, or the respiratory tract (e.g., allergy, bronchial asthma, and cystic fibrosis), among others. Species of Bifidobacterium genus are the normal inhabitants of a healthy human gut and alterations in number and composition of their populations is one of the most frequent features present in these diseases. The use of probiotics, including bifidobacteria strains, in preventive medicine to maintain a healthy intestinal function is well documented. Probiotics are also proposed as therapeutic agents for gastrointestinal disorders and other pathologies. The World Gastroenterology Organization recently published potential clinical applications for several probiotic formulations, in which species of lactobacilli are predominant. This review is focused on probiotic preparations containing Bifidobacterium strains, alone or in combination with other bacteria, which have been

  18. Diet and host-microbial crosstalk in postnatal intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitya; Walker, W Allan

    2015-01-01

    Neonates face unique challenges in the period following birth. The postnatal immune system is in the early stages of development and has a range of functional capabilities that are distinct from the mature adult immune system. Bidirectional immune-microbial interactions regulate the development of mucosal immunity and alter the composition of the microbiota, which contributes to overall host well-being. In the past few years, nutrition has been highlighted as a third element in this interaction that governs host health by modulating microbial composition and the function of the immune system. Dietary changes and imbalances can disturb the immune-microbiota homeostasis, which might alter susceptibility to several autoimmune and metabolic diseases. Major changes in cultural traditions, socioeconomic status and agriculture are affecting the nutritional status of humans worldwide, which is altering core intestinal microbial communities. This phenomenon is especially relevant to the neonatal and paediatric populations, in which the microbiota and immune system are extremely sensitive to dietary influences. In this Review, we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding early-life nutrition, its effects on the microbiota and the consequences of diet-induced perturbation of the structure of the microbial community on mucosal immunity and disease susceptibility.

  19. Effects of Gliadin consumption on the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Homeostasis in Mice Fed a High-fat Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Li; Andersen, Daniel; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2017-01-01

    compartments, gut barrier function, gene expression, urinary metabolites and immune profiles in intestinal, lymphoid, liver and adipose tissues was performed. Mice fed the gliadin-containing HFD displayed higher glycated hemoglobin and higher insulin resistance as evaluated by the homeostasis model assessment......, more hepatic lipid accumulation and smaller adipocytes than mice fed the gliadin-free HFD. This was accompanied by alterations in the composition and activity of the gut microbiota, gut barrier function, urine metabolome, and immune phenotypes within liver and adipose tissue. Our results reveal...... that gliadin disturbs the intestinal environment and affects metabolic homeostasis in obese mice, suggesting a detrimental effect of gluten intake in gluten-tolerant subjects consuming a high-fat diet....

  20. Loss of Survivin in Intestinal Epithelial Progenitor Cells Leads to Mitotic Catastrophe and Breakdown of Gut Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Martini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A tightly regulated balance of proliferation and cell death of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs is essential for maintenance of gut homeostasis. Survivin is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in several cancer types, but little is known about its role in adult gut tissue. Here, we show that Survivin is specifically expressed in transit-amplifying cells and Lgr5+ stem cells. Genetic loss of Survivin in IECs resulted in destruction of intestinal integrity, mucosal inflammation, and death of the animals. Survivin deletion was associated with decreased epithelial proliferation due to defective chromosomal segregation. Moreover, Survivin-deficient animals showed induced phosphorylation of p53 and H2AX and increased levels of cell-intrinsic apoptosis in IECs. Consequently, induced deletion of Survivin in Lgr5+ stem cells led to cell death. In summary, Survivin is a key regulator of gut tissue integrity by regulating epithelial homeostasis in the stem cell niche.

  1. Availability of intestinal microbial lysine for whole body lysine homeostasis in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metges, C C; El-Khoury, A E; Henneman, L; Petzke, K J; Grant, I; Bedri, S; Pereira, P P; Ajami, A M; Fuller, M F; Young, V R

    1999-10-01

    We have investigated whether there is a net contribution of lysine synthesized de novo by the gastrointestinal microflora to lysine homeostasis in six adults. On two separate occasions an adequate diet was given for a total of 11 days, and a 24-h (12-h fast, 12-h fed) tracer protocol was performed on the last day, in which lysine turnover, oxidation, and splanchnic uptake were measured on the basis of intravenous and oral administration of L-[1-(13)C]lysine and L-[6,6-(2)H(2)]lysine, respectively. [(15)N(2)]urea or (15)NH(4)Cl was ingested daily over the last 6 days to label microbial protein. In addition, seven ileostomates were studied with (15)NH(4)Cl. [(15)N]lysine enrichment in fecal and ileal microbial protein, as precursor for microbial lysine absorption, and in plasma free lysine was measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Differences in plasma [(13)C]- and [(2)H(2)]lysine enrichments during the 12-h fed period were observed between the two (15)N tracer studies, although the reason is unclear, and possibly unrelated to the tracer form per se. In the normal adults, after (15)NH(4)Cl and [(15)N(2)]urea intake, respectively, lysine derived from fecal microbial protein accounted for 5 and 9% of the appearance rate of plasma lysine. With ileal microbial lysine enrichment, the contribution of microbial lysine to plasma lysine appearance was 44%. This amounts to a gross microbial lysine contribution to whole body plasma lysine turnover of between 11 and 130 mg. kg(-1). day(-1), depending on the [(15)N]lysine precursor used. However, insofar as microbial amino acid synthesis is accompanied by microbial breakdown of endogenous amino acids or their oxidation by intestinal tissues, this may not reflect a net increase in lysine absorption. Thus we cannot reliably estimate the quantitative contribution of microbial lysine to host lysine homeostasis with the present paradigm. However, the results confirm the significant presence of

  2. Intestinal epithelial cell-specific RARα depletion results in aberrant epithelial cell homeostasis and underdeveloped immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijon, H B; Suarez-Lopez, L; Diaz, O E; Das, S; De Calisto, J; Yaffe, M B; Pittet, M J; Mora, J R; Belkaid, Y; Xavier, R J; Villablanca, E J

    2017-11-15

    Retinoic acid (RA), a dietary vitamin A metabolite, is crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. RA acts on intestinal leukocytes to modulate their lineage commitment and function. Although the role of RA has been characterized in immune cells, whether intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) rely on RA signaling to exert their immune-regulatory function has not been examined. Here we demonstrate that lack of RA receptor α (RARα) signaling in IECs results in deregulated epithelial lineage specification, leading to increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells. Mechanistically, lack of RARα resulted in increased KLF4 + goblet cell precursors in the distal bowel, whereas RA treatment inhibited klf4 expression and goblet cell differentiation in zebrafish. These changes in secretory cells are associated with increased Reg3g, reduced luminal bacterial detection, and an underdeveloped intestinal immune system, as evidenced by an almost complete absence of lymphoid follicles and gut resident mononuclear phagocytes. This underdeveloped intestinal immune system shows a decreased ability to clear infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Collectively, our findings indicate that epithelial cell-intrinsic RARα signaling is critical to the global development of the intestinal immune system.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 15 November 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.91.

  3. Physiologic TLR9-CpG-DNA interaction is essential for the homeostasis of the intestinal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Claudia; Dunger, Nadja; Doser, Kristina; Lippert, Elisabeth; Siller, Sebastian; Edinger, Matthias; Falk, Werner; Obermeier, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs are immunostimulatory components of bacterial DNA and activators of innate immunity through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Administration of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides before the onset of experimental colitis prevents intestinal inflammation by enforcement of regulatory mechanisms. It was investigated whether physiologic CpG/TLR9 interactions are critical for the homeostasis of the intestinal immune system. Mesenteric lymph node cell and lamina propria mononuclear cell (LPMC) populations from BALB/c wild-type (wt) or TLR9 mice were assessed by flow cytometry and proteome profiling. Cytokine secretion was determined and nuclear extracts were analyzed for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cAMP response-element binding protein activity. To assess the colitogenic potential of intestinal T cells, CD4-enriched cells from LPMC of wt or TLR9 donor mice were injected intraperitoneally in recipient CB-17 SCID mice. TLR9 deficiency was accompanied by slight changes in cellular composition and phosphorylation of signaling proteins of mesenteric lymph node cell and LPMC. LPMC from TLR9 mice displayed an increased proinflammatory phenotype compared with wt LPMC. NF-κB activity in cells from TLR9 mice was enhanced, whereas cAMP response-element binding activity was reduced compared with wt. Transfer of lamina propria CD4-enriched T cells from TLR9 mice induced severe colitis, whereas wt lamina propria CD4-enriched T cells displayed an attenuated phenotype. Lack of physiologic CpG/TLR9 interaction impairs the function of the intestinal immune system indicated by enhanced proinflammatory properties. Thus, physiologic CpG/TLR interaction is essential for homeostasis of the intestinal immune system as it is required for the induction of counterregulating anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  4. Molecular ecological network analysis reveals the effects of probiotics and florfenicol on intestinal microbiota homeostasis: An example of sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Peng, Mo; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin

    2017-07-06

    Animal gut harbors diverse microbes that play crucial roles in the nutrition uptake, metabolism, and the regulation of host immune responses. The intestinal microbiota homeostasis is critical for health but poorly understood. Probiotics Paracoccus marcusii DB11 and Bacillus cereus G19, and antibiotics florfenicol did not significantly impact species richness and the diversity of intestinal microbiota of sea cucumber, in comparison with those in the control group by high-throughput sequencing. Molecular ecological network analysis indicated that P. marcusii DB11 supplementation may lead to sub-module integration and the formation of a large, new sub-module, and enhance species-species interactions and connecter and module hub numbers. B. cereus G19 supplementation decreased sub-module numbers, and increased the number of species-species interactions and module hubs. Sea cucumber treated with florfenicol were shown to have only one connecter and the lowest number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and species-species interactions within the ecological network. These results suggested that P. marcusii DB11 or B. cereus G19 may promote intestinal microbiota homeostasis by improving modularity, enhancing species-species interactions and increasing the number of connecters and/or module hubs within the network. In contrast, the use of florfenicol can lead to homeostatic collapse through the deterioration of the ecological network.

  5. Intestinal microbiota as modulators of the immune system and neuroimmune system: impact on the host health and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranduba, Carlos Magno da Costa; De Castro, Sandra Bertelli Ribeiro; de Souza, Gustavo Torres; Rossato, Cristiano; da Guia, Francisco Carlos; Valente, Maria Anete Santana; Rettore, João Vitor Paes; Maranduba, Claudinéia Pereira; de Souza, Camila Maurmann; do Carmo, Antônio Márcio Resende; Macedo, Gilson Costa; Silva, Fernando de Sá

    2015-01-01

    Many immune-based intestinal disorders, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as other illnesses, may have the intestines as an initial cause or aggravator in the development of diseases, even apparently not correlating directly to the intestine. Diabetes, obesity, multiple sclerosis, depression, and anxiety are examples of other illnesses discussed in the literature. In parallel, importance of the gut microbiota in intestinal homeostasis and immunologic conflict between tolerance towards commensal microorganisms and combat of pathogens is well known. Recent researches show that the immune system, when altered by the gut microbiota, influences the state in which these diseases are presented in the patient directly and indirectly. At the present moment, a considerable number of investigations about this subject have been performed and published. However, due to difficulties on correlating information, several speculations and hypotheses are generated. Thus, the present review aims at bringing together how these interactions work-gut microbiota, immune system, and their influence in the neuroimmune system.

  6. Increased maternal consumption of methionine as its hydroxyl analog promoted neonatal intestinal growth without compromising maternal energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Heju; Li, Hao; Liu, Guangmang; Wan, Haifeng; Mercier, Yves; Zhang, Xiaoling; Lin, Yan; Che, Lianqiang; Xu, Shengyu; Tang, Li; Tian, Gang; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De; Fang, Zhengfeng

    2016-01-01

    To determine responses of neonatal intestine to maternal increased consumption of DL-methionine (DLM) or DL-2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid (HMTBA), eighteen primiparous sows (Landrace × Yorkshire) were allocated based on body weight and backfat thickness to the control, DLM and HMTBA groups (n = 6), with the nutritional treatments introduced from postpartum d0 to d14. The DLM-fed sows showed negative energy balance manifested by lost bodyweight, lower plasma glucose, subdued tricarboxylic acid cycle, and increased plasma lipid metabolites levels. Both villus height and ratio of villus height to crypt depth averaged across the small intestine of piglets were higher in the DLM and HMTBA groups than in the control group. Piglet jejunal oxidized glutathione concentration and ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione were lower in the HMTBA group than in the DLM and control groups. However, piglet jejunal aminopeptidase A, carnitine transporter 2 and IGF-II precursor mRNA abundances were higher in the DLM group than in the HMTBA and control groups. Increasing maternal consumption of methionine as DLM and HMTBA promoted neonatal intestinal growth by increasing morphological development or up-regulating expression of genes responsible for nutrient metabolism. And increasing maternal consumption of HMTBA promoted neonatal intestinal antioxidant capacity without compromising maternal energy homeostasis during early lactation.

  7. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing

  8. The role of innate signaling in the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity in the intestine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.; Loonen, L.M.P.; Karczewski, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the intestine innate recognition of microbes is achieved through pattern recognition receptor (PRR) families expressed in immune cells and different cell lineages of the intestinal epithelium. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) families

  9. Intestinal crypt homeostasis revealed at single-stem-cell level by in vivo live imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsma, Laila; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Zomer, Anoek; Snippert, Hugo J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Simons, Benjamin D; Clevers, Hans; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    The rapid turnover of the mammalian intestinal epithelium is supported by stem cells located around the base of the crypt. In addition to the Lgr5 marker, intestinal stem cells have been associated with other markers that are expressed heterogeneously within the crypt base region. Previous

  10. Rho-A prenylation and signaling link epithelial homeostasis to intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Posadas, Rocío; Becker, Christoph; Günther, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Although defects in intestinal barrier function are a key pathogenic factor in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), the molecular pathways driving disease-specific alterations of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are largely unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by characterizing t...

  11. Lowered dietary phosphorus affects intestinal and renal gene expression to maintain mineral homeostasis with immunomodulatory implications in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Franziska; Oster, Michael; Büsing, Kirsten; Borgelt, Luisa; Murani, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wolf, Petra; Wimmers, Klaus

    2018-03-20

    In monogastric animals, phosphorus (P) homeostasis is maintained by regulating intestinal absorption, bone mobilization, and renal excretion. Since P is a non-renewable resource, a shortage is imminent due to widespread over-usage in the farming and animal husbandry industries. As a consequence, P efficiency should be improved in pig production. We sought to characterize the transcriptional response in re-/absorbing and excreting tissues in pigs to diets varying in calcium: phosphorus ratios. Weaned piglets were assigned to one of three groups fed diets varying in digestible P content for a period of five weeks. Gene expression profiles were analyzed in jejunum, colon, and kidney. Transcriptome analysis revealed that reduced dietary P intake affects gene expression in jejunum and kidney, but not in colon. The regulation of mineral homeostasis was reflected via altered mRNA abundances of CYP24A1, CYP27A1, TRPM6, SPP1, and VDR in jejunum and kidney. Moreover, lowered abundances of transcripts associated with the classical complement system pathway were observed in the jejunum. In kidney, shifted transcripts were involved in phospholipase C, calcium signaling, and NFAT signaling, which may have immunomodulatory implications. Our results revealed local transcriptional consequences of variable P intake in intestinal and renal tissues. The adaptive responses are the result of organismal efforts to maintain systemic mineral homeostasis while modulating immune features at local tissue sites. Therefore, the deviation from the currently recommended dietary P supply must be carefully considered, as the endogenous mechanisms that respond to low P diets may impact important adaptive immune responses.

  12. The joint power of sex and stress to modulate brain-gut-microbiota axis and intestinal barrier homeostasis: implications for irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigrau, M; Rodiño-Janeiro, B K; Casado-Bedmar, M; Lobo, B; Vicario, M; Santos, J; Alonso-Cotoner, C

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is a dynamic process that takes place at the interface between the lumen and the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, where a constant scrutiny for antigens and toxins derived from food and microorganisms is carried out by the vast gut-associated immune system. Intestinal homeostasis is preserved by the ability of the mucus layer and the mucosal barrier to keep the passage of small-sized and antigenic molecules across the epithelium highly selective. When combined and preserved, immune surveillance and barrier's selective permeability, the host capacity of preventing the development of intestinal inflammation is optimized, and viceversa. In addition, the brain-gut-microbiome axis, a multidirectional communication system that integrates distant and local regulatory networks through neural, immunological, metabolic, and hormonal signaling pathways, also regulates intestinal function. Dysfunction of the brain-gut-microbiome axis may induce the loss of gut mucosal homeostasis, leading to uncontrolled permeation of toxins and immunogenic particles, increasing the risk of appearance of intestinal inflammation, mucosal damage, and gut disorders. Irritable bowel syndrome is prevalent stress-sensitive gastrointestinal disorder that shows a female predominance. Interestingly, the role of stress, sex and gonadal hormones in the regulation of intestinal mucosal and the brain-gut-microbiome axis functioning is being increasingly recognized. We aim to critically review the evidence linking sex, and stress to intestinal barrier and brain-gut-microbiome axis dysfunction and the implications for irritable bowel syndrome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing with the epithelial lineage. However, the functional relevance of these observations is unknown. In the present study we employ a model system in which we cannot only detect cell fusion but also exam...

  14. Chlorogenic Acid Maintains Glucose Homeostasis through Modulating the Expression of SGLT-1, GLUT-2, and PLG in Different Intestinal Segments of Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bing Jie; Zhu, Qi; Zhong, Ying Li; Xu, Shi Hao; Wang, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    To reveal the effects and related mechanisms of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on intestinal glucose homeostasis. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly and equally divided into four groups: normal chow (NC), high-fat diet (HFD), HFD with low-dose CGA (20 mg/kg, HFD-LC), and HFD with high-dose CGA (90 mg/kg, HFD-HC). The oral glucose tolerance test was performed, and fast serum insulin (FSI) was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA expression levels of glucose transporters (Sglt-1 and Glut-2) and proglucagon (Plg) in different intestinal segments (the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon) were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. SGLT-1 protein and the morphology of epithelial cells in the duodenum and jejunum was localized by using immunofluorescence. At both doses, CGA ameliorated the HFD-induced body weight gain, maintained FSI, and increased postprandial 30-min glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion. High-dose CGA inhibited the HFD-induced elevation in Sglt-1 expression. Both CGA doses normalized the HFD-induced downregulation of Glut-2 and elevated the expression of Plg in all four intestinal segments. An HFD can cause a glucose metabolism disorder in the rat intestine and affect body glucose homeostasis. CGA can modify intestinal glucose metabolism by regulating the expression of intestinal glucose transporters and Plg, thereby controlling the levels of blood glucose and insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  15. Enteroendocrine Cells Support Intestinal Stem-Cell-Mediated Homeostasis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Amcheslavsky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut are regulated by growth factors produced from the surrounding niche cells including enterocytes and visceral muscle. The role of the other major cell type, the secretory enteroendocrine cells, in regulating intestinal stem cells remains unclear. We show here that newly eclosed scute loss-of-function mutant flies are completely devoid of enteroendocrine cells. These enteroendocrine cell-less flies have normal ingestion and fecundity but shorter lifespan. Moreover, in these newly eclosed mutant flies, the diet-stimulated midgut growth that depends on the insulin-like peptide 3 expression in the surrounding muscle is defective. The depletion of Tachykinin-producing enteroendocrine cells or knockdown of Tachykinin leads to a similar although less severe phenotype. These results establish that enteroendocrine cells serve as an important link between diet and visceral muscle expression of an insulin-like growth factor to stimulate intestinal stem cell proliferation and tissue growth.

  16. Type 3 muscarinic receptors contribute to intestinal mucosal homeostasis and clearance of nippostrongylus brasiliensis through induction of Th2 cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite increased appreciation for the role of nicotinic receptors in the modulation of and response to inflammation, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to mucosal homeostasis, clearance of enteric pathogens, and modulation of immune cell function remains relatively undefined. Uninfected and N...

  17. Methods to assess Myc function in intestinal homeostasis, regeneration, and tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huels, David J.; Cammareri, Patrizia; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Medema, Jan P.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2013-01-01

    Within the intestinal epithelium, c-Myc has been characterized as a target of β-catenin-TCF signalling (He et al., Science 281:1509-1512, 1998). Given the most commonly mutated tumor suppressor gene within colorectal cancer (CRC) is the APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) gene, a negative regulator of

  18. Immune deficiency vs. immune excess in inflammatory bowel diseases-STAT3 as a rheo-STAT of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have provided many genetic alterations, conferring susceptibility to multifactorial polygenic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Yet, how specific genetic alterations functionally affect intestinal inflammation often remains elusive. It is noteworthy that a large overlap of genes involved in immune deficiencies with those conferring inflammatory bowel disease risk has been noted. This has provided new arguments for the debate on whether inflammatory bowel disease arises from either an excess or a deficiency in the immune system. In this review, we highlight the functional effect of an inflammatory bowel disease-risk allele, which cannot be deduced from genome-wide association studies data alone. As exemplified by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), we show that a single gene can have a plethora of effects in various cell types of the gut. These effects may individually contribute to the restoration of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand or pave the way for excessive immunopathology on the other, as an inflammatory "rheo-STAT". © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Signal transduction pathways participating in homeostasis and malignant transformation of the intestinal tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krausová, Michaela; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2012), s. 708-718 ISSN 0028-2685 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/1780; GA ČR GAP305/12/2347; GA ČR GAP304/11/1252; GA ČR GD204/09/H058 Keywords : colorectal cancer * epithelium * gut * intestine * mouse models * stem cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.574, year: 2012

  20. The Starting Lineup: Key Microbial Players in Intestinal Immunity and Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Catherine Reading; Nicola Catherine Reading; Dennis L. Kasper; Dennis L. Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of microbiota inhabiting the intestine is increasingly apparent. Delicate balance of numerous bacterial species can affect development of the immune system, how susceptible a host is to pathogenic organisms, and the auto-inflammatory state of the host. In the last decade, with the increased use of germ-free mice, gnotobiotic mice, and animal models in which a germ-free animal has been colonized with a foreign microbiota such as humanized mice, it has been possible to deline...

  1. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the ‘multibiome’ to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine...

  2. The Contribution of Intestinal Gluconeogenesis to Glucose Homeostasis Is Low in 2-Day-Old Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherbuy, Claire; Vaugelade, Pierre; Labarthe, Simon; Honvo-Houeto, Edith; Darcy-Vrillon, Béatrice; Watford, Malcolm; Duée, Pierre-Henri

    2017-03-01

    Background: Active gluconeogenesis is essential to maintain blood glucose concentrations in neonatal piglets because of the high glucose requirements after birth. In several adult mammals, the liver, kidney, and possibly the gut may exhibit gluconeogenesis during fasting and insulinopenic conditions. During the postnatal period, the intestine expresses all of the gluconeogenic enzymes, suggesting the potential for gluconeogenesis. Galactose in milk is a potential gluconeogenic precursor for newborns. Objective: Our aim was to quantify the rate of intestinal glucose production from galactose in piglets compared with the overall rate of glucose production. Methods: A single bolus of [U- 14 C]-galactose was injected into 2-d-old piglets (females and males; mean ± SEM weight: 1.64 ± 0.07 kg) through a gastric catheter. Galactosemia, glycemia, and glucose turnover rate (assessed by monitoring d-[6- 3 H]-glucose) were monitored. Intestinal glucose production from [U- 14 C]-galactose was calculated from [U- 14 C]-glucose appearance in the blood and isotopic dilution. Galactose metabolism was also investigated in vitro in enterocytes isolated from 2-d-old piglets that were incubated with increasing concentrations of galactose. Results: In piglet enterocytes, galactose metabolism was active (mean ± SEM maximum rate of reaction: 2.26 ± 0.45 nmol · min -1 · 10 6 cells -1 ) and predominantly oriented toward lactate and pyruvate production (74.0% ± 14.5%) rather than glucose production (26.0% ± 14.5%). In conscious piglets, gastric galactose administration led to an increase in arterial galactosemia (from 0 to 1.0 ± 0.8 mmol/L) and glycemia (35% ± 12%). The initial increase in arterial glycemia after galactose administration was linked to an increase in glucose production rate (33% ± 15%) rather than to a decrease in glucose utilization rate (3% ± 6%). The contribution of intestinal glucose production from galactose was gluconeogenesis in 2-d-old piglets. © 2017

  3. Complication related to colostomy orifice: intestinal evisceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdemir José Alegre Salles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal evisceration at the site of a stoma is a rare event, with high morbimortality. Its clinical manifestation often occurs between the sixth and seventh days after surgery. The risk factors most frequently related to evisceration are: increased intra-abdominal pressure, digestive tract cancer surgery, emergency surgery and stomas in the surgical incision. The authors report the case of a male patient, aged 62, suffering from adenocarcinoma of the rectum with obstructive acute abdomen, who underwent loop transversotomy for decompression. On the fourth day after surgery, he had a bronchospasm crisis, with evisceration of ileum and colon through the colostomic hole. The association of some triggering factors, such as emergency surgery, colorectal malignant neoplasm, increased intra-abdominal pressure and technical failure of colostomy were decisive in the development of this rare peri-colostomy complication.A evisceração intestinal desenvolvida no sítio de um estoma é um evento raro, tendo elevada morbimortalidade. Sua manifestação clínica ocorre frequentemente entre o sexto e o sétimo dias de pós-operatório. Os fatores de risco mais frequentemente relacionados à evisceração são: aumento da pressão intra-abdominal, câncer do aparelho digestório, cirurgia de urgência e estomias na incisão cirúrgica. Os autores relatam o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino, com 62 anos, portador de adenocarcinoma do reto médio com abdômen agudo obstrutivo, sendo submetido à transversostomia em alça, com finalidade descompressiva. No quarto dia de pós-operatório com crise de broncoespasmo, apresentou evisceração do cólon e íleo pelo orifício abdominal colostômico. A associação de alguns fatores desencadeantes, como a cirurgia de urgência, a doença neoplásica colorretal maligna, o aumento da pressão intra-abdominal e a falha técnica na confecção da colostomia, foram determinantes para o desenvolvimento desta rara

  4. Challenging homeostasis to define biomarkers for nutrition related health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, van B.; Keijer, J.; Heil, S.G.; Kaput, J.

    2009-01-01

    A primary goal of nutrition research is to optimize health and prevent or delay disease. Biomarkers to quantify health optimization are needed since many if not most biomarkers are developed for diseases. Quantifying normal homeostasis and developing validated biomarkers are formidable tasks because

  5. The Multibiome: The Intestinal Ecosystem's Influence on Immune Homeostasis, Health, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyk, Heather A; Osborne, Lisa C

    2016-11-01

    Mammalian evolution has occurred in the presence of mutualistic, commensal, and pathogenic micro- and macro-organisms for millennia. The presence of these organisms during mammalian evolution has allowed for intimate crosstalk between these colonizing species and the host immune system. In this review, we introduce the concept of the 'multibiome' to holistically refer to the biodiverse collection of bacteria, viruses, fungi and multicellular helminthic worms colonizing the mammalian intestine. Furthermore, we discuss new insights into multibiome-host interactions in the context of host-protective immunity and immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and multiple sclerosis. Finally, we provide reasons to account for the multibiome in experimental design, analysis and in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ROLE OF THE MICROFLORA IN DISTAL INTESTINAL TRACT BY MAINTAINING OXALATE HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osolodchenko T.P.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal microflora is part of the human body and performs numerous function. Considerable research interest is in the field of probiotics for the prevention of kidney stones, which is one of the most common urological diseases.Urolithiasis is one of the most common urological diseases. This is polyetiological disease congenital and acquired character with complex physical and chemical processes that occur not only in the urinary system, but also the whole body. None of the treatments does not guarantee full recovery of the patient and often leads to relapse. The open methods of removal stones yield news minimally invasive the technologys. Development of stone formation depends on the presence of many factors, metabolic disorders, chronic urinary tract infections, genetic disorders and more. Most have the following metabolic disorders as hypercalciuria, hiperurikuria, hipotsytraturia , hyperoxaluria and hipomahniuria. Among all types of urolithiasis kaltsiyoksalatnyy ranked first in the prevalence rate - about 75.0 - 85.0 % of cases. Dietary restriction by oxalates іs the unreliable method of preventing disease. Although there is evidence for the growth inhibition normobiocenosis representatives, which in turn enhances the absorption of salts of oxalic acid oxalate in the application of sodium , magnesium and cobalt in their intragastric administration. Recently published many papers on the impact on the level of oxalate intestinal microflora. The first publications appeared on the influence of gram-negative obligate anaerobes O. formigenes the concentration of oxalate in the urine. This anaerobic bacteria living in the colon, its prevalence - 46.0 % - 77.0 % of the adult population. O. formigenes reveals the symbiotic interaction with the human body by reducing absorption of oxalate in the intestinal cavity with subsequent decrease in their concentration in plasma and urine. O. formigenes has two key enzymes - oksalyl

  7. Altered systemic bile acid homeostasis contributes to liver disease in pediatric patients with intestinal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong-Tao; Cao, Yi; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Lu, Li-Na; Cai, Wei

    2016-12-15

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD), as a major complication, contributes to significant morbidity in pediatric IF patients. However, the pathogenesis of IFALD is still uncertain. We here investigate the roles of bile acid (BA) dysmetabolism in the unclear pathogenesis of IFALD. It found that the histological evidence of pediatric IF patients exhibited liver injury, which was characterized by liver bile duct proliferation, inflammatory infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis and different stages of fibrosis. The BA compositions were altered in serum and liver of pediatric IF patients, as reflected by a primary BA dominant composition. In IF patients, the serum FGF19 levels decreased significantly, and were conversely correlated with ileal inflammation grades (r = -0.50, p liver, the expression of induction of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile salt synthesis, cytochrome P450 7a1 (CYP7A1) increased evidently. In conclusion, ileum inflammation decreases FXR expression corresponding to reduce serum FGF19 concentration, along with increased hepatic bile acid synthesis, leading to liver damages in IF patients.

  8. Impact of metal ion homeostasis of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and K12 (W3110) strains on colonization properties in the murine intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupz, Andreas; Fischer, André; Nies, Dietrich H; Grass, Gregor; Göbel, Ulf B; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2013-09-01

    Metal ions are integral parts of pro- as well as eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Escherichia coli proved a valuable in vitro model organism to elucidate essential mechanisms involved in uptake, storage, and export of metal ions. Given that E. coli Nissle 1917 is able to overcome murine colonization resistance, we generated several E. coli Nissle 1917 mutants with defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, manganese homeostasis and performed a comprehensive survey of the impact of metal ion transport and homeostasis for E. coli colonization capacities within the murine intestinal tract. Seven days following peroral infection of conventional mice with E. coli Nissle 1917 strains exhibiting defined defects in zinc or iron uptake, the respective mutant and parental strains could be cultured at comparable, but low levels from the colonic lumen. We next reassociated gnotobiotic mice in which the microbiota responsible for colonization resistance was abrogated by broad-spectrum antibiotics with six different E. coli K12 (W3110) mutants. Seven days following peroral challenge, each mutant and parental strain stably colonized duodenum, ileum, and colon at comparable levels. Taken together, defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, and manganese homeostasis do not compromise colonization capacities of E. coli in the murine intestinal tract.

  9. Gastrointestinal Hormones, Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Homeostasis in Obese Patients: Effect of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Dallio, Marcello; Tolone, Salvatore; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Patrone, Vania; Romano, Marco; Tuccillo, Concetta; Mozzillo, Anna Licia; Amoroso, Vincenzo; Misso, Gabriella; Morelli, Lorenzo; Docimo, Ludovico; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven efficacy in the modulation of a number of gut peptides that can contribute to improvement of diabetes and its associated metabolic changes. In order to evaluate dietary intake, nutritional assessment and plasma levels of gastrointestinal peptides, we enrolled severely obese patients before and after bariatric surgery. We evaluated food intake, plasma levels of peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1/2 (GLP-1/2), ghrelin (GHR), orexin (ORE) and cholecystokinin (CCK), body composition and fecal microbiota in 28 severely obese patients and 28 healthy normal-weight controls. All parameters were evaluated at 0 time and 6 months after bariatric surgery. In obese patients we found a higher intake of nutrients, a decrease of free fat mass and an increase of BMI (body mass index), a significant decrease of GLP-1 and an increase of GLP-2, GHR and PYY with respect to controls, further increase in GLP-2, GHR and PYY, as well as increase over control values of GLP-1 after bariatric surgery. Obese individuals were found to harbor a community dominated by members of the Clostridial clusters XIVa and IV, whereas prominent bands after surgery were identified as Lactobacillus crispatus and Megasphaera elsdenii-related phylotype. The beneficial effects of bariatric surgery may at least in part be accounted for changes in circulating gastrointestinal (GI) peptides and fecal microbiota. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Lactobacillus GG-fermented milk prevents DSS-induced colitis and regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; Yan, Fang; He, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Background Fermented milk is considered one of the best sources for efficient consumption of probiotic strains by hosts to promote good health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of orally administering LGG-fermented milk (LGG milk) on intestinal inflammation and injury and to study the mechanisms of LGG milk's action. Methods LGG milk and non-LGG-fermented milk (non-LGG milk) were administered through gavage to mice before and during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced intestinal injury and colitis. Inflammatory/injury score and colon length were assessed. Intestinal epithelial cells were treated with the soluble fraction of LGG milk to detect its effects on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its down stream target, Akt activation, cytokine-induced apoptosis, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced disruption of tight junctions. Results LGG milk treatment significantly reduced DSS-induced colonic inflammation and injury, and colon shortening in mice, compared to that in non-LGG milk-treated and untreated mice. The soluble fraction of LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, stimulated activation of EGFR and Akt in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed cytokine-induced apoptosis, and attenuated H2O2-induced disruption of tight junction complex in the intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of LGG milk were blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor. LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, contained two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, which have been reported to promote survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells through activation of EGFR. Depletion of p40 and p75 from LGG milk abolished the effects of LGG milk on prevention of cytokine-induced apoptosis and H2O2-induced disruption of tight junctions. Conclusions These results suggest that LGG milk may regulate intestinal epithelial homeostasis and potentially prevent intestinal inflammatory diseases through activation of EGFR by LGG-derived proteins. PMID:23468308

  11. Lactobacillus GG-fermented milk prevents DSS-induced colitis and regulates intestinal epithelial homeostasis through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; Yan, Fang; He, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Fermented milk is considered one of the best sources for efficient consumption of probiotic strains by hosts to promote good health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of orally administering LGG-fermented milk (LGG milk) on intestinal inflammation and injury and to study the mechanisms of LGG milk's action. LGG milk and non-LGG-fermented milk (non-LGG milk) were administered through gavage to mice before and during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced intestinal injury and colitis. Inflammatory/injury score and colon length were assessed. Intestinal epithelial cells were treated with the soluble fraction of LGG milk to detect its effects on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream target, Akt activation, cytokine-induced apoptosis, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced disruption of tight junctions. LGG milk treatment significantly reduced DSS-induced colonic inflammation and injury, and colon shortening in mice, compared to that in non-LGG milk-treated and -untreated mice. The soluble fraction of LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, stimulated the activation of EGFR and Akt in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed cytokine-induced apoptosis, and attenuated H2O2-induced disruption of tight junction complex in the intestinal epithelial cells. These effects of LGG milk were blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor. LGG milk, but not non-LGG milk, contained two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, that have been reported to promote survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells through the activation of EGFR. Depletion of p40 and p75 from LGG milk abolished the effects of LGG milk on prevention of cytokine-induced apoptosis and H2O2-induced disruption of tight junctions. These results suggest that LGG milk may regulate intestinal epithelial homeostasis and potentially prevent intestinal inflammatory diseases through activation of EGFR by LGG-derived proteins.

  12. From sensing to shaping microbiota: insights into the role of NOD2 in intestinal homeostasis and progression of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Iyshwarya; Gao, Nan

    2017-07-01

    NOD2 was the first susceptibility gene identified for Crohn's disease (CD), one of the major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The field of NOD2 research has opened up many questions critical to understanding the complexities of microbiota-host interactions. In addition to sensing its specific bacterial components as a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor, NOD2 also appears to shape the colonization of intestinal microbiota. Activated NOD2 triggers downstream signaling cascades exampled by the NF-κB pathway to induce antimicrobial activities, however, defective or loss of NOD2 functions incur a similarly activated inflammatory response. Additional studies have identified the involvement of NOD2 in protection against non-microbiota-related intestinal damages as well as extraintestinal infections. We survey recent molecular and genetic studies of NOD2-mediated bacterial sensing and immunological modulation, and integrate evidence to suggest a highly reciprocal but still poorly understood cross talk between enteric microbiota and host cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Temporal and spatial interplay of microbiota and intestinal mucosa drive establishment of immune homeostasis in conventionalized mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidy, El S.; Baarlen, van P.; Derrien, M.; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, D.J.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Levenez, F.; Dore, J.; Dekker, J.; Samsom, J.N.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    During colonization of germfree mice with the total fecal microbial community of their conventionally born and raised siblings (conventionalization), the intestinal mucosal immune system initiates and maintains a balanced immune response. However, the genetic regulation of these balanced,

  14. The interplay between the gut immune system and microbiota in health and disease: nutraceutical intervention for restoring intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Gut immune system is daily exposed to a plethora of antigens contained in the environment as well as in food. Both secondary lymphoid tissue, such as Peyer's patches, and lymphoid follicles (tertiary lymphoid tissue) are able to respond to antigenic stimuli releasing cytokines or producing antibodies (secretory IgA). Intestinal epithelial cells are in close cooperation with intraepithelial lymphocytes and possess Toll-like receptors on their surface and Nod-like receptors (NLRs) which sense pathogens or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Intestinal microbiota, mainly composed of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, generates tolerogenic response acting on gut dendritic cells and inhibiting the T helper (h)-17 cell anti-inflammatory pathway. This is the case of Bacteroides fragilis which leads to the production of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, from both T regulatory cells and lamina propria macrophages. Conversely, segmented filamentous bacteria rather induce Th17 cells, thus promoting intestinal inflammation. Intestinal microbiota and its toxic components have been shown to act on both Nod1 and Nod2 receptors and their defective signaling accounts for the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In IBD a loss of normal tolerance to intestinal microbiota seems to be the main trigger of mucosal damage. In addition, intestinal microbiota thanks to its regulatory function of gut immune response can prevent or retard neoplastic growth. In fact, chronic exposure to environmental microorganisms seems to be associated with low frequency of cancer risk. Major nutraceuticals or functional foods employed in the modulation of intestinal microbiota are represented by prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids, amino acids and polyphenols. The cellular and molecular effects performed by these natural products in terms of modulation of the intestinal microbiota and mostly attenuation of the inflammatory pathway are described.

  15. 1-alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3up-regulates the expression of 2 types of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase alternative splicing variants in Caco-2 cells and may be an important regulator of their expression in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Seiko; Yamada, Asako; Nakaoka, Kanae; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis and also influences skeletal muscle functions, differentiation, and development. The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase the absorption of calcium from the intestine, and the level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a differentiation marker for intestinal epithelial cells, is regulated by vitamin D. Intestinal-type ALP is expressed at a high concentration in the brush border membrane of intestinal epithelial cells, and is known to be affected by several kinds of nutrients. Recent reviews have highlighted the importance of intestinal-type ALP in gut homeostasis. Intestinal-type ALP controls bacterial endotoxin-induced inflammation by dephosphorylating lipopolysaccharide and is a gut mucosal defense factor. In this study, we investigated the influence of vitamin D on the expression of 2 types of alternative mRNA variants encoding the human alkaline phosphatase, intestinal (ALPI) gene in human Caco-2 cells as an in vitro model of the small intestinal epithelium. After treatment with 1-alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , the biologically active form of vitamin D 3 , there were significant increases in the ALP activities of Caco-2 cells. Inhibitor and thermal inactivation experiments showed that the increased ALP had properties of intestinal-type ALP. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that expression of the 2 types of alternative mRNA variants from the ALPI gene was markedly enhanced by vitamin D in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, these findings agree with the hypothesis: vitamin D up-regulated the expression of 2 types of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase alternative splicing variants in Caco-2 cells; vitamin D may be an important regulator of ALPI gene expression in gut homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intestinal microbiota in healthy adults: temporal analysis reveals individual and common core and relation to intestinal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Jalanka-Tuovinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While our knowledge of the intestinal microbiota during disease is accumulating, basic information of the microbiota in healthy subjects is still scarce. The aim of this study was to characterize the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults and specifically address its temporal stability, core microbiota and relation with intestinal symptoms. We carried out a longitudinal study by following a set of 15 healthy Finnish subjects for seven weeks and regularly assessed their intestinal bacteria and archaea with the Human Intestinal Tract (HIT Chip, a phylogenetic microarray, in conjunction with qPCR analyses. The health perception and occurrence of intestinal symptoms was recorded by questionnaire at each sampling point. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A high overall temporal stability of the microbiota was observed. Five subjects showed transient microbiota destabilization, which correlated not only with the intake of antibiotics but also with overseas travelling and temporary illness, expanding the hitherto known factors affecting the intestinal microbiota. We identified significant correlations between the microbiota and common intestinal symptoms, including abdominal pain and bloating. The most striking finding was the inverse correlation between Bifidobacteria and abdominal pain: subjects who experienced pain had over five-fold less Bifidobacteria compared to those without pain. Finally, a novel computational approach was used to define the common core microbiota, highlighting the role of the analysis depth in finding the phylogenetic core and estimating its size. The in-depth analysis suggested that we share a substantial number of our intestinal phylotypes but as they represent highly variable proportions of the total community, many of them often remain undetected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A global and high-resolution microbiota analysis was carried out to determine the temporal stability, the associations with intestinal symptoms, and the

  17. Molecular signatures for the dynamic process of establishing intestinal host-microbial homeostasis: potential for disease diagnostics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidy, El S.F.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: The dynamic interplay of the intestinal microbiota and host has been the focus of many studies because of its impact on the health status in human life. Recent reports on the time-resolved immune and metabolic interactions between the host and microbiota, as well as the molecular

  18. Polyphenol- and Caffeine-Rich Postfermented Pu-erh Tea Improves Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome by Remodeling Intestinal Homeostasis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyu; Xie, Qiuhong; Kong, Ping; Liu, Ling; Sun, Sheng; Xiong, Boyu; Huang, Baojia; Yan, Liang; Sheng, Jun; Xiang, Hongyu

    2018-01-01

    Postfermented Pu-erh tea (PE) protects against metabolic syndrome (MS), but little is known regarding its underlying mechanisms. Animal experiments were performed to determine whether the gut microbiota mediated the improvement in diet-induced MS by PE and its main active components (PEAC). We confirmed that PE altered the body composition and energy efficiency, attenuated metabolic endotoxemia and systemic and multiple-tissue inflammation, and improved the glucose and lipid metabolism disorder in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice via multiple pathways. Notably, PE promoted the lipid oxidation and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) in HFD-fed mice. Polyphenols and caffeine (CAF) played critical roles in improving these parameters. Meanwhile, PE remodeled the disrupted intestinal homeostasis that was induced by the HFD. Many metabolic changes observed in the mice were significantly correlated with alterations in specific gut bacteria. Akkermansia muciniphila and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were speculated to be the key gut bacterial links between the PEAC treatment and MS at the genus and species levels. Interestingly, A. muciniphila administration altered body composition and energy efficiency, promoted the browning of WAT, and improved the lipid and glucose metabolism disorder in the HFD-fed mice, whereas F. prausnitzii administration reduced the HFD-induced liver and intestinal inflammatory responses. In summary, polyphenol- and CAF-rich PE improved diet-induced MS, and this effect was associated with a remodeling of the gut microbiota. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta 3 alters intestinal smooth muscle function: implications for gastroschisis-related intestinal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Olufemi, S D; Olsen, A B; Hook-Dufresne, D M; Bandla, V; Cox, C S

    2015-05-01

    Gastroschisis (GS) is a congenital abdominal wall defect that results in the development of GS-related intestinal dysfunction (GRID). Transforming growth factor-β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has been shown to cause organ dysfunction through alterations in vascular and airway smooth muscle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of TGF-β3 on intestinal smooth muscle function and contractile gene expression. Archived human intestinal tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for TGF-β isoforms and markers of smooth muscle gene and micro-RNA contractile phenotype. Intestinal motility was measured in neonatal rats ± TGF-β3 (0.2 and 1 mg/kg). Human intestinal smooth muscle cells (hiSMCs) were incubated with fetal bovine serum ± 100 ng/ml of TGF-β 3 isoforms for 6, 24 and 72 h. The effects of TGF-β3 on motility, hiSMC contractility and hiSMC contractile phenotype gene and micro-RNA expression were measured using transit, collagen gel contraction assay and RT-PCR analysis. Data are expressed as mean ± SEM, ANOVA (n = 6-7/group). GS infants had increased immunostaining of TGF-β3 and elevated levels of micro-RNA 143 & 145 in the intestinal smooth muscle. Rats had significantly decreased intestinal transit when exposed to TGF-β3 in a dose-dependent manner compared with Sham animals. TGF-β3 significantly increased hiSMC gel contraction and contractile protein gene and micro-RNA expression. TGF-β3 contributed to intestinal dysfunction at the organ level, increased contraction at the cellular level and elevated contractile gene expression at the molecular level. A hyper-contractile response may play a role in the persistent intestinal dysfunction seen in GRID.

  20. Serum PBDE levels in exposed rats in relation to effects on thyroxine homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnerud, P.O.; Aune, M.; Larsson, L.; Hallgren, S. [National Food Administration, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is a group of environmental chemicals for which lately both interest and knowledge have increased considerably. Among the BFRs, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have attained special interest. Much data on environmental and human levels have been presented and several toxicological reviews are now published. Among interesting results is the difference in human PBDE levels that seem to exist between U.S.A. and Europe, results that suggest differences in exposure but without being able to pin-point the exact sources. In experimental studies PBDEs alter serum thyroxin levels, an effect seen both in rats and in mice. The mechanism(s) are still not completely clarified, but are thought to include alterations in serum transport, induced enzymatic degradation and possibly also direct effects on the thyroid gland. As perinatal alterations in thyroid homeostasis could affect brain development, early effects on thyroid hormones may be of special concern. Indeed, PBDEs have been shown to affect behaviour and learning in mice, when given neonatally. The aim of the present study was to relate the serum levels of PBDEs in rats to effects of these compounds on thyroxine homeostasis in these animals. Specifically, the relation between serum PBDE levels and effects on serum thyroxine levels was investigated, after two weeks of daily oral exposure. The result may have consequences for the future risk assessment activities on PBDE and specifically in finding the critical serum PBDE concentration at which the effect on thyroid hormone levels begin to occur.

  1. A Cross-Talk Between Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids and the Host Mucosal Immune System Regulates Intestinal Homeostasis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Araújo, João Ricardo; Di Santo, James P

    2018-02-15

    Gut microbiota has a fundamental role in the energy homeostasis of the host and is essential for proper "education" of the immune system. Intestinal microbial communities are able to ferment dietary fiber releasing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The SCFAs, particularly butyrate (BT), regulate innate and adaptive immune cell generation, trafficing, and function. For example, BT has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the recruitment and proinflammatory activity of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and effector T cells and by increasing the number and activity of regulatory T cells. Gut microbial dysbiosis, ie, a microbial community imbalance, has been suggested to play a role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The relationship between dysbiosis and IBD has been difficult to prove, especially in humans, and is probably complex and dynamic, rather than one of a simple cause and effect relationship. However, IBD patients have dysbiosis with reduced numbers of SCFAs-producing bacteria and reduced BT concentration that is linked to a marked increase in the number of proinflammatory immune cells in the gut mucosa of these patients. Thus, microbial dysbiosis and reduced BT concentration may be a factor in the emergence and severity of IBD. Understanding the relationship between microbial dysbiosis and reduced BT concentration to IBD may lead to novel therapeutic interventions.

  2. Related radiation effects on the intestine and their treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardychev, M.S.; Kurpeshcheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Late radiation injuries of the intestine are frequent after radiation therapy of malignant tumours of female genitalia and some other tumours due to which the intestine gets into the irradiation field. On the basis of the analysis of 80 patients with late radiation injuries of intestine which developed at remote terms after radiation therapy of cervix uteri cancer and corpus uteri (65 patients) and other tumours, peculiarities of the clinical course and treatment of radiation enterocolitis, rectosigmoidites and rectites are discussed. In 39 patients these injuries were concomitant with late radiation injuries of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissues. The clinical course of radiation unjuries of the intestine was defined by the character of the pathological process in the intestine and was more sharply marked in patients suffering from radiation enterocolites. It was established that one of the pathogenetic mechanisms of late radiation injuries of the intestine was a disorder of the absorption function of the intestine. Local treatment of radiation injuries of the intestine should be combined with a general one the important component of which is a parenteral diet

  3. Protein homeostasis in models of aging and age-related conformational disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikis, Elise A; Gidalevitz, Tali; Morimoto, Richard I

    2010-01-01

    The stability of the proteome is crucial to the health of the cell, and contributes significantly to the lifespan of the organism. Aging and many age-related diseases have in common the expression of misfolded and damaged proteins. The chronic expression of damaged proteins during disease can have devastating consequences on protein homeostasis (proteostasis), resulting in disruption ofnumerous biological processes. This chapter discusses our current understanding of the various contributors to protein misfolding, and the mechanisms by which misfolding, and accompanied aggregation/toxicity, is accelerated by stress and aging. Invertebrate models have been instrumental in studying the processes related to aggregation and toxicity of disease-associated proteins and how dysregulation ofproteostasis leads to neurodegenerative diseases of aging.

  4. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the

  5. Sex-Related Differences in the Effects of the Mediterranean Diet on Glucose and Insulin Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Bédard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To document sex differences in the impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet on glucose/insulin homeostasis and to verify whether these sex-related effects were associated with changes in nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA. Methods. All foods were provided to 38 men and 32 premenopausal women (24–53 y during 4 weeks. Variables were measured during a 180 min OGTT before and after the MedDiet. Results. A sex-by-time interaction for plasma insulin iAUC was found (men: −17.8%, P=0.02; women: +9.4%, P=0.63; P for sex-by-time interaction = 0.005. A sex-by-time interaction was also observed for insulin sensitivity (Cederholm index, P=0.03, for which only men experienced improvements (men: +8.1%, P=0.047; women: −5.9%, P=0.94. No sex difference was observed for glucose and C-peptide responses. Trends toward a decrease in NEFA AUC (P=0.06 and an increase in NEFA suppression rate (P=0.06 were noted, with no sex difference. Changes in NEFA were not associated with change in insulin sensitivity. Conclusions. Results suggest that the more favorable changes in glucose/insulin homeostasis observed in men compared to women in response to the MedDiet are not explained by sex differences in NEFA response. This clinical trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01293344.

  6. intestinal helminthes infestation in relation to some haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-09

    Jul 9, 2015 ... Intestinal parasitic infections caused by protozoa and helminthes are globally endemic and have been described as constituting the greatest single worldwide ... anaemia by decreasing appetite and thus food and iron intake (Bondevik et al., 2000; Stephenson et al., 2000). Worldwide anemia is an important ...

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Disrupts Thymic Homeostasis by Altering Intrathymic and Systemic Stress-Related Endocrine Circuitries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Carvalho, Vinicius Frias; e Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues; Villar, Silvina; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Savino, Wilson; Morrot, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that experimental infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is associated with changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Increased glucocorticoid (GC) levels are believed to be protective against the effects of acute stress during infection but result in depletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by apoptosis, driving to thymic atrophy. However, very few data are available concerning prolactin (PRL), another stress-related hormone, which seems to be decreased during T. cruzi infection. Considering the immunomodulatory role of PRL upon the effects caused by GC, we investigated if intrathymic cross-talk between GC and PRL receptors (GR and PRLR, respectively) might influence T. cruzi-induced thymic atrophy. Using an acute experimental model, we observed changes in GR/PRLR cross-activation related with the survival of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes during infection. These alterations were closely related with systemic changes, characterized by a stress hormone imbalance, with progressive GC augmentation simultaneously to PRL reduction. The intrathymic hormone circuitry exhibited an inverse modulation that seemed to counteract the GC-related systemic deleterious effects. During infection, adrenalectomy protected the thymus from the increase in apoptosis ratio without changing PRL levels, whereas an additional inhibition of circulating PRL accelerated the thymic atrophy and led to an increase in corticosterone systemic levels. These results demonstrate that the PRL impairment during infection is not caused by the increase of corticosterone levels, but the opposite seems to occur. Accordingly, metoclopramide (MET)-induced enhancement of PRL secretion protected thymic atrophy in acutely infected animals as well as the abnormal export of immature and potentially autoreactive CD4+CD8+ thymocytes to the periphery. In conclusion, our findings clearly show that Trypanosoma cruzi subverts mouse thymus homeostasis by altering intrathymic and systemic stress-related

  8. Changes in transcript related to osmosis and intracellular ion homeostasis in Paulownia tomentosa under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang eFan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Paulownia tomentosa is an important economic and greening tree species that is cultivated widely, including salt environment. Our previous studies indicated its autotetraploid induced by colchicine showed better stress tolerance, but the underlying molecular mechanism related to ploidy and salt stress is still unclear. To investigate this issue, physiological measurements and transcriptome profiling of diploid and autotetraploid plants untreated and treated with NaCl were performed. Through the comparisons among four accessions, for one thing, we found different physiological changes between diploid and autotetraploid P. tomentosa; for another, and we detected many differentially expressed unigenes involved in salt stress response. These differentially expressed unigenes were assigned to several metabolic pathways, including plant hormone signal transduction, RNA transporter, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and plant-pathogen interaction, which constructed the complex regulatory network to maintain osmotic and intracellular ion homeostasis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the expression patterns of 20 unigenes. The results establish the foundation for the genetic basis of salt tolerance in P. tomentosa, which in turn accelerates Paulownia breeding and expands available arable land.

  9. Preserved dopaminergic homeostasis and dopamine-related behaviour in hemizygous TH-Cre mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runegaard, Annika H; Jensen, Kathrine L; Fitzpatrick, Ciarán M; Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Gether, Ulrik; Rickhag, Mattias

    2017-01-01

    Cre-driver mouse lines have been extensively used as genetic tools to target and manipulate genetically defined neuronal populations by expression of Cre recombinase under selected gene promoters. This approach has greatly advanced neuroscience but interpretations are hampered by the fact that most Cre-driver lines have not been thoroughly characterized. Thus, a phenotypic characterization is of major importance to reveal potential aberrant phenotypes prior to implementation and usage to selectively inactivate or induce transgene expression. Here, we present a biochemical and behavioural assessment of the dopaminergic system in hemizygous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre mice in comparison to wild-type (WT) controls. Our data show that TH-Cre mice display preserved dopaminergic homeostasis with unaltered levels of TH and dopamine as well as unaffected dopamine turnover in striatum. TH-Cre mice also show preserved dopamine transporter expression and function supporting sustained dopaminergic transmission. In addition, TH-Cre mice demonstrate normal responses in basic behavioural paradigms related to dopaminergic signalling including locomotor activity, reward preference and anxiolytic behaviour. Our results suggest that TH-Cre mice represent a valid tool to study the dopamine system, though careful characterization must always be performed to prevent false interpretations following Cre-dependent transgene expression and manipulation of selected neuronal pathways. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The short isoform of the CEACAM1 receptor in intestinal T cells regulates mucosal immunity and homeostasis via Tfh cell induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lanfen; Chen, Zhangguo; Baker, Kristi; Halvorsen, Elizabeth M; da Cunha, Andre Pires; Flak, Magdalena B; Gerber, Georg; Huang, Yu-Hwa; Hosomi, Shuhei; Arthur, Janelle C; Dery, Ken J; Nagaishi, Takashi; Beauchemin, Nicole; Holmes, Kathryn V; Ho, Joshua W K; Shively, John E; Jobin, Christian; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L; Higgins, Darren E; Blumberg, Richard S

    2012-11-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule like I (CEACAM1) is expressed on activated T cells and signals through either a long (L) cytoplasmic tail containing immune receptor tyrosine based inhibitory motifs, which provide inhibitory function, or a short (S) cytoplasmic tail with an unknown role. Previous studies on peripheral T cells show that CEACAM1-L isoforms predominate with little to no detectable CEACAM1-S isoforms in mouse and human. We show here that this was not the case in tissue resident T cells of intestines and gut associated lymphoid tissues, which demonstrated predominant expression of CEACAM1-S isoforms relative to CEACAM1-L isoforms in human and mouse. This tissue resident predominance of CEACAM1-S expression was determined by the intestinal environment where it served a stimulatory function leading to the regulation of T cell subsets associated with the generation of secretory IgA immunity, the regulation of mucosal commensalism, and defense of the barrier against enteropathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is butyrate the link between diet, intestinal microbiota and obesity-related metabolic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahe, L K; Astrup, A; Larsen, L H

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that there is a connection between diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal barrier function and the low-grade inflammation that characterizes the progression from obesity to metabolic disturbances, making dietary strategies to modulate the intestinal environment relevant. In this context, the ability of some Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria to produce the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is interesting. A lower abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria has been associated with metabolic risk in humans, and recent studies suggest that butyrate might have an anti-inflammatory potential that can alleviate obesity-related metabolic complications, possibly due to its ability to enhance the intestinal barrier function. Here, we review and discuss the potential of butyrate as an anti-inflammatory mediator in metabolic diseases, and the potential for dietary interventions increasing the intestinal availability of butyrate. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  12. Redox homeostasis and age-related deficits in neuromuscular integrity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Lightfoot, Adam P; Earl, Kate E; Stofanko, Martin; McDonagh, Brian

    2017-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major site of metabolic activity and is the most abundant tissue in the human body. Age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia) and weakness, characterized by progressive loss of lean muscle mass and function, is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. With a continuously growing older population (estimated 2 billion of people aged >60 by 2050), demand for medical and social care due to functional deficits, associated with neuromuscular ageing, will inevitably increase. Despite the importance of this 'epidemic' problem, the primary biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying age-related deficits in neuromuscular integrity and function have not been fully determined. Skeletal muscle generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) from a variety of subcellular sources, and age-associated oxidative damage has been suggested to be a major factor contributing to the initiation and progression of muscle atrophy inherent with ageing. RONS can modulate a variety of intracellular signal transduction processes, and disruption of these events over time due to altered redox control has been proposed as an underlying mechanism of ageing. The role of oxidants in ageing has been extensively examined in different model organisms that have undergone genetic manipulations with inconsistent findings. Transgenic and knockout rodent studies have provided insight into the function of RONS regulatory systems in neuromuscular ageing. This review summarizes almost 30 years of research in the field of redox homeostasis and muscle ageing, providing a detailed discussion of the experimental approaches that have been undertaken in murine models to examine the role of redox regulation in age-related muscle atrophy and weakness. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  13. Does microbiota composition affect thyroid homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virili, Camilla; Centanni, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for the host to ensure digestive and immunologic homeostasis. When microbiota homeostasis is impaired and dysbiosis occurs, the malfunction of epithelial barrier leads to intestinal and systemic disorders, chiefly immunologic and metabolic. The role of the intestinal tract is crucial in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, and hormones, including exogenous and endogenous iodothyronines as well as micronutrients involved in thyroid homeostasis. However, the link between thyroid homeostasis and microbiota composition is not yet completely ascertained. A pathogenetic link with dysbiosis has been described in different autoimmune disorders but not yet fully elucidated in autoimmune thyroid disease which represents the most frequent of them. Anyway, it has been suggested that intestinal dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune thyroiditis. Furthermore, hypo- and hyper-thyroidism, often of autoimmune origin, were respectively associated to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and to changes in microbiota composition. Whether some steps of this thyroid network may be affected by intestinal microbiota composition is briefly discussed below.

  14. Ketogenesis contributes to intestinal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingding; Zhou, Yuning; Rychahou, Piotr; Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark

    2017-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium undergoes a continual process of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, we have shown that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. However, the downstream targets mediating the effects of mTOR in intestinal cells are not known. Here, we show that the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) induces intestinal cell differentiation as noted by the increased expression of differentiation markers (Mucin2 (MUC2), lysozyme, IAP, sucrase-isomaltase, KRT20, villin, Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and p21 Waf1 ). Conversely, knockdown of the ketogenic mitochondrial enzyme hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) attenuated spontaneous differentiation in the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Overexpression of HMGCS2, which we found is localized specifically in the more differentiated portions of the intestinal mucosa, increased the expression of CDX2, thus further suggesting the contributory role of HMGCS2 in intestinal differentiation. In addition, mice fed a ketogenic diet demonstrated increased differentiation of intestinal cells as noted by an increase in the enterocyte, goblet and Paneth cell lineages. Moreover, we showed that either knockdown of mTOR or inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin increases the expression of HMGCS2 in intestinal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a possible cross-talk between mTOR and HMGCS2/βHB signaling in intestinal cells. In contrast, treatment of intestinal cells with βHB or feeding mice with a ketogenic diet inhibits mTOR signaling in intestinal cells. Together, we provide evidence showing that HMGCS2/βHB contributes to intestinal cell differentiation. Our results suggest that mTOR acts cooperatively with HMGCS2/βHB to maintain intestinal homeostasis.

  15. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodvaël Fraysse

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2, a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca2+ and releasable Ca2+ content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content.

  16. Gut commensal flora: tolerance and homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rescigno, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Commensal microorganisms are not ignored by the intestinal immune system. Recent evidence shows that commensals actively participate in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis by interacting with intestinal epithelial cells and delivering tolerogenic signals that are transmitted to the underlying cells of the immune system.

  17. Preserved dopaminergic homeostasis and dopamine-related behaviour in hemizygous TH-Cre mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard; Jensen, Kathrine L; Fitzpatrick, Ciarán M

    2017-01-01

    assessment of the dopaminergic system in hemizygous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre mice in comparison to wild-type (WT) controls. Our data show that TH-Cre mice display preserved dopaminergic homeostasis with unaltered levels of TH and dopamine as well as unaffected dopamine turnover in striatum. TH-Cre mice...

  18. Intestinal Dysbiosis, Barrier Dysfunction, and Bacterial Translocation Account for CKD-Related Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kirstin; Kesper, Marie Sophie; Marschner, Julian A; Konrad, Lukas; Ryu, Mi; Kumar Vr, Santhosh; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Demleitner, Jana; Schiller, Patrick; Dietrich, Alexander; Müller, Susanna; Gross, Oliver; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Huson, Daniel H; Stecher, Bärbel; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    CKD associates with systemic inflammation, but the underlying cause is unknown. Here, we investigated the involvement of intestinal microbiota. We report that collagen type 4 α3-deficient mice with Alport syndrome-related progressive CKD displayed systemic inflammation, including increased plasma levels of pentraxin-2 and activated antigen-presenting cells, CD4 and CD8 T cells, and Th17- or IFNγ-producing T cells in the spleen as well as regulatory T cell suppression. CKD-related systemic inflammation in these mice associated with intestinal dysbiosis of proteobacterial blooms, translocation of living bacteria across the intestinal barrier into the liver, and increased serum levels of bacterial endotoxin. Uremia did not affect secretory IgA release into the ileum lumen or mucosal leukocyte subsets. To test for causation between dysbiosis and systemic inflammation in CKD, we eradicated facultative anaerobic microbiota with antibiotics. This eradication prevented bacterial translocation, significantly reduced serum endotoxin levels, and fully reversed all markers of systemic inflammation to the level of nonuremic controls. Therefore, we conclude that uremia associates with intestinal dysbiosis, intestinal barrier dysfunction, and bacterial translocation, which trigger the state of persistent systemic inflammation in CKD. Uremic dysbiosis and intestinal barrier dysfunction may be novel therapeutic targets for intervention to suppress CKD-related systemic inflammation and its consequences. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  20. Basis for the Age-related Decline in Intestinal Mucosal Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Schmucker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly are characterized by mucosal immunosenescence and high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases of the intestinal tract. Little is known about how the differentiation of immunoglobulin A (IgA plasma cells in Peyer's patches (PPs and their subsequent homing to the small intestinal lamina propria (LP is affected by aging. Quantitative immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the number of IgA+ cells in the PPs, coupled with significant declines in the numbers of IgA+ and antibody-positive cells in the intestinal LP of senescent rats compared to young adult animals. These data suggest that aging diminishes the emigration of IgA immunoblasts from these lymphoid aggregates, as well as their migration to the intestinal LP. Flow cytometry and lymphocyte adoptive transfer studies showed 3- to 4-fold age-related declines in the homing of antibody-containing cells and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes to the small intestines of rhesus macaques and rats, respectively. The number of peripheral blood IgA immunoblasts expressing the homing molecule α4β7 declined 30% in senescent rats. This was accompanied by a >17% decrease in the areal density of LP blood vessels staining positive for the cell adhesion molecule MAdCAM-1. Cumulatively, declines in expression of these homing molecules constitute a substantial age-related diminution of IgA immunoblast homing potential. In vitro antibody secretion by LP plasma cells, i.e. antibody secreted per antibody-positive cell, remains unchanged as a function of donor age. Intestinal mucosal immunosenescence is a consequence of reduced homing of IgA plasma cells to the intestinal LP as a result of declines in homing molecule expression.

  1. Gene expression related to oxidative stress in the heart of mice after intestinal ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somaio Neto, Frederico; Ikejiri, Adauto Tsutomu; Bertoletto, Paulo Roberto; Chaves, José Carlos Bertoletto [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados - UFGD, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Teruya, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul - UFMS, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Fagundes, Djalma José, E-mail: fsomaio@cardiol.br; Taha, Murched Omar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion is a frequent clinical event associated to injury in distant organs, especially the heart. To investigate the gene expression of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the heart of inbred mice subjected to intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR). Twelve mice (C57BL / 6) were assigned to: IR Group (GIR) with 60 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion; Control Group (CG) which underwent anesthesia and laparotomy without IR procedure and was observed for 120 minutes. Intestine and heart samples were processed using the RT-qPCR / Reverse transcriptase-quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction method for the gene expression of 84 genes related to oxidative stress and oxidative defense (Student's 't' test, p < 0.05). The intestinal tissue (GIR) was noted to have an up-regulation of 65 genes (74.71%) in comparison to normal tissue (CG), and 37 genes (44.04%) were hyper-expressed (greater than three times the threshold allowed by the algorithm). Regarding the remote effects of intestinal I/R in cardiac tissue an up-regulation of 28 genes (33.33%) was seen, but only eight genes (9.52%) were hyper-expressed three times above threshold. Four (7.14%) of these eight genes were expressed in both intestinal and cardiac tissues. Cardiomyocytes with smaller and pyknotic nuclei, rich in heterochromatin with rare nucleoli, indicating cardiac distress, were observed in the GIR. Intestinal I/R caused a statistically significant over expression of 8 genes associated with oxidative stress in remote myocardial tissue.

  2. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, P.; Zhou, Y.; Qin, H.; Shen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithel...

  3. Intestinal microbiota in healthy adults: temporal analysis reveals individual and common core and relation to intestinal symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalanka-Tuovinen, J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While our knowledge of the intestinal microbiota during disease is accumulating, basic information of the microbiota in healthy subjects is still scarce. The aim of this study was to characterize the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults and specifically address its temporal stability,

  4. Age-related changes in bone in the dog: calcium homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.A.; Kelly, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    To explore the changes in the relationship between skeletal and Ca 2+ homeostasis with age, a study was made of 50 dogs divided into four age groups. The skeletal uptake of 85 Sr decreased markedly with age, and the immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level increased. There was a significant correlation between iPTH value and the calculated short-term exchange of Ca in bone. Bone formation and bone resorption decreased with age except that in the oldest group of dogs the resorption increased. The authors suggest that in aging dogs the skeletal exchange of Ca falls to a very low level that decreases the immediate effect of PTH and thus leads to a chronic net increase in circulating PTH. Concomitant with this is an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption and, over a long time, loss of skeletal mass

  5. Out of Balance—Systemic Iron Homeostasis in Iron-Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea U. Steinbicker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential element in our daily diet. Most iron is required for the de novo synthesis of red blood cells, where it plays a critical role in oxygen binding to hemoglobin. Thus, iron deficiency causes anemia, a major public health burden worldwide. On the other extreme, iron accumulation in critical organs such as liver, heart, and pancreas causes organ dysfunction due to the generation of oxidative stress. Therefore, systemic iron levels must be tightly balanced. Here we focus on the regulatory role of the hepcidin/ferroportin circuitry as the major regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. We discuss how regulatory cues (e.g., iron, inflammation, or hypoxia affect the hepcidin response and how impairment of the hepcidin/ferroportin regulatory system causes disorders of iron metabolism.

  6. Intestinal colonization with phylogenetic group B2 Escherichia coli related to inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Increased numbers of Escherichia coli and, furthermore, specific subtypes of E. coli, such as E. coli of the phylogenetic groups B2 and D have been found in the intestine of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we wanted to evaluate...... on 163 patients with IBD and 89 controls. Among IBD patients, 57 patients had ulcerative colitis (UC) and 95 Crohn's disease (CD). Random-effects meta-analysis showed that IBD patients were more likely to have B2 E. coli intestinal colonization compared with controls (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95...... to be related to IBD, UC or CD. CONCLUSIONS: Our study reveals that intestinal colonization with phylogenetic group B2 E. coli is associated with UC. Due to the design, we are unable to determine if the colonization with B2 E. coli leads to the development of the disease or the disease increases the risk...

  7. 10 Prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4 counts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Parasitic infections continue to take their toll on HIV positive patients by influencing the blood qualitatively and quantitatively. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in relation to anaemia and CD4 counts among HIV-infected patients in Benin City,. Nigeria.

  8. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha is a key factor related to depression and physiological homeostasis in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Yamanishi

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a common psychiatric disorder that involves marked disabilities in global functioning, anorexia, and severe medical comorbidities. MDD is associated with not only psychological and sociocultural problems, but also pervasive physical dysfunctions such as metabolic, neurobiological and immunological abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors have yet to be determined in detail. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and dysregulation of physiological homeostasis, including immunological function as well as lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity in the brain. We generated depression-like behavior in mice using chronic mild stress (CMS as a model of depression. We compared the gene expression profiles in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of CMS and control mice using microarrays. We subsequently categorized genes using two web-based bioinformatics applications: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We then confirmed significant group-differences by analyzing mRNA and protein expression levels not only in the PFC, but also in the thalamus and hippocampus. These web tools revealed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (Hnf4a may exert direct effects on various genes specifically associated with amine synthesis, such as genes involved in serotonin metabolism and related immunological functions. Moreover, these genes may influence lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity. We also confirmed the significant effects of Hnf4a on both mRNA and protein expression levels in the brain. These results suggest that Hnf4a may have a critical influence on physiological homeostasis under depressive states, and may be associated with the mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and the dysregulation of

  9. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Kawahara

    Full Text Available Human rotavirus (RV infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1, which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in

  10. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Tomohiro; Makizaki, Yutaka; Oikawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Maeda, Ayako; Shimakawa, Masaki; Komoto, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Kyoko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Human rotavirus (RV) infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1), which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in mice administered

  11. Age-dependent alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis: Role of TRPV5 and TRPV6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Abel (Monique); S. Huybers (Sylvie); J.G. Hoenderop (Joost); A.W.C.M. Kemp (Annemiete); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); R.J.M. Bindels (René)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAging is associated with alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis, which predisposes elder people to hyperparathyroidism and osteoporosis. Intestinal Ca2+ absorption decreases with aging and, in particular, active transport of Ca2+ by the duodenum. In addition, there are age-related changes in

  12. Age-dependent alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis: role of TRPV5 and TRPV6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abel, M. van; Huybers, S.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Leeuwen, J.P.P.M. van; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis, which predisposes elder people to hyperparathyroidism and osteoporosis. Intestinal Ca2+ absorption decreases with aging and, in particular, active transport of Ca2+ by the duodenum. In addition, there are age-related changes in renal Ca2+

  13. Agaricus brasiliensis (sun mushroom) affects the expression of genes related to cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Aline Mayrink; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; Souza E Silva, Lorena; Dos Santos, Rinaldo Cardoso; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2017-06-01

    The sun mushroom (Agaricus brasiliensis) is considered a major source of bioactive compounds with potential health benefits. Mushrooms typically act as lipid-lowering agents; however, little is known about the mechanisms of action of A. brasiliensis in biological systems. This study aimed to determine the underlying mechanism involved in the cholesterol-lowering effect of A. brasiliensis through the assessment of fecal and serum lipid profiles in addition to gene expression analysis of specific transcription factors, enzymes, and transporters involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Twenty-four albino Fischer rats approximately 90 days old, with an average weight of 205 g, were divided into four groups of 6 each and fed a standard AIN-93 M diet (C), hypercholesterolemic diet (H), hypercholesterolemic diet +1 % A. brasiliensis (HAb), or hypercholesterolemic diet +0.008 % simvastatin (HS) for 6 weeks. Simvastatin was used as a positive control, as it is a typical drug prescribed for lipid disorders. Subsequently, blood, liver, and feces samples were collected for lipid profile and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction gene expression analyses. Diet supplementation with A. brasiliensis significantly improved serum lipid profiles, comparable to the effect observed for simvastatin. In addition, A. brasiliensis dietary supplementation markedly promoted fecal cholesterol excretion. Increased expression of 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), ATP-binding cassette subfamily G-transporters (ABCG5/G8), and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) was observed following A. brasiliensis administration. Our results suggest that consumption of A. brasiliensis improves the serum lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic rats by modulating the expression of key genes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism.

  14. Strict stoichiometric homeostasis of Cryptomonas pyrenoidifera (Cryptophyceae in relation to N:P supply ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Ramos Rodríguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A common freshwater cryptophyte, Cryptomonas pyrenoidifera, was cultivated in batch-cultures to analyze intraspecific variation in elemental stoichiometry along a broad gradient of pulsed phosphorus (P enrichment during the early acclimation period and to determine the immediate homeostatic capacity of the nitrogen-to-phosphorus (N:P ratio of this alga when nutrients are at saturating levels. Experimental results revealed that nitrogen (N and P cell quotas significantly increased with increasing P concentration. However, despite the wide range of N:P ratios in the medium, Cryptomonas N:P ratios were highly stable at higher P-level treatments, indicating a highly conservative behavior and suggesting strict elemental homeostasis when nutrients are at saturating levels. The strictly homeostatic N:P ratio appears to be attributable to their high potential for a fast luxury consumption of both N and P after a brief and intense episode of increased resource availability and to physiological limits on their nutrient storage capacity. Most importantly, the N:P biomass ratio at nutrient saturating levels converged around 11:1, which was the observed ratio of maximum internal cell quotas for N and P (i.e. Qmax,N:Qmax,P under the prevailing experimental conditions. This value is particularly informative for C. pyrenoidifera because it represents cell storage quotients and may be a taxon-specific evolutionary optimum, providing a reference point to infer the grade of nutrient-limitation. The experimental data give ranges of variation in C. pyrenoidifera elemental composition permitting, among others, proper parameterization of cryptophyte stoichiometry models.

  15. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  16. An In-Depth View into Human Intestinal Fluid Colloids: Intersubject Variability in Relation to Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethorst, Danny; Baatsen, Peter; Remijn, Caroline; Mitra, Amitava; Tack, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-10-03

    Intestinal fluids dictate the intraluminal environment, and therefore, they substantially affect the absorption of orally taken drugs. The characterization of human intestinal fluids (HIF) and the design of simulated intestinal fluids (SIF) mainly focus on composition, not necessarily taking into account the ultrastructure of HIF. Colloidal structures in HIF and SIF can enhance the solubilizing capacity for lipophilic drugs while decreasing the bioaccessible fraction. As such, colloids present in HIF play a crucial role and require an in-depth characterization. Therefore, the present study pursued a comprehensive characterization of the ultrastructure of fasted and fed state HIF, focusing on (i) intersubject variability in relation to composition and (ii) differences between the ultrastructure of HIF and SIF. Individual as well as pooled HIF were collected from human volunteers near the ligament of Treitz and compositionally characterized previously. A HIF population pool (20 healthy volunteers) for both fasted (FaHIF) and fed state (FeHIF) was compared to current SIF, as well as selected HIF from different individuals. The selected individual HIF represented the full spectrum of compositional characteristics. Three complementary electron microscopy techniques, cryo-TEM (transmission electron microscopy), negative stain TEM, and cryo-SEM (scanning electron microscopy), were employed to provide a comprehensive view of the colloidal structures in HIF and SIF. The use of complementary EM techniques provided a unique insight into the ultrastructure of HIF, including their native conformation. These characterizations showed that FaHIF and FaSSIF (fasted state simulated intestinal fluids) only consist of (mixed)-micelles with minimal intersubject variability. Ultrastructures in FeSSIF (fed state simulated intestinal fluids) and FeSSIF-v2 are not representative of the colloids in FeHIF since SIF lack (multi)-lamellar vesicles and lipid droplets. Furthermore, the images

  17. Differential Effects of Falcarinol and Related Aliphatic C17-Polyacetylenes on Intestinal Cell Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Purup, Stig; Larsen, Eric; Christensen, Lars P.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative major polyacetylenes of carrots (falcarinol and falcarindiol) and American ginseng roots (falcarinol and panaxydol) were isolated and tested in human intestinal epithelial cells of normal (FHs 74 Int.) and cancer (Caco-2) origin. A hormesis effect was seen for all isolated polyacetylenes when added to Caco-2 cells in concentrations ranging from 1 ng/mL to 20 ?g/mL. The relative inhibitory potency was falcarinol > panaxydol > falcarindiol. No hormesis effect was observed when addi...

  18. Purinergic Ligands as Potential Therapeutic Tools for the Treatment of Inflammation-Related Intestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Dal Ben

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation-related intestinal diseases are a set of various conditions presenting an overactive enteric immune system. A continuous overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a decreased production of anti-inflammatory modulators are generally observed, while morpho-functional alterations of the enteric nervous system lead to intestinal secretory and motor dysfunctions. The factors at the basis of these conditions are still to be totally identified and current therapeutic strategies are aimed only at achieving and maintaining remission states, by using therapeutic tools like aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, biological drugs (i.e., monoclonal antibodies, and eventually surgery. Recent reports described a key role of purinergic mediators (i.e., adenosine and its nucleotides ATP and ADP in the regulation of the activity of immune cells and enteric nervous system, showing also that alterations of the purinergic signaling are linked to pathological conditions of the intestinal tract. These data prompted to a series of investigations to test the therapeutic potential for inflammation-related intestinal conditions of compounds able to restore or modulate an altered purinergic signaling within the gut. This review provides an overview on these investigations, describing the results of preclinical and/or clinical evaluation of compounds able to stimulate or inhibit specific P2 (i.e., P2X7 or P1 (i.e., A2A or A3 receptor signaling and to modify the adenosine levels through the modulation of enzymes activity (i.e., Adenosine Deaminase or nucleoside transporters. Recent developments in the field are also reported and the most promising purine-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammation-related gastrointestinal disorders are schematically summarized.

  19. T-type calcium channels promote predictive homeostasis of input-output relations in thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Z. Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A general theory views the function of all neurons as prediction, and one component of this theory is that of predictive homeostasis or prediction error. It is well established that sensory systems adapt so that neuronal output maintains sensitivity to sensory input, in accord with information theory. Predictive homeostasis applies the same principle at the cellular level, where the challenge is to maintain membrane excitability at the optimal homeostatic level so that spike generation is maximally sensitive to small gradations in synaptic drive. Negative feedback is a hallmark of homeostatic mechanisms, as exemplified by depolarization-activated potassium channels. However, T-type calcium channels exhibit positive feedback that appears at odds with the theory. In thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, T-type channels are capable of causing bursts of spikes with an all-or-none character in response to excitation from a hyperpolarized potential. This burst mode would partially uncouple visual input from spike output and reduce the information spikes convey about gradations in visual input. However, past observations of T-type-driven bursts may have resulted from unnaturally high membrane excitability. By mimicking natural patterns of synaptic conductance that occur during vision, we found that T-type channels in rat brain slices did not cause bursts, but rather enabled retinogeniculate excitation to cause spikes despite sustained hyperpolarization, thereby restoring the homeostatic input-output relation observed at depolarized potentials. Our results suggest that T-type channels help to maintain a single optimal mode of transmission rather than creating a second mode. In addition, our results provide evidence for the general theory, which seeks to predict the properties of a neuron’s ion channels and synapses given knowledge of natural patterns of synaptic input.

  20. Diabetes-Related Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARP/Ankrd23 Modifies Glucose Homeostasis by Modulating AMPK Activity in Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Shimoda

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the major site for glucose disposal, the impairment of which closely associates with the glucose intolerance in diabetic patients. Diabetes-related ankyrin repeat protein (DARP/Ankrd23 is a member of muscle ankyrin repeat proteins, whose expression is enhanced in the skeletal muscle under diabetic conditions; however, its role in energy metabolism remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel role of DARP in the regulation of glucose homeostasis through modulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity. DARP is highly preferentially expressed in skeletal muscle, and its expression was substantially upregulated during myotube differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interestingly, DARP-/- mice demonstrated better glucose tolerance despite similar body weight, while their insulin sensitivity did not differ from that in wildtype mice. We found that phosphorylation of AMPK, which mediates insulin-independent glucose uptake, in skeletal muscle was significantly enhanced in DARP-/- mice compared to that in wildtype mice. Gene silencing of DARP in C2C12 myotubes enhanced AMPK phosphorylation, whereas overexpression of DARP in C2C12 myoblasts reduced it. Moreover, DARP-silencing increased glucose uptake and oxidation in myotubes, which was abrogated by the treatment with AICAR, an AMPK activator. Of note, improved glucose tolerance in DARP-/- mice was abolished when mice were treated with AICAR. Mechanistically, gene silencing of DARP enhanced protein expression of LKB1 that is a major upstream kinase for AMPK in myotubes in vitro and the skeletal muscle in vivo. Together with the altered expression under diabetic conditions, our data strongly suggest that DARP plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions, and thus DARP is a new therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  1. Alteration of local adipose tissue trace element homeostasis as a possible mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Sinitskii, Anton I; Popova, Elizaveta V; Nemereshina, Olga N; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of association between obesity and the related metabolic disturbances in general and insulin resistance in particular are extensively studied. Taking into account a key role of adipose tissue insulin resistance in the development of systemic obesity-related insulin resistance, the estimation of mechanisms linking increased adiposity and impaired insulin signaling in adipocytes will allow to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to treatment of these states. A number of trace elements like chromium, zinc, and vanadium have been shown to take part in insulin signaling via various mechanisms. Taking into account a key role of adipocyte in systemic carbohydrate homeostasis it can be asked if trace element homeostasis in adipose tissue may influence regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism. We hypothesize that caloric excess through currently unknown mechanisms results in decreased chromium, vanadium, and zinc content in adipocytes. Decreased content of trace elements in the adipose tissue causes impairment of intra-adipocyte insulin signaling subsequently leading to adipose tissue insulin resistance. The latter significantly contributes to systemic insulin resistance and further metabolic disruption in obesity. It is also possible that decreased adipose tissue trace element content is associated with dysregulation of insulin-sensitizing and proinflammatory adipokines also leading to insulin resistance. We hypothesize that insulin resistance and adipokine dysbalance increase the severity of obesity subsequently aggravating alteration of adipose tissue trace element balance. Single indications of high relative adipose tissue trace element content, decreased Cr, V, and Zn content in obese adipose tissue, and tight association between fat tissue chromium, vanadium, and zinc levels and metabolic parameters in obesity may be useful for hypothesis validation. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by later studies, adipose tissue chromium

  2. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

  3. Decaying cyanobacteria decrease N2O emissions related to diversity of intestinal denitrifiers of Chironomus plumosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O emission of fresh invertebrates has too long been neglected in eutrophic lakes, although the sediments these animals inhabit are presumably hot spots of N2O emission. Thus, the experiment in this research was designed to gain insight into the influence of cyanobacterial degradation on the N2O emission by fresh water invertebrates (Chironomus plumosus. The presence of decaying cyanobacteria in Lake Taihu decreased the N2O emission rate of Chironomus plumosus larvae from the larvae body by almost 400% for the larvae as a whole. The N2O emission rate decreased by 350% based on readings from studies of their gut, which was mostly due to stimulation of intestinal complete denitrification. The quantitative PCR results showed that intestinal gene abundance of nirK, nosZ (encoding the copper nitrite reductase and N2O reductase, respectively were significantly increased with the presence of decaying cyanobacteria. In contrast nirS (encoding the cytochrome cd1 heme nitrite reductase and the total bacteria decreased. In the gut of Chironomus plumosus, the diversity and richness of nosZ and nirK were lower with the cyanobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of the intestinal function genes (nosZ and nirK showed that the nosZ- and nirK-type denitrifying bacterial sequences were related to different phylotypes. Hence, additional cyanobacteria increased the abundance, but decreased the richness and diversity of intestinal nitrate-reducing bacteria, probably by providing more carbon source in the gut. The data obtained in this study elucidates that the decaying cyanobacteria decreased the emissions of N2O by the aquatic invertebrates in freshwater sediment and could serve as a valuable resource for nitrogen removal affecting greenhouse gas emissions.

  4. Age-Related Changes in CD8 T Cell Homeostasis and Immunity to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Li, Gang; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Renkema, Kristin R.; Smithey, Megan J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of CD8 T cell responses to vaccination or infection with various pathogens in both animal models and human subjects have revealed a markedly consistent array of age-related defects. In general, recent work shows that aged CD8 T cell responses are decreased in magnitude, and show poor differentiation into effector cells, with a reduced arsenal of effector functions. Here we review potential mechanisms underlying these defects. We specifically address phenotypic and numeric changes to the naïve CD8 T cell precursor pool, the impact of persistent viral infection(s) and inflammation, and contributions of the aging environment in which these cells are activated. PMID:22554418

  5. Age-related changes in CD8 T cell homeostasis and immunity to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolich-Žugich, Janko; Li, Gang; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Renkema, Kristin R; Smithey, Megan J

    2012-10-01

    Studies of CD8 T cell responses to vaccination or infection with various pathogens in both animal models and human subjects have revealed a markedly consistent array of age-related defects. In general, recent work shows that aged CD8 T cell responses are decreased in magnitude, and show poor differentiation into effector cells, with a reduced arsenal of effector functions. Here we review potential mechanisms underlying these defects. We specifically address phenotypic and numeric changes to the naïve CD8 T cell precursor pool, the impact of persistent viral infection(s) and inflammation, and contributions of the aging environment in which these cells are activated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2013-10-01

    Research on sleep homeostasis aims to answer the question: how does the brain measure the duration and intensity of previous wakefulness in order to increase the duration and intensity of subsequent sleep? The search of regulatory factors has identified a number of potential molecules that increase their concentration in waking and decrease it during sleep. These factors regulate many physiological functions, including energy metabolism, neural plasticity and immune functions and one molecule may participate in the regulation of all these functions. The method to study regulation of sleep homeostasis is experimental prolongation of waking, which is used also to address the question of physiological purpose of sleep: prolonging wakefulness provokes symptoms that tell us what goes wrong during lack of sleep. The interpretation of the role of each identified factor in the regulation of sleep/sleep homeostasis reflects the theoretical background concept of the research. Presently three main concepts are being actively studied: the energy (depletion) hypothesis, the neural plasticity hypothesis and the (immune) defense hypothesis.

  7. Effects of weight loss in obese cats on biochemical analytes related to inflammation and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvarijonaviciute, A; Ceron, J J; Holden, S L; Morris, P J; Biourge, V; German, A J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to measure circulating metabolic and inflammation-related biochemical analytes in obese cats before and after weight loss. Thirty-seven overweight neutered cats were studied, median body weight 6.85 kg (range, 4.70 to 10.30 kg), representing a range of ages and both sexes. An individualized weight-loss program was devised for each cat and monitored until completion. Body fat mass was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, whereas plasma concentrations of acute-phase proteins (APPs; eg, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A), hormones (eg, insulin, IGF-1, and adiponectin), and enzymes (eg, butyrylcholinesterase and paraoxonase type 1 [PON-1]) associated with inflammation and metabolic compounds (eg, glucose) were also measured. No significant changes were found in APPs after weight loss (P > 0.3), but significant increases in plasma adiponectin (P = 0.021) and IGF-1 (P = 0.036) were seen, whereas insulin (P cats that failed to complete weight loss than cats that were successful, whereas glucose concentration was greater. Finally, multivariable linear regression analysis showed that lean tissue loss during weight management was associated with percentage weight loss (greater weight loss, greater lean tissue loss; R = 0.71, P < 0.001) and plasma adiponectin concentration before weight loss (lesser adiponectin, more lean tissue loss; R = -0.52, P = 0.023). In conclusion, various metabolic abnormalities occur in feline obesity, and these can be linked to outcomes of weight-loss programs. The changes that occur with weight loss suggest an improved metabolic status. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of the Interaction of Enteric Bacteria with Intestinal Mucosa by Stress-Related Catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Stress associated with parturition, transport or mixing has long been correlated with enhanced faecal excretion of diarrhoeal zoonotic pathogens in animals such as Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. It may also predispose humans to infection and/or be associated with more severe outcomes. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens to sense and respond to host stress-related catecholamines. This article reviews evidence of the ability of catecholamine hormones to modulate interactions between Gram-negative diarrhoeal pathogens and intestinal mucosa, as well as the molecular mechanisms that may be at work.

  9. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Roth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic obesity (HO occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP, which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future.

  10. Adipocyte LDL receptor–related protein–1 expression modulates postprandial lipid transport and glucose homeostasis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Susanna M.; Zhou, Li; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Greer, Todd; Grant, Erin; Wancata, Lauren; Thomas, Andrew; Pfluger, Paul T.; Basford, Joshua E.; Gilham, Dean; Herz, Joachim; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hui, David Y.

    2007-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity and its serious consequences such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are rapidly becoming a major global health threat. Therefore, understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which dietary fat causes obesity and diabetes is of paramount importance in order to identify preventive and therapeutic strategies. Increased dietary fat intake results in high plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRL). Tissue uptake of TGRL has been shown to promote glucose intolerance. We generated mice with an adipocyte-specific inactivation of the multifunctional receptor LDL receptor–related protein–1 (LRP1) to determine its role in mediating the effects of TGRL on diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Knockout mice displayed delayed postprandial lipid clearance, reduced body weight, smaller fat stores, lipid-depleted brown adipocytes, improved glucose tolerance, and elevated energy expenditure due to enhanced muscle thermogenesis. We further demonstrated that inactivation of adipocyte LRP1 resulted in resistance to dietary fat–induced obesity and glucose intolerance. These findings identify LRP1 as a critical regulator of adipocyte energy homeostasis, where functional disruption leads to reduced lipid transport, increased insulin sensitivity, and muscular energy expenditure. PMID:17948131

  11. Intestinal detoxification time of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in children with EV71 infection and the related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shu; Wei, Yi; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Lin, Xian-Yao; Shao, Qi-Min; Wang, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a common pediatric infectious disease caused by a variety of intestinal viruses. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the primary pathogen that might cause severe symptoms and even death in children with HFMD. This study aimed to investigate the intestinal detoxification time of HFMD children with EV71 infection and its related factors. Sixty-five HFMD children with EV71 infection were followed up. Their stool samples were collected once every 4 to 7 days. Viral nucleic acids were detected by fluorescent polymerase chain reaction until the results became negative. The positive rates of viral nucleic acids were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Log-rank test and Cox-Mantel test were used to analyze factors affecting the HFMD children with EV71 infection. On the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 10th week, the positive rates of viral nucleic acids in stool samples of the 65 children were 94.6%, 48.1%, 17.2% and 0, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the intestinal detoxification time of the children were related to gender, pre-admission disease course, severity of disease, and use of steroids or gamma globulin (Pdisease was an independent factor affecting the intestinal detoxification time (Pdisease was an important factor affecting the intestinal detoxification time of HFMD children with EV71 infection. Severe HFMD children with EV71 infection had a longer intestinal detoxification time.

  12. Intestinal permeability of 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in patients with Crohn's disease and their healthy relatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, M.; Eriksen, J.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Muckadell, O.B.S. de

    1989-01-01

    An increased intestinal permeability has been proposed as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. The 24-h urinary excretion of 100 μCi 51 Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to test the permeability in 15 patients with Crohn's disease and in 20 healthy first-degree relatives, who were known to have a genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty-eight healthy persons not related to patients with inflammatory bowel disease served as control material. The 51 Cr-EDTA excretion of the relatives was not significantly higher than that of the controls, whereas patients with Crohn's disease had a significantly higher excretion than both the relatives and the controls. Among patients the increased excretion was found only if the small intestine was involved. It is concluded that 1) as a group, patient with Crohn's disease in the small intestine have an increased intestinal permeability, in contrast to their healthy relatives, who have a normal permeability; 2) a considerable overlap of the results of the 51 Cr-EDTA test was found between the groups studied, and the test is not suitable for evaluating individual patients; 3) the results do not support the hypothesis of an increase in intestinal permeability as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. 29 refs

  13. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course......The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...

  14. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-01-01

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber

  15. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Gang [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Xu, Zhenjiang [Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tian, Xiangli, E-mail: xianglitian@ouc.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Dong, Shuanglin [The Key Laboratory of Mariculture, Ministry of Education, Fisheries College, Ocean University of China (China); Peng, Mo [School of Animal Science and Technology, Jiangxi Agricultural University (China)

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber.

  16. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology......-CoA synthetase 5 pattern correlate with conversion of intestinal epithelial cells to a gastric phenotype. These results suggest that deranged acyl-CoA synthetase 5 expression, synthesis, and activity are closely related to the state of villus architecture and epithelial homeostasis in human small intestine....

  17. Differential effects of falcarinol and related aliphatic C(17)-polyacetylenes on intestinal cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purup, Stig; Larsen, Eric; Christensen, Lars P

    2009-09-23

    Quantitative major polyacetylenes of carrots (falcarinol and falcarindiol) and American ginseng roots (falcarinol and panaxydol) were isolated and tested in human intestinal epithelial cells of normal (FHs 74 Int.) and cancer (Caco-2) origin. A hormesis effect was seen for all isolated polyacetylenes when added to Caco-2 cells in concentrations ranging from 1 ng/mL to 20 microg/mL. The relative inhibitory potency was falcarinol > panaxydol > falcarindiol. No hormesis effect was observed when adding the polyacetylenes to FHs 74 Int. cells. Instead, an inhibitory growth response was observed above 1 microg/mL. The relative inhibitory potency was panaxydol > falcarinol > falcarindiol. Maximal inhibition at 20 microg/mL corresponded to approximately 95% and 80% inhibition of cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells, respectively. Combinations of falcarinol and falcarindiol added to normal and cancer cells showed a synergistic response for the inhibition of cell growth. Furthermore, the oxidized form of falcarinol, falcarinon, showed a significantly less growth inhibitory effect in intestinal cells of both normal and cancer origin; hence, a hydroxyl group at C-3 may be important for activity of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes. Extracts of carrots, containing different amounts of falcarinol, falcarindiol, and falcarindiol 3-acetate had significant inhibitory effects on both normal and cancer cell proliferation. In cancer cells, the extract containing the highest concentration of falcarinol tended to have the highest growth inhibitory effect, in accordance with a higher potency of falcarinol than falcarindiol. The present study demonstrates that aliphatic C(17)-polyacetylenes are potential anticancer principles of carrots and related vegetables and that synergistic interaction between bioactive polyacetylenes may be important for their bioactivity.

  18. Differential Effects of Falcarinol and Related Aliphatic C17-Polyacetylenes on Intestinal Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative major polyacetylenes of carrots (falcarinol and falcarindiol) and American ginseng roots (falcarinol and panaxydol) were isolated and tested in human intestinal epithelial cells of normal (FHs 74 Int.) and cancer (Caco-2) origin. A hormesis effect was seen for all isolated polyacetylenes when added to Caco-2 cells in concentrations ranging from 1 ng/mL to 20 μg/mL. The relative inhibitory potency was falcarinol > panaxydol > falcarindiol. No hormesis effect was observed when adding the polyacetylenes to FHs 74 Int. cells. Instead, an inhibitory growth response was observed above 1 μg/mL. The relative inhibitory potency was panaxydol > falcarinol > falcarindiol. Maximal inhibition at 20 μg/mL corresponded to approximately 95% and 80% inhibition of cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells, respectively. Combinations of falcarinol and falcarindiol added to normal and cancer cells showed a synergistic response for the inhibition of cell growth. Furthermore, the oxidized form of falcarinol, falcarinon, showed a significantly less growth inhibitory effect in intestinal cells of both normal and cancer origin; hence, a hydroxyl group at C-3 may be important for activity of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes. Extracts of carrots, containing different amounts of falcarinol, falcarindiol, and falcarindiol 3-acetate had significant inhibitory effects on both normal and cancer cell proliferation. In cancer cells, the extract containing the highest concentration of falcarinol tended to have the highest growth inhibitory effect, in accordance with a higher potency of falcarinol than falcarindiol. The present study demonstrates that aliphatic C17-polyacetylenes are potential anticancer principles of carrots and related vegetables and that synergistic interaction between bioactive polyacetylenes may be important for their bioactivity. PMID:19694436

  19. Comparison of abdominal adiposity and overall obesity in relation to risk of small intestinal cancer in a European Prospective Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yunxia; Cross, Amanda J.; Murphy, Neil; Freisling, Heinz; Travis, Ruth C.; Ferrari, Pietro; Katzke, Verena A.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Olsson, Åsa; Johansson, Ingegerd; Renström, Frida; Panico, Salvatore; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H.; Siersema, Peter D.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Klinaki, Eleni; Tsironis, Christos; Agudo, Antonio; Navarro, Carmen; Sánchez, María José; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Racine, Antoine; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gunter, Marc J.; Riboli, Elio

    Background: The etiology of small intestinal cancer (SIC) is largely unknown, and there are very few epidemiological studies published to date. No studies have investigated abdominal adiposity in relation to SIC. Methods: We investigated overall obesity and abdominal adiposity in relation to SIC in

  20. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  2. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Liver Inflammation Relates to Decreased Canalicular Bile Transporter Expression in Pediatric Onset Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanen, Annika; Lohi, Jouko; Heikkilä, Päivi; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2017-02-23

    Although liver disease is a major complication of parenteral nutrition (PN) for intestinal failure (IF), its pathogenesis remains unclear. We investigated potential molecular mechanisms of liver injury in pediatric onset IF. Liver expression of canalicular phospholipid (ABCB4), bile acid (ABCB11), and sterol (ABCG5/8) transporters, their upstream regulators LXR and FXR as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were investigated among patients with IF [age median 3.8 (IQR 1.2 to 11)] in relation to biochemical and histologic liver injury, PN, serum plant sterols, fibroblast growth factor 19, and α-tocopherol. Patients receiving PN currently (n = 18) showed more advanced liver injury than patients after weaning off PN (n = 30). Histologic portal inflammation strongly segregated PN-dependent (44%) from weaned off patients (3%, P = 0.001) and coupled with progression of cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Patients with portal inflammation demonstrated markedly induced liver RNA expression of IL6 and TNF, repression of FXR and its canalicular bile transporter target gene RNA expression, including ABCB4 and ABCB11 as well as decreased protein expression of ABCB11 and ABCB4. Furthermore, upregulation of LXR and ABCG5/8 RNA expression was suppressed in patients with portal inflammation. Current PN, increased serum levels of plant sterols stigmasterol, avenasterol, and sitosterol along with serum citrulline, a marker of enterocyte mass, predicted portal inflammation. In pediatric onset IF, current PN delivery synergistically with intestinal compromise promote liver inflammation, which associates with progression of biochemical and histologic liver injury, while reducing expression of canalicular bile transporters.

  4. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4(+) T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4(+) T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4(+) T-cell counts less than 200 cells/μl.

  5. Glucose hydrogen breath test for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korterink, Judith J.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Wering, Herbert M.; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M.

    2015-01-01

    A potential link between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGID) has been suggested by symptom similarities and by the reported prevalence of SIBO in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional AP. The

  6. Intestinal malrotation in patients with situs anomaly: Implication of the relative positions of the superior mesenteric artery and vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Sung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun, E-mail: iater@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the usefulness of the relative position of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) in diagnosing intestinal malrotation in situs anomaly. Materials and methods: From January 2004 to April 2015, 33 patients with situs anomalies were enrolled in this study who underwent abdominal USG, CT or MRI as well as upper gastrointestinal series (UGIS) or surgery: situs inversus (n = 16), left isomerism (n = 10), and right isomerism (n = 7); age 21.2 ± 23.2 years (mean ± standard deviation), range 0–72 years. The intestinal malrotation was confirmed with UGIS and/or operation in 16 patients. Relative positions of the SMV to the SMA were classified into four groups by reviewing abdominal USG, CT, or MRI: right sided, left sided, ventral sided, and dorsal sided. The incidence of malrotation was analyzed for each group. Results: In 16 patients with situs inversus, there was reversed SMA-SMV relationship: left sided (n = 11) or ventral sided (n = 5). One situs inversus patient with ventral sided SMV had intestinal malrotation (6.25%). 17 patients with situs ambiguus showed various SMA-SMV relationships (ventral sided, n = 7; left sided, n = 5; right sided, n = 4; dorsal sided, n = 1). Among them, 15 patients (88.2%) had intestinal malrotation. Two patients with normal rotation had either right sided or dorsal sided SMV. Conclusion: Situs ambiguus was commonly associated with intestinal malrotation with a variable SMA-SMV relationship. Reversal of the mesenteric vascular relationship was observed in situs inversus with normal rotation, not excluding the possibility of intestinal malrotation.

  7. Ubiquitination-Related MdBT Scaffold Proteins Target a bHLH Transcription Factor for Iron Homeostasis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Qing-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Fei; You, Chun-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is crucial for plant growth and development. A network of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors positively regulates Fe uptake during iron deficiency. However, their up-regulation or overexpression leads to Fe overload and reactive oxygen species generation, thereby damaging the plants. Here, we found that two BTB/TAZ proteins, MdBT1 and MdBT2, interact with the MbHLH104 protein in apple. In addition, the function of MdBT2 was characterized as a regulator of MdbHLH104 degradation via ubiquitination and the 26S proteasome pathway, thereby controlling the activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPases and the acquisition of iron. Furthermore, MdBT2 interacted with MdCUL3 proteins, which were required for the MdBT2-mediated ubiquitination modification of MdbHLH104 and its degradation. In sum, our findings demonstrate that MdBT proteins interact with MdCUL3 to bridge the formation of the MdBTsMdCUL3 complex, which negatively modulates the degradation of the MdbHLH104 protein in response to changes in Fe status to maintain iron homeostasis in plants. PMID:27660166

  8. Gut Homeostasis, Microbial Dysbiosis, and Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuyuan; Roy, Sabita

    2017-01-01

    Gut homeostasis plays an important role in maintaining animal and human health. The disruption of gut homeostasis has been shown to be associated with multiple diseases. The mutually beneficial relationship between the gut microbiota and the host has been demonstrated to maintain homeostasis of the mucosal immunity and preserve the integrity of the gut epithelial barrier. Currently, rapid progress in the understanding of the host-microbial interaction has redefined toxicological pathology of opioids and their pharmacokinetics. However, it is unclear how opioids modulate the gut microbiome and metabolome. Our study, showing opioid modulation of gut homeostasis in mice, suggests that medical interventions to ameliorate the consequences of drug use/abuse will provide potential therapeutic and diagnostic strategies for opioid-modulated intestinal infections. The study of morphine's modulation of the gut microbiome and metabolome will shed light on the toxicological pathology of opioids and its role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  9. Intestinal, Systemic, and Oral Gluten-related Alterations in Patients With Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picarelli, Antonio; Borghini, Raffaele; Di Tola, Marco; Marino, Mariacatia; Urciuoli, Caterina; Isonne, Claudia; Puzzono, Marta; Porowska, Barbara; Rumi, Gabriele; Lonardi, Silvia; Salemme, Marianna; Tiberti, Antonio; Rizzo, Carmelo; Donato, Giuseppe; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    Nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is an emergent condition, the framework of which is yet unclear, whereas the diagnosis is suggested only by gluten-dependent symptoms after excluding wheat allergy and celiac disease (CD). Our goal was to highlight intestinal, systemic, and oral alterations to clarify the NCGS pathogenesis and identify new diagnostic tools. A total of 60 NCGS patients, 20 untreated CD, 20 treated CD, and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited. The differential diagnosis among gluten-related disorders was performed by serological, allergy, and histologic tools. NCGS patients were also subjected to antigliadin antibody (AGA) detection and HLA typing. All participants underwent an oral mucosa patch test for gluten (GOMPT), whereas an oral provocation test (OPT) for gluten was performed in 26 NCGS patients. About 6/60 (10%) NCGS patients showed IgG AGA-positive results, whereas 45/60 (75%) patients carried HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 genes. GOMPT showed positive results in 45/60 (75%) NCGS patients, 3/20 (15%) untreated CD patients, 5/20 (25%) treated CD patients, and in no healthy volunteers. No significant difference was found between the severity of symptoms reported by NCGS patients subjected to OPT with gluten-containing croissants and those who underwent OPT with gluten-free croissants. GOMPT seems to be a specific tool for NCGS diagnosis, although further investigations are needed to overcome limits due to the small population studied and to contextualize GOMPT false-positive results.

  10. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: experience with Rifaximin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-06-07

    To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO. Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a positive test, received Rifaximin (Normix, Alfa Wassermann) 1200 mg/d for 7 d; 3 wk after the end of treatment, the BTLact was repeated. Based on the BTLact results, SIBO was present in about 56% of IBS patients, and it was responsible for some IBS-related symptoms, such as abdominal bloating and discomfort, and diarrhoea. 1-wk treatment with Rifaximin turned the BTLact to negative in about 50% of patients and significantly reduced the symptoms, especially in those patients with an alternated constipation/diarrhoea-variant IBS. SIBO should be always suspected in patients with IBS, and a differential diagnosis is done by means of a "breath test". Rifaximin may represent a valid approach to the treatment of SIBO.

  11. Gastrointestinal Transit Time, Glucose Homeostasis and Metabolic Health: Modulation by Dietary Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mattea; Canfora, Emanuel E; Blaak, Ellen E

    2018-02-28

    Gastrointestinal transit time may be an important determinant of glucose homeostasis and metabolic health through effects on nutrient absorption and microbial composition, among other mechanisms. Modulation of gastrointestinal transit may be one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial health effects of dietary fibers. These effects include improved glucose homeostasis and a reduced risk of developing metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review, we first discuss the regulation of gastric emptying rate, small intestinal transit and colonic transit as well as their relation to glucose homeostasis and metabolic health. Subsequently, we briefly address the reported health effects of different dietary fibers and discuss to what extent the fiber-induced health benefits may be mediated through modulation of gastrointestinal transit.

  12. Radiographic diagnosis of mechanical obstruction in dogs based on relative small intestinal external diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Cyrielle; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Alexander, Kate; Specchi, Swan; Beauchamp, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical obstruction is a frequent cause of acute vomiting in dogs requiring prompt diagnosis to improve patient management and prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare small intestinal radiographic characteristics in dogs with versus without mechanical intestinal obstruction. Fifty dogs with gastrointestinal clinical signs and abdominal radiographs were recruited from hospital record archives and assigned to groups (group 1, obstructive, n = 25; group 2, nonobstructive n = 25). Abdominal radiographs were randomized and independently interpreted by three examiners who were unaware of group status. Intestinal dilation was subjectively scored based on distribution (segmental, regional or diffuse), and severity (absent, mild, moderate or severe). Small intestinal maximal diameter (SImax), L5 vertebral body height, small intestinal minimal diameter (SImin), and an estimated average of small intestinal diameters (SIave) were measured and three ratios were calculated: SImax/L5, SImax/SImin, and SImax/SIave. Segmental dilation was more prevalent in obstructed dogs for all examiners (P ≤ 0.03) and most nonobstructed dogs had no dilation (P ≤ 0.05). All ratios were higher in obstructed dogs (P dogs with SImax/L5 ≤ 1.4, SImax/SImin ≤ 2, and SImax/SIave ≤ 1.3 values are very unlikely to be mechanically obstructed; dogs with SImax/L5 ≥ 2.4, SImax/SImin ≥ 3.4 and SImax/SIave ≥ 1.9 are very likely obstructed, particularly if segmental dilation (less than 25% of the small intestine) is present. Dogs with ratios falling between these thresholds may need further testing unless other signs justify surgical exploration or endoscopy. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Intestinal barrier: A gentlemen's agreement between microbiota and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricilli, Andrea Moro; Castoldi, Angela; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2014-02-15

    Our body is colonized by more than a hundred trillion commensals, represented by viruses, bacteria and fungi. This complex interaction has shown that the microbiome system contributes to the host's adaptation to its environment, providing genes and functionality that give flexibility of diet and modulate the immune system in order not to reject these symbionts. In the intestine, specifically, the microbiota helps developing organ structures, participates of the metabolism of nutrients and induces immunity. Certain components of the microbiota have been shown to trigger inflammatory responses, whereas others, anti-inflammatory responses. The diversity and the composition of the microbiota, thus, play a key role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and explain partially the link between intestinal microbiota changes and gut-related disorders in humans. Tight junction proteins are key molecules for determination of the paracellular permeability. In the context of intestinal inflammatory diseases, the intestinal barrier is compromised, and decreased expression and differential distribution of tight junction proteins is observed. It is still unclear what is the nature of the luminal or mucosal factors that affect the tight junction proteins function, but the modulation of the immune cells found in the intestinal lamina propria is hypothesized as having a role in this modulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the interaction of the gut microbiota with the immune system in the development and maintenance of the intestinal barrier.

  14. Do intestinal hyperpermeability and the related food antigens play a role in the progression of IgA nephropathy? I. Study of intestinal permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovács, T.; Kun, L.; Schmelczer, M.; Wagner, L.; Davin, J. C.; Nagy, J.

    1996-01-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated by using 51Cr-EDTA as a probe molecule in 29 patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgA NP) and 20 healthy controls in 1990. Intestinal permeability was significantly higher in the IgA NP patients than in the controls (IgA NP, 3.86 +/- 0.29%; controls,

  15. CD40-signalling abrogates induction of ROR gamma t(+) Treg cells by intestinal CD103(+) DCs and causes fatal colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthels, Christian; Ogrinc, Ana; Steyer, Verena; Meier, Stefanie; Simon, Ferdinand; Wimmer, Maria; Blutke, Andreas; Straub, Tobias; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Lutgens, Esther; Marconi, Peggy; Ohnmacht, Caspar; Garzetti, Debora; Stecher, Bärbel; Brocker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in intestinal tissues depends on the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) acquire microbiota-derived material from the gut lumen for transport to draining lymph nodes and generation of receptor-related orphan gamma t(+) (ROR gamma t(+))

  16. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  17. Cinnamon extract regulates intestinal lipid metabolism related gene expression in primary enterocytes of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging evidence suggests that the small intestine is not a passive organ, but is actively involved in the regulation of lipid absorption, intracellular transport, and metabolism, and is closely linked to systemic lipoprotein metabolism. We have reported previously that the water-soluble components...

  18. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4 counts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidium species (P= 0.005), A. lumbricoides (P=0.035), hookworm and Taenia species (P=0.014) were associated with anaemia. Anaemia was associated with CD4 count while Cryptosporidium species, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Taenia species were the intestinal parasitic agents associated with ...

  19. Cross-Species Comparison of Genes Related to Nutrient Sensing Mechanisms Expressed along the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielen, N. van der; Avesaat, M. van; Wit, N.J.W. de; Vogels, J.T.W.E.; Troost, F.; Masclee, A.; Koopmans, S.J.; Meulen, J. van der; Boekschoten, M.V.; Muller, M.; Henk F. J. Hendriks1,6; Renger F. Witkamp2; Jocelijn Meijerink2

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intestinal chemosensory receptors and transporters are able to detect food-derived molecules and are involved in the modulation of gut hormone release. Gut hormones play an important role in the regulation of food intake and the control of gastrointestinal functioning. This mechanism

  20. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.

  1. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; MULDER, CJJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  2. Age-Related Variations in Intestinal Microflora of Free-Range and Caged Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yizhe; Wang, Qiuju; Liu, Shengjun; Sun, Rui; Zhou, Yaqiang; Li, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Free range feeding pattern puts the chicken in a mixture of growth materials and enteric bacteria excreted by nature, while it is typically unique condition materials and enteric bacteria in commercial caged hens production. Thus, the gastrointestinal microflora in two feeding patterns could be various. However, it remains poorly understood how feeding patterns affect development and composition of layer hens' intestinal microflora. In this study, the effect of feeding patterns on the bacteria community in layer hens' gut was investigated using free range and caged feeding form. Samples of whole small intestines and cecal digesta were collected from young hens (8-weeks) and mature laying hens (30-weeks). Based on analysis using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA gene amplicons, the microflora of all intestinal contents were affected by both feeding patterns and age of hens. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the main components. Additionally, uncultured environmental samples were found too. There were large differences between young hens and adult laying hens, the latter had more Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and bacterial community is more abundant in 30-weeks laying hens of all six phyla than 8-weeks young hens of only two phyla. In addition, the differences were also observed between free range and caged hens. Free range hens had richer Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Most of strains found were detected more abundant in small intestines than in cecum. Also the selected Lactic acid bacteria from hens gut were applied in feed and they had beneficial effects on growth performance and jejunal villus growth of young broilers. This study suggested that feeding patterns have an importance effect on the microflora composition of hens, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health.

  3. Age-Related Variations in Intestinal Microflora of Free-Range and Caged Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhe Cui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Free range feeding pattern puts the chicken in a mixture of growth materials and enteric bacteria excreted by nature, while it is typically unique condition materials and enteric bacteria in commercial caged hens production. Thus, the gastrointestinal microflora in two feeding patterns could be various. However, it remains poorly understood how feeding patterns affect development and composition of layer hens’ intestinal microflora. In this study, the effect of feeding patterns on the bacteria community in layer hens’ gut was investigated using free range and caged feeding form. Samples of whole small intestines and cecal digesta were collected from young hens (8-weeks and mature laying hens (30-weeks. Based on analysis using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA gene amplicons, the microflora of all intestinal contents were affected by both feeding patterns and age of hens. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the main components. Additionally, uncultured environmental samples were found too. There were large differences between young hens and adult laying hens, the latter had more Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and bacterial community is more abundant in 30-weeks laying hens of all six phyla than 8-weeks young hens of only two phyla. In addition, the differences were also observed between free range and caged hens. Free range hens had richer Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Most of strains found were detected more abundant in small intestines than in cecum. Also the selected Lactic acid bacteria from hens gut were applied in feed and they had beneficial effects on growth performance and jejunal villus growth of young broilers. This study suggested that feeding patterns have an importance effect on the microflora composition of hens, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health.

  4. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F.; Petersen, Anne H.

    2017-01-01

    , and prior CRBSI incidence. The prior CRBSI incidence in the study population was 2.4 episodes/1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days [95% Poisson confidence limits (CLs): 2.12, 2.71 episodes/1000 CVC days]. The maximum treatment period was 2 y or until occurrence of a CRBSI or right-censoring because......Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution.......02).Conclusions: In patients with intestinal failure who are life dependent on HPS, the taurolidine-citrate-heparin catheter lock demonstrates a clinically substantial and cost-beneficial reduction of CRBSI occurrence in a high-risk population compared with heparin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials...

  5. Reduced mucin sulfonation and impaired intestinal barrier function in the hyposulfataemic NaS1 null mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P A; Huxley, S; Gardiner, B; Tran, T; McAuley, J L; Grimmond, S; McGuckin, M A; Markovich, D

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an abundant component of intestinal mucins and its content is decreased in certain gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, the hyposulfataemic NaS1 sulfate transporter null (Nas1(-/-)) mice were used to investigate the physiological consequences of disturbed sulfate homeostasis on (1) intestinal sulfomucin content and mRNA expression; (2) intestinal permeability and proliferation; (3) dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis; and (4) intestinal barrier function against the bacterial pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. Intestinal sulfomucins and sialomucins were detected by high iron diamine staining, permeability was assessed by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran uptake, and proliferation was assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Nas1(-/-) and wild-type (Nas1(+/+)) mice received DSS in drinking water, and intestinal damage was assessed by histological, clinical and haematological measurements. Mice were orally inoculated with C jejuni, and intestinal and systemic infection was assessed. Ileal mRNA expression profiles of Nas1(-/-) and Nas1(+/+) mice were determined by cDNA microarrays and validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Nas1(-/-) mice exhibited reduced intestinal sulfomucin content, enhanced intestinal permeability and DSS-induced colitis, and developed systemic infections when challenged orally with C jejuni. The transcriptional profile of 41 genes was altered in Nas1(-/-) mice, with the most upregulated gene being pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 and the most downregulated gene being carbonic anhydrase 1 (Car1). Sulfate homeostasis is essential for maintaining a normal intestinal metabolic state, and hyposulfataemia leads to reduced intestinal sulfomucin content, enhanced susceptibility to toxin-induced colitis and impaired intestinal barrier to bacterial infection.

  6. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Is Related to Protein Signaling Involved in Glucose Homeostasis in a Tissue-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewan Parker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has been suggested to play a role in glucose metabolism. However, previous findings are contradictory and mechanistic pathways remain unclear. We examined the relationship between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD, insulin sensitivity, and insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Seventeen healthy adults (Body mass index: 26 ± 4; Age: 30 ± 12 years underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and resting skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies. In this cohort, the plasma 25(OHD concentration was not associated with insulin sensitivity (r = 0.19, p = 0.56. However, higher plasma 25(OHD concentrations correlated with lower phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 αSer21 and βSer9 in skeletal muscle (r = −0.66, p = 0.015 and r = −0.53, p = 0.06, respectively and higher GSK-3 αSer21 and βSer9 phosphorylation in adipose tissue (r = 0.82, p < 0.01 and r = 0.62, p = 0.042, respectively. Furthermore, higher plasma 25(OHD concentrations were associated with greater phosphorylation of both protein kinase-B (AktSer473 (r = 0.78, p < 0.001 and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1Ser312 (r = 0.71, p = 0.01 in adipose tissue. No associations were found between plasma 25(OHD concentration and IRS-1Tyr612 phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The divergent findings between muscle and adipose tissue with regard to the association between 25(OHD and insulin signaling proteins may suggest a tissue-specific interaction with varying effects on glucose homeostasis. Further research is required to elucidate the physiological relevance of 25(OHD in each tissue.

  7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to polydextrose and changes in bowel function (ID 784), changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract (ID 784), decreasing, potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 785) and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort (ID 784) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to polydextrose and changes in bowel function, changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract, decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort. The scientific substantiation...

  8. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Molecular aspects of intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Guizzardi, Solange; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2015-06-21

    Intestinal Ca(2+) absorption is a crucial physiological process for maintaining bone mineralization and Ca(2+) homeostasis. It occurs through the transcellular and paracellular pathways. The first route comprises 3 steps: the entrance of Ca(2+) across the brush border membranes (BBM) of enterocytes through epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV6, TRPV5, and Cav1.3; Ca(2+) movement from the BBM to the basolateral membranes by binding proteins with high Ca(2+) affinity (such as CB9k); and Ca(2+) extrusion into the blood. Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA1b) and sodium calcium exchanger (NCX1) are mainly involved in the exit of Ca(2+) from enterocytes. A novel molecule, the 4.1R protein, seems to be a partner of PMCA1b, since both molecules co-localize and interact. The paracellular pathway consists of Ca(2+) transport through transmembrane proteins of tight junction structures, such as claudins 2, 12, and 15. There is evidence of crosstalk between the transcellular and paracellular pathways in intestinal Ca(2+) transport. When intestinal oxidative stress is triggered, there is a decrease in the expression of several molecules of both pathways that inhibit intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Normalization of redox status in the intestine with drugs such as quercetin, ursodeoxycholic acid, or melatonin return intestinal Ca(2+) transport to control values. Calcitriol [1,25(OH)₂D₃] is the major controlling hormone of intestinal Ca(2+) transport. It increases the gene and protein expression of most of the molecules involved in both pathways. PTH, thyroid hormones, estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, and glucocorticoids apparently also regulate Ca(2+) transport by direct action, indirect mechanism mediated by the increase of renal 1,25(OH)₂D₃ production, or both. Different physiological conditions, such as growth, pregnancy, lactation, and aging, adjust intestinal Ca(2+) absorption according to Ca(2+) demands. Better knowledge of the molecular details of intestinal Ca(2

  10. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  12. Effect of yogurt containing deep sea water on health-related serum parameters and intestinal microbiota in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun Moon; Jhoo, Jin Woo; Pak, Jae In; Kwon, Ill Kyoung; Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Gur Yoo

    2015-09-01

    Deep sea water (DSW) has health benefits and is widely used as food supplement; however, its effect in fermented products has not been explored. Here, we investigated the effect of DSW-containing yogurt on health-related serum parameters and intestinal microbiota in mice. Animals were assigned to 3 feeding groups, which received water (control), normal yogurt (N-yogurt), or DSW-containing yogurt (DSW-yogurt) with a basal diet. Mice were killed at wk 4 or 8 of feeding and analyzed for serum parameters and microbial population in the small intestine. Both yogurt groups demonstrated increased populations of intestinal lactic acid bacteria compared with the control group. The activity of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase was markedly decreased in the DSW-yogurt and N-yogurt groups, and triglyceride level tended to be lower in the DSW-yogurt group compared with that in the control mice. Furthermore, the DSW-yogurt group showed a more significant decrease in the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol than did the N-yogurt group. These findings suggest that DSW supplementation of yogurt can increase its beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Persistent intestinal bleeding due to severe CMV-related thrombocytopenia in a preterm newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Alberto; Spaggiari, Eugenio; Cattelani, Chiara; Roversi, Maria Federica; Pecorari, Monica; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2018-05-01

    The optimal threshold for neonatal platelet transfusions in sick newborns is still uncertain. We report a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in a premature neonate with severe thrombocytopenia who subsequently presented with necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal bleeding. The baby recovered after platelet transfusions were discontinued and the therapy was switched from intravenous ganciclovir to oral valganciclovir. We discuss both measures, speculating on the key role of platelet transfusions.

  14. Sedentary lifestyle related exosomal release of Hotair from gluteal-femoral fat promotes intestinal cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiaozhao; Bai, Danna; Liu, Xiangwei; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Guodong

    2017-01-01

    Pioneering epidemiological work has established strong association of sedentary lifestyle and obesity with the risk of colorectal cancer, while the detailed underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that Hotair (HOX transcript antisense RNA) is a pro-adipogenic long non-coding RNA highly expressed in gluteal-femoral fat over other fat depots. Hotair knockout in adipose tissue results in gluteal-femoral fat defect. Squeeze of the gluteal-femoral fat induces intestinal proliferation in...

  15. Modulation of immune development and function by intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Srinivasan, Naren; Maloy, Kevin J

    2014-11-01

    The immune system must constantly monitor the gastrointestinal tract for the presence of pathogens while tolerating trillions of commensal microbiota. It is clear that intestinal microbiota actively modulate the immune system to maintain a mutually beneficial relation, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis are not fully understood. Recent advances have begun to shed light on the cellular and molecular factors involved, revealing that a range of microbiota derivatives can influence host immune functions by targeting various cell types, including intestinal epithelial cells, mononuclear phagocytes, innate lymphoid cells, and B and T lymphocytes. Here, we review these findings, highlighting open questions and important challenges to overcome in translating this knowledge into new therapies for intestinal and systemic immune disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma ghrelin level and plasma ghrelin/obestatin ratio are related to intestinal metaplasia in elderly patients with functional dyspepsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hwan Kim

    Full Text Available Whether plasma ghrelin/obestatin levels are associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, subtypes of functional dyspepsia (FD, and gastric mucosal histology has not yet been established in elderly patients.The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels are related to gastric mucosal histology, H. pylori infection, and FD subtypes in elderly patients with FD.Ninety-two patients diagnosed with FD and older than 60 years (median age 69.4; range 60-88 were included. Clinical symptoms investigated included postprandial fullness, epigastric pain, epigastric soreness, nausea, and vomiting. According to the Rome III criteria, patients diagnosed with FD were divided into two subtypes: epigastric pain syndrome (EPS and postprandial distress syndrome (PDS. Plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels were measured using enzyme immunoassay, and histological examination of gastric mucosa was performed. H. pylori infection was determined by histopathological examination of gastric mucosal biopsy and/or Campylobacter-like organism test.In our study, plasma ghrelin levels and plasma ghrelin/obestatin (G/O ratio were significantly lower in subjects with intestinal metaplasia compared with those without intestinal metaplasia (ghrelin, p = 0.010; G/O ratio, p = 0.012. On the other hand, there were no significant differences in plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative groups. (ghrelin, p = 0.130; obestatin, p = 0.888. Similarly, no significant differences were detected between the EPS and PDS groups (ghrelin, p = 0.238; obestatin, p = 0.710.Patients with intestinal metaplasia, a known precursor of gastric cancer, had significantly less plasma ghrelin levels and G/O ratio than those without intestinal metaplasia.

  17. The Commensal Microbiota Drives Immune Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Finlay, Barton Brett

    2012-01-01

    For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use t...

  18. The intestinal calcistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main physiological function of vitamin D is maintenance of calcium homeostasis by its effect on calcium absorption, and bone health in association with parathyroid gland. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD is defined as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD levels <20 ng/ml. Do all subjects with VDD have clinical disease according to this definition? We hypothesize that there exist an intestinal calcistat, which controls the calcium absorption independent of PTH levels. It consists of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR on intestinal brush border, which senses calcium in intestinal cells and vitamin D system in intestinal cells. CaSR dampens the generation of active vitamin D metabolite in intestinal cells and decrease active transcellular calcium transport. It also facilitates passive paracellular diffusion of calcium in intestine. This local adaptation adjusts the fractional calcium absorption according the body requirement. Failure of local adaptation due to decreased calcium intake, decreased supply of 25OHD, mutation in CaSR or vitamin D system decreases systemic calcium levels and systemic adaptations comes into the play. Systemic adaptations consist of rise in PTH and increase in active vitamin D metabolites. These adaptations lead to bone resorption and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Not all subjects with varying levels of VDD manifest with secondary hyperparathyroidism and decreased in bone mineral density. We suggest that rise in PTH is first indicator of VDD along with decrease in BMD depending on duration of VDD. Hence, subjects with any degree of VDD with normal PTH and BMD should not be labeled as vitamin D deficient. These subjects can be called subclinical VDD, and further studies are required to assess beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in this subset of population.

  19. Intestinal immune maturation is accompanied by temporal changes in the composition of the microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, G; De Vries-Reilingh, G; Wehrmaker, A M; Savelkoul, H F J; Parmentier, H K; Lammers, A

    2016-11-30

    In animals establishment of the intestinal microbial ecosystem is influenced by mucosal immune functions. As mucosal immune functions dynamically change during development of juvenile layer chicken, this study focused on dynamics in the ileal microbiota composition in relation to intestinal immune development. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum and amount of bacteria coated with IgA, a hallmark of intestinal immune maturation, were analysed. The composition of the intestinal microbiota transiently changed at the age of 14-42 days compared to the microbiota composition before and after this period. This temporal deviation in microbiota composition was associated to a temporal increase in transcriptional activity of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Furthermore, before week two limited amounts of faecal bacteria were bound by IgM and from week two increasing amounts of bacteria were bound by IgA, reaching a maximal level of 70% of IgA-coated bacteria at 6 weeks of age. These data could indicate that prior to achievement of intestinal homeostasis at 6-10 weeks post hatch, activation of inflammatory pathways cause a temporal disturbance of the microbiota composition. This period of imbalance may be essential for adequate immune development and establishment of intestinal homeostasis.

  20. Lamin-B in systemic inflammation, tissue homeostasis, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Gradual loss of tissue function (or homeostasis) is a natural process of aging and is believed to cause many age-associated diseases. In human epidemiology studies, the low-grade and chronic systemic inflammation in elderly has been correlated with the development of aging related pathologies. Although it is suspected that tissue decline is related to systemic inflammation, the cause and consequence of these aging phenomena are poorly understood. By studying the Drosophila fat body and gut, we have uncovered a mechanism by which lamin-B loss in the fat body upon aging induces age-associated systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation results in the repression of gut local immune response, which in turn leads to the over-proliferation and mis-differentiation of the intestinal stem cells, thereby resulting in gut hyperplasia. Here we discuss the implications and remaining questions in light of our published findings and new observations.

  1. Application of genomic densitometry for calculating the relative population of Escherichia Coli in the intestine of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Seidavi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the densitometry technique for calculating of the relative population of Escherichia coli in various segments of the intestine of broiler chicks was evaluated. Following preparation of the intestinal contents, the process of extraction and purification of DNA from the contents of duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum was undertaken. A specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR using two pairs of primers was employed to detect Escherichia coli and total bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tract of the chicks. Specific bands of E.coli were obtained using densitometry and Gel Proc Analyzer software based on linear regression with extrapolation. E.coli populations at different ages were also determined in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract of the chicks. The Results of this experiment indicated that 0.000004%, 0.07%, 0.64% and 2.51% of total bacteria present in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecum respectively consisted of E.coli. Also, E.coli constitutes 1.76, 0.01 and 0.80% of the total intestinal bacteria of chicks at 4, 14 and 30 days of age respectively. Furthermore, it was shown that at 4 days of age, 0.30, 2.05 and 3.97% of the total bacteria present in the jejunum, ileum and cecum respectively were from E.coli species and this bacteria was absent in the duodenum. At 14 days of age these figures were 0.000009%, 0.00011% and 0.08% respectively while at 30 days of age 0.00011%, 0.009% and 2.40% of all bacteria in the duodenum, ileum and cecum were E.coli species and this bacteria was absent in the jejunum. In conclusion, the densitometry method based on PCR results can be regarded as a useful tool for densitometry the relative population E.coli in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry.

  2. MDR1 is Related to Intestinal Epithelial Injury Induced by Acetylsalicylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munehiro Kugai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the cytotoxicity of aspirin against the intestinal epithelium is a major clinical problem, little is known about its pathogenesis. We assessed the involvement of Multi Drug Resistance (MDR 1 in intestinal epithelial cell injury caused by aspirin using MDR1 gene-transfected Caco2 cells. Methods: Caco2 cells were treated with various concentrations of aspirin for 24 h. After treatment of Caco2 cells with verapamil, a specific inhibitor of MDR1, we assessed the extent of cell injury using a WST-8 assay at 24 h after aspirin-stimulation. We performed the same procedure in MDR1 gene-transfected Caco2 cells. To determine the function of MDR1 in the metabolism of aspirin, flux study was performed using 14C-labeled aspirin. Results: The level of aspirin-induced cell injury was higher in verapamil-treated Caco2 cells than in control cells and was less serious in MDR1-transfected Caco2 cells than in control vector-transfected cells. The efflux of 14C-labeled aspirin was higher in verapamil-treated Caco2 cells than in control cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that aspirin effux occurs through the MDR1 transporter and that the MDR1 transporter is involved in the pathogenesis of aspirin-induced cell injury.

  3. Changes in Intestinal Gene Expression of Zebrafish (Danio rerio Related to Sterol Uptake and Excretion upon β-Sitosterol Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Takase

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of fishmeal with plant ingredients will introduce not only plant oil and protein but also phytosterol to the fish diet. Mammals strictly restrict the uptake of phytosterol at intestinal epithelial cells by regulating the gene expressions of sterol uptake and excretion proteins; however, phytosterol is found in the fish muscle and other organs. In order to assess the ability of phytosterol uptake by the intestinal epithelial cells of fish, no-sterol diet, cholesterol-, and β-sitosterol-containing diet was separately administered to zebrafish, and the relative mRNA expressions related to sterol uptake and excretion were evaluated. Gene expression of Niemann-Pick C1-like protein 1 in the sitosterol-fed group was significantly higher than that of the cholesterol-fed group (p < 0.05. The expression of apolipoprotein A-I gene was also higher in the sitosterol-fed group than that in the no-sterol and cholesterol-fed groups. The expressions of ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G, member 5 and 8, were significantly higher in the sitosterol-fed group, compared to the no-sterol group. Regarding the gene expression of ATP-binding cassette sub-family A, member 1, the sitosterol-fed group showed higher expression level compared to the other groups (p < 0.01. These results suggest that fish should be tolerant to phytosterols in contrast to mammals.

  4. The Role of Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth in Obesity-Related Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M. Ferolla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. It is a progressive disorder involving a spectrum of conditions that include pure steatosis without inflammation, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factor in the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistance that determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes, which may be followed by lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species and consequent inflammation. Recent studies suggest that the characteristics of the gut microbiota are altered in NAFLD, and also, that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO contributes to the pathogenesis of this condition. This review presents the chief findings from all the controlled studies that evaluated SIBO, gut permeability and endotoxemia in human NAFLD. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involving SIBO, lipid accumulation and development of NASH. The understanding of these mechanisms may allow the development of new targets for NASH treatment in the future.

  5. Commensal Bacteria and Epithelial Cross Talk in the Developing Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Rautava, Samuli; Walker, W. Allan

    2007-01-01

    Indigenous intestinal microbes have co-evolved with the intestinal immune system to form a symbiotic ecosystem. In the postnatal period, intestinal microbes provide the developing gut with stimuli that are necessary for healthy maturation of the intestinal immune system. Cross talk between the host and commensal microbes is an essential component of gut homeostasis mechanisms also in later life. During recent years, innovative research has shed light on the molecular mechanisms of these inter...

  6. Cytokine Dysregulation in MECP2- and CDKL5-Related Rett Syndrome: Relationships with Aberrant Redox Homeostasis, Inflammation, and ω-3 PUFAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Leoncini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An involvement of the immune system has been suggested in Rett syndrome (RTT, a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder related to oxidative stress, and caused by a mutation in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2 or, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5. To date, it is unclear whether both mutations may have an impact on the circulating cytokine patterns. In the present study, cytokines involved in the Th1-, Th2-, and T regulatory (T-reg response, as well as chemokines, were investigated in MECP2- (MECP2-RTT (n=16 and CDKL5-Rett syndrome (CDKL5-RTT (n=8, before and after ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs supplementation. A major cytokine dysregulation was evidenced in untreated RTT patients. In MECP2-RTT, a Th2-shifted balance was evidenced, whereas in CDKL5-RTT both Th1- and Th2-related cytokines (except for IL-4 were upregulated. In MECP2-RTT, decreased levels of IL-22 were observed, whereas increased IL-22 and T-reg cytokine levels were evidenced in CDKL5-RTT. Chemokines were unchanged. The cytokine dysregulation was proportional to clinical severity, inflammatory status, and redox imbalance. Omega-3 PUFAs partially counterbalanced cytokine changes, as well as aberrant redox homeostasis and the inflammatory status. RTT is associated with a subclinical immune dysregulation as the likely consequence of a defective inflammation regulatory signaling system.

  7. Recovery of immune competence following sublethal X irradiation of young and old mice: a model for studying age-related loss of immunologic homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, W.J.; Perkins, E.H.; Makinodan, T.

    1982-01-01

    Age-related alteration in lymphohematopoietic homeostasis was assessed kinetically by determining immunologic and stem-cell regenerating capacities of young (5-7 months), middle-aged (13 months), and old (23-24 months) C3H and C57BL/6 mice following their exposure to 500 R. Immunologic activities were based on the ability of spleen cells to respond to sheep erythrocytes, phytohemagglutinin, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Stem-cell activity was based on the ability of splenic and bone marrow cells to form colonies in vivo. Reflective of age-related homeostatic imbalance was alteration in the (a) time of recovery, (b) rate of regeneration, and (c) capacity of the regenerating system to overshoot the preirradition steady-state level. Most of the immunologic parameters showed a delay in the time of recovery in old mice. In contrast, the time of recovery of stem cells in old mice was equal to or faster than that in young mice. Furthermore, the magnitude of regeneration of stem cells was greater in old than young mice. These results suggest that recovery of immunologic activities in old mice is delayed partly because of the inability of their stem cells to rapidly generate immunocompetent progenies

  8. Long term running biphasically improves methylglyoxal-related metabolism, redox homeostasis and neurotrophic support within adult mouse brain cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falone

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and neurotrophic support decline seem to be crucially involved in brain aging. Emerging evidences indicate the pro-oxidant methylglyoxal (MG as a key player in the age-related dicarbonyl stress and molecular damage within the central nervous system. Although exercise promotes the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, habitual exercise may retard cellular aging and reduce the age-dependent cognitive decline through hormetic adaptations, yet molecular mechanisms underlying beneficial effects of exercise are still largely unclear. In particular, whereas adaptive responses induced by exercise initiated in youth have been broadly investigated, the effects of chronic and moderate exercise begun in adult age on biochemical hallmarks of very early senescence in mammal brains have not been extensively studied. This research investigated whether a long-term, forced and moderate running initiated in adult age may affect the interplay between the redox-related profile and the oxidative-/MG-dependent molecular damage patterns in CD1 female mice cortices; as well, we investigated possible exercise-induced effects on the activity of the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF-dependent pathway. Our findings suggested that after a transient imbalance in almost all parameters investigated, the lately-initiated exercise regimen strongly reduced molecular damage profiles in brains of adult mice, by enhancing activities of the main ROS- and MG-targeting scavenging systems, as well as by preserving the BDNF-dependent signaling through the transition from adult to middle age.

  9. Red pitaya juice supplementation ameliorates energy balance homeostasis by modulating obesity-related genes in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nurul Shazini; Ismail, Patimah; Rahmat, Asmah

    2016-07-26

    Red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) or known as buah naga merah in Malay belongs to the cactus family, Cactaceae. Red pitaya has been shown to give protection against liver damage and may reduce the stiffness of the heart. Besides, the beneficial effects of red pitaya against obesity have been reported; however, the mechanism of this protection is not clear. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated the red pitaya-targeted genes in obesity using high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome rat model. A total of four groups were tested: corn-starch (CS), corn-starch + red pitaya juice (CRP), high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) and high-carbohydrate, high-fat + red pitaya juice (HRP). The intervention with 5 % red pitaya juice was continued for 8 weeks after 8 weeks initiation of the diet. Retroperitoneal, epididymal and omental fat pads were collected and weighed. Plasma concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α were measured using commercial kits. Gene expression analysis was conducted using RNA extracted from liver samples. A total of eighty-four genes related to obesity were analyzed using PCR array. The rats fed HCHF-diet for 16 weeks increased body weight, developed excess abdominal fat deposition and down-regulated the expression level of IL-1α, IL-1r1, and Cntfr as compared to the control group. Supplementation of red pitaya juice for 8 weeks increased omental and epididymal fat but no change in retroperitoneal fat was observed. Red pitaya juice reversed the changes in energy balance homeostasis in liver tissues by regulation of the expression levels of Pomc and Insr. The increased protein expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in HCHF group and red pitaya treated rats confirmed the results of gene expression. Collectively, this study revealed the usefulness of this diet-induced rat model and the beneficial effects of red pitaya on energy balance homeostasis by modulating the anorectic, orexigenic and energy expenditure related

  10. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  11. Fructans of chicory: intestinal transport and fermentation of different chain lengths and relation to fructose and sorbitol malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1998-08-01

    Fructans (fructooligosaccharides and inulin) are of increasing interest to clinical nutritionists as functional food additives. The chemically closely related food carbohydrates fructose and sorbitol are implicated in functional bowel disease. Intestinal handling of these carbohydrates is incompletely understood. Intestinal absorption, transit, and fermentation (breath hydrogen and methane, venous acetate, blood glucose, and urine fructans) after ingestion of 10-30 g short- and long-chain fructans from chicory were studied by single-blind, crossover randomization in 10 healthy adults. Responses were compared with responses after ingestion of lactulose, fructose, and sorbitol. Breath hydrogen and venous acetate production increased in proportion to increasing fructan dose and were similar to responses to lactulose. The transit times of long-chain fructans were longer than those of short-chain fructans (75 compared with 30 min, Pmalabsorption than were breath-hydrogen curves (Pmalabsorption of 50 g fructose, resulting in significantly more symptoms than 20 g fructose (Pmalabsorption or abdominal distress. Abdominal symptoms after fructans increased with increasing dose and decreasing chain length. The overall gastrointestinal effects of short-chain fructans seem similar to those of lactulose. Fructans with different chain lengths may have different physiologic properties and further studies of fructans in disease states are warranted.

  12. Arabidopsis ZED1-related kinases mediate the temperature-sensitive intersection of immune response and growth homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhicai; Cui, Dayong; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Cheng; Xin, Wei; Li, Yuan; Liu, Na; Ren, Dongtao; Tang, Dingzhong; Hu, Yuxin

    2017-07-01

    Activation of the immune response in plants antagonizes growth and development in the absence of pathogens, and such an autoimmune phenotype is often suppressed by the elevation of ambient temperature. However, molecular regulation of the ambient temperature-sensitive intersection of immune response and growth is largely elusive. A genetic screen identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zed1-D, by its high temperature-dependent growth retardation. A combination of molecular, cytological and genetic approaches was used to investigate the molecular basis behind the temperature-sensitive growth and immune response in zed1-D. A dominant mutation in HOPZ-ETI-DEFICIENT 1 (ZED1) is responsible for a high temperature-dependent autoimmunity and growth retardation in zed1-D. The autoimmune phenotype in zed1-D is dependent on the HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1 (ZAR1). ZED1 and some ZED1-related kinases (ZRKs) are induced by elevated temperature and function cooperatively to suppress the immune response by modulating the transcription of SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1-1 CONSTITUTIVE 1 (SNC1) in the absence of pathogens. Our data reveal a previously unidentified role of ZRKs in the ambient temperature-sensitive immune response in the absence of pathogens, and thus reveals a possible molecular mechanism underlying the temperature-mediated intersection of immune response and growth in plants. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Non-excitatory electrical stimulation attenuates myocardial infarction via homeostasis of calcitonin gene-related peptide in myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Jia; Guo, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown protection of brain, retina, optic nerves and pancreatic β-cells but the effect on cardio-protection is still unknown. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in the pathology of injury and protection of myocardium but whether or not electrical stimulation modulates endogenous CGRP is not clear. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, without any treatment. (2) I/R group, animals were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion. (3) NES+I/R group, non-excitatory electrical stimulation (NES) was commenced from 15 min before coronary artery occlusion till the end of reperfusion. (4) I/R+CGRP8-37 group, animals were given with CGRP8-37 (an antagonist of CGRP receptor, 10(-7) mol/L, 0.3 ml, i.v.) at 5 min before reperfusion without any electrical stimulation. The hemodynamics and electrocardiogram were monitored and recorded. Infarct size and troponin I were examined and CGRP expression in the myocardium and serum was analyzed. It was found that the infarct size and TnI were significantly reduced in NES+I/R group, by 45% and 58% respectively, accompanied by an obvious fall back of CGRP in myocardium, compared to I/R group (all p0.05). It can be concluded that NES reduced the infarction size after acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, for which the underlying mechanism may be associated with modulation of endogenous CGRP in myocardium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How patients experience the surroundings in relation to patient participation: a qualitative study of inpatients with intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyssen GD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gunvor Dichmann Thyssen, Anne BeckDepartment of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkIntroduction: Patient participation is known to improve patients' motivation, compliance, treatment results, and satisfaction with the received care. It is well known that the physical environment is of great importance in supporting patient involvement. A systematic literature search has shown a lack of articles on the subject of “surroundings” in relation to patient participation, for all patient groups.Aim: We aimed to investigate how patients with intestinal failure experience their hospital surroundings in relation to patient participation.Methods: The study included eight patients admitted for at least 2 weeks at the Intestinal Failure Unit, H8, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. Included patients had a good level of consciousness with no confusion. The included patients participated in a semistructured interview. The interviews were analyzed using Malterud's principles of systematic text condensation.Results: The patients described that the surroundings enabled them to participate in their treatment and care. The surroundings made it possible for them and encouraged them to participate through: the possibility to seek and get information and the possibility to participate in daily activities. This led to a feeling of independence, reassurance, normality, control, responsibility, and confidence.Conclusion: The findings in this study indicate that the hospital surroundings are essential for the patients with respect to their ability to participate in their own care and treatment. The surroundings, in relation to patient participation, should be considered when planning and organizing nursing care. Further research is needed to increase the understanding of the surroundings in relation to patient participation - this research could, for eg, include the nurse's perspective

  15. Arabidopsis MYB-Related HHO2 Exerts a Regulatory Influence on a Subset of Root Traits and Genes Governing Phosphate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Vinay K; Satheesh, Viswanathan; Poling, Michael D; Raghothama, Kashchandra G; Jain, Ajay

    2016-06-01

    Phosphate (Pi), an essential macronutrient required for growth and development of plants, is often limiting in soils. Pi deficiency modulates the expression of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes including transcription factors (TFs). Here, we elucidated the role of the MYB-related TF HYPERSENSITIVITY TO LOW PHOSPHATE-ELICITED PRIMARY ROOT SHORTENING1 HOMOLOG2 (HHO2, At1g68670) in regulating Pi acquisition and signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana HHO2 was specifically and significantly induced in different tissues in response to Pi deprivation. Transgenic seedlings expressing 35S::GFP::HHO2 confirmed the localization of HHO2 to the nucleus. Knockout mutants of HHO2 showed significant reduction in number and length of first- and higher-order lateral roots and Pi content of different tissues compared with the wild-type irrespective of the Pi regime. In contrast, HHO2-overexpressing lines exhibited augmented lateral root development, enhanced Pi uptake rate and higher Pi content in leaf compared with the wild-type. Expression levels of PSR genes involved in Pi sensing and signaling in mutants and overexpressors were differentially regulated as compared with the wild-type. Attenuation in the expression of HHO2 in the phr1 mutant suggested a likely influence of PHR1 in HHO2-mediated regulation of a subset of traits governing Pi homeostasis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Intestinal microbiome is related to lifetime antibiotic use in Finnish pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Virta, Lauri J; Kekkonen, Riina A; Forslund, Kristoffer; Bork, Peer; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-01-26

    Early-life antibiotic use is associated with increased risk for metabolic and immunological diseases, and mouse studies indicate a causal role of the disrupted microbiome. However, little is known about the impacts of antibiotics on the developing microbiome of children. Here we use phylogenetics, metagenomics and individual antibiotic purchase records to show that macrolide use in 2-7 year-old Finnish children (N=142; sampled at two time points) is associated with a long-lasting shift in microbiota composition and metabolism. The shift includes depletion of Actinobacteria, increase in Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, decrease in bile-salt hydrolase and increase in macrolide resistance. Furthermore, macrolide use in early life is associated with increased risk of asthma and predisposes to antibiotic-associated weight gain. Overweight and asthmatic children have distinct microbiota compositions. Penicillins leave a weaker mark on the microbiota than macrolides. Our results support the idea that, without compromising clinical practice, the impact on the intestinal microbiota should be considered when prescribing antibiotics.

  17. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the obstruction along the intestines. Treatment Suction via nasogastric tube Fluids given by vein Surgery for strangulation Sometimes ... nose and placed in the stomach (called a nasogastric tube) or into the intestine. Suction is applied to ...

  18. Influence of fentanyl and morphine on intestinal circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of fentanyl and morphine on the intestinal circulation was evaluated in an isolated loop preparation in 37 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital intravenously. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mm Hg. A mixture of 86 Rb and 9-micron spheres labeled with 141 Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A strong correlation was found between the clearances of rubidium and microspheres (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001), suggesting that the shunting of 9-micron spheres through the intestines reflects the shunting of blood through nonnutritive vessels. Intravenous fentanyl decreased oxygen uptake (O 2 up), and vascular resistance (VR), and increased blood flow (BF), rubidium and microsphere clearances (Cl-Rb, Cl-Sph, respectively), and permeability--surface area product (PS) in a dose-related fashion. Intravenous morphine in a dose of 1 mg X kg-1 increased Cl-Rb (nutritive BF) without changes in total (nutritive and nonnutritive) BF. This increase in nutritive BF is probably related to morphine-induced histamine release. Morphine in a dose of 5 mg X kg-1 was accompanied by vasoconstriction that was completely abolished by alpha-adrenoceptor blockade. The data suggest that morphine-induced intestinal vasoconstriction is mediated via a release of epinephrine, apparently from the adrenal medulla. It is concluded that changes in the intestinal circulation during anesthesia with narcotics might play a certain role in the cardiovascular homeostasis during anesthesia and surgery. An increase in oxygen content in portal venous blood, resulting from a decrease in intestinal oxygen uptake, should facilitate hepatic oxygenation

  19. Influence of fentanyl and morphine on intestinal circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of fentanyl and morphine on the intestinal circulation was evaluated in an isolated loop preparation in 37 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital intravenously. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mm Hg. A mixture of /sup 86/Rb and 9-micron spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A strong correlation was found between the clearances of rubidium and microspheres (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001), suggesting that the shunting of 9-micron spheres through the intestines reflects the shunting of blood through nonnutritive vessels. Intravenous fentanyl decreased oxygen uptake (O/sub 2/up), and vascular resistance (VR), and increased blood flow (BF), rubidium and microsphere clearances (Cl-Rb, Cl-Sph, respectively), and permeability--surface area product (PS) in a dose-related fashion. Intravenous morphine in a dose of 1 mg X kg-1 increased Cl-Rb (nutritive BF) without changes in total (nutritive and nonnutritive) BF. This increase in nutritive BF is probably related to morphine-induced histamine release. Morphine in a dose of 5 mg X kg-1 was accompanied by vasoconstriction that was completely abolished by alpha-adrenoceptor blockade. The data suggest that morphine-induced intestinal vasoconstriction is mediated via a release of epinephrine, apparently from the adrenal medulla. It is concluded that changes in the intestinal circulation during anesthesia with narcotics might play a certain role in the cardiovascular homeostasis during anesthesia and surgery. An increase in oxygen content in portal venous blood, resulting from a decrease in intestinal oxygen uptake, should facilitate hepatic oxygenation.

  20. Intestinal Farnesoid X Receptor Controls Transintestinal Cholesterol Excretion in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan Freark; Schonewille, Marleen; Boesjes, Marije; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W.; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H.; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Boverhof, Renze; Wolters, Justina C.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; van Deursen, Jan M.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.; Moschetta, Antonio; Kremoser, Claus; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2017-01-01

    The role of the intestine in the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis increasingly is recognized. Fecal excretion of cholesterol is the last step in the atheroprotective reverse cholesterol transport pathway, to which biliary and transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE) contribute. The

  1. Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Peter A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert Jan; Cani, Patrice D.; Mercenier, Annick; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is

  2. Impact of matrine on inflammation related factors in rat intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Zhanwei; Liu, Ye; Ferreri, Miro; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Zhongjie; Mu, Xiang; Han, Bo

    2009-09-25

    Matrine (MT) is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for the treatment of inflammations like enteritis, hepatitis and atopic dermatitis. Aim of the study is to gain insight into the effects of MT on nitric oxide (NO) release, intracellular NO production, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) level in second generation rat intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (RIMECs). Moreover, the effects of MT on soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in these cells were evaluated. Isolated and identified RIMECs cultures were exposed to different concentrations of matrine, and changes in extra- and intracellular NO concentrations were measured in dependance of time by Griess reaction or DAF-FM diacetate. Obtained cell cultures were solitude treated with lypopolysaccharide (LPS) or combined with MT to observe impacts on sICAM-1, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration in culture supernatants by ELISA. Matrine dose-dependently increased the concentration of NO in culture supernatant of RIMECs. Exposure of MT resulted in a steady intracellular NO increase pattern under different concentrations with different values and has an increasing effect on eNOS concentration at a long time exposure. Additionally, matrine reduced the increasing effect of LPS on the production of IL-6, IL-8, and sICAM-1 in RIMECs. These results show that matrine may serve as a protective agent against tissue damage in inflammation by improving NO-dependent vasomotion and inhibiting inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS.

  3. Nanocarrier-mediated foliar zinc fertilization influences expression of metal homeostasis related genes in flag leaves and enhances gluten content in durum wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh Deshpande

    Full Text Available Wheat is the staple food for most of the world's population; however, it is a poor source of zinc. Foliar fertilization of zinc via zinc loaded chitosan nanocarriers (Zn-CNP post-anthesis has proved to be a promising approach for grain zinc enhancement in durum wheat as evidenced in our earlier study. However, the molecular mechanism of uptake of zinc via Zn-CNP remains unclear.Foliar application of Zn-CNP was performed at post anthesis stages in two durum wheat cultivars (MACS 3125 and UC1114, containing the Gpc-B1 gene, and expression levels of several metal-related genes were analyzed during early senescence. Zn-CNP application indeed caused changes in gene expression as revealed by qPCR data on representative genes involved in metal homeostasis, phloem transporters, and leaf senescence. Furthermore, zinc-regulated transporters and iron (Fe-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP family [ZIP1, ZIP7, ZIP15], CA (carbonic anhydrase, and DMAS (2'-deoxymugineic acid synthase in flag leaves exhibited significant correlation with zinc content in the seeds. The analysis of grain endosperm proteins showed enhancement of gamma gliadins while other gluten subunits decreased. Gene expression within ZIP family members varied with the type of cultivar mostly attributed to the Gpc-B1, concentration of external zinc ions as well as the type of tissue analyzed. Correlation analysis revealed the involvement of the selected genes in zinc enhancement.At the molecular level, uptake of zinc via Zn-CNP nanocarrier was comparable to the uptake of zinc via common zinc fertilizers i.e. ZnSO4.

  4. Nanocarrier-mediated foliar zinc fertilization influences expression of metal homeostasis related genes in flag leaves and enhances gluten content in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Paresh; Dapkekar, Ashwin; Oak, Manoj; Paknikar, Kishore; Rajwade, Jyutika

    2018-01-01

    Wheat is the staple food for most of the world's population; however, it is a poor source of zinc. Foliar fertilization of zinc via zinc loaded chitosan nanocarriers (Zn-CNP) post-anthesis has proved to be a promising approach for grain zinc enhancement in durum wheat as evidenced in our earlier study. However, the molecular mechanism of uptake of zinc via Zn-CNP remains unclear. Foliar application of Zn-CNP was performed at post anthesis stages in two durum wheat cultivars (MACS 3125 and UC1114, containing the Gpc-B1 gene), and expression levels of several metal-related genes were analyzed during early senescence. Zn-CNP application indeed caused changes in gene expression as revealed by qPCR data on representative genes involved in metal homeostasis, phloem transporters, and leaf senescence. Furthermore, zinc-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) family [ZIP1, ZIP7, ZIP15], CA (carbonic anhydrase), and DMAS (2'-deoxymugineic acid synthase) in flag leaves exhibited significant correlation with zinc content in the seeds. The analysis of grain endosperm proteins showed enhancement of gamma gliadins while other gluten subunits decreased. Gene expression within ZIP family members varied with the type of cultivar mostly attributed to the Gpc-B1, concentration of external zinc ions as well as the type of tissue analyzed. Correlation analysis revealed the involvement of the selected genes in zinc enhancement. At the molecular level, uptake of zinc via Zn-CNP nanocarrier was comparable to the uptake of zinc via common zinc fertilizers i.e. ZnSO4.

  5. Obesity induced by a pair-fed high fat sucrose diet: methylation and expression pattern of genes related to energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campión Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of some genes controlling energy homeostasis could be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms that may play a role in body weight regulation. Thus, it is known that various nutritional factors affect DNA methylation. In order to assess whether the macronutrient composition of the diet could be related to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and with obesity development, we investigated the effects on methylation and expression patterns of two pair-fed isocaloric diets in rats: control (rich in starch and HFS (rich in fat and sucrose. Results The pair-fed HFS diet induced higher weight gain and adiposity as compared to the controls as well as liver triglyceride accumulation and oxidative stress. Feeding the HFS diet impaired glucose tolerance and serum triglycerides and cholesterol. Liver glucokinase expression, a key glycolytic gene, remained unaltered, as well as the mRNA values of fatty acid synthase and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone 1 beta subcomplex, 6 (NDUFB6 in liver and visceral adipocytes, which regulate lipogenesis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, respectively. Liver expression of hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HADHB, a key gene of β-oxidation pathway, was higher in the HFS-fed animals. However, the methylation status of CpG islands in HADHB and glucokinase genes remained unchanged after feeding the HFS diet. Conclusions These results confirm that the distribution and type of macronutrients (starch vs. sucrose, and percent of fat influence obesity onset and the associated metabolic complications. HFS diets produce obesity independently of total energy intake, although apparently no epigenetic (DNA methylation changes accompanied the modifications observed in gene expression.

  6. Diversity and functions of intestinal mononuclear phagocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joeris, Thorsten; Müller-Luda, K; Agace, William Winston

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal lamina propria (LP) contains a diverse array of mononuclear phagocyte (MNP) subsets, including conventional dendritic cells (cDC), monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages (mφ) that collectively play an essential role in mucosal homeostasis, infection and inflammation. In the curr......The intestinal lamina propria (LP) contains a diverse array of mononuclear phagocyte (MNP) subsets, including conventional dendritic cells (cDC), monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages (mφ) that collectively play an essential role in mucosal homeostasis, infection and inflammation....... In the current review we discuss the function of intestinal cDC and monocyte-derived MNP, highlighting how these subsets play several non-redundant roles in the regulation of intestinal immune responses. While much remains to be learnt, recent findings also underline how the various populations of MNP adapt...

  7. The commensal microbiota drives immune homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use to keep our immune system healthy, as opposed to trying to correct the immune imbalances caused by dysbiosis, may prove to be a more astute and efficient way of treating immune-mediated disease.

  8. Mucosal Ecological Network of Epithelium and Immune Cells for Gut Homeostasis and Tissue Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2017-04-26

    The intestinal epithelial barrier includes columnar epithelial, Paneth, goblet, enteroendocrine, and tuft cells as well as other cell populations, all of which contribute properties essential for gastrointestinal homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa is covered by mucin, which contains antimicrobial peptides and secretory IgA and prevents luminal bacteria, fungi, and viruses from stimulating intestinal immune responses. Conversely, the transport of luminal microorganisms-mediated by M, dendritic, and goblet cells-into intestinal tissues facilitates the harmonization of active and quiescent mucosal immune responses. The bacterial population within gut-associated lymphoid tissues creates the intratissue cohabitations for harmonized mucosal immunity. Intermolecular and intercellular communication among epithelial, immune, and mesenchymal cells creates an environment conducive for epithelial regeneration and mucosal healing. This review summarizes the so-called intestinal mucosal ecological network-the complex but vital molecular and cellular interactions of epithelial mesenchymal cells, immune cells, and commensal microbiota that achieve intestinal homeostasis, regeneration, and healing.

  9. Branched-chain Amino Acids are Beneficial to Maintain Growth Performance and Intestinal Immune-related Function in Weaned Piglets Fed Protein Restricted Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As a novel approach for disease control and prevention, nutritional modulation of the intestinal health has been proved. However, It is still unknown whether branched-chain amino acid (BCAA is needed to maintain intestinal immune-related function. The objective of this study was to determine whether BCAA supplementation in protein restricted diet affects growth performance, intestinal barrier function and modulates post-weaning gut disorders. One hundred and eight weaned piglets (7.96±0.26 kg were randomly fed one of the three diets including a control diet (21% crude protein [CP], CON, a protein restricted diet (17% CP, PR and a BCAA diet (BCAA supplementation in the PR diet for 14 d. The growth performance, plasma amino acid concentrations, small intestinal morphology and intestinal immunoglobulins were tested. First, average daily gain (ADG (p0.05. The PR and BCAA treatments had a higher (p<0.05 plasma concentration of methionine and threonine than the CON treatment. The level of some essential and functional amino acids (such as arginine, phenylalanine, histidine, glutamine etc. in plasma of the PR group was lower (p<0.05 than that of the CON group. Compared with CON group, BCAA supplementation significantly increased BCAA concentrations (p<0.01 and decreased urea concentration (p<0.01 in pig plasma indicating that the efficiency of dietary nitrogen utilization was increased. Compared with CON group, the small intestine of piglets fed PR diet showed villous atrophy, increasing of intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs number (p<0.05 and declining of the immunoglobulin concentration, including jejunal immunoglobulin A (IgA (p = 0.04, secreted IgA (sIgA (p = 0.03 and immunoglobulin M (p = 0.08, and ileal IgA (p = 0.01 and immunoglobulin G (p = 0.08. The BCAA supplementation increased villous height in the duodenum (p<0.01, reversed the trend of an increasing IELs number. Notably, BCAA supplementation increased levels of jejunal and ileal

  10. Modulation of intestinal microbiota by the probiotic VSL#3 resets brain gene expression and ameliorates the age-related deficit in LTP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Distrutti

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is increasingly recognized as a complex signaling network that impacts on many systems beyond the enteric system modulating, among others, cognitive functions including learning, memory and decision-making processes. This has led to the concept of a microbiota-driven gut-brain axis, reflecting a bidirectional interaction between the central nervous system and the intestine. A deficit in synaptic plasticity is one of the many changes that occurs with age. Specifically, the archetypal model of plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP, is reduced in hippocampus of middle-aged and aged rats. Because the intestinal microbiota might change with age, we have investigated whether the age-related deficit in LTP might be attenuated by changing the composition of intestinal microbiota with VSL#3, a probiotic mixture comprising 8 Gram-positive bacterial strains. Here, we report that treatment of aged rats with VSL#3 induced a robust change in the composition of intestinal microbiota with an increase in the abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacterioidetes, which was reduced in control-treated aged rats. VSL#3 administration modulated the expression of a large group of genes in brain tissue as assessed by whole gene expression, with evidence of a change in genes that impact on inflammatory and neuronal plasticity processes. The age-related deficit in LTP was attenuated in VSL#3-treated aged rats and this was accompanied by a modest decrease in markers of microglial activation and an increase in expression of BDNF and synapsin. The data support the notion that intestinal microbiota can be manipulated to positively impact on neuronal function.

  11. The new functions of the gut in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithieux, Gilles

    2005-07-01

    It has become clear during the past few years that the intestine is more than a digestive tract. In addition to its role as a subtle endocrine organ, its participation in endogenous glucose production, a property so far believed to be restricted to the liver and kidney, has been emphasized. The role of the gut in the regulation of glucose homeostasis has received further experimental accreditation from both animal and human studies. In relation to the molecular mechanisms of control of glucose production the potential regulatory role of glutaminase and glycerokinase has been suggested from studies of fasting, and the transcription of the glucose-6 phosphatase gene has been specified in an intestinal context. Furthermore, two newly described metabolic pathways accounting for the transepithelial transport of glucose have received further support: from the intestinal lumen to inside the enterocyte, involving a translocation of the glucose transporter Glut2 to the apical membrane, and from inside the enterocyte into the blood, involving glucose 6-phosphatase and independent of Glut2. The new knowledge regarding the control of glucose, glutamine, and glycerol metabolisms in the small intestine should be of interest to those who care for diabetic or septic patients, or are involved in nutrition research in humans. They should also be of importance in the knowledge of inherited genetic deficiencies, such as glycogen storage disease type 1 (Von Gierke disease) and the Fanconi-Bickel and glucose-galactose malabsorption syndromes.

  12. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation: an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, Suzanna; Versloot, Christian J.; Voskuijl, Wieger; van Vliet, Sara J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Zhang, Ling; Richardson, Susan; Bourdon, Céline; Netea, Mihai G.; Berkley, James A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Bandsma, Robert Hj

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their associations with mortality in

  13. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation : an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, Suzanna; Versloot, Christian J.; Voskuijl, Wieger; van Vliet, Sara J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Zhang, Ling; Richardson, Susan; Bourdon, Celine; Netea, Mihai G.; Berkley, James A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Bandsma, Robert H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. Objective: We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their

  14. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation: an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, S.; Versloot, C.J.; Voskuijl, W.; Vliet, S.J. van; Giovanni, V. Di; Zhang, L.; Richardson, S.; Bourdon, C.; Netea, M.G.; Berkley, J.A.; Rheenen, P.F. van; Bandsma, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their

  15. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  16. Phosphorylation of p27(KIP1) homologs KRP6 and 7 by SNF1-related protein kinase-1 links plant energy homeostasis and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérinier, Thomas; Millan, Laurine; Crozet, Pierre; Oury, Céline; Rey, François; Valot, Benoit; Mathieu, Chantal; Vidal, Jean; Hodges, Michael; Thomas, Martine; Glab, Nathalie

    2013-08-01

    SNF1-related protein kinase-1 (SnRK1), the plant kinase homolog of mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is a sensor that maintains cellular energy homeostasis via control of anabolism/catabolism balance. AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of p27(KIP1) affects cell-cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. Here, we show that SnRK1 phosphorylates the Arabidopsis thaliana cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) homologs AtKRP6 and AtKRP7, thus extending the role of this kinase to regulation of cell-cycle progression. AtKRP6 and 7 were phosphorylated in vitro by a recombinant activated catalytic subunit of SnRK1 (AtSnRK1α1). Tandem mass spectrometry and site-specific mutagenesis identified Thr152 and Thr151 as the phosphorylated residues on AtKRP6- and AtKRP7, respectively. AtSnRK1 physically interacts with AtKRP6 in the nucleus of transformed BY-2 tobacco protoplasts, but, in contrast to mammals, the AtKRP6 Thr152 phosphorylation state alone did not modify its nuclear localization. Using a heterologous yeast system, consisting of a cdc28 yeast mutant complemented by A. thaliana CDKA;1, cell proliferation was shown to be abolished by AtKRP6(WT) and by the non-phosphorylatable form AtKRP6(T152A) , but not by the phosphorylation-mimetic form AtKRP6(T152D). Moreover, A. thaliana SnRK1α1/KRP6 double over-expressor plants showed an attenuated AtKRP6-associated phenotype (strongly serrated leaves and inability to undergo callogenesis). Furthermore, this severe phenotype was not observed in AtKRP6(T152D) over-expressor plants. Overall, these results establish that the energy sensor AtSnRK1 plays a cardinal role in the control of cell proliferation in A. thaliana plants through inhibition of AtKRP6 biological function by phosphorylation. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Impact of gain-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) on glucose and lipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foer, D; Zhu, M; Cardone, R L

    2017-01-01

    to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that individuals with an HBM-causing mutation in LRP5 would exhibit improved glucose and lipid homeostasis. Since studies in animal models have suggested that Wnt signaling augments insulin secretion, we also examined the effect of Wnt signaling......LRP5 loss-of-function mutations have been shown to cause profound osteoporosis and have been associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and dysregulated lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that gain-of-function mutations in LRP5 would also affect these parameters. We therefore studied individuals...... potentially represents a target for drug discovery in type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Studies in animal models suggest a physiologic link between LRP5 and glucose and lipid homeostasis; however, whether it plays a similar role in humans is unclear. As current literature links loss-of-function LRP5...

  18. [Steps for solutions and hindrances in progress in relation to an implantable bio-artificial hemofilter-intestine-hybrid kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstenberg, P W; Dörp, E; Schumann, L; Adam, U; Adam, H; Falkenhagen, D; Klinkmann, H

    1989-10-01

    On the view of 1989 older and modern developments to a bioartificial implantable hybrid kidney are presented. To the realization proof of the implantable hemofilter-intestine-hybrid kidney the routes were described in an experimental rat model to the plasmakinetic simulation of the urea and sodium level as a marker of the hybrid kidney functions. The results of the bioartificial hemofilter-intestine-hybrid kidney development are presented, but significant detail problems must be solved, especially the hemofilter biocompatibility problem.

  19. Mitochondrial protein Fus1/Tusc2 in premature aging and age-related pathologies: critical roles of calcium and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzhachenko, Roman; Boyd, Kelli; Olivares-Villagomez, Danyvid; Zhu, Yueming; Goodwin, J Shawn; Rana, Tanu; Shanker, Anil; Tan, Winston J T; Bondar, Tanya; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Ivanova, Alla V

    2017-03-26

    Decreased energy production and increased oxidative stress are considered to be major contributors to aging and aging-associated pathologies. The role of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis has also been highlighted as an important factor affecting different pathological conditions. Here, we present evidence that loss of a small mitochondrial protein Fus1 that maintains mitochondrial homeostasis results in premature aging, aging-associated pathologies, and decreased survival. We showed that Fus1KO mice develop multiple early aging signs including lordokyphosis, lack of vigor, inability to accumulate fat, reduced ability to tolerate stress, and premature death. Other prominent pathological changes included low sperm counts, compromised ability of adult stem cells to repopulate tissues, and chronic inflammation. At the molecular level, we demonstrated that mitochondria of Fus1 KO cells have low reserve respiratory capacity (the ability to produce extra energy during sudden energy demanding situations), and show significantly altered dynamics of cellular calcium response.Our recent studies on early hearing and memory loss in Fus1 KO mice combined with the new data presented here suggest that calcium and energy homeostasis controlled by Fus1 may be at the core of its aging-regulating activities. Thus, Fus1 protein and Fus1-dependent pathways and processes may represent new tools and targets for anti-aging strategies.

  20. Deregulation of intestinal anti-microbial defense by the dietary additive, maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Kourtney P; Chanin, Rachael; McDonald, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multi-factorial disease thought to arise from an inappropriate immune response to commensal bacteria in a genetically susceptible person that results in chronic, cyclical, intestinal inflammation. Dietary and environmental factors are implicated in the initiation and perpetuation of IBD; however, a singular causative agent has not been identified. As of now, the role of environmental priming or triggers in IBD onset and pathogenesis are not well understood, but these factors appear to synergize with other disease susceptibility factors. In previous work, we determined that the polysaccharide dietary additive, maltodextrin (MDX), impairs cellular anti-bacterial responses and suppresses intestinal anti-microbial defense mechanisms. In this addendum, we review potential mechanisms for dietary deregulation of intestinal homeostasis, postulate how dietary and genetic risk factors may combine to result in disease pathogenesis, and discuss these ideas in the context of recent findings related to dietary interventions for IBD.

  1. Environmental aspects related to tuberculosis and intestinal parasites in a low-income community of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Biatriz Araújo; Fonseca, Fabio de Oliveira; Moraes, Antonio Henrique Almeida de; Martins, Ana Caroline Guedes Souza; Oliveira, Nissa Vilhena da Silva; Lima, Luana Nepomuceno Gondim Costa; Dias, George Alberto da Silva; Saad, Maria Helena Féres

    2017-08-07

    We carried out a cross-sectional study from January to December 2015 on 1,425 inhabitants from a floating population in the Brazilian Amazon (Murinin district, Pará State) to describe the population-based prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) from 2011 to 2014, recent TB contacts (rCts) latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI) , the coverage of the local health network, socio-environmental factors, and frequency of intestinal parasitic infection (IPI). We found that the sanitary structure was inadequate, with latrines being shared with other rooms within the same accommodation; well water was the main source of water, and 48% of families had low incomes. The average rate of TB was 105/100, 000 inhabitants per year; one third of TB patients had been household contacts of infected individuals in the past, and 23% of rCts were LTBI. More than half (65%) of 44% of the stools examined (representing 76% of the housing) had IPIs; the highest prevalence was of fecal-oral transmitted protozoa (40%, Giardia intestinalis ), followed by soil-transmitted helminths (23%). TB transmission may be related to insufficient disease control of rCts, frequent relocation, and underreporting. Education, adopting hygienic habits, improving sanitation, provision of a treated water supply and efficient sewage system, further comprehensive epidemiological surveillance of those who enter and leave the community and resources for basic treatment of IPIs are crucial in combating the transmission of these neglected diseases.

  2. Environmental aspects related to tuberculosis and intestinal parasites in a low-income community of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biatriz Araújo Cardoso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We carried out a cross-sectional study from January to December 2015 on 1,425 inhabitants from a floating population in the Brazilian Amazon (Murinin district, Pará State to describe the population-based prevalence of tuberculosis (TB from 2011 to 2014, recent TB contacts (rCts latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI , the coverage of the local health network, socio-environmental factors, and frequency of intestinal parasitic infection (IPI. We found that the sanitary structure was inadequate, with latrines being shared with other rooms within the same accommodation; well water was the main source of water, and 48% of families had low incomes. The average rate of TB was 105/100, 000 inhabitants per year; one third of TB patients had been household contacts of infected individuals in the past, and 23% of rCts were LTBI. More than half (65% of 44% of the stools examined (representing 76% of the housing had IPIs; the highest prevalence was of fecal-oral transmitted protozoa (40%, Giardia intestinalis , followed by soil-transmitted helminths (23%. TB transmission may be related to insufficient disease control of rCts, frequent relocation, and underreporting. Education, adopting hygienic habits, improving sanitation, provision of a treated water supply and efficient sewage system, further comprehensive epidemiological surveillance of those who enter and leave the community and resources for basic treatment of IPIs are crucial in combating the transmission of these neglected diseases.

  3. The Human Intestinal Microbiome: A New Frontier of Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Masahira; Taylor, Todd D.

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the vast number and variety of microorganisms inhabiting the human intestine, emerging metagenomic technologies are extremely powerful. The intestinal microbes are taxonomically complex and constitute an ecologically dynamic community (microbiota) that has long been believed to possess a strong impact on human physiology. Furthermore, they are heavily involved in the maturation and proliferation of human intestinal cells, helping to maintain their homeostasis and can be causative o...

  4. Ballroom dancing with stem cells: placement and displacement in the intestinal crypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-03-06

    Intestinal homeostasis is dependent upon stem cells that reside in the intestinal crypt, although the identity and dynamics of this population are unclear. Ritsma et al. (2014) recently reported temporal live imaging of mouse intestinal stem cells and their progeny, providing insights into spatial dynamics underlying stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  6. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-03-28

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m 2 - the human body's largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases.

  7. Postprandial gallbladder emptying is related to intestinal motility at the time of meal ingestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oster-Jørgensen, E; Qvist, N; Pedersen, S A

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of meal-induced gallbladder emptying in healthy individuals are subject to wide variation. We hypothesized that some of the observed variation might relate to ingestion of the meal during different phases of the migrating motor complex (MMC). Recording of gastrointestinal...... pressure was combined with scintigraphic recording of bile kinetics during infusion of 99mTc-HIDA. The material consisted of 12 healthy men. Group 1 (n = 6) had a fat-rich meal in phase I, and group 2 (n = 6) had the meal in a phase II. With the end of the meal ingestion as zero, the following results...... emerged. The subjects in group 1 had a median (range) lag period before beginning of gallbladder emptying of 13.5 (9.0-22.5) min. In group 2 gallbladder emptying began during the meal ingestion in four subjects, and the median lag period was 0 min (minimum, -9.0; maximum, 13.5 (p = 0.02)). The median...

  8. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M.; Rupper, P.; Sarrieu, C.; Melucci, M.; Treossi, E.; Schwarz, A.; León, V.; Kraegeloh, A.; Flahaut, E.; Vázquez, E.; Palermo, V.; Wick, P.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml-1) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell

  9. Contrasting Ecological Processes and Functional Compositions Between Intestinal Bacterial Community in Healthy and Diseased Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinyong; Dai, Wenfang; Qiu, Qiongfen; Dong, Chunming; Zhang, Jinjie; Xiong, Jinbo

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal bacterial communities play a pivotal role in promoting host health; therefore, the disruption of intestinal bacterial homeostasis could result in disease. However, the effect of the occurrences of disease on intestinal bacterial community assembly remains unclear. To address this gap, we compared the multifaceted ecological differences in maintaining intestinal bacterial community assembly between healthy and diseased shrimps. The neutral model analysis shows that the relative importance of neutral processes decreases when disease occurs. This pattern is further corroborated by the ecosphere null model, revealing that the bacterial community assembly of diseased samples is dominated by stochastic processes. In addition, the occurrence of shrimp disease reduces the complexity and cooperative activities of species-to-species interactions. The keystone taxa affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria in healthy shrimp gut shift to Gammaproteobacteria species in diseased shrimp. Changes in intestinal bacterial communities significantly alter biological functions in shrimp. Within a given metabolic pathway, the pattern of enrichment or decrease between healthy and deceased shrimp is correlated with its functional effects. We propose that stressed shrimp are more prone to invasion by alien strains (evidenced by more stochastic assembly and higher migration rate in diseased shrimp), which, in turn, disrupts the cooperative activity among resident species. These findings greatly aid our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern shrimp intestinal community assembly between health statuses.

  10. Recent Advances in Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Laura R; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    The intestine is a dynamic organ with rapid stem cell division generating epithelial cells that mature and apoptose in 3-5 days. Rapid turnover maintains the epithelial barrier and homeostasis. Current insights on intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their regulation are discussed here. The Lgr5+ ISCs maintain intestinal homeostasis by dividing asymmetrically, but also divide symmetrically to extinguish or replace ISCs. Following radiation or mucosal injury, reserve BMI1+ ISCs as well as other crypt cells can de-differentiate into Lgr5+ ISCs. ISC niche cells, including Paneth, immune and myofibroblast cells secrete factors that regulate ISC proliferation. Finally, several studies indicate that the microbiome metabolites regulate ISC growth. ISC cells can be plastic and integrate a complexity of environmental/niche cues to trigger or suppress proliferation as needed.

  11. MR imaging of intestinal angioedema related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: Report of three cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Michael R; Mittal, Pardeep K; Miller, Frank H

    Angioedema is a condition in which an increase in vascular permeability leads to the swelling of body tissues. There are both hereditary and acquired forms of the disease, with the latter often associated with the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor medication. Involvement of the intestinal tract is a rare manifestation of angioedema, and can present with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. It is critical for radiologists to be aware of this entity, as they may have the only opportunity to make the diagnosis. We present three cases of intestinal angioedema diagnosed on MRI with discussion of the imaging findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of immune homeostasis by commensal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Littman, Dan R.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria form a resident community that has co-evolved with the mammalian host. In addition to playing important roles in digestion and harvesting energy, commensal bacteria are crucial for the proper functioning of mucosal immune defenses. Most of these functions have been attributed to the presence of large numbers of “innocuous” resident bacteria that dilute or occupy niches for intestinal pathogens or induce innate immune responses that sequester bacteria in the lumen, thus quenching excessive activation of the mucosal immune system. However it has recently become obvious that commensal bacteria are not simply beneficial bystanders, but are important modulators of intestinal immune homeostasis and that the composition of the microbiota is a major factor in pre-determining the type and robustness of mucosal immune responses. Here we review specific examples of individual members of the microbiota that modify innate and adaptive immune responses, and we focus on potential mechanisms by which such species-specific signals are generated and transmitted to the host immune system. PMID:21215684

  13. [Importance of taste in maintaining homeostasis and pathological impact of orosensory reflexes distraction in relation to sweet taste after non-caloric sweeteners consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirthová, Jana; Gál, Břetislav; Smilek, Pavel; Kostřica, Rom

    2014-01-01

    Taste signals and their reflexes have important signalling function in nature. They protect organism against toxic substances in food with help of taste aversion, they help to cope nutrition deficiencies through taste preferences, on the other hand, they act in many postprandial reflexes to maintain energy homeostasis. It is well-known that sweet taste is important oro-sensory stimulus for mammals. It acts as predictor of caloric food intake even before its entry into stomach and circulation. Taste and other oro-sensory signals from oral cavity affect not only the intake regulation, but also influence hormonal, neural and metabolic pathways to maintain homeostasis. The aim is to utilize effectively food energy and prevent energy instability of organism. Oro-sensory reflexes mediated by taste cells develop naturally from the first contact with sweet breast milk in infancy. It has been proven that the attenuation of reflexes due to the use of artificial sweeteners that don´t bring any caloric value to human body leads to hormonal and energetic dysregulation of organism and may contribute to metabolic syndrome.

  14. Intestinal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss Intestinal ischemia Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Intestinal Coccidia

    OpenAIRE

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycl...

  16. Lipo sarcoma in small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Iglesias, J.; Pineyro Gutierrez, A.; Taroco Medeiros, L.; Fein Kolodny, C.; Navarrete Pedocchi, H.

    1987-01-01

    A case is presented by primitive liposarcoma in small intestine , an extensive bibliographical review foreigner and national in this case. It detach the exceptional of the intestinal topography of the liposarcomas; and making stress in the relative value of the computerized tomography and ultrasonography in the diagnose of the small intestine tumors . As well as in the sarcomas of another topography, chemo and radiotherapy associated to the exeresis surgery, it can be of benefit [es

  17. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  18. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebeer, S.; Claes, I.J.; Tytgat, H.L.P.; Verhoeven, T.L.A.; Marien, E.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Keersmaecker, de S.C.; Vanderleyden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a

  19. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC{sup 1638N/+} Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Shay, Jerry W. [Department of Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC{sup 1638N/+} mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, or {sup 56}Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after {sup 28}Si, followed by {sup 56}Fe and {sup 12}C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after {sup 28}Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with {sup 28}Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  20. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC(1638N/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling; Shay, Jerry W; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2016-05-01

    There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Male and female APC(1638N/+) mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, (12)C, (28)Si, or (56)Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. The highest number of tumors was observed after (28)Si, followed by (56)Fe and (12)C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after (28)Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with (28)Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Energetic Heavy Ions for Intestinal Tumorigenesis Shows Male Preponderance and Radiation Type and Energy Dependence in APC1638N/+ Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steve J.; Thakor, Hemang; Fan, Ziling; Shay, Jerry W.; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There are uncertainties associated with the prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk from highly energetic heavy ion (HZE) radiation. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis induced after exposure to high linear energy transfer (high-LET) HZE radiation spanning a range of doses and LET in a CRC mouse model and compared the results with the effects of low-LET γ radiation. Methods and Materials: Male and female APC 1638N/+ mice (n=20 mice per group) were whole-body exposed to sham-radiation, γ rays, 12 C, 28 Si, or 56 Fe radiation. For the >1 Gy HZE dose, we used γ-ray equitoxic doses calculated using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) determined previously. The mice were euthanized 150 days after irradiation, and intestinal and colon tumor frequency was scored. Results: The highest number of tumors was observed after 28 Si, followed by 56 Fe and 12 C radiation, and tumorigenesis showed a male preponderance, especially after 28 Si. Analysis showed greater tumorigenesis per unit of radiation (per cGy) at lower doses, suggesting either radiation-induced elimination of target cells or tumorigenesis reaching a saturation point at higher doses. Calculation of RBE for intestinal and colon tumorigenesis showed the highest value with 28 Si, and lower doses showed greater RBE relative to higher doses. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that the RBE of heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colon tumorigenesis is related to ion energy, LET, gender, and peak RBE is observed at an LET of 69 keV/μm. Our study has implications for understanding risk to astronauts undertaking long duration space missions.

  2. The Prediction of the Relative Importance of CYP3A/P-glycoprotein to the Nonlinear Intestinal Absorption of Drugs by Advanced Compartmental Absorption and Transit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Junichi; Maeda, Kazuya; Bolger, Michael B; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal CYP3A and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decrease the intestinal absorption of substrate drugs. Since substrate specificity of CYP3A often overlaps that of P-gp, and estimation of their saturability in the intestine is difficult, dose-dependent F a F g (fraction of the administered drugs that reach the portal blood) of substrate drugs and the relative importance of CYP3A and P-gp have not been clarified in many cases. Thus, we tried to establish the universal methodology for predicting the in vivo absorption of several CYP3A and/or P-gp substrates from in vitro assays. One of the key points is to set up the scaling factor (SF), correcting the difference between the observed in vivo clearance and the predicted clearance from in vitro data. The SFs of V max for CYP3A (SF CYP3A ) and P-gp (SF P-gp ) were simultaneously optimized to explain the F a F g of CYP3A and/or P-gp substrate drugs. The best predictability of F a F g was achieved when considering both SF CYP3A and SF P-gp The simulation also clarified the relative importance of CYP3A and P-gp in determining F a F g In particular, the nonlinear intestinal absorption of verapamil was caused by the saturation of intestinal CYP3A, whereas that of quinidine was governed by the saturation of both CYP3A and P-gp. In addition, the dose-dependent F a F g of selective and dual CYP3A and/or P-gp substrates was well predicted. We therefore propose a methodology for predicting the F a F g of drugs using a mathematical model with optimized SF CYP3A and SF P-gp Our methodology is applicable to in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of intestinal absorption, even if absolute in vivo functions of enzymes/transporters are unclear. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Expression and distribution patterns of Mas-related gene receptor subtypes A-H in the mouse intestine: inflammation-induced changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Leela Rani; Buckinx, Roeland; Favoreel, Herman; Cox, Eric; Adriaensen, Dirk; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors constitute a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors that are implicated in nociception, and are as such considered potential targets for pain therapies. Furthermore, some Mrgs have been suggested to play roles in the regulation of inflammatory responses to non-immunological activation of mast cells and in mast cell-neuron communication. Except for MrgD, E and F, whose changed expression has been revealed during inflammation in the mouse intestine in our earlier studies, information concerning the remaining cloned mouse Mrg subtypes in the gastrointestinal tract during (patho) physiological conditions is lacking. Therefore, the present study aimed at identifying the presence and putative function of these remaining cloned Mrg subtypes (n = 19) in the (inflamed) mouse intestine. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, quantitative-PCR and multiple immunofluorescence staining with commercial and newly custom-developed antibodies, we compared the ileum and the related dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of non-inflamed mice with those of two models of intestinal inflammation, i.e., intestinal schistosomiasis and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced ileitis. In the non-inflamed ileum and DRG, the majority of the Mrg subtypes examined were sparsely expressed, showing a neuron-specific expression pattern. However, significant changes in the expression patterns of multiple Mrg subtypes were observed in the inflamed ileum; for instance, MrgA4, MrgB2and MrgB8 were expressed in a clearly increased number of enteric sensory neurons and in nerve fibers in the lamina propria, while de novo expression of MrgB10 was observed in enteric sensory neurons and in newly recruited mucosal mast cells (MMCs). The MrgB10 expressing MMCs were found to be in close contact with nerve fibers in the lamina propria. This is the first report on the expression of all cloned Mrg receptor subtypes in the (inflamed) mouse intestine. The observed changes in the expression and

  4. Background Intestinal 18F-FDG Uptake Is Related to Serum Lipid Profile and Obesity in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Jeon Yoon

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationships between background intestinal uptake on 18F-FDG PET and cardio-metabolic risk (CMR factors.A total of 326 female patients that underwent 18F-FDG PET to determine the initial stage of breast cancer were enrolled. None of the patients had history of diabetes or hypertension. The background intestinal uptake on PET was visually graded (low vs. high uptake group and quantitatively measured using the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax. SUVmax of 7 bowel segments (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, hepatic flexure, splenic flexure, and descending colon-sigmoid junction were averaged for the total bowel (TB SUVmax. Age, body mass index (BMI, fasting blood glucose level (BST, triglyceride (TG, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, and low density lipoprotein (LDL were the considered CMR factors. The relationships between background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake on PET and diverse CMR factors were analyzed.The visual grades based on background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake classified 100 (30.7% patients into the low uptake group, while 226 (69.3% were classified into the high uptake group. Among CMR factors, age (p = 0.004, BMI (p<0.001, and TG (p<0.001 were significantly different according to visual grade of background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake. Quantitative TB SUVmax showed significant positive correlation with age (r = 0.203, p<0.001, BMI (r = 0.373, p<0.001, TG (r = 0.338, p<0.001, cholesterol (r = 0.148, p = 0.008, and LDL (r = 0.143, p = 0.024 and significant negative correlation with HDL (r = -0.147, p = 0.022. Multivariate analysis indicated that BMI and TG were independent factors in both visually graded background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake (p = 0.027 and p = 0.023, respectively and quantitatively measured TB SUVmax (p = 0.006 and p = 0.004, respectively.Increased background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake on PET may suggest alteration of lipid metabolism and risk of cardio-metabolic disease in non

  5. Interactions between the intestinal microbiome and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, Bernd; Brenner, David A

    2014-05-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse community of microbes that promote metabolism and digestion in their symbiotic relationship with the host. Disturbance of its homeostasis can result in disease. We review factors that disrupt intestinal homeostasis and contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and cirrhosis. Liver disease has long been associated with qualitative and quantitative (overgrowth) dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota. Extrinsic factors, such as the Western diet and alcohol, contribute to these changes. Dysbiosis results in intestinal inflammation, a breakdown of the intestinal barrier, and translocation of microbial products in animal models. However, the contribution of the intestinal microbiome to liver disease goes beyond simple translocation of bacterial products that promote hepatic injury and inflammation. Microbial metabolites produced in a dysbiotic intestinal environment and host factors are equally important in the pathogenesis of liver disease. We review how the combination of liver insult and disruptions in intestinal homeostasis contribute to liver disease. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  7. Extra-intestinal calcium handling contributes to normal serum calcium levels when intestinal calcium absorption is suboptimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieben, Liesbet; Verlinden, Lieve; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Torrekens, Sophie; Moermans, Karen; Schoonjans, Luc; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-12-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, is a crucial regulator of calcium homeostasis, especially through stimulation of intestinal calcium transport. Lack of intestinal vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling does however not result in hypocalcemia, because the increased 1,25(OH)2D levels stimulate calcium handling in extra-intestinal tissues. Systemic VDR deficiency, on the other hand, results in hypocalcemia because calcium handling is impaired not only in the intestine, but also in kidney and bone. It remains however unclear whether low intestinal VDR activity, as observed during aging, is sufficient for intestinal calcium transport and for mineral and bone homeostasis. To this end, we generated mice that expressed the Vdr exclusively in the gut, but at reduced levels. We found that ~15% of intestinal VDR expression greatly prevented the Vdr null phenotype in young-adult mice, including the severe hypocalcemia. Serum calcium levels were, however, in the low-normal range, which may be due to the suboptimal intestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium loss, insufficient increase in bone resorption and normal calcium incorporation in the bone matrix. In conclusion, our results indicate that low intestinal VDR levels improve intestinal calcium absorption compared to Vdr null mice, but also show that 1,25(OH)2D-mediated fine-tuning of renal calcium reabsorption and bone mineralization and resorption is required to maintain fully normal serum calcium levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dimethyloxalylglycine preserves the intestinal microvasculature and protects against intestinal injury in a neonatal mouse NEC model: role of VEGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Rakhee M; Yan, Xiaocai; Managlia, Elizabeth; Liu, Shirley X L; Marek, Catherine; Tan, Xiao-Di; De Plaen, Isabelle G

    2018-02-01

    BackgroundNecrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating neonatal disease characterized by intestinal necrosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has a critical role in cellular oxygen homeostasis. Here, we hypothesized that prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibition, which stabilizes HIF-1α, protects against NEC by promoting intestinal endothelial cell proliferation and improving intestinal microvascular integrity via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.MethodsTo assess the role of PHD inhibition in a neonatal mouse NEC model, we administered dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) or vehicle to pups before or during the NEC protocol, and determined mortality and incidence of severe intestinal injury. We assessed intestinal VEGF by western blot analysis and quantified endothelial cell and epithelial cell proliferation following immunofluorescence.ResultsDMOG decreased mortality and incidence of severe NEC, increased intestinal VEGF expression, and increased intestinal villus endothelial and epithelial cell proliferation in experimental NEC. Inhibiting VEGFR2 signaling eliminated DMOG's protective effect on intestinal injury severity, survival, and endothelial cell proliferation while sparing DMOG's protective effect on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.ConclusionDMOG upregulates intestinal VEGF, promotes endothelial cell proliferation, and protects against intestinal injury and mortality in experimental NEC in a VEGFR2 dependent manner. DMOG's protective effect on the neonatal intestinal mucosa may be mediated via VEGFR2 dependent improvement of the intestinal microvasculature.

  9. A Formal Explication of the Concept of Family Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Shlomo; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents three articles discussing the concept of family homeostasis and the related concepts of family rules and family feedback. Includes a reply by Paul Dell citing the need for family therapy to go beyond homeostasis and further comments by Ariel, Carel, and Tyano. (JAC)

  10. Chemometric evaluation for the relation of BCR sequential extraction method and in vitro gastro-intestinal method for the assessment of metal bioavailability in contaminated soils in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadaş, Cennet; Kara, Derya

    2012-05-01

    A chemometric evaluation has been done to classify metal ions in soils and to determine whether or not the gastric and intestinal phases of a physiologically based extraction test bear any relation to any of the phases of the four-stage Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extraction protocol. Nine trace analytes (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined in extracts obtained from the BCR sequential extraction procedure as well as from in vitro gastro-intestinal experiments. The results showed that high As, Pb, Zn and Cd concentrations were found in these soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis were used as classification techniques. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was applied to the data set to determine how the bioaccessibility of a metal is linked to the operationally defined fractions of metal speciation in soil. This analysis showed that the metal concentrations in the intestinal and gastric extracts are mainly dependent on the concentrations found in BCR phases 1 and 2 for each metal ion except for Cr, which was mainly dependent on the concentrations found in BCR phase 3. From the chemometric technique of correlation analysis, it was concluded that the metals extracted using BCR phases 1 and 2 are more likely to be bioaccessible, i.e. are also extracted by gastric and intestinal digestion solutions. When the correlation and PCA results were interpreted together, it indicated that the bioaccessiblity of Zn, Pb, Mn and Cd were higher than As, Ba, Cr, Ni and Cu for these soils.

  11. Somatostatin, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive intramural nerve structures of the human large intestine affected by carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kaleczyc

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the arrangement and chemical coding of enteric nerve structures in the human large intestine affected by cancer. Tissue samples comprising all layers of the intestinal wall were collected during surgery form both morphologically unchanged and pathologically altered segments of the intestine (n=15, and fixed by immersion in buffered paraformaldehyde solution. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5 and their chemical coding using antibodies against somatostatin (SOM, substance P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP. The microscopic observations revealed distinct morphological differences in the enteric nerve system structure between the region adjacent to the cancer invaded area and the intact part of the intestine. In general, infiltration of the cancer tissue resulted in the gradual (depending on the grade of invasion first decomposition and reduction to final partial or complete destruction and absence of the neuronal elements. A comparative analysis of immunohistochemically labeled sections (from the unchanged and pathologically altered areas revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of CGRP-positive neurons and nerve fibres in both submucous and myenteric plexuses in the transitional zone between morphologically unchanged and cancer-invaded areas. In this zone, a decrease was also observed in the density of SP-positive nerve fibres in all intramural plexuses. Conversely, the investigations demonstrated statistically insignificant differences in number of SP- and SOM-positive neurons and a similar density of SOM-positive nerve fibres in the plexuses of the intact and pathologically changed areas. The differentiation between the potential adaptive changes in ENS or destruction of its elements by cancer invasion should be

  12. Gut Microbiota Richness and Composition and Dietary Intake of Overweight Pregnant Women Are Related to Serum Zonulin Concentration, a Marker for Intestinal Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkala, Kati; Röytiö, Henna; Munukka, Eveliina; Pietilä, Sami; Ekblad, Ulla; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Eerola, Erkki; Laiho, Asta; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2016-09-01

    Increased intestinal permeability may precede adverse metabolic conditions. The extent to which the composition of the gut microbiota and diet contribute to intestinal permeability during pregnancy is unknown. The aim was to investigate whether the gut microbiota and diet differ according to serum zonulin concentration, a marker of intestinal permeability, in overweight pregnant women. This cross-sectional study included 100 overweight women [mean age: 29 y; median body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 30] in early pregnancy (zonulin (primary outcome) was determined by using ELISA, gut microbiota by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, and dietary intake of macro- and micronutrients from 3-d food diaries. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for pairwise comparisons and linear regression and Spearman's nonparametric correlations for relations between serum zonulin and other outcome variables. Women were divided into "low" (zonulin groups on the basis of the median concentration of zonulin (46.4 ng/mL). The richness of the gut microbiota (Chao 1, observed species and phylogenetic diversity) was higher in the low zonulin group than in the high zonulin group (P = 0.01). The abundances of Bacteroidaceae and Veillonellaceae, Bacteroides and Blautia, and Blautia sp. were lower and of Faecalibacterium and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii higher (P zonulin group than in the high zonulin group. Dietary quantitative intakes of n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), fiber, and a range of vitamins and minerals were higher (P zonulin group than those in the high zonulin group. The richness and composition of the gut microbiota and the intake of n-3 PUFAs, fiber, and a range of vitamins and minerals in overweight pregnant women are associated with serum zonulin concentration. Modification of the gut microbiota and diet may beneficially affect intestinal permeability, leading to improved metabolic health of both the mother and fetus. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  13. RELATION BETWEEN GLUCOLIPID PROFILE AND SMALL INTESTINE HISTOLOGICAL PATTERNS IN DIABETIC RATS EXPOSED TO AN INTERMITTENT DIETARY RESTRICTION

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    Noriyuki Hisano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of an intermittent and prolonged dietary restriction on biochemical variables and histological small intestinal patterns in 12-month-old male eSMT rats are examined. These spontaneously diabetic animals were separated in two groups after weaning: 10 rats fed ad libitum with standard rat chow and 10 rats fed a restricted diet by deprivation of the same food for 24 hours every 72. At 12 months of age, animals were weighed and euthanized after tail vein bleeding for plasma analysis (glycemia- both fasting and 120 minutes after an oral glucose challenge-, triglyceridemia and total cholesterolemia. Small intestines were removed, weighed and measured in length.Intestinal specimens were fixed, embedded in paraffin, semi serially cut at 6 µm and stained with PAS-Hematoxilyn and Hematoxilyn-Eosin. Histometry was performed through a linear devise attached to ocular lens and lectin histochemistry was accomplished employing Canavalis ensiformis, Dolichos biflorus, Arachis hypogea, Ulex europaeus-I, Triticum vulgaris, Ricinus communis and Soy Bean (Glicine Max Agglutinin. Essentially, eSMT rats, a suitable animal model for studying diabetes and/or its complications, revealed at 12 months of age after undergoing the dietary restriction: 1.- An expected improvement in body weight and determined biochemical variables (fasting and after glucose overload glycemias, triglyceridemia and total cholesterolemia without reaching euglycemic values. 2.- Changes in most of the analyzed histometric patterns with no relevant reflection on morphometric ones, and 3.- No modifications in lectinhistochemical patterns.

  14. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

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    Per eSodersten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic orexigen excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality.

  15. Ageing and water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens; Jacob, Giris; Ketch, Terry; Shannon, John R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2002-01-01

    This review outlines current knowledge concerning fluid intake and volume homeostasis in ageing. The physiology of vasopressin is summarized. Studies have been carried out to determine orthostatic changes in plasma volume and to assess the effect of water ingestion in normal subjects, elderly subjects, and patients with dysautonomias. About 14% of plasma volume shifts out of the vasculature within 30 minutes of upright posture. Oral ingestion of water raises blood pressure in individuals with impaired autonomic reflexes and is an important source of noise in blood pressure trials in the elderly. On the average, oral ingestion of 16 ounces (473ml) of water raises blood pressure 11 mmHg in elderly normal subjects. In patients with autonomic impairment, such as multiple system atrophy, strikingly exaggerated pressor effects of water have been seen with blood pressure elevations greater than 75 mmHg not at all uncommon. Ingestion of water is a major determinant of blood pressure in the elderly population. Volume homeostasis is importantly affected by posture and large changes in plasma volume may occur within 30 minutes when upright posture is assumed.

  16. The transcriptional repressor HIC1 regulates intestinal immune homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burrows, K.; Antignano, F.; Bramhall, M.; Chenery, A.; Scheer, S.; Kořínek, Vladimír; Underhill, T. M.; Zaph, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2017), s. 1518-1528 ISSN 1933-0219 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cd4(+) t-cells * anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal-antibody * cd103(+) dendritic cells * acid receptor-alpha * retinoic acid * t(h)17 cells * target genes * double-blind * tgf-beta * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 7.478, year: 2016

  17. Focal adhesion kinase is required for intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis downstream of Wnt/c-Myc signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sears, Rosalie C.; Clarke, Alan R.; Frame, Margaret C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration

  18. Insig proteins mediate feedback inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Matthew R; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J

    2014-01-24

    Enterocytes are the only cell type that must balance the de novo synthesis and absorption of cholesterol, although the coordinate regulation of these processes is not well understood. Our previous studies demonstrated that enterocytes respond to the pharmacological blockade of cholesterol absorption by ramping up de novo sterol synthesis through activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2). Here, we genetically disrupt both Insig1 and Insig2 in the intestine, two closely related proteins that are required for the feedback inhibition of SREBP and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR). This double knock-out was achieved by generating mice with an intestine-specific deletion of Insig1 using Villin-Cre in combination with a germ line deletion of Insig2. Deficiency of both Insigs in enterocytes resulted in constitutive activation of SREBP and HMGR, leading to an 11-fold increase in sterol synthesis in the small intestine and producing lipidosis of the intestinal crypts. The intestine-derived cholesterol accumulated in plasma and liver, leading to secondary feedback inhibition of hepatic SREBP2 activity. Pharmacological blockade of cholesterol absorption was unable to further induce the already elevated activities of SREBP-2 or HMGR in Insig-deficient enterocytes. These studies confirm the essential role of Insig proteins in the sterol homeostasis of enterocytes.

  19. Intestinal microbiota pathogenesis and fecal microbiota transplantation for inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Kai; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Chen, Ye; Yuan, Jing; Sun, Gang; Peng, Li-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The pathogenesis of IBD involves inappropriate ongoing activation of the mucosal immune system driven by abnormal intestinal microbiota in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there are still no definitive microbial pathogens linked to the onset of IBD. The composition and function of the intestinal microbiota and their metabolites are indeed disturbed in IBD patients. The special alterations of gut microbiota associated with IBD remain to be evaluated. The microbial interactions and host-microbe immune interactions are still not clarified. Limitations of present probiotic products in IBD are mainly due to modest clinical efficacy, few available strains and no standardized administration. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may restore intestinal microbial homeostasis, and preliminary data have shown the clinical efficacy of FMT on refractory IBD or IBD combined with Clostridium difficile infection. Additionally, synthetic microbiota transplantation with the defined composition of fecal microbiota is also a promising therapeutic approach for IBD. However, FMT-related barriers, including the mechanism of restoring gut microbiota, standardized donor screening, fecal material preparation and administration, and long-term safety should be resolved. The role of intestinal microbiota and FMT in IBD should be further investigated by metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses combined with germ-free/human flora-associated animals and chemostat gut models. PMID:25356041

  20. Inflammasome in Intestinal Inflammation and Cancer

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    Tiago Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of specific cytosolic pathogen recognition receptors, the nucleotide-binding-oligomerization-domain- (NOD- like receptors (NLRs, leads to the assembly of the inflammasome, a multimeric complex platform that activates caspase-1. The caspase-1 pathway leads to the upregulation of important cytokines from the interleukin (IL-1 family, IL-1β, and IL-18, with subsequent activation of the innate immune response. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure, the mechanisms behind the inflammasome activation, and its possible role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal cancer. Here, we show that the available data points towards the importance of the inflammasome in the innate intestinal immune response, being the complex involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, correct intestinal barrier function and efficient elimination of invading pathogens.

  1. The intestinal microenvironment in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Katherine T; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2017-10-01

    The gastrointestinal tract has long been hypothesized to function as "the motor" of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The gastrointestinal microenvironment is comprised of a single cell layer epithelia, a local immune system, and the microbiome. These three components of the intestine together play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis during times of health. However, the gastrointestinal microenvironment is perturbed during sepsis, resulting in pathologic changes that drive both local and distant injury. In this review, we seek to characterize the relationship between the epithelium, gastrointestinal lymphocytes, and commensal bacteria during basal and pathologic conditions and how the intestinal microenvironment may be targeted for therapeutic gain in septic patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Functions of innate immune cells and commensal bacteria in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal immune system remains unresponsive to beneficial microbes and dietary antigens while activating pro-inflammatory responses against pathogens for host defence. In intestinal mucosa, abnormal activation of innate immunity, which directs adaptive immune responses, causes the onset and/or progression of inflammatory bowel diseases. Thus, innate immunity is finely regulated in the gut. Multiple innate immune cell subsets have been identified in both murine and human intestinal lamina propria. Some innate immune cells play a key role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis by preventing inappropriate adaptive immune responses while others are associated with the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation through development of Th1 and Th17 cells. In addition, intestinal microbiota and their metabolites contribute to the regulation of innate/adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, perturbation of microbiota composition can trigger intestinal inflammation by driving inappropriate immune responses. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  4. Constitutive STAT3 activation in intestinal T cells from patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovato, Paola; Brender, Christine; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Via cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways, cytokines induce a variety of biological responses and modulate the outcome of inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Perturbation of the intestinal cytokine homeostasis is ...

  5. Effect of diet on the intestinal microbiota and its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-03-01

    To summarize and discuss recent findings concerning diet-microbiota-health relations. Mouse and other model animal studies have provided detailed insight into host-microbiota interactions, but cannot be extrapolated easily to humans that have different dietary habits, intestinal architecture, and microbiota composition. In spite of the fact that all humans have a personalized microbiome, the discovery of the high-level clusters, such as enterotypes, offer great potential for stratifying individuals in intervention studies based on their intestinal microbiota. A highly diverse microbiota seems to be key to adult human health. Long-term dietary patterns have been found to be associated with specific microbiota compositions and in some cases enterotypes. Fecal transplantations indicate that homeostasis can be restored and indicate that diet-microbiota-induced disorders can be improved by therapeutic modification of the microbiota. The specificity of complex carbohydrate conversion is the driving ecological force in the colon, while competition for sugars with the host is the driver for the small intestinal ecosystem. At both locations, the microbial fermentation of dietary components occurs in trophic chains and insight into these multispecies conversions is essential to understand the impact of diet on health. There are clear associations between the microbiota, our diet and our health. However, as microbiota correlations with human health and diet are generally based on baseline comparisons between populations, there is a need for dedicated dietary intervention studies in humans to differentiate between correlation and causality.

  6. A model of metabolic syndrome and related diseases with intestinal endotoxemia in rats fed a high fat and high sucrose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Han, Dewu; Xu, Ruiling; Li, Suhong; Wu, Huiwen; Qu, Chongxiao; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Yuanchang

    2014-01-01

    We sought develop and characterize a diet-induced model of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases. The experimental animals (Spague-Dawley rats) were randomly divided into two groups, and each group was fed a different feed for 48 weeks as follows: 1) standard control diet (SC), and 2) a high sucrose and high fat diet (HSHF). The blood, small intestine, liver, pancreas, and adipose tissues were sampled for analysis and characterization. Typical metabolic syndrome (MS), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and type II diabetes (T2DM) were common in the HSHF group after a 48 week feeding period. The rats fed HSHF exhibited signs of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance (IR). At the same time, these animals had significantly increased levels of circulating LPS, TNFα, and IL-6 and increased ALP in their intestinal tissue homogenates. These animals also showed a significant reduction in the expression of occluding protein. The HSHF rats showed fatty degeneration, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and lipid accumulation when their liver pathologies were examined. The HSHF rats also displayed increased islet diameters from 12 to 24 weeks, while reduced islet diameters occurred from 36 to 48 weeks with inflammatory cell infiltration and islet fat deposition. The morphometry of adipocytes in HSHF rats showed hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration. HSHF CD68 analysis showed macrophage infiltration and significant increases in fat and pancreas size. HSHF Tunel analysis showed significant increases in liver and pancreas cell apoptosis. This work demonstrated the following: 1) a characteristic rat model of metabolic syndrome (MS) can be induced by a high sucrose and high fat diet, 2) this model can be used to research metabolic syndrome and its related diseases, such as NAFLD and T2DM, and 3) intestinal endotoxemia (IETM) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS and related diseases, such as NAFLD and

  7. A model of metabolic syndrome and related diseases with intestinal endotoxemia in rats fed a high fat and high sucrose diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available We sought develop and characterize a diet-induced model of metabolic syndrome and its related diseases.The experimental animals (Spague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups, and each group was fed a different feed for 48 weeks as follows: 1 standard control diet (SC, and 2 a high sucrose and high fat diet (HSHF. The blood, small intestine, liver, pancreas, and adipose tissues were sampled for analysis and characterization.Typical metabolic syndrome (MS, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and type II diabetes (T2DM were common in the HSHF group after a 48 week feeding period. The rats fed HSHF exhibited signs of obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance (IR. At the same time, these animals had significantly increased levels of circulating LPS, TNFα, and IL-6 and increased ALP in their intestinal tissue homogenates. These animals also showed a significant reduction in the expression of occluding protein. The HSHF rats showed fatty degeneration, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and lipid accumulation when their liver pathologies were examined. The HSHF rats also displayed increased islet diameters from 12 to 24 weeks, while reduced islet diameters occurred from 36 to 48 weeks with inflammatory cell infiltration and islet fat deposition. The morphometry of adipocytes in HSHF rats showed hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration. HSHF CD68 analysis showed macrophage infiltration and significant increases in fat and pancreas size. HSHF Tunel analysis showed significant increases in liver and pancreas cell apoptosis.This work demonstrated the following: 1 a characteristic rat model of metabolic syndrome (MS can be induced by a high sucrose and high fat diet, 2 this model can be used to research metabolic syndrome and its related diseases, such as NAFLD and T2DM, and 3 intestinal endotoxemia (IETM may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS and related diseases, such as NAFLD

  8. PREVALENCE OF GIARDIA LAMBLIA AND OTHER INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN AND ITS RELATION TO RESIDENCE PLACE, SEX AND BLOOD GROUP IN ILAM COUNTY OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourbabak

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available 1711' object of this study was to determine the prevalence oj asymptomatic infestation with Giardia lamblia lind other intestinal parasites in children of urban anti rural communities oj /lam county and its relation with dwelling place, sex and blood grollp!.. 77w study designed as (l five-month pUTasitoulgica! .m,..£!' oj fecal ami blood specimens from humans anti performed in 10 urban hcalih-trcatmcru clinics of llam city, two urban health treatment clinics of Eyvun city, two rural health-treatment clinics oj Chavar and Sartaf villages, llam province west of fran, 17,e examined population was preschool {, to 7 year-old children without any 'gastrointestinal compliarus. Prevalence oj infestation in subject grOllp W(l."' 32.54% (n=3100. Among intestinal parasites' G. lambliu with 85.43o/c (27.8% oj all, n=JO(JI prevalence rate was the most common. Infestation with 11. nnrm with 1'/.93% and E. coli with 3.07';, were in the second and third ranks, respectively, Infestation shows a distinct relationship with gender (P<0.05 and dwelling place, but it lacks a significant relation with blood groups. This study ."lIOWS that the prevalence of intestinal infestation in 6 to 7 year old child oj llam county hi equivalent to the top oj tile line oj the statistical percentage all over the world. 17,e relation between the severity oj infestation and residence place may arouse the suspicion oj sever contamination oj imbibing water.

  9. Pretreatment with remifentanil protects against the reduced-intestinal contractility related to the ischemia and reperfusion injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Sayan-Ozacmak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Serious functional and structural alterations of gastrointestinal tract are observed in failure of blood supply, leading to gastrointestinal dismotility. Activation of opioid receptors provides cardioprotective effect against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not remifentanil could reduce I/R injury of small intestine. METHODS: Male Wistar Albino rats were subjected to mesenteric ischemia (30 min followed by reperfusion (3 h. Four groups were designed: sham control; remifentanil alone; I/R control; and remifentanil + I/R. Animals in remifentanil + I/R group were subjected to infusion of remifentanil (2 ug kg-1 min-1 for 60 min, half of which started before inducing ischemia. Collecting the ileum tissues, evaluation of damage was based on contractile responses to carbachol, levels of lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration, and observation of histopathological features in intestinal tissue. RESULTS: Following reperfusion, a significant decrease in carbachol-induced contractile response, a remarkable increase in both lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration, and a significant injury in mucosa were observed. An average contractile response of remifentanil + I/R group was significantly different from that of the I/R group. Lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration were also significantly suppressed by the treatment. The tissue samples of the I/R group were grade 4 in histopathological evaluation. In remifentanil + I/R group, on the other hand, the mucosal damage was moderate, staging as grade 1. CONCLUSIONS: The pretreatment with remifentanil can attenuate the intestinal I/R injury at a remarkable degree possibly by lowering lipid peroxidation and leukocyte infiltration.

  10. Intestinal failure: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Philip; Lal, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the gut to absorb necessary water, macronutrients (carbohydrate, protein, and fat), micronutrients, and electrolytes sufficient to sustain life and requiring intravenous supplementation or replacement. Acute IF (types 1 and 2) is the initial phase of the illness and may last for weeks to a few months, and chronic IF (type 3) from months to years. The challenge of caring for patients with IF is not merely the management of the underlying condition leading to IF or the correct provision of appropriate nutrition or both but also the prevention of complications, whether thromboembolic phenomenon (for example, venous occlusion), central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection, IF-associated liver disease, or metabolic bone disease. This review looks at recent questions regarding chronic IF (type 3), its diagnosis and management, the role of the multidisciplinary team, and novel therapies, including hormonal treatment for short bowel syndrome but also surgical options for intestinal lengthening and intestinal transplant. PMID:29399329

  11. Parasitosis intestinal, su relación con factores ambientales en niños del sector "Altos de Milagro", Maracaibo Intestinal parasitosis, its relation to environmental factors in children from the "Altos de Milagro", Maracaibo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Espinosa Morales

    2011-09-01

    Republic of Venezuela including the predominance of children and adolescents due the poor hygienic health condition in the neighborhoods. OBJECTIVE: To determine the presence of some environmental factors present in parasitized children from the "Altos de Milgro Norte" Maracaibo, Zulia state, from December, 2008 to December, 2009. METHODS: A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted to determine the behavior of the intestinal parasitosis in children from that sector and its relation to some environmental factors using a survey carried out the author. RESULTS: Fifty six patients were cared, the 51.7 % was of male sex, this latter was the more parasitized with a 42.7 %, there was predominance of ages from 1 to 4 years with a 39.2 %, the inappropriate disposition of excretes was present in a 86.6 %, as well as the presence of vectors in a 94.6 % and 26 patients drank non-prepared water (57.8 %. CONCLUSIONS: There was high presence of disease where the male sex was the more involved; however, there was not significant differences with the female one and predominance of age group from 1 to 4 years. The high percentage obtained in study environmental factors showed that it was important in appearance, transmission and widespread of the parasitosis. Authors recommended designing programs of community interventions to avoid or to limit the appearance of these diseases.

  12. Impact of gain-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) on glucose and lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foer, D; Zhu, M; Cardone, R L; Simpson, C; Sullivan, R; Nemiroff, S; Lee, G; Kibbey, R G; Petersen, K F; Insogna, K L

    2017-06-01

    LRP5 loss-of-function mutations have been shown to cause profound osteoporosis and have been associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and dysregulated lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that gain-of-function mutations in LRP5 would also affect these parameters. We therefore studied individuals with LRP5 gain-of-function mutations exhibiting high bone mass (HBM) phenotypes and found that while there was no detected change in insulin sensitivity, there was a significant reduction in serum LDL. Wnt signaling through LRP5 represents a newly appreciated metabolic pathway, which potentially represents a target for drug discovery in type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Studies in animal models suggest a physiologic link between LRP5 and glucose and lipid homeostasis; however, whether it plays a similar role in humans is unclear. As current literature links loss-of-function LRP5 to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that individuals with an HBM-causing mutation in LRP5 would exhibit improved glucose and lipid homeostasis. Since studies in animal models have suggested that Wnt signaling augments insulin secretion, we also examined the effect of Wnt signaling on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion on human pancreatic islets. This was a matched case-control study. We used several methods to assess glucose and lipid metabolism in 11 individuals with HBM-causing mutations in LRP5. Affected study participants were recruited from previously identified kindreds with HBM-causing LRP5 mutations and included 9 males and 2 females. Two subjects that were being treated with insulin for type 2 diabetes were excluded from our analysis, as this would have obscured our ability to determine the impact of gain-of-function LRP5 mutations on glucose metabolism. The mean age of the evaluated study subjects was 55 ± 7 with a mean BMI of 27.2 ± 2.0. Control subjects were matched and recruited from the general community at an equivalent ratio, with 18 males and 4

  13. Sexual dimorphism in the lasting effects of moderate caloric restriction during gestation on energy homeostasis in rats is related with fetal programming of insulin and leptin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palou Mariona

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim We aimed to characterize the lasting effect of moderate caloric restriction during early pregnancy on offspring energy homeostasis, by focusing on the effects on food intake and body weight as well as on the insulin and leptin systems. Methods Male and female offspring of 20% caloric restricted dams (from 1 to 12 days of pregnancy (CR and from control dams were studied. These animals were fed after weaning with a normal-fat (NF diet until the age of 4 months, and then moved to a high-fat (HF diet. Blood parameters were measured under fed and 14-h fasting conditions at different ages (2, 4 and 5 months. Food preferences were also assessed in adult animals. Results Accumulated caloric intake from weaning to the age of 5 months was higher in CR animals compared with their controls, and this resulted in higher body weight in adulthood in males, but not in females. Both male and female CR animals already showed higher insulin levels at the age of 2 months, under fed conditions, and higher HOMA-IR from the age of 4 months, compared with their controls. CR male animals, but not females, displayed higher preference for fat-rich food than their controls in adulthood and higher circulating leptin levels when they were under HF diet. Conclusion It is suggested that hyperinsulinemia may play a role in the etiology of hyperphagia in the offspring of caloric restricted animals during gestation, with different outcomes on body weight depending on the gender, which could be associated with different programming effects on later leptin resistance.

  14. A Physiologist's View of Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of…

  15. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid. PMID:22020518

  16. Functional analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG pili in relation to adhesion and immunomodulatory interactions with intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeer, Sarah; Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L P; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; Vos, Willem M de; Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J De; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid.

  17. Intestinal parasitic infections in relation to HIV/AIDS status, diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assefa Zelalem

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection has been modifying both the epidemiology and outcome of parasitic infections. Hence, this study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among people with and without HIV infection and its association with diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Hawassa Teaching and Referral Hospital focusing on HIV positive individuals, who gave blood for CD4 T-cell count at their first enrolment and clients tested HIV negative from November, 2008 to March, 2009. Data on socio-demographic factors and diarrhea status were obtained by interviewing 378 consecutive participants (214 HIV positive and 164 HIV negative. Stool samples were collected from all study subjects and examined for parasites using direct, formol-ether and modified acid fast stain techniques. Results The prevalence of any intestinal parasitic infection was significantly higher among HIV positive participants. Specifically, rate of infection with Cryptosporidium, I. belli, and S. stercoralis were higher, particularly in those with CD4 count less than 200 cells/μL. Diarrhea was more frequent also at the same lower CD4 T-cell counts. Conclusion Immunodeficiency increased the risk of having opportunistic parasites and diarrhea. Therefore; raising patient immune status and screening at least for those treatable parasites is important.

  18. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathogen invasion changes the intestinal microbiota composition and induces innate immune responses in the zebrafish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Zou, Song-Song; Zhai, Li-Juan; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Fu-Miao; An, Li-Guo; Yang, Gui-Wen

    2017-12-01

    Numerous bacteria are harbored in the animal digestive tract and are impacted by several factors. Intestinal microbiota homeostasis is critical for maintaining the health of an organism. However, how pathogen invasion affects the microbiota composition has not been fully clarified. The mechanisms for preventing invasion by pathogenic microorganisms are yet to be elucidated. Zebrafish is a useful model for developmental biology, and studies in this organism have gradually become focused on intestinal immunity. In this study, we analyzed the microbiota of normal cultivated and infected zebrafish intestines, the aquarium water and feed samples. We found that the predominant bacteria in the zebrafish intestine belonged to Gammaproteobacteria (67%) and that feed and environment merely influenced intestinal microbiota composition only partially. Intestinal microbiota changed after a pathogenic bacterial challenge. At the genus level, the abundance of some pathogenic intestinal bacteria increased, and these genera included Halomonas (50%), Pelagibacterium (3.6%), Aeromonas (2.6%), Nesterenkonia (1%), Chryseobacterium (3.4‰), Mesorhizobium (1.4‰), Vibrio (1‰), Mycoplasma (0.7‰) and Methylobacterium (0.6‰) in IAh group. However, the abundance of some beneficial intestinal bacteria decreased, and these genera included Nitratireductor (0.8‰), Enterococcus (0.8‰), Brevundimonas (0.7‰), Lactococcus (0.7‰) and Lactobacillus (0.4‰). Additionally, we investigated the innate immune responses after infection. ROS levels in intestine increased in the early stages after a challenge and recovered subsequently. The mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptide genes lectin, hepcidin and defensin1, were upregulated in the intestine after pathogen infection. These results suggested that the invasion of pathogen could change the intestinal microbiota composition and induce intestinal innate immune responses in zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4 counts and anaemia among HIV-infected patients in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Frederick O; Okaka, Christopher E; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic infections continue to take their toll on HIV positive patients by influencing the blood qualitatively and quantitatively. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in relation to anaemia and CD4 counts among HIV-infected patients in Benin City, Nigeria. Using a serial sampling method, a total of 2000 HIV-infected patients were recruited on their first visit prior to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital from August 2007 to August 2009. Stool and blood samples were collected from each patient. The stool samples were processed using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique to microscopically identify the oocysts of Cryptosporidium species, Isospora belli, Cyclospora species and spores of Microsporidium species while saline and iodine preparations were used for identifying the ova, cysts and parasites of Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Taenia spp and other parasites. The blood specimens were equally analyzed using the flow cytometry for CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and autoanalyzer - sysmex kx - 21 for haemoglobin concentration. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 93.3% while 18% had parasitic infections. There was a significant relationship between CD4 count <200cells/microL and anaemia (P<0.0001). Cryptosporidium species (P= 0.005), A. lumbricoides (P=0.035), hookworm and Taenia species (P=0.014) were associated with anaemia. Anaemia was associated with CD4 count while Cryptosporidium species, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Taenia species were the intestinal parasitic agents associated with anaemia. In conclusion the prevalence of anaemia in HIV-infected patients is high low CD4 count is a significant risk factor of acquiring anaemia. Except for isosporiasis, cryptosporidiosis, A. lumbricoides, hookworm and Taenia species in HIV infected individuals are parasitic agents associated with anaemia. Routine screening for intestinal parasites and

  1. Effects of glutamine alone or in combination with zinc and vitamin A on growth, intestinal barrier function, stress and satiety-related hormones in Brazilian shantytown children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aldo A M; Anstead, Gregory M; Zhang, Qiong; Figueiredo, Ítalo L; Soares, Alberto M; Mota, Rosa M S; Lima, Noélia L; Guerrant, Richard L; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of supplemental zinc, vitamin A, and glutamine alone or in combination on growth, intestinal barrier function, stress and satiety-related hormones among Brazilian shantytown children with low median height-for-age z-scores. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in children aged two months to nine years from the urban shanty compound community of Fortaleza, Brazil. Demographic and anthropometric information was assessed. The random treatment groups available for testing (a total of 120 children) were as follows: (1) glutamine alone, n = 38; (2) glutamine plus vitamin A plus zinc, n = 37; and a placebo (zinc plus vitamin A vehicle) plus glycine (isonitrogenous to glutamine) control treatment, n = 38. Leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), and plasma levels of cortisol were measured with immune-enzymatic assays; urinary lactulose/mannitol and serum amino acids were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00133406. Glutamine treatment significantly improved weight-for-height z-scores compared to the placebo-glycine control treatment. Either glutamine alone or all nutrients combined prevented disruption of the intestinal barrier function, as measured by the percentage of lactulose urinary excretion and the lactulose:mannitol absorption ratio. Plasma leptin was negatively correlated with plasma glutamine (p = 0.002) and arginine (p = 0.001) levels at baseline. After glutamine treatment, leptin was correlated with weight-for-age (WAZ) and weight-for-height z-scores (WHZ) (p≤0.002) at a 4-month follow-up. In addition, glutamine and all combined nutrients (glutamine, vitamin A, and zinc) improved the intestinal barrier function in these children. Taken together, these findings reveal the benefits of glutamine alone or in combination with other gut-trophic nutrients in growing children via interactions with leptin.

  2. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. INTRACELLULAR Ca2+ HOMEOSTASIS

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    Shahdevi Nandar Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ signaling functions to regulate many cellular processes. Dynamics of Ca2+ signaling or homeostasis is regulated by the interaction between ON and OFF reactions that control Ca2+ flux in both the plasma membrane and internal organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. External stimuli activate the ON reactions, which include Ca2+ into the cytoplasm either through channels in the plasma membrane or from internal storage like in ER. Most of the cells utilize both channels/sources, butthere area few cells using an external or internal source to control certain processes. Most of the Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm adsorbed to the buffer, while a smaller part activate effect or to stimulate cellular processes. Reaction OFF is pumping of cytoplasmic Ca2+ using a combination mechanism of mitochondrial and others. Changes in Ca2+ signal has been detected in various tissues isolated from animals induced into diabetes as well as patients with diabetes. Ca2+ signal interference is also found in sensory neurons of experimental animals with diabetes. Ca2+ signaling is one of the main signaling systems in the cell.

  4. of Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences exist in the complex regulation of energy homeostasis that utilizes central and peripheral systems. It is widely accepted that sex steroids, especially estrogens, are important physiological and pathological components in this sex-specific regulation. Estrogens exert their biological functions via estrogen receptors (ERs. ERα, a classic nuclear receptor, contributes to metabolic regulation and sexual behavior more than other ER subtypes. Physiological and molecular studies have identified multiple ERα-rich nuclei in the hypothalamus of the central nervous system (CNS as sites of actions that mediate effects of estrogens. Much of our understanding of ERα regulation has been obtained using transgenic models such as ERα global or nuclei-specific knockout mice. A fundamental question concerning how ERα is regulated in wild-type animals, including humans, in response to alterations in steroid hormone levels, due to experimental manipulation (i.e., castration and hormone replacement or physiological stages (i.e., puberty, pregnancy, and menopause, lacks consistent answers. This review discusses how different sex hormones affect ERα expression in the hypothalamus. This information will contribute to the knowledge of estrogen action in the CNS, further our understanding of discrepancies in correlation of altered sex hormone levels with metabolic disturbances when comparing both sexes, and improve health issues in postmenopausal women.

  5. Intestinal Cgi-58 deficiency reduces postprandial lipid absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping; Guo, Feng; Ma, Yinyan; Zhu, Hongling; Wang, Freddy; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Yang, Jian; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58), a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, promotes intracellular triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis in vitro. Mutations in human CGI-58 cause TG accumulation in numerous tissues including intestine. Enterocytes are thought not to store TG-rich LDs, but a fatty meal does induce temporary cytosolic accumulation of LDs. Accumulated LDs are eventually cleared out, implying existence of TG hydrolytic machinery in enterocytes. However, identities of proteins responsible for LD-TG hydrolysis remain unknown. Here we report that intestine-specific inactivation of CGI-58 in mice significantly reduces postprandial plasma TG concentrations and intestinal TG hydrolase activity, which is associated with a 4-fold increase in intestinal TG content and large cytosolic LD accumulation in absorptive enterocytes during the fasting state. Intestine-specific CGI-58 knockout mice also display mild yet significant decreases in intestinal fatty acid absorption and oxidation. Surprisingly, inactivation of CGI-58 in intestine significantly raises plasma and intestinal cholesterol, and reduces hepatic cholesterol, without altering intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, intestinal CGI-58 is required for efficient postprandial lipoprotein-TG secretion and for maintaining hepatic and plasma lipid homeostasis. Our animal model will serve as a valuable tool to further define how intestinal fat metabolism influences the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  6. Farewell to Animal Testing: Innovations on Human Intestinal Microphysiological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyun Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human intestine is a dynamic organ where the complex host-microbe interactions that orchestrate intestinal homeostasis occur. Major contributing factors associated with intestinal health and diseases include metabolically-active gut microbiota, intestinal epithelium, immune components, and rhythmical bowel movement known as peristalsis. Human intestinal disease models have been developed; however, a considerable number of existing models often fail to reproducibly predict human intestinal pathophysiology in response to biological and chemical perturbations or clinical interventions. Intestinal organoid models have provided promising cytodifferentiation and regeneration, but the lack of luminal flow and physical bowel movements seriously hamper mimicking complex host-microbe crosstalk. Here, we discuss recent advances of human intestinal microphysiological systems, such as the biomimetic human “Gut-on-a-Chip” that can employ key intestinal components, such as villus epithelium, gut microbiota, and immune components under peristalsis-like motions and flow, to reconstitute the transmural 3D lumen-capillary tissue interface. By encompassing cutting-edge tools in microfluidics, tissue engineering, and clinical microbiology, gut-on-a-chip has been leveraged not only to recapitulate organ-level intestinal functions, but also emulate the pathophysiology of intestinal disorders, such as chronic inflammation. Finally, we provide potential perspectives of the next generation microphysiological systems as a personalized platform to validate the efficacy, safety, metabolism, and therapeutic responses of new drug compounds in the preclinical stage.

  7. Intestinal Cgi-58 deficiency reduces postprandial lipid absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xie

    Full Text Available Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58, a lipid droplet (LD-associated protein, promotes intracellular triglyceride (TG hydrolysis in vitro. Mutations in human CGI-58 cause TG accumulation in numerous tissues including intestine. Enterocytes are thought not to store TG-rich LDs, but a fatty meal does induce temporary cytosolic accumulation of LDs. Accumulated LDs are eventually cleared out, implying existence of TG hydrolytic machinery in enterocytes. However, identities of proteins responsible for LD-TG hydrolysis remain unknown. Here we report that intestine-specific inactivation of CGI-58 in mice significantly reduces postprandial plasma TG concentrations and intestinal TG hydrolase activity, which is associated with a 4-fold increase in intestinal TG content and large cytosolic LD accumulation in absorptive enterocytes during the fasting state. Intestine-specific CGI-58 knockout mice also display mild yet significant decreases in intestinal fatty acid absorption and oxidation. Surprisingly, inactivation of CGI-58 in intestine significantly raises plasma and intestinal cholesterol, and reduces hepatic cholesterol, without altering intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, intestinal CGI-58 is required for efficient postprandial lipoprotein-TG secretion and for maintaining hepatic and plasma lipid homeostasis. Our animal model will serve as a valuable tool to further define how intestinal fat metabolism influences the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  8. [Intra-digestive fermentation in intestinal malabsorption syndromes: relations with elevated serum activity of gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, D; Lauvin, R; Hellegouarc'h, R

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to examine the relationship between gastrointestinal ethanol production ("Mei-Tei-Sho" syndrome described in Japan) and biological liver dysfunction associated with intestinal malabsorption syndromes. Sixty-five patients with malabsorption-diarrhea underwent 98 simultaneous measurements of plasma gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase and of faecal ethanol concentrations; in 5 cases, ethanolemia and faecal ethanol concentrations were measured after a 250 g rice-meal; in 1, ethanol concentration was measured in a sample of caecal liquid in hours following local instillation of fructose (40 g). Faecal ethanol was detected at least once in 60/65 patients (74/98 measurements, maximum 3.50 g*L-1), more often (98.0%, P fructose instillation was 11.8 g*L-1. Endogenous gastrointestinal ethanol production contributes to elevated gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity observed during malabsorption syndromes.

  9. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... growth marked by weight and villus/crypt ratio was significantly reduced in the TPN group compared with the EN group, and CDCA treatment increased both parameters. These results suggest that decreased circulating FGF19 during TPN may contribute to PNALD. Moreover, we show that enteral CDCA not only...

  10. Colostral and milk insulin-like growth factors and related substances: mammary gland and neonatal (intestinal and systemic) targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J W; Baumrucker, C R

    2002-07-01

    The identification of hormones and regulatory factors in colostrum and milk has led to intensive investigations on their roles in the development and maintenance of the mammary and neonatal tissues. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in transgenic mice influence mammary biology gland towards the end of lactation. In the bovine, IGFBP-3 is the major IGFBP in mammary secretions. In addition to binding IGFs, IGFBP-3 also binds to lactoferrin (Lf). Secreted IGFBP-3 re-enters mammary epithelial cells and with the presence of a nuclear localization sequence, IGFBP-3 and Lf enter the nucleus. Nuclear IGFBP-3 affects apoptotic signaling through the retinoic-x-receptors, while Lf affects apoptotic events through unknown mechanisms. Such interactions likely influence mammary development and involution. Furthermore, ingested colostral bioactive factors can exert regulatory functions in neonates. Intestinal receptors for IGFs and insulin are modified by age and/or diet. Feeding IGF-I had no effect, but colostrum extracts had small intestinal effects (stimulation of proliferation and villus size), suggesting that several factors, rather than one single bioactive factor were responsible. Systemic changes of metabolic and endocrine profiles in neonates depend on composition, amounts, time and duration of feeding colostrum. Early postnatal colostrum intake is not only important for the provision and absorption of immunoglobulins. Thus, in neonatal calves the lack of colostrum intake during the first 24h after birth results in a low immunoglobulin G, beta-carotene and Vitamin A status that persists for weeks and plasma patterns of fatty acids, essential amino acids and the glutamine/glutamate ratios are affected. In calves oral administration of IGF-I had no and feeding of colostrum whey extracts had only minor effects on metabolic and endocrine traits. Thus, mammary secretions influence regulatory functions of mammary and neonatal tissues.

  11. Why Homeodynamics, Not Homeostasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lloyd

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideas of homeostasis derive from the concept of the organism as an open system. These ideas can be traced back to Heraclitus. Hopkins, Bernard, Hill, Cannon, Weiner and von Bertalanffy developed further the mechanistic basis of turnover of biological components, and Schoenheimer and Rittenberg were pioneers of experimental approaches to the problems of measuring pool sizes and dynamic fluxes. From the second half of the twentieth century, a biophysical theory mainly founded on self-organisation and Dynamic Systems Theory allowed us to approach the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the organised complexity that characterises living systems. This combination of theoretical framework and more refined experimental techniques revealed that feedback control of steady states is a mode of operation that, although providing stability, is only one of many modes and may be the exception rather than the rule. The concept of homeodynamics that we introduce here offers a radically new and all-embracing concept that departs from the classical homeostatic idea that emphasises the stability of the internal milieu toward perturbation. Indeed, biological systems are homeody- namic because of their ability to dynamically self-organise at bifurcation points of their behaviour where they lose stability. Consequently, they exhibit diverse behaviour; in addition to monotonic stationary states, living systems display complex behaviour with all its emergent characteristics, i.e., bistable switches, thresholds, waves, gradients, mutual entrainment, and periodic as well as chaotic behaviour, as evidenced in cellular phenomena such as dynamic (supramolecular organisation and flux coordination. These processes may proceed on different spatial scales, as well as across time scales, from the very rapid processes within and between molecules in membranes to the slow time scales of evolutionary change. It is dynamic organisation under homeodynamic conditions that make

  12. Why homeodynamics, not homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, D; Aon, M A; Cortassa, S

    2001-04-04

    Ideas of homeostasis derive from the concept of the organism as an open system. These ideas can be traced back to Heraclitus. Hopkins, Bernard, Hill, Cannon, Weiner and von Bertalanffy developed further the mechanistic basis of turnover of biological components, and Schoenheimer and Rittenberg were pioneers of experimental approaches to the problems of measuring pool sizes and dynamic fluxes. From the second half of the twentieth century, a biophysical theory mainly founded on self-organisation and Dynamic Systems Theory allowed us to approach the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the organised complexity that characterises living systems. This combination of theoretical framework and more refined experimental techniques revealed that feedback control of steady states is a mode of operation that, although providing stability, is only one of many modes and may be the exception rather than the rule. The concept of homeodynamics that we introduce here offers a radically new and all-embracing concept that departs from the classical homeostatic idea that emphasises the stability of the internal milieu toward perturbation. Indeed, biological systems are homeodynamic because of their ability to dynamically self-organise at bifurcation points of their behaviour where they lose stability. Consequently, they exhibit diverse behaviour; in addition to monotonic stationary states, living systems display complex behaviour with all its emergent characteristics, i.e., bistable switches, thresholds, waves, gradients, mutual entrainment, and periodic as well as chaotic behaviour, as evidenced in cellular phenomena such as dynamic (supra)molecular organisation and flux coordination. These processes may proceed on different spatial scales, as well as across time scales, from the very rapid processes within and between molecules in membranes to the slow time scales of evolutionary change. It is dynamic organisation under homeodynamic conditions that make possible the organised

  13. Recent advances in understanding bile acid homeostasis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John YL Chiang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are derived from cholesterol to facilitate intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of cholesterol. Recent studies have identified bile acids as signaling molecules that activate nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR and membrane G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (Gpbar-1, also known as TGR5 to maintain metabolic homeostasis and protect liver and other tissues and cells from bile acid toxicity. Bile acid homeostasis is regulated by a complex mechanism of feedback and feedforward regulation that is not completely understood. This review will cover recent advances in bile acid signaling and emerging concepts about the classic and alternative bile acid synthesis pathway, bile acid composition and bile acid pool size, and intestinal bile acid signaling and gut microbiome in regulation of bile acid homeostasis.

  14. Intestinal Epithelial Sirtuin 1 Regulates Intestinal Inflammation During Aging in Mice by Altering the Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Alicia S; Metukuri, Mallikarjuna R; Kazgan, Nevzat; Xu, Xiaojiang; Xu, Qing; Ren, Natalie S X; Czopik, Agnieszka; Shanahan, Michael T; Kang, Ashley; Chen, Willa; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Gulati, Ajay S; Fargo, David C; Guarente, Leonard; Li, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by complex interactions among epithelial cells, commensal gut microorganisms, and immune cells. Disruption of this homeostasis is associated with disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the mechanisms of this process are not clear. We investigated how Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a conserved mammalian NAD + -dependent protein deacetylase, senses environmental stress to alter intestinal integrity. We performed studies of mice with disruption of Sirt1 specifically in the intestinal epithelium (SIRT1 iKO, villin-Cre+, Sirt1 flox/flox mice) and control mice (villin-Cre-, Sirt1 flox/flox ) on a C57BL/6 background. Acute colitis was induced in some mice by addition of 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate to drinking water for 5-9 consecutive days. Some mice were given antibiotics via their drinking water for 4 weeks to deplete their microbiota. Some mice were fed with a cholestyramine-containing diet for 7 days to sequester their bile acids. Feces were collected and proportions of microbiota were analyzed by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Intestines were collected from mice and gene expression profiles were compared by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. We compared levels of specific mRNAs between colon tissues from age-matched patients with ulcerative colitis (n=10) vs without IBD (n=8, controls). Mice with intestinal deletion of SIRT1 (SIRT1 iKO) had abnormal activation of Paneth cells starting at the age of 5-8 months, with increased activation of NF-κB, stress pathways, and spontaneous inflammation at 22-24 months of age, compared with control mice. SIRT1 iKO mice also had altered fecal microbiota starting at 4-6 months of age compared with control mice, in part because of altered bile acid metabolism. Moreover, SIRT1 iKO mice with defective gut microbiota developed more severe colitis than control mice. Intestinal tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis expressed significantly lower

  15. ) production and/or pH in the gastrointestinal tract (ID 787, 813), changes in bowel function (ID 813, 853, 1902, 1903, 1904, 2929, 2930, 2931), and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort (ID 813, 1902, 1903, 1904, 2929, 2930, 2931) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006, EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to partially hydrolysed guar gum (PHGG) and decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 788), changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to partially hydrolysed guar gum and decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms, changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract, changes in bowel function, and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort...

  16. Debug your bugs-how NLRs shape intestinal host-microbe interactions

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    Philip eRosenstiel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The host’s ability to discriminate friend and foe and to establish a precise homeostasis with its associated microbiota is crucial for its survival and fitness. Among the mediators of intestinal host-microbe interactions, NOD-like receptor (NLR proteins take center stage. They are present in the epithelial lining and innate immune cells that constantly monitor microbial activities at the intestinal barrier. Dysfunctional NLRs predispose to intestinal inflammation as well as sensitization to extra-intestinal immune-mediated diseases and are linked to the alteration of microbial communities. Here, we review advances in our understanding of their reciprocal relationship in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis and implications for intestinal health.

  17. The role of gut microbiota in immune homeostasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Keeping a delicate balance in the immune system by eliminating invading pathogens, while still maintaining self-tolerance to avoid autoimmunity, is critical for the body's health. The gut microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to its host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Moreover, it has recently become obvious that alterations of these gut microbial communities can cause immune dysregulation, leading to autoimmune disorders. Here we review the advances in our understanding of how the gut microbiota regulates innate and adaptive immune homeostasis, which in turn can affect the development of not only intestinal but also systemic autoimmune diseases. Exploring the interaction of gut microbes and the host immune system will not only allow us to understand the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases but will also provide us new foundations for the design of novel immuno- or microbe-based therapies.

  18. Dietary fat composition, food matrix and relative polarity modulate the micellarization and intestinal uptake of carotenoids from vegetables and fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Palika, Ravindranadh; Jyrwa, Yvette Wilda; Bhaskarachary, K; Pullakhandam, Raghu

    2017-02-01

    Dietary fat increases carotenoid bioavailability by facilitating their transfer to the aqueous micellar fraction during digestion. However, the specific effect of both quantity and type of dietary fat required for optimal carotenoid absorption remained unexplored. In the present study, the effect of amount and type of vegetable oils on carotenoid micellarization from carrot, spinach, drumstick leaves and papaya using in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model have been assessed. Although, dietary fat (0.5-10% w/w) significantly increased the micellarization of carotenoids from all the test foods, the extent of increase was determined by the food matrix (papaya > drumstick = spinach > carrot) and polarity of carotenoids (lutein > β-carotene = α-carotene > lycopene). Among the dietary fats tested the carotenoid micellarization was twofold to threefold higher with dietary fat rich in unsaturated fatty acids (olive oil = soybean oil = sunflower oil) compared to saturated fatty acids (peanut oil = palm oil > coconut oil). Intestinal cell uptake of lutein exceeded that of β-carotene from micellar fraction of spinach leaves digested with various oils. However, cellular uptake of β-carotene is depended on the carotenoid content in micellar fraction rather than the type of fat used. Together these results suggest that food matrix, polarity of carotenoids and type of dietary fat determines the extent of carotenoid micellarization from vegetables and fruits.

  19. Effect of a multispecies probiotic supplement on quantity of irritable bowel syndrome-related intestinal microbial phylotypes

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    Lyra Anna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics can alleviate the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, possibly by stabilizing the intestinal microbiota. Our aim was to determine whether IBS-associated bacterial alterations were reduced during multispecies probiotic intervention consisting of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus Lc705, Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS and Bifidobacterium breve Bb99. The intervention has previously been shown to successfully alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms of IBS. Methods The faecal microbiotas of 42 IBS subjects participating in a placebo-controlled double-blind multispecies probiotic intervention were analysed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Eight bacterial targets within the gastrointestinal microbiota with a putative IBS association were measured. Results A phylotype with 94% similarity to Ruminococcus torques remained abundant in the placebo group, but was decreased in the probiotic group during the intervention (P = 0.02 at 6 months. In addition, the clostridial phylotype, Clostridium thermosuccinogenes 85%, was stably elevated during the intervention (P = 0.00 and P = 0.02 at 3 and 6 months, respectively. The bacterial alterations detected were in accordance with previously discovered alleviation of symptoms. Conclusions The probiotic supplement was thus shown to exert specific alterations in the IBS-associated microbiota towards the bacterial 16S rDNA phylotype quantities described previously for subjects free of IBS. These changes may have value as non-invasive biomarkers in probiotic intervention studies.

  20. Increase of faecal tryptic activity relates to changes in the intestinal microbiome: analysis of Crohn's disease with a multidisciplinary platform.

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    Tore Midtvedt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate-by molecular, classical and functional methods-the microbiota in biopsies and faeces from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD and controls. DESIGN: The microbiota in biopsies was investigated utilizing a novel molecular method and classical cultivation technology. Faecal samples were investigated by classical technology and four functional methods, reflecting alterations in short chain fatty acids pattern, conversion of cholesterol and bilirubin and inactivation of trypsin. RESULTS: By molecular methods we found more than 92% similarity in the microbiota on the biopsies from the two groups. However, 4.6% of microbes found in controls were lacking in CD patients. Furthermore, NotI representation libraries demonstrate two different clusters representing CD patients and controls, respectively. Utilizing conventional technology, Bacteroides (alt. Parabacteroides was less frequently detected in the biopsies from CD patients than from controls. A similar reduction in the number of Bacteroides was found in faecal samples. Bacteroides is the only group of bacteria known to be able to inactivate pancreatic trypsin. Faecal tryptic activity was high in CD patients, and inversely correlated to the levels of Bacteroides. CONCLUSIONS: CD patients have compositional and functional alterations in their intestinal microbiota, in line with the global description hypothesis rather than the candidate microorganism theory. The most striking functional difference was high amount of faecal tryptic activity in CD patients, inversely correlated to the levels of Bacteroides in faeces.

  1. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Acute colonic ileus; Colonic pseudo-obstruction; Idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Ogilvie syndrome; Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; Paralytic ileus - pseudo-obstruction

  2. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and plasma membrane polarity of intestinal epithelial cells: Presence of a brush border antigen in the distal large intestine that is immunologically related to beta subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marxer, A.; Stieger, B.; Quaroni, A.; Kashgarian, M.; Hauri, H.P. (Univ. of Basel (Switzerland))

    1989-09-01

    The previously produced monoclonal antibody IEC 1/48 against cultured rat intestinal crypt cells was extensively characterized and found to be directed against the beta subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase as assessed by immunological and enzymatic criteria. Under nondenaturing conditions the antibody precipitated the alpha-beta enzyme complex (98,000 and 48,000 Mr). This probe, together with the monoclonal antibody C 62.4 against the alpha subunit was used to localize (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in epithelial cells along the rat intestinal tract by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Both antibodies exclusively labeled the basolateral membrane of small intestine and proximal colon epithelial cells. However, in the distal colon, IEC 1/48, but not C 62.4, also labeled the brush border membrane. The cross-reacting beta-subunit-like antigen on the apical cell pole was tightly associated with isolated brush borders but was apparently devoid of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity. Subcellular fractionation of colonocytes in conjunction with limited proteolysis and surface radioiodination of intestinal segments suggested that the cross-reacting antigen in the brush border may be very similar to the beta subunit. The results support the notion that in the small intestine and proximal colon the enzyme subunits are exclusively targeted to the basolateral membrane while in the distal colon nonassembled beta subunit or a beta-subunit-like protein is also transported to the apical cell pole.

  3. Intestinal myiasis

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    U S Udgaonkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intestinal myiasis is a condition when the fly larvae inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and are passed out in faeces. This type of infestation results when eggs or larvae of the fly, deposited on food are inadvertently taken by man. They survive the unfavourable conditions within the gastrointestinal tract and produce disturbances, which may vary from mild to severe. The condition is not uncommon and is often misdiagnosed as pinworm infestation. Correct diagnosis by the clinical microbiologist is important to avoid unnecessary treatment. Materials and Methods: We had 7 cases of intestinal myiasis. In 2 cases the larvae were reared to adult fly in modified meat and sand medium (developed by Udgaonkar. This medium is simple and can be easily prepared in the laboratory. Results: Of the 7 larvae, 5 were Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, 1 Megaselia species and 1 was identified as Muscina stabulans. Conclusions: S. haemorrhoidalis was the commonest maggot involved. A high index of suspicion is required for clinical diagnosis when the patient complains of passing wriggling worms in faeces for a long period without any response to antihelminthics. The reason for long duration of illness and recurrence of infestation is baffling. The nearest to cure was colonic wash. We feel prevention is of utmost importance, which is to avoid eating food articles with easy access to flies.

  4. Autophagy protects intestinal epithelial cells against deoxynivalenol toxicity by alleviating oxidative stress via IKK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Jianjun; Li, Fengna; Hu, Chien-An A; Liao, Peng; Tan, Kunrong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process of homeostatic degradation that promotes cell survival under various stressors. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a fungal toxin, often causes diarrhea and disturbs the homeostasis of the intestinal system. To investigate the function of intestinal autophagy in response to DON and associated mechanisms, we firstly knocked out ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) using CRISPR-Cas9 technology. When treated with DON, autophagy was induced in IPEC-J2 cells but not in IPEC-J2.Atg5ko cells. The deficiency in autophagy increased DON-induced apoptosis in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cellular stress response can be restored in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells by overexpressing proteins involved in protein folding. Interestingly, we found that autophagy deficiency downregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum folding proteins BiP and PDI when IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells were treated with DON. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanism of autophagy involved in the IKK, AMPK, and mTOR signaling pathway and found that Bay-117082 and Compound C, specific inhibitors for IKK and AMPK, respectively, inhibited the induction of autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy is pivotal for protection against DON in pig intestinal cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitochondrial Iron Transport and Homeostasis in Plants

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    Anshika eJain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for plants and although the mechanisms controlling iron uptake from the soil are relatively well understood, comparatively little is known about subcellular trafficking of iron in plant cells. Mitochondria represent a significant iron sink within cells, as iron is required for the proper functioning of respiratory chain protein complexes. Mitochondria are a site of Fe-S cluster synthesis, and possibly heme synthesis as well. Here we review recent insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial iron transport and homeostasis. We focus on the recent identification of a mitochondrial iron uptake transporter in rice and a possible role for metalloreductases in iron uptake by mitochondria. In addition, we highlight recent advances in mitochondrial iron homeostasis with an emphasis on the roles of frataxin and ferritin in iron trafficking and storage within mitochondria.

  6. Wnt signaling in the intestinal epithelium: from endoderm to cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregorieff, A.; Clevers, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Wnt pathway controls cell fate during embryonic development. It also persists as a key regulator of homeostasis in adult self-renewing tissues. In these tissues, mutational deregulation of the Wnt cascade is closely associated with malignant transformation. The intestinal epithelium represents

  7. Roles of connexins and pannexins in digestive homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Cogliati, Bruno; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Connexin proteins are abundantly present in the digestive system. They primarily form gap junctions, which control the intercellular exchange of critical homeostasis regulators. By doing so, gap junctions drive a plethora of gastrointestinal and hepatic functional features, including gastric and gut motility, gastric acid secretion, intestinal innate immune defense, xenobiotic biotransformation, glycogenolysis, bile secretion, ammonia detoxification and plasma protein synthesis. In the last decade, it has become clear that connexin hemichannels, which are the structural precursors of gap junctions, also provide a pathway for cellular communication, namely between the cytosol and the extracellular environment. Although merely pathological functions have been described, some physiological roles have been attributed to connexin hemichannels, in particular in the modulation of colonic motility. This equally holds true for cellular channels composed of pannexins, connexin-like proteins recently identified in the intestine and the liver, which have become acknowledged key players in inflammatory processes and that have been proposed to control colonic motility, secretion and blood flow.

  8. Effects of adding chymosin to milk on calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif

    2015-01-01

    either chymosin or similar placebo was added. Compared with placebo, chymosin did not affect 24-h urinary calcium, calcium/creatinine ratio, plasma parathyroid hormone, calcitonin or ionized calcium levels. However, during the first 4 h after intake of milk with chymosin, urinary calcium-creatinine ratio...... not depend on plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Chymosin added to milk increases renal calcium excretion in the hours following intake without affecting plasma levels of calcium or calciotropic hormones. The effect most likely represents enhanced intestinal calcium absorption shortly after intake. Further......Calcium intake and absorption is important for bone health. In a randomized double-blind cross-over trial, we investigated effects of adding chymosin to milk on the intestinal calcium absorption as measured by renal calcium excretion and indices of calcium homeostasis. The primary outcome...

  9. Effects of short- and long-course antibiotics on the lower intestinal microbiome as they relate to traveller's diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lawrence Clifford

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics have profound and lasting effects on the lower intestinal (gut) microbiome that can both promote resistance and increase susceptibility to colonization and infection; knowledge of these changes is important to the prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Recent data from epidemiologic and modern metagenomics studies were reviewed in regard to how such findings could inform the prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Although it is well recognized that antibiotics increase the risk for Clostridium difficile infection, it is less recognized how they predispose patients to typically foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella or Camplyobacter spp. While these pathogens account for only a fraction of traveler's diarrhea, such predisposition reflects how antibiotic exposure that precedes or occurs during travel may increase the risk for infection with other more common pathogens, even possibly enterotoxigenic Eschericia coli, especially in the setting of acquired resistance. Even short antibiotic exposures disrupt the gut microbiome up to a year or more and repeated exposures appear to attenuate recovery from ever occurring. One bacterial phylum that commonly increases in the gut following antibiotics are the proteobacteria including Enterobacteriacea; these are pro-inflammatory and often carry antibiotic resistance genes, the number and diversity of these genes (i.e. the resistome) commonly expands following antibiotics. The gut resistome among healthy community-dwelling adults reflects geographic variability in antibiotic use practices in both humans and food-producing animals as well as possibly the transmission of antibiotic resistance genes through the food supply. Because antibiotic use among travelers will influence the resistome and thereby promote geographic spread of resistance, it is important that antibiotic use recommendations for travelers be guided by resistance surveillance data as well as a careful assessment of the risks and

  10. Effects of Immune Stress on Performance Parameters, Intestinal Enzyme Activity and mRNA Expression of Intestinal Transporters in Broiler Chickens

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    Y. Feng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune stress is the loss of immune homeostasis caused by external forces. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the effects of immune stress on the growth performance, small intestinal enzymes and peristalsis rate, and mRNA expression of nutrient transporters in broiler chickens. Four hundred and thirty-two 1-d-old broilers (Cobb500 were randomly assigned to four groups for treatment; each group included nine cages with 12 birds per cage. Group 1 = no vaccine (NV; Group 2 = conventional vaccine (CV; group 3 = lipopolysaccharide (LPS+conventional vaccine (LPS; group 4 = cyclophosphamide (CYP+conventional vaccine (CYP. The results demonstrated that immune stress by LPS and CYP reduced body weight gain (BWG, feed intake (FI, small intestine peristalsis rate and sIgA content in small intestinal digesta (p<0.05. However, the feed conversion ratio (FCR remained unchanged during the feeding period. LPS and CYP increased intestinal enzyme activity, relative expression of SGLT-1, CaBP-D28k and L-FABP mRNAs (p<0.05. LPS and CYP injection had a negative effect on the growth performance of healthy broiler chickens. The present study demonstrated that NV and CV could improve growth performance while enzyme activity in small intestine and relative expression of nutrient transporter mRNA of NV and CV were decreased in the conditions of a controlled rational feeding environment. It is generally recommended that broilers only need to be vaccinated for the diseases to which they might be exposed.

  11. Fecal microbiota transplantation and bacterial consortium transplantation have comparable effects on the re-establishment of mucosal barrier function in mice with intestinal dysbiosis

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    Ming eLi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a promising therapy, despite some reports of adverse side effects. Bacterial consortia transplantation (BCT for targeted restoration of the intestinal ecosystem is considered a relatively safe and simple procedure. However, no systematic research has assessed the effects of FMT and BCT on immune responses of intestinal mucosal barrier in patients. We conducted complementary studies in animal models on the effects of FMT and BCT, and provide recommendations for improving the clinical outcomes of these treatments. To establish the dysbiosis model, male BALB/c mice were treated with ceftriaxone intra-gastrically for 7 days. After that, FMT and BCT were performed on ceftriaxone-treated mice for 3 consecutive days to rebuild the intestinal ecosystem. Post-FMT and post-BCT changes of the intestinal microbial community and mucosal barrier functions were investigated and compared. Disruption of intestinal microbial homeostasis impacted the integrity of mucosal epithelial layer, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. These outcomes were accompanied by overexpression of Muc2, significant decrease of SIgA secretion, and overproduction of defensins and inflammatory cytokines. After FMT and BCT, the intestinal microbiota recovered quickly, this was associated with better reconstruction of mucosal barriers and re-establishment of immune networks compared with spontaneous recovery (SR. Although based on a short-term study, our results suggest that FMT and BCT promote the re-establishment of intestinal microbial communities in mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, and contribute to the temporal and spatial interactions between microbiota and mucosal barriers. The effects of BCT are comparable to that of FMT, especially in normalizing the intestinal levels of Muc2, SIgA, and defensins.

  12. Concerted transcription of auxin and carbohydrate homeostasis-related genes underlies improved adventitious rooting of microcuttings derived from far-red treated Eucalyptus globulus Labill mother plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedell, Carolina Michels; de Almeida, Márcia Rodrigues; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano

    2015-12-01

    Economically important plant species, such as Eucalyptus globulus, are often rooting recalcitrant. We have previously shown that far-red light enrichment applied to E. globulus donor-plants improved microcutting rooting competence and increased rooting zone/shoot carbohydrate ratio. To better understand this developmental response, the relative expression profiles of genes involved in auxin signaling (ARF6, ARF8, AGO1), biosynthesis (YUC3) and transport (AUX1, PIN1, PIN2); sucrose cleavage (SUS1, CWINV1), transport (SUC5), hexose phosphorylation (HXK1, FLN1) and starch biosynthesis (SS3) were quantified during adventitious rooting of E. globulus microcuttings derived from donor plants exposed to far-red or white light. Expression of auxin transport-related genes increased in the first days of root induction. Far-red enrichment of donor plants induced ARF6, ARF8 and AGO1 in microcuttings. The first two gene products could activate GH3 and other rooting related genes, whereas AGO1 deregulation of the repressor ARF17 may relief rooting inhibition. Increased sink strength at the basal stem with sucrose unloading in root tissue mediated by SUC and subsequent hydrolysis by SUS1 were also supported by gene expression profile. Fructose phosphorylation and starch biosynthesis could also contribute to proper carbon allocation at the site of rooting, as evidenced by increased expression of related genes. These data are in good agreement with increased contents of hexoses and starch at the cutting base severed from far-red exposed donor plants. To sum up, pathways integrating auxin and carbohydrate metabolism were activated in microcuttings derived from donor plants exposed to far red light enrichment, thereby improving rooting response in E. globulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Aspects of Renal Magnesium Homeostasis

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    Paula Giménez-Mascarell

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg2+ is indispensable for several vital functions, such as neurotransmission, cardiac conductance, blood glucose, blood pressure regulation, and proper function of more than 300 enzymes. Thus, Mg2+ homeostasis is subject to tight regulation. Besides the fast and immediate regulation of plasma Mg2+, a major part of Mg2+ homeostasis is realized by a concerted action of epithelial molecular structures that tightly control intestinal uptake and renal absorption. This mechanism is provided by a combination of para- and transcellular pathways. Whereas the first pathway provides the organism with a maximal amount of vital substances by a minimal energy expenditure, the latter enables controlling and fine-tuning by means of local and regional regulatory systems and also, hormonal control. The paracellular pathway is driven by an electrochemical gradient and realized in principal by the tight junction (TJ, a supramolecular organization of membrane-bound proteins and their adaptor and scaffolding proteins. TJ determinants are claudins (CLDN, a family of membrane spanning proteins that generate a barrier or a pore between two adjacent epithelial cells. Many insights into molecular mechanisms of Mg2+ handling have been achieved by the identification of alterations and mutations in human genes which cause disorders of paracellular Mg2+ pathways (CLDN10, CLDN14, CLDN16, CLDN19. Also, in the distal convoluted tubule, a basolateral protein, CNNM2, causes if mutated, familial dominant and also recessive renal Mg2+ wasting, albeit its true function has not been clarified yet, but is assumed to play a key role in the transcellular pathway. Moreover, mutations in human genes that are involved in regulating these proteins directly or indirectly cause, if mutated human diseases, mostly in combination with comorbidities as diabetes, cystic renal disease, or metabolic abnormalities. Generation and characterization of animal models harboring the corresponding

  14. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome) What is intestinal failure? Intestinal failure occurs when a significant portion of the small ... intestine does. Who is at risk for intestinal failure? N Babies (usually premature) who have had surgery ...

  15. A B-Cell Gene Signature Correlates With the Extent of Gluten-Induced Intestinal Injury in Celiac DiseaseSummary

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    Mitchell E. Garber

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Celiac disease (CeD provides an opportunity to study autoimmunity and the transition in immune cells as dietary gluten induces small intestinal lesions. Methods: Seventy-three celiac disease patients on a long-term, gluten-free diet ingested a known amount of gluten daily for 6 weeks. A peripheral blood sample and intestinal biopsy specimens were taken before and 6 weeks after initiating the gluten challenge. Biopsy results were reported on a continuous numeric scale that measured the villus-height–to–crypt-depth ratio to quantify gluten-induced intestinal injury. Pooled B and T cells were isolated from whole blood, and RNA was analyzed by DNA microarray looking for changes in peripheral B- and T-cell gene expression that correlated with changes in villus height to crypt depth, as patients maintained a relatively healthy intestinal mucosa or deteriorated in the face of a gluten challenge. Results: Gluten-dependent intestinal damage from baseline to 6 weeks varied widely across all patients, ranging from no change to extensive damage. Genes differentially expressed in B cells correlated strongly with the extent of intestinal damage. A relative increase in B-cell gene expression correlated with a lack of sensitivity to gluten whereas their relative decrease correlated with gluten-induced mucosal injury. A core B-cell gene module, representing a subset of B-cell genes analyzed, accounted for the correlation with intestinal injury. Conclusions: Genes comprising the core B-cell module showed a net increase in expression from baseline to 6 weeks in patients with little to no intestinal damage, suggesting that these individuals may have mounted a B-cell immune response to maintain mucosal homeostasis and circumvent inflammation. DNA microarray data were deposited at the GEO repository (accession number: GSE87629; available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. Keywords: Oral Tolerance, Mucosal Immunity, Autoimmunity

  16. Diagnosis of intestinal and extra intestinal amoebiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Myriam Consuelo; Quiroz, Damian Arnoldo; Pinilla, Analida Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to carry out a review of the national and international literature as of the XXth century in order to update the advances for the diagnosis of complex odd Entamoeba histolytic / Entamoeba dispar and that of intestinal and extra intestinal amoebiasis that may be of use to the scientific community. As well as to unify the diagnostic criteria of this parasitosis known as a public health problem, and as a consequence of that, optimize the quality of population care. Data source: there was a systematic search for the scientific literature Publisher in Spanish and English since 1960 until today, this selection started on the first semester of 2006 until 2007, in the development of the line on intestinal and extra-intestinal amoebiasis of the Medical School of the National University of Colombia. A retrospective search process was carried out, systematically reviewing the most relevant articles as well as the products of this research line. In deciding how to make this article, there was a continuous search in different data bases such as Medline, SciELO and other bases in the library of the National University of Colombia, as well as other classical books related to the subject. For that purpose the terms amoebiasis, odd Entamoeba histolytic, Entamoeba, diagnosis, epidemiology, dysentery, amoebic liver abscess, were used. Studies selection: titles and abstracts were reviewed to select the original publications and the most representative ones related to this article's subject. Data extraction: the articles were classified according to the subject, the chronology and the authors according to the scientific contribution to solve the problem. Synthesis of the data: in the fi rst instance, a chronological critical analysis was carried out to order and synthesize the progress made in the diagnosis until confirmation of the experts' agreements in the field of amoebiasis was obtained throughout the world. Conclusion: this article summarizes what has taken place

  17. Concept analysis of family homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Rose, Karen M

    2014-11-01

    To report a concept analysis of family homeostasis. As family members are a majority of informal caregivers, negative consequences from caregiving duty create a vicious cycle in the family unit resulting in ongoing health crises and care challenges. Concept analysis. Forty empirical studies published from 1956-2012 were selected by searching five electronic bibliographical databases and by a manual search conducted from 2012-2013. Search terms included 'family homeostasis', 'homeostasis in family', 'homeostatic care' and 'family equilibrium'. Clinical experiences in nursing practice were used for constructing cases and clinical implications. Walker and Avant's method guided this analysis. Family homeostasis is defined as the capacity and mechanisms by which equilibrium is re-established in the family after a change occurs. Five critical attributes are identified: (1) predetermined setpoint; (2) self-appraised antecedents; (3) interdependence; (4) tendency to stability; and (5) feedback mechanisms. Antecedents include any type of causative change beyond the tolerable limit, while consequences encompass intermediate and long-term outcomes as well as equilibrium itself. Family homeostasis provides a conceptual rationale of family caregiving. While care recipients remain the primary beneficiaries of healthcare provision, homeostatic mechanisms are required to support the family caregiver's valuable contribution in the caring process to enhance family well-being. Further study should expand the definition and settings of family to reflect healthcare needs of diverse types of families and from the perspectives of different healthcare providers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The vagal innervation of the gut and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Gianluca; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2013-08-01

    The central nervous system interacts dynamically with the immune system to modulate inflammation through humoral and neural pathways. Recently, in animal models of sepsis, the vagus nerve (VN) has been proposed to play a crucial role in the regulation of the immune response, also referred to as the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. The VN, through release of acetylcholine, dampens immune cell activation by interacting with α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Recent evidence suggests that the vagal innervation of the gastrointestinal tract also plays a major role controlling intestinal immune activation. Indeed, VN electrical stimulation potently reduces intestinal inflammation restoring intestinal homeostasis, whereas vagotomy has the reverse effect. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding concerning the mechanisms and effects involved in the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the gastrointestinal tract. Deeper investigation on this counter-regulatory neuroimmune mechanism will provide new insights in the cross-talk between the nervous and immune system leading to the identification of new therapeutic targets to treat intestinal immune disease.

  19. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  20. Research Progress of Intestinal Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-shun YE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disseases (IBD are chronic recurrent diseases occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, mainly including ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. At present, the etiological factors and mechanism of IBD are still unclear yet. However, it is widely believed that IBD is caused by immune dysfunction, genetic factors, gut barrier dysfuction and dysbacteriosis, change of dietary structure, use of antibiotics, smoking, and environment. Studies suggest that breaking the accurate balance between host and intestinal microbiota in patients with IBD can trigger immuno-inflammatory responses in genetically susceptible individuals. Therefore, regulating intestinal microbiota disturbance and recovery of intestinal homeostasis between host and intestinal microbiota become a new treatment direction for IBD. This article mainly reviewed research progress of intestinal microbiota in pathogenetic mechanism and treatment of IBD.

  1. Secretory IgA's complex roles in immunity and mucosal homeostasis in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantis, N J; Rol, N; Corthésy, B

    2011-11-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) serves as the first line of defense in protecting the intestinal epithelium from enteric toxins and pathogenic microorganisms. Through a process known as immune exclusion, SIgA promotes the clearance of antigens and pathogenic microorganisms from the intestinal lumen by blocking their access to epithelial receptors, entrapping them in mucus, and facilitating their removal by peristaltic and mucociliary activities. In addition, SIgA functions in mucosal immunity and intestinal homeostasis through mechanisms that have only recently been revealed. In just the past several years, SIgA has been identified as having the capacity to directly quench bacterial virulence factors, influence composition of the intestinal microbiota by Fab-dependent and Fab-independent mechanisms, promote retro-transport of antigens across the intestinal epithelium to dendritic cell subsets in gut-associated lymphoid tissue, and, finally, to downregulate proinflammatory responses normally associated with the uptake of highly pathogenic bacteria and potentially allergenic antigens. This review summarizes the intrinsic biological activities now associated with SIgA and their relationships with immunity and intestinal homeostasis.

  2. Defence Mechanisms during Intestinal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Buret

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This review examines and compares host defence mechanisms during intestinal infection with three types of organisms: a virus, a bacterium and a nematode parasite (ie, transmissible gastroenteritis virus [TGEV], Helicobacter jejuni and Trichinella spiralis. Diarrhea is commonly associated with all of these infections. It appears that T spiralis initiates the most elaborate defence system of the three organisms, involving full range humoral and cellular immunity, as well as mucus hypersecretion, epithelial alterations, altered gut motility and parasite impairment (morphological and physiological. In contrast, intestinal defence against H jejuni and TGEV involves fewer components. The latter seems to initiate the most rudimentary host response. Despite such differences, these mechanisms exhibit many similarities, thus further illustrating the relatively limited repertoire of defence systems that the intestine can mount. The mediators translating the insult of any intestinal pathogen into a common response deserve further investigation.

  3. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  4. Growth curves and age-related changes in carcass characteristics, organs, serum parameters, and intestinal transporter gene expression in domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C Q; Yang, J X; Chen, M X; Yan, H C; Wang, X Q

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to fit growth curves, and determine age-related changes in carcass characteristics, organs, serum biochemical parameters, and gene expression of intestinal nutrient transporters in domestic pigeon (Columba livia). In experiment 1, body weight (BW) of 30 pigeons was respectively determined at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days old to fit growth curves and to describe the growth of pigeons. In experiment 2, eighty-four 1-day-old squabs were grouped by weight into 7 groups. On d 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35, twelve birds from each group were randomly selected for slaughter and post-slaughter analysis. The results showed that BW of pigeons increased rapidly from d 1 to d 28 (a 25.7-fold increase), and then had little change until d 35. The Logistic, Gompertz, and Von Bertalanffy functions can all be well fitted with the growth curve of domestic pigeons (R2>0.90) and the Gompertz model showed the highest R2value among the models (R2=0.9997). The equation of Gompertz model was Y=507.72×e-(3.76exp(-0.17t))(Y=BW of pigeon (g); t=time (day)). In addition, breast meat yield (%) increased with age throughout the experiment, whereas the leg meat yield (%) reached to the peak on d 14. Serum total protein, albumin, globulin, and glucose concentration were increased with age, whereas serum uric acid concentration was decreased (Ppigeon were increased with age. The results of correlation analysis showed the gene expressions of B0AT1, PepT1, and NHE2 had positive correlations with BW (0.73pigeon. And the various physiological and functional properties of organs, serum profiles, and gene expression of nutrient transporters in small intestine might cause the differences in their development patterns. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  5. MicroRNAs and Periodontal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, X; Zhou, X; Trombetta-eSilva, J; Francis, M; Gaharwar, A K; Atsawasuwan, P; Diekwisch, T G H

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small RNAs that control gene expression in all aspects of eukaryotic life, primarily through RNA silencing mechanisms. The purpose of the present review is to introduce key miRNAs involved in periodontal homeostasis, summarize the mechanisms by which they affect downstream genes and tissues, and provide an introduction into the therapeutic potential of periodontal miRNAs. In general, miRNAs function synergistically to fine-tune the regulation of biological processes and to remove expression noise rather than by causing drastic changes in expression levels. In the periodontium, miRNAs play key roles in development and periodontal homeostasis and during the loss of periodontal tissue integrity as a result of periodontal disease. As part of the anabolic phase of periodontal homeostasis and periodontal development, miRNAs direct periodontal fibroblasts toward alveolar bone lineage differentiation and new bone formation through WNT, bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch signaling pathways. miRNAs contribute equally to the catabolic aspect of periodontal homeostasis as they affect osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function, either by directly promoting osteoclast activity or by inhibiting osteoclast signaling intermediaries or through negative feedback loops. Their small size and ability to target multiple regulatory networks of related sets of genes have predisposed miRNAs to become ideal candidates for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. To address the immense therapeutic potential of miRNAs and their antagomirs, an ever growing number of delivery approaches toward clinical applications have been developed, including nanoparticle carriers and secondary structure interference inhibitor systems. However, only a fraction of the miRNAs involved in periodontal health and disease are known today. It is anticipated that continued research will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the periodontal miRNA world, and a systematic

  6. THE WORLD VIEW, IDENTITY AND SOCIOCULTUR HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Yur’evna Neronova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the relationship between the phenomenon of world view and sociocultural identity both individuals and the community as a whole. The research is being carried out in the context of current crisis of world view accepted in so-called art Nouveau era. This paper also presents the identity crisis typical for modern civilized societies. A new notion of sociocultural homeostasis is introduced in connection with analyzable phenomena and their mutual relations.Purpose. Study of the relationship between the phenomenon of the world view and sociocultural identity as a structural and functional mechanism.Methodology. Phenomenological and systematic methods with the elements of historical method were employed. Cultural analysis is based on using both axiological and phenomenological approach, and also the elements of semiotic approach.Results. The dependence of identity on the world view is revealed (or is being revealed?, the phenomenon of sociocultural homeostasis is singled out (or is being singled out in the capacity of the mechanism setting up the correspondence in the contradictory unity between the world view as a subjective image and concrete reality as an objective part of this contradictory. The analysis of sociocultural homeostasis is carried out (or is being carried out and the conclusion is being drown that instability of the latter leads to serious problems in the identification of both individuals and communities as a whole. Besides, (moreover the relationship between the legitimacy level of the world view and stability of sociocultural homeostasis is established. (is being established.Practical implications: the system of education.

  7. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  8. Ethylene and nitric oxide involvement in the up-regulation of key genes related to iron acquisition and homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María J; Lucena, Carlos; Romera, Francisco J; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2010-09-01

    In a previous work it was shown that ethylene participates in the up-regulation of several Fe acquisition genes of Arabidopsis, such as AtFIT, AtFRO2, and AtIRT1. In this work the relationship between ethylene and Fe-related genes in Arabidopsis has been looked at in more depth. Genes induced by Fe deficiency regulated by ethylene were searched for. For this, studies were conducted, using microarray analysis and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), to determine which of the genes up-regulated by Fe deficiency are simultaneously suppressed by two different ethylene inhibitors (cobalt and silver thiosulphate), assessing their regulation by ethylene in additional experiments. In a complementary experiment, it was determined that the Fe-related genes up-regulated by ethylene were also responsive to nitric oxide (NO). Further studies were performed to analyse whether Fe deficiency up-regulates the expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis [S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase, and ACC oxidase genes] and signalling (AtETR1, AtCTR1, AtEIN2, AtEIN3, AtEIL1, and AtEIL3). The results obtained show that both ethylene and NO are involved in the up-regulation of many important Fe-regulated genes of Arabidopsis, such as AtFIT, AtbHLH38, AtbHLH39, AtFRO2, AtIRT1, AtNAS1, AtNAS2, AtFRD3, AtMYB72, and others. In addition, the results show that Fe deficiency up-regulates genes involved in both ethylene synthesis (AtSAM1, AtSAM2, AtACS4, AtACS6, AtACS9, AtACO1, and AtACO2) and signalling (AtETR1, AtCTR1, AtEIN2, AtEIN3, AtEIL1, and AtEIL3) in the roots.

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide 2 Stimulates Postresection Intestinal Adaptation in Preterm Pigs by Affecting Proteins Related to Protein, Carbohydrate, and Sulphur Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) stimulates intestinal adaptation after resection in animal models of pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS). It is unknown whether the molecular mechanisms of such GLP-2 effects are similar to those of postresection spontaneous adaptation. Using...... affected by the spontaneous intestinal adaptation following resection alone. Whether more long-term GLP-2 treatment may affect the intestinal proteome following intestinal resection remains unknown.......BACKGROUND: Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) stimulates intestinal adaptation after resection in animal models of pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS). It is unknown whether the molecular mechanisms of such GLP-2 effects are similar to those of postresection spontaneous adaptation. Using...

  10. Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-06-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated with the majority of de novo cholesterol synthesis occurring in the liver and intestine. 3 Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a major enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, is raised in both liver and intestine in diabetic animals. Niemann PickC1-like1 protein regulates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and facilitates cholesterol transport through the liver. There is evidence to suggest that the effect of inhibition of Niemann PickC1-like1 lowers cholesterol through its effect not only in the intestine but also in the liver. ATP binding cassette proteins G5\\/G8 regulate cholesterol re-excretion in the intestine and in the liver, cholesterol excretion into the bile. Diabetes is associated with reduced ATP binding cassette protein G5\\/G8 expression in both the liver and intestine in animal models. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is central to the formation of the chylomicron in the intestine and VLDL in the liver. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mRNA is increased in diabetes in both the intestine and liver. Cross-talk between the intestine and liver is poorly documented in humans due to the difficulty in obtaining liver biopsies but animal studies are fairly consistent in showing relationships that explain in part mechanisms involved in cholesterol homeostasis.

  11. Intestinal parasitosis in relation to CD4+T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengist, Hylemariam Mihiretie; Taye, Bineyam; Tsegaye, Aster

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasites (IPs) are major concerns in most developing countries where HIV/AIDS cases are concentrated and almost 80% of AIDS patients die of AIDS-related infections. In the absence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV/AIDS patients in developing countries unfortunately continue to suffer from the consequences of opportunistic and other intestinal parasites. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4+ T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naïve pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A prospective comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV/AIDS patients attending a model ART center at Zewditu Memorial Hospital between August 05, 2013 and November 25, 2013. A total of 180 (79 HAART initiated and 101 HAART naïve) children were included by using consecutive sampling. Stool specimen was collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated risk factors. CD4+ T cells and complete blood counts were performed using BD FACScalibur and Cell-Dyn 1800, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16 software. Logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between explanatory factors and outcome variables. P values intestinal parasites significantly differed by HAART status and cryptosporidium species were found only in HAART naïve patients with low CD4+ T cell counts. Anemia was also more prevalent and significantly associated with IPs in non-HAART patients. This study identified some environmental and associated risk factors for intestinal parasitic infections. Therefore, Public health measures should continue to emphasize the importance of environmental and personal hygiene to protect HIV/AIDS patients from

  12. Physiological Roles for mafr-1 in Reproduction and Lipid Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshat Khanna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Maf1 is a conserved repressor of RNA polymerase (Pol III transcription; however, its physiological role in the context of a multicellular organism is not well understood. Here, we show that C. elegans MAFR-1 is functionally orthologous to human Maf1, represses the expression of both RNA Pol III and Pol II transcripts, and mediates organismal fecundity and lipid homeostasis. MAFR-1 impacts lipid transport by modulating intestinal expression of the vitellogenin family of proteins, resulting in cell-nonautonomous defects in the developing reproductive system. MAFR-1 levels inversely correlate with stored intestinal lipids, in part by influencing the expression of the lipogenesis enzymes fasn-1/FASN and pod-2/ACC1. Animals fed a high carbohydrate diet exhibit reduced mafr-1 expression and mutations in the insulin signaling pathway genes daf-18/PTEN and daf-16/FoxO abrogate the lipid storage defects associated with deregulated mafr-1 expression. Our results reveal physiological roles for mafr-1 in regulating organismal lipid homeostasis, which ensure reproductive success.

  13. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  14. Arginine homeostasis in allergic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, Harm; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    2008-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic disease characterized by early and late asthmatic reactions, airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Changes in L-arginine homeostasis may contribute to all these features of asthma by decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and increased

  15. Homeostasis: an underestimated focal point of ecology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Mario

    2013-10-01

    The concept of homeostasis is often ill-defined, in the scientific literature. The word "homeostasis", literally, indicates the absence of changes and an absolute maintenance of the status quo. The multiplicity of possible examples of homeostasis suggests that it is essentially impossible that all aspects of the composition of the organism and the rate of processes carried out by the organism are simultaneously held constant, when the environment changes are in the non-lethal range. In attempting to clarify the usage of the term homeostasis, I emphasize the probable contributions to evolutionary fitness of homeostasis main attributes: rate processes and compositions. I also attempted to identify the aspects of homeostasis that are most likely to be subject to natural selection. The tendency to retain the status quo derives from the interplay of functions (among which growth), metabolic pools and elemental stoichiometry. The set points around which oscillations occur in biological system and their control mechanisms are determined by evolutionary processes; consequently, also the tendency of a cell to be homeostatic with respect to a given set point is selectable. A homeostatic response to external perturbations may be selectively favored when the potential reproductive advantage offered by a reorganization of cell resources cannot be exploited. This is most likely to occur in the case of environmental perturbations of moderate intensity and short duration relative to the growth rate. Under these circumstances, homeostasis may be an energetically and competitively preferable option, because it requires no alteration of the expressed proteome and eliminates the requirement for reverse acclimation, upon cessation of the perturbation. This review also intends to be a stimulus to "ad hoc" experiments to assess the ecological and evolutionary relevance of homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to polydextrose and changes in bowel function (ID 784), changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract (ID 784), decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 785) and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort (ID 784) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    OpenAIRE

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health claims in relation to polydextrose and changes in bowel function, changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract, decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-in...

  17. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  18. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation

  19. Ischemia-reperfusion and neonatal intestinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christopher M; Kingma, Sandra D K; Neu, Josef

    2011-02-01

    We review research relating ischemia/reperfusion to injury in the neonatal intestine. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that the most common form of necrotizing enterocolitis is not triggered by a primary hypoxic-ischemic event. Its late occurrence, lack of preceding ischemic events, and evidence for microbial and inflammatory processes preclude a major role for primary hypoxic ischemia as the sentinel pathogenic event. However, term infants, especially those with congenital heart disease who have development of intestinal necrosis, and those preterm infants with spontaneous intestinal perforations, are more likely to have intestinal ischemia as a primary component of their disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The homeostasis solution – Mechanical homeostasis in architecturally homeostatic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin-Shu; Ma, Peizheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Architectural homeostatic buildings (AHBs) make sense because of the laws of physics. • However, high efficiency can be obtained only with AHBs and equipment considered as systems. • Mechanical homeostasis facilitates AHB-equipment system synergy with heat extraction. • Entropically speaking a building needs neither energy nor a fixed amount of heat, but its homeostatic existence. • Homeostatic buildings can reduce building energy consumption from 80% to 90%. - Abstract: We already know, for energy-saving potential, the necessary architectural features in well-designed buildings: high performance building envelope, sufficient interior thermal mass, and hydronic-network activated radiant surfaces for cooling and heating. Buildings with these features may be referred to as architecturally homeostatic buildings (AHBs); such a building-system is thermally semi-autonomous in the sense that its temperature variation stays within a certain range even without conditioning equipment, and, with conditioning equipment in operation, its thermal regulation is handled by its hydronic heat-distribution-network for controlling the temperature level of the building. At the present time conventional HVAC equipment is used for maintaining the heat-distribution-network: this arrangement, however, has resulted in great energy saving only for AHBs with accessible natural water bodies. In operation of general AHBs, a case is made here for a new kind of mechanical equipment having the attribute of mechanical homeostasis (MH). MH is a new energy transformation concept in a triadic framework. Superlative energy efficiency is predicted as a result of combined improvements in higher triadCOPs and lower total (inducted + removed) heat rates—evincing existence of synergy in architectural and mechanical homeostasis, which together will be referred to as the homeostasis solution.

  1. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure: Catheter-Related Complications Over 4 Decades at the Main Danish Tertiary Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M; Brøbech, Per; Staun, Michael; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2018-01-01

    Catheter-related complications (CRCs) cause mortality and morbidity in patients dependent on parenteral support at home (HPN) due to intestinal failure (IF). This study describes the incidences of CRCs in an adult IF cohort over 40 years. It illustrates the evolution and consequences of CRCs, their association to demographic characteristics, and potential risk factors in an effort to provide the rationale for preventive precautions to the relevant patients with IF at risk. All patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010 were included. Patient and treatment characteristics were extracted from the Copenhagen IF database. The incidences were given per 1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days. The 1715 CRCs occurred in 70% of the 508 patients with IF (56% of the 2191 CVCs). The incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) was 1.43. Higher age, HPN administration by community home nurses, and prior CRBSIs significantly raised the hazard for CRBSIs. In the 1970s, catheters were generally replaced following CRBSIs, whereas catheter salvage was the norm in the 2000s. The incidences of mechanical complications, tunnel infections, and catheter-related venous thromboses were 0.80, 0.25, and 0.11, respectively. The overall CRC incidence was 2.58, decreasing the first 3 decades but peaking in the last (2.84). The deaths related to CRCs were low (0.018). Even in an experienced IF center of excellence, the incidence of CRCs increased over the 4 decades. This increase could be explained by the expansion of the indication of HPN to a more elderly and frail patient population. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Anatomical localization of commensal bacteria in immune cell homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Thomas C; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract is colonized by trillions of beneficial commensal bacteria that are essential for promoting normal intestinal physiology. While the majority of commensal bacteria are found in the intestinal lumen, many species have also adapted to colonize different anatomical locations in the intestine, including the surface of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and the interior of gut-associated lymphoid tissues. These distinct tissue localization patterns permit unique interactions with the mammalian immune system and collectively influence intestinal immune cell homeostasis. Conversely, dysregulated localization of commensal bacteria can lead to inappropriate activation of the immune system and is associated with numerous chronic infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases. Therefore, regulatory mechanisms that control proper anatomical containment of commensal bacteria are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis and limit pathology. In this review, we propose that commensal bacteria associated with the mammalian GI tract can be anatomically defined as (i) luminal, (ii) epithelial-associated, or (iii) lymphoid tissue-resident, and we discuss the role and regulation of these microbial populations in health and disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Nutritional components regulate the gut immune system and its association with intestinal immune disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun

    2013-12-01

    The gut is equipped with a unique immune system for maintaining immunological homeostasis, and its functional immune disruption can result in the development of immune diseases such as food allergy and intestinal inflammation. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that nutritional components play an important role in the regulation of gut immune responses and also in the development of intestinal immune diseases. In this review, we focus on the immunological functions of lipids, vitamins, and nucleotides in the regulation of the intestinal immune system and as potential targets for the control of intestinal immune diseases. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Morphologic and cytoproliferative patterns of duodenal mucosa in two patients after long-term total parenteral nutrition: changes with oral refeeding and relation to intestinal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironi, L; Paganelli, G M; Miglioli, M; Biasco, G; Santucci, R; Ruggeri, E; Di Febo, G; Barbara, L

    1994-01-01

    The morphologic and cytoproliferative patterns of the duodenal mucosa of two adult patients, one of whom had a short bowel, were evaluated after more than 2 months of postoperative total parenteral nutrition and 2 and 12 months after the resumption of oral alimentation. Morphometric analysis was performed on routinely processed duodenal biopsies. Cell proliferation was evaluated by means of in vitro bromodeoxyuridine uptake. The results were compared with those obtained in five healthy controls. After parenteral nutrition, patients showed significantly lower villus height and crypt depth than those of controls and a normal bromodeoxyuridine labeling index. After 2 months of refeeding, villus and crypt returned to normal, and the labeling index was increased. After 12 months of oral refeeding, labeling index, villus height, and crypt depth were similar to those of controls. The patient with the short bowel showed a number of cells per unit length of villus and crypt significantly greater than those of the controls and of the patient who underwent shorter intestinal resection. In human duodenal mucosa, (1) hypoplasia develops after long-term total parenteral nutrition; (2) mucosal recovery occurs through an increased cell proliferation after oral refeeding; and (3) extensive small bowel resection determines the development of relative hyperplasia.

  5. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine presents a huge surface area to the outside environment, a property that is of critical importance for its key functions in nutrient digestion, absorption, and waste disposal. As such, the intestine is constantly exposed to dietary and microbial-derived foreign antigens, to which im...... of the role these subsets play in the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis and inflammation will help to define novel strategies for the treatment of intestinal pathologies and contribute to improved rational design of mucosal vaccines....... immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive...... immune responses. In the intestinal mucosa, DCs are located diffusely throughout the intestinal lamina propria, within gut-associated lymphoid tissues, including Peyer's patches and smaller lymphoid aggregates, as well as in intestinal-draining lymph nodes, including mesenteric lymph nodes...

  6. Energy Homeostasis in Monotremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart C. Nicol

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1803, the French anatomist Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire decided that the newly described echidna and platypus should be placed in a separate order, the monotremes, intermediate between reptiles and mammals. The first physiological observations showed monotremes had low body temperatures and metabolic rates, and the consensus was that they were at a stage of physiological development intermediate between “higher mammals” and “lower vertebrates.” Subsequent studies demonstrated that platypuses and echidnas are capable of close thermoregulation in the cold although less so under hot conditions. Because the short-beaked echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus, may show very large daily variations in body temperature, as well as seasonal hibernation, it has been suggested that it may provide a useful model of protoendotherm physiology. Such analysis is complicated by the very significant differences in thermal relations between echidnas from different climates. In all areas female echidnas regulate Tb within 1°C during egg incubation. The lactation period is considered to be the most energetically expensive time for most female mammals but lactating echidnas showed no measurable difference in field metabolic rate from non-lactating females, while the lactation period is more than 200 days for Kangaroo Island echidnas but only 150 days in Tasmania. In areas with mild winters echidnas show reduced activity and shallow torpor in autumn and early winter, but in areas with cold winters echidnas enter true hibernation with Tb falling as low as 4.5°C. Monotremes do not possess brown adipose tissue and maximum rates of rewarming from hibernation in echidnas were only half those of marmots of the same mass. Although echidnas show very large seasonal variations in fat stores associated with hibernation there is no relationship between plasma leptin and adiposity. Leptin levels are lowest during post-reproductive fattening, supporting suggestions that in

  7. Measures to minimize small intestine injury in the irradiated pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Iba, G.; Smith, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    Small intestine injury causes long-term suffering and high mortality. Five of 187 of our patients had developed serious small intestine injury. Four patients had corrective surgery. Three patients died. All were women. Subsequently, all patients who received definitive pelvic irradiation had small intestine roentgenograms to determine its location and mobility. Female patients, thin patients, and elderly patients had larger amounts of small intestine in the whole pelvis, a deeper cul de sac, and a greater incidence of relatively immobile small intestine. Patients with relatively immobile small intestine in the treatment field may be predisposed to injury. There was no relationship of the incidence of relatively immobile small intestine to prior pelvic surgery. We used the findings from the small intestine roentgenograms to modify individually the radiotherapy regimen so as to minimize the risk for small intestine injury. Patients were placed in the prone position to displace the small intestine out of the treatment fields used for booster dose irradiation. The treatment field was modified to exclude the small intestine. The total tumor dose delivered was determined by expectations for cure vs complications. To date, none of the patients in this study group has developed small intestine injury. Cadaver studies showed the feasibility of elective shortening of the pelvic cul de sac. The small intestine can be displaced away from the bladder, prostate, or cervix. (U.S.)

  8. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: a report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prognosis is poor and most patients die early because of sepsis or total parental nutrition-related complications. This report describes a new case of megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome associated with meconium ileus, dilated stomach, and megaesophagus. Keywords: intestinal hypoperistalsis ...

  9. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: a report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intestinal peristalsis. The prognosis is poor and most patients die early because of sepsis or total parental nutrition-related complications. This report describes a new case of megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome associated with meconium ileus, dilated stomach, and megaesophagus. Ann Pediatr Surg.

  10. Effects of flavonoids on intestinal inflammation, barrier integrity and changes in gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cardoso, Katherine; Ginés, Iris; Pinent, Montserrat; Ardévol, Anna; Blay, Mayte; Terra, Ximena

    2016-12-01

    Diet-induced obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, which, in most cases, leads to the development of metabolic disorders, primarily insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Although prior studies have implicated the adipose tissue as being primarily responsible for obesity-associated inflammation, the latest discoveries have correlated impairments in intestinal immune homeostasis and the mucosal barrier with increased activation of the inflammatory pathways and the development of insulin resistance. Therefore, it is essential to define the mechanisms underlying the obesity-associated gut alterations to develop therapies to prevent and treat obesity and its associated diseases. Flavonoids appear to be promising candidates among the natural preventive treatments that have been identified to date. They have been shown to protect against several diseases, including CVD and various cancers. Furthermore, they have clear anti-inflammatory properties, which have primarily been evaluated in non-intestinal models. At present, a growing body of evidence suggests that flavonoids could exert a protective role against obesity-associated pathologies by modulating inflammatory-related cellular events in the intestine and/or the composition of the microbiota populations. The present paper will review the literature to date that has described the protective effects of flavonoids on intestinal inflammation, barrier integrity and gut microbiota in studies conducted using in vivo and in vitro models.

  11. Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manganelli Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15 attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15% tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81% out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19% presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.

  12. Intestinal microbiome landscaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss

  13. [Prevention and management of intestinal obstruction after gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiming

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication after gastrointestinal surgery, and will endanger the patients if not managed properly. The key to the management of intestinal obstruction includes not only the selection of treatment, but also adequate judgment of the cause, location, extent and the probability of reoperation by detailed inquiry of the history, thorough physical examination, and imaging studies, which will guide the treatment. Non-operative therapy is the mainstay of treatment for incomplete obstruction, whilebowel decompression the gut by small intestinal decompression tube, preoperative procedures including restoration of systemic homeostasis should be performed. Efforts should be made to avoid emergency laparotomy without any preparations. Procedures to avoid intestinal obstruction include all the efforts to protect the gut and the intra-abdominal viscera during laparotomy, and to clear all the foreign body and tissues by thorough lavage of the abdominal cavity with saline before closing the abdomen.

  14. MicroRNA-orchestrated pathophysiologic control in gut homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Eun Jeong; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The intestine represents the largest and most elaborate immune system organ, in which dynamic and reciprocal interplay among numerous immune and epithelial cells, commensal microbiota, and external antigens contributes to establishing both homeostatic and pathologic conditions. The mechanisms that sustain gut homeostasis are pivotal in maintaining gut health in the harsh environment of the gut lumen. Intestinal epithelial cells are critical players in creating the mucosal platform for interplay between host immune cells and luminal stress inducers. Thus, knowledge of the epithelial interface between immune cells and the luminal environment is a prerequisite for a better understanding of gut homeostasis and pathophysiologies such as inflammation. In this review, we explore the importance of the epithelium in limiting or promoting gut inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease). We also introduce recent findings on how small RNAs such as microRNAs orchestrate pathophysiologic gene regulation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 263-269].

  15. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Witherden, Deborah A; Havran, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial surfaces line the body and provide a crucial interface between the body and the external environment. Tissue-resident epithelial γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in the epithelial tissues and are ideally positioned to carry out barrier surveillance and aid in tissue homeostasis and repair. In this Review, we focus on the intraepithelial γδ T cell compartment of the two largest epithelial tissues in the body - namely, the epidermis and the intestine - and provide a comprehensive overview of the crucial contributions of intraepithelial γδ T cells to tissue integrity and repair, host homeostasis and protection in the context of the symbiotic relationship with the microbiome and during pathogen clearance. Finally, we describe epithelium-specific butyrophilin-like molecules and briefly review their emerging role in selectively shaping and regulating epidermal and intestinal γδ T cell repertoires.

  16. Comparison of intestinal microbiota and activities of digestive and immune-related enzymes of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus in two habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiumei; Chen, Muyan; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Peidong

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus stock enhancement by releasing hatchery-produced seeds is a management tool used to recover its population under natural environmental conditions. To assess the suitability of releasing sites, we examined the microbiota of the gut contents of A. japonicus from two populations (one in sandy-muddy seagrass beds and one in rocky intertidal reefs) and the microbiota in their surrounding sediments. The activities of digestive and immune-related enzymes in the A. japonicus were also examined. The results indicated that higher bacterial richness and Shannon diversity index were observed in all the seagrass-bed samples. There were significant differences in intestinal and sediment microorganisms between the two habitats, with a 2.87 times higher abundance of Firmicutes in the seagrass bed sediments than that in the reefs. Meanwhile, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were significantly higher abundant in the gut content of A. japonicus from seagrass bed than those from the reefs. In addition, the seagrass-bed samples exhibited a relatively higher abundance of potential probiotics. Principal coordinates analysis and heatmap showed the bacterial communities were classified into two groups corresponding to the two habitat types. Moreover, compared to A. japonicus obtained from rocky intertidal habitat, those obtained from the seagrass bed showed higher lysozyme, superoxide dismutase and protease activities. Our results suggest that bacterial communities present in seagrass beds might enhance the digestive function and immunity of A. japonicus. Therefore, compared with the rocky intertidal reef, seagrass bed seems to be more beneficial for the survival of A. japonicus.

  17. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all of an organ that contains cancer. The resection may include the small intestine and nearby organs (if the cancer has spread). The doctor may remove the section of the small intestine that contains cancer and perform an anastomosis (joining the cut ends of the intestine together). ...

  18. Antibiotic-mediated modification of the intestinal microbiome in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whangbo, J; Ritz, J; Bhatt, A

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many patients with severe benign and malignant hematologic disorders. The success of allogeneic HSCT is limited by the development of transplant-related complications such as acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Early pre-clinical studies suggested that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of acute GvHD, and that growth suppression or eradication of intestinal bacteria prevented the development of acute GvHD even in MHC-mismatched transplants. These observations led to the practice of gut decontamination (GD) with oral non-absorbable antibiotics in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT as a method of acute GvHD prophylaxis. Microbiome studies in the modern sequencing era are beginning to challenge the benefit of this practice. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the practice of GD and highlight findings from the limited number of clinical trials evaluating the use of GD for acute GvHD prevention in allogeneic HSCT patients. In addition, we examine the role of the gut microbiota in allogeneic HSCT in the context of recent studies linking the microflora to regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis. We discuss the implications of these findings for future strategies to reduce acute GvHD risk by selective manipulation of the microbiota.

  19. Wnt control of stem cells and differentiation in the intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Daniel; Clevers, Hans

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents a very attractive experimental model for the study of integrated key cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation. The tissue is subjected to a rapid and perpetual self-renewal along the crypt-villus axis. Renewal requires division of multipotent stem cells, still to be morphologically identified and isolated, followed by transit amplification, and differentiation of daughter cells into specialized absorptive and secretory cells. Our understanding of the crucial role played by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in controlling the fine balance between cell proliferation and differentiation in the gut has been significantly enhanced in recent years. Mutations in some of its components irreversibly lead to carcinogenesis in humans and in mice. Here, we discuss recent advances related to the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in regulating intestinal stem cells, homeostasis, and cancer. We emphasize how Wnt signaling is able to maintain a stem cell/progenitor phenotype in normal intestinal crypts, and to impose a very similar phenotype onto colorectal adenomas

  20. RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnblox(ex3 mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration. : In this article, Zheng and colleagues show that inducible RHOA deletion in mice causes defects in intestine epithelial polarity and deficiencies in intestinal stem cell proliferation, survival, and regeneration. They further demonstrate by genetic rescues that RHOA controls a YAP-EREG axis to mediate canonical Wnt signaling, intestinal stem cell function, and intestinal homeostasis. Keywords: mouse model, intestinal stem cell, regeneration, Rho GTPase, RhoA, Hippo signaling, YAP, Wnt signaling

  1. Nonlinear transcriptomic response to dietary fat intake in the small intestine of C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyima, Tenzin; Müller, Michael; Hooiveld, Guido J E J; Morine, Melissa J; Scotti, Marco

    2016-02-09

    A high caloric diet, in conjunction with low levels of physical activity, promotes obesity. Many studies are available regarding the relation between dietary saturated fats and the etiology of obesity, but most focus on liver, muscle and white adipose tissue. Furthermore, the majority of transcriptomic studies seek to identify linear effects of an external stimulus on gene expression, although such an assumption does not necessarily hold. Our work assesses the dose-dependent effects of dietary fat intake on differential gene expression in the proximal, middle and distal sections of the small intestine in C57BL/6J mice. Gene expression is analyzed in terms of either linear or nonlinear responses to fat intake. The highest number of differentially expressed genes was observed in the middle section. In all intestine sections, most of the identified processes exhibited a linear response to increasing fat intake. The relative importance of logarithmic and exponential responses was higher in the proximal and distal sections, respectively. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted a constantly linear regulation of acute-phase response along the whole small intestine, with up-regulation of Serpina1b. The study of gene expression showed that exponential down-regulation of cholesterol transport in the middle section is coupled with logarithmic up-regulation of cholesterol homeostasis. A shift from linear to exponential response was observed in genes involved in the negative regulation of caspase activity, from middle to distal section (e.g., Birc5, up-regulated). The transcriptomic signature associated with inflammatory processes preserved a linear response in the whole small intestine (e.g., up-regulation of Serpina1b). Processes related to cholesterol homeostasis were particularly active in the middle small intestine and only the highest fat intake down-regulated cholesterol transport and efflux (with a key role played by the down-regulation of ATP binding cassette

  2. Modeling intestinal disorders using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Pack, M

    2017-01-01

    Although the zebrafish was initially developed as a model system to study embryonic development, it has gained increasing attention as an advantageous system to investigate human diseases, including intestinal disorders. Zebrafish embryos develop rapidly, and their digestive system is fully functional and visible by 5days post fertilization. There is a large degree of homology between the intestine of zebrafish and higher vertebrate organisms in terms of its cellular composition and function as both a digestive and immune organ. Furthermore, molecular pathways regulating injury and immune responses are highly conserved. In this chapter, we provide an overview of studies addressing developmental and physiological processes relevant to human intestinal disease. These studies include those related to congenital disorders, host-microbiota interactions, inflammatory diseases, motility disorders, and intestinal cancer. We also highlight the utility of zebrafish to functionally validate candidate genes identified through mutational analyses and genome-wide association studies, and discuss methodologies to investigate the intestinal biology that are unique to zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Isotopic identification of intestinal strangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.C.; Selby, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A small series of eleven dogs prepared with a strangulating segment of jejunum demonstrated that a radionuclide, 99 mTc-labelled albumin, concentrates in the lumen and bowel wall of the affected intestinal segment. Modern scanning equipment accurately localized the strangulating loop. This technique has the potential of identifying patients with intestinal obstruction, in whom strangulation is a factor, prior to the development of impaired arterial inflow and frank gangrene. These findings confirmed earlier obstructions that were reported when nuclear scanning instrumentation was less sophisticated. Identification of patients at risk for intestinal strangulation requires a high index of suspicion. Excruciating cramping abdominal pain out of proportion to physical findings, roentgenogram evidence, and laboratory studies should alert the physician to the possibility of intestinal ischemia and closed loop obstruction. Radionuclide scanning in such cases may be of assistance in defining or excluding the diagnosis of a strangulating mechanism. The test is simple, relatively economical, and represents a low risk procedure to patients. It would have no place when the classic physical and laboratory findings of intestinal infarction are present

  4. Isotopic identification of intestinal strangulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.C.; Selby, J.B.

    1982-12-01

    A small series of eleven dogs prepared with a strangulating segment of jejunum demonstrated that a radionuclide, /sup 99/mTc-labelled albumin, concentrates in the lumen and bowel wall of the affected intestinal segment. Modern scanning equipment accurately localized the strangulating loop. This technique has the potential of identifying patients with intestinal obstruction, in whom strangulation is a factor, prior to the development of impaired arterial inflow and frank gangrene. These findings confirmed earlier obstructions that were reported when nuclear scanning instrumentation was less sophisticated. Identification of patients at risk for intestinal strangulation requires a high index of suspicion. Excruciating cramping abdominal pain out of proportion to physical findings, roentgenogram evidence, and laboratory studies should alert the physician to the possibility of intestinal ischemia and closed loop obstruction. Radionuclide scanning in such cases may be of assistance in defining or excluding the diagnosis of a strangulating mechanism. The test is simple, relatively economical, and represents a low risk procedure to patients. It would have no place when the classic physical and laboratory findings of intestinal infarction are present.

  5. [Estimate of cytogenetic homeostasis in natural populations of some small murid rodents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, C G; Zakharov, V M

    2001-01-01

    Cytogenetic homeostasis in natural populations under natural conditions and anthropogenic stress was estimated according to the frequency of chromosome aberrations in somatic cells for six species of small mammals. Cytogenetic homeostasis was disturbed under the stress effect of increased density during population cycles, at the ecological periphery, and in the case of environmental chemical and radiation contamination. Cytogenetic homeostasis disturbances were related to changes in other indices of homeostasis, such as developmental stability and immune status, suggesting the use of the cytogenetic approach for estimating the general state of individuals in natural populations.

  6. Hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, P A

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, with overall mortality exceeding 40% even with treatment. Effective efforts for screening and prevention are most likely to succeed in patient groups identified as high risk for colorectal cancer, most notably the hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes. In these syndromes, benign polyps develop throughout the intestinal tract prior to the development of colorectal cancer, marking the patient and associated family for precancer diagnosis followed by either close surveillance or preventive treatment. This review article was undertaken to discuss the most recent developments in the knowledge of hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes, emphasizing the clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment relative to preventing the development of cancer. The most common of the hereditary polyposis syndromes is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which is characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomatous polyps in the colon followed at an early age by colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer can be prevented in this autosomal dominant condition by prophylactic colectomy, though a risk for other tumors, including periampullary cancers, remains throughout life. Variant of FAP associated with fewer and smaller polyps (hereditary flat adenoma syndrome), or even CNS tumors (Turcot's syndrome) also carry this high risk of colorectal cancer. Hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes such as juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (also autosomal dominant) are characterized by less frequent polyps. Though these are generally benign polyps, they are also associated with a significant risk of colorectal and other cancers. Other polyposis syndromes, including neurofibromatosis and Cowden's disease, do not carry this increased risk of colorectal cancer, and therefore affect different treatment strategies. Analysis of genetic factors responsible for these and other hereditary syndromes with

  7. Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to sugar beet fibre and decreasing intestinal transit time pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    based on newly developed scientific evidence related to sugar beet fibre and “decreasing intestinal transit time”. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is sugar beet fibre. This opinion applies to sugar beet fibre naturally present in foods and to those forms added to foods......Following an application from Nordic Sugar A/S, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Denmark, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim....... The Panel considers that sugar beet fibre is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect. The claimed effect is “decreasing intestinal transit time”. The target population proposed by the applicant is people who want to improve or maintain normal bowel function. The Panel considers...

  8. BVES Regulates Intestinal Stem Cell Programs and Intestinal Crypt Viability after Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vishruth K.; Short, Sarah P.; Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Mittal, Mukul K.; Keating, Cody E.; Thompson, Joshua J.; Harris, Elizabeth I.; Revetta, Frank; Bader, David M.; Brand, Thomas; Washington, M. Kay; Williams, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Blood Vessel Epicardial Substance (BVES/Popdc1) is a junctional-associated transmembrane protein that is underexpressed in a number of malignancies and regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We previously identified a role for BVES in regulation of the Wnt pathway, a modulator of intestinal stem cell programs, but its role in small intestinal (SI) biology remains unexplored. We hypothesized that BVES influences intestinal stem cell programs and is critical to SI homeostasis after radiation injury. At baseline, Bves−/− mice demonstrated increased crypt height, as well as elevated proliferation and expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5 compared to wildtype (WT) mice. Intercross with Lgr5-EGFP reporter mice confirmed expansion of the stem cell compartment in Bves−/− mice. To examine stem cell function after BVES deletion, we employed ex vivo 3D-enteroid cultures. Bves−/− enteroids demonstrated increased stemness compared to WT, when examining parameters such as plating efficiency, stem spheroid formation, and retention of peripheral cystic structures. Furthermore, we observed increased proliferation, expression of crypt-base columnar “CBC” and “+4” stem cell markers, amplified Wnt signaling, and responsiveness to Wnt activation in the Bves−/− enteroids. Bves expression was downregulated after radiation in WT mice. Moreover, after radiation, Bves−/− mice demonstrated significantly greater small intestinal crypt viability, proliferation, and amplified Wnt signaling in comparison to WT mice. Bves−/− mice also demonstrated elevations in Lgr5 and Ascl2 expression, and putative damage-responsive stem cell populations marked by Bmi1 and TERT. Therefore, BVES is a key regulator of intestinal stem cell programs and mucosal homeostasis. PMID:26891025

  9. Distribution of E-cadherin and ß-catenin in relation to cell maturation and cell extrusion in rat and mouse small intestines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2006-01-01

    of programmed cell death (PCD) in mouse small intestinal epithelium. We have studied if this also occurs in the intact rodent small intestine. Our results confirm that extruded cells are negatie for E-cadherin. However, loss of the E-cadherin-interacting protein ß-cetenin preceded both extrusion and loss of E......-cadherin. Thus, all extruded cells as well as all cells in the process of extrusion lacked staining for ß-catenin. Moreover, almost 80% of all cells undergoing programmed cell death, as detected by the TUNEL reaction, lacked ß-catenin whereas over 70% of such cells were positive for E-cadherin. However, most...

  10. Effects of Resistant Starch and Arabinoxylan on Parameters Related to Large Intestinal and Metabolic Health in Pigs Fed Fat-Rich Diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Theil, Peter Kappel; Purup, Stig

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of a resistant starch (RS)-rich, arabinoxylan (AX)-rich, or low-DF Western-style control diet (all high-fat) on large intestinal gene expression, adiposity, and glycemic response parameters in pigs. Animals were slaughtered after 3 weeks of treatment. Plasma butyrate...... (cecum, proximal, mid or distal colon) and some genes also by diet. In contrast, there was no diet-induced effect on adipose mRNA abundance or adipocyte size. Overall, a high level of RS or AX did not demonstrate strong beneficial effects on large intestinal gene expression as indicators of colonic...

  11. Innate immunity orchestrates adipose tissue homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Wei; Wei, Li-Na

    2017-06-23

    Obesity is strongly associated with multiple diseases including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, fatty liver disease, neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, etc. Adipose tissue (AT), mainly brown AT (BAT) and white AT (WAT), is an important metabolic and endocrine organ that maintains whole-body homeostasis. BAT contributes to non-shivering thermogenesis in a cold environment; WAT stores energy and produces adipokines that fine-tune metabolic and inflammatory responses. Obesity is often characterized by over-expansion and inflammation of WAT where inflammatory cells/mediators are abundant, especially pro-inflammatory (M1) macrophages, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation and leading to insulin resistance and metabolic complications. Macrophages constitute the major component of innate immunity and can be activated as a M1 or M2 (anti-inflammatory) phenotype in response to environmental stimuli. Polarized M1 macrophage causes AT inflammation, whereas polarized M2 macrophage promotes WAT remodeling into the BAT phenotype, also known as WAT browning/beiging, which enhances insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. This review will discuss the regulation of AT homeostasis in relation to innate immunity.

  12. Construction of cDNA library from intestine, mesentery and coelomocyte of Apostichopus japonicus Selenka infected with Vibrio sp. and a preliminary analysis of immunity-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongzhan; Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Cai, Yimei

    2012-06-01

    The aquaculture of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Echinodermata, Holothuroidea) has grown rapidly during recent years and has become an important sector of the marine industry in Northern China. However, with the rapid growth of the industry and the use of non-standard culture techniques, epidemic diseases of A. japonicus now pose increasing problems to the industry. To screen the genes with stress response to bacterial infection in sea cucumber at a genome wide level, we constructed a cDNA library from A. japonicus Selenka (Aspidochirotida: Stichopodidae) after infecting them with Vibrio sp. for 48 h. Total RNA was extracted from the intestine, mesentery and coelomocyte of infected sea cucumber using Trizol and mRNA was isolated by Oligotex mRNA Kits. The ligated cDNAs were transformed into DH5α, and a library of 3.24×105 clones (3.24×105 cfu mL-1) was obtained with the sizes of inserted fragments ranging from 0.8 to 2.5 kb. Sequencing the cDNA clones resulted in a total of 1106 ESTs that passed the quality control. BlastX and BlastN searches have identified 168 (31.5%) ESTs sharing significant homology with known sequences in NCBI protein or nucleotide databases. Among a panel of 25 putative immunity-related genes, serum lectin isoform, complement component 3, complement component 3-like genes were further studied by real-time PCR and they all increased more than 5 fold in response to Vibrio sp. challenge. Our library provides a valuable molecular tool for future study of invertebrate immunity against bacterial infection and our gene expression data indicates the importance of the immune system in the evolution and development of sea cucumber.

  13. Serotonergic Control of Metabolic Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C. Wyler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New treatments are urgently needed to address the current epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Recent studies have highlighted multiple pathways whereby serotonin (5-HT modulates energy homeostasis, leading to a renewed interest in the identification of 5-HT-based therapies for metabolic disease. This review aims to synthesize pharmacological and genetic studies that have found diverse functions of both central and peripheral 5-HT in the control of food intake, thermogenesis, and glucose and lipid metabolism. We also discuss the potential benefits of targeting the 5-HT system to combat metabolic disease.

  14. Causality of small and large intestinal microbiota in weight regulation and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, Torsten P M; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; de Vos, Willem M; Nieuwdorp, Max; van Raalte, Daniël H

    2016-09-01

    The twin pandemics of obesity and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are a global challenge for health care systems. Changes in the environment, behavior, diet, and lifestyle during the last decades are considered the major causes. A Western diet, which is rich in saturated fat and simple sugars, may lead to changes in gut microbial composition and physiology, which have recently been linked to the development of metabolic diseases. We will discuss evidence that demonstrates the influence of the small and large intestinal microbiota on weight regulation and the development of insulin resistance, based on literature search. Altered large intestinal microbial composition may promote obesity by increasing energy harvest through specialized gut microbes. In both large and small intestine, microbial alterations may increase gut permeability that facilitates the translocation of whole bacteria or endotoxic bacterial components into metabolic active tissues. Moreover, changed microbial communities may affect the production of satiety-inducing signals. Finally, bacterial metabolic products, such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and their relative ratios, may be causal in disturbed immune and metabolic signaling, notably in the small intestine where the surface is large. The function of these organs (adipose tissue, brain, liver, muscle, pancreas) may be disturbed by the induction of low-grade inflammation, contributing to insulin resistance. Interventions aimed to restoring gut microbial homeostasis, such as ingestion of specific fibers or therapeutic microbes, are promising strategies to reduce insulin resistance and the related metabolic abnormalities in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a special issue on microbiota.

  15. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates intestinal epithelial cell morphology and polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxin Yu

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in regulating cell lineage differentiation during development and maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the intestine. In normal intestine, KLF4 is predominantly expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells. It has been identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. KLF4 knockout mice demonstrated a decrease in number of goblet cells in the colon, and conditional ablation of KLF4 from the intestinal epithelium led to altered epithelial homeostasis. However, the role of KLF4 in differentiated intestinal cells and colon cancer cells, as well as the mechanism by which it regulates homeostasis and represses tumorigenesis in the intestine is not well understood. In our study, KLF4 was partially depleted in the differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. We found a significant increase in the number of goblet cells in the KLF4-deleted small intestine, suggesting that KLF4 is not only required for goblet cell differentiation, but also required for maintaining goblet cell numbers through its function in inhibiting cell proliferation. The number and position of Paneth cells also changed. This is consistent with the KLF4 knockout study using villin-Cre [1]. Through immunohistochemistry (IHC staining and statistical analysis, we found that a stem cell and/or tuft cell marker, DCAMKL1, and a proliferation marker, Ki67, are affected by KLF4 depletion, while an enteroendocrine cell marker, neurotensin (NT, was not affected. In addition, we found KLF4 depletion altered the morphology and polarity of the intestinal epithelial cells. Using a three-dimensional (3D intestinal epithelial cyst formation assay, we found that KLF4 is essential for cell polarity and crypt-cyst formation in human colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that, as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, KLF4 affects intestinal epithelial cell

  16. Two intestinal specific nuclear factors binding to the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and sucrase-isomaltase promoters are functionally related oligomeric molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, J T; Mitchelmore, C; Sjöström, H

    1994-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) are enterocyte-specific gene products. The identification of regulatory cis-elements in the promoter of these two genes has enabled us to carry out comparative studies of the corresponding intestinal-specific nuclear factors (NF-LPH1...

  17. Renal tubular NHE3 is required in the maintenance of water and sodium chloride homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Robert A; Poulsen, Søren B; de la Mora Chavez, Samantha; Soleimani, Manoocher; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A; Rieg, Timo

    2017-08-01

    The sodium/proton exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) is expressed in the intestine and the kidney, where it facilitates sodium (re)absorption and proton secretion. The importance of NHE3 in the kidney for sodium chloride homeostasis, relative to the intestine, is unknown. Constitutive tubule-specific NHE3 knockout mice (NHE3 loxloxCre) did not show significant differences compared to control mice in body weight, blood pH or bicarbonate and plasma sodium, potassium, or aldosterone levels. Fluid intake, urinary flow rate, urinary sodium/creatinine, and pH were significantly elevated in NHE3 loxloxCre mice, while urine osmolality and GFR were significantly lower. Water deprivation revealed a small urinary concentrating defect in NHE3 loxloxCre mice on a control diet, exaggerated on low sodium chloride. Ten days of low or high sodium chloride diet did not affect plasma sodium in control mice; however, NHE3 loxloxCre mice were susceptible to low sodium chloride (about -4 mM) or high sodium chloride intake (about +2 mM) versus baseline, effects without differences in plasma aldosterone between groups. Blood pressure was significantly lower in NHE3 loxloxCre mice and was sodium chloride sensitive. In control mice, the expression of the sodium/phosphate co-transporter Npt2c was sodium chloride sensitive. However, lack of tubular NHE3 blunted Npt2c expression. Alterations in the abundances of sodium/chloride cotransporter and its phosphorylation at threonine 58 as well as the abundances of the α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel, and its cleaved form, were also apparent in NHE3 loxloxCre mice. Thus, renal NHE3 is required to maintain blood pressure and steady-state plasma sodium levels when dietary sodium chloride intake is modified. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and 137 Cs γ rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and γ-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome

  19. Glycogen autophagy in glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoulas, O B; Kalamidas, S A; Kondomerkos, D J

    2006-01-01

    Glycogen autophagy, the sequestration and degradation of cell glycogen in the autophagic vacuoles, is a selective, hormonally controlled and highly regulated process, representing a mechanism of glucose homeostasis under conditions of demand for the production of this sugar. In the newborn animals, this process is induced by glucagon secreted during the postnatal hypoglycemia and inhibited by insulin and parenteral glucose, which abolishes glucagon secretion. Hormonal action is mediated by the cAMP/protein kinase A (induction) and phosphoinositides/mTOR (inhibition) pathways that converge on common targets, such as the protein phosphatase 2A to regulate autophgosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid glucosidase and glycogen autophagy. Intralysosomal phosphate exchange reactions, which are affected by changes in the calcium levels and acid mannose 6- and acid glucose 6-phosphatase activities, can modify the intralysosomal composition in phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated glucose and promote the exit of free glucose through the lysosomal membrane. Glycogen autophagy-derived nonphosphorylated glucose assists the hyaloplasmic glycogen degradation-derived glucose 6-phosphate to combat postnatal hypoglycemia and participates in other metabolic pathways to secure the fine tuning of glucose homeostasis during the neonatal period.

  20. Microbiota-stimulated immune mechanisms to maintain gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hachung; Kasper, Dennis Lee

    2010-08-01

    In recent years there has been an explosion of interest to identify microbial inhabitants of human and understand their beneficial role in health. In the gut, a symbiotic host-microbial interaction has coevolved as bacteria make essential contributions to human metabolism and bacteria in turn benefits from the nutrient-rich niche in the intestine. To maintain host-microbe coexistence, the host must protect itself against microbial invasion, injury, and overreactions to foreign food antigens, and gut microbes need protection against competing microbes and the host immune system. Perturbation of this homeostatic coexistence has been strongly associated with human disease. This review discusses how gut bacteria regulate host innate and adaptive immunity, with emphasis on how this regulation contributes to host-microbe homeostasis in the gut. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Interaction of effective ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines with intestinal microbiota].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Xian-Peng; Lin, Zhang; Xie, Hai-Sheng; Yang, Niao; Liu, Xin-Ru; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2016-05-01

    A large number and wide varieties of microorganisms colonize in the human gastrointestinal tract. They construct an intestinal microecological system in the intestinal environment. The intestinal symbiotic flora regulates a series of life actions, including digestion and absorption of nutrient, immune response, biological antagonism, and is closely associated with the occurrence and development of many diseases. Therefore, it is greatly essential for the host's health status to maintain the equilibrium of intestinal microecological environment. After effective compositions of traditional Chinese medicines are metabolized or biotransformed by human intestinal bacteria, their metabolites can be absorbed more easily, and can even decrease or increase toxicity and then exhibit significant different biological effects. Meanwhile, traditional Chinese medicines can also regulate the composition of the intestinal flora and protect the function of intestinal mucosal barrier to restore the homeostasis of intestinal microecology. The relevant literatures in recent 15 years about the interactive relationship between traditional Chinese medicines and gut microbiota have been collected in this review, in order to study the classification of gut microflora, the relationship between intestinal dysbacteriosis and diseases, the important roles of gut microflora in intestinal bacterial metabolism in effective ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines and bioactivities, as well as the modulation effects of Chinese medicine on intestinal dysbacteriosis. In addition, it also makes a future prospect for the research strategies to study the mechanism of action of traditional Chinese medicines based on multi-omics techniques. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. Development of iron homeostasis in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Healthy, term, breastfed infants usually have adequate iron stores that, together with the small amount of iron that is contributed by breast milk, make them iron sufficient until ≥6 mo of age. The appropriate concentration of iron in infant formula to achieve iron sufficiency is more controversial. Infants who are fed formula with varying concentrations of iron generally achieve sufficiency with iron concentrations of 2 mg/L (i.e., with iron status that is similar to that of breastfed infants at 6 mo of age). Regardless of the feeding choice, infants' capacity to regulate iron homeostasis is important but less well understood than the regulation of iron absorption in adults, which is inverse to iron status and strongly upregulated or downregulated. Infants who were given daily iron drops compared with a placebo from 4 to 6 mo of age had similar increases in hemoglobin concentrations. In addition, isotope studies have shown no difference in iron absorption between infants with high or low hemoglobin concentrations at 6 mo of age. Together, these findings suggest a lack of homeostatic regulation of iron homeostasis in young infants. However, at 9 mo of age, homeostatic regulatory capacity has developed although, to our knowledge, its extent is not known. Studies in suckling rat pups showed similar results with no capacity to regulate iron homeostasis at 10 d of age when fully nursing, but such capacity occurred at 20 d of age when pups were partially weaned. The major iron transporters in the small intestine divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin were not affected by pup iron status at 10 d of age but were strongly affected by iron status at 20 d of age. Thus, mechanisms that regulate iron homeostasis are developed at the time of weaning. Overall, studies in human infants and experimental animals suggest that iron homeostasis is absent or limited early in infancy largely because of a lack of regulation of the iron transporters DMT1 and ferroportin

  3. [THE INTESTINAL BARRIER, THE MICROBIOTA, MICROBIOME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar'yanovich, A T

    2016-01-01

    The review examined modern condition of development directions physiology of digestion, like structure and function of the intestinal barrier, the microbiota of the digestive tract in its relations with the microorganism.

  4. Dietary myo-inositol deficiency decreased the growth performances and impaired intestinal physical barrier function partly relating to nrf2, jnk, e2f4 and mlck signaling in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang-An; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Feng, Lin; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Tang, Xu; Shi, He-Qun; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary myo-inositol on the growth and intestinal physical barrier functions of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp (221.83 ± 0.84 g) were fed six diets containing graded levels of myo-inositol (27.0, 137.9, 286.8, 438.6, 587.7 and 737.3 mg/kg) for 10 weeks. After the growth trial, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila for 14 days. The results indicated that compared with optimal myo-inositol levels, myo-inositol deficiency (27.0 mg/kg diet): (1) decreased glutathione (GSH) contents and antioxidant enzymes activities, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes [not glutathione-S-transferase (gst) p1 and gstp2] and NF-E2-related factor 2 (nrf2), whereas up-regulated the reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) contents, and the mRNA levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (keap1) in three intestinal segments of young grass carp (P inositol deficiency could damage physical barrier function in three intestinal segments of fish. Finally, the myo-inositol requirements based on the percent weight gain (PWG), reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents in the proximal intestine (PI), relative mRNA levels of caspase-2 (PI), cyclin b (MI) as well as claudin-b (PI) were estimated to be 276.7, 304.1, 327.9, 416.7 and 313.2 mg/kg diet, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  6. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  7. Copper homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace element essential for the growth and development of almost all organisms, including bacteria. However, Cu overload in most systems is toxic. Studies show Cu accumulates in macrophage phagosomes infected with bacteria, suggesting Cu provides an innate immune mechanism to combat invading pathogens. To counteract the host-supplied Cu, increasing evidence suggests that bacteria have evolved Cu resistance mechanisms to facilitate their pathogenesis. In particular, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, has evolved multiple pathways to respond to Cu. Here, we summarize what is currently known about Cu homeostasis in Mtb and discuss potential sources of Cu encountered by this and other pathogens in a mammalian host.

  8. [Bone homeostasis and Mechano biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    The weight-bearing exercises help to build bones and to maintain them strength. Bone is constantly renewed by the balanced action of osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption both of which mainly occur at the bone surface. This restructuring process called "bone remodeling" is important not only for normal bone mass and strength, but also for mineral homeostasis. Bone remodeling is stringently regulated by communication between bone component cells such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. An imbalance of this process is often linked to various bone diseases. During bone remodeling, resorption by osteoclasts precedes bone formation by osteoblasts. Based on the osteocyte location within the bone matrix and the cellular morphology, it is proposed that osteocytes potentially contribute to the regulation of bone remodeling in response to mechanical and endocrine stimuli.

  9. Intestinal parasites and tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Alonso Cedeño-Burbano

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The available evidence was insufficient to affirm that intestinal parasites predispose to developing tuberculous. The studies carried out so far have found statistically insignificant results.

  10. Recreating Intestinal Peristalsis in the Petri Dish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Luna, Rosa; Barajas-Espinosa, Alma R; Ochoa-Cortez, Fernando; Barajas-López, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Here we describe a culture technique of cells dissociated from the external muscularis of the guinea pig small intestine, which allows us to maintain all the elements involved in the intestinal peristaltic reflex. After a few days in culture, these cells reorganize to form a small group of cells that permit the generation of pacemaker activity, spontaneous contractions, and the development of inhibitory and excitatory junction potentials in the petri dish, all elements involved in the peristaltic reflex. Therefore, these co-cultures are suitable to study the cellular and molecular aspects related to the development, maintenance, and modulation of motor intestinal functions.

  11. Osmotic homeostasis and NKLy lymphoma cells radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishchenko, V.V.; Magda, I.N.

    1992-01-01

    In experiments with cells of ascites NKLy lymphoma differing in ploidy and position in the cell cycle, a study was made of the radiosensitivity, osmotic homeostasis peculiarities and thermoradiation changes in potassium content. It was shown that the resistance of osmotic homeostasis of NKLy cells to thermoradiation correlated with their radioresistance

  12. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of intestinal iron absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Sukru; Anderson, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace mineral that plays a number of important physiological roles in humans, including oxygen transport, energy metabolism, and neurotransmitter synthesis. Iron absorption by the proximal small bowel is a critical checkpoint in the maintenance of whole-body iron levels since, unlike most other essential nutrients, no regulated excretory systems exist for iron in humans. Maintaining proper iron levels is critical to avoid the adverse physiological consequences of either low or high tissue iron concentrations, as commonly occurs in iron-deficiency anemia and hereditary hemochromatosis, respectively. Exquisite regulatory mechanisms have thus evolved to modulate how much iron is acquired from the diet. Systemic sensing of iron levels is accomplished by a network of molecules that regulate transcription of the HAMP gene in hepatocytes, thus modulating levels of the serum-borne, iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin decreases intestinal iron absorption by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin 1 on the basolateral surface of duodenal enterocytes, causing its internalization and degradation. Mucosal regulation of iron transport also occurs during low-iron states, via transcriptional (by hypoxia-inducible factor 2α) and posttranscriptional (by the iron-sensing iron-regulatory protein/iron-responsive element system) mechanisms. Recent studies demonstrated that these regulatory loops function in tandem to control expression or activity of key modulators of iron homeostasis. In health, body iron levels are maintained at appropriate levels; however, in several inherited disorders and in other pathophysiological states, iron sensing is perturbed and intestinal iron absorption is dysregulated. The iron-related phenotypes of these diseases exemplify the necessity of precisely regulating iron absorption to meet body demands. PMID:24994858

  13. Homeostasis of the gut barrier and potential biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Robert J.; Derrien, Muriel; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Troost, Freddy; Cani, Patrice D.; Theodorou, Vassilia; Dekker, Jan; Méheust, Agnes; de Vos, Willem M.; Mercenier, Annick; Nauta, Arjen; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L.

    2017-01-01

    The gut barrier plays a crucial role by spatially compartmentalizing bacteria to the lumen through the production of secreted mucus and is fortified by the production of secretory IgA (sIgA) and antimicrobial peptides and proteins. With the exception of sIgA, expression of these protective barrier factors is largely controlled by innate immune recognition of microbial molecular ligands. Several specialized adaptations and checkpoints are operating in the mucosa to scale the immune response according to the threat and prevent overreaction to the trillions of symbionts inhabiting the human intestine. A healthy microbiota plays a key role influencing epithelial barrier functions through the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and interactions with innate pattern recognition receptors in the mucosa, driving the steady-state expression of mucus and antimicrobial factors. However, perturbation of gut barrier homeostasis can lead to increased inflammatory signaling, increased epithelial permeability, and dysbiosis of the microbiota, which are recognized to play a role in the pathophysiology of a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Additionally, gut-brain signaling may be affected by prolonged mucosal immune activation, leading to increased afferent sensory signaling and abdominal symptoms. In turn, neuronal mechanisms can affect the intestinal barrier partly by activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and both mast cell-dependent and mast cell-independent mechanisms. The modulation of gut barrier function through nutritional interventions, including strategies to manipulate the microbiota, is considered a relevant target for novel therapeutic and preventive treatments against a range of diseases. Several biomarkers have been used to measure gut permeability and loss of barrier integrity in intestinal diseases, but there remains a need to explore their use in assessing the effect of nutritional factors on gut barrier function. Future studies

  14. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 10(14) cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS.

  15. Epithelial structure and function in the hen lower intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, G.; Elbrønd, Vibeke Sødring; Árnason, Sigvatur S.

    2006-01-01

    In birds, transport processes in the lower intestine mediate absorption of ions, water and a variety of organic substrates, including significant amounts of glucose, amino acids derived from protein associated with urate spheres, and short-chain fatty acids derived from fermentation processes....... These transport pathways contribute to both osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Although birds lack a urinary bladder, evidence has shown that ureteral urine, entering the distal lower intestine, is forced into the colon, caecae and even distal portions of the small intestine. Further, substrates also enter......, by resalination of low-salt hens, or by aldosterone administration to high-salt-acclimated birds. In the coprodeum, the changes in transport are paralleled by extensive remodelling of the mucosal surface, with low-salt acclimation increasing cell numbers, microvillus density and length and the proportion...

  16. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-11-17

    The mucosal immune system - consisting of adaptive and innate immune cells as well as the epithelium - is profoundly influenced by its microbial environment. There is now growing evidence that the converse is also true, that the immune system shapes the composition of the intestinal microbiome. During conditions of health, this bidirectional interaction achieves a homeostasis in which inappropriate immune responses to non-pathogenic microbes are averted and immune activity suppresses blooms of potentially pathogenic microbes (pathobionts). Genetic alteration in immune/epithelial function can affect host gardening of the intestinal microbiome, contributing to the diversity of intestinal microbiota within a population and in some cases allowing for unfavorable microbial ecologies (dysbiosis) that confer disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radioprotection of intestinal crypt cells by cox-inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisnar, Paul O.; Dones, Rosa Angela S.A.; Serna, Paulene-Ver A.; Deocaris, Chester C.; Guttierez, Kalangitan V.; Deocaris, Custer C.

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of tissue homeostasis in the gastrointestinal epithelium after epithelial injury focuses on the prostaglandins(PGs) as its major mediators. The two cyclooxygenase isoforms, cox-1 and cox-2, catalyze synthesis of PGs. Cox-1 is the predominant cyclooxygenase isoform found in the normal intestine. In contrast, cox-2 is present at low levels in normal intestine but is elevated at sites of inflammation, and in adenomas and carcinomas. To study the effects of various commercially-available cox-inhibitors (Ketorolac: cox-1 selective; Celecoxib: cox-2 selective; and Indocid: cox-1/2 non-selective), we determine mouse crypt epithelial cell fate after genotoxic injury with whole-body gamma-ray exposure at 15 Gy. Intestinal tissues of mice treated with cox-2 inhibitors that showed invariable apoptotic event, however, have increased occurrence of regenerating cells. Our results suggest a potential application of cox-2 selective inhibitors as radioprotective agent for normal cells after radiotherapy. (Author)

  18. Microbiota intestinal, probióticos y prebióticos

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos David Castañeda Guillot

    2017-01-01

    La microbiota intestinal es el elemento fundamental del “Ecosistema Intestinal”, cuyas acciones tienen un efecto beneficioso para la salud, al participar de forma activa en los procesos de digestión de nutrientes asociado a sus mecanismos sobre la homeostasis y la inmunidad del intestino. Los probióticos y prebióticos juegan un rol decisivo en la modulación de la microbiota intestinal y han demostrado sus beneficios para el tratamiento de distintas enfermedades intestinales y extra-intestinal...

  19. Autophagy and tight junction proteins in the intestine and intestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-An A. Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium (IE forms an indispensible barrier and interface between the intestinal interstitium and the luminal environment. The IE regulates water, ion and nutrient transport while providing a barrier against toxins, pathogens (bacteria, fungi and virus and antigens. The apical intercellular tight junctions (TJ are responsible for the paracellular barrier function and regulate trans-epithelial flux of ions and solutes between adjacent cells. Increased intestinal permeability caused by defects in the IE TJ barrier is considered an important pathogenic factor for the development of intestinal inflammation, diarrhea and malnutrition in humans and animals. In fact, defects in the IE TJ barrier allow increased antigenic penetration, resulting in an amplified inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, necrotizing enterocolitis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, the beneficial enhancement of the intestinal TJ barrier has been shown to resolve intestinal inflammation and apoptosis in both animal models of IBD and human IBD. Autophagy (self-eating mechanism is an intracellular lysosome-dependent degradation and recycling pathway essential for cell survival and homeostasis. Dysregulated autophagy has been shown to be directly associated with many pathological processes, including IBD. Importantly, the crosstalk between IE TJ and autophagy has been revealed recently. We showed that autophagy enhanced IE TJ barrier function by increasing transepithelial resistance and reducing the paracellular permeability of small solutes and ions, which is, in part, by targeting claudin-2, a cation-selective, pore-forming, transmembrane TJ protein, for lysosome (autophagy-mediated degradation. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that the inflamed intestinal mucosa in patients with active IBD has increased claudin-2 expression. In addition, inflammatory cytokines (for example, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6

  20. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  1. Abnormal vascularization in mouse retina with dysregulated retinal cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Omarova, Saida; Charvet, Casey D.; Reem, Rachel E.; Mast, Natalia; Zheng, Wenchao; Huang, Suber; Peachey, Neal S.; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a link between age-related macular degeneration and retinal cholesterol maintenance. Cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) is a ubiquitously expressed mitochondrial sterol 27-hydroxylase that plays an important role in the metabolism of cholesterol and cholesterol-related compounds. We conducted a comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation of mice lacking CYP27A1. We found that the loss of CYP27A1 led to dysregulation of retinal cholesterol homeostasis, including unexpecte...

  2. Metabolomic profiling of heat stress: hardening and recovery of homeostasis in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Bundy, Jacob G

    2006-01-01

    homeostasis after subsequent heat stress. Several metabolites were identified as responsive to heat stress and could be related to known physiological and biochemical responses. The time course of the recovery of metabolite homeostasis mirrored general changes in gene expression, showing that recovery follows...... the same temporal pattern at these two biological levels. Finally, our data show that heat hardening permits a quicker return to homeostasis, rather than a reduction of the acute metabolic perturbation and that the reestablishment of homeostasis is important for obtaining maximal heat-hardening effect....... The results display the power of NMR metabolomic profiling for characterization of the instantaneous physiological condition, enabling direct visualization of the perturbation of and return to homeostasis....

  3. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  4. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) regulate intestinal immunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; LaCasse, Eric C; Seidelin, Jakob B

    2014-01-01

    -linked lymphoproliferative disease type 2 (XLP2), in which 20% of patients develop severe intestinal inflammation. In addition, 4% of males with early-onset IBD also have inactivating mutations in XIAP. Therefore, the IAPs play a greater role in gut homeostasis, immunity and IBD development than previously suspected...

  5. Paneth cells constitute the niche for Lgr5 stem cells in intestinal crypts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, T.; van Es, J.H.; Snippert, H.J.G.; Stange, D.E.; Vries, R.G.J.; van den Born, M.M.W.; Barker, N.; Shroyer, N.F.; van de Wetering, M.L.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    Homeostasis of self-renewing small intestinal crypts results from neutral competition between Lgr5 stem cells, which are small cycling cells located at crypt bottoms. Lgr5 stem cells are interspersed between terminally differentiated Paneth cells that are known to produce bactericidal products such

  6. Mouse background strain profoundly influences Paneth cell function and intestinal microbial composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay S Gulati

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence supports the central role of Paneth cells in maintaining intestinal host-microbial homeostasis. However, the direct impact of host genotype on Paneth cell function remains unclear. Here, we characterize key differences in Paneth cell function and intestinal microbial composition in two widely utilized, genetically distinct mouse strains (C57BL/6 and 129/SvEv. In doing so, we demonstrate critical influences of host genotype on Paneth cell activity and the enteric microbiota.Paneth cell numbers were determined by flow cytometry. Antimicrobial peptide (AMP expression was evaluated using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, acid urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Effects of mouse background on microbial composition were assessed by reciprocal colonization of germ-free mice from both background strains, followed by compositional analysis of resultant gut bacterial communities using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and 16 S qPCR. Our results revealed that 129/SvEv mice possessed fewer Paneth cells and a divergent AMP profile relative to C57BL/6 counterparts. Novel 129/SvEv á-defensin peptides were identified, including Defa2/18v, Defa11, Defa16, and Defa18. Host genotype profoundly affected the global profile of the intestinal microbiota, while both source and host factors were found to influence specific bacterial groups. Interestingly, ileal α-defensins from 129/SvEv mice displayed attenuated antimicrobial activity against pro-inflammatory E. coli strains, a bacterial species found to be expanded in these animals.This work establishes the important impact of host genotype on Paneth cell function and the composition of the intestinal microbiota. It further identifies specific AMP and microbial alterations in two commonly used inbred mouse strains that have varying susceptibilities to a variety of disorders, ranging from obesity to intestinal

  7. Regional variations in Paneth cell antimicrobial peptide expression along the mouse intestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevins Charles L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteric antimicrobial peptides secreted from Paneth cells, including α-defensins (in mice named cryptdins, are key effector molecules of innate immunity in the small intestine. The importance of Paneth cells α-defensins emerged from studies of enteric bacterial infection in genetically modified mice, as well as from recent studies linking reduced levels of these α-defensins to Crohn's disease localized to the ileum. However, analysis of expression of Paneth cell α-defensins is incomplete. We therefore performed a comprehensive evaluation of the distribution of antimicrobial molecules along the mouse small intestinal tract to identify potential variations in regional expression. Results In conventionally reared mice, the repertoire of Paneth cell antimicrobials differs between duodenum and ileum. In contrast to the uniform expression of most Paneth cell antimicrobials, both cryptdin 4 and cryptdin-related sequences (CRS 4C peptides were expressed at progressively increasing amounts (101- and 104-fold, respectively comparing duodenum and ileum. In tissues other than the small intestine, expression of CRS peptides was noted in thymus and caecum. Most Paneth cell products were also produced in the small intestine of germ-free mice at levels similar to those in controls, however CRS4C and RegIIIγ had reduced levels in the former (3- and 8-fold, respectively. No significant changes in expression levels of Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides was observed after oral challenge with either Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium or Listeria monocytogenes, supporting current notions on the constitutive nature of this defensive system. Conclusion The repertoire of antimicrobial peptides changes along the small intestinal tract, and a subset of these molecules are up-regulated upon colonization, but not in response to enteric bacterial pathogens. The changes detected upon colonization suggest that Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides

  8. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein as a marker for intra-abdominal pressure-related complications in patients admitted to the intensive care unit; study protocol for a prospective cohort study (I-Fabulous study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Steven G; Van Waes, Oscar J F; Van der Hoven, Ben; Ali, Samir; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Pickkers, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2015-01-16

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have detrimental effects on all organ systems and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Intra-bladder measurement of the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is currently the gold standard. However, IAH is not always indicative of intestinal ischemia, which is an early and rapidly developing complication. Sensitive biomarkers for intestinal ischemia are needed to be able to intervene before damage becomes irreversible. Gut wall integrity loss, including epithelial cell disruption and tight junctions breakdown, is an early event in intestinal damage. Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP) is excreted in urine and blood specifically from damaged intestinal epithelial cells. Claudin-3 is a specific protein which is excreted in urine following disruption of intercellular tight junctions. This study aims to investigate if I-FABP and Claudin-3 can be used as a diagnostic tool for identifying patients at risk for IAP-related complications. In a multicenter, prospective cohort study 200 adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit with at least two risk factors for IAH as defined by the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS) will be included. Patients in whom an intra-bladder IAP measurement is contra-indicated or impossible and patients with inflammatory bowel diseases that may affect I-FABP levels will be excluded. The IAP will be measured using an intra-bladder technique. During the subsequent 72 hours, the IAP measurement will be repeated every six hours. At these time points, a urine and serum sample will be collected for measurement of I-FABP and Claudin-3 levels. Clinical outcome of patients during their stay at the intensive care unit will be monitored using the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Successful completion of this trial will provide evidence on the eventual

  9. Dietary zinc deficiency reduced growth performance, intestinal immune and physical barrier functions related to NF-κB, TOR, Nrf2, JNK and MLCK signaling pathway of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zheng-Xing; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Feng, Lin

    2017-07-01

    Our study investigated the effects of dietary zinc (Zn) deficiency on growth performance, intestinal immune and physical barrier functions of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 630 grass carp (244.14 ± 0.40 g) were fed graded levels of zinc lactate (10.71, 30.21, 49.84, 72.31, 92.56, 110.78 mg Zn/kg diet) and one zinc sulfate group (56.9 mg Zn/kg diet) for 60 days. At the end of the feeding trial, fish were challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila for 14 days. These results indicated that compared with optimal dietary Zn level, dietary Zn deficiency (10.71 mg/kg diet) decreased the production of antibacterial compounds, up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines related to nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and down-regulated anti-inflammatory cytokines related to target of rapamycin (TOR) in three intestinal segments of young grass carp (P zinc lactate as Zn source) based on percent weight gain (PWG), against enteritis morbidity, acid phosphatase (ACP) activity in the proximal intestine (PI) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the PI of young grass carp was estimated to be 61.2, 61.4, 69.2 and 69.5 mg/kg diet, respectively. Finally, based on specific growth rate (SGR), feed efficiency (FE) and against enteritis morbidity of young grass carp, the efficacy of zinc lactate relative to zinc sulfate were 132.59%, 135.27% and 154.04%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated With Histological Liver Steatosis in Pediatric-Onset Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Katri; Mutanen, Annika; Salonen, Anne; Savilahti, Erkki; de Vos, Willem M; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD) is the major cause of mortality in IF. The link between intestinal microbiota and IFALD is unclear. We compared intestinal microbiota of patients with IF (n = 23) with healthy controls (n = 58) using culture-independent phylogenetic microarray analysis. The microbiota was related to histological liver injury, fecal markers of intestinal inflammation, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calprotectin, and disease characteristics. Overabundance of Lactobacilli, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria was observed in IF, whereas bacteria related to Clostridium clusters III, IV, and XIVa along with overall diversity and richness were reduced. Patients were segregated into 3 subgroups based on dominating bacteria: Clostridium cluster XIVa, Proteobacteria, and bacteria related to Lactobacillus plantarum. In addition to liver steatosis and fibrosis, Proteobacteria were associated with prolonged current parenteral nutrition (PN) as well as liver and intestinal inflammation. Lactobacilli were related to advanced steatosis and fibrosis mostly after weaning off PN without associated inflammation. In multivariate permutational analysis of variance, liver steatosis, bowel length, PN calories, and antibiotic treatment best explained the microbiota variation among patients with IF. Intestinal microbiota composition was associated with liver steatosis in IF and better predicted steatosis than duration of PN or length of the remaining intestine. Our results may be explained by a model in which steatosis is initiated during PN in response to proinflammatory lipopolysaccharides produced by Proteobacteria and progresses after weaning off PN, as the L plantarum group Lactobacilli becomes dominant and affects lipid metabolism by altering bile acid signaling.

  11. Protein synthesis controls phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element assimilated largely as orthophosphate (Pi). Cells respond to Pi starvation by importing Pi from their surroundings. We now report that impaired protein synthesis alone triggers a Pi starvation response even when Pi is plentiful in the extracellular milieu. In the bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium , this response entails phosphorylation of the regulatory protein PhoB and transcription of PhoB-dependent Pi transporter genes and is eliminated upon stimulation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. When protein synthesis is impaired due to low cytoplasmic magnesium (Mg 2+ ), Salmonella triggers the Pi starvation response because ribosomes are destabilized, which reduces ATP consumption and thus free cytoplasmic Pi. This response is transient because low cytoplasmic Mg 2+ promotes an uptake in Mg 2+ and a decrease in ATP levels, which stabilizes ribosomes, resulting in ATP consumption and Pi increase, thus ending the response. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of protein synthesis also elicited a Pi starvation response in the bacterium Escherichia coli and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Our findings identify a regulatory connection between protein synthesis and Pi homeostasis that is widespread in nature. © 2018 Pontes and Groisman; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Genetic dissection of sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Géraldine M; Franken, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is a complex behavior both in its manifestation and regulation, that is common to almost all animal species studied thus far. Sleep is not a unitary behavior and has many different aspects, each of which is tightly regulated and influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Despite its essential role for performance, health, and well-being, genetic mechanisms underlying this complex behavior remain poorly understood. One important aspect of sleep concerns its homeostatic regulation, which ensures that levels of sleep need are kept within a range still allowing optimal functioning during wakefulness. Uncovering the genetic pathways underlying the homeostatic aspect of sleep is of particular importance because it could lead to insights concerning sleep's still elusive function and is therefore a main focus of current sleep research. In this chapter, we first give a definition of sleep homeostasis and describe the molecular genetics techniques that are used to examine it. We then provide a conceptual discussion on the problem of assessing a sleep homeostatic phenotype in various animal models. We finally highlight some of the studies with a focus on clock genes and adenosine signaling molecules.

  13. The heterocyclic ring fission and dehydroxylation of catechins and related compounds by Eubacterium sp. strain SDG-2, a human intestinal bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L Q; Meselhy, M R; Li, Y; Nakamura, N; Min, B S; Qin, G W; Hattori, M

    2001-12-01

    A human intestinal bacterium, Eubacterium (E.) sp. strain SDG-2, was tested for its ability to metabolize various (3R)- and (3S)-flavan-3-ols and their 3-O-gallates. This bacterium cleaved the C-ring of (3R)- and (3S)-flavan-3-ols to give 1,3-diphenylpropan-2-ol derivatives, but not their 3-O-gallates. Furthermore, E. sp. strain SDG-2 had the ability of p-dehydroxylation in the B-ring of (3R)-flavan-3-ols, such as (-)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, but not of (3S)-flavan-3-ols, such as (+)-catechin and (+)-epicatechin.

  14. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury augments intestinal mucosal injury and bacterial translocation in jaundiced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksek, Yunus Nadi; Kologlu, Murat; Daglar, Gül; Doganay, Mutlu; Dolapci, Istar; Bilgihan, Ayse; Dolapçi, Mete; Kama, Nuri Aydin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local effects and degree of bacterial translocation related with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat obstructive jaundice model. Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three groups; including Group 1 (jaundice group), Group 2 (jaundice-ischemia group) and Group 3 (ischemia group). All rats had 2 laparotomies. After experimental interventions, tissue samples for translocation; liver and ileum samples for histopathological examination, 25 cm of small intestine for mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels and blood samples for biochemical analysis were obtained. Jaundiced rats had increased liver enzyme levels and total and direct bilirubin levels (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels were found to be high in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion groups (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal damage was more severe in rats with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion after bile duct ligation (p<0.05). Degree of bacterial translocation was also found to be significantly high in these rats (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosa is disturbed more severely in obstructive jaundice with the development of ischemia and reperfusion. Development of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in obstructive jaundice increases bacterial translocation.

  15. Trophic status of the small intestine in young and aged rats: modulation by a yogurt-supplemented diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foligne, Benoit; Sénégas-Balas, Françoise; Antoine, Jean-Michel; Cayuela, Chantal; Rolf-Pedersen, Nathalie; Balas, Daniel

    2004-08-01

    Among the multifactorial causes of undernutrition in old age, gastrointestinal mucosa altered function and resulting specific malabsorption are the most relevant. Despite numerous studies that have dealt with the effects of aging on the digestive tract of mammals, results showed discrepancies in terms of proliferation and biochemical aging small intestine events. However, the slowing-down of the maturation process and the poor adaptation of metabolism and intestinal function are obvious and there is evidence that protective mechanisms are impaired with age and contribute to affecting the trophic activity and related systemic homeostasis. Good prospects to improve gastrointestinal function in the elderly are essential and research on nutritional intervention to limit and counteract age-related impairments must be extensive. Probiotics are good candidates and fermented milks might be of great interest. In the present study we first show the main structural and functional variations between 3- and 23-month-old rat small intestines. The trophic consequences of aging and nutritional adaptation under basal conditions are also analyzed and discussed after 20 days of a yogurt-supplemented specific diet in both young and aged rats. The main variations that occur with aging and yogurt diet are located in the proximal small intestine. The present findings indicate a slight improvement of morphological trophic parameters in both young and aged rats by yogurt, whereas enzymatic changes are more discrete. Despite the obvious age-related decrease in trophicity, we suggest that assessment of probiotic potentials on trophicity requires a more altered model than normal, healthy aging animals.

  16. Interactions between intestinal microbiota and innate immune system in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura; Aloi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of an altered immune homeostasis within the intestinal mucosa against the gut microbiota, leading to chronic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Under normal conditions, the immune system defends against pathogens and prevents the passage of excessive intestinal bacteria; regulatory pathways must maintain a low-grade, controlled inflammation in a healthy gut, but also induce a protective response against pathogens. The innate immune system is the first-line defense from microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, immediate response. The immune system constantly controls commensal bacteria and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to sustain immune homeostasis. The discovery that several genes linked to IBD modulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), and genes that mediate autophagy (ie, ATG16L1, IRGM), has highlighted the critical role of host-microbe interactions in controlling intestinal immune homeostasis. Commensal microorganisms actively interact with the intestinal mucosa and influence the activity of the immune system as well as the amplitude of the immune response. In contrast, host factors can influence microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. In this paper, we focus on the mechanisms that mediate host-microbe interactions and how the disruption of this balance leads to chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD.

  17. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  18. Mycotoxins and the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Broom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biochemical pathways can yield various compounds that are not considered to be necessary for their growth and are thus referred to as secondary metabolites. These compounds have been found to have wide ranging biological effects and include potent poisons (mycotoxins. Mycotoxins invariably contaminate crops and (thus animal feeds. The intestine is the key link between ingested mycotoxins and their detrimental effects on the animal. Effects on the intestine, or intestinal environment, and immune system have been reported with various mycotoxins. These effects are almost certainly occurring across species. Most, if not all, of the reported effects of mycotoxins are negative in terms of intestinal health, for example, decreased intestinal cell viability, reductions in short chain fatty acid (SCFA concentrations and elimination of beneficial bacteria, increased expression of genes involved in promoting inflammation and counteracting oxidative stress. This challenge to intestinal health will predispose the animal to intestinal (and systemic infections and impair efficient digestion and absorption of nutrients, with the associated effect on animal productivity.

  19. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  20. Primary structure and conformational analysis of peptide methionine-tyrosine, a peptide related to neuropeptide Y and peptide YY isolated from lamprey intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conlon, J M; Bjørnholm, B; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1991-01-01

    A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Asp-Asn-......A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met......%) or with pig pancreatic polypeptide (42%). Molecular modelling and dynamic simulation, based upon sequence similarity with turkey pancreatic polypeptide, indicates that the conformations of the polyproline-helix-like region (residues 1-8) and the alpha-helical region (residues 15-30) in turkey pancreatic...... polypeptide are conserved in peptide methionine-tyrosine, and that non-bonded interactions between these domains have preserved the overall polypeptide fold in the molecule. The substitution of the otherwise totally conserved Gly9 residue by serine in lamprey peptide methionine-tyrosine, however, results...

  1. PTHrP regulates water absorption and aquaporin expression in the intestine of the marine sea bream (Sparus aurata, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Canário, Adelino V M; Power, Deborah M; Fuentes, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Water ingestion by drinking is fundamental for ion homeostasis in marine fish. However, the fluid ingested requires processing to allow net water absorption in the intestine. The formation of luminal carbonate aggregates impacts on calcium homeostasis and requires epithelial HCO3(-) secretion to enable water absorption. In light of its endocrine importance in calcium handling and the indication of involvement in HCO3(-) secretion the present study was designed to expose the role of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in HCO3(-) secretion, water absorption and the regulation of aqp1 gene expression in the anterior intestine of the sea bream. HCO3(-) secretion rapidly decreased when PTHrP(1-34) was added to anterior intestine of the sea bream mounted in Ussing chambers. The effect achieved a maximum inhibition of 60% of basal secretion rates, showing a threshold effective dose of 0.1 ng ml(-1) compatible with reported plasma values of PTHrP. When applied in combination with the adenylate cyclase inhibitor (SQ 22.536, 100 μmol l(-1)) or the phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122, 10 μmol l(-1)) the effect of PTHrP(1-34) on HCO3(-) secretion was reduced by about 50% in both cases. In parallel, bulk water absorption measured in intestinal sacs was sensitive to inhibition by PTHrP. The inhibitory action conforms to a typical dose-response curve in the range of 0.1-1000 ng ml(-1), achieves a maximal effect of 60-65% inhibition from basal rates and shows threshold significant effects at hormone levels of 0.1 ng ml(-1). The action of PTHrP in water absorption was completely abolished in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor (SQ 22.536, 100 μmol l(-1)) and was insensitive to the phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122, 10 μmol l(-1)). In vivo injections of PTHrP(1-34) or the PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist PTHrP(7-34) evoked respectively, a significant decrease or increase of aqp1ab, but not aqp1a. Overall the present results suggest that PTHrP acts as a key

  2. The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun Hong; Lin, Grace; Fu, Gui Hong; Wan, Zi Yi; Lee, May; Wang, Le; Liu, Xiao Jun; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-04-05

    Starvation not only affects the nutritional and health status of the animals, but also the microbial composition in the host's intestine. Next-generation sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore gut microbial communities and their interactions with hosts. However, studies on gut microbiomes have been conducted predominantly in humans and land animals. Not much is known on gut microbiomes of aquatic animals and their changes under changing environmental conditions. To address this shortcoming, we determined the microbial gene catalogue, and investigated changes in the microbial composition and host-microbe interactions in the intestine of Asian seabass in response to starvation. We found 33 phyla, 66 classes, 130 orders and 278 families in the intestinal microbiome. Proteobacteria (48.8%), Firmicutes (15.3%) and Bacteroidetes (8.2%) were the three most abundant bacteria taxa. Comparative analyses of the microbiome revealed shifts in bacteria communities, with dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes, but significant depletion of Betaproteobacteria in starved intestines. In addition, significant differences in clusters of orthologous groups (COG) functional categories and orthologous groups were observed. Genes related to antibiotic activity in the microbiome were significantly enriched in response to starvation, and host genes related to the immune response were generally up-regulated. This study provides the first insights into the fish intestinal microbiome and its changes under starvation. Further detailed study on interactions between intestinal microbiomes and hosts under dynamic conditions will shed new light on how the hosts and microbes respond to the changing environment.

  3. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...... membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption...

  4. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    membrane transporters in the small intestine in order to increase oral bioavailabilities of drug or prodrug, the major influence on in vivo pharmacokinetics is suggested to be dose-dependent increase in bioavailability as well as prolonged blood circulation due to large capacity facilitated absorption......A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and...

  5. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  6. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    or mutations to their phosphorylation sites cause dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Our work identifies the Orm proteins as critical mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis and raises the possibility that sphingolipid misregulation contributes to the development of childhood asthma....

  7. Repression of Intestinal Stem Cell Function and Tumorigenesis through Direct Phosphorylation of β-Catenin and Yap by PKCζ

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    Victoria Llado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial homeostasis requires continuous renewal supported by stem cells located in the base of the crypt. Disruption of this balance results in failure to regenerate and initiates tumorigenesis. The β-catenin and Yap pathways in Lgr5+ stem cells have been shown to be central to this process. However, the precise mechanisms by which these signaling molecules are regulated in the stem cell population are not totally understood. Protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ has been previously demonstrated to be a negative regulator of intestinal tumorigenesis. Here, we show that PKCζ suppresses intestinal stem cell function by promoting the downregulation of β-catenin and Yap through direct phosphorylation. PKCζ deficiency results in increased stem cell activity in organoid cultures and in vivo, accounting for the increased tumorigenic and regenerative activity response of Lgr5+-specific PKCζ-deficient mice. This demonstrates that PKCζ is central to the control of stem cells in intestinal cancer and homeostasis.

  8. Arginine consumption by the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis reduces proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, María C; Persson, Lo; Svärd, Staffan G

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the hosts production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consumes arginine as main energy source and secretes an arginine-consuming enzyme, arginine deiminase (ADI). Reduced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation is a common theme during bacterial and viral intestinal infections, but it has never been connected to arginine-consumption. Our specific question was thereby, whether the arginine-consumption by Giardia leads to reduced IEC proliferation, in addition to NO reduction. In vitro cultivation of human IEC lines in arginine-free or arginine/citrulline-complemented medium, as well as in interaction with different G. intestinalis isolates, were used to study effects on host cell replication by MTT assay. IEC proliferation was further analyzed by DNA content analysis, polyamine measurements and expressional analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes. IEC proliferation was reduced upon arginine-withdrawal and also in an arginine-dependent manner upon interaction with G. intestinalis or addition of Giardia ADI. We show that arginine-withdrawal by intestinal pathogens leads to a halt in the cell cycle in IECs through reduced polyamine levels and upregulated cell cycle inhibitory genes. This is of importance with regards to intestinal tissue homeostasis that is affected through reduced cell proliferation. Thus, the slower epithelial cell turnover helps the pathogen to maintain a more stable niche for colonization. This study also shows why supplementation therapy of diarrhea patients with arginine/citrulline is helpful and that

  9. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Yun

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the pr...

  10. Intestinal parasitosis in relation to CD4+T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

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    Hylemariam Mihiretie Mengist

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasites (IPs are major concerns in most developing countries where HIV/AIDS cases are concentrated and almost 80% of AIDS patients die of AIDS-related infections. In the absence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, HIV/AIDS patients in developing countries unfortunately continue to suffer from the consequences of opportunistic and other intestinal parasites. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4+ T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naïve pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.A prospective comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV/AIDS patients attending a model ART center at Zewditu Memorial Hospital between August 05, 2013 and November 25, 2013. A total of 180 (79 HAART initiated and 101 HAART naïve children were included by using consecutive sampling. Stool specimen was collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated risk factors. CD4+ T cells and complete blood counts were performed using BD FACScalibur and Cell-Dyn 1800, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16 software. Logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between explanatory factors and outcome variables. P values < 0.05 were taken as statistically significant.The overall prevalence of IPs was 37.8% where 27.8% of HAART initiated and 45.5% of HAART naive pediatric HIV/AIDS patients were infected (p < 0.05. Cryptosporidium species, E. histolytica/dispar, Hook worm and Taenia species were IPs associated with CD4+ T cell counts <350 cells/μμL in HAART naive patients. The overall prevalence of anemia was 10% in HAART and 31.7% in non-HAART groups. Hook worm, S. stercoralis and H. nana were helminthes

  11. Regulation of Bicarbonate Secretion in Marine Fish Intestine by the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregório, Sílvia F; Fuentes, Juan

    2018-04-04

    In marine fish, high epithelial intestinal HCO₃ − secretion generates luminal carbonate precipitates of divalent cations that play a key role in water and ion homeostasis. The present study was designed to expose the putative role for calcium and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in the regulation of HCO₃ − secretion in the intestine of the sea bream ( Sparus aurata L.). Effects on the expression of the CaSR in the intestine were evaluated by qPCR and an increase was observed in the anterior intestine in fed fish compared with unfed fish and with different regions of intestine. CaSR expression reflected intestinal fluid calcium concentration. In addition, anterior intestine tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers to test the putative regulation of HCO₃ − secretion in vitro using the anterior intestine. HCO₃ − secretion was sensitive to varying calcium levels in luminal saline and to calcimimetic compounds known to activate/block the CaSR i.e., R 568 and NPS-2143. Subsequent experiments were performed in intestinal sacs to measure water absorption and the sensitivity of water absorption to varying luminal levels of calcium and calcimimetics were exposed as well. It appears, that CaSR mediates HCO₃ − secretion and water absorption in marine fish as shown by responsiveness to calcium levels and calcimimetic compounds.

  12. Regulation of Bicarbonate Secretion in Marine Fish Intestine by the Calcium-Sensing Receptor

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    Sílvia F. Gregório

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In marine fish, high epithelial intestinal HCO3− secretion generates luminal carbonate precipitates of divalent cations that play a key role in water and ion homeostasis. The present study was designed to expose the putative role for calcium and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR in the regulation of HCO3− secretion in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata L.. Effects on the expression of the CaSR in the intestine were evaluated by qPCR and an increase was observed in the anterior intestine in fed fish compared with unfed fish and with different regions of intestine. CaSR expression reflected intestinal fluid calcium concentration. In addition, anterior intestine tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers to test the putative regulation of HCO3− secretion in vitro using the anterior intestine. HCO3− secretion was sensitive to varying calcium levels in luminal saline and to calcimimetic compounds known to activate/block the CaSR i.e., R 568 and NPS-2143. Subsequent experiments were performed in intestinal sacs to measure water absorption and the sensitivity of water absorption to varying luminal levels of calcium and calcimimetics were exposed as well. It appears, that CaSR mediates HCO3− secretion and water absorption in marine fish as shown by responsiveness to calcium levels and calcimimetic compounds.

  13. Prevention of cholesterol gallstones by inhibiting hepatic biosynthesis and intestinal absorption of cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Helen H; Portincasa, Piero; de Bari, Ornella; Liu, Kristina J; Garruti, Gabriella; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Wang, David Q.-H

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol cholelithiasis is a multifactorial disease influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors, and represents a failure of biliary cholesterol homeostasis in which the physical-chemical balance of cholesterol solubility in bile is disturbed. The primary pathophysiologic event is persistent hepatic hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol, which has both hepatic and small intestinal components. The majority of the environmental factors are probably related to Western-type dietary habits, including excess cholesterol consumption. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the US, is nowadays a major treatment for gallstones. However, it is invasive and can cause surgical complications, and not all patients with symptomatic gallstones are candidates for surgery. The hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been employed as first-line pharmacological therapy in a subgroup of symptomatic patients with small, radiolucent cholesterol gallstones. Long-term administration of UDCA can promote the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones. However, the optimal use of UDCA is not always achieved in clinical practice because of failure to titrate the dose adequately. Therefore, the development of novel, effective, and noninvasive therapies is crucial for reducing the costs of health care associated with gallstones. In this review, we summarize recent progress in investigating the inhibitory effects of ezetimibe and statins on intestinal absorption and hepatic biosynthesis of cholesterol, respectively, for the treatment of gallstones, as well as in elucidating their molecular mechanisms by which combination therapy could prevent this very common liver disease worldwide. PMID:23419155

  14. Homeostasis in defined genotypes of Matthiola incana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyffert, W

    1983-02-01

    Based on 256 defined genotypes of the Brassicaceae Matthiola incana the influence of the alleles at four different loci and of their combinations on homeostasis was investigated against an isogenic background. The measured character was the anthocyanin content of the flowers. There are significant maternal and paternal influences on homeostasis. Moreover the extent of heterozygosity as well as the number of wildtype alleles, summarized over all loci, are positively correlated with the increase of homeostasis. The analysis of individual gene effects shows distinct graduations between the contributions of the particular loci. In principle, the wild-type allele proved to be more homeostatic when compared to the mutant; in some cases monogenic heterosis was indicated. Nonallelic interactions of first and second order do considerably modify the degree of expression of homeostasis; they are neither strongly correlated with the individual gene effects nor with the interactions of lower order, and hence they are not predictable. This means also that it is not possible to formulate a general hypothesis as to the causes of homeostasis. We have to assume rather that homeostasis depends on specific gene combinations which enable the organism to stabilize its phenotype by means of certain physiological conditions.

  15. Cdc42 and Rab8a are critical for intestinal stem cell division, survival, and differentiation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan

    2012-01-01

    The constant self renewal and differentiation of adult intestinal stem cells maintains a functional intestinal mucosa for a lifetime. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate intestinal stem cell division and epithelial homeostasis are largely undefined. We report here that the small GTPases...... reminiscent of human microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), a devastating congenital intestinal disorder that results in severe nutrient deprivation. Further analysis revealed that Cdc42-deficient stem cells had cell division defects, reduced capacity for clonal expansion and differentiation into Paneth cells...... activity in the intestinal epithelium, where continued cell division takes place. Furthermore, mice haploinsufficient for both Cdc42 and Rab8a in the intestine demonstrated abnormal crypt morphogenesis and epithelial transporter physiology, further supporting their functional interaction. These data...

  16. Central venous line associated osteomyelitis in children with intestinal failure

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    Teresa Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with intestinal failure often require long-term central venous access for parenteral nutrition. Line-related complications often include liver dysfunction, sepsis, and loss of venous access. Osteomyelitis is a rare complication that has been reported in adults with intestinal failure. There has been little focus, however, on the development of osteomyelitis in the pediatric population. In this study we present 2 case studies of patients with intestinal failure requiring parenteral nutrition who subsequently developed acute osteomyelitis.

  17. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Colon in acute intestinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Alfredo; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Armellino, Carla

    2009-04-01

    The colon is actively implicated in intestinal infections not only as a target of enteric pathogens and their products but also as a target organ for treatment. In the presence of diarrhea, both of osmotic and secretory nature, the colon reacts with homeostatic mechanisms to increase ion absorption. These mechanisms can be effectively exploited to decrease fluid discharge. A model of intestinal infections using rotavirus (RV) in colonic cells was set up and used to define a dual model of secretory and osmotic diarrhea in sequence. Using this model, antidiarrheal drugs were tested, namely zinc and the enkephalinase inhibitor racecadotril. Zinc was able to decrease the enterotoxic activity responsible for secretory diarrhea. It also inhibited the cytotoxic effect of RV. The mechanism of zinc was related at least in part to the activation of MAPK activity, but also a direct antiviral effect was observed. Racecadotril showed a potent and selective inhibition of active secretion, being particularly effective in the first phase of RV diarrhea. The use of drugs active at the colonic level, therefore, offers effective options to treat intestinal infections in childhood. In addition, the colon is the natural site of colonic microflora, a target of probiotic therapy, which is the first line of approach recommended by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition to treat infectious diarrhea.

  19. The human intestinal microbiome: a new frontier of human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Masahira; Taylor, Todd D

    2009-02-01

    To analyze the vast number and variety of microorganisms inhabiting the human intestine, emerging metagenomic technologies are extremely powerful. The intestinal microbes are taxonomically complex and constitute an ecologically dynamic community (microbiota) that has long been believed to possess a strong impact on human physiology. Furthermore, they are heavily involved in the maturation and proliferation of human intestinal cells, helping to maintain their homeostasis and can be causative of various diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. A simplified animal model system has provided the mechanistic basis for the molecular interactions that occur at the interface between such microbes and host intestinal epithelia. Through metagenomic analysis, it is now possible to comprehensively explore the genetic nature of the intestinal microbiome, the mutually interacting system comprising the host cells and the residing microbial community. The human microbiome project was recently launched as an international collaborative research effort to further promote this newly developing field and to pave the way to a new frontier of human biology, which will provide new strategies for the maintenance of human health.

  20. Nutritional strategies to enhance adaptation in intestinal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Georg; Bodammer, Peggy

    2016-04-01

    This article summarizes the current and potential future nutritional approaches to stimulate adaptation in intestinal failure. Adaptation in this context usually refers to intestinal adaptation but also involves changes in whole body physiology as well as in eating/drinking behavior. Adaptation largely depends on residual functional anatomy. Luminal exposure to complex nutrients is the most important trigger for intestinal adaptation. Enteral fat as well as enteral or parenteral short chain fatty acids have a specific stimulatory effect. Zinc and vitamin A status need to be optimized for adaptation to proceed and be maintained. In the context of maintaining sodium and water homeostasis, flushing the remnant intestine because of uncontrolled thirst/drinking must be avoided. Complications of nutritional care such as malnutrition, intestinal failure-associated liver disease, and recurrent line sepsis also need optimal management. Stimulation by luminal nutrients as well as prophylaxis against and treatment of (nutritional) complications are the cornerstones of adaptation to the short bowel situation. Based on ample data from animal studies but only limited evidence in humans specific nutritional stimulators need to be studied more rigorously. As long as such data are missing they can be tried on an individual basis.

  1. The impact of the repair of staple line dehiscence in post-RYGB patients on glucose homeostasis and gut hormones--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durczynski, Adam; Szymanski, Dariusz; Nowicki, Michal; Hogendorf, Piotr; Wojciechowska-Durczyńska, Katarzyna; Czupryniak, Leszek; Strzelczyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Staple-line disruption (SLD) following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) results in weight regain. This study evaluated glucose homeostasis and gut hormonal changes following surgical repair of gastrogastric fistula. Three patients with SLD underwent an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before (baseline) and one week after gastric pouch restoration. Plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured in the OGTT samples. Fasting plasma levels of ghrelin and leptin were assessed. Restoration of gastric pouch provided moderate amelioration of glucose metabolism and gut hormones, yet without complete normalisation of glucose homeostasis at one week after surgery. Duodenal passage exclusion resulted in early improvement of control fasting plasma glucose with decrease of glucagon from 18.5 to 15 (ng/mL, by 19%), relatively stable insulin and decline of incretin hormones (GIP and GLP-1). Post-challenge measurements confirmed amelioration of glycaemic control with decrease of plasma glucose from 182 to 158 mg/dL at 60 minutes. Surgical re-intervention resulted in exacerbation of GIP response with brisk rise in plasma level, accompanied by considerable increase of peak insulin concentration. The overall post-challenge glucagon and GLP-1 responses were decreased. Marked decrease in fasting plasma ghrelin and leptin were observed. Our report gives further insight into the hormonal mechanisms underlying the effects of surgically altered anatomy of different parts of the small intestine on glucose homeostasis that is highly important, since it may facilitate novel conservative therapies of diabetes without the need for surgery.

  2. An Interactome-Centered Protein Discovery Approach Reveals Novel Components Involved in Mitosome Function and Homeostasis in Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Rout

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan parasites of the genus Giardia are highly prevalent globally, and infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts including humans, with proliferation and pathology restricted to the small intestine. This narrow ecological specialization entailed extensive structural and functional adaptations during host-parasite co-evolution. An example is the streamlined mitosomal proteome with iron-sulphur protein maturation as the only biochemical pathway clearly associated with this organelle. Here, we applied techniques in microscopy and protein biochemistry to investigate the mitosomal membrane proteome in association to mitosome homeostasis. Live cell imaging revealed a highly immobilized array of 30-40 physically distinct mitosome organelles in trophozoites. We provide direct evidence for the single giardial dynamin-related protein as a contributor to mitosomal morphogenesis and homeostasis. To overcome inherent limitations that have hitherto severely hampered the characterization of these unique organelles we applied a novel interaction-based proteome discovery strategy using forward and reverse protein co-immunoprecipitation. This allowed generation of organelle proteome data strictly in a protein-protein interaction context. We built an initial Tom40-centered outer membrane interactome by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, identifying small GTPases, factors with dual mitosome and endoplasmic reticulum (ER distribution, as well as novel matrix proteins. Through iterative expansion of this protein-protein interaction network, we were able to i significantly extend this interaction-based mitosomal proteome to include other membrane-associated proteins with possible roles in mitosome morphogenesis and connection to other subcellular compartments, and ii identify novel matrix proteins which may shed light on mitosome-associated metabolic functions other than Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Functional analysis also revealed conceptual conservation of protein

  3. An Interactome-Centered Protein Discovery Approach Reveals Novel Components Involved in Mitosome Function and Homeostasis in Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Samuel; Zumthor, Jon Paulin; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Faso, Carmen; Hehl, Adrian B

    2016-12-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Giardia are highly prevalent globally, and infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts including humans, with proliferation and pathology restricted to the small intestine. This narrow ecological specialization entailed extensive structural and functional adaptations during host-parasite co-evolution. An example is the streamlined mitosomal proteome with iron-sulphur protein maturation as the only biochemical pathway clearly associated with this organelle. Here, we applied techniques in microscopy and protein biochemistry to investigate the mitosomal membrane proteome in association to mitosome homeostasis. Live cell imaging revealed a highly immobilized array of 30-40 physically distinct mitosome organelles in trophozoites. We provide direct evidence for the single giardial dynamin-related protein as a contributor to mitosomal morphogenesis and homeostasis. To overcome inherent limitations that have hitherto severely hampered the characterization of these unique organelles we applied a novel interaction-based proteome discovery strategy using forward and reverse protein co-immunoprecipitation. This allowed generation of organelle proteome data strictly in a protein-protein interaction context. We built an initial Tom40-centered outer membrane interactome by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, identifying small GTPases, factors with dual mitosome and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution, as well as novel matrix proteins. Through iterative expansion of this protein-protein interaction network, we were able to i) significantly extend this interaction-based mitosomal proteome to include other membrane-associated proteins with possible roles in mitosome morphogenesis and connection to other subcellular compartments, and ii) identify novel matrix proteins which may shed light on mitosome-associated metabolic functions other than Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Functional analysis also revealed conceptual conservation of protein translocation

  4. Haemorrhage and intestinal lymphoma

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    Attilia M. Pizzini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of coeliac disease is around 1% in general population but this is often unrecognised. The classical presentation of adult coeliac disease is characterized by diarrhoea and malabsorption syndrome, but atypical presentations are probably more common and are characterized by iron deficiency anaemia, weight loss, fatigue, infertility, arthralgia, peripheral neuropathy and osteoporosis. Unusual are the coagulation disorders (prevalence 20% and these are due to vitamin K malabsorption (prolonged prothrombin time. Clinical case: A 64-year-old man was admitted to our Department for an extensive spontaneous haematoma of the right leg. He had a history of a small bowel resection for T-cell lymphoma, with a negative follow-up and he didn’t report any personal or familiar history of bleeding. Laboratory tests showed markedly prolonged prothrombin (PT and partial-thromboplastin time (PTT, corrected by mixing studies, and whereas platelet count and liver tests was normal. A single dose (10 mg of intravenous vitamin K normalized the PT. Several days before the patient had been exposed to a superwarfarin pesticide, but diagnostic tests for brodifacoum, bromadiolone or difenacoum were negative. Diagnosis of multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulationfactor deficiencies (II, VII, IX, X due to intestinal malabsorption was made and coeliac disease was detected. Therefore the previous lymphoma diagnosis might be closely related to coeliac disease. Conclusions: A gluten free diet improves quality of life and restores normal nutritional and biochemical status and protects against these complications.

  5. A model of calcium homeostasis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granjon, David; Bonny, Olivier; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-11-01

    We developed a model of calcium homeostasis in the rat to better understand the impact of dysfunctions such as primary hyperparathyroidism and vitamin D deficiency on calcium balance. The model accounts for the regulation of calcium intestinal uptake, bone resorption, and renal reabsorption by parathyroid hormone (PTH), vitamin D 3 , and Ca 2+ itself. It is the first such model to incorporate recent findings regarding the role of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in the kidney, the presence of a rapidly exchangeable pool in bone, and the delayed response of vitamin D 3 synthesis. Accounting for two (fast and slow) calcium storage compartments in bone allows the model to properly predict the effects of bisphophonates on the plasma levels of Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] p ), PTH, and vitamin D 3 Our model also suggests that Ca 2+ exchange rates between plasma and the fast pool vary with both sex and age, allowing [Ca 2+ ] p to remain constant in spite of sex- and age-based hormonal and other differences. Our results suggest that the inconstant hypercalciuria that is observed in primary hyperparathyroidism can be attributed in part to counterbalancing effects of PTH and CaSR in the kidney. Our model also correctly predicts that calcimimetic agents such as cinacalcet bring down [Ca 2+ ] p to within its normal range in primary hyperparathyroidism. In addition, the model provides a simulation of CYP24A1 inactivation that leads to a situation reminiscent of infantile hypercalcemia. In summary, our model of calcium handling can be used to decipher the complex regulation of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in the circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiermann, Christoph; Frenette, Paul S; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2015-08-01

    The functions of blood cells extend well beyond the immune functions of leucocytes or the respiratory and hemostatic functions of erythrocytes and platelets. Seen as a whole, the bloodstream is in charge of nurturing and protecting all organs by carrying a mixture of cell populations in transit from one organ to another. To optimize these functions, evolution has provided blood and the vascular system that carries it with various mechanisms that ensure the appropriate influx and egress of cells into and from the circulation where and when needed. How this homeostatic control of blood is achieved has been the object of study for over a century, and although the major mechanisms that govern it are now fairly well understood, several new concepts and mediators have recently emerged that emphasize the dynamism of this liquid tissue. Here we review old and new concepts that relate to the maintenance and regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in blood and briefly discuss the mechanisms for platelets and red blood cells. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Nutrition and protein energy homeostasis in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boirie, Yves; Morio, Béatrice; Caumon, Elodie; Cano, Noël J

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy homeostasis is a major determinant of healthy aging. Inadequate nutritional intakes and physical activity, together with endocrine disturbances are associated with of sarcopenia and frailty. Guidelines from scientific societies mainly address the quantitative aspects of protein and energy nutrition in elderly. Besides these quantitative aspects of protein load, perspective strategies to promote muscle protein synthesis and prevent sarcopenia include pulse feeding, the use of fast proteins and the addition of leucine or citrulline to dietary protein. An integrated management of sarcopenia, taking into account the determinants of muscle wasting, i.e. nutrition, physical activity, anabolic factors such as androgens, vitamin D and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids status, needs to be tested in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. The importance of physical activity, specifically resistance training, is emphasized, not only in order to facilitate muscle protein anabolism but also to increase appetite and food intake in elderly people at risk of malnutrition. According to present data, healthy nutrition in elderly should respect the guidelines for protein and energy requirement, privilege a Mediterranean way of alimentation, and be associated with a regular physical activity. Further issues relate to the identification of the genetics determinants of protein energy wasting in elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of the small intestine in the development of dietary fat-induced obesity and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice

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    Bromhaar Mechteld

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and insulin resistance are two major risk factors underlying the metabolic syndrome. The development of these metabolic disorders is frequently studied, but mainly in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. To gain more insight in the role of the small intestine in development of obesity and insulin resistance, dietary fat-induced differential gene expression was determined along the longitudinal axis of small intestines of C57BL/6J mice. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat or a high-fat diet that mimicked the fatty acid composition of a Western-style human diet. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks of diet intervention small intestines were isolated and divided in three equal parts. Differential gene expression was determined in mucosal scrapings using Mouse genome 430 2.0 arrays. Results The high-fat diet significantly increased body weight and decreased oral glucose tolerance, indicating insulin resistance. Microarray analysis showed that dietary fat had the most pronounced effect on differential gene expression in the middle part of the small intestine. By overrepresentation analysis we found that the most modulated biological processes on a high-fat diet were related to lipid metabolism, cell cycle and inflammation. Our results further indicated that the nuclear receptors Ppars, Lxrs and Fxr play an important regulatory role in the response of the small intestine to the high-fat diet. Next to these more local dietary fat effects, a secretome analysis revealed differential gene expression of secreted proteins, such as Il18, Fgf15, Mif, Igfbp3 and Angptl4. Finally, we linked the fat-induced molecular changes in the small intestine to development of obesity and insulin resistance. Conclusion During dietary fat-induced development of obesity and insulin resistance, we found substantial changes in gene expression in the small intestine, indicating modulations of biological processes, especially related to lipid

  9. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

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    Ling Zhang

    Full Text Available Severe acute malnutrition (SAM is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis.An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6-60 mont